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SGPN Fantasy Football Podcast
Early Inside Linebacker IDP Rankings | SGPN Fantasy Football (Ep. 311)

SGPN Fantasy Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 6, 2023 43:25


John and Gary roll out the way early inside linebacker IDP rankings. With straightforward and basic language for the novice. And, of course, it's with plenty of deep stuff for the veterans with hot NFL defensive insight. So check out where your favorite landed. And guys in question after 2022. Like Jordan Brooks, Logan Wilson, Bobby Wagner, and Quay Walker. Especially after their notable and telling 2022 seasons. - 2023 Draft Adive - (14:01) Twitter - @IDProPlayersPod Johny The Greek - @OrangeMan3142 Gary - @TheIDPTipster ===================================================== SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app Check out SGPN.TV   Support us by supporting our partners WynnBET - Bet $100 and get a $100! - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Underdog Fantasy code SGPN - 100% Deposit Match up to $100 - https://sg.pn/underdog FFPC Playoff Challenge - $25 promo off first FFPC entry of $35 or more - https://sg.pn/ffpc Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Discord - https://sg.pn/discord  Reddit - https://sg.pn/reddit Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
Early Inside Linebacker IDP Rankings | SGPN Fantasy Football (Ep. 311)

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 6, 2023 43:25


John and Gary roll out the way early inside linebacker IDP rankings. With straightforward and basic language for the novice. And, of course, it's with plenty of deep stuff for the veterans with hot NFL defensive insight. So check out where your favorite landed. And guys in question after 2022. Like Jordan Brooks, Logan Wilson, Bobby Wagner, and Quay Walker. Especially after their notable and telling 2022 seasons. - 2023 Draft Adive - (14:01) Twitter - @IDProPlayersPod Johny The Greek - @OrangeMan3142 Gary - @TheIDPTipster ===================================================== SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app Check out SGPN.TV   Support us by supporting our partners WynnBET - Bet $100 and get a $100! - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Underdog Fantasy code SGPN - 100% Deposit Match up to $100 - https://sg.pn/underdog FFPC Playoff Challenge - $25 promo off first FFPC entry of $35 or more - https://sg.pn/ffpc Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Discord - https://sg.pn/discord  Reddit - https://sg.pn/reddit Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Screaming in the Cloud
The Evolution of DevRel with Jeremy Meiss

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2023 30:12


About JeremyJeremy is the Director of DevRel & Community at CircleCI, formerly at Solace, Auth0, and XDA. He is active in the DevRel Community, and is a co-creator of DevOpsPartyGames.com. A lover of all things coffee, community, open source, and tech, he is also house-broken, and (generally) plays well with others.Links Referenced: CircleCI: https://circleci.com/ DevOps Party Games: https://devopspartygames.com/ Twitter: Iamjerdog LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jeremymeiss/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Logicworks. Getting to the cloud is challenging enough for many places, especially maintaining security, resiliency, cost control, agility, etc, etc, etc. Things break, configurations drift, technology advances, and organizations, frankly, need to evolve. How can you get to the cloud faster and ensure you have the right team in place to maintain success over time? Day 2 matters. Work with a partner who gets it - Logicworks combines the cloud expertise and platform automation to customize solutions to meet your unique requirements. Get started by chatting with a cloud specialist today at snark.cloud/logicworks. That's snark.cloud/logicworksCorey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I generally try to have people that I know in the ecosystem on this show from time to time, but somehow today's guest has never made it onto the show. And honestly, I have no excuse other than that, I guess I just like being contrary about it. Jeremy Meiss is the Director of DevRel and Community at CircleCI. Jeremy, thank you for finally getting on the show.Jeremy: Hey, you know what? I woke up months and months ago hoping I would be able to join and never have, so I appreciate you finally, you know, getting that celestial kick in the ass.Corey: I love the fact that this is what you lie awake at night worrying about. As all people should. So, let's get into it. You have been at CircleCI in their DevRel org—heading their DevRel org—for approximately 20 years, but in real-time and non-tech company timeframes, three years. But it feels like 20. How's that been? It's been an interesting three years, I'll say that much with the plague o'er the land.Jeremy: Yes, absolutely. No, it was definitely a time to join. I joined two weeks before the world went to shit, or shittier than it already was. And yeah, it's been a ride. Definitely see how everything's changed, but it's also been one that I couldn't be happier where I'm at and seeing the company grow.Corey: I've got to level with you. For the longest time, I kept encountering CircleCI in the same timeframes and context, as I did Travis CI. They both have CI in the name and I sort of got stuck on that. And telling one of the companies apart from the other was super tricky at the time. Now, it's way easier because Travis CI got acquired and then promptly imploded.Security issues that they tried to hide left and right, everyone I knew there long since vanished, and at this point, it is borderline negligence from my point of view to wind up using them in production. So oh, yeah, CircleCI, that's the one that's not trash. I don't know that you necessarily want to put that on a billboard somewhere, but that's my mental shortcut for it.Jeremy: You know, I'm not going to disagree with that. I think, you know, it had its place, I think there's probably only one or two companies nowadays actually propping it up as a business, and I think even they are actively trying to get out of it. So yeah, not going to argue there.Corey: I have been on record previously as talking about CI/CD—Continuous Integration slash Continuous Deployment—or for those who have not gone tumbling down that rabbit hole, the idea that when you push a commit to a particular branch on Git—or those who have not gotten to that point, push the button, suddenly code winds up deploying to different environments, occasionally production, sometimes staging, sometimes development, sometimes by accident—and there are a bunch of options in that space. AWS has a bunch of services under their CodeStar suite: CodeBuild, CodeDeploy, CodePipeline, and that's basically there as a marketing exercise by CI/CD companies that are effective because after having attempted to set those things up with the native offerings, you go scrambling to something else, anything else. GitHub Actions has also been heavily in that space because it's low friction to integrate, it's already there in GitHub, and that's awesome in some ways, terrible in others. But CircleCI has persistently been something that I see in a lot of different environments, both the open-source world, as well as among my clients, where they are using you folks to go from developer laptops to production safely and sanely.Jeremy: Absolutely, yeah. And I think that's one thing for us is, there's a niche of—you know, you can start if you're into AWS or you're into Google, or you're in—any of those big ecosystems, you can certainly use what they have, but those are always, like, add-on things, they're always like an afterthought of, “Oh, we're going to go add this,” or, “We're going to go add that.” And so, I think you adequately described it of, you know, once you start hitting scale, you're eventually going to start to want to use something, and I think that's where we generally fit in that space of, you know, you can start, but now you're going to eventually end up here and use best-in-class. I spent years Auth0 in the identity space, and it was the same kind of boat is that, you know, sure you can start with hopefully not rolling your own, but eventually you're going to end up wanting to use something best-in-class that does everything that you want it to do and does it right.Corey: The thing that just completely blows my mind is how much for all these companies, no matter who they are and how I talk to them, everyone talks about their CI/CD flow with almost a sense of embarrassment. And back in the days when I was running production environments, we use Jenkins as sort of a go-to answer for this. And that was always a giant screaming exemption to the infrastructure-as-code approach because you could configure it via the dashboard and the web interface and it would write that out as XML files. So, you wound up with bespoke thing lots of folks could interact with in different ways, and oh, by the way, it has access into development, staging, and production. Surely, there will be no disasters that happened as a result of this.And that felt terrible. And now we've gotten into a place where most folks are not doing that anymore, at least with the folks that I talk to, but I'm still amazed by how few best practices around a lot of this stuff has really emerged. Every time I see a CI/CD pipeline, it feels like it is a reimplementation locally of solving a global problem. You're the director of DevRel and have been for a few years now. Why haven't you fixed this yet?Jeremy: Primarily because I'm still stuck on the fact you mentioned, pushing a button and getting to XML. That just kind of stuck me there and sent me back that I can't come up with a solution at this point.Corey: Yeah, it's the way that you solve the gap—the schism as it were—between JSON and YAML. “Cool, we're going to use XML.” And everyone's like, “Oh, God, not that.” It's like, “Cool, now you're going to settle your differences or I'm going to implement other things, too.”Jeremy: That's right, yeah. I mean, then we're going to go use some bespoke company's own way of doing IAC. No, I think there's an element here where—I mean, it goes back to still using best-in-class. I think Hudson, which eventually became Jenkins, after you know, Cisco—was it Cisco? No, it was Sun—after Sun, you know, got their hands all over it, it was the thing. It's kind of, well, we're just going to spin this up and do it ourselves.But as the industry changes, we do more and more things on the cloud and we do it primarily because we're relocating the things that we don't want to have to manage ourselves with all of the overhead and all of the other stuff. We're going to go spit it over to the cloud for that. And so, I think there's been this shift in the industry that they still do, like you said, look at their pipelines with a little bit of embarrassment [laugh], I think, yeah. I chuckle when I think about that, but there is a piece where more and more people are recognizing that there is a better way and that you can—you don't have to look at your pipelines as this thing you hate and you can start to look at what better options there are than something you have to host yourself.Corey: What I'm wondering about now, though, because you've been fairly active in the space for a long time, which is a polite way of saying you have opinions—and you should hear the capital O and ‘Opinions' when I say it that way—let's fight about DevRel. What does DevRel mean to you? Or as I refer to it, ‘devrelopers?'Jeremy: Uh, devrelopers. Yes. You know, not to take from the standard DevOps answer, but I think it depends.Corey: That's the standard lawyer answer to anything up to and including, is it legal for me to murder someone? And it's also the senior consultant answer, to anything, too, because it turns out the world is baked and nuanced and doesn't lend itself to being resolved in 280 characters or less. That's what threads are for.Jeremy: Right [laugh]. Trademark. That is ultimately the answer, I think, with DevRel. For me, it is depending on what your company is trying to do. You ultimately want to start with building relationships with your developers because they're the ones using your product, and if you can get them excited about what they're doing with your product—or get excited about your product with what they're doing—then you have something to stand on.But you also have to have a product fit. You have to actually know what the hell your product is doing and is it going to integrate with whatever your developers want. And so, DevRel kind of stands in that gap that says, “Okay, here's what the community wants,” and advocates for the community, and then you have—it's going to advocate for the company back to the community. And hopefully, at the end of the day, they all shake hands. But also I've been around enough to recognize that there comes that point where you either a have to say, “Hey, our product for that thing is probably not the best thing for what you're trying to do. Here, you should maybe start at this other point.”And also understanding to take that even, to the next step to finish up the answer, like, my biggest piece now is all the fights that we have constantly around DevRel in the space of what is it and what is it not, DevRel is marketing. DevRel is sales. DevRel is product. And each of those, if you're not doing those things as a member of the company, you're not doing your job. Everybody in the company is the product. Everybody in the company is sales. Everybody in the company is marketing.Corey: Not everyone in the company realizes this, but I agree—Jeremy: Yes.Corey: Wholeheartedly.Jeremy: Yes. And so, that's where it's like yes, DevRel is marketing. Yes, it is sales. Because if you're not out there, spreading whatever the news is about your product and you're not actually, you know, showing people how to use it and making things easier for people, you're not going to have a job. And too often, these companies that—or too often I think a lot of DevRel teams find themselves in places where they're the first that get dropped when the company goes through things because sometimes it is just the fact that the company has not figured out what they really want, but also, sometimes it's the team hasn't really figured out how to position themselves inside the business.Corey: One of the biggest, I'll call it challenges that I see in the DevRel space comes down to defining what it is, first and foremost. I think that it is collectively a mistake for an awful lot of practitioners of developer relations, to wind up saying first and foremost that we're not marketing. Well, what is it that you believe that marketing is? In fact, I'll take it a step beyond that. I think that marketing is inherently the only place in most companies where we know that doing these things leads to good results, but it's very difficult to attribute or define that value, so how do we make sure that we're not first up on the chopping block?That has been marketing's entire existence. It's, you know that doing a whole bunch of things in marketing will go well for you, but as the old chestnut says, half your marketing budget is wasted and you'll go broke figuring out which half it is.Jeremy: Yeah. And whenever you have to make cuts, generally, they always, you know, always come to the marketing teams because hey, they're the ones spending, you know, millions of dollars a quarter on ads, or whatever it is. And so yeah, marketing has, in many ways figured this out. They're also the team that spends the most money in a company. So, I don't really know where to go with that isn't completely off the rails, but it is the reality. Like, that's where things happen, and they are the most in touch with what the direction of the company is going to ultimately be received as, and how it's going to be spoken about. And DevRel has great opportunities there.Corey: I find that when people are particularly militant about not liking sales or marketing or any other business function out there, one of the ways to get through them is to ask, “Great. In your own words, describe to me what you believe that department does. What is that?” And people will talk about marketing in a bunch of tropes—or sales in a bunch of tropes—where it is the worst examples of that.It's, “Terrific, great. Do you want me to wind up describing what you do as an engineer—in many cases—in the most toxic stereotype of Uber and 2015-style engineer I can come up with?” I think, in most cases if we're having a conversation and I haven't ended it by now, you would be horrified by that descriptor. Yeah. Not every salesperson is the skeezy used car salesman trying to trick you into something awful. Actual selling comes down to how do we wind up taking your pain away. One of my lines is, “I'm a consultant. You have problems and money. I will take both.”Jeremy: That's right [laugh]. Yeah, that's right.Corey: If you don't have a painful problem, I have nothing to sell you and all I'm doing is wasting my breath trying.Jeremy: Yeah, exactly. And that's where—I'll say it two ways—the difference between good marketing teams are, is understanding that pain point of the people that they're trying to sell to. And it's also a difference between, like, good and bad, even, DevRel teams is understanding what are the challenges that your users are having you're trying to express to, you're trying to fix? Figure that out because if you can't figure that out, then you or your marketing team are probably soon to be on the block and they're going to bring someone else in.Corey: I'm going to fight you a little bit, I suspect, in that a line I've heard is that, “Oh, DevRel is part of product because we are the voice of the community back into the development cycle of what product is building.” And the reason that I question that is I think that it glosses over an awful lot of what makes product competent as a department and not just a function done by other people. It's, “Oh, you're part of the product. Well, great. How much formal training have you had as part of your job on conducting user research and interviews with users and the rest?”And the answer invariably rounds to zero and, okay, in other words, you're just giving feedback in a drive-by fashion that not structured in any way and your product people are polite enough not to call you out on it. And that's when the fighting and slapping begins.Jeremy: Yeah. I don't think we're going to disagree too much there. I think one of the challenges, though, is for the very reason you just mentioned, that the product teams tend to hear your product sucks. And we've heard all the people telling us that, like, people in the community say that, they hear that so much and they've been so conditioned to it that it just rolls off their back, like, “Okay, whatever.” So, for DevRel teams, even if you're in product, which we can come back to that, regardless of where you're at, like, bringing any type of feedback you bring should have a person, a name associated with it with, like, Corey at Duckbill Group hates this product.Corey: Uh-oh [laugh]. Whenever my name is tied to feedback, it never goes well for me, but that will teach me eventually, ideally, to keep my mouth shut.Jeremy: Yeah. Well, how's that working for you?Corey: I'll let you know if it ever happens.Jeremy: Good. But once you start making the feedback like an actual person, it changes the conversation. Because now it's like, oh, it's not this nebulous, like, thing I can not listen to. It's now oh, it's actually a person at a specific company. So, that's one of the challenges in working with product that you have to overcome.When I think about DevRel in product, while I don't think that's a great spot for it, I think DevRel is an extension of product. That's part of where that, like, the big developer experience craze comes from, and why it is a valuable place for DevRel to be able to have input into is because you tend to be the closest to the people actually using the product. So, you have a lot of opportunities and a big surface area to have some impact.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Strata. Are you struggling to keep up with the demands of managing and securing identity in your distributed enterprise IT environment? You're not alone, but you shouldn't let that hold you back. With Strata's Identity Orchestration Platform, you can secure all your apps on any cloud with any IDP, so your IT teams will never have to refactor for identity again. Imagine modernizing app identity in minutes instead of months, deploying passwordless on any tricky old app, and achieving business resilience with always-on identity, all from one lightweight and flexible platform.Want to see it in action? Share your identity challenge with them on a discovery call and they'll hook you up with a complimentary pair of AirPods Pro. Don't miss out, visit Strata.io/ScreamingCloud. That's Strata dot io slash ScreamingCloud.Corey: I think that that is a deceptively nuanced statement. One of the things I learned from an earlier episode I had with Dr. Christina Maslach, is contributors to occupational burnout, so much of it really distills down—using [unintelligible 00:16:35] crappy layman's terms—to a lack of, I guess what I'm going to call relevance or a lack—a feeling like you are not significant to what the company is actually doing in any meaningful way. And I will confess to having had a number of those challenges in my career when I was working in production environments because, yeah, I kept the servers up and the applications up, but if you really think about it, one of the benefits of working in the system space—or the production engineers base, or DevOps, or platform engineering, or don't even start with me these days—is that what you do conveys almost seamlessly from company to company. Like, the same reason that I can do what I do now, I don't care what your company does, necessarily, I just know that the AWS bill is a bounded problem space and I can reason about it almost regardless of what you do.And if I'm keeping the site up, okay, it doesn't matter if we're streaming movies or selling widgets or doing anything, just so long as I don't find that it contradicts my own values. And that's great, but it also is isolating because you feel like you're not really relevant to the direction of what the company actually does. It's, “Okay, so what does this company do?” “We make rubber bands,” and well, I'm not really a rubber band connoisseur, but I could make sure that the website stays up. But it just feels like there's a disconnect element happening.Jeremy: That is real. It is very real. And one of the ways that I tried to kind of combat that, and I help my team kind of really try and keep this in mind, is we try to meet as much as possible with the people that are actually doing the direction, whether it be product marketing, or whether it's in product managers, or it's even, you know, in engineering is have some regular conversations with what we do as a company. How are we going to fit with that in what we do and what we say and all of our objectives, and making sure that everything we do ties to something that helps other teams and that fits within the business and where it's going so that we grow our understanding of what the company is trying to do so that we don't kind of feel like a ship that's without a sail and just floating wherever things go.Corey: On some level, I am curious as to what you're seeing as we navigate this—I don't know if it's a recession,' I don't know if it's a correction; I'm not sure what to call it—but my gut tells me that a lot of things that were aimed at, let's call it developer quality of life, they were something of a necessity in the unprecedented bull market that we've seen for the last decade at some point because most companies cannot afford to compete with the giant tech company compensation packages, so you have to instead talk about quality of life and what work-life balance looks like, and here's why all of the tools and processes here won't drive you to madness. And now it feels like, “Oh, we don't actually have to invest in a lot of those things, just because oh yeah, like, the benefits here are you're still going to be employed next week. So, how about that?” And I don't think that's a particularly healthy way to interact with people—it's certainly not how I do—but it does seem that worrying about keeping developers absolutely thrilled with every aspect of their jobs has taken something of a backseat during the downturn.Jeremy: I don't know. I feel like developer satisfaction is still an important piece, even though, you know, we have a changing market. And as you described, if you're not happy with the tool you're using, you're not going to be as productive than using the tool or using—you know, whether it's an actual developer productivity tool, or it's even just the fact that you might need two monitors, you're not going to be as productive if you're not enjoying what you're doing. So, there is a piece of it, I think, the companies are recognizing that there are some tools that do ultimately benefit and there's some things that they can say, we're not going to invest in that area right now. We're good with where we're at.Corey: On some level, being able to say, “No, we're not going to invest in that right now,” is the right decision. It is challenging, in some cases, to wind up talking to some team members in some orgs, who do not have the context that is required to understand why that decision is being made. Because without context, it looks like, “Mmm, no. I'm just canceling Christmas for you personally this year. Sorry, doesn't it suck to be you? [singing] Dut, dut.” And that is very rarely how executives make decisions, except apparently if they're Elon Musk.Jeremy: Right. Well, the [Muskrat 00:21:23] can, you know, sink any company—Corey: [laugh].Jeremy: — and get away with it. And that's one thing I've really been happy with where I'm at now, is you have a leadership team that says, “Hey, here's where things are, and here's what it looks like. And here's how we're all contributing to where we're going, and here's the decisions we're going to make, and here's how—” they're very open with what's going on. And it's not a surprise to anybody that the economic time means that we maybe can't go to 65 events next year. Like, that's just reality.But at the end of the day, we still have to go and do a job and help grow the company. So, how can we do that more efficiently? Which means that we—it leaves it better to try and figure that out than to be so nebulous, with like, “Yep, nope. You can't go do that.” That's where true leadership comes to is, like, laying it out there, and just, you know, getting people alongside with you.Corey: How do you see DevRel evolving? Because I think we had a giant evolution over the past few years. Because suddenly, the old vision of DevRel—at least in some quarters, which I admit I fell a little too deeply into—was, I'm going to go to all the conferences and give all of the talks, even though most of them are not related to the core of what I do. And maybe that's a viable strategy; maybe it's not. I think it depends on what your business does.And I don't disagree with the assertion that going and doing something in public can have excellent downstream effects, even if the connection is not obvious. But suddenly, we weren't able to do that, and people were forced to almost reinvent how a lot of that works. Now, that the world is, for better or worse, starting to open up again, how do you see it evolving? Are we going right back to a different DevOps days in a different city every week?Jeremy: I think it's a lot more strategic now. I think generally, there is less mountains of money that you can pull from to go and do whatever the hell you want. You have to be more strategic. I said that a few times. Like, there's looking at it and making sure, like, yeah, it would be great to go and, you know, get in front of 50,000 people this quarter or this year, whatever you want to do, but is that really going to move the bottom line for us? Is that really going to help the business, or is that just helping your Delta miles?What is really the best bang for the buck? So, I think DevRel as it evolves, in the next few years, has to come to a good recognition moment of we need to be a little bit more prescriptive in how we do things within our company and not so willy-nilly return to you know, what we generally used to get away with. That means you're going to see a lot more people have to be held to account within their companies of, is what you're doing actually match up to our business goal here? How does that fit? And having to explain more of that, and that's, I think, for some people will be easy. Some people are going to have to stretch that muscle, and others are going to be in a real tough pickle.Corey: One last topic I want to get into with you is devopspartygames.com, an online more or less DevOps, quote-unquote, “Personality” assortment of folks who wind up playing online games. I was invited once and promptly never invited back ever again. So first, was it something I said—obviously—and two what is that and how—is that still going in this post-pandemic-ish era?Jeremy: I like how you answered your own question first; that way I don't have to answer it. The second one, the way it came about was just, you know, Matty and I had started missing that interaction that we would tend to have in person. And so, one of the ways we started realizing is we play these, you know, Jackbox games, and why can't we just do this with DevOps tech prompts? So, that's kind of how it kicked off. We started playing around doing it for fun and then I was like, “You know, we should—we could do this as a big, big deal for foreseeable future.”Where's that now is, we actually have not done one online for—what is it? So probably, like, eight, nine months, primarily because it's harder and harder to do so as everybody [laugh]—we're now doing a little bit more travel, and it's hard to do those—as you know, doing podcasts, it takes a lot of work. It's not an easy kind of thing. And so, we've kind of put that on pause. But we actually did our first in-person DevOps Party Games at DevOpsDays Chicago recently, and that was a big hit, I think, and opportunity to kind of take what we're doing virtually, and the fun and excitement that we generally would have—relatively half-drunk—to actually doing it actually in-person at an event. And in the different—like, just as giving talks in person was a different level of interaction with the crowd, the same thing is doing it in person. So, it was just kind of a fun thing and an opportunity maybe to continue to do it in person.Corey: I think we all got a hell of a lot better very quickly at speaking to cameras instead of audiences and the rest. It also forced us to be more focused because the camera gives you nothing in a way that the audience absolutely does.Jeremy: They say make love to the camera, but it doesn't work anyways.Corey: I really want to thank you for spending as much time as you have talking to me. If people want to learn more about who you are and what you're up to, where should they go?Jeremy: Well, for the foreseeable future, or at least what we can guess, you can find me on the Twitters at @Iamjerdog. You can find me there or you can find me at, you know, LinkedIn, at jeremymeiss, LinkedIn. And you know, probably come into your local DevOpsDays or other conference as well.Corey: Of course. And we will, of course, put links to that in the show notes.Jeremy: Excellent.Corey: Thank you so much for being so generous with your time. It is always appreciated. And I do love talking with you.Jeremy: And I appreciate it, Corey. It was great beyond, finally. I won't hold it against you anymore.Corey: Jeremy Meiss, Director of DevRel at CircleCI. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry, irritated comment talking about how CI/CD is nonsense and the correct way to deploy to production is via the tried-and-true method of copying and pasting.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.

Get Real with Kacey Kasem
Get Real Episode 73: Faith Enes

Get Real with Kacey Kasem

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 74:44


Welcome back to another episode of Get Real with Kacey Kasem. It's the podcast going behind the scenes of the fantasy sports industry through interviews with some of your favorites in the biz. I was delighted to have Faith Enes join me for this conversation. Faith is co-founder of Women of Fantasy Football and lead editor with IDPGuys. She gave fascinating insights into the world of editing articles for a fantasy football website (oxford comma anyone?), the Scott Fish Bowl live draft, being a part of the Women's Panel at the Fantasy Football Expo, tips for hosting interview-style podcasts, being in an IDP only league, and much more. I learned a lot from Faith, had a blast recording this one, and even figured out that “blew it out of the park” is not a saying. Please follow Faith on Twitter @FF_LeapofFaith (I know, genius handle). You can follow me on Twitter @thekaceykasem (not a genius handle) and the podcast can be found @GetReal_Pod. This podcast is a proud member of the Dynasty Addicts Podcast Network (DAP Network). Go check out all of those brilliant podcasts over there (just, wait until you're done with this one). I have some super rad news that I wanted to share with all of the listeners. Because of YOU, this podcast is a finalist for the Fantasy Sports Writers Association's ‘Best Fantasy Podcast - all/multiple sports'. This recognition is a huge honor for me, and I have to thank all of you for listening. Thank you all for helping to grow the show by sharing this podcast with your friends. I just wanted to make this intro a bit longer so I could thank you… so… thanks! This is long. I'm sorry! But wanted to let y'all know that I was having a bit of internet trouble for a brief period of time1. I got it all fixed up… But I have subpar editing skills. And now here's Faith Enes on Get Real with Kacey Kasem. Thank you so much to TrophySmack for being an affiliate of Get Real with Kacey Kasem. This is the spot to check out if you are looking for fantasy football trophies, belts, rings, draft boards, and more. I have an affiliate link: https://www.trophysmack.com?sca_ref=2707024.X4KuGUPAuL you can check out in order to view all the rad items they have there. 100% satisfaction guaranteed. I've been a fan of theirs for a while, and they are definitely good people over there. Make sure to use the discount code GETREALPOD for a free ring with the purchase of a trophy or belt. Note you must have BOTH the trophy or belt + ring in your cart for the discount to apply. Football season is upon us, so what are you waiting for? Theme song by Audionautix. Join the Stay Rad Crew: Get Real with Kacey Kasem Patreon Members — HERMS., Dynasty Outhouse --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/getrealpod/support

Dynasty Addicts Podcast Network
Get Real Episode 73: Faith Enes

Dynasty Addicts Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 74:44


Welcome back to another episode of Get Real with Kacey Kasem.  It's the podcast going behind the scenes of the fantasy sports industry through interviews with some of your favorites in the biz.  I was delighted to have Faith Enes join me for this conversation.  Faith is co-founder of Women of Fantasy Football and lead editor with IDPGuys.  She gave fascinating insights into the world of editing articles for a fantasy football website (oxford comma anyone?), the Scott Fish Bowl live draft, being a part of the Women's Panel at the Fantasy Football Expo, tips for hosting interview-style podcasts, being in an IDP only league, and much more.  I learned a lot from Faith, had a blast recording this one, and even figured out that “blew it out of the park” is not a saying.      Please follow Faith on Twitter @FF_LeapofFaith (I know, genius handle).  You can follow me on Twitter @thekaceykasem (not a genius handle) and the podcast can be found @GetReal_Pod.  This podcast is a proud member of the Dynasty Addicts Podcast Network (DAP Network).  Go check out all of those brilliant podcasts over there (just, wait until you're done with this one).   I have some super rad news that I wanted to share with all of the listeners.  Because of YOU, this podcast is a finalist for the Fantasy Sports Writers Association's ‘Best Fantasy Podcast - all/multiple sports'.  This recognition is a huge honor for me, and I have to thank all of you for listening.  Thank you all for helping to grow the show by sharing this podcast with your friends.  I just wanted to make this intro a bit longer so I could thank you… so… thanks!   This is long. I'm sorry! But wanted to let y'all know that I was having a bit of internet trouble for a brief period of time1. I got it all fixed up… But I have subpar editing skills.    And now here's Faith Enes on Get Real with Kacey Kasem. Thank you so much to TrophySmack for being an affiliate of Get Real with Kacey Kasem.  This is the spot to check out if you are looking for fantasy football trophies, belts, rings, draft boards, and more.  I have an affiliate link: https://www.trophysmack.com?sca_ref=2707024.X4KuGUPAuL you can check out in order to view all the rad items they have there. 100% satisfaction guaranteed.  I've been a fan of theirs for a while, and they are definitely good people over there.   Make sure to use the discount code GETREALPOD for a free ring with the purchase of a trophy or belt.  Note you must have BOTH the trophy or belt + ring in your cart for the discount to apply.  Football season is upon us, so what are you waiting for? Theme song by Audionautix.   Join the Stay Rad Crew: Get Real with Kacey Kasem Patreon Members — HERMS., Dynasty Outhouse

Screaming in the Cloud
Saving the World though Cloud Sustainability with Aerin Booth

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 35:56


About AerinAerin is a Cloud Sustainability Advocate and neurodiverse founder in tech on a mission to help developers understand the real impact that cloud computing has on the world and reduce their carbon emissions in the cloud. Did you know that internet and cloud computing contribute over 4% of annual carbon emissions? Twice that of the airline industry!Aerin also hosts "Public Cloud for Public Good," a podcast targeted towards developers and senior leaders in tech. Every episode, they also donate £500 to charities and highlight organisations that are working towards a better future. Listen and learn how you can contribute towards making the world a better place through the use of public cloud services.Links Referenced: Twitter: https://twitter.com/aerincloud LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/aerinb/ Public Cloud for Public Good: https://publicgood.cloud/ duckbillgroup.com: https://duckbillgroup.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Uptycs, because they believe that many of you are looking to bolster your security posture with CNAPP and XDR solutions. They offer both cloud and endpoint security in a single UI and data model. Listeners can get Uptycs for up to 1,000 assets through the end of 2023 (that is next year) for $1. But this offer is only available for a limited time on UptycsSecretMenu.com. That's U-P-T-Y-C-S Secret Menu dot com.Corey: Cloud native just means you've got more components or microservices than anyone (even a mythical 10x engineer) can keep track of. With OpsLevel, you can build a catalog in minutes and forget needing that mythical 10x engineer. Now, you'll have a 10x service catalog to accompany your 10x service count. Visit OpsLevel.com to learn how easy it is to build and manage your service catalog. Connect to your git provider and you're off to the races with service import, repo ownership, tech docs, and more. Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn and I am joined what feels like roughly a year later by a returning guest, Aerin Booth. How long have you been?Aerin: I've been really great. You know, it's been a journey of a year, I think, since we sort of did this podcast even, like, you know, a year and a bit since we met, and, like, I'm doing so much and I think it's doing, like, a big difference. And yeah, I can't wait for everything else. It's just yeah, a lot of work right now, but I'm really enjoying it. So, I'm really well, thank you.Corey: Normally, I like to introduce people by giving their job title and the company in which they work because again, that's a big deal for an awful lot of people. But a year ago, you were independent. And now you still are. And back when I was doing my own consulting independently, it felt very weird to do that, so I'm just going to call you the Ted Lasso of cloud at this point.Aerin: [laugh].Corey: You've got the mustache, you've got the, I would say, obnoxiously sunny disposition. It's really, there's a certain affinity right there. So, there we go. I feel like that is the best descriptor for what you have become.Aerin: I—do know what, I only just watched Ted Lasso over Christmas and I really found it so motivational in some ways because wow, like, it's not just who we'd want to be in a lot of ways? And I think, you know, for the work that I do, which is focused on sustainability, like, I want to present a positive future, I want to encourage people to achieve more and collaborate, and yeah, basically work on all these problems that we need to be worked on. And yeah, I think that's [laugh] [crosstalk 00:02:02]—Corey: One of the challenges of talking to you sometimes is you talk about these depressing things, but there's such a—you take such an upbeat, positive approach to it that I, by comparison, invariably come away from our conversations during, like, I'm Surly McBastard over here.Aerin: [laugh]. Yeah, you can be the bad cop of cloud computing and I'll try and be the good cop. Do you know, you say that the stuff I talk about is depressing, and it is true and people do worry about climate change. Like I did an online conference recently, it's focused on FinOps, and we had a survey, “Do you worry about climate change?” 70% of the people that responded said they worry about it.So, we all know, it's something we worry about and we care about. And, you know, I guess what I'm really trying to do is encourage people to care a bit more and start taking action and look after yourself. Because you know, when you do start taking action towards it, when you join those communities that are also working on it, it is good, it is helpful. And, you know, I've gone through some ups and downs and some of this, like, just do I throw in the towel because no one cares about it? Like, we spoke last year; I had attended re:Invent for the first time.This year, I was able to speak at re:Invent. So, I did a talk on being ethical in tech. And it was fun, it was good. I enjoyed what I delivered, but I had about 35 people sign up to that. I'm pretty sure if I talked about serverless or the next Web3 blockchain product, I would have got hundreds more. But what I'm starting to realize is that I think people just aren't ready to, sort of, want to do this yet. And yeah, I'm hoping that'll change.Corey: Let's first talk about, I guess, something that is more temporally pressing than some other things. Not that it is more important than climate change, mind you, but it feels like it's on a shorter timeline which is, relatively soon after this recording, there is a conference that you are kicking off called The State of Open. Ajar, Aerin. The State of Open is ajar. What is this conference? Is it in person? Is it virtual? Is it something where you and three friends are going to show up and basically talk to each other? How big? How small? What is it? What's it about? Tell me more, please. I'm riveted.Aerin: So, State of Open conference is a conference that's been in the works now for maybe about two weeks, a little bit longer in the planning, but the work we've been putting in over the last two weeks. It'll be on the seventh and eighth of February in London as a physical event in the QEII Conference Centre, but it will also be available online. And you know, when we talk about the State of Open, it's that question: what is the State of Open? The state of open-source, the state of open hardware, and the state of open data. And it is going to be probably the first and hopefully the biggest open-source conference in the UK.We already have over 100 confirmed guest speakers from Jimmy Wales, the co-founder of Wikipedia, to many of our great guests and headliners who haven't even announced yet for the plenary. So, I'm really excited. And the reason why I wanted to get involved with this is because one of the coolest things about this conference—compared to some others like re:Invent, for example—is that sustainability and diversity run through every single thing that we do. So, as the content director, I reviewed every single CFP for both of these things. I mean, you couldn't get a better person than someone like me, who's the queer person who won't shut up about sustainability to sort of do this thing.So, you know, I looked after those scorings for the CFPs in support of the CFP chairs. And now, as I'm working with those individual speakers on their content and making sure that diversity is included in the content. It's not just the diversity of the speaker, for example it's, who were the other people whose voice you're raising? What other people if you worked on this? Are there anyone that you've mentored, like, you know, actually, you know, let's have this as a wider conversation?Corey: Thank God. I thought you were about to say diversity of thought, and I was about to reach through the screen to strangle you.Aerin: [laugh]. No, no. I mean, we're doing really well, so of the announced speakers online, we are 40% non-male and about 18% non-white, which to be honest, for a fair sheer conference, when we didn't really do that much to specifically call this out, but I would probably raise this to Amanda Brock, who is the CEO of OpenUK, you know, she has built a community in the UK and around the world over the last few years which has been putting women forward and building these links. And that's why we've had such a great response for our first-year conferences, the work she's put in. It's hard.Like, this isn't easy. You know, we've had to do a lot of work to make sure that it is representative, at least better than other conferences, at least. So, I'm really excited. And like, there's so much, like, open-source is probably going to be the thing that saves the world. If we're going to end up looking at two different futures with monopolies and closed systems and all the money going towards cloud providers versus a fair and equitable society, open-source is the thing that's going to get us closer to that. So yeah, this conference will be a great event.Corey: Is it all in person? Is it being live-streamed as well? What is the deal here?Aerin: So, in person, we have loads of different things going on, but what will be streamed online if you sign up for virtual ticket is five different tracks. So, our platform engineering track, our security track, government law and policy, open data, and open hardware. And of course, the keynote and plenaries. But one of the things I'm also really proud about this conference is that we're really focusing on the developer experience, like, you know, what is your experience at the conference? So, we also have an unconference, we have a sub-conference run by Sustain OSS focused on workshops related to climate change and sustainability.We have loads of developer experience halls in the event itself. And throughout the day, over the two days, we have two one-hour blocks with no speaking content at all so that we can really make sure that people have that hardware track and are out there meeting each other and having a good time. And obviously, of course, like any good conference, the all-hands party on the first night. So, it really is a conference that's doing things differently from diversity to sustainability to that experience. So, it's awesome.Corey: One of the challenges that I've seen historically around things aiming at the idea of open conferences—and when we talk open-source, et cetera, et cetera—open' seems like it is a direction parallel to, we haven't any money, where it's, “Yes, we're a free software foundation,” and it turns out conferences themselves are not free. And you wind up with a whole bunch of folks showing up to it who are, in many cases, around the fringes of things. There are individual hobbyists who are very passionate about a thing but do not have the position in the corporate world. I'm looking through the lengthy list of speakers you have here and that is very much not this. These are serious people at serious companies. Not that there are not folks who are individual practitioners and passionate advocates and hobbyists than the rest. This is, by virtually any way you look at it, a remarkably diverse conference.Aerin: Mmm. You know, you are right about, like, that problem in open-source. It's like, you know, we look at open and whether we want to do open and we just go, “Well, it won't make me any money. I can't do that. I don't have the time. I need to bring in some money.”And one of the really unique things, again, about this conference is—I have not even mentioned it yet—we have an entrepreneurship room. So, we have 20 tables filled with entrepreneurs and CEOs and founders of open-source companies throughout the two days where you can book in time to sit at that table and have conversations with them. Ask them the questions that you want to ask about, whether it's something that you want to work on, or a company you want to found, and you'll be able to get that time. I had a very similar experience in some ways. It was re:Invent.I was a peer talk expert and you know, I had 15 or so conversations with some really interesting people just because they were able put that time in and they were able to find me on the website. So, that's something we are replicating to get those 20 also entrepreneurs and co-founders out to everyone else. They want to be able to help you and support you.Corey: That is an excellent segue if I do say so myself. Let's talk about re:Invent. It's the one time of the year you and I get to spend time in the same room. One thing that I got wrong is that I overbooked myself as I often do, and I didn't have time to do anything on their peer talk expert program, which is, you more or less a way that any rando can book time to sit down and chat with you. Now, in my case, I have assassination concerns because it turns out Amazon employees can read that thing too and some of them might work on billing. One wonders.So yeah, I have to be a little careful for personal reasons but for most people, it's a non-issue. I didn't get as much time as I wanted to talk to folks in the community. That is not going to repeat itself at the end of this year. But what was your take on re:Invent, because I was in meetings for most of them?Aerin: So, comparing this re:Invent to the re:Invent I went to, my first re:Invent when we met in 2021, you know, that was the re:Invent that inspired me to get into sustainability. They'd announced stuff to do with the shared responsibility model. A few months later, they released their carbon calculator, and I was like, “Yeah, this is the problem. This is the thing I want to work on and it will make me happy.” And a lot of that goes into, you know, finding a passion that keeps me motivated when things aren't that great.When maybe not a lot of money is coming in, at least I know, I'm doing everything I can to help save the world. So, re:Invent 2021 really inspired me to get involved with sustainability. When I look at re:Invent 2022, you might have Adam Selipsky on the main stage saying that sustainability is the problem of our generation, but that is just talk and bluster compared to what they were putting out in terms of content and their experience of, like, let's say the sustainability—I don't know what to call it—tiny little square in the back of the MGM Grand compared to the paid hall in the expo. Like, you know, that's the sort of thing where you can already see the prioritization of money. Let's put the biggest sponsors and all the money that we can bring it in the big hall where everyone is, and then put the thing we care about the most, apparently—sustainability—in the back of the MGM.And that in itself was annoying, but then you get there in the content, and it was like a massive Rivian van, like, an advert for, “Oh, Amazon has done all this to electrify Rivian and deliver you Prime.” But where was the people working on sustainability in the cloud? You know, we had a couple of teams who were talking about the customer carbon footprint tool, but there was just not much. And I spoke to a lot of people and they were saying similar things, like, “Where are the announcements? Where are the actual interesting things?” Rather than just—which is kind of what I'm starting to realize is that a lot of the conversations about sustainability is about selling yourself as sustainable.Use me rather than my competitors because we're 88% more, kind of, carbon neutral when it comes to traditional data centers, not because we are really going to solve these problems. And not to say that Amazon isn't doing innovative, amazing things that no one else can't do, because that is true, and cloud as part of the solution, but you know, sustainability shouldn't be about making more sales and growing your business, it should be about making the world a better place, not just in terms of carbon emissions, but you know, our life, the tech that we can access. Three billion people on this planet have never accessed the internet. And as we continue to grow all of our services like AI and machine learning and new Web3, bloody managed services come online, that's going to be more carbon, more compute power going towards the already rich and the already westernized people, rather than solving the problems we need to solve in the face of climate change.So, I was a little bit disappointed. And I did put a tweet thread out about it afterwards. And I just hope it can be different next year and I hope more people will start to ask for this. And that also what I'm starting to realize is that until more Amazon customers put this as their number one priority and say, “I'm not going to do business with you because of this issue,” or, you know, “This is what we really care about,” they're not going to make a change. Unless it starts to impact their bottom lines and people start to choose other cloud providers, they're not going to prioritize it.And I think up until this point, we're not seeing that from customers. We're kind of getting some people like me shouting about it, but across the board, sustainability isn't the number one priority right now. It's, like what Amazon says, security or resiliency or something else.Corey: And I think that, at least from where I set, the challenge is that if you asked me what I got out of re:Invent, and what the conversations I had—going into it, what are my expectations, and what do I hope to get and how's it going to end up, and then you ask you that same question—though maybe you are a poor example of this—and then you ask someone who works out as an engineer at a company that uses AWS and their two or three years into their career, why don't you talk to a manager or director or someone else? And the problem is if you start polling the entire audience, you'll find that this becomes—you're going to wind up with 20 different answers, at least. The conference doesn't seem like it has any idea of what it wants to be and to whom and in that vacuum, it tries to be all things to all people. And surprise, just like the shooting multifunction printer some of us have in our homes, it doesn't do well with any of those things because it's trying to stand in too many worlds at the same time.Aerin: You know, let's not, like, look at this from a way that you know, re:Invent is crap and, like, do all the work that everyone puts it is wasted because it is a really great event for a lot of different things for a lot of different people. And to be honest, the work that the Amazon staff put into it is pretty out of this world. I feel sorry though because you know, the rush for AWS sell more and do this massive event, they put people through the grinder. And I feel like, I don't know, we could see the cracks in some of that, the way that works. But, you know, there's so many people that I speak to who were like, “Yeah, I'm definitely not going again. I'm not even going to go anywhere near submitting a talk.”And, sort of, the thing is, like, I can imagine if the conference was something different; it was focused at sustainability at number one, it was about making the world a better place from everything that they do, it was about bringing diverse communities together. Like, you know, bringing these things up the list would make the whole thing a lot better. And to be honest, it would probably make it a lot more enjoyable [laugh] for the Amazon staff who end up talking at it. Because, you know, I guess it can feel a bit soulless over time is all you're doing is making money for someone else and selling more things. And, yeah, I think there's a lot more… different things we can do and a lot more things we can talk about if people just start to talk about, like you know, if you care about this as well and you work at Amazon, then start saying that as well.It'll really make a difference if you say we want re:Invent to look different. I mean, even Amazon staff, [laugh] and we've not even mentioned this one because I got Covid straight after re:Invent, nine days and staring at a wall in hotel room in Vegas was not my idea of a good time post-conference. So, that was a horrible, horrible experience. But, you know, I've had people call it re:Infect. Like, where are the Covid support?Like, there was hardly any conversation about that. It was sort of like, “Don't mention it because oh, s”—whatever else. But imagine if you just did something a little bit differently to look like you care about your customers. Just say, “We recommend people mask or take a test,” or even provide tests and masks. Like, even if it's not mandatory, they could have done a lot more to make it safer for everyone. Because, yeah, imagine having the reputation of re:Infect rather than re:Invent?Corey: I can only imagine how that would play out.Aerin: Only imagine.Corey: Yeah, it's it feels like we're all collectively decided to pretend that the pandemic is over. Because yeah, that's a bummer. I don't want to think about it. You know, kind of like we approach climate change.Aerin: Yeah. At the end of the day, like, and I keep coming across this more and more, you know, my thinking has changed over the last year because, like, you know, initially it was like a hyperactive puppy. Why are we caring about this? Like, yeah, if I say it, people will come, but the reality is, we have to blinker ourselves in order to deal with a lot of this stuff. We can't always worry about all of this stuff all of the time. And that's fine. That's acceptable. We do that in so many different parts of our life.But there comes to a point when you kind of think, “How much do I care about this?” And for a lot of people, it's because they have kids. Like, anyone who has kids right now must have to think, “Wow, what's the future going to look like?” And if you worry about what the future is going to look like, make sure you're taking steps to make the world a better place and make it the future you want it to look like. You know, I made the decision a long time ago not to have kids because I don't think I'd want to bring anyone into the world on what it might actually end up being, but you know, when I speak to people who are older in the 60s and they're like, “Oh, you've got 100 years. You don't need to worry about it.” Like, “Maybe you can say that because you're closer to dying than I am.” But yeah, I have to worry about this now because I'll still be eighty when all this shit is kicking off [laugh].Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Strata. Are you struggling to keep up with the demands of managing and securing identity in your distributed enterprise IT environment? You're not alone, but you shouldn't let that hold you back. With Strata's Identity Orchestration Platform, you can secure all your apps on any cloud with any IDP, so your IT teams will never have to refactor for identity again. Imagine modernizing app identity in minutes instead of months, deploying passwordless on any tricky old app, and achieving business resilience with always-on identity, all from one lightweight and flexible platform.Want to see it in action? Share your identity challenge with them on a discovery call and they'll hook you up with a complimentary pair of AirPods Pro. Don't miss out, visit Strata.io/ScreamingCloud. That's Strata dot io slash ScreamingCloud.Corey: That I guess is one of the big fears I have—and I think it's somewhat unfounded—is that every year starts to look too much like the year before it. Because it's one of those ideas where we start to see the pace of innovation is slowing at AWS—and I'm not saying that to piss people at Amazon off and have them come after me with pitchforks and torches again—but they're not launching new services at the rate they once did, which is good for customers, but it starts to feel like oh, have we hit peak cloud this is what it's going to look like? Absolutely not. I don't get the sense that the world is like, “Well, everything's been invented. Time to shut down the patent office,” anytime soon.And in the short term, it feels like oh, there's not a lot exciting going on, but you look back the last five years even and look at how far we've come even in that period of time and—what is it? “The days are long, but the years are short.” It becomes a very macro thing of as things ebb and flow, you start to see the differences but the micro basis on a year-to-year perspective, it seems harder to detect. So longer term, I think we're going to see what the story looks like. And it's going to be satisfying one. Just right now, it's like, well, this wasn't as entertaining as I would have hoped, so I'm annoyed. Which I am because it wasn't, but that's not the biggest problem in the world.Aerin: It's not. And, you know, you look at okay, cool, there wasn't all these new flashy services. There was a few things are announced, I mean, hopefully that are going to contribute towards climate change. One of them is called AWS Supply Chain. And the irony of seeing sort of like AWS Supply Chain where a company that already has issues with data and conversations around competition, saying to everyone, “Hey, trust us and give all of your supply chain information and put it into one of our AWS products,” while at the same time their customer carbon footprint tool won't even show the full scope for their emissions of their own supply chain is not lost on me.And you do say, “Maybe we should start seeing things at a macro level,” but unless Amazon and other cloud hyperscalers start pulling the finger out and showing us how they have got a vision between now and 2040, and now in 2050, of how they're going to get there, it kind of just feels like they're saying, “It'll all be fine as long as we continue to grow, as long as we keep sucking up the market.” And, you know, an interesting thing that just kicked off in the UK back in November was the Competition and Markets Authority have started an investigation into the cloud providers on how they are basically sucking up all these markets, and how the growth of things that are not hyperscale is going. So, in the UK, the percentage of cloud has obviously gone up—more and more cloud spending has gone up—but kind of usage across non-hyperscalers has gone down over that same period. And they really are at risk of sucking up the world. Like, I have got involved in a lot of different things.I'm an AWS community builder; like, I do promote AWS. And, you know, the reason why I promote cloud, for example is serverless. We need serverless as the way we run our IT because that's the only way we'll do things like time shifting or demand shifting. So, when we look at renewable energy on the grid if that really high, the wind is blowing and the sun is shining, we want more workloads to be running then and when they're tiny, and they're [unintelligible 00:21:03], and what's the call it serverless generally, uh—Corey: Hype?Aerin: Function as a Code?Corey: Function—yeah, Function as a Service and all kinds of other nonsense. But I have to ask, when you're talking about serverless, in this context, is a necessary prerequisite of serverless that scale to zero when it's [unintelligible 00:21:19].Aerin: [laugh]. I kind of go back to marketing. What Amazon releasing these days when it relates to serverless that isn't just marketing and saying, “Oh, it's serverless.” Because yeah, there was a few products this year that is not scaled to zero is it? It's a 100-pound minimum. And when you're looking at number of accounts that you have, that can add up really quickly and it excludes people from using it.Corey: It's worse than that because it's not number of accounts. I consider DynamoDB to be serverless, by any definition of the term. Because it is. And what I like about it is I can have a separate table for every developer, for every service or microservice or project that they have, and in fact, each branch can have its own stuff like that. I look at some of the stuff that I build with multi-branch testing and whatnot, and, “Oh, wow. That would cost more than the engineer if they were to do that with some of the serverless offerings that AWS has put out.”Which makes that entire philosophy a complete non-starter, which means that invariably as soon as you start developing down that path, you are making significant trade-offs. That's just from a economics slash developer ergonomics slash best practices point of view. But there's a sustainability story to it as well.Aerin: Yeah. I mean, this sustainability thing is like, if you're not going to encourage this new way of working, like, if you're not going to move everyone to this point of view and this is how we need to do things, then you kind of just propagating the old world, putting it into your data center. For every managed service that VMware migrated piece of crap, just that land in the cloud, it's not making a real difference in the world because that's still going to exist. And we mentioned this just before the podcast and, you know, a lot of focus these days and for a lot of people is, “Okay, green energy is the problem. We need to solve green energy.”And Amazon is the biggest purchaser of power purchase agreements in renewable energy around the world, more than most governments. Or I think that the biggest corporate purchaser of it anyway. And that all might sound great, like, “Oh, the cloud is going to solve this problem for me and Amazon is going to solve it for me even better because they're bigger.” But at the end of the day, when we think about a data center, it exists in the real world.It's made of concrete. You know, when you pour concrete and when you make concrete, it releases CO2. It's got racks of servers that all are running. So, those individual servers had to be made by whoever it is in Asia or mined from rare earth metals and end up in the supply chain and then transported into the data centers in us-east-1. And then things go wrong. You have to repair you have to replace and you have to maintain them.Unless we get these circular economies going in a closed system, we can't just continue to grow like this. Because carbon emissions related to Scope 3, all those things I've just been talking about, basically anything that isn't the energy, is about 80 to 90% of all the carbon emissions. So, when Amazon says, “Oh, we're going to go green and get energy done by 2030”—which is seven years away—they've then got ten years to solve 90% of the problem. And we cannot all just continue to grow and think of tech as neutral and better for the world if we still got that 90% problem, which we do right now. And it really frustrates me when you look at the world and the way we've jumped on technology just go on, “Oh, it must be good.”Like Bitcoin, for example. Bitcoin has released 200 million metric tons of CO2 since its inception. And for something that is basically a glorified Ponzi scheme, I can't see how that is making the world a better place. So, when cloud providers are making managed services for Web3 and for blockchain, and they're selling more and more AI and machine learning, basically so they can keep on selling GPU access, I do worry about whether our path to infinite growth with all of these hyperscalers is probably the wrong way of looking at things. So, linking back to, you know, the conference, open-source and, you know, thinking about things differently is really important in tech right now.And not just for your own well-being and being able to sleep at night, but this is how we're going to solve our problems. When all companies on the planet want people to be sustainable and we have to start tackling this because there's a financial cost related to it, then you're going to be in the vogue. If you're really good developer, thinking about things differently can be efficient, then yeah, you're the developer that's going to win in the future. You might be assisted by ChatGPT three or whatever else, but yeah, sustainability and efficiency can really be the number one priority because it's a win, win, win. We save the world, we make ourselves better, we sleep better at night, and you just become a better developer.I keep monologuing at this point, but you know, when it comes to stuff like games design, we look at things like Quake and Pokemon and all these things when there's like, “How did they get these amazing games and these amazing experiences in such small sizes,” they had boundaries. They had boundaries to innovate within because they had to. They couldn't release the game if they couldn't fit into the cartridge, therefore, they made it work. When the cloud is sold as infinitely scalable and horizontally scalable and no one needs to worry about this stuff because you can get your credit card out, people stop caring about being innovative and being more efficient. So yeah, let's get some more boundaries in the cloud.Corey: What I find that is super helpful, has been, like, if I can, like, descri—like, Instagram is down. Describe your lunch to me style meme description, like, the epic handshake where you have two people clasping hands, and one side is labeled in this case, ‘sustainability advocates,' and the other side should be labeled ‘cloud economists,' and in the middle, it's, “Turn that shit off.” Because it's not burning carbon if it's not running, and it's not costing you anything—ideally—if it's not running, so it's one of those ideas where we meet in the middle. And that's important, not just because it makes both of us independently happy because it's both good for the world and you'll get companies on board with this because, “Wait. We can do this thing and it saves us money?” Suddenly, you're getting them aligned because that is their religion.If companies could be said to have a religion, it is money. That's the way it works. So, you have to make it worth money for them to do the right thing or you're always going to be swimming upstream like a depressed salmon.Aerin: I mean, look at why [unintelligible 00:27:11] security is near the top: because there's so many big fines related to security breaches. It will cost them money not to be secure. Right now, it doesn't cost companies money to be inefficient or to release all this carbon, so they get away with it or they choose to do it. And I think that's going to change. We see in regulations across you're coming out.So, you know, if you work for a big multinational that operates in Europe, by next year, you'll have to report on all of your Scope 3 carbon emissions. If you're a customer of AWS right now, you have no ability to do that. So, you know, this is going to be crunch time over the next 18 months to two years for a lot of big businesses, for Amazon and the other hyperscalers, to really start demonstrating that they can do this. And I guess that's my big push. And, you know, I want to work with anyone, and it's funny because I have been running this business for about, you know, a couple of years now, it's been going really well, I did my podcast, I'm on this path.But I did, last year, take some time, and I applied into AWS. And you know, I was like, “Okay, maybe I'll apply for this big tech company and help Amazon out.” And because I'll take that salary and I'll do something really good with it afterwards, I'll do my time for three years and attend re:Invent and deliver 12 talks and never sleep, but you know, at the end of it, I'll say, “Okay, I've done that and now I can do something really good.” Unfortunately, I didn't get the role—or fortunately—but you know, when I applied for that role, what I said to them is, “I really care about sustainability. I want to make the world a better place. I want to help your customers be more sustainable.”And they didn't want me to join. So, I'm just going to continue doing that but from the outside. And whether that means working with politicians or developers or anyone else to try and make the world better and to kind of help fight against climate change, then, yeah, that's definitely what I'm doing.Corey: So, one last question before we wind up calling it an episode. How do we get there? What is the best next step that folks can take? Because it's easy to look at this as a grand problem and realize it's too big to solve. Well, great. You don't need to solve the entire problem. You need take the first step. What is that first step?Aerin: Individuals, I would say it's just realizing that you do care about it and you want to take action. And you're going to say to yourself, “Even if I do little things, I'm going to move forward towards that point.” So, if that is being a more sustainable engineer or getting more conversations about climate change or even just doing other things in your community to make the world a better place than it is, taking that action. But one thing that I can definitely help about and talk a bit more of is that at the conference itself, I'll be running a panel with some great experts called the, “Next Generation of Cloud Education.” So, I really think we need to—like I said earlier in the podcast—to think differently about the cloud and IT.So, I am doing this panel and I'm bringing together someone like Simon Wardley to help people do Wardley Mapping. Like, that is a tool that allows you to see the landscape that you're operating in. You know, if you use that sort of tool to understand the real-world impact of what you're doing, then you can start caring about it a bit more. I'm bringing in somebody called Anne Currie, who is a tech ethicist and speaker and lecturer, and she's actually written some [laugh] really great nonfiction books, which I'd recommend everyone reads. It starts with Utopia Five.And that's about asking, “Well, is this ethical? Can we continue to do these things?” Can't—talks about things about sustainability. If it's not sustainable for everyone, it's not ethical. So, when I mentioned 3 billion people currently don't use the internet, it's like, can we continue to just keep on doing things the same way?And then John Booth, who is a data center expert, to help us really understand what the reality is on the ground. What are these data centers really look like? And then Amanda Brock, from OpenUK in the conference will joining as well to talk about, kind of, open-source and how we can make the world kind of a better place by getting involved in these communities. So, that'll be a really great panel.But what I'm also doing is releasing this as an online course. So, for people who want to get involved, it will be very intimate, about 15 seats on each core, so three weeks for you to actually work and talk directly with some of these experts and me to figure out what you want to do in the world of climate change and how you can take those first steps. So, it'll be a journey that even starts with an ecotherapist to help us deal with climate grief and wonder about the things we can do as individuals to feel better ourselves and be happier. So, I think that'd be a really great thing for a lot of people. And, yeah, not only that, but… it'll be great for you, but it also goes towards making the world a better place.So, 50% of the course fees will be donated, 25%, to charity, and 25% supporting open-source projects. So, I think it kind of just win, win, win. And that's the story of sustainability in general. It's a win, win, win for everyone. If you start seeing the world through a lens of sustainability, you'll save money, you'll sleep better at night, you'll get involved with some really great communities, and meet some really great people who care about this as well. And yeah, it'll be a brighter future.Corey: If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Aerin: So, if you want to learn more about what I'm up to, I'm on Twitter under @aerincloud, that A-E-R-I-N cloud. And then you can also find me on LinkedIn. But I also run my own podcast that was inspired by Corey, called Public Cloud for Public Good talking about cloud sustainability and how to make the world a better place for the use of public cloud services.Corey: And we will, of course, put a link to that in the [show notes 00:32:32]. Thank you so much for your time. I appreciate it, as always.Aerin: Thank you.Corey: Aerin Booth, the Ted Lasso of cloud. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this episode, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry and insulting comment that I will immediately scale to zero in true serverless fashion.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

SGPN Fantasy Football Podcast
Way Too Early IDP Rankings | SGPN Fantasy Football (Ep. 294)

SGPN Fantasy Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 41:51


The IDP Pros Johny the Greek. And Gary, The IDP Tipster, continues coverage of the way-too-early redraft IDP rankings. Topping off their top 6 thru 10 fantasy football designated positions, including players like... Devin White, Drue Tranquill, Chase Young, Joey Bosa, and C.J. Gardner. And don't miss the bonus Jordyn Brooks, Haason Reddick, and Alex Singleton updates! Jordyn Brooks/NFL News: 01:30 Linebackers: 06:28 Alex Singleton: 17:05 Defensive Backs: 18:40 Defensive Line/Edge: 28:37 Haason Reddick: 33.39 ===================================================== SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app Check out SGPN.TV   Support us by supporting our partners WynnBET - Bet $100 and get a $100! - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Underdog Fantasy code SGPN - 100% Deposit Match up to $100 - https://sg.pn/underdog FFPC Playoff Challenge - $25 promo off first FFPC entry of $35 or more - https://sg.pn/ffpc Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Discord - https://sg.pn/discord  Reddit - https://sg.pn/reddit ===================================================== Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
Way Too Early IDP Rankings | SGPN Fantasy Football (Ep. 294)

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 41:51


The IDP Pros Johny the Greek. And Gary, The IDP Tipster, continues coverage of the way-too-early redraft IDP rankings. Topping off their top 6 thru 10 fantasy football designated positions, including players like... Devin White, Drue Tranquill, Chase Young, Joey Bosa, and C.J. Gardner. And don't miss the bonus Jordyn Brooks, Haason Reddick, and Alex Singleton updates! Jordyn Brooks/NFL News: 01:30 Linebackers: 06:28 Alex Singleton: 17:05 Defensive Backs: 18:40 Defensive Line/Edge: 28:37 Haason Reddick: 33.39 ===================================================== SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app Check out SGPN.TV   Support us by supporting our partners WynnBET - Bet $100 and get a $100! - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Underdog Fantasy code SGPN - 100% Deposit Match up to $100 - https://sg.pn/underdog FFPC Playoff Challenge - $25 promo off first FFPC entry of $35 or more - https://sg.pn/ffpc Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Discord - https://sg.pn/discord  Reddit - https://sg.pn/reddit ===================================================== Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

EDGE CRUSHERS - IDP Podcast
IDP Nation EP #189 Wild Card Round

EDGE CRUSHERS - IDP Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2023 128:51


Welcome back to another episode of IDP Nation, which is one of the best IDP information podcasts on the market. We deliver the news and notes of the past week and look at what's ahead, with a main event topic followed by some awesome listener questions. Kyle and Darrell co-hosting at its best! You can also find their written work at IDPNation.com and if you're looking for even more content that you can't find anywhere else, try out their patron. Sponsors Trophy Smack is the #1 source for all of your championship needs Action 247 Sportsbook is the one-stop shop for all your gambling needs My Fantasy League.com is where best come to play fantasy football Listener League Winners 2022 Listener League #1 - Peter Randall Listener League #1 - Todd Fink Devy IDP Grind (Campus side) - Dwight Peebles Devy IDP Grind (Canton side) - Todd Foster News & Notes Seattle Seahawks LB Jordyn Brooks underwent surgery on Thursday to repair a torn right ACL that he injured on New Year's day during week 17 Baltimore Ravens GM Eric Decosta wouldn't commit to saying whether or not the team would pick up LB Patrick Queen's 5th-year option HC Sean Payton is reportedly seeking between $20-$25m a year for his next gig Tampa Bay Buccaneers DE Shaq Barrett (Achilles) told reporters that he will be ready for the start of the 2023 season. Playoff Picks Darrell: Buffalo, Kansas City, Philadelphia, San Francisco Kyle: Buffalo, Kansas City, Philadelphia, San Francisco Main Event PFF's Top Free Agent LBs Lavonta David, Tremaine Edmunds, David Long, Germaine Pratt, Leighton Vander Esch, Bobby Okereke, TJ Edwards Listener Questions Twitter u/DanCook@seahawksdan8 Is Chicago Bears LB Jack Sanborn a one-year wonder or $$$$? Twitter u/SalCusamano@cusamano_sal Favorite type of IDP scoring? Who are the top 2-3 rookies in this class at each position for fantasy football purposes? Twitter u/ToddFoster@FF_banterman Who are some EDGEs & LBs that you see gaining a significant increase in snaps for 2023? Who are some of your IDP rookie sleepers? Reddit u/reaction-jackson Which Jack will score the most fantasy points for the 2023 season? Jack Sanborn, Myles Jack, or Jack Gibbens? Reddit u/RandomPhillyGuy How do you rank the Tennessee linebackers heading into next season? What are some potential open slots in defenses that a free agent or draft pick could slide into and produce? --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/darrell-winstead/support

In This League Fantasy Football
Episode 445 - Early 2023 Five-Round Mock Draft

In This League Fantasy Football

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 65:45


New @InThisLeaguePod Fantasy Football Podcast!✅ @BogmanSports and @IsItTheWelsh are previewing the divisional round of the playoffs and breakdown a early 5-Round 2023 Mock Draft.Join up to be a member of the army and support your boys to create more and more fantasy football content that not only wins your league, but makes you laugh! Redraft/Dynasty/Superflex and even IDP ranks, live podcast recordings and tons more! Find it all at the ITL Army Page Today at www.inthisleague.comFollow the guys on Twitter @IsItTheWelsh @BogmanSports

Screaming in the Cloud
Becoming a Rural Remote Worker with Chris Vermilion

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 33:01


About ChrisChris is a mostly-backend mostly-engineer at Remix Labs, working on visual app development. He has been in software startups for ten years, but his first and unrequited love was particle physics.  Before joining Remix Labs, he wrote numerical simulation and analysis tools for the Large Hadron Collider, then co-founded Roobiq, a clean and powerful mobile client for Salesforce back when the official ones were neither.Links Referenced: Remix Labs: https://remixlabs.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/chrisvermilion TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Tailscale SSH is a new, and arguably better way to SSH. Once you've enabled Tailscale SSH on your server and user devices, Tailscale takes care of the rest. So you don't need to manage, rotate, or distribute new SSH keys every time someone on your team leaves. Pretty cool, right? Tailscale gives each device in your network a node key to connect to your VPN, and uses that same key for SSH authorization and encryption. So basically you're SSHing the same way that you're already managing your network. So what's the benefit? Well, built-in key rotation, the ability to manage permissions as code, connectivity between any two devices, and reduced latency. You can even ask users to re-authenticate SSH connections for that extra bit of security to keep the compliance folks happy. Try Tailscale now - it's free forever for personal use.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Logicworks. Getting to the cloud is challenging enough for many places, especially maintaining security, resiliency, cost control, agility, etc, etc, etc. Things break, configurations drift, technology advances, and organizations, frankly, need to evolve. How can you get to the cloud faster and ensure you have the right team in place to maintain success over time? Day 2 matters. Work with a partner who gets it - Logicworks combines the cloud expertise and platform automation to customize solutions to meet your unique requirements. Get started by chatting with a cloud specialist today at snark.cloud/logicworks. That's snark.cloud/logicworksCorey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. When I was nine years old, one of the worst tragedies that can ever befall a boy happened to me. That's right, my parents moved me to Maine. And I spent the next ten years desperately trying to get out of the state.Once I succeeded and moved to California, I found myself in a position where almost nothing can drag me back there. One of the exceptions—basically, the only exception—is Monktoberfest, a conference put on every year by the fine folks at RedMonk. It is unquestionably the best conference that I have ever been to, and it continually amazes me every time I go. The last time I was out there, I met today's guest. Chris Vermilion is a Senior Software Developer at Remix Labs. Chris, now that I finished insulting the state that you call home, how are you?Chris: I'm great. I'm happy to be in a state that's not California.Corey: I hear you. It's, uh—I talk a lot of smack about Maine. But to be perfectly direct, my problem with it is that I grew up there and that was a difficult time in my life because I, really I guess, never finished growing up according to most people. And all right, we'll accept it. No one can hate a place in the same way that you can hate it if you grew up there and didn't enjoy the experience.So, it's not Maine that's the problem; it's me. I feel like I should clarify that I'm going to get letters and people in Maine will write those letters and then have to ride their horses to Massachusetts to mail them. But we know how that works.Chris: [laugh].Corey: So, what is Remix Labs? Let's start there. Because Remix sounds like… well, it sounds like a term that is overused. I see it everywhere in the business space. I know there was a Remix thing that recently got sold to I think it was at Shopify or Spotify; I keep getting those two confused. And—Chris: One of the two, yeah.Corey: Yeah, exactly one of them plays music and one of them sells me things except now I think they both do both, and everything has gone wonky and confusing. But what do you folks do over there?Chris: So, we work on visual app development for everybody. So, the goal is to have kind of a spreadsheet-on-steroids-like development environment where you can build interactively, you have live coding, you have a responsive experience in building interactive apps, websites, mobile apps, a little bit of everything, and providing an experience where you can build systems of engagement. So tools, mobile apps, that kind of work with whatever back-end resources you're trying to do, you can collaborate across different people, pass things around, and you can do that all with a nice kind of visual app developer, where you can sort of drop nodes around and wire them together and built in a way that's it's hopefully accessible to non-developers, to project managers, to domain experts, to you know, whatever stakeholders are interested in modifying that final product.Corey: I would say that I count as one of those. I use something similar to build the tool that assembles my newsletter every week, and that was solving a difficult problem for me. I can write back-ends reasonably well, using my primary tool, which is sheer brute force. I am not much of a developer, but it turns out that with enough enthusiasm, you can overcome most limitations. And that's great, but I know nothing about front end; it does not make sense to me, it does not click in the way that other things have clicked.So, I was fourth and inches from just retaining a contractor to build out a barely serviceable internal app. And I discovered, oh, use this low-code tool to drag and drop things and that basically was Visual Basic for internal apps. And that was awesome, but they're still positioned squarely in the space of internal apps only. There's no mobile app story, there's—and it works well enough for what I do, but I have other projects, I want to wind up getting out the door that are not strictly for internal use that would benefit from being able to have a serviceable interface slapped onto. It doesn't need to be gorgeous, it doesn't need to win awards, it just needs to be, “Cool, it can display the output of a table in a variety of different ways. It has a button and when I click a button, it does a thing, generally represented as an API call to something.”And doesn't take much, but being able to have something like that, even for an internal app, has been absolutely transformative just for workflow stuff internally, for making things accessible to people that are not otherwise going to be able to do those sorts of things, by which I mean me.Chris: Yeah. I mean, exactly, I think that is the kind of use case that we are aiming for is making this accessible to everybody, building tools that work for people that aren't necessarily software developers, they don't want to dive into code—although they can if they want, it's extensible in that way—that aren't necessarily front-end developers or designers, although it's accessible to designers and if you want to start from that end, you can do it. And it's amenable to collaboration, so you can have somebody that understands the problem build something that works, you can have somebody that understands design build something that works well and looks nice, and you can have somebody that understands the code or is more of a back-end developer, then go back in and maybe fine-tune the API calls because they realize that you're doing the same thing over and over again and so there's a better way to structure the lower parts of things. But you can pass around that experience between all these different stakeholders and you can construct something that everybody can modify to sort of suit their own needs and desires.Corey: Many years ago, Bill Clinton wound up coining the phrase, ‘The Digital Divide' to talk about people who had basically internet access and who didn't—those who got it or did not—and I feel like we have a modern form of that, the technology haves and have nots. Easy example of this for a different part of my workflow here: this podcast, as anyone listening to it is probably aware by now, is sponsored by awesome folks who wind up wanting to tell you about the exciting services or tools or products that they are building. And sometimes some of those sponsors will say things like, “Okay, here's the URL I want you to read into the microphone during the ad read,” and my response is a polite form of, “Are you serious?” It's seven different subdirectories on the web server, followed by a UTM series of tracking codes that, yeah, I promise, none of you are going to type that in. I'm not even going to wind up reading into the microphone because my attention span trips out a third of the way through.So, I needed a URL shortener. So, I set up snark.cloud for this. For a long time, that was relatively straightforward because I just used an S3 bucket with redirect objects inside of it. But then you have sort of the problem being a victim of your own success, to some extent, and I was at a point where, oh, I can have people control some of these things that aren't me; I don't need to be the person that sets up the link redirection work.Yeah, the challenge is now that you have a business user who is extraordinarily good at what he does, but he's also not someone who has deep experience in writing code, and trying to sit here and explain to him, here's how to set up a redirect object in an S3 bucket, like, why didn't I save time and tell him to go screw himself? It's awful. So, I've looked for a lot of different answers for this, and the one that I found lurking on GitHub—and I've talked about it a couple of times, now—runs on Google Cloud Run, and the front-end for that of the business user—which sounds ridiculous, but it's also kind of clever, is a Google Sheet. Because every business user knows how to work a Google Sheet. There's one column labeled ‘slug' and the other one labeled ‘URL' that it points to.And every time someone visits a snark.cloud slash whatever the hell the slug happens to be, it automatically does a redirect. And it's glorious. But I shouldn't have to go digging into the depths of GitHub to find stuff like that. This feels like a perfect use case for a no-code, low-code tool.Chris: Yeah. No, I agree. I mean, that's a cool use case. And I… as always, our competitor is Google Sheets. I think everybody in software development in enterprise software's only real competitor is the spreadsheet.Corey: Oh, God, yes, I wind up fixing AWS bills for a living and my biggest competitor is always Microsoft Excel. It's, “Yeah, we're going to do it ourselves internally,” is what most people do. It seems like no matter what business line I've worked in, I've companies that did Robo-advising for retirement planning; yeah, some people do it themselves in Microsoft Excel. I worked for an expense reporting company; everyone does that in Microsoft Excel. And so, on and so forth.There are really very few verticals where that's not an option. It's like, but what about a dating site? Oh, there are certain people who absolutely will use Microsoft Excel for that. Personally, I think it's a bad idea to hook up where you VLOOKUP but what do I know?Chris: [laugh]. Right, right.Corey: Before you wound up going into the wide world of low-code development over at Remix, you—well, a lot of people have different backstories when I talk to them on this show. Yours is definitely one of the more esoteric because the common case and most people talk about is oh, “I went to Stanford and then became a software engineer.” “Great. What did you study?” “Computer Science,” or something like it. Alternately, they drop out of school and go do things in their backyard. You have a PhD in particle physics, is it?Chris: That's right. Yeah.Corey: Which first, is wild in his own right, but we'll get back to that. How did you get here from there?Chris: Ah. Well, it's kind of the age-old story of academia. So, I started in electrical engineering and ended up double majoring in physics because that you had to take a lot of physics to be an engineer, and I said, you know, this is more fun. This is interesting. Building things is great, but sitting around reading papers is really where my heart's at.And ended up going to graduate school, which is about the best gig you can ever get. You get paid to sit in an office and read and write papers, and occasionally go out drinking with other grad students, and that's really about it.Corey: I only just now for the first time in my life, realized how much some aspects of my career resemble being a [laugh] grad student. Please, continue.Chris: It doesn't pay very well is the catch, you know? It's very hard to support a lifestyle that exists outside of your office, or, you know, involves a family and children, which is certainly one downside. But it's a lot of fun and it's very low stress, as long as you are, let's say, not trying to get a job afterward. Because where this all breaks down is that, you know, as I recall, the time I was a graduate student, there were roughly as many people graduating as graduate students every year as there were professors total in the field of physics, at least in the United States. That was something like the scale of the relationship.And so, if you do the math, and unfortunately, we were relatively good at doing math, you could see, you know, most of us were not going to go on, you know? This was the path to becoming a professor, but—Corey: You look at number of students and the number of professorships available in the industry, I guess we'll call it, and yeah, it's hmm, basic arithmetic does not seem like something that anyone in that department is not capable of doing.Chris: Exactly. So, you're right, we were all I think, more or less qualified to be an academic professor, certainly at research institutions, where the only qualification, really, is to be good at doing research and you have to tolerate teaching students sometimes. But there tends to be very little training on how to do that, or a meaningful evaluation of whether you're doing it well.Corey: I want to dive into that a bit because I think that's something we see a lot in this industry, where there's no training on how to do a lot of different things. Teaching is one very clear example, another one is interviewing people for jobs, so people are making it up as they go along, despite there being decades and decades of longitudinal studies of people figuring out what works and what doesn't, tech his always loved to just sort of throw it all out and start over. It's odd to me that academia would follow in similar patterns around not having a clear structure for, “Oh, so you're a grad student. You're going to be teaching a class. Here's how to be reasonably effective at it.” Given that higher education was not the place for me, I have very little insight into this. Is that how it plays out?Chris: I don't want to be too unfair to academia as a whole, and actually, I was quite lucky, I was a student at the University of Washington and we had a really great physics education group, so we did actually spend a fair amount of time thinking about effective ways to teach undergraduates and doing this great tutorial system they had there. But my sense was in the field as a whole, for people on the track to become professors at research institutions, there was typically not much in the way of training as a teacher, there was not really a lot of thought about pedagogy or the mechanics of delivering lectures. You know, you're sort of given a box full of chalk and a classroom and said, you know, “You have freshman physics this quarter. The last teacher used this textbook and it seems to be okay,” tended to be the sort of preparation that you would get. You know, and I think it varies institution to institution what kind of support you get, you know, the level of graduate students helping you out, but I think in lots of places in academia, the role of professors as teachers was the second thought, you know, if it was indeed thought at all.And similarly, the role of professors as mentors to graduate students, which, you know, if anything, is sort of their primary job is guiding graduate students through their early career. And again, I mean, much like in software, that was all very ad hoc. You know, and I think there are some similarities in terms of how academics and how tech workers think of themselves as sort of inventing the universe, we're at the forefront, the bleeding edge of human knowledge, and therefore because I'm being innovative in this one particular aspect, I can justify being innovative in all of them. I mean, that's the disruptive thing to do, right?Corey: And it's a shame that you're such a nice person because you would be phenomenal at basically being the most condescending person in all of tech if you wanted to. Because think about this, you have people saying, “Oh, what do you do?” “I'm a full-stack engineer.” And then some of the worst people in the world, of which I admit I used to be one, are, “Oh, full-stack. Really? When's the last time you wrote a device driver?”And you can keep on going at that. You work in particle physics, so you're all, “That's adorable. Hold my tea. When's the last time you created matter from energy?” And yeah, and then it becomes this the—it's very hard to wind up beating you in that particular game of [who'd 00:15:07] wore it better.Chris: Right. One of my fond memories of being a student is back when I got to spend more time thinking about these things and actually still remembered them, you know, in my electoral engineering days and physics days, I really had studied all the way down from the particle physics to semiconductor physics to how to lay out silicon chips and, you know, how to build ALUs and CPUs and whatnot from basic transistor gates. Yeah, and then all the way up to, you know, writing compilers and programming languages. And it really did seem like you could understand all those parts. I couldn't tell you how any of those things work anymore. Sadly, that part of my brain has now taken up with Go's lexical scoping rules and borrow checker fights with Rust. But there was a time when I was a smart person and knew those things.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Strata. Are you struggling to keep up with the demands of managing and securing identity in your distributed enterprise IT environment? You're not alone, but you shouldn't let that hold you back. With Strata's Identity Orchestration Platform, you can secure all your apps on any cloud with any IDP, so your IT teams will never have to refactor for identity again. Imagine modernizing app identity in minutes instead of months, deploying passwordless on any tricky old app, and achieving business resilience with always-on identity, all from one lightweight and flexible platform.Want to see it in action? Share your identity challenge with them on a discovery call and they'll hook you up with a complimentary pair of AirPods Pro. Don't miss out, visit Strata.io/ScreamingCloud. That's Strata dot io slash ScreamingCloud.Corey: I want to go back to what sounded like a throwaway joke at the start of the episode. In seriousness, one of the reasons—at least that I told myself at the time—that I left Maine was that it was pretty clear that there was no significant, lasting opportunity in industry when I was in Maine. In fact, the girl that I was dating at the time in college graduated college, and the paper of record for the state, The Maine Sunday Telegram, which during the week is called The Portland Press Herald, did a front-page story on her about how she went to school on a pulp and paper scholarship, she was valedictorian in her chemical engineering class at the University of Maine and had to leave the state to get a job. And every year they would roll out the governor, whoever that happened to be, to the University of Maine to give a commencement speech that's, “Don't leave Maine, don't leave Maine, don't leave Maine,” but without any real answer to, “Well, for what jobs?”Now, that Covid has been this plague o'er the land that has been devastating society for a while, work-from-home has become much more of a cohesive thing. And an awful lot of companies are fully embracing it. How have you seen Maine change based upon that for one, and for another, how have you found that community has been developed in the local sense because there was none of that in Maine when I was there? Even the brief time where I was visiting for a conference for a week, I saw definite signs of a strong local community in the tech space. What happened? I love it.Chris: It's great. Yeah, so I moved to Maine eight years ago, in 2014. And yeah, I was lucky enough to pretty early on, meet up with a few of the local nerds, and we have a long-running Slack group that I just saw was about to turn nine, so I guess I was there in the early days, called Computers Anonymous. It was a spinoff, I think, from a project somebody else had started in a few other cities. The joke was it was a sort of a confessional group of, you know, we're here to commiserate over our relationships with technology, which all of us have our complaints.Corey: Honestly, tech community is more of a support group than most other areas, I think.Chris: Absolutely. All you have to do is just have name and technology and somebody will pipe up. “Okay, you know, I've a horror story about that one.” But it has over the years turned into, you know, a very active Slack group of people that meet up once a month for beers and chats with each other, and you know, we all know each other's kids. And when the pandemic hit, it was absolutely a lifeline that we were all sort of still talking to each other every day and passing tips of, you know, which restaurants were doing takeout, and you know which ones were doing takeout and takeout booze, and all kinds of local knowledge was being spread around that way.So, it was a lucky thing to have when that hit, we had this community. Because it existed already as this community of, you know, people that were remote workers. And I think over the time that I've been here, I've really seen a growth in people coming here to work somewhere else because it's a lovely place to live, it's a much cheaper place to live than almost anywhere else I've ever been, you know, I think it's pretty attractive to the folks come up from Boston or New York or Connecticut for the summer, and they say, “Ah, you know, this doesn't seem so bad to live.” And then they come here for a winter, and then they think, “Well, okay, maybe I was wrong,” and go back. But I've really enjoyed my time here, and the tools for communicating and working remotely, have really taken off.You know, a decade ago, my first startup—actually, you know, in kind of a similar situation, similar story, we were starting a company in Louisville, Kentucky. It was where we happen to live. We had a tech community there that were asking those same questions. “Why is anybody leaving? Why is everybody leaving?”And we started this company, and we did an accelerator in San Francisco, and every single person we talked to—and this is 2012—said, you have to bring the company to San Francisco. It's the only way you'll ever hire anybody, it's the only way you'll ever raise any money, this is the only place in the world that you could ever possibly run a tech company. And you know, we tried and failed.Corey: Oh, we're one of those innovative industries in the world. We've taken a job that can be done from literally anywhere that has internet access and created a land crunch on eight square miles, located in an earthquake zone.Chris: Exactly. We're going to take a ton of VC money and where to spend 90% of it on rent in the Bay Area. The rent paid back to the LPs of our VC funds, and the circle of life continues.Corey: Oh, yeah. When I started this place as an independent consultant six years ago, I looked around, okay, should I rent space in an office so I have a place where I go and work? And I saw how much it costs to sublet even, like, a closed-door office in an existing tech startup's office space, saw the price tag, laughed myself silly, and nope, nope, nope. Instead installed a door on my home office and got this place set up as a—in my spare room now is transformed into my home office slash recording studio. And yeah, “Well, wasn't it expensive to do that kind of stuff?” Not compared to the first three days of rent in a place like that it wasn't. I feel like that's what's driving a lot of the return to office stories is the sort of, I guess, an expression of the sunk cost fallacy.Chris: Exactly. And it's a variation of nobody ever got fired for choosing IBM, you know? Nobody ever got fired for saying we should work in the office. It's the way we've always done things, people are used to it, and there really are difficulties to collaborating effectively remotely, you know? You do lose something with the lack of day-to-day contact, a lack of in-person contact, people really do get kind of burned out on interacting over screens. But I think there are ways around that and the benefits, in my mind, my experience, you know, working remotely for the last ten years or so, tend to outweigh the costs.Corey: Oh, yeah. If I were 20 years younger, I would absolutely have been much more amenable to staying in the state. There's a lot of things that recommend it. I mean, I don't want people listening to this to think I actually hate Maine. It's become a running joke, but it's also, there was remarkably little opportunity in tech back when I lived there.And now globally, I think we're seeing the rise of opportunity. And that is a line I heard in a talk once that stuck with me that talent is evenly distributed, but opportunity isn't. And there are paths forward now for folks who—I'm told—somehow don't live in that same eight-square miles of the world, where they too can build tech companies and do interesting things and work intelligently with other folks. I mean, the thing that always struck me as so odd before the pandemic was this insistence on, “Oh, we don't allow remote work.” It's, “Well, hang on a minute. Aren't we all telecommuting in from wherever offices happen to be to AWS?” Because I've checked thoroughly, they will not let you work from us-east-1. In fact, they're very strict on that rule.Chris: [laugh]. Yeah. And it's remarkable how long I think the attitude persisted that we can solve any problem except how to work somewhere other than SoMa.Corey: Part of the problem too in the startup space, and one of the things I'm so excited about seeing what you're doing over at Remix Labs, is so many of the tech startups for a long time felt like they were built almost entirely around problems that young, usually single men had in their 20s when they worked in tech and didn't want to deal with the inconveniences of having to take care of themselves. Think food delivery, think laundry services, think dating apps, et cetera, et cetera. It feels like now we're getting into an era where there's a lot of development and focus and funding being aimed at things that are a lot more substantial, like how would we make it possible for someone to build an app internally or externally without making them go to through a trial-by-fire hazing ritual of going to a boot camp for a year first?Chris: Yeah. No, I think that's right. I think there's been an evolution toward building tools for broader problems, for building tools that work for everybody. I think there was a definite startup ouroboros in the, kind of, early days of this past tech boom of so much money being thrown at early-stage startups with a couple of young people building them, and they solved a zillion of their own problems. And there was so much money being thrown at them that they were happy to spend lots of money on the problems that they had, and so it looked like there was this huge market for startups to solve those problems.And I think we'll probably see that dry up a little bit. So, it's nice to get back to what are the problems that the rest of us have. You know, or maybe the rest of you. I can't pretend that I'm not one of those startup people that wants on-demand laundry. But.Corey: Yet you wake up one day and realize, oh, yeah. That does change things a bit. Honestly, one of the weirdest things for me about moving to California from Maine was just the sheer level of convenience in different areas.Chris: Yes.Corey: And part of it is city living, true, but Maine is one those places where if you're traveling somewhere, you're taking a car, full stop. And living in a number of cities like San Francisco, it's, oh great, if I want to order food, there's not, “The restaurant that delivers,” it's, I can have basically anything that I want showing up here within the hour. Just that alone was a weird, transformative moment. I know, I still feel like 20 years in, that I'm “Country Boy Discovers City for the First Time; Loses Goddamn Mind.” Like, that is where I still am. It's still magic. I became an urban creature just by not being one for my formative years.Chris: Yeah. No, I mean, absolutely. I grew up in Ann Arbor, which is sort of a smallish college town, and certainly more urban than the areas around it, but visiting the big city of Detroit or Lansing, it was exciting. And, you know, I got older, I really sort of thought of myself as a city person. And I lived in San Francisco for a while and loved it, and Seattle for a while and loved it.Portland has been a great balance of, there's city; it's a five minute drive from my house that has amazing restaurants and concerts and a great art scene and places to eat and roughly 8000 microbreweries, but it's still a relatively small community. I know a lot of the people here. I sort of drive across town from one end to the other in 20 minutes, pick up my kids from school pretty easily. So, it makes for a nice balance here.Corey: I am very enthused on, well, the idea of growing community in localized places. One thing that I think we did lose a bit during the pandemic was, every conference became online, so therefore, every conference becomes the same and it's all the same crappy Zoom-esque experience. It's oh, it's like work with a slightly different topic, and for once the people on this call can't fire me… directly. So, it's one of those areas of just there's not enough differentiation.I didn't realize until I went back to Monktoberfest a month or so ago at the time at this call recording just how much I'd missed that sense of local community.Chris: Yeah.Corey: Because before that, the only conferences I'd been to since the pandemic hit were big corporate affairs, and yeah, you find community there, but it also is very different element to it, it has a different feeling. It's impossible to describe unless you've been to some of these community conferences, I think.Chris: Yeah. I mean, I think a smallish conference like that where you see a lot of the same people every year—credit to Steven, the whole RedMonk team for Monktoberfest—that they put on such a great show that every year, you see lots and lots of faces that you've seen the last several because everybody knows it's such a great conference, they come right back. And so, it becomes kind of a community. As I've gotten older a year between meetings doesn't seem like that long time anymore, so these are the friends I see from time to time, and you know, we have a Slack who chat from time to time. So, finding those ways to sort of cultivate small groups that are in regular contact and have that kind of specific environment and culture to them within the broader industry, I think has been super valuable, I think. To me, certainly.Corey: I really enjoyed so much of what has come out of the pandemic in some ways, which sounds like a weird thing to say, but I'm trying to find the silver linings where I can. I recently met someone who'd worked here with me for a year-and-a-half that I'd never met in person. Other people that I'd spoken to at length for the last few years in various capacity, I finally meet them in person and, “Huh. Somehow it never came up in conversation that they're six foot eight.” Like, “Yeah, okay/ that definitely is one of those things that you notice about them in person.” Ah, but here we are.I really want to thank you for spending as much time as you have to talk about what you're up to, what your experiences have been like. If people want to learn more, where's the best place for them to find you? And please don't say Maine.Chris: [laugh]. Well, as of this recording, you can find me on Twitter at @chrisvermilion, V-E-R-M-I-L-I-O-N. That's probably easiest.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:28:53]. Thank you so much for being so generous with your time. I appreciate it.Chris: No, thanks for having me on. This was fun.Corey: Chris Vermilion, Senior Software Developer at Remix Labs. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment, and since you're presumably from Maine when writing that comment, be sure to ask a grown-up to help you with the more difficult spellings of some of the words.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
Early 2023 IDP Rankings | SGPN Fantasy Football (Ep. 290)

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 43:21


It's those early top-tier NFL defensive players with the top 5 at each base position for standard formats. And general redraft leagues this off-season across the board. Join Gary and John as they talk about Maxx Crosby, Brian Burns, C.J. Mosley, Budda Baker, and more higher-end IDP targets. And don't miss the Kwity Paye and George Karlaftis projecting. Things are going to get interesting fast for both of them. So the question is, who are you letting it ride with? Linebackers (02:11) Safety (10:29) Defensive Lineman/Edge - Paye/Karlaftis (25:55) Playoff Picks (39:12) ===================================================== SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app Check out SGPN.TV   Support us by supporting our partners WynnBET - Bet $100 and get a $100! - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Underdog Fantasy code SGPN - 100% Deposit Match up to $100 - https://sg.pn/underdog FFPC Playoff Challenge - $25 promo off first FFPC entry of $35 or more - https://sg.pn/ffpc Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Discord - https://sg.pn/discord  Reddit - https://sg.pn/reddit ===================================================== Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Burmese Morning Broadcast
အာဏာသိမ်းမှုနောက်ပိုင်း အိမ်နီးချင်းနိုင်ငံတွေထဲ ခိုလှုံနေရသူ ၁.၁သန်းနီးပါးရှိလာ

Burmese Morning Broadcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 10:26


အာဏာသိမ်းမှုနောက်ပိုင်း အိမ်နီးချင်းနိုင်ငံတွေထဲ ခိုလှုံနေရသူ ၁.၁သန်းနီးပါးရှိလာ - တကျော့ပြန်အာဏာသိမ်းမှုနောက်ပိုင်း အိမ်နီးချင်းနိုင်ငံတွေထဲ ခိုလှုံနေရသူ တစ်သန်းနဲ့ ရှစ်သောင်းခြောက်ထောင် ဝန်းကျင်ထိအောင် ရှိလာပြီး၊ ပြည်တွင်း IDP အရေအတွက်လည်း တစ်သန်းခွဲအထက်ကို ရောက်သွားကြောင်း ကုလကိန်းဂဏန်းတွေကဆို - စစ်ကိုင်း၊ ပုလဲမြို့နယ်ထဲ ရဲစခန်းအတိုက်ခံရလို့ ဘေးဝန်းကျင်ရွာတွေကို လက်တုံ့ပြန် မီးရှို့နေတာ အနည်းဆုံး ၇ ရွာ အရှို့ခံထားရ - ယူကရိန်းအရှေ့ဘက်ခြမ်း တိုက်ခိုက်နေတဲ့ ရုရှားကြေးစားတပ် ဗာ့ဂနာရဲ့ တပ်မှူးတစ်ယောက် နော်ဝေနိုင်ငံမှာ ခိုလှုံခွင့်တောင်း - လန်ဒန်မြို့တော်ရဲတပ်ဖွဲ့မှာ အမှုထမ်းနေတုန်း မုဒိန်းမှု နှစ်ဒါဇင် အပါအဝင် ကျူးလွန်မှုပေါင်း ၄၉ မှုအတွက် အပြစ်ရှိကြောင်း သေနတ်ကိုင် ရဲအမှုထမ်း ဒေးဗစ်ကဲရစ် ဖြောင့်ချက် ပေးပြီးတဲ့နောက်၊ ကျူးလွန်စော်ကားမှုတွေ ပြုလုပ်ထားလားဆိုပြီး စုံစမ်းစစ်ဆေး ခံနေရသူ ရဲအမှုထမ်း အယောက် ၈၀၀ ဝန်းကျင်ရှိတယ်လို့ ရဲကော်မရှင်နာမင်းကြီး ဝန်ခံပြောဆို - ဆိုမာလီယာမှာ အစ္စလမ်မစ်လက်နက်ကိုင် အယ်လ်ရှာဘတ်တွေ ဆယ်စုနှစ်နဲ့ချီ ထိန်းချုပ်ထားတဲ့ ဗျူဟာမြောက် ဆိပ်ကမ်းမြို့ကို အစိုးရတပ် ပြသိမ်း၊ အယ်လ်ရှာဘတ်တွေ အတွက် အဓိက ထောက်ပို့ရေးလမ်းကြောင်း ပြတ်သွားလို့ အတော်လေး အထိနာသွား ..... စတဲ့ မြန်မာနဲ့ ကမ္ဘာက နောက်ဆုံးရ သတင်းတွေကို ရှုစားနားဆင်နိုင်ပါပြီ။ မနက်ပိုင်း ပေါ့ဒ်ကတ်စ် ရယူရန် - https://www.bbc.com/burmese/media-45625862 ညပိုင်း ပေါ့ဒ်ကတ်စ် ရယူရန် - https://www.bbc.com/burmese/media-45625858 ယူကျု - http://youtube.com/thebbcburmese အင်စတာဂရမ် - https://www.instagram.com/bbcburmese/ ဝက်ဘ်ဆိုက် - https://www.bbcburmese.com

SGPN Fantasy Football Podcast
Early 2023 IDP Rankings | SGPN Fantasy Football (Ep. 290)

SGPN Fantasy Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 43:21


It's those early top-tier NFL defensive players with the top 5 at each base position for standard formats. And general redraft leagues this off-season across the board. Join Gary and John as they talk about Maxx Crosby, Brian Burns, C.J. Mosley, Budda Baker, and more higher-end IDP targets. And don't miss the Kwity Paye and George Karlaftis projecting. Things are going to get interesting fast for both of them. So the question is, who are you letting it ride with? Linebackers (02:11) Safety (10:29) Defensive Lineman/Edge - Paye/Karlaftis (25:55) Playoff Picks (39:12) ===================================================== SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app Check out SGPN.TV   Support us by supporting our partners WynnBET - Bet $100 and get a $100! - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Underdog Fantasy code SGPN - 100% Deposit Match up to $100 - https://sg.pn/underdog FFPC Playoff Challenge - $25 promo off first FFPC entry of $35 or more - https://sg.pn/ffpc Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Discord - https://sg.pn/discord  Reddit - https://sg.pn/reddit ===================================================== Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

In This League
1/14 Hour 2: Defensive Prospects, NFL Draft Preview, & More

In This League

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 46:04


In This League Fantasy Football
2023 War Room Episode 5 - Defensive Players First Look

In This League Fantasy Football

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 90:49


The Top 18 picks are locked in now that the regular season is over and Bogman and CK take a look at where everyone is and possible picks for the Top 5! We also take a look at the Top defensive prospects after Bogman does a sales pitch for IDP and team needs on the defensive side!Follow us on Twitter - @BogmanSports @CopiepsCheck out the ITL Patreon - Patreon.com/ITLArmy

FANTASY
Getting You Ready for Week 17 (2022)

FANTASY

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 37:24


Jorge and Keith get you ready for Week 17 (2022) by discussing some of their plays and fades on offense.

The Fantasy Points Podcast
2022 IDP Corner: Week 17 Preview

The Fantasy Points Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 21:14


Justin Varnes (@downwithIDP) and Tom Simons look at each Week 17 game and positions on the defensive side and for IDP leagues.

SGPN Fantasy Football Podcast
Week 17 IDP Fantasy Football Preview | SGPN Fantasy Football (Ep. 277)

SGPN Fantasy Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 53:43


John and Gary wrap up their playoff coverage with those deep dart throws and the hottest NFL topics. Setting the stage for week 17 of the fantasy football playoffs. On tap, Monty Rice, Jordan Hicks, Buddha Baker, and Deion Jones to just name a few. So come close out the season with a bang as the guys set up IDP managers to bring home those Championship rings. ===================================================== SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app Check out SGPN.TV   Support us by supporting our partners WynnBET - Bet $100 and get a $100 FREE bet! - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Discord - https://sg.pn/discord  Reddit - https://sg.pn/reddit ===================================================== Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
Week 17 IDP Fantasy Football Preview | SGPN Fantasy Football (Ep. 277)

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 53:43


John and Gary wrap up their playoff coverage with those deep dart throws and the hottest NFL topics. Setting the stage for week 17 of the fantasy football playoffs. On tap, Monty Rice, Jordan Hicks, Buddha Baker, and Deion Jones to just name a few. So come close out the season with a bang as the guys set up IDP managers to bring home those Championship rings. ===================================================== SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app Check out SGPN.TV   Support us by supporting our partners WynnBET - Bet $100 and get a $100 FREE bet! - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Discord - https://sg.pn/discord  Reddit - https://sg.pn/reddit ===================================================== Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Footballguys.com - The Audible - Fantasy Football Info for Serious Fans
Week 17 Situations to Monitor - The IDP Blitz - Fantasy Football 2022

Footballguys.com - The Audible - Fantasy Football Info for Serious Fans

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 15:15 Very Popular


Sigmund Bloom and Matt Schauf talk IDP fantasy football. TIME STAMPS 0:50 Can Denzel Perryman's replacement help you IDP leagues 2:15 Is there a Dallas linebacker to play in place of Leighton Vander Esch 3:30 Denico Autry's performance in his first week back 6:04 Devin Lloyd vs. Chad Muma 7:10 The weekly Browns linebacker update   Save Time, Worry Less and Win More with Footballguys: https://www.footballguys.com ​ Join our FREE Daily Email Update for the Fantasy news you need to know: https://join.footballguys.com/emailup... Follow our hosts on Twitter! Sigmund Bloom: https://twitter.com/SigmundBloom   Footballguys Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fbgfantasy/​​ Footballguys Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/footballguys/​​ Footballguys Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/footballguys/   watch on YouTube -> https://youtu.be/ImozMUdmjD8

The Individual Defensive Podcast
Episode 48 - Week 17 Preview

The Individual Defensive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 39:47


Bogman and Gary break down the action from Week 16, give you an update on some injuries, recommend some players to add/drop and talk about the big trades from the deadline!Please Follow us on Twitter!! @BogmanSports @IDPSharksCheck out the ITL Patreon patreon.com/ITLarmy

The Big 3 IDP Podcast
Week 17 Preview: Josh Sweat is Poised to Be Our Playoff MVP

The Big 3 IDP Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 122:34


Fresh off Christmas and looking forward to a new year, Josh and Adam reunite with Canada's finest, Jon Macri, for a Week 17 preview. The Pride of PFF joins the boys to talk through every matchup and all the relevant IDP pieces for championship week, including some riskier plays, some guys we're starting with confidence, and some players we'd rather sit down with everything on the line. The trio also covers the dynasty outlook for several IDPs, so no matter where your season is at right now, we've got you covered. Good luck this week and we'll see you in 2023! If you'd like to support the show, you can do so over at TheIDPShow.com. We've got some premium features for paid subscribers that we think you'll enjoy. Follow us on Twitter @theidpshow, check out our YouTube page, and be sure to give us a 5-star rating and review on Apple Podcasts and Spotify. Thanks for listening!

Fantasy Football Today Podcast
Waiver Wire! Allgeier, Dotson, Mike White and More! (12/27 Fantasy Football Podcast)

Fantasy Football Today Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 58:26 Very Popular


Fantasy Football Today is available for free on the Audacy app as well as Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher and wherever else you listen to podcasts.  Need to hit the waiver wire to win your Fantasy championship? We've got some good options at each position for you. Jamey and Dave give you their top priorities (2:40) which include Mike White, Gardner Minshew, Jahan Dotson, Tyler Allgeier and Greg Dortch ... News and notes (11:15) and the top three priorities at each position: QB (22:40), RB (27:30), WR (29:30), TE (31:35), DST (32:30) and Kicker. Should Justin Fields managers be making backup plans this weekend? Do we like Brock Purdy this week? Chuba Hubbard? Richie James? Tyler Higbee? Noah Fant? ... Recapping Colts-Chargers (33:22) and taking a longer look at the waiver wire (36:05) with a few IDP names at the end (54:15) ... Email us at fantasyfootball@cbsi.com Follow our FFT team on Twitter: @FFToday, @AdamAizer, @JameyEisenberg, @daverichard, @heathcummingssr, @ctowerscbs Follow the brand new FFT TikTok account: https://www.tiktok.com/@fftoday Watch FFT on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/fantasyfootballtoday Get 20% off Fantasy Football Today merch: https://store.cbssports.com/collections/fantasy-football-today%20?utm_source=podcast-apple-com&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=buy-our-merch&utm_content=fantasy-football-collection Join our Facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/FantasyFootballToday/ Sign up for the FFT newsletter https://www.cbssports.com/newsletter You can listen to Fantasy Football Today on your smart speakers! Simply say "Alexa, play the latest episode of the Fantasy Football Today podcast" or "Hey Google, play the latest episode of the Fantasy Football Today podcast." To hear more from the CBS Sports Podcast Network, visit https://www.cbssports.com/podcasts/ To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

IDP Guys' Podcast
The BEST IDP & Offensive Waiver Wire Picks & Targets for Week 17

IDP Guys' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 79:30


In this video, IDP Guys fantasy football expert Michael Sicoli (@Michael__Sicoli) is joined this week by co-host Axton Harding (@Harding_3), and they are going to be looking at some of the IDP and offensive waiver wire targets and pickups for Week 17. Whether you're in a league that uses IDP or not, these pickups will help you improve your team. We'll also be looking at some of the Fantasy Football waiver wire targets and pickups for Week 17. Whether you're in a league that uses fantasy points or not, these pickups will help you improve your team. So be sure to check out this video, and let us help you improve your team for Week 17! Nakobe Dean giveaway: https://www.idpguys.org/nakobe-dean-youtube-giveaway/ Twitter The IDPGuys: @IDPGuys Website: IDPGuys.org Times: Defense for the first 30, Offense for the last 30! Order DL LB DB Waiver Wire Questions QB RB WR TE Waiver Wire Questions --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/idpguys/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/idpguys/support

The Fantasy Points Podcast
2022 IDP Corner: Week 16 Preview

The Fantasy Points Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 21:49


Justin Varnes (@downwithIDP) and Tom Simons look at each Week 16 game and positions on the defensive side and for IDP leagues.

SGPN Fantasy Football Podcast
Week 16 IDP Fantasy Football Preview | SGPN Fantasy Football (Ep. 269)

SGPN Fantasy Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 43:38


John and Gary bring on a few more deep dart throws and cover all that's notable from week 15 for our IDP prep in week 16. It's the fantasy football NFL defensive podcast that's tackling it all this week, from Chandler Jones's touchdown to Jaylin Smith's surfacing. Including all the normal stud warnings on guys like Patrick Queen and Roqaun Smith. Because we are IDP reporting and prepping, with all of the hard work done for you, and it's all wrapped up in one with john and Gary in the week 16 IDPro Players Podcast. ===================================================== SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app Check out SGPN.TV   Support us by supporting our partners WynnBET - Bet $100 and get a $100 FREE bet! - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Discord - https://sg.pn/discord  Reddit - https://sg.pn/reddit ===================================================== Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
Week 16 IDP Fantasy Football Preview | SGPN Fantasy Football (Ep. 269)

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 43:38


John and Gary bring on a few more deep dart throws and cover all that's notable from week 15 for our IDP prep in week 16. It's the fantasy football NFL defensive podcast that's tackling it all this week, from Chandler Jones's touchdown to Jaylin Smith's surfacing. Including all the normal stud warnings on guys like Patrick Queen and Roqaun Smith. Because we are IDP reporting and prepping, with all of the hard work done for you, and it's all wrapped up in one with john and Gary in the week 16 IDPro Players Podcast. ===================================================== SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app Check out SGPN.TV   Support us by supporting our partners WynnBET - Bet $100 and get a $100 FREE bet! - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Discord - https://sg.pn/discord  Reddit - https://sg.pn/reddit ===================================================== Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Footballguys.com - The Audible - Fantasy Football Info for Serious Fans
The IDP Blitz Week 16 Preview with the IDP Show

Footballguys.com - The Audible - Fantasy Football Info for Serious Fans

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 67:43


Sigmund Bloom joins with The IDP Show to discuss Week 16 Matchups and Plays. TIME STAMPS 0:00 Week 16 Preview 1:35 DL Starts 17:40 DB Starts 29:20 LB Starts 45:50 What the Heck Flex Save Time, Worry Less and Win More with Footballguys: https://www.footballguys.com​ Join our FREE Daily Email Update for the Fantasy news you need to know: https://join.footballguys.com/emailup... Follow our hosts on Twitter! Sigmund Bloom: https://twitter.com/SigmundBloom Footballguys Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fbgfantasy/​​ Footballguys Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/footballguys/​​ Footballguys Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/footballguys/   watch on YouTube -> https://youtu.be/hbXhksH_hcs

Fantasy Football Today Podcast
Waiver Wire! Minshew, Purdy, Moss and More (12/20 Fantasy Football Podcast)

Fantasy Football Today Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 68:48 Very Popular


Fantasy Football Today is available for free on the Audacy app as well as Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher and wherever else you listen to podcasts.  Is Gardner Minshew going to carry your Fantasy team to victory? We'll give you our top priorities (3:10) for Week 16 and discuss Brock Purdy, Zack Moss, Treylon Burks and many more. Also, weather could be a big factor this week (12:10) ... News and notes (17:15) and our top priorities at each position: QB (19:15), RB (22:10), WR (26:00), TE (28:24) DST (30:30) and Kicker. Plus we give you options in shallow leagues (32:30) like Daniel Jones and Zay Jones and options in deeper leagues (37:35) including Marquise Goodwin, plus IDP waiver wire options (39:50) ... Recapping Rams-Packers (42:00) and taking a longer look at the waiver wire (44:15) ... Email us at fantasyfootball@cbsi.com Follow our FFT team on Twitter: @FFToday, @AdamAizer, @JameyEisenberg, @daverichard, @heathcummingssr, @ctowerscbs Follow the brand new FFT TikTok account: https://www.tiktok.com/@fftoday Watch FFT on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/fantasyfootballtoday Get 20% off Fantasy Football Today merch: https://store.cbssports.com/collections/fantasy-football-today%20?utm_source=podcast-apple-com&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=buy-our-merch&utm_content=fantasy-football-collection Join our Facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/FantasyFootballToday/ Sign up for the FFT newsletter https://www.cbssports.com/newsletter You can listen to Fantasy Football Today on your smart speakers! Simply say "Alexa, play the latest episode of the Fantasy Football Today podcast" or "Hey Google, play the latest episode of the Fantasy Football Today podcast." To hear more from the CBS Sports Podcast Network, visit https://www.cbssports.com/podcasts/ To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

IDP Guys' Podcast
The BEST IDP & Offensive Waiver Wire Picks & Targets for Week 16

IDP Guys' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 72:19


In this video, IDP Guys fantasy football expert Michael Sicoli (@Michael__Sicoli) is joined this week by co-host Axton Harding (@Harding_3), and they are going to be looking at some of the IDP and offensive waiver wire targets and pickups for Week 16. Whether you're in a league that uses IDP or not, these pickups will help you improve your team. We'll also be looking at some of the Fantasy Football waiver wire targets and pickups for Week 16. Whether you're in a league that uses fantasy points or not, these pickups will help you improve your team. So be sure to check out this video, and let us help you improve your team for Week 16! Nakobe Dean giveaway: https://www.idpguys.org/nakobe-dean-youtube-giveaway/ Twitter The IDPGuys: @IDPGuys Website: IDPGuys.org Times: Defense for the first 30, Offense for the last 30! Order DL LB DB IDP Waiver Wire Questions QB RB WR TE Offensive Waiver Wire Questions --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/idpguys/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/idpguys/support

The Fantasy Points Podcast
2022 IDP Corner: Week 15 Preview

The Fantasy Points Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 20:54


Justin Varnes (@downwithIDP) and Tom Simons look at each Week 15 game and positions on the defensive side and for IDP leagues.

The Big 3 IDP Podcast
Week 15 Preview: Will You Be Sorry if You Bench Ojulari?

The Big 3 IDP Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 75:32


It's Round 1 of the fantasy playoffs! To get you ready, Bobby and Joey the Tooth partner up to give a letter grade to every single relevant IDP player in Week 15. Each player gets either an A (solid start), B (preferred backup), C (break glass in case of an emergency), D (not considering starting, just on the radar), or F (lol, no) grade to help you make those tough start/sit decisions. From linebackers and safeties to defensive tackles and cornerbacks, our dynamic duo leaves no stone unturned. Be sure to check out Joey's work over at Footballguys. If you'd like to support the show, you can do so over at TheIDPShow.com. We've got some premium features for paid subscribers that we think you'll enjoy. Follow us on Twitter @theidpshow, check out our YouTube page, and be sure to give us a 5-star rating and review on Apple Podcasts and Spotify. Thanks for listening!

Footballguys.com - The Audible - Fantasy Football Info for Serious Fans
Week 15 Matchup Wisdom - IDP Blitz - Fantasy Football 2022

Footballguys.com - The Audible - Fantasy Football Info for Serious Fans

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 13:36


Sigmund Bloom and Gary Davenport talk IDP fantasy football. TIME STAMPS 0:50 Is there a Cleveland linebacker can we count on 2:50 How to decipher the value of Tennessee linebackers 5:00 Who is the most valuable Giants linebacker 8:45 Why you might want to play a Colts edge rusher in the playoffs 10:00 Which linebacker playoff schedules are the best Save Time, Worry Less and Win More with Footballguys: https://www.footballguys.com ​ Join our FREE Daily Email Update for the Fantasy news you need to know: https://join.footballguys.com/emailup... Follow our hosts on Twitter! Sigmund Bloom: https://twitter.com/SigmundBloom Footballguys Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fbgfantasy/​​ Footballguys Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/footballguys/​​ Footballguys Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/footballguys/   watch on YouTube -> https://youtu.be/OmTDjEJf4kc

The Big 3 IDP Podcast
Week 14 Recap: Josh Uche Does His Best Matt Judon Impression

The Big 3 IDP Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 78:25


The fantasy football regular season is a wrap and the Big 3 bid it farewell with one final recap episode in 2023, highlighting the standout (and subpar) IDP performances from Week 14. The trio goes game by game, giving love to guys like Frankie Luvu, Josey Jewell, Josh Uche, Aidan Hutchinson, and Azeez Ojulari who've come on as of late, and asking themselves how much they trust riskier assets as we head into the first round of the fantasy playoffs. Be sure to stick around the next couple weeks, as the guys will welcome in Sigmund Bloom (Week 16) and Jon Macri (Week 17) to help prepare you for a championship run! If you'd like to support the show, you can do so over at TheIDPShow.com. We've got some premium features for paid subscribers that we think you'll enjoy. Follow us on Twitter @theidpshow, check out our YouTube page, and be sure to give us a 5-star rating and review on Apple Podcasts and Spotify. Thanks for listening!

Fantasy Football Today Podcast
Waiver Wire! Mike White, Pierre Strong, Zay Jones (12/13 Fantasy Football Podcast)

Fantasy Football Today Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 69:32


Are we ready to trust the Jets and Jaguars in our Fantasy playoffs? After we react to the Patriots-Cardinals injuries (2:30) we'll give you our top waiver wire priorities (4:08)! Mike White could be great this week, but do we trust D.J. Chark and Zay Jones with potentially tough matchups? Also, be aware of some tough tight end matchups this week (10:10) ... News and notes (12:30) and our top priorities at each position: QB (15:55), RB (21:05), WR (22:55), TE (30:30), DST (33:35), Kicker and IDP. Should you start Brock Purdy, Jerick McKinnon, Elijah Moore or Evan Engram this week? What about Chuba Hubbard and Chris Moore? ... Options in shallow leagues (36:50), deep leagues (39:15), stashes for Week 16 (43:30), a recap of the Patriots-Cardinals game (45:50) and more waiver wire talk (48:00) ... Email us at fantasyfootball@cbsi.com Follow our FFT team on Twitter: @FFToday, @AdamAizer, @JameyEisenberg, @daverichard, @heathcummingssr, @ctowerscbs Follow the brand new FFT TikTok account: https://www.tiktok.com/@fftoday Watch FFT on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/fantasyfootballtoday Get 20% off Fantasy Football Today merch: https://store.cbssports.com/collections/fantasy-football-today%20?utm_source=podcast-apple-com&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=buy-our-merch&utm_content=fantasy-football-collection Join our Facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/FantasyFootballToday/ Sign up for the FFT newsletter https://www.cbssports.com/newsletter You can listen to Fantasy Football Today on your smart speakers! Simply say "Alexa, play the latest episode of the Fantasy Football Today podcast" or "Hey Google, play the latest episode of the Fantasy Football Today podcast." To hear more from the CBS Sports Podcast Network, visit https://www.cbssports.com/podcasts/ To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Footballguys.com - The Audible - Fantasy Football Info for Serious Fans
Risers and Fallers for IDP Dynasty - IDP Blitz - Fantasy Football 2022

Footballguys.com - The Audible - Fantasy Football Info for Serious Fans

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 71:15


Sigmund Bloom joins with The IDP Show to talk about risers and fallers for IDP Dynasty in 2022. TIME STAMPS 1:12 How do you balance winning now vs. winning later? 8:38 What do you go after in dynasty trades? 23:53 Fallers 49:15 Risers Save Time, Worry Less and Win More with Footballguys: https://www.footballguys.com​ Join our FREE Daily Email Update for the Fantasy news you need to know: https://join.footballguys.com/emailup... Follow our hosts on Twitter! Sigmund Bloom: https://twitter.com/SigmundBloom Footballguys Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fbgfantasy/​​ Footballguys Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/footballguys/​​ Footballguys Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/footballguys/   watch on YouTube -> https://youtu.be/pUThGj_OQqU

Footballguys.com - The Audible - Fantasy Football Info for Serious Fans
Players on the Rise - IDP Blitz - Fantasy Football 2022

Footballguys.com - The Audible - Fantasy Football Info for Serious Fans

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 17:06


Sigmund Bloom and John Norton talk IDP fantasy football. TIME STAMPS 1:05 Chad Muma has momentum 4:25 Who will start for Atlanta after the bye 5:50 Who is the Cleveland Browns linebacker we want to have 8:30 Will Nakobe Dean help us win our leagues? 12:45 Is Romeo Okwara arriving in time to matter in IDP leagues? Save Time, Worry Less and Win More with Footballguys: https://www.footballguys.com​ Join our FREE Daily Email Update for the Fantasy news you need to know: https://join.footballguys.com/emailup... Follow our hosts on Twitter! Sigmund Bloom: https://twitter.com/SigmundBloom Footballguys Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fbgfantasy/​​ Footballguys Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/footballguys/​​ Footballguys Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/footballguys/   watch on YouTube -> https://youtu.be/sybopzCQICE

Fantasy Football Today Podcast
Waiver Wire (12/06 Fantasy Football Podcast)

Fantasy Football Today Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 67:33


What injuries are we keeping an eye on as we get ready for Week 14 (3:10) and who are our top waiver wire priorities (4:22)? Is James Cook about to become a Fantasy starter? Can we trust Cam Akers? Nico Collins? Tyler Huntley? ... More news and notes (11:08) and the top three players at each position: QB (14:30), RB (18:50), WR (22:00), TE (23:30), DST (25:10), Kicker and IDP. We love Jared Goff if he is available. Greg Dulcich could have a big week and the Seahawks backfield might give us a streaming option ... Options in deep (29:40) and shallow (34:45) leagues, a recap of Saints-Bucs (37:40), the Dropometer (44:40) and a longer look at the waiver wire (46:50) ... Email us at fantasyfootball@cbsi.com Follow our FFT team on Twitter: @FFToday, @AdamAizer, @JameyEisenberg, @daverichard, @heathcummingssr, @ctowerscbs Follow the brand new FFT TikTok account: https://www.tiktok.com/@fftoday Watch FFT on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/fantasyfootballtoday Get 20% off Fantasy Football Today merch: https://store.cbssports.com/collections/fantasy-football-today%20?utm_source=podcast-apple-com&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=buy-our-merch&utm_content=fantasy-football-collection Join our Facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/FantasyFootballToday/ Sign up for the FFT newsletter https://www.cbssports.com/newsletter You can listen to Fantasy Football Today on your smart speakers! Simply say "Alexa, play the latest episode of the Fantasy Football Today podcast" or "Hey Google, play the latest episode of the Fantasy Football Today podcast." To hear more from the CBS Sports Podcast Network, visit https://www.cbssports.com/podcasts/ To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Footballguys.com - The Audible - Fantasy Football Info for Serious Fans
Linebackers That Can Help You Win - IDP Blitz - Fantasy Football 2022

Footballguys.com - The Audible - Fantasy Football Info for Serious Fans

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 14:21


Sigmund Bloom and Matt Schauf talk IDP fantasy football. TIME STAMPS 1:00 Would we rather have Chad Muma or Devin Lloyd 3:45 Cody Barton Playing Time Update 6:35 Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah the most valuable Browns linebacker 8:30 Why have Ernest Jones tackle totals gone up 10:20 Is Marcus Williams ready to play Save Time, Worry Less and Win More with Footballguys: https://www.footballguys.com​ Join our FREE Daily Email Update for the Fantasy news you need to know: https://join.footballguys.com/emailup... Follow our hosts on Twitter! Sigmund Bloom: https://twitter.com/SigmundBloom Footballguys Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fbgfantasy/​​ Footballguys Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/footballguys/​​ Footballguys Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/footballguys/   watch on YouTube -> https://youtu.be/5uruco1jVPI

Fantasy Football Today Podcast
Waiver Wire: Knight, Snell, Zay Jones and More (11/29 Fantasy Football Podcast)

Fantasy Football Today Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 72:37


Late in the show we get an important update on Josh Jacobs (1:03:35) and tell you how to rank Zamir White in your waiver wire priorities. But first, let's give you the top priorities for Week 13 (4:00) with a lot of running back talk. Do we prefer Benny Snell or Zonovan Knight? What role could James Robinson and Jaylen Warren play? How much do we like Zay Jones? ... News and notes (19:05), some FAB talk (22:40) and the top three players at each position: QB (24:40), RB (25:30), WR (28:05), TE (32:23), DST (34:35), Kicker and IDP. Take a look at Jared Goff, Jordan Mason, Treylon Burks and Tyler Conklin this week ... Options in shallow leagues (40:00) and deep leagues (42:15), a recap of Steelers-Colts (46:00), the Dropometer (49:00) and a longer look at the waiver wire at each position (51:15) ... Email us at fantasyfootball@cbsi.com Follow our FFT team on Twitter: @FFToday, @AdamAizer, @JameyEisenberg, @daverichard, @heathcummingssr, @ctowerscbs Follow the brand new FFT TikTok account: https://www.tiktok.com/@fftoday Watch FFT on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/fantasyfootballtoday Get 20% off Fantasy Football Today merch: https://store.cbssports.com/collections/fantasy-football-today%20?utm_source=podcast-apple-com&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=buy-our-merch&utm_content=fantasy-football-collection Join our Facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/FantasyFootballToday/ Sign up for the FFT newsletter https://www.cbssports.com/newsletter You can listen to Fantasy Football Today on your smart speakers! Simply say "Alexa, play the latest episode of the Fantasy Football Today podcast" or "Hey Google, play the latest episode of the Fantasy Football Today podcast." To hear more from the CBS Sports Podcast Network, visit https://www.cbssports.com/podcasts/ To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Fantasy Football Today Podcast
Waiver Wire! Latavius, Burks, Perine and More (11/22 Fantasy Football Podcast)

Fantasy Football Today Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 69:46


Latavius Murray could help you rest of season while Samaje Perine might be more of a Week 12 rental. Those are two of the headliners as we tell you the top priorities for Week 12 (2:40), go through all of the big news (6:35) and talk FAB (17:00) while expanding on Latavius Murray's value ... Shallow league (23:30) and deep league (27:15) options. Check for Derek Carr and Darnell Mooney in shallow leagues. In deep leagues, Greg Dortch and Skyy Moore could be options ... We get much deeper into the waiver wire at QB (32:50), RB (40:40), WR (45:15) ,TE (55:40), DST (59:40), Kicker and IDP. We'll talk about Ryan Tannehill, Jerick McKinnon, Cam Akers, Donovan Peoples-Jones, Treylon Burks, Demarcus Robinson, Evan Engram and everyone else you need to know about. Then we recap 49ers-Cardinals to end the show (1:02:30) ... Email us at fantasyfootball@cbsi.com Follow our FFT team on Twitter: @FFToday, @AdamAizer, @JameyEisenberg, @daverichard, @heathcummingssr, @ctowerscbs Follow the brand new FFT TikTok account: https://www.tiktok.com/@fftoday Watch FFT on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/fantasyfootballtoday Get 20% off Fantasy Football Today merch: https://store.cbssports.com/collections/fantasy-football-today%20?utm_source=podcast-apple-com&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=buy-our-merch&utm_content=fantasy-football-collection Join our Facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/FantasyFootballToday/ Sign up for the FFT newsletter https://www.cbssports.com/newsletter You can listen to Fantasy Football Today on your smart speakers! Simply say "Alexa, play the latest episode of the Fantasy Football Today podcast" or "Hey Google, play the latest episode of the Fantasy Football Today podcast." To hear more from the CBS Sports Podcast Network, visit https://www.cbssports.com/podcasts/ To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices