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Best podcasts about mines

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Latest podcast episodes about mines

Industrial Theory
A Conversation with StoneAge Inc. Co-Founder, John Wolgamott

Industrial Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 42:08


Guest:   John Wolgamott is the  co-founder of StoneAge Inc. Established in 1979 in Durango, Colorado,  StoneAge has grown to be the world's leading provider of high-pressure waterblasting equipment, automated solutions, and services. John is a charter member of the Waterjet Technology Association and served on its Board of Directors since its founding in 1983 until 2011. He is a co-inventor of several patented tools, has authored numerous research papers, and has presented instructional sessions on waterjet applications at WJTA conferences. John graduated from the University of Colorado's School of Engineering and did graduate work at the Colorado School of Mines. Episode in a Tweet:  Kerry Siggins  interviews  John Wolgamott,  co-founder of StoneAge Inc., about the company's journey from a garage in 1979 to becoming the world's leading provider of high-pressure waterblast equipment, accessories, and automated solutions. Summary:   Host Kerry Siggins is joined by John Wolgamott,  co-founder of StoneAge Inc. John details starting the company alongside co-founder, Jerry Zink, with a “waterjet rock drill” used for uranium mining, and its subsequent pivot towards manufacturing rotary tools and automated equipment for the industrial cleaning industry. He describes how their mutual focus on taking care of customer needs has helped guide the business's growth internationally as well as its product development evolution. John explains why StoneAge became an employee-owned company and his passion for growing the Employee Stock Ownership Program further. Kerry and John discuss frequently asked questions including where the name “StoneAge” came from, why the company has never developed a pump, and why its headquarters is firmly located in Durango. Plus, John shares his vision for the industry and the role StoneAge plays in delivering the next generation of smarter, safer industrial cleaning equipment.

Appels sur l'actualité
Appels sur l'actualité - [2] Émission spéciale : Rompre avec la malédiction des matières premières

Appels sur l'actualité

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 20:00


Les sous-sols du continent africain sont parmi les plus riches du monde mais cette richesse profite peu aux populations. Est-ce le cas au Mali ? A qui profite donc cette manne ? Comment rendre plus transparente la gestion des ressources naturelles ? Invités :  - Lamine Seydou Traoré, ministre malien des Mines, de l'Energie et de l'Eau - Nouhoum Diakité, juriste environnementaliste, coordinateur de la branche malienne de l'organisation internationale « Publiez Ce Que Vous Payez » - Samba Touré, consultant, 40 ans d'expérience dans le secteur minier au sein de plusieurs multinationales australiennes et sud-africaines comme BHP Minerals, Anglogold, Randgold * Par téléphone : de France : 09 693 693 70 de l'étranger : 33 9 693 693 70 * Par WhatsApp : +33 6 89 28 53 64 N'OUBLIEZ PAS DE NOUS COMMUNIQUER VOTRE NUMÉRO DE TÉLÉPHONE (avec l'indicatif pays). Pour nous suivre : * Facebook : Rfi appels sur l'actualité * Twitter : @AppelsActu

Appels sur l'actualité
Appels sur l'actualité - [1] Émission spéciale : Rompre avec la malédiction des matières premières

Appels sur l'actualité

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 19:30


Les sous-sols du continent africain sont parmi les plus riches du monde mais cette richesse profite peu aux populations. Est-ce le cas au Mali ? A qui profite donc cette manne ? Comment rendre plus transparente la gestion des ressources naturelles ? Invités :  - Lamine Seydou Traoré, ministre malien des Mines, de l'Energie et de l'Eau - Nouhoum Diakité, juriste environnementaliste, coordinateur de la branche malienne de l'organisation internationale « Publiez Ce Que Vous Payez » - Samba Touré, consultant, 40 ans d'expérience dans le secteur minier au sein de plusieurs multinationales australiennes et sud-africaines comme BHP Minerals, Anglogold, Randgold * Par téléphone : de France : 09 693 693 70 de l'étranger : 33 9 693 693 70 * Par WhatsApp : +33 6 89 28 53 64 N'OUBLIEZ PAS DE NOUS COMMUNIQUER VOTRE NUMÉRO DE TÉLÉPHONE (avec l'indicatif pays). Pour nous suivre : * Facebook : Rfi appels sur l'actualité * Twitter : @AppelsActu

Les pieds sur terre
Montceau-les-Mines, à la vie à la mort

Les pieds sur terre

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 28:56


durée : 00:28:56 - Les Pieds sur terre - Le 23 septembre, un jeune homme est mort dans un accident de moto à Montceau-les-Mines. Ali et Yanis ont grandi avec lui, Emma et Abiba étaient dans le même foyer, Sulta lui servait un kebab très souvent. Dans cette ancienne ville minière, tout le monde se connaît de près ou de loin. Ils racontent.

Appels sur l'actualité
Appels sur l'actualité - [2] Émission spéciale : Mines, ressources naturelles : un danger pour l'environnement ?

Appels sur l'actualité

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 20:00


Au Mali, l'extraction de l'or, principale source de revenus d'exportation du pays, pose de graves problèmes environnementaux. Comme pour de nombreux Etats, les matières premières représentent une manne financière importante mais leur exploitation peut s'avérer un désastre environnemental. Comment concilier défense de l'environnement et exploitation des ressources naturelles ? Invités :  - Keita Aïda M'Bo, ancien ministre de l'​Environnement, de l'Assainissement et du Développement durable (2016 à 2019) - Ali Diarra, expert, économiste de l'artisanat minier, Directeur général de l'ONG Environnement Business Conseil - Adama Sambou Sissoko, fondateur du blog « Le journal vert du Mali », spécialisé sur les questions environnementales * Par téléphone : de France : 09 693 693 70 de l'étranger : 33 9 693 693 70 * Par WhatsApp : +33 6 89 28 53 64 N'OUBLIEZ PAS DE NOUS COMMUNIQUER VOTRE NUMÉRO DE TÉLÉPHONE (avec l'indicatif pays). Pour nous suivre : * Facebook : Rfi appels sur l'actualité * Twitter : @AppelsActu

Appels sur l'actualité
Appels sur l'actualité - [1] Émission spéciale : Mines, ressources naturelles : un danger pour l'environnement ?

Appels sur l'actualité

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 19:30


Au Mali, l'extraction de l'or, principale source de revenus d'exportation du pays, pose de graves problèmes environnementaux. Comme pour de nombreux Etats, les matières premières représentent une manne financière importante mais leur exploitation peut s'avérer un désastre environnemental. Comment concilier défense de l'environnement et exploitation des ressources naturelles ? Invités :  - Keita Aïda M'Bo, ancien ministre de l'​Environnement, de l'Assainissement et du Développement durable (2016 à 2019) - Ali Diarra, expert, économiste de l'artisanat minier, Directeur général de l'ONG Environnement Business Conseil - Adama Sambou Sissoko, fondateur du blog « Le journal vert du Mali », spécialisé sur les questions environnementales * Par téléphone : de France : 09 693 693 70 de l'étranger : 33 9 693 693 70 * Par WhatsApp : +33 6 89 28 53 64 N'OUBLIEZ PAS DE NOUS COMMUNIQUER VOTRE NUMÉRO DE TÉLÉPHONE (avec l'indicatif pays). Pour nous suivre : * Facebook : Rfi appels sur l'actualité * Twitter : @AppelsActu

Swimming in Sweetwater: A Deep Dive into Riverdale
S5E17: A Deep Dive into Murder in/around the Mines, Mothmen Murder in the Mud, and Whatever Cheryl is doing with

Swimming in Sweetwater: A Deep Dive into Riverdale

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 55:27


Section YY8 Podcast
Back To The Mines

Section YY8 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 73:28


In probably the greatest episode in this podcast's history, Negative Nease and Gavin make fun of Kentucky fans for yet again getting their hopes up of beating Tennessee in football.  We also look ahead to the #1 Georgia Bulldogs coming to Neyland Stadium and take a quick look at Tennessee Basketball.

Here & Now
Kenneth Branagh mines childhood memories in 'Belfast'; Hand signal saves missing teen

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 42:22


Sir Kenneth Branagh joins us to discuss his new film "Belfast," which he directed and wrote. The movie is loosely based on his childhood in Northern Ireland during the late '60s. And, a hand signal popularized on TikTok is credited with saving a North Carolina teenager who'd been reported missing by her parents. Andrea Gunraj of the Canadian Women's Foundation, the group that pioneered the gesture, explains its origins.

FOX Sports Knoxville
3&OUT The Podcast HR1: "Back To The Coal Mines!" 11/8/21

FOX Sports Knoxville

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 47:50


-Vols/Cats Recap -ESPN2 Broadcast Sucks -Your Calls

Queens of the Mines
Lotta Crabtree

Queens of the Mines

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 40:11


   Firmly gripping the hand of her five year old daughter Charlotte, Mary Ann Crabtree scanned the sea of men that crowded the docks, in San Francisco, looking for a familiar face. Her husband John, who had finally sent for them in New York,  was nowhere to be seen and Mary Ann was nearly a professional when it came to accepting anxieties. Queens of the Mines features the authentic stories of gold rush women who blossomed from the camouflaged, twisted roots of California. In this episode, we meet the Nation's Darling and The Golden West's Gift to Vaudeville, California's 19th Century Queen of Captivation. I am Andrea Anderson, This is a true story from America's Largest Migration, The Gold Rush. This is Queens of the Mines. John Crabtree had left his family and position as a bookseller in New York and left for California in the search for gold in 1851, two years prior. His wife and daughter dutifully waited for his call, and when it had finally come, she sold the bookshop off Broadway, and made the exhaustive journey here to the Isthmus of Panama, crossing by land before picking up a second ship to California. Now, John Crabtree was nowhere to be found. Charlotte remained secluded while her and her mother were given a temporary home with a group of popular actors of the 19th century, including the Chapmans, and the child actress Sue Robinson, whom Mary Ann had befriended. In the Presidio of San Francisco, Mrs. Crabtree kept up with the trends and all of the glamourous and disheartening stories from the rough mining camps. The gossip finally came and Mary Ann heard that John had been seen living in a little town in the Sierra.  People were becoming rich all around her, and she was raising Charlotte on her own. The wheels began to turn for Mary Ann. It was a brand new environment for the shrewd and thrifty woman, who was small in figure with an unshakeable will. Here, among the theatrical crowd and actors in San Francisco, a most tantalizing scene had presented itself. She zeroed in on the theatre gossip and dreamt up a career of stardom for her cheerful, animated daughter, Charlotte, or, like her mother called her, Lotta. Lotta had hair that was an even brighter red than Mary Ann's, and she was sturdy with roguish black eyes and an unquenchable laughter, yet she seemed far off from stage ready.   During a celebration at her school near the Presidio, it was requested that Lotta sang Annie Laurie for the crowd. She barely made it to the platform before the young girl, to her mother's dismay, lost control and broke down, sobbing. She wept so hard and for so long, Mary Ann had to take her daughter home. That night in bed, Mary Ann went over her daughter's chances of success singing and dancing at the mines.  The next morning, an optimistic letter vaguely mentioning a project involving gold, came from her husband John in the high Sierra's, from a town called Grass Valley. Although the letter had no mention of any progress, it was requested that Mrs. Crabtree and Lotta proceed to him at once. In California, anyone could make a dazzling fortune overnight. Mary Ann, battling skepticism and the prospect of a bonanza, packed their belongings.   At dawn, Lotta stood by the luggage as her mother procured a place for two in a rickety, yet affordable stagecoach. The young girl slept much of the journey, but she awoke as they rolled past embers of a few dying fires where men were waking up. They moved into a torch lit shadowy settlement and Lotta observed the intimidating shapes that danced across the scene, cast by the torches. She was excited to see her father, it had been over two years since she had last seen him. She wondered if she would recognize him as he went to hug her? There was no embrace, John patted Lotta's head and took them to a hotel where they all shared a small bed for the night.  That next morning, the family took a walk, admiring what the Sierra spring had to offer. Nestled in the rich green slopes, and fertile deep gullies they saw the promise of luck, as, towards the valley, melting snow fed the clearest streams they had ever seen.  Already, men were attending their claims in an air of conquest, working tirelessly digging tunnels, sinking shafts, bridging gorges, and piping water in flumes across the foothills. John told his family stories of men literally stumbling upon rich mines, pulling gold out of the earth with a knife, and how he once left a claim prior to the "big strike." But luck had not been with John Crabtree. With all the excitement around them, John Crabtree only offered Mary Ann disappointment. Passing by peddlers with sealing wax, baubles and trinkets, and luxurious fabrics, Lotta approached a cart that held paperbacks, and ran her finger down the spine of a Dickens novel. She noticed if a vendor was not prosperous enough to possess mules, they carried their goods strapped into a pack that was worn on the shoulders. As Lotta looked at the books, John asked his wife “Why not keep a boarding house? Everyone spends lavishly here, and rich merchants in town need homes! We could do no less than get rich”. Mary Ann was disappointed, she was not familiar in the kitchen. In New York, she worked in upholstery and had a servant who did the household work and cooked. Yet, she still agreed.  To Mary Ann's surprise, she did a fantastic job maintaining the boarding house and not to her surprise, John's participation quickly diminished as he wandered away to prospect, and Mary Ann continued her duties, and saved her money, in a pure atmosphere of rebellion.  Two doors down from the Crabtrees, that summer in 1853, a famous showgirl moved in. It was not long before the woman had transformed the home into a true salon that was constantly abrupting with singing and laughter. Lotta soon attracted the attention of the eccentric woman who had a pet parrot and a monkey! Typically, Mary Ann would always keep her daughter Lotta under her watchful eye. By doing so, Lotta's life had been incredibly innocent. Yet Mary Ann was entirely lenient while Lotta was in company with this new, exotic companion, whose name was Lola Montez.      The unlikely  pair of Lola Montez and Lotta Crabtree became fast friends. In the parlor of the Montez home, Lola gave Lotta daily dance lessons and it was apparent that Lotta had a better sense of rhythm than Lola. Lotta learned fandangos and intricate ballet steps. Lola taught her the jigs reels and the Irish flings from her own childhood. She gave the young child singing lessons, teaching her ballads and Lotta was allowed to play in Lola's trunk of stage costumes, and play Lola's German music box. Lotta fit right in as she mingled with the trolling players, entertainers and witty theatrical company visiting the star. Lola Montez had recognized genuine talent compared to her force of personality and encouraged Lotta's enthusiasm for the performance. They did not stop at the indoors, Lola also taught Lotta to ride horseback. On one sunny morning, the two went for a ride, Lola on a horse and Lotta on a pony. They ended up in the town of Rough and Ready, where huge fortunes were gambled away, recklessly. The street was lined by gaming houses and saloons with bullet-riddled ceilings. Lola and Lotta sauntered in to one.  Lola stood Lotta on a blacksmith's anvil, and they young child danced for the group of miners that sat at the bar. It was a refreshing change for the men, who considered the small child a hit. Irishmen made up a sizable fraction of the miners, Lotta's jigs had reminded them of home. They threw a more than generous amount of gold nuggets at her feet. Lola brought the gold home to Mary Ann and declared Lotta should go with her to Paris. The next morning, John reappeared. With the news that they were again moving, forty miles north of Grass Valley, to Rabbit Creek. Mary Ann was not happy, compared to the somewhat civilized, law-abiding Grass Valley, Rabbit Creek was a small but busy and violent camp where murders were as frequent as each pocket of gold was found and exploited. When the family arrived, John found the hardier characters had found the ground first, and he eventually found nothing. There was an intense drought that summer which affected the prospectors, who needed water for washing gold. John chose to spend his time drinking in the saloons and rambling away mysteriously on quote unquote prospecting missions. Without his support for months, Mary Ann's only option was to open another boarding house, which she did, that winter. That is when the italian Mart Taylor, a musician and dancer arrived in Rabbit Creek. He was tall and had a graceful figure, with long hair and piercing black eyes. He opened a saloon with a connecting makeshift theatre. When the business slowed in the saloon during the afternoons, Taylor conducted a dancing school for children.  His first prerequisite was music and he was impressed by the 8 year old red-haired girl. Her eyes would flash as her small feet traced the intricate steps he taught her. She looked six years old, and he knew she could be a sensation with the audiences who were eager for child performers. Taylor gave her a place to exhibit her talents before the miners. He played the guitar and hired a fiddler and Mrs. Crabtree played the triangle.  Lotta Crabtree had become a nightly attraction, dressed in a green tail-coat, knee breeches, tall hat and brogans her mother sewed. Lotta would often get stage fright, and it would show when she shoved her hands in her pockets. So Mary Ann, sewed them shut. She danced jig after jig only pausing to change costumes. At the finale, she would return to a storm of applause to then sing a ballad. Lotta Crabtree would shake the house with emotion. Gold nuggets shone at her feet.  She completed the repertoire for the company, and her family now had more money than ever. Naturally, Mrs. Crabtree became her daughter's manager. Few child stars had training, and Lotta, was trained by Lola Montez. She would be a gold mine.  Once the roads had reopened in the spring, Lola Montez rode over to Rabbit Creek to see her protege. Lola was to go on tour to Australia and wanted to bring little Lotta with her. Mary Ann saw a future for Lotta with Mart Taylor, who she had become fast friends with, and declined. Mary Ann then made the most of her refusal to Lola's request to take the child to Australia, this even furthered Lotta's growing reputation.   That summer, Mary Ann discovered that she was to have another child and Lotta's baby brother, John Ashworth, was born, just as John Sr. returned home. Lotta continued to work for Taylor while her mother recovered.  After years of performing in Rabbit Creek, the next move seemed obvious to Mary Ann, Lotta should tour the mines. On a late spring morning in 1856, Mary Ann left her husband John three loaves of fresh bread, a kettle of beans and a goodbye note. They left with Taylor's troupe, traveling by wagon, Lotta sat next to her mother with her baby brother in her arms.  As they toured in the California mining camps, Lotta started to make a name for herself as a dancer, singer, and banjo player in saloons. For an audience of men,  whom she had never seen before, on a makeshift stage set up on sawhorses with candles stuffed into bottles served as footlights arranged along the outer edge.  Mary Ann never had a moment to relax, traveling the dangerous higher Sierra by horseback, trees snapping and blocking their path, and boulders, rolling down mountain sides, after being loosened by mining operations. The 8 year old Lotta, watched as a lone rider, far ahead, plunged into the bottom of an abyss in front of her eyes. Once she lay ducked on the floor after one performance, in their room, as bullets burst through the canvas walls while a brawl from the opposite side of the hotel commenced. Yet Mary Ann remained cool, and kept Lotta in good spirits. Mary Ann would coax Lotta, telling her funny stories and persuading her for an hour or more and even when it was time for the stage, Mary Ann always had to give Lotta a little push to get her on the stage. Once onstage, Lotta would perfectly execute her Irish jig. At every performance's conclusion, Lotta would appear angelically. A face scrubbed clean, hair smoothly combed,  a white dress with puffed sleeves while Mary Ann, exhausted from costuming, coaching, and playing the triangle, collected the gold in a basket, scraping every fragment of dust from the boards.  Mary Ann Crabtree was her daughter's mentor. Using the knowledge she had picked up by observing the actors she met in the Presidio and at the home of Montez. She distrusted theatre folk at heart but would listen to every word, resisting its attraction. But if she mistrusted its people she did not mistrust the theatre itself.   As busy as Mary Ann was, she still found time to become pregnant again, with another younger brother for Lotta. Taylor's company was then forced to break up in Weaverville. Mart Taylor took Lotta's brother, Ashworth jr. to San Francisco and Lotta was sent to stay with the family of James Ryan Talbot, who was a pioneer, in Eureka. In the Talbot household in Eureka, Lotta thoroughly enjoyed life, and would go through her acts as in a game for the other children and would frolic and song the stage Irish song Barney Brallaghan," I've a howl in my heart big enough to roll a cabbage round in". Mary Ann's health had finally permitted her to go to Lotta in Eureka in the spring of 1856, where she gathered her and her belongings. Mary Ann, Lotta and her newest brother, George then caught a schooner to San Francisco.  In San Francisco, gamblers crowded the halls, natives rode on spirited horses through the streets, and silk lined carriages dashed around. The city had become legendarily violent. Charles Cora had just been hanged for the murder of the United States Marshal Richardson by the second Vigilance Committee, yet the days of lawlessness were not yet gone. The exuberant scene was exciting for Mary Ann, and Lotta was more than impressed. San Francisco had grown to bold proportions, with longer wharves, and elaborate buildings and it did not seem to be the same city Mary Ann left years ago. Lotta followed her mother into the Bella Union, eyeing the women in lurid clothes who were dealing cards to a group of shady men. Taken backstage quickly, Lotta performed, Mary Ann got paid, and took her away before the wild atmosphere of the saloon could leave a lasting impression. At least that's what she hoped for. Mary Ann was booking Lotta all over the city, enforcing the hard bargains she drove, hungry for gold yet still protecting Lotta passionately. When Lotta appeared in The Dumb Belle, Lotta was to carry a bottle onstage, place it on a table and exit, there was an older actresses who insisted on having the role but Mrs. Crabtree was sure to not let it happen. Mary Ann instructed Lotta to do an elaborate pantomime that in itself, became its own act.  The audience showered the stage with money and roared with laughter. Lotta wasn't going anywhere. She was an instantaneous success with great audience-drawing power. The family started touring, first traveling by schooner across the bay, then up shallow Petaluma Creek, carrying Lotta's costumes in champagne baskets, and all of Lotta's earnings in gold, in a large leather bag. The shrewd Mary Ann did not trust banks nor paper money. When this became too heavy, it was transferred to a steamer trunk. When the steamer trunk became too heavy, she invested Crabtree's earnings in local real estate, race horses and bonds.  She made good profits in Sonoma County. Lotta was then in demand in the Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys. She gained a new skill in Placerville when a skilled black breakdown dancer taught Lotta a vigorous and complicated soft-shoe dance. She also began smoking small, thinly rolled black cigars like her dear friend Lola. It was considered to be not a very lady-like thing yet it became a trademark for Lotta. She often, on stage and off, wore male clothes. The fact that Lotta smoked cigars kept her out of the prominent ladies social group, Sorosis. This infuriated Mary Ann. Lotta could also laugh at herself. She once slipped in the street and called out “prima donna in the gutter“. By 1859, she had become "Miss Lotta, the San Francisco Favorite", who mastered the suggestive double entendre long before Mae West.  She played in Virginia City, and the famous Bird Cage Theater in Tombstone, Arizona then toured the east coast, acting in plays in theaters, a favorite for her portrayals of children due to her petite size. Her youthful appearance led The New York Times to call her “The eternal child” with "The face of a beautiful doll and the ways of a playful kitten, no one could wriggle more suggestively than Lotta." They also said in reference to her skills as a dancer, “What punctuation is to literature, legs are to Lotta”. By the end of the decade the "Lotta Polka" and "Lotta Gallup" was quite the rage in the United States. When Lotta sat down to write a letter to a friend in San Francisco in 1865 she wrote "We started out quite fresh, and so far things have been very prosperous. I am a continual success wherever I go. In some places I created quite a theatrical furor, as they call it. I have played with the biggest houses but never for so much money, for their prices are double. I'm a star, and that is sufficient, and I am making quite a name. But I treat all and every one with the greatest respect and that is not what everyone does,  and in consequence I get my reward."  In 1869 Lotta purchased a lot, on the south side of Turk street, east of Hyde, paying $7,000, a portion of her earnings at a recent show which would be 132k today. She began touring the nation with her own theatrical company in 1875, hitting the height of her success for another decade. Still a teenager she was shocking audiences by showing her legs and smoking on stage. Mary Ann was still managing her career, finding locations, organizing troupes of actors and booking plays,for the then highest-paid actress in America, who was earning sums of up to $5,000 per week, nearly 155K today.  In September of 1875 she gave the city of San Francisco a gift of appreciation to the people, a fountain modeled after a lighthouse prop from one of her plays at the intersection of Market and Kearny streets. Politicians, respectable citizens and even hellions gathered to dedicate the city's new public drinking fountain.  Lotta had many admirers, including the Grand Duke Alexis of Russia, and Brigham Young. She was proposed to many times but never married. From newspaper boys, European royalty, to lawyers and well known actors, Lotta time after time turned them down saying “I'm married to the stage”. Some said her mother would not allow it as it would end her ability to be considered forever young, and her career left little time for a social life. Some say she was only interested in women. It was whispered in the backstages of the theatres tha Adah Isaacs Menken ws Lotta's secret lover. Lotta was a bit of a rebel in her day,advocating women's rights and wearing skirts too short that she shook  while laughing at society matrons.  Lotta had many celebrity friends she was close with, including President Abraham Lincoln and his wife, the great Harry Houdini, President Ulysses S. Grant always made it a point to visit her whenever she was performing in Washington DC while he was president, and actor John Barrymore, who referred to Lotta as “ the queen of the American stage”. In New Orleans Lotta had “ The Lotta Baseball Club”. When Lotta came to visit they presented her with a gold medal and a beautiful banjo Lotta traveled to Europe with her mother and brothers, learning French, visiting museums and taking up painting. The people of San Francisco missed their very own star while she was away. After her tour ended, she went home to San Francisco to perform at the California Theatre.  In 1883, The New York Times devoted much of its front page to "The Loves of Lotta." In 1885, Mary Ann had an 18-room summer cottage built in the Breslin Park section of Mount Arlington, New Jersey, as a gift for her daughter Lotta. It was a Queen Anne/Swiss chalet style lakefront estate on the shores of Lake Hopatcong. It sat on land that sloped down to Van Every Cove. It is 2-1/2 stories on the land side and 3-1/2 on the lake side. She named it Attol Tryst (Lotta spelled backward). They gave parties, rode horses, and pursued her painting. It's "upside-down" chimneys had corbels that flared outward near the top. There was an expansive porch, including a semi-circular section that traced the curve of the parlor, wrapping around three sides of the house. Inside, there was a wine cellar, music room, library, and a fireplace flanked by terra cotta dog-faced beasts. The billiard room's massive stone fireplace once featured a mosaic that spelled out LOTTA in gemstones. After a fall in the spring of 1889 while in Wilmington, Delaware, Lotta recovered lakeside and decided to retire permanently from the stage, at age 45. later resisting calls for a farewell tour. She was the richest actress in America and  made quite a spectacle as one of the first women to own and drive her own car that she called “Red Rose”. She got out on top. During her retirement, Lotta traveled, painted and was active in charitable work. One final appearance was made in 1915 for Lotta Crabtree Day in San Francisco at the Panama-Pacific Exposition. Lotta was a vegetarian for years and took time to visit inmates in prisons.   Mary Ann died and Lotta's serious side emerged. After Mary Ann's death, Lotta seriously wanted to have her sainted. But she eventually settled on having a $20,000 stained glass window decorated with angels made for her, which is today in St. Stephen's church in Chicago.   The last 15 years of Lotta's life was spent living alone at the Brewster Hotel, which she had purchased in Boston, a dog at her feet, regularly traveling to Gloucester to paint seascapes, with a cigar in her teeth.  She died at home on September 25, 1924 at age 76. She was described by critics as mischievous, unpredictable, impulsive, rattlebrained, teasing, piquant, rollicking, cheerful and devilish. Boston papers recalled Lotta as a devoted animal rights activist who wandered the streets, putting hats on horses to protect them from the sun. She was interred at the Woodlawn Cemetery in Bronx, New York.  Lotta's Fountain still stands at the intersection of Market and Kearny streets in San Francisco. It is the oldest surviving monument in the City's collection. After the earthquake, it was a known gathering place and one of the only locations to get potable water in the city. It is the site of the anniversary of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake every April 18. She left an estate of some $4 million in a charitable trust for “anti-animal experimentation”, “trust to provide food, fuel and hospitalization for the poor”, “help for released convicts”, “support for poor, needy actors”,” aid to young graduates of agricultural colleges”, and “relief for needy vets of WWI”. Over 59 million today. The trust still exists today. The estate ran into complications when a number of people unsuccessfully contested the will, claiming to be relatives, and a woman claimed to be Lotta's adult child. A long series of court hearings followed. The famed Wyatt Earp even testified at one of the hearings, being a friend of the family. A medical exam was conducted at the autopsy and it was confirmed that Lotta Crabtree died a virgin.  Lotta's legacy is not preserved as well as entertainers that came after her, no video or audio of her performing. She was the queen of the stage, but retired before the days of Hollywood.  Lotta's influence is all around us today in the domino of effects from the money and support she has given to farmers, animals, prisoners, soldiers, and actors. Her style was groundbreaking, and helped shape modern entertainment. Her strong influence on animal rights, women's rights, and human rights have forever shaped society and she left a legacy of love  with fountains, paintings, and by promoting the arts. Crabtree Hall, a dormitory at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, is named for Lotta. The Attol Tryst stands today and in recent years it has been restored. Lotta started the tradition of daytime performances for women and children, now commonly known as the afternoon matinee. Lotta was against wars, but very supportive of the members of the military, and America. Lotta has been credited as being an influence on Mary Pickford, Mae West, Betty Hutton, and Judy Garland. The Academy Award nominated 1951 movie musical “Golden Girl” was based on Lotta's exciting life, starring Hollywood Walk-Of-Famer, Mitzi Gaynor as Lotta. I am Andrea Anderson, thank you for taking the time to listen today,  let's meet again when we continue the story of Lotta Crabtree, The Queen of Captivation Chapter 8 Part 2, next time, on “Queens of the Mines.    In light of the BLM movement and the incredible change we are seeing, I would like to mention a quote said by Marian Anderson. "No matter how big a nation is, it is no stronger than its weakest people, and as long as you keep a person down, some part of you has to be down there to hold him down, so it means you cannot soar as you might otherwise."   Until recently, historians and the public have dismissed "conflict history," and important elements that are absolutely necessary for understanding American history have sometimes been downplayed or virtually forgotten. If we do not incorporate racial and ethnic conflict in the presentation of the American experience, we will never understand how far we have come and how far we have to go. No matter how painful, we can only move forward by accepting the truth.  Queens of the Mines was written, produced and narrated by me, Andrea Anderson.  The theme song, In San Francisco Bay is by DBUK, You can find the links to their music, tour dates and merchandise, as well as links to all our social media and research links at queensofthemines.com                    

Queens of the Mines
Lola Montez - Part 2 of 2

Queens of the Mines

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 34:50


Lola's mother had found out about new life in Europe, and she went into mourning as if her daughter was dead, sending out customary funeral letters on stationary edged in black. Lola could have easily been the richest woman to ever live, had she preferred her own advantage over political freedom. Lola's identity had been revealed at Her Majesty's Theatre, it led to an arrest on a charge of bigamy. Lola's wealthy new husband George Trafford Heald bailed her out of jail and they ran to Spain. The feisty and sometimes violent Montez and Heald were not getting along and the couple eventually decided to split while in Portugal. When George Heald suddenly and mysteriously drowned there in Portugal, Lola gained Heald's large inheritance. Lola, with her new fortune, was ready to find a new start. It was 1850, and she left for the land the whole world had been rushing to, The United States of America.   On the stages up and down the east coast of the New World, Lola Montez debuted a southern Italian folk dance, her own gussied up version of a lively tarantella. She wore tights in the color of her flesh, and layers and layers of petticoats in every color that bounced with her quick, flirtatious steps.  In her act, she was playing the part of a maiden in the country, who had spiders in her clothes. The spiders hung from her gloves and gown and hid under the layers of her petticoat. As she shook off and stomped away the toy spiders that riddled her costume and the stage, she exposed her shapely legs and as she lifted her skirt, the men cheered for her to find each and every spider. Lola lifted her petticoat so high that the men in the audience went crazy, for they could see, onstage, Lola wore no underclothing at all. Lola Montez was a smash. Although not everyone impressed, and some believed her performance was unprofessional, and talentless.    Lola stirred up excitement on that side of the new world for two years. After one particular show at an East Coast theatre, the manager openly criticized her spider act. Backstage, the sassy star retaliated with the bull whip she used onstage, busting the manager's face open. Denying the assault later, Lola said instead “there is one comfort in the falsehood, which is, that this man very likely would have deserved the whipping.” It was soon decided that she may be a better match with the lawless west. Without telling anyone, Lola caught a ride via a Pacific Mail paddle-wheel steamer in New Orleans, headed for California.   After the passage along the isthmus of Panama, and finally on the last ship of the voyage, Lola stood on the deck with a male distinguished fellow passenger looking out over the water. He asked her about her life. “My father was Irish, she told Brannan. “Irish! Well, then where did you get the name Montez?” Lola Montez stared out into the still ocean, “I took it”. She said. Just like I have taken everything I ever wanted.”    He chuckled, approvingly. This man was Sam Brannan. California's first millionaire. Brannan was on his way home after doing business in Boston and New York, he had a wife and 4 children at home in California yet he was paying much attention to his glamorous shipmate. The 29 year old Lola was by now an epic tabloid sensation in The United States. Her political schemes, erotic expolits and violent temper had made the top headlines through out the world. Yet no one would be at the long wharf to greet her when she stepped off the ship into San Francisco in 1853. She was arriving unannounced.   On the northeast corner of Sansome and Halleck streets, stood the American Theater. The American Theatre was the first brick large building built on the newly made soil along Sansome Street on land reclaimed from Yerba Buena Cove. During its opening night two years earlier in 1851, The American Theatre was so crowded that the walls sunk a couple of inches from the weight.    The irish satirist Richard Brinsley Sheridan's comedy "School for Scandal” was playing, and Lola Montez was playing Lady Teazle. The theater was able to charge $5 for the best seats. An outrageous price.  The reason being, the men in the audience truly desired to see her famous risque Spider Dance they had read about in the East Coast papers, and with that it was more than a dance they wanted to see. If you know what I mean. Lola obliged on the second night, to the delight of the mostly male audience her body exposed by her contortions.  She won the people over through naked charisma and pure force of personality. The act was reasonably well received by some, and it outraged others who felt they were obliged to look for the spiders in improper places.    Lola Montez was an eccentric woman who fascinated the masses entirely. She wore trousers and she carried a bull whip. She had an uncommon for ladies' fondness for hand-rolled cigarettes, and smoked openly! She became the first woman to ever be photographed while smoking. She straddled highbrow and lowbrow classes, rejecting the restrictive social codes associated with Victorian notions of “true womanhood.” Lola had the appearance of a Duchess.  As she spoke the royal illusion evaporated. Her vial mouth would have been considered to be unacceptable even in the wee hours of the city's most provocative men's smoking clubs.  Although they watched her every move, and even sometimes copied her style,  San Francisco's respectable classes never truly embraced Lola Montez, and she really felt it.   Lola was being courted by the married Sam Brannan. He was spoiling her in finer style than her Bavarian King Ludwig had ever provided her. Quite an impressive feat. Sam Brannan had an income of one thousand dollars a day, which is over 30,000 in 2020. He owned one hundred and seventy thousand acres, over 250 square miles where present day Los Angeles County lies. He lived well and lavishly, drinking and womanizing freely. Ann Eliza Brannan, his wife eventually divorced Sam, and when she did, she took half of everything he had. Lola moved on.  In San Francisco's early years, attending the theatre was a mostly male centered activity for they were the majority of the population. By 1853 it had become a highbrow sophisticated activity for audiences of both genders. Giving a place that countered the degrading, debilitating atmosphere of the times. The American Theatre had a rival theatre that was aptly named The San Francisco. One of the first original plays staged in the city was put on at the theatre San Francisco. "Who's Got the Countess?", a satire that profited off of Lola's deflating balloon. For two weeks, the burlesque packed the house. Some audience members accused the play of going too far. A writer for the Herald said the show was "an exceeding coarse and vulgar attack upon one who, whatever her faults and foibles may have been, has proved herself a noble-hearted and generous woman."   Lola Montez was performing onstage one evening in Sacramento, when someone laughed during the Spider Dance. Lola berated the audience and then stormed offstage. In the papers, it read that it was believed Montez had papered the house with her supporters. A letter challenging the editor to a duel soon surfaced, assertedly from Lola that read "You may choose between my dueling pistols or take your choice of a pill out of a pill box. One shall be poison and one shall not."   When Lola first sailed to San Francisco, on the same trip she met Brannan, she also met Patrick Purdy Hull. He was an irish reporter and the owner of the newspaper The San Francisco Whig. Lola said Patrick Hull could tell a story better than any other man she had known, and that was why she fell in love with him. On 1 July 1853 at the Mission Dolores, in a catholic ceremony, Lola Montez and Patrick Hull were married. Making Lola a US citizen. Lola did not want to live among the ridicule in the city, and instead bought a mine in a swelteringly hot ravine. The property was close to two of the richest mines in Nevada Country, California, Empire Mine and North Star Mine. She left San Francisco for the unincorporated town of Grass Valley.   Three years prior to her move to Grass Valley, the town held its first election under a large oak tree and one year later a building was constructed on the site. It was first used as the office for Gilmor Meredith's Gold Hill Mining Company, and then as a schoolhouse. Lola Montez purchased the building at 248 Mill St in Grass Valley and made it the home where her parrot, pet monkey, herself and Hull would live.     The town's disdain for the woman was proven by Grass Valley's Reverend when he spoke in a sermon denouncing Montez, warning the locals of the newest evil in town, calling the woman a hussy. Word passes to Lola, who was outraged at the statement and decided she would prove the quality of her act to the man herself. That night, she stormed into the Reverend's house where he was sitting to eat dinner with his wife. Lola Montez demanded the couple watch her full performance. She stomped and clapped and shook around his living room until he finally agreed she was in fact, a professional.  Montez ended up hated her life with her newest husband, and rather spent her days in Grass Valley with the young girl next door. Patrick Hull was tired of the parties and extremely spiteful of his wife's popularity. When a baron who was visiting from Europe attended one of Lola's social gatherings, he gifted her a grizzly bear to add to her exotic collection of pets. She named him Major. Patrick Hull was insanely jealous, and this final straw yanked a tear in the relationship that could not be mended. Hull sued Montez for divorce, naming a german doctor as the co-respondent. A few days later, the doctor was found in near-by hills, shot dead.   The neighbors, who ran a boarding house, had a daughter who was fascinated with the clearly unique Lola Montez and her private menagerie. It was not long before Lola was equally fascinated by the little girl, who was genuinely talented. She taught her to sing and dance and live wildly and allowed her to play in her extravagant costumes. Lola taught the young irish girl to sing ballads and perform ballet steps, fandangos, jig reels and Irish Highland flings from Lola's own childhood. The little blonde child's sense of rhythm surpassed Lola's, and she impressed the theatrical elite, strolling players and entertainers who came to the lavish parties Montez hosted. The unlikely pair rode bareback together, on a horse and pony. Despite the townspeople's opinion, the mother of the girl liked Lola and appreciated the time she spent with her daughter.  In the two years that Lola lived in Grass Valley, the California Gold Rush was ending, yet there was another gold mining rush in full swing. She hired Augustus Noel Folland, a married American actor as her new manager, hired a company of actors, and within two weeks, they were all sailing to Sydney Australia, aboard the Fanny Major. By the time they arrived, two months later, she had taken her new manager on as a lover. The following week, Lola's show opened at the Royal Victoria Theatre in a show titled 'Lola Montez in Bavaria'. That night, Montez fired some of the company, and they quickly sued her for damages.    As Lola and Folland were waiting to depart Sydney for Melbourne on board the Waratah, A sheriff's officer boarded the ship with a warrant of arrest, demanding she paid the sacked actors. Lola ran to her cabin, where she undressed. She sent out a note inviting the officer in to arrest her and drag her out. He left empty handed.     Audiences began to diminish at the Theatre Royal in Melbourne as Montez performed in her Bavarian role. Monttez made the decision to bring out her 'Spider Dance'. It was an instant hit for the men in the audience, again, Montez raising her skirts so high that the audience could see she wore no underclothing at all. The papers roared that her performance was 'utterly subversive to all ideas of public morality'. The theatre began to show heavy losses when respectable families ceased to attend the theatre. One even summoned the mayor of Melbourne to issue a warrant for her arrest for public indecency, but he refused the application. Months later in Ballarat, packed houses miners were showering gold nuggets at her feet yet again, the papers attacked her notoriety. Lola by now had a motto, “Courage---and shuffle the cards".  When Lola ran into the Ballarat Timeseditor Henry Seekamp at the United States Hotel, she retaliated by publicly horsewhipping him. Resulting in the rest of her tour being canceled. Folland and Montez quarreled excessively as they left for San Francisco on May 22 1856. On the journey near Fiji on the night of July 8th, Folland mysteriously fell overboard and drowned. Some believed he committed suicide after there fight, other believe he was pushed. No official investigation followed.    When Lola arrived back in the United States in 1856, she was different, subdued. Whatever happened on that ship, changed Lola Montez.Her previous lover from the past Alexandre Dumas once said 'She is fatal to any man who dares to love her'. Uncharacteristically, she sold her jewelry and gave the proceeds to Folland's children. She began using the remains of her bank account to give homeless and less fortunate women food, water and money. She decided to spread knowledge rather than performance, and began lecturing on her life, fashion, beauty, and famous women.  "I have known all the world has to give -- ALL!"  She began to write her book titled The Arts of Beauty, Or, Secrets of a Lady's Toilet: With Hints to Gentlemen on the Art of Fascinating.    Dance with all the might of your body, and all the fire of your soul, in order that you may shake all melancholy out of your liver; and you need not restrain yourself with the apprehension that any lady will have the least fear that the violence of your movements will ever shake anything out of your brains. I never claimed to be famous. Notorious I have always been.    She moved to New York, and reinvented herself once more. Embracing christianity, and with the Reverend Charles Chauncy Burr she arranged to deliver a series of moral lectures in Britain and America written by him. She returned to Ireland and did her final lecture in Dublin, “America and its people”, speaking in Limerick and Cork. Then returned to America in 1859. Later that year, the Philadelphia Press wrote Lola was iving very quietly up town, and doesn't have much to do with the world's people. Some of her old friends, the Bohemians, now and then drop in to have a little chat with her, and though she talks beautifully of her present feelings and way of life, she generally, by way of parenthesis, takes out her little tobacco pouch and makes a cigarette or two for self and friend, and then falls back upon old times with decided gusto and effect. But she doesn't tell anybody what she's going to do.   Within two years, Lola Montex began showing the tertiary effects of syphilis, the last contribution to the marriage from Patrick Hurdy Hull, and her body began to waste away. Lola, 39 years old, suffered a massive stroke and died alone in poverty on January 7th 1861. She is buried in the Greenwood cemetery, in Brooklyn. The marker simply reads “Mrs. Eliza Gilbert / Died 7 January 1861.”   You can read Lola's own writing, The Arts of Beauty, Secrets of a Lady's Toilet: With Hints to Gentlemen on the Art of Fascinating, Lectures of Lola Montez, Anecdotes of love, and Timeless Beauty: Advice to Ladies & Gentlemen. Lola's restored house  at 248 Mill St in Grass Valley is now a registered California Historical Landmark. Mount Lola, Nevada County and the Sierra Nevada's north of interstate 80 highest point at 9,148 feet, is named in her honour as well as two lakes you can find in the Tahoe National Forest. Named the Upper and Lower Lola Montez Lakes.   Now, let's talk about song lyrics, you many have heard this famous lyric.  "Whatever Lola Wants, Lola Gets".  "Whatever Lola Wants” was written by Richard Adler and Jerry Ross for the 1955 musical play Damn Yankees. The saying was inspired by Lola Montez. Or what about “Her name was Lola, she was a showgirl, With yellow feathers in her hair and a dress cut down to there", even Copacabana by Barry Manilow was inspired by our girl Lola.   In light of the BLM movement and the incredible change we are seeing, I would like to mention a quote said by Marian Anderson. "No matter how big a nation is, it is no stronger than its weakest people, and as long as you keep a person down, some part of you has to be down there to hold him down, so it means you cannot soar as you might otherwise."   Until recently, historians and the public have dismissed "conflict history," and important elements that are absolutely necessary for understanding American history have sometimes been downplayed or virtually forgotten. Lola constructed an identity as a “Spanish dancer” when Anglo Americans in California swayed between appreciating aspects of non-white cultures and rejecting them. If we do not incorporate racial and ethnic conflict in the presentation of the American experience, we will never understand how far we have come and how far we have to go. No matter how painful, we can only move forward by accepting the truth.  I am Andrea Anderson, thank you for taking the time to listen today,  let's meet again when we meet Lola's neighbor, the little irish girl in Grass Valley, next time, on “Queens of the Mines.    Queens of the Mines was written, produced and narrated by me, Andrea Anderson.  The theme song, In San Francisco Bay is by DBUK, You can find the links to their music, tour dates and merchandise, as well as links to all our social media and research links at queensofthemines.com  

Queens of the Mines
Lola Montez Part 1 of 2

Queens of the Mines

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 19:31


 Queens of the Mines features the authentic stories of gold rush women who blossomed from the camouflaged, twisted roots of California. These are true stories, with some of my own fabrication of descriptive details. It is recommended that you start this series from the first episode. In this episode of Queens of the Mines, we will meet a theatre and burlesque sensation with a secret past, who will reveal herself as California's 19th century Queen of Temptation. This is a true story, from America's Largest Migration, The Gold Rush. In  Berlin, 1843 in a cyclone of cigarette smoke and sexuality, Tsar Nikolai I of Russia and King Friedrich Wilhelm IV were indulging in a private dance from the seductive Spanish dancer and burlesque performer Donna Lola Montez. Lola Montez enchanted or appalled everyone she met. While Montez was there in Prussia, Prince Albrecht, the King's brother, soon took the showgirl as his lover for a wild affair. Yet, like her kind, Donna Lola Montez was more than normally vain, selfish, ruthless, and immoral and the seductress had eventually tired of the prince's company. One afternoon, she greatly embarrassed him publicly during a royal picnic. Humiliated, in front of the entire court, he demanded that she leave his realm.  “That's not such a long trip,” she said with sass as she turned dramatically towards her carriage and away she went, to Russia. Montez believed it was her destiny to be royalty, she wanted a castle. While in Russia, she was courted by one of the great magnates of St. Petersburg, Prince Schulkowski. Lola failed to secure her royal marriage with the Russian Prince and then  headed to France. In Paris Lola Montez began a relationship with the former English Hussar, Francis Leigh. Lola's jealous tendencies were less than to be desired, and she ended up running him off with a pistol in a rage.   Queens of the Mines features the authentic stories of gold rush women who blossomed from the camouflaged, twisted roots of California. These are true stories, with some of my own fabrication of descriptive details. It is recommended that you start this series from the first episode. In this episode of Queens of the Mines, we will meet a theatre and burlesque sensation with a secret past, who will reveal herself as California's 19th century Queen of Temptation. This is a true story, from America's Largest Migration, The Gold Rush. The preceding program features stories that contain adult content including violence which may be disturbing to some listeners, or secondhand listeners. So, discretion is advised.   Lola spent the following year in Paris, frequenting high-society saloons with the most fashionable bohemians of the day. There was something provoking and voluptuous about her. The purity of the dancer's white skin, her mouth like a budding pomegranate, blue eye tameless and wild, wavy bronze hair with dark shadows, like the tendrils of the woodbine curled almost childishly back from her face. Montez led the most extravagant lifestyle, and it was financed by the collection of wealthy men she had seduced.  In that year, she became the mistress of the author responsible for The Count of Monte Cristo and The Three Musketeers, Alexandre Dumas. As well as the famous Hungarian composer Franz Liszt. The composer fell deeply in love with her, so much so that he dedicated a sonata, a long piece of classical music to their love. She ended the year by marrying the part-owner of the French Newspaper La Presse, Charles Alexandre Dujarier. Months after the wedding, during a night of drunken gambling, her new husband offended a man and was killed in a duel. Lord Momsbury, the elderly and proper Englishmen had taken pity on Lola after her husband's death, and Montez as usual, took advantage of the kindness of her admirers. Lord Momsbury hosted a benefit concert for Lola, where she made connections there that would eventually lead to an engagement at her majesty's theatre in London and funded her further travels.   After the performance at Her Majesty's Theatre in London, Lola made her way back to Prussia. The following year, she found herself performing for the ageing King Ludwig I of Bavaria. After she performed a private burlesque performance for him, the King was intrigued. The robed man pointed inquiringly toward her well-formed bosom and he asked the woman, ‘Nature or art?' Lola responded by cutting open the front of her dress, exposing nature's endowment. The King instantly fell in love with Lola Montez.  He spoiled her rotten, and made her dream a reality when he gave the showgirl her own castle, with a pension. The King named her the Countess Marie von Landsfeld, but he personally called her Lolita. As Countess Marie von Landsfeld, Lola Montez was able to win support from the radical university students in Bavaria. However, the Bavarian aristocracy and even the middle class had refused to acknowledge her as Countess.  One general was even said to have declared, “I've never seen such a demon! She said I would see what a spirited woman could accomplish when she set all the levers of intrigue into motion. During her time in Bavaria, entire ministries had risen and fallen at the beautiful seductress' doing. Thousands gathered and rioted the streets, on February 7, 1848 demanding the expulsion of Lola Montez. The crowd echoed with the chanting, “down with the whore”. The King gave in to his people, and his Lolita had vanished to Switzerland then to London.  In London, George Trafford Heald her newest husband had bailed her out after an arrest. Heald put his hand on his wife's knee, in a weak attempt to comfort her. Lola hastily pulled it away, turning her body to the window, gazing at the scenery as they were approaching Madrid. He had by now had given up in the attempt to console the stubborn woman during the last hours of their journey.  He was only a British cavalry officer, but attracted the woman when he had received a large inheritance.  Heald was 20 to her 27, the age difference as well as Lola's notoriety scandalised his wealthy family. The life of royalty and great political influence was now three years behind her, and it was taking some getting used to. A decade before Heald and Montez were in that carriage, rolling into Madrid, on the same road, the young irish Eliza Rosanna was ready to start fresh and the culture there in Spain was new and exotic to her. Her father's regiment had been posted in India as a toddler, and he died of cholera when she was three and her mother was seventeen. Her mother married the Major John Craigie who was a general of the British army in India. They sent Eliza to a boarding school in England and when Eliza was 16 years old, she received word that she was to return to India. Her mother and step father had arranged her to marry a wealthy, 64-year-old judge.  On the passage to India, Eliza met a handsome, 30-year-old Irish lieutenant returning home on sick leave. His name was Thomas James. She nursed James back to health in his cabin during the voyage. The two of them did not remain in India long, and to avoid the arranged marriage, Eliza and Lieutenant Thomas James eloped and set off for Ireland. There, she soon found out that her new husband was a violent man and their scandalous marriage was ultimately unhappy. When James needed to rejoin his regiment in 1839, the couple returned, and her beauty made her the new toast of British India. A title previously held by her mother. While living in India, James strayed with the wife of another captain, Eliza saw it as an easy way out. She decided to leave him, and return to Britain. As the ship left the dock, a dashing army officer caught her eye. George Lennox, the grandson of the Duke of Richmond. Surrounded by peeping eyes,  their affair blossomed and the couple perhaps enjoyed putting on a show. The door of Lennox's cabin had swung open rather too often, revealing him lacing Eliza's corset or sitting on the bed, watching her rolling up her stockings. The Captain was so infuriated that he barred Eliza from George's table.  When they arrived in London, Lennox set Eliza up as his mistress and introduced her to several influential men. The news of her affair eventually made its way back to Thomas James and he sued her for divorce. Eliza lost everything in the separation on the ground of her adultery on a shipboard with another soldier, even though it was James who strayed first. The terms of the divorce prohibited neither party to remarry, as long as they were both living. The affair with Lennox did not last long, and he soon abandoned Eliza. She was left with no means of support. She now faced the dilemma that many 'fallen' women in that era faced, virtually unemployable as a governess or a lady's companion.  So, there Eliza Rosanna stood on the dusty street in Madrid, looking up and down the street in either direction, and then back into the window of the establishment where she was to begin studying dance that day. Mobs of men and horses pulling carts were barely dodging the brave nineteen year old girl. “That was then, and this is now,” she said out loud. Snubbing out a cigar in the dirt, she stood up tall, and walked in as if she owned the damn place.  HER MAJESTY'S THEATRE June 3, 1843 SPECIAL ATTRACTION! Mr. Benjamin Lumley begs to announce that, between the acts of the Opera, Donna Lola Montez will have the honour to make her first appearance in England in an Original Spanish dance. Mr. Benjamin Lumley sat with Lola in his office at Her Majesty's Theatre in London. "If you make a hit," he said, "you shall have a contract for the rest of the season. It all depends on yourself." Lola, smiled and nodded to the man. She wanted nothing better. As she left the managerial office, she felt as if she was treading on air. Lola stood at the wings, in a black satin bodice and flounced pink silk skirt she waited for her cue.  Lumley passed her one last time, giving her a nod of encouragement. "Capital," he said, rubbing his whiskers. "Most attractive. You'll be a big success, my dear."   The conductor lifted his baton, and she took in a deep breath. Everything had led up to this moment. The heavy curtains slowly were drawn aside and her heart began to race with excitement. Under a cross-fire of opera glasses, Lola bounded on to the stage and executed her initial pirouette. Her slender waist swayed to the music as she swept round the stage. Her graceful head and neck bent with it like a flower that bends with the impulse given to its stem by the fitful temper of the wind. There was a sudden hush at the finish of the number, she stepped up to the footlights and awaited the verdict. All was well, a storm of applause filled the air. Past the footlights, she could see Lumley from his place in the wings, he was beaming with approval. His enterprise would be greatly rewarded with the débutantes success. There was no doubt about it. Lola thought to the moment where she would sign her contract with him and Her majesty's Theatre.      Then, breaking her daydream, an ominous hiss suddenly split the air. It was coming from the occupants of Lord Ranelagh's stage box. The audience gasped in astonishment, and looking to Lord Ranelagh, he shouted, "Egad!" he exclaimed in a loud voice, "that's not Lola Montez at all. It's Eliza Rosanna James, an Irish girl who had committed adultery against Lieutenant Thomas James and vanished. Ladies and gentlemen, we're being properly swindled!"    Eliza, unable to remarry under her own name, had reinvented herself as a Spanish aristocrat's daughter with an imperious manner. Donna Lola Montez, well, Eliza Rosanna rushed behind the curtain in tears, the audience was in an uproar. She was left penniless, and Lola fled to Prussia, where she then bore all to King Ludwig 1 and became a Bavarian Countess.   Frontier pioneer Eliza Inman wrote in her journal in 1843, “If Hell laid to the west, Americans would cross Heaven to reach it.”   It looks like she was right. I am Andrea Anderson, thank you for taking the time to listen today. Let's meet again next time, as we continue the story of Lola Montez, theatre and burlesque sensation with a secret past, as she makes her way to California, On “Queens of the Mines. Queens of the Mines was written, produced and narrated by me, Andrea Anderson.  The theme song, In San Francisco Bay is by DBUK, You can find the links to their music, tour dates and merchandise, as well as links to all our social media and research links at queensofthemines.com   Before we start the episode, I would like to read this dedication written by Lola Montez in her book the Arts of Beauty. “To all men and women of every land, who are not afraid of themselves, who trust so much in their own souls that they dare to stand up in the might of their own individuality to meet the tidal currents of the world.”   You may remember Sam Brannan from the very first episode as the man who brought news of the discovery of gold to San Francisco, chanting, "Gold! Gold! Gold from the American River". When Brannan first arrived in 1846 on the ship Brooklyn, he was the leader of a Mormon colony who intended to start a self-sufficient colony with 238 Saints. His entourage of carpenters, blacksmiths, farmers, bakers and everything a community might need, doubled or tripled the population of San Francisco. He had brought a printing press and used it to publish San Francisco's first newspaper, the Alta. Sam Brannan and his people quickly jump-started the local economy in California, settling mormon island on the Sacramento Delta. Queens of the Mines features the authentic stories of gold rush women who blossomed from the camouflaged, twisted roots of California. These are true stories, with some of my own fabrication of descriptive details. It is recommended that you start this series from the first episode. In this episode, we continue and complete the story of Lola Montez, the burlesque sensation with a secret past who will reveal herself as California's 19th century Queen of Temptation. This is a true story, from America's Largest Migration, The Gold Rush. I am Andrea Anderson, and this is Queens of the Mines.  

China Stories
[The World of Chinese] I sacrificed 16 years to the mines

China Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 27:24


Miner-poet Chen Nianxi tells the harrowing story of his years working as a blaster underground.Read the article: https://www.theworldofchinese.com/2021/10/i-sacrificed-16-years-to-the-mines/Narrated by Elyse Ribbons.Translated by Nathaniel J. Gan. This story was originally told in Chinese on the Story FM podcast. It has been translated and republished by The World of Chinese with permission.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

HOB on Rose Ave
"Proximity mines"

HOB on Rose Ave

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 124:55


The Haus of bloos discusses orange of topics. Like can men and women really be friends? Are we moving too fast into the metaverse, Jay z & kid cudi and more...

ASLE EcoCast Podcast
Nature Creeps Back: Creature Features and the Environment with Christy Tidwell & Bridgitte Barclay

ASLE EcoCast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 42:57


What's scarier than climate change? Not much, but this month's guests--Bridgitte Barclay, Associate Professor at Aurora University, and Christy Tidwell, Associate Professor at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology--join us to talk about the sub-genre of horror films known as creature features, and how these films can change how we think about environmental concerns. For more on Christy and Bridgitte: Christy: https://christymtidwell.wordpress.com/   Twitter: @christymtidwell Bridgitte:https://bridgitteabarclay.wixsite.com/bridgittebarclay Twitter: @bridgebarclay Special Issue of Science Fiction Film and Television:https://www.liverpooluniversitypress.co.uk/journals/issue/6509 Creatures in the Classroom CFP: https://www.asle.org/calls-for-contributions/cfp-creatures-in-the-classroom-teaching-environmental-creature-features/ (Proposals due by January 18, 2022.) If you have an idea for an episode, please submit your proposal here: https://forms.gle/Y1S1eP9yXxcNkgWHA   Twitter: @ASLE_EcoCast Jemma Deer: @Geowrites Brandon Galm: @BeGalm If you're enjoying the show, please consider subscribing, sharing, and writing reviews on your favorite podcast platform(s)! Episode recorded October 9, 2021. CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Mission Spooky
Episode 65: Tommyknockers and Haunted Mines of PA with Brennan Storr

Mission Spooky

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 55:19


We are joined today by one half of The Ghost Story Guys Podcast, Brennan Storr, to discuss the legendary Tommyknockers, their connection to Pennsylvania coal mines, and a few mine hauntings that made the newspapers of old!  . Our featured music is from Hororhaus with the song "Ghost Host" You can find Hororhaus on Spotify and Bandcamp. . Be sure to check out Brennan's podcasts Ghost Story Guys where he is joined by Paul Bestall of Mysteries and Monsters Podcast every two weeks and his new show Largely the Truth. You can find Brennan's book A Strange Little Place on Amazon and on Audible. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/missionspooky/support

The ROAMies Podcast
Mines, Trains, Mucking, Getting Robbed, and Tommy Knockers

The ROAMies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 17:29


Thanks, Vicki!https://www.georgetownlooprr.com/Georgetown Loop RailroadHistoric trains, mines, and railroadsHistory ColoradoHistoric Rail AdventuresSunshine, Space, and Fresh Air!Mine tours and Gold PanningDiscover the best of Colorado's Rocky Mountains by visiting the Georgetown Loop Railroad and Mining Park for gold panning & historically immersive experiences.

CU Buffs Daily
Buffs Daily with Voice of the Buffs Mark Johnson for Thursday October 28th

CU Buffs Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 3:18


Today on the Buffs Daily with Voice of the Buffs Daily with Voice of the Buffs, Mark Johnson, we got our first look at Tad Boyle's Buffaloes last night in an exhibition game with School of Mines, football preps for #7 Oregon and loses it's best player, and a busy next few days for CU athletics!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

MountainLore
The Wild Man Of The Cranberry Mines

MountainLore

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 7:23


The Tweetsie Railroad ran from Johnson City, Tennessee, to Cranberry, North Carolina.  The line transported passengers and freight, the most valuable of which was iron ore mined near Cranberry.   Today we tell the tale of a strange man-like creature that was spotted around those mines over a hundred years ago. Happy Halloween, podcast listeners!

CU Buffs Daily
Buffs Daily for Wednesday with Voice of the Buffs Mark Johnson for Wednesday October 27th

CU Buffs Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 3:02


Today on the Buffs Daily with Voice of the Buffs, Mark Johnson, Tad Boyle's men's team is in action tonight with an exhibition vs School of Mines, football's changing current, and a busy next few days for CU sports teams!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Scandalous Six D&D Podcast
#138 – Triple Kill!

Scandalous Six D&D Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021


A new group of adventurers set forth on a journey in the D&D campaign “Fallen Empires” Characters of this campaign include: Powell the Goliath Paladin (Eric), Squeeb the Deep Gnome Wizard (Stephen), Token the Mousefolk Rogue (Matt), Tamsyn the Wood Elf Ranger (Andy), Ildahn the Goliath Warlock (Jordan) and Luke is once again our fearless … Continue reading #138 – Triple Kill!

Queens of the Mines
Indentured Servitude in Sonora

Queens of the Mines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 17:11


Until february of 1850, Sonora was known as the Sonorain camp, then named Stewart, then to Sonora. The History of Tuolumne stated that according to the California blue book the word Tuolumne meant “many stone houses or caves” having a similar meaning as the word Shasta in another native tongue. I love this because Shasta is my sister's name!      Tuolumne County was a wild and rough country in the gold rush days, and not all of the local history was squeaky clean. The region was full of diversity among the merchants, miners, gamblers, drunkards and women of leisure. From the research that lead up to todays episode, I was thrilled to learn how Sonorians had came together in the past to push back against any discrimination that came to the town's attention.    During America's largest migration, the gold rush, indentured servitude was one way people secured their passage to California. By their own choice, they would barter their labor for a specific amount of time as collateral with their chosen Master. The Master paid their fare to California and boarded them while they were working for them. Today I will share two stories of indentured servitude from Sonora, California in the 1850's. I found these stories in an old book called Justice in Sonora from my grandpa's collection. I am not sure if I have ever mentioned it, but my grandfather was Tuo Co sheriff Wally Berry circa 1980s. “This is Queens of the Mines, where we discuss untold stories from the twisted roots of California. I'm Andrea Anderson. We are in a time where historians and the public are no longer dismissing the “conflict history” that has been minimized or blotted out. We now have the opportunity to incorporate the racial and patriarchal experience in the presentation of American reality. The preceding episode may feature foul language and or adult content including violence which may be disturbing some listeners, or secondhand listeners. So, discretion is advised.   It was a hot August day in the gold rush town of Sonora, California. On a crowded Main Street, which is now known as Washington, bookstore owner and City Council member W.H. Mintzer walked past the tented hotels and busy saloons that lined the dusty street in 1850. In the sea of people from all over the globe, Mintzer was approaching a crowded cluster of poverty-ridden brush covered ramadas when he heard a miserable sound. Mintzer stopped to see if he could make out the noise among the multiple languages murmuring and shouting in the streets. It was the sound of a person groaning. Someone was in trouble and he knew he had to find them. Mintzer moved closer to the makeshift homes in the Mexican neighborhood, following the sound of someone in pain.   Eventually, he found the tent that the tragic moaning was coming from. Lifting the flap that served as the door to the tent, Mintzer became overwhelmed by a cloud of flies swarming so thick, he could hardly see who was inside. As his eyes adjusted, he moved closer. Crouching in the corner, was a young Mexican boy, without clothes. Estás bien? He asked the boy, who motioned to the other side of the tent, Mintzer swatted the flies away, revealing another boy, lying in the fetal position. The child was about 12 years old and it was obvious to Mintzer that he was dying.   Mintzer knew that he did not have the supplies or knowledge to help the boys and in a panic, he rushed to the nearby shop of Dr. Marius Chapelle.   He yelled to the doctor to hurry, and showed him the way to the tent. When he found the boy, Dr. Chapelle realized he himself was also helpless. The boy was close to death. The two men sat with the boy, as he took his last breaths, and then comforted the other child, who was his brother.    Word spread around the town about the two boys as quick as wildfire. The streets were buzzing with townspeople as they joined forces to search for the responsible party. It was a man named Bryan, and he was soon found and put on trial before acting judge, justice of the peace, Richard C. Barry. In the early 1850's, Major Richard Barry took on the role as one of the justice of the peace of the towns, alongside Judge Tuttle and John G Marvin. Barry was born in Ireland, and immigrated to Texas. This was while Texas was still a province of Mexico and while there, he dedicated himself to the struggle for independence and became a Major for the Texas Rangers. Barry had a tenderheart for the suffering.   There was a trial, on August 15, 1850, Judge Barry confirmed the conditions of the boys were awful. Simply proven that one boy was naked and the other boy was very sick. The first witness put on the stand was the young surviving boy. He told the judge that his father had given Bryan consent, against the wishes of his mother for indenturement. Without shoes, the two boys, brothers walked for 50 days from Mazatlan to San Jose and then to the plains. Once arriving in Sonora, Bryan left him and his brother alone.    The court then called bookstore owner W.H. Mintzer to the stand.  Mintzer explained how he had discovered the condition of the boys after hearing the groans while walking up Main street. The Frenchman Dr Chapelle then testified that after the boy's death, he took the surviving boy to his  shop, cleaned him up, had his hair cut and gave him clothes and plenty of food. He gave the boy a job washing dishes and he stayed out around the store, selling Chappele's french luxury items. There was no doubt the boy was in good hands. A man named H.E. Masden corroborated statements of the two men.   Uinte Zapedu, who lived in the front of the tent where the boy died, was called to the stand. She testified that the boys were without clothes. A week before his death, Zapedu said the boy did have a sore throat. One of the boys told her he was sick, the other said he was hungry. She would have helped, but her own condition was equally poor and bare.    Next to be sworn in was the countryman Bien Tauster, who was acquainted with the man in charge of the boys, his name was Bryan. Tauster and Bryan had known each other since birth and the two men had come to California on the same ship. He also told the judge of the possessions the boys had, the sick boy had a pair of white pants and a shirt which he had worn since leaving Mazatlan, the younger boy had a hat and a mat. He told Judge Barry that Bryan was kind to the boys and treated them as if they were his own. With the assistance of an interpreter, some members of the local Mexican community then testified that the boys were being treated well.   Tauster also knew the boy's parents in Mazatlan, and explained they were brought here in indentured servitude with consent from the boy's parents. A contract was signed, to keep the boys, providing food and shelter for them. If Bryan did not find gold during this trip, he was to bring them back home. Two young boys, far away from their family and home, dependent on a stranger striking gold.    Bien Tauster attended to the brothers every night, he was one of the people that Bryan had delegated to take care of the boys. Soon the older boy had swelling in his throat and could not work. Tauster told Judge Barry he gave the sick boy sago, a starch extracted from palm stems and rice. He believed the food to be suitable for a sore throat. Tauster did not call for a doctor.   Henry Angill, the area's official grave digger was called to testify. Angill told the court he did not know Bryan, but he had seen the sick boy the day before his death in horrific condition. The following day, two Americans called upon him to tell him the boy was dead and that they wished to bury him. Bryan was in Monterey when the boy became sick and there is no statement from him in the court records. When the evidence portion of the trial was concluded, The Court ordered Dr Chappelle to take care of the young boy until a new guardian could be appointed. Bryan was taken to the jail and was charged $12.50 (428 in today's dollars) for Judge Barry was always alert that cost should be remembered.  What was it like for the women in California during the 1850's? What hardships did they face? What victories were they able to realize? Who were the first women who came to California, and who was already here? Explore the lives of ten brilliant people who made their own way, in a time where women were not so welcome to do so. Their stories contributed to the shaping of the future of California and the United States. The undermined people were often rendered voiceless, leaving them ghosts of our past, dismissed and forgotten. They are rarely heard of, and I want you to know their names. Queens of the Mines, the Paperback Novel is available. I am booking a winter book release tour. If you or your town would like to host Queens of the Mines, let us know! Find it on  queensofthemines.com Now, back to Sonora...   In the summer of 1849, a year prior to the discovery of the young Mexican brothers, the majority of the population of Sonora were Chileans who were working in the mines. The Chileans were the first miners in California to start to extract gold from the quartz once the placer gold ran out around Sonora. Our last quick story for the day is about Sofia, a beautiful Chilean young woman who wanted to get herself to the goldfields in the Mother Lode. So Sofia made a deal back home in Chile. She would travel north to California, via an indentured servitude contract with an older couple living in Sonora.   The arrangement was that Sofia was to repay the cost of her passage to California over time with her labor. For over a year, Sofia worked hard for her Masters. Yet the balance she owed never seemed to get any smaller. She was accomplishing so little towards her own freedom. Her master was taking advantage of her, and not only that, her master was abusive to her in many ways. Sofia did not know how to get out of the trap she was in, and continued to do the couple's chores. One chore that Sofia did find rather pleasant, was accompanying her mistress to the Mexican tienda, or shop on Main Street. A young handsome Chilean man helped around the shop and Sofia found herself thinking about him often. Sofia began an eye to eye courtship with the man she often saw at the shop. A susceptible young man in the country does not keep his eyes on the ground and even a girl with her eyes lowered is not blind. They found a way to communicate directly with each other, and it was quickly decided, they were in love, and they would be married.    One night, he snuck her out of the older couple's home. He was devastated to find that she had been beaten and bruised and that her life at her new home had been utterly miserable.    Her master noticed she was missing, and immediately suspected the young man from the shop had taken her.  He stormed into the sheriff's office and reported the crime. He went to the casa with the support of a constable and violently hauled Sofia back to his house.    The young chileno man was in a rage and turned to his American friends who eagerly briefed him on American ideas of liberty and justice. So he went and made a complaint himself. The young man had made it clear to the judge that he wanted to marry Sofia. Justice Jenkins was not a slave to legal patterns nor would he let a young woman be maltreated. Judge Jenkins then issued a subpoena for Sofia's presence in court.   To everyone's annoyance, the wrinkled old man who kept her appeared instead and he insisted that he was her compadre. He told the judge that he had jurisdiction over her. This was a distasteful idea to the Americans who swarmed the courtroom. A constable with a more forcible order was sent to fetch the girl.   When she arrived, Justice Jenkins performed the marriage ceremony right there and then. The whole town celebrated the outcome and they wished the young couple well. Their next step was to sue for back wages which he considered due to his mujer. Lewis C Gunn, displayed his pleasure in the story with a happy ending in his May 7, 1853 edition of the Sonora Herald. -a poem taken from The early history of Tuolumne County, California   Alright, love you all, be safe, get vaccinated, wear a mask, stay positive and act kind. Thank you for taking the time to listen today, subscribe to the show so we can meet again weekly, on Queens of the Mines. Queens of the Mines is a product of the “Youreka! Podcast Network” and was written, produced and narrated by Andrea Anderson. Go to queensofthemines.com for the book and more. 

Other Worldly: A friendly guide to the uncanny
Tommyknockers and Pit Ponies

Other Worldly: A friendly guide to the uncanny

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 45:24


Today we explore the spooky underground world of haunted mines and ghostly caverns!

GROW Podcast
You are Good as Gold as Beloved Mines of Africa holds

GROW Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 20:25


GROW Greatness Reached over Oppression through Wisdom I have Anxiety but Anxiety don't have Me.Anxiety can cause ProcrastinationAs you see mine isn't taking over meGod has brought us Here       and here We are GROWing.Repeat after me.“I know my worth and my worth is Gold Gold in God.No matter what they thought about me, what God left for me is Gold, Royalty and that's what I am”I Love you,     Love you too.  Be Lifted, You and You.This was what it was for,                                               Gold.Gold is where the Oppression began.God is where we GROW Cause now we know, Love not hate is what will make                                   the World Great.P.S.  My Gold is worth me, but materialistically  it's been separated from Me.That's why it's in the Pawn Shop.  I give to God's People,            that My Beloved is Ministry

Electronic Specifier Insights
Test & Measurement Mines the Channel – Part Two

Electronic Specifier Insights

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 27:15


In our latest Electronic Specifier Insights podcast, we spoke to Robert Morton, Vice President, Sales, EMEA at NI about the company's strategy and how it will benefit customers and distributors and progress so far. 

True scary stories with Edi
STORIES FROM COAL MINES

True scary stories with Edi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 48:59


There is a part of the world that requires a different type of person. Working in coal mind is definitely not a career that one just applies for. Most coal miners have known each other for a long time... and they also knows many tales of caution. Here's some of those very tales. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/edi-gibson/support

No Laying Up - Golf Podcast
NLU Podcast, Episode 490: Michigan Trip Recap

No Laying Up - Golf Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 211:55


With Season 7 of Tourist Sauce set to air on our YouTube channel this Wednesday, October 20, we spend 3+ hours recapping our trip through Michigan. We chat about the trip coming together, and each course that we played, including: Detroit Golf Club, Rackham, University of Michigan, Pilgrim's Run, Diamond Springs, The Mines, Forest Dunes, The Loop, Kingsley, Belvedere, Bay Harbor, Boyne Highlands (Hills), Wawashkamo, and Greywalls. Enjoy!

CHRONIQUES CRIMINELLES
L'affaire Delphine Jubillar : Rumeurs, soupçons et révélations

CHRONIQUES CRIMINELLES

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 65:22


C'est sans doute l'un des faits divers les plus marquants de ces derniers mois… Une affaire mystérieuse qui tient la France en haleine depuis le 15 décembre 2020 déjà… Cette nuit-là, Delphine Jubillar, se volatilise sans laisser de trace. Malgré des recherches d'une ampleur exceptionnelle, l'infirmière de 33 ans reste introuvable. Pour ses proches, les interrogations sont nombreuses : Pourquoi aurait-elle quitté son domicile de Cagnac-les-Mines en abandonnant ses deux jeunes enfants ? Et que dire du comportement de son mari, Cédric ? Car derrière le visage du mari éploré et inquiet, se cache en réalité une personnalité plus que troublante… Alors, quels éléments ont conduit les enquêteurs à le mettre en examen le 18 juin 2021 pour « homicide volontaire par conjoint » ? Entre rebondissements inattendus et nouvelles pistes étonnantes, Chroniques Criminelles fait le point sur cette enquête qui est loin d'avoir livré tous ses secrets… L'affaire « Delphine Jubillar », un podcast inédit raconté par Jacques Pradel

Radio Campus France
Sticky Snake ou le rap de gauchiste brestois | Starting Block

Radio Campus France

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 28:01


Cette semaine Starting Block vous balade à la pointe du Finistère, à Brest. Radio U vous emmène à la rencontre du rappeur Sticky Snake. Après une bonne dizaine d'années à développer son flow et ses lyrics bien ancrées à gauche au sein de l'Alerte Rouge, le MC Brestois prend son envol en solo. Son album « Chants de Mines » est sorti le 1er Octobre sur son label Strictement Vaurien.ne. Un album introspectif et thématique sur la ville de Brest et l'acool, mais jamais loin non plus de l'engagement politique. Une émission réalisée par Pierre-Louis Leseul Radio U Brest https://www.radio-u.org Infos | Sticky Snake https://strictementvaurien.bandcamp.com/

Scandalous Six D&D Podcast
#137 – Danger: Death Inside

Scandalous Six D&D Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021


A new group of adventurers set forth on a journey in the D&D campaign “Fallen Empires” Characters of this campaign include: Powell the Goliath Paladin (Eric), Squeeb the Deep Gnome Wizard (Stephen), Token the Mousefolk Rogue (Matt), Tamsyn the Wood Elf Ranger (Andy), Ildahn the Goliath Warlock (Jordan) and Luke is once again our fearless … Continue reading #137 – Danger: Death Inside

Le zoom de la rédaction
De Kaboul à Saint-Éloy-les-Mines : la nouvelle vie française de réfugiés afghans

Le zoom de la rédaction

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 4:20


durée : 00:04:20 - Le zoom de la rédaction - 2.600 Afghans ont été évacués de Kaboul par les forces françaises après la prise de pouvoir des talibans en août. Ils ont ensuite été répartis dans des logements pour demandeurs d'asile, un peu partout sur le territoire français. France Inter a retrouvé quatre familles dans le Puy-de-Dôme.

Find Your Beach
Patreon Preview #79: Into the Mines

Find Your Beach

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 10:06


Hi Beaches! Come on in, the water is warm! This week on Find Your Beach, Rosebud is kicked off ZocDoc for blowing off half the doctors in New York City, Andy breaks down his plan to invade the Mormon church and we discuss Dave Chappelle's controversial new Netflix special. Make sure you text us your BAD ADVICE questions and your CHILDHOOD TRAUMA stories and you'll get a shout out on the pod! TEXT your BAD ADVICE questions to 917-540-8395 Subscribe to the Patreon for exclusive videos and behind the scenes clips: http://www.patreon.com/findyourbeach​... Follow Andy: http://www.instagram.com/imandyhaynes... Follow Rosebud: http://www.instagram.com/rosebudbaker... Produced at Park Studio: https://www.parkstudio.nyc/ Follow Park Studio NYC: @parkstudio.nyc

CruxCasts
Ceylon Graphite (CYL) - Showing Technical Capabilities as Mines Grow

CruxCasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 33:01


Ceylon Graphite is a public company listed on the TSX Venture Exchange (CYL:TSX-V) involved in the exploration and production of graphite in historic resource jurisdictions in Sri Lanka. It holds a land package constituting 121 km² grids containing historic vein graphite deposits. These unique and comparatively higher margin vein (lump) deposits currently make up less than 1% of the world graphite production. These exploration grids represent the majority of known historic graphite resources in Sri Lanka. The relevant areas in which these grids reside have previously had historical production dating back to the 1920s and 1930s.

One and One Podcast
Diamond Gillis

One and One Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 63:18


Diamond Gillis played football at Colorado School of Mines from 2010-2014.  He talks about growing up in Aurora, Colorado, how he got into football, playing Quarterback at a young age, and his great career at Cherokee Trail High School where excelled in football, basketball, and was an Honors student.  He tells the great story of coming into the game as a Sophomore backup quarterback and winning a State Playoff game.  Diamond discusses his recruiting process, why he chose Colorado School of Mines, a Division II school, and the unique academic experience that Mines offers.  He describes the transition from high school to college football, redshirting his freshman year, switching positions from Quarterback to Wide Receiver, the hard work he put in to be one of the best receivers on the team, and how he balanced athletics and academics.  Diamond then explains his career highlights at Mines, the success the program had, his decision to return for a 5th year, and making the SportsCenter Top 10 Plays list for an insane catch he made in 2014.  He talks about what he's been up to since graduation, becoming a husband and father, and keeping football in his life by coaching at the high school level.

Queens of the Mines
The Occupation of Alcatraz - Happy Indigenous Peoples Day!

Queens of the Mines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 26:53


The famed Alcatraz prison on Alcatraz Island was in operation from 1934 to 1963. For most, the thought of Alcatraz may bring up a Hollywood film or some of the most notorious criminals in America. But the island carries a different symbolism to the native coastal peoples of California. The California Ohlone Mewuk which translates to coastal people, passed down an oral history that tells us that Alcatraz was used by their Native population long before  anyone else “discovered” the San Francisco Bay. Trips would be made to the island in tule boats for gathering foods, such as bird eggs and sea-life. It was also used as a place of isolation, or for punishment for naughty members of the tribe. The island was also a camping spot and hiding place for many native Americans attempting to escape the California Mission system. In 1895, the island was being used as a US fort and military prison and 19 Hopi men served time on Alcatraz for trying to protect their children from being sent to federal Indian boarding schools, which we discussed last week.    “This is Queens of the Mines, where we discuss untold stories from the twisted roots of California. This week's episode is coming out a few days early in honor of Indigenous Peoples Day. Today we will talk about The Occupation of Alcatraz and the Red Power Movement which demanded self-determination for Native Americans to better the lives of all Indian people. To make it known to the world that they have a right to use their land for their own benefit by right of discovery. We are in a time where historians and the public are no longer dismissing the “conflict history” that has been minimized or blotted out.    In 1953, U.S. Congress established a policy towards American Indians: termination. This policy eliminated most government support for indigenous tribes and ended the protected trust status of all indigenous-owned lands. It wiped out the reservations and natives had the choice to assimilate or die out. So the BIA began a voluntary urban relocation program where American Indians could move from their rural tribes to metropolitan areas, and they would give them assistance with locating housing and employment. Numerous American Indians made the move to cities, lured by the hope of a better life. It was a struggle for them. Many struggled to adjust to life in a city with these low-end jobs, they faced discrimination, they were homesickn and they totally lost their cultural identity. Giving a person a home and a job, yet taking away everything that they are, that is defining a human only in economic terms. So, after they relocated and got job and housing placement, as soon as they received their first paycheck, the assistance was done. Termination.    This Episode is brought to you by the Law Offices of CHARLES B SMITH. Are you facing criminal charges in California? The most important thing you can do is obtain legal counsel from an aggressive Criminal Defense Lawyer you can trust. The Law Office of Charles B. Smith has effectively handled thousands of cases. The Law Offices of CHARLES B SMITH do not just defend cases, they represent people. Charles is intimately familiar with the investigative techniques the police and prosecutors use and is able to look at your case and see defenses that others can, and do, miss. Visit cbsattorney.com for more information.  Even during the gold rush, no one liked attorneys, and Charles, you will love. Now, back to Alcatraz.   When Rosebud Sioux Belva Cottier heard the Alcatraz Federal Penitentiary was closing in 1963 and that the property was going to be given to the City of San Francisco, she thought of the 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie. The Treaty that allowed Native Americans to appropriate surplus federal land. So, she and her cousin Richard McKenzie retrieved a copy of the treaty and thought, if the property was surplus land of the government, the Sioux could claim it.    Belva organized a demonstration to raise awareness and planned to take court action to obtain the title to the island. On March 8, 1964 her group of Sioux activists, photographers, reporters and her lawyer landed on Alcatraz. About 40 people. The demonstration lasted only four hours. It was "peaceful and in accordance with Sioux treaty rights” but the demonstrators left under the threat of felony charges. The idea of reclaiming “the Rock” became a rallying cry for the indigenous population.   Five years later, on October 10, 1969, there was a fire that destroyed the San Francisco American Indian Center. It was a detrimental loss for the native community because the center provided Native Americans with jobs, health care, aid in legal affairs, and social opportunities.    An activist group formed, known as “Indians of All Tribes” with Pipestone Indian Boarding School graduate Adam Fortunate Eagle and the handsome, Mohawk college student Richard Oakes.  Richard had co-founded the American Indian Studies Dept at SF State and worked as a bartender in the Mission District of San Francisco which brought him in contact with the local Native American communities.    The goal was to take immediate action towards claiming space for the local Indian community and they set their sights on the unused federal land at Alcatraz, which would soon be sold to a billionaire developer.   Adam and Oakes planned a takeover of the island as a symbolic act. They agreed on November 9, 1969. Richard would gather approximately 75 indigenous people and Adam would arrange transportation to the island. The boats did not show up.   Nearby, a sailor was watching the natives waiting, some wearing traditional ceremony dress and Adam Fortunate Eagle convinced him, the owner of a three-masted yacht to pass by the island with him and 4 friends on board. As the boat passed by Alcatraz, Oates and two men jumped overboard, swam to shore, and claimed the island by right of discovery. At this moment, Richard became the leader of the movement. The five men were quickly removed by the Coast Guard.    Later that night, Adam, Richard and others hired a boat, making their way back to the island again, some students stayed overnight before they were again made to leave. Richard Oakes told the San Francisco Chronicle, “If a one day occupation by white men on Indian land years ago established squatter's rights, then the one day occupation of Alcatraz should establish Indian rights to the island.”   Eleven days later on November 20, 1969, Richard and Adam met 87 native men, women and children, 50 of whom California State University students at the No Name bar in Sausalito just after closing at 2, met with some free-spirited boat owners and sailed through San Francisco Bay towards Alcatraz, not knowing if they'd be killed, ignoring warnings that the occupation of the island was illegal. Indians of All Tribes made one last attempt to seize Alcatraz and claim the island for all the tribes of North America using unarmed, body and spirit politics. As they disembarked onto the island an Alcatraz security guard yelled out, may day! May day! The Indians have landed! Three days in, it became clear - this wasn't going to be a short demonstration.    Richard Oates soon addressed the media with a manifesto titled “The Great White Father and All His People.” In it, he stated the intention was to use the island for an Indian school, cultural center and museum. Oates claimed Alcatraz belonged to the Native Americans “by right of discovery”. He sarcastically offered to buy the island back for “$24 in glass beads and red cloth”, the same price that Natives received for the island of Manhattan.    Now I'll read the manifesto   “We feel that this so-called Alcatraz Island is more than suitable as an Indian Reservation, as determined by the white man's own standards. By this we mean that this place resembles most Indian reservations, in that: It is isolated from modern facilities, and without adequate means of transportation. It has no fresh running water. The sanitation facilities are inadequate. There are no oil or mineral rights. There is no industry and so unemployment is very great. There are no health care facilities. The soil is rocky and non-productive and the land does not support game. There are no educational facilities. The population has always been held as prisoners and kept dependent upon others. Further, it would be fitting and symbolic that ships from all over the world, entering the Golden Gate, would first see Indian land, and thus be reminded of the true history of this nation. This tiny island would be a symbol of the great lands once ruled by free and noble Indians.   “We hold the Rock”   The Nixon administration sent out a negotiator, and as the two sides debated, the natives continued to settle onto their new land. Native American college students and activists flocked to join the protest, and the population of Alcatraz often swelled to more than 600 people. They moved into the old warden's house and guards' quarters and began personalizing the island with graffiti. Buildings were tagged with slogans like Home of the Free, Indian Land, Peace and Freedom, Red Power and Custer Had It Coming.   This episode is brought to you by Sonora Florist. SONORA FLORIST has been providing our community with beautiful flower arrangements for whatever the occasion since the early 1950s. You can visit sonoraflorist.com, or search Sonora Florist on Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram. There is a special website for wedding florals, visit sincerelysonoraflorist.com to see their wedding work, read reviews, or to book a consultation with one of their designers if you are getting married in the area. Thank you Sonora Florist. And if you have not checked out the mural on the side of the shop, on the corner of Washington and Bradford in downtown Sonora, in honor of the local Chinese history, do so! It was a fight to get it up, and it was worth it!   This episode was also brought to you by our main Sponsor Columbia Mercantile 1855, Columbia Historic Park's Main street grocery store. Teresa, the owner, carries a mix of quality international and local products that replicate diverse provisions of when Columbia was California's second largest city after San Francisco. I love the selection of hard kombucha, my favorite. It is common to hear, "Wow! I didn't expect to find that here in Columbia". The Columbia Mercantile 1855 is located in Columbia State Historic Park at 11245 Jackson Street and is a great place to keep our local economy moving. At a time like this, it is so important to shop local, and The Columbia Mercantile 1855 is friendly, welcoming, fairly priced and accepts EBT. Open Daily! Now, back to Alcatraz   The occupation sought to unify indigenous peoples from more than 500 nations across America, the Western Hemisphere and Pacific. Everyone on the island had a job. The island soon had its own clinic, kitchen, public relations department and even a nursery and grade school for its children. A security force sarcastically dubbed the “Bureau of Caucasian Affairs” patrolled the shoreline to watch for intruders. All decisions were made by unanimous consent of the people. A Sioux named John Trudell hopped behind the mic to broadcast radio updates from Alcatraz under the banner of “Radio Free Alcatraz.” “ We all had things to offer each other,” resident Luwana Quitquit later remembered. “Brotherhood. Sisterhood.”    The federal government initially insisted that the protestors leave the island and they placed an inadequate barricade around the island. The demonstration was a media frenzy and the protestors received an enormous amount of support. There was a call for contributions  and a mainland base was set up at San Francisco's Pier 40, near Fisherman's Wharf. Supplies such as canned goods and clothes were shipped in. Visitors and volunteers were sailing in, and thousands of dollars in cash were pouring in from donors across the country. The Black Panther Party had volunteered to help provide security and celebrities like Marlon Brando, Jane Fonda and Merv Griffin visited the island in support. The band Creedence Clearwater Revival gave the Indians of All Tribes a boat, which was christened the “Clearwater.”    Things started to change in early 1970, there was a leadership crisis.  The organizers and a majority of the college students had to return to school. Many vagrants who were not interested in fighting for the cause moved in, taking advantage of the rent free living and drugs and alcohol, which were originally banned on the island, started to move freely among a select crowd.     Then tragically, Richard and Annie Oakes's daughter Yvonne fell 5 stories to her death from one of the prison's stairwells in the guards quarters. Oakes and his wife left Alcatraz in the wake of the accident, leaving groups of warring activists to fight it out for control of the island.    In May of 1970, the Nixon administration cut the electricity to Alcatraz, hoping to force the demonstrators out. Let's face it, the government was never going to meet the demands of the Indians of All Tribes. Next, they removed the water barge which had been providing fresh water to the occupiers. Three days following the removal of the water barge, a fire was started on the island, destroying the warden's house, the inside of the lighthouse which was important for SF bay navigation and several of Alcatraz's historic buildings. No one knows who started the fire. It could have come from either side. Was it - Burn it down? Or get them out?   Two months later, President Richard Nixon gave a speech saying, “The time has come…for a new era in which the Indian future is determined by Indian acts and Indian decisions.” The U.S. government later returned millions of acres of ancestral Indian land and passed more than 50 legislative proposals supporting tribal self rule. The termination policy was terminated.   In the meantime, the FBI, Coast Guard and the Government Services Administration stayed clear of the island. While it appeared to those on the island that negotiations were actually taking place, in fact, the federal government was playing a waiting game, hoping that support for the occupation would subside and those on the island would elect to end the occupation. At one point, secret negotiations were held where the occupiers were offered a portion of Fort Miley, a 15 minute walk from the Sutro Baths, as an alternative site to Alcatraz Island.    The occupation continued into 1971. Support for the cause had diminished after the press turned against them and began publishing stories of alleged beatings and assaults; one case of assault was prosecuted. In an attempt to raise money to buy food, they allegedly began stripping copper wiring and copper tubing from the buildings and selling it as scrap metal. Three of the occupiers were arrested, tried and found guilty of selling some 600lbs of copper. In January 1971, two oil tankers collided in the entrance to the San Francisco Bay. Though it was acknowledged that the lack of an Alcatraz light or fog horn played no part in the collision, it was enough to push the federal government into action. A few holdouts continued to live on the Rock for another year. “I don't want to say Alcatraz is done with,” former occupier Adam Fortunate Eagle lamented to The San Francisco Chronicle in April 1971, “but no organized Indian groups are active there. It has turned from an Indian movement to a personality thing.”    Citing a need to restore Alcatraz's foghorn and lighthouse, President Nixon gave the go-ahead to develop a removal plan to be acted upon with as little force as possible, when the smallest number of people were on the island. The government told the remaining occupiers they would have news on the deed the following Monday morning. They were told no action would be taken until the negotiations were settled. That was a lie. On June 10, 1971 armed federal marshals, FBI agents, and special forces police descended on the island and removed five women, four children, and six unarmed men. the last of the indigenous residents. The occupation was over.   An island ledger entry reads “We are about to leave for Alcatraz, maybe for the last time, To this beautiful little Island, which means a little something, which no one will ever understand my feelings.”  It is signed by Marie B. Quitiquit of Stockton. Beneath Quitiquit's words someone wrote in capital letters “I SHALL NEVER FORGET, MY PEOPLE, MY LAND ALCATRAZ”.   Oakes, who had once proclaimed that “Alcatraz was not an island, it was an idea”, never left the idea behind and continued his resistance. As a result of his activism, he endured tear gas, billy clubs, and brief stints in jail. He helped the Pit River Tribe in their attempts to regain nearly 3 million acres of land that had been seized by Pacific Gas & Electric and had plans to create a "mobile university" dedicated to creating opportunities for Native Americans.  Soon after he left the occupation, Oates was in Sonoma where Michael Morgan, a YMCA camp manager was being accussesd as a white supremacist, and being tough with Native American children. 30 year old Oakes reportedly confronted Michael Morgan. Morgan said he was in fear for his life, when he drew a handgun and fatally shot Richard Oakes. Oakes was unarmed. Morgan was charged with voluntary manslaughter, but was acquitted by a jury that agreed with Morgan that the killing was an act of self-defense, even though Oakes was unarmed. Oakes supporters contend the shooting was an act of murder, and that Morgan received support from a racially motivated jury and district attorney.  So, over the course of the 19-month occupation, more than 10,000 indigenous people visited the island to offer support. Alcatraz may have been lost, but the occupation gave birth to political movements which continue today as injustices inflicted on indigenous people is an ongoing problem. The Rock has also continued to serve as a focal point of Native American social campaigns  and it left the demonstrators with big ideas. Indian rights organizations, many of them staffed by Alcatraz veterans, later staged occupations and protests at Plymouth Rock, Mount Rushmore, the Bureau of Indian Affairs and dozens of other sites across the country. Federal officials also started listening to calls for Indian self-determination. The occupation of Alcatraz was the first demonstration of its kind for the American Indians. It was a spiritual reawakening for the indigenous peoples and renewed interest in tribal communities. Many natives did not know what it meant to be native, and they learned of and about their heritage in light of the media attention the occupation received. It was the first chance they were able to feel proud of their indigenous background. A beginning for Native pride, the kickstarter for a move back to a traditional identity. A revival of language, traditions. Awakening the native people, the tribes, the media, the government and Americans. The “return of the buffalo”. Dr LaNada War Jack, Shoshone Bannock Tribe, one of UC Berkeley's first native students & demonstration leader tells us, “We wanted to bring to the forefront that every single one of (more than 500) treaties were broken by the fed government.” The boarding schools, genocide, relocation, termination, , everything that historically happened to American Indians — continues to impact them today. They are still here.  Now, that is a real theft of freedom. A theft of freedom from the ones who were here first. So, I do not want to hear a damn word about your loss of rights for having to wear a damn mask. You want to fight for freedom? Stand up for your local indigenous people.    Alright, love you all, be safe, get vaccinated, wear a mask, stay positive and act kind. Thank you for taking the time to listen today, subscribe to the show so we can meet again weekly, on Queens of the Mines. Queens of the Mines is a product of the “Youreka! Podcast Network” and was written, produced and narrated by Andrea Anderson. Go to queensofthemines.com for the book and more.  https://www.latimes.com/entertainment-arts/story/2020-11-19/alcatraz-occupation-indigenous-tribes-autry-museum https://www.history.com/news/native-american-activists-occupy-alcatraz-island-45-years-ago The Alcatraz Indian Occupation by Dr. Troy Johnson, Cal State Long Beach https://www.nps.gov/alca/learn/historyculture/we-hold-the-rock.htm https://www.foundsf.org/index.php?title=ALCATRAZ_Proclamation  

Scandalous Six D&D Podcast
#136 – I Sense the Legs of His Presence

Scandalous Six D&D Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021


A new group of adventurers set forth on a journey in the D&D campaign “Fallen Empires” Characters of this campaign include: Powell the Goliath Paladin (Eric), Squeeb the Deep Gnome Wizard (Stephen), Token the Mousefolk Rogue (Matt), Tamsyn the Wood Elf Ranger (Andy), Ildahn the Goliath Warlock (Jordan) and Luke is once again our fearless … Continue reading #136 – I Sense the Legs of His Presence

SDPB News
South Dakota Mines receives $4 million dollar donation in honor of beloved alumna| October 8th

SDPB News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 14:12


Each day, SDPB brings you statewide news coverage. We then compile those stories into a daily podcast.

Queens of the Mines
The Murderous Mail Order Bride of Tuttletown

Queens of the Mines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 22:26


This is Queens of the Mines. Today I am going to tell you the story of the Murderous Mail Order Bride of Tuttletown from 1929. The preceding episode may feature foul language and or adult content including violence which may be disturbing some listeners, or secondhand listeners. So, discretion is advised.   On a ranch on blanket creek, near the current Kress Ranch Road, lived  Carroll and his parents Stephen Rablen and Corrine Brown. They were a well known family in Sonora who were pioneers there during the gold rush. Corrine was the daughter of the late C.C. Brown, a prominent lawyer of Sonora.    Carroll had been married twice, first to Martha Copeland and second to Eva Young. Neither marriage lasted. While serving during WW 1 in France, a German shell exploded in Carroll's dugout, causing him to lose his hearing. The thirty-four year old veteran returned to Tuttletown to live with his widower father. The hearing impairment made Carroll too shy to meet a local girl. Yet he was lonely.   So lonely that, in June of 1928, Carroll placed an ad in a San Francisco matrimonial paper in search of a bride. He stated that he was looking for a woman who would enjoy a life with him hiking and enjoying the natural wonders of the Sierra Nevadas. The ad was printed in matrimonial papers across the nation and a thirty-three year old waitress in Texas responded to Rablen's request. They wrote back and forth. She told him she was a heavy boned blond with a twin sister who she called Effie and a son, Albert. About Albert, Eva wrote to Rablan, he has had no father since he was a month old. The father left her. She hasn't seen him and if a man left her she wouldn't want to see them again and she would make sure she didn't.” It was an odd thing to say during courtship. They continued to write back and forth and it was decided that Eva would leave Texas, come to California and the two would be married.    Carroll met Eva at the station in San Francisco, and together they traveled to Nevada where they were married in Reno. Her twin sister Effie and son Albert soon followed her out to California. Stephen Rablen was not keen on the idea of his son's previously divorced “mail order bride”. Steven questioned her motives. The town was curious.    One year after the wedding, the gossiping had died off. Carroll had found a job as a clerk with Standard City Lumber, which was being acquired and would soon be named Pickering Lumber and the couple was living on a chicken ranch in Standard City. The two of them quarreled often and shared a toxic and unhealthy relationship. When Eva transferred herself as the beneficiary on the $3,500 life insurance policy Carroll had purchased for himself, his father Stephen was alarmed.    Stephen Rablen played the fiddle and a local wedding or party seldom went without Stephen and his brother John providing the music. The brothers had been asked to play at a community dance at the Tuttletown school house on the 29th of April in 1929. Carroll and Eva joined them for the party. Well, Eva did.  Carroll's insecurities with his hearing impairment kept him from fully enjoying the festivities and as per usual, Carroll waited out the night in the car while his wife danced the night away with the people from town.  Halfway through the night, Stephen was playing “Turkey in the Straw” on his fiddle when Eva went to the refreshment table to make up a sandwich and a cup of coffee for Carroll. She would bring him a refreshment to the car. With her hands full, Eva made her way across the dance floor towards the front door. Alice Shea, a local woman who was dancing, jostled her arm, and some of the coffee spilled on Alice's pink dress. Oops.    Eva made her way outside with the sandwich and cup of coffee to her husband who was still in the car. “Here dear, here is something to eat.” Carroll thanked his bride, she waved and returned to the dance floor. He had a few bites of his sandwich while he waited for the hot coffee to cool down. He blew into it, and took a sip. He made a strange face. He took another drink and then another. Then, he dropped the cup.   This episode was brought to you by our main Sponsor Columbia Mercantile 1855, Columbia Historic Park's Main street grocery store. Teresa, the owner carries a mix of quality international and local products that replicate diverse provisions of when Columbia was California's second largest city after San Francisco. I love the selection of hard kombucha, my favorite. It is common to hear, "Wow! I didn't expect to find that here in Columbia". The Columbia Mercantile 1855 is located in Columbia State Historic Park at 11245 Jackson Street and is a great place to keep our local economy moving. At a time like this, it is so important to shop local, and The Columbia Mercantile 1855 is friendly, welcoming, fairly priced and accepts EBT. Open Daily! Now, back to Tuttletown-    A few minutes after midnight, Rancher Frank Shell and a group of his friends were smoking in front of the schoolhouse on the night of the dance.  The men stopped mid conversation when they began to hear groans of distress. Frank Shell realized it was coming from a nearby parked car and followed the sound. He found Carroll doubled over and shouted to him. “What's the matter, are you sick?” Carroll mumbled to Shell, “That coffee - bitter - get  - my - father.”    Frank Shell opened the car door, picked the vet up and carried him into the schoolhouse. Shell was yelling as he burst through the door,  “Steve - Steve Rablen- Your boy is sick!” The music in the Tuttletown schoolhouse stopped and everyone heard Carroll cry out in pain. Stephen threw his fiddle down, jumped off the platform and rushed through the crowd towards his son. Eva had rushed out from the kitchen where she had been helping clean up. She stood and watched the action play out around her, seemingly terrified. She finally attempted to hold her husband down as he thrashed around but Frank Shell carried Carrol outside and placed him on the ground.   Carroll reached out for his father's hand and told him one last time, “ Papa, that coffee was awfully bitter.” His words faded as he slipped into an unconscious state. Emergency services arrived 45 minutes later with Tuolumne County Sheriff Jack H. Dambacher, who pronounced Carroll B. Rablen dead at the scene. Eva rode along quietly as the ambulance took her husband's body to Coroner Josie Terzich.    Dr. Bromley also built a two-story hospital called the Bromley Sanitarium, which we talked about in the Open Mic episode, it later became known as Sonora Hospital. It was situated at the current Yosemite Title parking lot.   Dr. Bromley performed an autopsy on Carrol Rablen's body and sent Rablen's stomach contents to the University of California for analysis. Foul play was not obvious, and it was assumed Carroll had died of natural causes but Steven Rablen did not buy it. He stormed Dambacher's headquarters, demanding that the search continued.    Sheriff Dambacher returned to the Tuttletown schoolhouse on May 1, 1929, the day of Carroll Rablen's funeral. After an hour of searching which turned up nothing, he placed his hat on his head and turned to leave the scene, he paused. On the ground in a bush, near where the Rablen's car had been parked, was a small medicinal bottle from Bigelow's drugstore. He picked up the bottle and read the label. STRYCHNINE. The poison used to kill rodents.   We want to welcome this month's featured sponsor, Sonora Florist. SONORA FLORIST has been providing our community with beautiful flower arrangements for whatever the occasion since the early 1950s. You can visit sonoraflorist.com, or search Sonora Florist on Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram. There is a special website for wedding florals, visit sincerelysonoraflorist.com to see their wedding work, read reviews, or to book a consultation with one of their designers if you are getting married in the area. Thank you Sonora Florist. And if you have not checked out the mural on the side of the shop, on the corner of Washington and Bradford in downtown Sonora, in honor of the local Chinese history, do so! It was a fight to get it up, and it was worth it!   This Episode is brought to you by the Law Offices of CHARLES B SMITH. Are you facing criminal charges in California? The most important thing you can do is obtain legal counsel from an aggressive Criminal Defense Lawyer you can trust. The Law Office of Charles B. Smith has effectively handled thousands of cases. The Law Offices of CHARLES B SMITH do not just defend cases, they represent people. Charles is intimately familiar with the investigative techniques the police and prosecutors use and is able to look at your case and see defenses that others can, and do, miss. Visit cbsattorney.com for more information.  Even during the gold rush, no one liked attorneys, and Chrles, you will love.    After finding the empty bottle of strychnine at the scene of the crime, Dambacher headed to Bigelow's Drug Store to question the clerk about the recent purchases of the poison. There had been only one purchase of the substance that week, to a Mrs. Joe Williams, who lived on a chicken ranch near the junction of the Sonora Mono road and the road to Soulsbyville, at about 10 o'clock on the morning of Crroll's death. The purchase was under the pretext of the need for poisoning gophers. When the drugstore clerk described the appearance of Mrs. Joe Williams, it was an exact description of Eva Brandon.    Eva had been staying with Mrs. Jasper Shell after the accident, and Dambacher headed to the Shell's Hale Ranch. Eva came outside, and the Sheriff told her they were going on a ride with Constable Hoskins to the drugstore. The employees that were present when she bought the poison for 50 cents were Walter Ronten and Mrs Warren Sahey. They told the officers that Eva was the woman who bought the bottle. Dambacher made the clerks aware that their certainty would end in a murder charge for Eva, they took a second look but were positive. Eva was immediately accused of murder. She vigorously denied the charges, saying her husband was broken-hearted over his health problems and had surely poisoned himself. She demanded the Sheriff bring her home but Jack Dambacher told Eva she was not going home for a long time.   At the sheriff headquarters, Carrol's father Stephen insisted that he suspected his daughter-in-law had killed his son over a $3,500 insurance policy. For reference, $3500 would be the equivalent of $56k in 2021. Stephen Rablen told the deputies he believed that Eva found her victims through mail-order bride advertisements. He suggested she surely killed her last husband, a mail-order groom named Hubert Brandon. Eva was formally charged with premeditated murder the following day in a complaint signed by Stephen Rablan. Her twin sister Effie had been working night and day to prove someone else bought the poison. Effie insisted that the two were deeply in love and that Eva was miles away when the poison was bought.   Sonora's Dr. Bromley conducted the autopsy and sent Carroll's stomach to western laboratories in Oakland to be tested for poison by the famed scientist Edward O. Heinrich. Local Coroner Jesie Terzzich attended the testing. Heinrich was a famous American criminologist in the 20's known as the Wizard of Berkeley, America's Sherlock Holmes and the Edison of Crime Detection. He was an extraordinarily skilled criminologist who, almost single-handedly, helped to instill a systematic and scientific level of criminal investigation in the 20s and 30s. Heinrich is still held in the highest esteem by those who are familiar with his methodologies.    The Mother Lode was seething with controversy, everyone had their own opinion on whether it was murder, suicide or natural causes. Eva sat calmly in jail for a week proclaiming “why would I kill my husband? I never poisoned him!” The San Joaquin attorney Charles H. Vance, offered to defend Eva, telling her that “No hick sheriff or county prosecutor would ever be able to convict her”. The entire case was heavily covered in extreme detail in the papers as front page news.    The trial for the murder of Crroll Rablan was so largely attended on June 10 1929, the hearing was held outside in an open-air dance pavilion, where there was no shortage of space. Eva arrived on the arm of her attorney and quickly pleaded not guilty. Her defense focused on the mental state of the husband and wife. Carroll, they claimed, was suicidal. His first wife was there to testify that she had heard him make suicidal remarks in the past. The defense stated that Eva was manic depressive with developmental disabilities leaving her with an IQ equal to her eleven year old son.    Then, the opposition took the stage. An insurance agent from Oakdale  was called on as a witness, testifying that he had called on Carroll the day before he died to let him know his insurance would soon expire, and he had refused to renew the policy under Eva's name. Next, a handwriting expert proved the signature on a drugstore's registry with Eva's handwriting and they were a perfect match. It wasn't looking good for Eva.   Now, forensic science was still new, and forensic science using DNA would not be used to solve a crime until 1984, but it was forensics and chemical analysis that cracked this case in 1929. Edward O. Heinrich was called to the stand. Heinrich proved to the judge, and the curious audience, that there was strychnine in Carroll's stomach, on the coffee cup, and on the coffee stain that was left on Alice Shea's dress.    Eva and her team's mood changed when they realized the strong case against her and the crowd was shocked when suddenly, Eva took the stand and changed her plea to guilty.    She told the judge the war had left horrific effects on her husband. He constantly victimised himself and complained about his ailments.    “Quarrels, quarrels, I was sick and tired of them. We talked things over. It was decided we should both commit suicide. But I couldn't bring myself to do it. I was exhausted by my husband's suicidal tendencies, he constantly talked about self-harm and asked me to kill him. Finally I decided to poison him. It was the best way out, I thought. Now they want to hang me? I could only put him out of the way because I felt it was the only way to get my freedom.”     Her confession eliminated the need for the trial and Eva Brandon-Rablen was sentenced to life in prison at San Quentin for Murder, without the possibility of parole. By pleading guilty, Eva evaded the death penalty.  Sheriff Jack Dambacher and his wife escorted Eva to the ferry that would take her to the penitentiary. Eva was all smiles as she told the couple “I feel fine,  not a bit tired. I'm not at all downhearted or discouraged.” Effie was there with Eva's son, eleven year old Albert Lee so he could say farewell to his mother. She held her son in a cold embrace. “I will be alright,” she told him. “I'm going to study Spanish. I've always been crazy to learn Spanish. Then if I get along well with that I can take on other subjects.” Reporters on hand at the ferry dock asked her why she killed Carroll. “I can't tell you why. I can't tell you why I confessed to putting strychnine in my husband's coffee. I told the court all and I want to tell.”  Eva boarded the ferry that would transport her to San Quentin and looked to the distance as the ferry left the shore. She disappeared behind the prison walls to spend the rest of her life; she would never again be free. Well, never say never.    Nine years later, on Jan 27th 1938, against the recommendations of the Tuolumne County Superior Court and officials at prison, she applied for parole.       You see, Eva was one of the original prisoners transferred from San Quentin to the California Institute for Women at Tehachapi. Eva had served longer than most of the other criminals incarcerated there. Parole was granted. The forgotten woman left the prison walls and was whisked away in a car that was waiting for her outside.    I guess we will never know what Eva's true motive was. Was she insane, as her lawyers would have argued? Did Carroll poison himself and she took the blame? Did he ask her to do it? Was it for $3,500, as her father-in-law believed? Or is there a story, still untold? What do you think?   John Henry “Jack” Dambacher, whose tenure as sheriff from 1922 to 1946 is the longest in county history. Dambacher was known by his nickname “The Black Hat”, apparently after his iconic headwear. The new county jail was named the JH Dambacher detention center. He was originally buried in Sonora's Mountain View Catholic Cemetery but he was dis-interred and moved to the Casa Bonita Mausoleum in Stockton. Carroll Burdette Rablen, his mother and his father Stephen are buried in the Sonora City Cemetery. Heinnrich was buried at Chapel of the Chimes Columbarium and Mausoleum at hot - topic on QOTM Mountain View Oakland.   Alright, love you all, be safe, get vaccinated, wear a mask, stay positive and act kind. Thank you for taking the time to listen today, subscribe to the show so we can meet again weekly, on Queens of the Mines. Queens of the Mines is a product of the “Youreka! Podcast Network” and was written, produced and narrated by Andrea Anderson. Go to queensofthemines.com for the book and more.    Primary sources: Oakland Tribune Tue May 14, 1929 The Ogden Standard Examiner Sun Jul 14, 1929 www.murderpedia.org/female.R/images/rablen_eva/eva-rablen.pdf https://oldspirituals.com/2019/06/16/from-the-end-eva-rablen-mail-order-bride/ THE MAIL ORDER BRIDE MURDER- C.A. Asbrey  Object: Matrimony: The Risky Business of Mail-Order Matchmaking on the … By Chris Enss

Consumer Choice Radio
EP92: We are not victims. But we must stand up for Afghan equality, liberty & freedom (w/ Fmr. Afghan Minister Nargis Nehan)

Consumer Choice Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 48:21


For our first segment, David is off prancing in Washington, D.C., so Yaël gives a reaction to the Facebook "whistleblower" and the politicians chomping at the bits to get in on social media regulation. INTERVIEW: Nargis Nehan was formerly the Afghan Minister of Mines and Petroleum,  and worked in various positions at the Ministry of Finance the Ministry of Education, the Afghan Central Bank, and served as an advisor to the President of Afghanistan for two years. She eventually left the government and founded EQUALITY for Peace and Democracy (EPD) a civil society organization for empowering women and youth across 16 provinces of Afghanistan. https://twitter.com/NehanNargis — Having to flee Afghanistan a second time — History repeating itself — What will happen to those who must stay in Afghanistan? — Female activists still in hiding — The persistent issues that still plagued post-Taliban Afghanistan — Helping modernize the financial and resource systems  — Working within the Afghan treasury — Equality for Peace and Democracy, and promoting good governance — Developing the mining sector and fighting other ministers reluctant to deal with female officials — Harassment within Afghan institutions and resigning from the government — The cause of reform and governance was lost to elections — What can people in other countries do to help Afghans and support freedom? — The barbarity of the Taliban, the dark age-mentality, and how to restore rights and freedom in Afghanistan. Broadcast on Consumer Choice Radio on October 7, 2021. Radio: http://sauga960am.ca Radio: http://bigtalkerfm.com  Website: http://consumerchoiceradio.com ***PODCAST***  Apple: http://apple.co/2G7avA8  Spotify: http://spoti.fi/3iXIKIS  Produced by the Consumer Choice Center. Support the show: http://consumerchoicecenter.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Screen Test of Time
Episode 172: King Solomon's Mines

Screen Test of Time

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 28:40


David refers to King Solomon's Mines as the movie that dares to ask, “What if Trader Horn was in color?” but what it really answers is why the character of Allan Quatermain, who was as popular and well known at the turn of the 20th century as James Bond is today, and played here by Stewart Granger, disappeared entirely from the popular imagination.

Daily Crypto Report
"TikTok NFT collection. EL Salvador mines BTC from volcano." October 1, 2021

Daily Crypto Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 3:38


Today's blockchain and cryptocurrency news Brought to you by ungrocery.com Bitcoin is up 1% at $47,504 Ethereum is up 1% at $3,236 and Cardano is up slightly at $2.24 Vechain up 24% AMP up 15% THORchain up 15% El Salvador has started mining bitcoin with geothermal energy from volcanos. The bank of England starfs up third-party working groups to provide input into CBDC. TikTok announces NFT collection that will partner with top creators. Rugpull in Solana NFT project. US Fed Chair Jerome Powell said he'd misspoken abut CBDCs replacing private cryptos.

Macro Hive Conversations With Bilal Hafeez
Anas Alhajji On the Energy Outlook, Climate Change and Arctic Oil

Macro Hive Conversations With Bilal Hafeez

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 58:25


This episode is sponsored by Masterworks. Dr. Anas Alhajji is a leading energy markets expert, and advises governments, companies, and financial institutions on energy markets. He focuses on oil and gas market outlook, energy geopolitics, energy security, and the impact of disruptive technologies on the supply and demand of energy. He is the Managing Partner at Energy Outlook Advisors LLC, and was previously the Chief Economist of NGP Energy Capital Management. He is also a contributing editor for top industry publication: World Oil. Before moving to industry, Anas taught economics at the University of Oklahoma, the Colorado School of Mines and Ohio Northern University. In this podcast we discuss: False ideas around what drives oil prices What supply and demand drivers matter Why OPEC doesn't matter Why peak oil is wrong Why bearish oil demand forecasts on ESG/climate change are wrong How governments and companies are not acting on carbon neutrality How Iran oil supply has continued despite sanctions Oil underinvestment in oil producing nations Saudi, US and Russian oil supply outlook The Arctic oil play China's dominance in oil markets The rise of private generators Book that Anas rates: Kuwait in the Time of British Empire (Khajah)  

Queens of the Mines
National Day for Truth and Reconciliation - Bonus Episode

Queens of the Mines

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 16:40


  “This is Queens of the Mines, where we discuss untold stories from the twisted roots of California. Today, we'll be talking about Indian Boarding Schools in the US and California. We are in a time where historians and the public are no longer dismissing the “conflict history” that has been minimized or blotted out. We now have the opportunity to incorporate the racial and patriarchal experience in the presentation of American reality. The preceding episode may feature foul language and or adult content including violence which may be disturbing some listeners, or secondhand listeners. So, discretion is advised.   Over 1,300 bodies of First Nations students were found at former Canada's residential schools this year. In response, Canada has declared September 30 2021, as the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. Since 2013, this day has been commemorated as Orange Shirt Day.  Like most of our topics on the podcast, the truth about our Indian boarding school has been written out of the US history books. The system  has long been condemned by Native Americans as a form of cultural genocide. By 1926, nearly 83% of Indian school-age children were attending boarding schools. There once were over 350 government-funded Indian Boarding schools across the US where native children were forcibly abducted by government agents, sent to schools hundreds of miles away, and beaten, starved, or otherwise abused when they spoke their native languages. Nothing short of the previous Mission System, truly.    This Episode is also brought to you by the Law Offices of CHARLES B SMITH. Are you facing criminal charges in California? The most important thing you can do is obtain legal counsel from an aggressive Criminal Defense Lawyer lawyer you can trust. The Law Office of Charles B. Smith has the knowledge and experience to assess your situation and help you build a strong defense against your charges. The Law Offices of CHARLES B SMITH do not just defend cases, they represent people. So visit their website cbsattorney.com, we know even in the gold rush no one liked attorneys, but Charles you will love.   Between 1869 and the 1960s, hundreds of thousands of Native American children were voluntarily or forcibly removed from their homes, families,  communities and placed in boarding schools. where they were punished for speaking their native language, banned from acting in any way that might be seen to represent traditional or cultural practices, stripped of traditional clothing, hair and personal belongings and behaviors reflective of their native culture. The United States government tied Native Americans' naturalization to the eradication of Native American cultural identity and complete assimilation into the “white culture.” Congress passed an act in 1887 that established “every Indian born within the territorial limits of the United States who has voluntarily taken up… his residence separate and apart from any tribe of Indians…[and] adopted the habits of civilized life…” may secure a United States citizenship. Often these residential schools were run by different faith groups including Methodists, Latter-day Saints (LDS) and Catholics. Like the Missions, often crowded conditions,students weakened by overwork and lack of public sanitation put students at risk for infectious diseases such as tuberculosis, measles and trachoma. None of these diseases were yet treatable by antibiotics or controlled by vaccines, and epidemics swept schools as they did cities. Often students were prevented from communicating with their families, and parents were not notified when their children fell ill; the schools also failed sometimes to notify them when a child died. "Many of the Indian deaths during the great influenza pandemic of 1918–19, which hit the Native American population hard, took place in boarding schools. "The 1928 Meriam Report noted that death rates for Native American students were six and a half times higher than for other ethnic groups.  They suffered physical, sexual, cultural and spiritual abuse and neglect, and experienced treatment that in many cases constituted torture for speaking their Native languages. Many children never returned home and their fates have yet to be accounted for by the U.S. government. Though we don't know how many children were taken in total, by 1900 there were 20,000 children in Indian boarding schools, and by 1925 that number had more than tripled. Because of Bureau of Indian Affairs policies, students did not return home for several years. Those who died were often buried in the school cemetery. Many survivors of these residential schools say they suffered physical, psychological and sexual abuse that sometimes resulted in the death of other children, and others died while trying to escape these schools. This episode was brought to you by our main Sponsor Columbia Mercantile 1855, It looks like a living museum, but it is a real grocery store with gold standard products for your modern life from quality international and local products that replicate diverse provisions of when Columbia was California's second largest city after San Francisco. I recently bought rice shampoo and conditioner bars there that have nearly changed how I feel about my hair, and I love the selection of hard kombucha, my favorite. The Columbia Mercantile 1855 is located in Columbia State Historic Park at 11245 Jackson Street and is a great place to keep our local economy moving. At a time like this, it is so important to shop local, and The Columbia Mercantile 1855 is friendly, welcoming, fairly priced and accepts EBT. Open Daily! Also sponsoring this episode is Sonora Florist, who has been providing our community with beautiful flower arrangements since the early 1950s. The designers at Sonora Florists are skilled at creating unique floral designs and you can visit sonoraflorist.com, or search Sonora Florist on Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram to see what I am talking about. There is a special website for wedding florals at sincerelysonoraflorist.com Thank you Sonora Florist. And if you have not checked out the mural on the side of the shop, on the corner of Washington and Bradford in downtown Sonora, in honor of the local Chinese history, do so! It was a fight to get it up, and it was worth it! Let's talk about the United States Army general Richard H. Pratt. In 1875, Pratt pulled seventy-two American Indian prisoners from the Red River War to form the first Indian boarding school in Florida. The students were taught English, European culture, vocational skills, and required to dress in European clothing. Students were not allowed to speak their native language once their English was sufficient. Many students lost the ability to speak in their native language or were unable to communicate effectively with their relatives and other tribal members due to the students' vocabulary deficiency. This served to distance the children from their culture and traditions and further undermined the authority figures at home and also reinforced the American Indian belief that the boarding schools were aimed at destroying their families and by extension their tribes. Another important part of this education system was the shedding of the Native American religions to be replaced by conversion to Christianity. Sounds familiar right? Pratt said, "A great general has said that the only good Indian is a dead one, and that high sanction of his destruction has been an enormous factor in promoting Indian massacres. In a sense, I agree with the sentiment, but only in this: that all the Indian there is in the race should be dead. Kill the Indian in him, and save the man." In 1879 Pratt opened the first Indian boarding school called the Carlisle Industrial Training School located in  Carlisle, Pennsylvania. From 1879 to 1918, it housed Native students from tribes across America, with the express purpose of assimilating them into American culture. "It was born out of his experience Puritan beliefs and as the jailer of a group of Kiowa, Comanche, and Arapaho prisoners of war who were arrested by the United States and sentenced to a three-year imprisonment, and while working with these 12 prisoners, Pratt developed his philosophy in Indian education." He was able to get those 12 prisoners to help him recruit children from multiple tribes for the Carlisle Indian School, which became the first class at Carlisle. Pratt designed the program to have a regimented structure. When the students arrived at Carlisle, their hair was cut, they were put in uniforms and they were organized into regiments and units and battalions. He implemented a ranking system in which the more senior students would mete out punishment to their subordinates if they disobeyed orders. They followed strict military schedules with marching drills and whistle or bell signals and emphasizing the importance of work were critical to the boarding schools success of turning the Native American children from their heritage to the “white way. The students received a vocational education with the goal of obtaining a lower income job, depending on the child's gender. For the males, carpentering, wagon making, harness-making, tailoring, shoemaking, tinning, painting, printing, baking, and farming. The female Indian students, however, learned “sewing, laundry and housework. Over four decades, roughly 8,000 students attended the school, and nearly 200 were buried here. At times, parents of students at Carlisle would receive notice of their child's passing only after they had been buried. The cause was often attributed to disease, although abuse was often rampant at these schools. Now, the number of graves at Carlisle is incrementally dropping, since efforts began several years ago to return the remains of students to their tribes and families. In June, 10 bodies of kids who attended the Pennsylvania school were returned home to their families.  From 1897, the Indian Industrial Training School was in operation in Perris, California until it was closed in 1904 due to problems with the school's water source. The school was relocated to Riverside, California under the name Sherman Institute and is still in operation today as an off-reservation boarding high school for Native Americans. When the school was accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges in 1971, it became known as Sherman Indian High School. Like a slap in the face, Mission Revival Style architecture was used when the school was built. To meet earthquake standards, most of the original school buildings were demolished during the 1970s, and new structures were built in their place. The California Native Tribes were required to pay for the demolition and for the new buildings. Children from the Klamath, Miwok, Maidu and Concow tribes attended the Fort Bidwell School in Fort Bidwell, California from 1898 to 1930. The Greenville Indian Industrial School was opened near the town of Greenville in Plumas County, California The boarding school enrolled Indian students aged five to sixteen. The school had a history of runaway female students according to multiple newspaper articles. There was also the St. Boniface Indian School in Banning, California built for the purpose of educating the children of the 3000 Mission children. The construction of the buildings was done by the native students. Approximately 21 children died while attending St. Boniface, most of them due to tuberculosis. There have been reports from students who used to attend the school, that the cemetery was at one time bigger than it is now and more children are buried here than we are aware. One researcher, Preston McBride, believes the number of graves discovered could be as many as 40,000 here in the US. In order to understand the development of the present-day Native American tribes and their sovereignty relationship to the United States' federal government; people need to hear a comprehensive history through the use of surviving documents and oral histories from those involved in Indian boarding schools. You can find books on the topic of Indian boarding schools at most bookstores. The topics covered include, but are not limited to: personal accounts of students, resistance amongst the student body, boarding schools' policies, and the treatment and care provided to the boarding school students. Individual case studies are one topic of interest that may be pursued. Also, one could look into the outing system of the Indian boarding schools within the United States and those in Canada.  Alright, love you all, be safe, get vaccinated, wear a mask, stay positive and act kind. Thank you for taking the time to listen today, subscribe to the show so we can meet again weekly, on Queens of the Mines.  Show notes: https://scholarworks.lib.csusb.edu/history-in-the-making Part of the Indigenous Studies Commons, and the United States History Commons Recommended Citation Ward, Erica Maien (2011)   https://www.cbc.ca/books/48-books-by-indigenous-writers-to-read-to-understand-residential-schools-1.6056204   https://boardingschoolhealing.org/education/us-indian-boarding-school-history/   https://scholarworks.lib.csusb.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2100&context=etd   https://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2021/08/28/1031398120/native-boarding-schools-repatriation-remains-carlisle https://www.thespectrum.com/story/news/2021/09/02/how-utah-and-indian-residential-schools-connected-panguitch/5591605001/   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sherman_Indian_High_School  

Queens of the Mines
Surprise Interview at Open Mic Night

Queens of the Mines

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 25:06


  In today's episode, we drop in on a conversation I had this week at the Open Mic at Jack Douglass Saloon in historic Columbia about Dona Josefa Balmasada. Open Mic happens there  every Monday at 7pm. This is an ad free episode. Queens of the Mines is a product of the “Youreka! Podcast Network” and was written, produced and narrated by Andrea Anderson. Go to queensofthemines.com for the book and more. The location of the Bromley Sanitarium was at the southwest corner of Washington and Bradford streets. Based on the size of the lot, the sanitarium was not as large as photographs make it appear. The building was torn down in 1959 for Davis Motors.    Also, I forgot I took the Tuttletown episode down, but here is Flo's story.  https://queensofthemines.podbean.com/e/flo-the-queen-of-sorrow-the-story-before-the-hauntings/   Sources: The Ogden Standard Examiner Sun Jul 14, 1929 ww.murderpedia.org/female.R/images/rablen_eva/eva-rablen.pdf https://oldspirituals.com/2019/06/16/from-the-end-eva-rablen-mail-order-bride/ THE MAIL ORDER BRIDE MURDER C.A. Asbrey  Object: Matrimony: The Risky Business of Mail-Order Matchmaking… By Chris Enss Annals of Tuolumne County – Tuolumne County Historical Society  https://tchistory.org  

Financial Survival Network
Fury Gold Mines - Drilling Big Enough to Succeed in Any Market

Financial Survival Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 22:28


I sat down with Fury Gold Mines' Chair Ivan Bebek and new President/CEO Tim Clark for a sponsor update. Bebek heartily agrees with Rick Rule's prediction that 2022 will definitely be the year of the explorer. If they're right, then it could also be the year to be a Fury investor. Clark explains that he was extremely fortunate to join and lead Fury's exemplary team; all it needed was a refocus on drilling. He has 23+ years of experience working on the finance side of the sector. Since joining, he has cut costs significantly to ensure that drilling dollars go even further. The team is driven to make a major discovery and thereby unlock Fury's value.  A recent CAD $5 million private placement leaves the company in an excellent position to build upon already impressive drill results. Clark's extensive contacts with large institutional investors will help keep the money spigot open and flowing.   Assay lab delays are still prevalent across the industry, and the company has a huge quantity of samples waiting to be evaluated. Eventually the backlog will ease and then the market will understand the success of the drill program.  Bebek believes that the recently announced Angico Eagle-Kirkland merger is a sea change for the juniors. He points out that other large mergers in the past have set off similar cycles. This could be the spark that ignites a major round of merger and acquisition activity--and that could be very good news for Fury's shareholders.  (We own shares) Compay Website: www.FuryGoldMines.com Ticker Symbols: NYSE/American - TSX: FURY

The Jason Cavness Experience
Colton Becker Founder Meliorem Inc.

The Jason Cavness Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 100:11


.On this episode of the Jason Cavness Experience I talk to Colton Becker - Founder | Optimist | Veteran | Improver We talk about the following Hunting Becoming an U.S. Army Ranger and his Army career Meliorem Inc. His core values Making the world a better place Bunker Labs and Veterans in Residence Colton's Bio Colton E. Becker was born in Vail, Colorado in October 1991. The youngest of three children, he spent most of his time as a kid playing hockey, hunting, fly-fishing, skiing, camping, golfing, rock-climbing, and enjoying the Colorado outdoors. Colton went to college at Colorado School of Mines, where he studied environmental engineering, joined the Army ROTC program, and played club hockey. Following his graduation, in December 2014, Colton was commissioned into the active-duty Army Infantry. At the same time, Colton began his entrepreneurial career by forming Global Water Farms, Inc. with his parents and their mutual business associate. The company's product was based on Colton's eighth grade science project, which is a novel and environmentally sustainable approach to water desalination that Colton and his father invented together. While in the Army, Colton spent his down time seeking investment for GWF in Seattle for over two years, during which time he helped raise $4 million in capital. After graduation from college, Colton went to the US Army's Infantry Basic Officer Leadership School at Ft. Benning, GA where he graduated first in his class. After IBOLC, he attended US Army Ranger School, but was ultimately dropped from the course after failing the final phase twice. At this point Colton confronted the same question as countless others, “should I just quit, or should I learn from my past experience and keep on going until I accomplish my goal?” Colton ultimately decided to go back to Ranger School and ended up completing to course after going straight through all phases. This accomplishment showed him the importance and value of determination, grit, and a no quit mindset when seeking to achieve large goals. When Colton separated from service in May of 2020, he moved down to California with his girlfriend, Jess, and began to work at Global Water Farms, Inc. as a full-time employee. During that time, Colton designed a 1.5 mega watt renewable power generation facility for the company's demonstration pilot. While Colton was living his lifelong dream of making his childhood science project reality, he noticed that the working relationship with his parents was becoming increasingly strained, and trending toward intolerable. Let's just say he thought Ranger School would be the hardest thing he would ever do until he spent a year working with his parents. Ultimately, Colton separated from GWF to pursue his own company and brought forth the lessons he learned from his time working at GWF. Through that experience, he learned firsthand the importance of having those “hard founder conversations” early or before the company's formation. This experience solidified in Colton the importance of valuing and supporting your team, cultivating a positive and creative working environment, recognizing team members' contributions, and holding one another accountable for meeting goals and deadlines. It also affirmed one of Colton's core values: that candor and purpose are paramount, and you should always give more than you seek to get. Ultimately, Colton left GWF in hopes of preserving the personal relationship with his family, moved back up to Washington with Jess, and formed Meliorem, Inc. with the goal of creating a company focused on bettering the world by providing climate conscious solutions to humanity's basic needs of food, water, and energy. Colton's Social Media Colton's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/colton-becker/ Colton's Email: colton.e.becker@gmail Colton's Advice Focus on giving more than you get. When I was facing my hard times at Ranger School. That was the one thing that I kept seeing that would actually bear some form of fruit. If you focus your energy and your efforts on the person to your left and your right and you help them out when and where you can, however you can. Then this weird thing happens where you might be thinking that you are devoting your resources to somebody else. But really, what you're doing is you're creating a positive community. A community that wants to support you, because you're willing to support them. If you focus on that, then, you know, crazy things happen.

Tripping Over the Barrel
Marshall Matters with Eric Marshall on Tripping Over the Barrel

Tripping Over the Barrel

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021


Remember when you were rejected from the University of Colorado, but accepted to Colorado School of Mines?! No? Well, our guy Eric Marshall does. A small town kid from Western CO. dubbed the "Pride of the Poudre" and the "Dude from Delta", Eric fled his small town roots and made his mark in International Oil & Gas, then Houston, before settling in Denver. Eric takes us through some CRAZY stories of drilling wells in China (TAFT), how he found his way onto some Energy Tech boards (Looking at you, IRON-IQ), and his latest hobby: Colorado Real Estate. Funny and Fun episode, enjoy it! The post Marshall Matters with Eric Marshall on Tripping Over the Barrel appeared first on Digital Wildcatters.

Crackpot
Premium Episode: Tommyknockers

Crackpot

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 7:26


GET‌ ‌EVERY‌ ‌EPISODE‌ ‌AND‌ ‌BONUS‌ ‌CONTENT‌ ‌AT:‌ ‌‌www.patreon.com/crackpotpodcast‌ ‌  ‌Tommyknockers...not just a Stephen King novel! This week the boys dive deep into the strange paranormal phenomena of Tommyknockers. Malevolent spirits or benevolent beings? Join the boys this week as they get to the bottom of it!

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 105: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by R. L. Stevenson, Part 1

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 77:28


Welcome to today's episode of The Literary Life Podcast! Today our hosts Angelina Stanford, Cindy Rollins and Thomas Banks explore Robert Louis Stevenson's The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. After their commonplace quote discussion, each cohost shares some personal thoughts on Robert Louis Stevenson. Be aware that this episode will contain some spoilers, though we will not spoil the full ending. Thomas shares some biographical information about R. L. Stevenson. Angelina points out the mythic quality of this story and the enduring cultural references inspired by Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. She and Thomas also discuss some of the differences between early and late Victorian writers. They also begin digging into the first section of the book. Join us again next week for the second part of this discussion. The fall schedule for the podcast will be posted soon on our Upcoming Events page for those who want to know what we will be reading and talking about on the podcast next! Don't forget to check out our sister podcast, The Well Read Poem, as well as Cindy's new podcast, The New Mason Jar! Commonplace Quotes: I would rather (said he) have the rod to be the general terrour to all, to make them learn, than tell a child, if you do thus, or thus, you will be more esteemed than your brothers or sisters. The rod produces an effect which terminates in itself. A child is afraid of being whipped, and gets his task, and there's an end on't; whereas, by exciting emulation and comparisons of superiority, you lay the foundation of lasting mischief; you make brothers and sisters hate each other. Samuel Johnson, as quoted by James Boswell Do not talk about Shakespeare's mistakes: they are probably your own G. M. Young The most influential books, and the truest in their influence, are works of fiction. They do not pin the reader to a dogma, which he must afterwards discover to be inexact; they do not teach him a lesson, which he must afterwards unlearn… They disengage us from ourselves, they constrain us to the acquaintance of others; and they show us the web of experience, not as we see it for ourselves, but with a singular change–that monstrous, consuming ego of ours being, for the nonce, struck out. Robert Louis Stevenson R L S by A. E. Houseman Home is the sailor, home from sea: Her far-borne canvas furled The ship pours shining on the quay The plunder of the world. Home is the hunter from the hill: Fast in the boundless snare All flesh lies taken at his will And every fowl of air. ‘Tis evening on the moorland free, The starlit wave is still: Home is the sailor from the sea, The hunter from the hill. Book List: The Life of Samuel Johnson by James Boswell Daylight and Champaign by G. M. Young “Books Which Have Influenced Me” by Robert Louis Stevenson David Balfour by Robert Louis Stevenson Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson A Child's Garden of Verses by Robert Louis Stevenson The White Company by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle The Silverado Squatters by Robert Louis Stevenson Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes by Robert Louis Stevenson King Solomon's Mines by H. Ryder Haggard The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde Beowulf Robert Louis Stevenson by G. K. Chesterton God in the Dock by C. S. Lewis Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen The Body Snatcher and Other Stories by Robert Louis Stevenson Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB