Podcasts about cac

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Latest podcast episodes about cac

Top à Wall Street - Didier Hameau
La bourse du 23/09/2022

Top à Wall Street - Didier Hameau

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 0:58


Wall Street, Cac 40, Europe 1 fait le point sur la situation de la Bourse.

La Story
Bourse : vers un octobre noir ?

La Story

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 25:09


Les Marchés traversent leur plus grosse crise en plus de dix ans et la question de savoir jusqu'où cette situation pourrait les tirer se pose. Après avoir caracolées en 2021, avec notamment un record historique pour le CAC 40 qui est monté à près de 7.400 points, la chute des bourses mondiales est arrivée dans le sillage de la guerre en Ukraine, sans qu'elle en soit la seule cause. Pour « La Story », le podcast d'actualité des « Echos », Pierrick Fay et ses invités analysent les facteurs de la conjoncture boursière, de l'euphorie en 2021 au marasme de 2022.La Story est un podcast des « Echos » présenté par Pierrick Fay. Cet épisode a été enregistré en septembre 2022. Rédaction en chef : Clémence Lemaistre. Invités : Christian Parisot (conseiller économique auprès de la société Aurel BGC) et Bastien Bouchaud (journaliste au service Marchés des « Echos »). Réalisation : Willy Ganne. Chargée de production et d'édition : Michèle Warnet. Musique : Théo Boulenger. Identité graphique : Upian. Photo : Richard Drew/AP/SIPA. Sons : Francis Cabrel « Octobre » (1995), La Story, TF1, Topito, Bob Decout « Faut pas mollir » (1981), Djadja & Dinaz « Bénéfice Max », Kass « Pessimiste ». Hébergé par Acast. Visitez acast.com/privacy pour plus d'informations.

Top à Wall Street - Didier Hameau
La bourse du 22/09/2022

Top à Wall Street - Didier Hameau

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 0:56


Wall Street, Cac 40, Europe 1 fait le point sur la situation de la Bourse.

Gym Secrets Podcast
Cold Outbound Sales Magic | Ep 439

Gym Secrets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 12:02


You're letting people know one-on-one about the stuff that you sell. Today, Alex (@AlexHormozi) talks about how you can possibly leverage referrals and affiliates, an interesting story about cold outbound sales, and how you can profitably grow, even if you're capital constrained. Welcome to The Game Podcast where we talk about how to get more customers, make more profit per customer, and keep them longer, and the many failures and lessons we have learned along the way to $100M in sales. We've got roll-up-your-sleeves kind of hustle with a little bit of cleverness and a lot of heart. Timestamps: (1:48) - Oftentimes, using the cold outbound strategy is getting affiliates then affiliates to customers. Getting affiliates are more affordable because they are worth more than a single customer. Alex shares a story of two girls selling energy drinks at the beach. (3:12) - Alex dives into the math of how much these two girls end up earning. He discusses the cost of shipping, the product, the labor, etc.  (4:15) - This is where having a very good product is so important because if you can give a can away for free the thing that you sell & know X percent of people will buy again, then you have an incredibly viral product. (7:08) - Marketing always works. It's just a matter of how efficient is it. The problem is it's hard to reach every single person in the world. Since it's a matter of efficiency, we need to have benchmarks such as LTV, and CAC ratio (cost of acquiring a customer).  (9:00) - Cold outbound strategies can work for any business. You can use it for direct-to-consumer business and other ways like door-to-door, emails, direct mailing, etc. You're letting people know one-on-one about the stuff that you sell. (10:01) - A big thing to consider is looking at the ideal cash flow of acquisition, meaning in the first 30 days, the customer, we wanna be able to make back the cash that it costs us to acquire them. Follow Alex Hormozi's Socials: https://www.linkedin.com/in/alexanderhormozi (LinkedIn ) | https://www.instagram.com/hormozi/?hl=en (Instagram) | https://www.facebook.com/alex.hormozi (Facebook) | https://www.youtube.com/c/AlexHormozi (YouTube ) | https://twitter.com/AlexHormozi?s=20&t=J9vPh75tO3ow9xExYLsBDQ (Twitter) | https://www.acquisition.com/ (Acquisition )

Top à Wall Street - Didier Hameau
La bourse du 21/09/2022

Top à Wall Street - Didier Hameau

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 0:53


Wall Street, Cac 40, Europe 1 fait le point sur la situation de la Bourse.

Rage, You Nerds
Harry Styles vs Chris Pine vs Shia LaBeouf... in a Steel Cage

Rage, You Nerds

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 52:24


The Super Cagle Bros are the nerdy lineup for today's episode, and they are tackling not only some geek-based headlines but also creating their own celebrity deathmatch! Harry Styles spit on Chris Pine, Olivia Wilde chased off Shia LaBeouf, and has issues with Florence Pugh... so all of this drama can only be settled one way; a pro wrestling match! CAC and Jared narrate this fantasy epic! Additional topics: What is going on with the "Don't Worry Darling" film and its drama, Gremlins 2 director confirms the Key & Peele sketch was pretty spot on, which of Nicolas Cage's characters are his best (according to a website... and debated by us), and lastly a funny story about the University of Central Michigan passing out some keyboard stickers to their students... and it turns out UCM has a bit of a different order on the keyboard (oof). --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rage-you-nerds/support

Mr. CAC and Me
Mr. CAC: Attorney of Law... and She-Hulk!

Mr. CAC and Me

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 28:08


Mr. CAC, after bearing his soul, needs an episode to cleanse his palate. So being responsible, he gathered up a couple of his geeky, nerdy friends and started discussing the latest Disney+ series featuring the Marvel Cinematic Universe... She-Hulk: Attorney at Law! She-Hulk is already halfway through this season, so the guys discuss episodes 4 and 5, and ultimately their thoughts (and prayers) for the series thus far! Do you agree with them? Are they completely off base? Do any of them sound cute? You be the judge (jury, and executioner)! Also... Madisynn and Wong, Daredevil cameo incoming, and other interesting easter eggs and cameos to the MCU, The Eternals, and the X-Men! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mr-cac/support

Acquisitions Anonymous
Should we buy a CBD shop? - Acquisitions Anonymous Episode 125

Acquisitions Anonymous

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 29:17


Michael Girdley (@Girdley) Bill D'Alessandro (@BillDA) and Mills Snell (@thegeneralmills) talk about an established herbal and CBD shop in Central Texas. We go deep diving into this hidden gem and have you think about whether or not we like this deal.We'll uncover the likelihood of having a lawyer as the broker (How to go around that), RE considerations & the Girdley technique to buy a business in ANY market.-----Thanks to our sponsor!MoreNow.co: We help you hire exceptional manager and director-level talent that costs 80% less than US-based staff.Tap into one of the world's most talented labor pools - The PhilippinesGo to morenow.co/aa and fill out the form. Or email hire@morenow.co. Mention this pod for 15% of your first hire. ----- Do you love Acquanon and want to see our smiling faces? Subscribe to our Youtube channel.Do you enjoy our content? Rate our show!Follow us on Twitter @acquanon Learnings about small business acquisitions and operations.-----Show Notes:(00:00) - Introduction(00:22) - Our Sponsor is MoreNow.co(01:27) - HOT LISTING PRICE DROP!(01:48) - Deal & financials: Established herbal and CBD shop in Central Texas(02:40) - Is this deal a hidden gem?(04:59) - Why would you sign a lease where a competitor is?(06:22) - OK, pros and cons of this deal from Bill's view.(07:23) - What are the perks of being a lawyer in the State of Texas?(11:00) - What is the place of this business in the value chain? What is going on with CBD retail?(14:34) -What's going on with CBD eCommerce on Social Media and Big Platforms? How does that impact your CAC?(16:40) - Is this business sellable at all? How could you make this work?(19:28) - The “Boomer” wealth transfer: Real vs. Zombie businesses(23:15) - How to buy a business in ANY market? The @Girdley technique!(26:26) - What is the bull case for this deal? -----Additional episodes you might enjoy:#122 ATMs are a sick business. Cash is King!  #121 An eCom business at 2x profits?! #106 A Pet Product and Saas business for sale - Which one do we like?#105 How to Make Money in the E-Commerce Game - Bill D'Alessandro gives an e-Commerce masterclass - Part 1#75 SBA Loan Secrets with Heather Endresen, expertise from a Billion-Dollar Loaner

Top à Wall Street - Didier Hameau
La bourse du 20/09/2022

Top à Wall Street - Didier Hameau

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 0:51


Wall Street, Cac 40, Europe 1 fait le point sur la situation de la Bourse.

Christian Apostolic Center
SERMON SERIES: "A Snare in the Church"

Christian Apostolic Center

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 55:54


DON'T MISS staying CONNECTED with C.A.C through our FACEBOOK page for current news, updates and even OUR LATEST devotional series: "THE WORD APPLIED" It's sure to provide an Apostolic insight and practical application for the born again believer. For more information, check out our Facebook page, as well as our website:C.A.C FACEBOOK:https://www.facebook.com/CACFlint/WEBSITE:  https://www.cacflint.comALSO:Continue to catch up on the latest C.A.C Sermon ON THE ROAD!! Just tune into our local radio station SATURDAY @ 1pm & SUNDAYS @ 2:30 pm on WSNL A.M 600/F.M 106.5. A HUGE THANK YOU FOR YOUR CONTINUED SUPPORT!

Christian Apostolic Center
THE WORD APPLIED: "Strive"

Christian Apostolic Center

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 4:46


DON'T MISS staying CONNECTED with C.A.C through our FACEBOOK page for current news, updates and even OUR LATEST  SERMON SERIES POST! It's sure to provide an Apostolic insight and practical application for the born again believer. C.A.C FACEBOOK:https://www.facebook.com/CACFlint/ALSO:Continue to catch up on the latest C.A.C Sermon ON THE ROAD!! Just tune into our local radio station SATURDAY @ 1pm & SUNDAYS @ 2:30 pm on WSNL A.M 600/F.M 106.5. A HUGE THANK YOU FOR YOUR CONTINUED SUPPORT!

Between the Bells
Morning Bell 19 September

Between the Bells

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 4:34


The Australian market closed sharply lower on Friday, down 1.52% as inflation panic set in causing investor confidence to tumble. Friday's session was weighed down by a sharp sell-off in energy and materials stocks, but every sector closed the day in negative territory.The winning stocks on Friday were the Star Entertainment Group (ASX:SGR), which jumped 5.07% higher on ASX, Computershare (ASX:CPU) added 4.42% and Tabcorp (ASX:TAH) rallied just over 4.2% on Friday. On the losing side, Lake Resources (ASX:LKE) recovered almost 1% on Friday but the lithium miner fell 28% for the week as investors sold out after the company revealed it has a dispute over deadline dates at its Kachi Lithium Project with its partner Lilac Solutions. Capricorn Metals (ASX:CMM) was the worst performing stock on Friday, shedding 11.7% followed by Atlas Arteria (ASX:ALX), which lost 9.7% and Sayona Mining (ASX:SYA), which ended the day down 9.4%.The most traded stocks by Bell Direct clients on Friday were the BetaShares Geared Australian Equity Hedge Fund (ASX:GEAR), Silver Lake Resources (ASX:SLR), and Desert Metals (ASX:DM1).Over in the US, the inflation related sell-off extended into Friday to close out America's worst trading week since June. The Dow Jones fell 0.45%, the S&P500 shed 0.72% and the Nasdaq had the biggest fall of 0.9%. Shares in FedEx plunged 21.4% in the company's worst session ever after the shipments company withdrew its full-year guidance and said it will implement cost-cutting initiatives to navigate softer global shipment volumes as the global market has ‘significantly worsened'. Following the news, shares in rivals UPS and XPO Logistics each dropped 4.5% and 4.7% respectively. The global market sell-off extended into the UK and Europe with the FTSE100 closing Friday's session 0.62% lower while the CAC and DAX each lost 1.3% and 1.6% respectively.What to watch today: Locally today, ASX futures are expecting the market to open marginally lower, around 0.03% at 6737 points which is a sharp rise from Friday's sell-off.Stocks going ex-dividend today include Enero Group (ASX:EGG), Service Stream (ASX:SSM), IPD Group (ASX:IPD), and QUBE Holdings (ASX:QUB), which could be a good opportunity to buy in if you have been thinking about these stocks as stocks going ex-dividend generally trade lower on the ex-dividend date.Taking a look at commodities, crude oil is flat trading around US$85 a barrel, Brent is up 0.99% at US$91.7 a barrel, natural gas is down 6.15% but gold is up 0.7% at US$1675.06 per ounce, and iron ore is down 2.9% to US$101.50 per tonne.On the economic data front, investors will be nervously awaiting the release of the RBA meeting minutes for September which are out on Tuesday to determine exactly how dovish the RBA is toward raising interest rates in the future, or whether there are hidden signals that future interest rate rises could be as aggressive as the previous few.Trading Ideas:Trading Central has identified a bullish signal on the Star Entertainment Group (ASX:SGR) following a short-term pattern forming over a period of 15-days which is the same time the upgraded price range between $3.04 to $3.08 may be achieved from the close of $2.90, according to standard principles of technical analysis.Bell Potter has initiated coverage on OreCorp (ASX:ORR) with a Speculative Buy rating on this stock and a price target of $0.84 per share following the major de-risking event of the completion of the Definitive Feasibility Study on the company's prime asset, the Nyanzaga Gold Project, and ahead of the key catalyst of project financing. The NGP is emerging as an attractive, significant scale, new gold project with strong financial performance metrics in a region that is experiencing a resurgence in investment by the world's largest mining companies.

@theAlynettework
All Things 805 9/18/22

@theAlynettework

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 52:05


Dr. Kimberly McCowan, First Lady the Miracle Center of Ventura invites you to the Her Time Women's Conference. J. Boogie spreads the word about the CAC & New Progressive Baptist Church Blood Drive. Ms. Restricted KJ is featured in the 805 Artist Spotlight. Local events, music and more. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/alynettework/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/alynettework/support

Top à Wall Street - Didier Hameau
La bourse du 16.09.2022

Top à Wall Street - Didier Hameau

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 0:55


Wall Street, Cac 40, Europe 1 fait le point sur la situation de la Bourse.

Debrief Bourse
Le debrief Bourse du 15 septembre : 3e séance de repli pour le CAC 40

Debrief Bourse

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 2:10


Et de trois. 3e séance de baisse pour le CAC 40 qui abandonne 1,04% vers les 6158 points et 3,2 milliards d'euros échangés. On a pourtant eu des stats américaines un peu réconfortantes avec des ventes au détail qui progressent de 0,3% en août aux Etats-Unis quand les analystes tablaient plutôt sur un recul de 0,1%.  C'est la même ambiance outre-Atlantique avec un Dow Jones qui cède 0,15% à 17h45 vers les 31.088 points alors que le Nasdaq cède 0,9% vers les 11.610 points. Valeurs en hausse C'est une nouvelle fois Renault qui mène la course sur le CAC 40 et termine également en tête du SBF 120.  Elior poursuit de son côté son mouvement de rebond : le titre gagne 30% sur les trois derniers mois.  Mercialys et Coface sont également bien orientés tout comme sur le CAC 40, Publicis, Société Générale et Sanofi. Morgan Stanley a relevé son objectif de cours de 32 à 34 euros tout en maintenant son opinion à « surperformance » sur la banque rouge et noir A noter sur le SRD LNA Santé (+5%), le spécialiste de la prise en charge de la dépendance a dévoilé un résultat net part du groupe en progression de 21,6% à 13,5 millions d'euros au titre du premier semestre 2022.  Carmat bondit lui de 8%. La medtech a confirmé se préparer à reprendre les implantations de son cœur artificiel Aeson en octobre, sous réserve de l'obtention des autorisations nécessaires. Enfin +30% en 5 séances pourMedinCell qui a annoncé aujourd'hui la signature d'un accord de licence avec le Medicines Patent Pool (MPP) sur une formulation injectable d'ivermectine d'une durée d'action de trois mois contre la transmission du paludisme Valeurs en baisse Le Brent redescend autour de 90 dollars le baril et Vallourec recule de 6,5% Sur le SBF 120 Quadient suit tout comme Elis. LE groupe a annoncé succès de son émission d'OCEANEs pour un montant de 380 ME Sur le CAC 40 , les plus forts replis Dassault Systèmes, Capgemini et les valeurs du luxe Hermes et Kering

Top à Wall Street - Didier Hameau
La bourse du 15/09/2022

Top à Wall Street - Didier Hameau

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 0:56


Wall Street, Cac 40, Europe 1 fait le point sur la situation de la Bourse.

MicroConf On Air
MicroConf Tactics: SaaS Metrics - The Best Guide to Software as a Service KPIs

MicroConf On Air

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 15:26


You need to be tracking these specific SaaS metrics in your business if you want it to succeed and grow! This is the audio from one of our YouTube videos that goes over the essential key performance indicators (aka KPIs) that you need to know in order to improve your SaaS product metrics. From churn rate to LTV to CAC and more, let's go through the SaaS KPIs that matter most. Links from the Pod: MicroConf Europe Tickets- 15-17 November, 2022 I Malta Watch the original video here Rob Walling | Twitter

Rage, You Nerds
D23 and Me with She-Hulk!

Rage, You Nerds

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 40:51


The Nerds, AL, TJ, and CAC, discuss and react to the info dump that Disney released at the D23 Expo! From trailers to announcements, the nerds will sort through the geeky goodness and bring you their thoughts, opinions, and theory crafting for the upcoming films and series for the MCU and Disney+ partnership (including a special presentation coming out in October)! The nerds will also continue their reaction and review of She-Hulk: Attorney at Law episodes 2, 3, and 4 (and their love for Wongers and Madisynn). Series and Films discussed: Captain America: New World Order, Black Panther: Wakanda Forever, Loki Season 2, Fantastic Four, Ironheart, Ant-Man and the Wasp: Quantumania, Werewolf by Night, Secret Invasion, Echo, Daredevil: Born Again, Thunderbolts, The Marvels, and She-Hulk: Attorney at Law. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rage-you-nerds/support

Top à Wall Street - Didier Hameau
La bourse du 14/09/2022

Top à Wall Street - Didier Hameau

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 0:46


Wall Street, Cac 40, Europe 1 fait le point sur la situation de la Bourse.

Grow & Monetize
5 Ways to Massively Reduce Cost of Acquisition

Grow & Monetize

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 13:45


An optimized CAC means more profit in your pocket. By determining your cost to acquire a customer then developing systems, campaigns and strategic processes around that key metric, the rest of your business flows in the right direction — upward! In this episode, I share five tangible ways to optimize and even liquidate your CAC. You can implement each of these methods within 24 hours. Enjoy! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Aphasia Access Conversations
Episode #90: Texting for Success in Aphasia Rehabilitation - A Conversation with Jaime Lee

Aphasia Access Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 46:32


Interviewer I'm Ellen Bernstein-Ellis, Program Specialist and Clinical Supervisor for the Aphasia Treatment Program at Cal State East Bay and a member of the Aphasia Access Podcast Working Group. AA's strives to provide members with information, inspiration, and ideas that support their aphasia care through a variety of educational materials and resources.  Today, I have the honor of speaking with Dr. Jamie Lee who was selected as a 2022 Tavistock Distinguished Scholar. We'll discuss her research interests and do a deeper dive into her work involving the study of texting behaviors of individuals with aphasia and her efforts to develop an outcome measure that looks at success at the transactional level of message exchange.  As we frame our podcast episodes in terms of the Gap Areas identified in the 2017 Aphasia Access State of Aphasia  Report by Nina Simmons-Mackie, today's episode best addresses Gap areas:  Insufficient attention to life participation across the continuum of care;  Insufficient training and protocols or guidelines to aid implementation of participation-oriented intervention across the continuum of care;  Insufficient or absent communication access for people with aphasia or other communication barriers  For more information about the Gap areas, you can listen to episode #62 with Dr. Liz Hoover or go to the Aphasia Access website.   Guest bio Jaime Lee is an Associate Professor in the department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at James Madison University. Jaime's clinical experience goes back nearly 20 years when she worked as an inpatient rehab SLP at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago (now Shirley Ryan Ability Lab). She later worked for several years as a Research SLP in Leora Cherney's Center for Aphasia Research and Treatment. Jaime earned her PhD at the University of Oregon, where she studied with McKay Sohlberg. Her research interests have included evaluating computer-delivered treatments to improve language skills in aphasia, including script training and ORLA, examining facilitation of aphasia groups, and most recently, exploring text messaging to improve participation, social connection and quality of life in IWA.   Listener Take-aways In today's episode you will: Learn about why texting might be a beneficial communication mode for IwA Explore the reasons it's important to consider the communication partner in the texting dyad Find out more about measures examining texting behaviors, like the Texting Transactional Success (TTS) tool. Consider how Conversational Analysis may be helpful in understanding texting interactions Edited show notes Ellen Bernstein-Ellis Jamie, welcome to the podcast today. I'm so excited that we finally get to talk to you. And I want to offer a shout out because you mentioned two mentors and colleagues who I just value so much, McKay Solberg and Leora Cherney, and I'm so excited that you've also had them as mentors.   Jaime Lee  02:44 Thanks, Ellen. It's really great to talk with you today. And speaking of shout outs, I feel like I have to give you a shout out because I was so excited to meet you earlier this summer at IARC. We met at a breakfast. And it was exciting because I got to tell you that I assigned to my students your efficacy of aphasia group paper, so it was really fun to finally meet you in person.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  03:11 Thank you, that is the paper that Roberta Elman was first author on. I was really proud to be part of that.   I was excited to get to come over and congratulate you at the breakfast on your Tavistock award. I think it's very, very deserving. And I'm excited today that we can explore your work and get to know each other better. And I'm just going to start with this question about the Tavistock. Can you share with our listeners what you think the benefits of the Tavistock Distinguished Scholar Award will be to your work? Jaime Lee  03:43 Sure, I think first off being selected as a Tavistock Distinguished Scholar has been really validating of my work in terms of research and scholarship. It's made me feel like I'm on the right track. And at least maybe I'm asking the right kinds of questions. And it's also really meaningful to receive an award that recognizes my teaching and impact on students. And I was thinking about this and a conversation that I had with my PhD mentor McKay Solberg. And it was early into my PhD when we were talking about the impact of teaching and how important it was, where she had said that when we work as a clinician, we're working directly with clients and patients were hopefully able to have a really positive meaningful impact. But when we teach, and we train the next generation of clinicians, you know, we have this even greater impact on all of the people that our students will eventually work with throughout their career. And so that's just huge.  Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  04:51 It really is huge. And I have to say I went to grad school with McKay and that sounds like something she would say, absolutely, her value of teaching.  I just want to do a quick shout out to Aphasia Access, because I think they also recognize and value the importance of teaching. They have shown that commitment by their LPAA curricular modules that they developed and make accessible to Aphasia Access members, so people can bring content right into their coursework, which is helpful because it takes so much time to prepare these materials. So, if you haven't heard of these curricular modules yet, please go to the website and check them out.  So yes, I'm so glad that you feel your work is validated. It's really important to validate our young researchers.  I think there's an opportunity to expand who you meet during this year. Is that true? Jaime Lee  05:40 That is already true. This honor has already led to growing connections with other aphasia scholars and getting more involved with Aphasia Access. I'm excited to share that I'll be chairing next year's 2023 Aphasia Access Leadership Summit together with colleagues Esther Kim and Gretchen Szabo. We're really enthusiastic about putting together a meaningful and inspiring program. I am just really grateful for the opportunity to have a leadership role in the conference. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  06:17 Wow, that's a fantastic team. And I, again, will encourage our listeners, if you've never been to a Aphasia Access  Leadership Summit, it is worth going to and everybody is welcomed. We've had several podcast guests who have said that it has been a game changer for them-- their first attendance at the Leadership Summit. So, we'll be hearing more about that.  Well, I want to start our interview today by laying some foundation for your work with texting and developing some outcome measures for treatment that captures transactional exchange in individuals with aphasia. And let me just ask what piqued your interest in this area? Jaime Lee  06:57 Yeah, thanks. Well, before I got interested specifically, in texting, I had this amazing opportunity to work as a research SLP with Leora Cherney and her Center for Aphasia Research and Treatment. And we all know Leora well for the contributions she's made to our field. At that time, she had developed ORLA, oral reading for language and aphasia, and a computerized version, and also a computerized version of aphasia scripts for script training. And these were treatments that not only improve language abilities in people with aphasia, but I really had this front row seat to seeing how her interventions really made a difference in the lives of people with aphasia, and help them reengage in the activities that they wanted to pursue-- reading for pleasure and being able to converse about topics that they want to do with their script training. So at the same time, I was gaining these really valuable research skills and understanding more about how to evaluate treatment. I was also able to start learning how to facilitate aphasia groups because Leora has this amazing aphasia community that she developed at what was then RIC. I'm just really grateful for the opportunity I had to have Leora as a mentor, and now as a collaborator. And her work really helped orient me to research questions that address the needs of people with aphasia, and to this importance of building aphasia community. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  08:37 Wow, that sounds like a really amazing opportunity. And I think it's wonderful that you've got to have Leora as a mentor and to develop those interests. Then look at where you're taking it now. So that's really exciting to talk about with you today. Jaime Lee  08:54 As for the texting interest that really started after I earned my PhD and was back at the Rehab Institute, now Shirley Ryan Ability Lab, Leora was awarded a NIDILRR field initiated grant and I served as a co-investigator on this grant. It was a randomized, controlled trial, evaluating ORLA, combined with sentence level writing.  The two arms of the trial were looking at ORLA plus writing using a handwriting modality, versus ORLA combined with electronic writing or we kind of thought about this as texting. So we call that arm T-write. And ORLA was originally designed to improve reading comprehension, but we know from some of Leora's work that there were also these nice cross-modal language improvements, including improvements in written expression. This was a study where we really were comparing two different arms, two different writing modalities, with some secondary interest in seeing if the participants who were randomized to practice electronic writing, would those improvements potentially carry over into actual texting, and perhaps even changes in social connectedness? Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  10:15 Those are great questions to look at. Interest in exploring texting's role in communication has just been growing and growing since you initiated this very early study. Jamie, would you like to explain how you actually gathered data on participants texting behaviors? How did that work? Jaime Lee  10:32 Yes. So we were very fortunate that the participants in this trial, in the T-write study, consented to have us extract and take a look at their real texting data from their mobile phones prior to starting the treatment. So, for those who consented, and everyone, I think we had 60 participants in the trial, and every single participant was open to letting us look at their texts and record them.    We recorded a week's worth of text messages between the participant and their contacts at baseline, and then again at a follow up point after the treatment that they were assigned to. And that was so that maybe we could look for some potential changes related to participating in the treatment. So maybe we would see if they were texting more, or if they had more contacts, or maybe they might even be using some of the same sentences that were trained in the ORLA treatment. We haven't quite looked at that, the trial just finished so we haven't looked at those pre/ post data. But when my colleagues at Shirley Ryan and I started collecting these texting data, we realized there were some really interesting things to be learned from these texts.  And there have been a couple of studies, we know Pagie Beeson's work, she did a T-CART study on texting, right? And later with her colleague, Mira Fein. So we had some texting studies, but nothing that really reported on how people with aphasia were texting in their everyday lives.  Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  12:08 Well, Jamie, do you want to share what you learned about how individuals with aphasia texts are different from individuals without aphasia? Jaime Lee  12:15 We saw that first, people with aphasia do text, there were messages to be recorded. I think only a couple of participants in the trial didn't have any text messages. But we took a look at the first 20 people to enroll in the trial. We actually have a paper out-- my collaborator, Laura Kinsey is the first author. This is a descriptive paper where we describe the sample, 20 people, both fluent aphasia and nonfluent aphasia, a range of ages from mid 30s up to 72. And one striking finding, but maybe not too surprising for listeners, is that the participants with aphasia in our sample texted much less frequently than neurologically healthy adults, where we compared our findings to Pew Research data on texting. And our sample, if we took an average of our 20 participants and look at their texts sent and received over a week, over the seven days, they exchanged an average of about 40 texts over the week. Adults without aphasia, send and receive 41.5 texts a day. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  13:36 Wow, that's quite a difference. Right?  Jaime Lee  13:39 Yes, even knowing that younger people tend to text more frequently than older adults. Even if we look at our youngest participants in that sample who were in their mid 30s, they were sending and receiving text much less frequently than the age matched Pew data. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  13:56 Okay, now, I want to let our listeners know that we're going to have the citation for the Kinsey et al. article that you just mentioned in our show notes. How can we situate addressing texting as a clinical goal within the life participation approach to aphasia?  Jaime Lee  14:14 I love this question. And it was kind of surprising from the descriptive paper, that texting activity, so how many texts participants were sending and receiving, was not correlated with overall severity of aphasia or severity of writing impairment?  Ellen Bernstein-Ellis I'm surprised by that. Were you?    Jaime Lee Yes, we thought that there would be a relationship. But in other words, having severe aphasia was not associated with texting less. And we recognize, it's dangerous to draw too many conclusions from a such a small sample. But a major takeaway, at least an aha moment for us, was that we can't make assumptions about texting behaviors based on participants' language impairments, also based on their age, their gender. You know, in fact, our oldest participant in the sample, who was 72, was actually most active texter. He sent and received 170 texts over the week period. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  15:22 Wow, that does blow assumptions out of the water there, Jamie. So that's a really good reminder that this to be individualized with that person at the center? Because you don't know.  Jaime Lee  15:32 You don't know. Yeah. And I think it comes down to getting to know our clients and our patients, finding out if texting is important to them. And if it's something they'd like to be doing more of, or doing more effectively, and going from there.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis Wow, that makes a lot of sense.    Jaime Lee   Yeah, of course, some people didn't text, before their stroke and don't want to text. But given how popular texting has become as a form of communication, I think there are many, many people with aphasia, who would be interested in pursuing texting as a rehab goal.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  16:08 Right? You really have to ask, right?    Jaime Lee  16:11 Yes, actually, there's a story that comes to mind about a participant who was in the T-write study, who had stopped using her phone after her stroke. Her family had turned off service; she wasn't going to be making calls or texting.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis Well, I've seen that happen too many times.  Jaime Lee   And when she enrolled in the study, and she was a participant at Shirley Ryan, because we ran participants here at JMU and they ran participants in Chicago. And she was so excited. I heard from my colleagues that she went out and got a new phone so that she could use her phone to participate in the study. And then her follow up data. When we look at her real texts gathered after the study at the last assessment point, her text consists of her reaching out to all of her contacts with this new number, and saying hello, and getting in touch and in some cases, even explaining that she'd had a stroke and has aphasia.  Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  17:13 Oh, well, that really reminds me of the value and importance of patient reported outcomes, because that may not be captured by a standardized test, per se, but man, is that impactful. Great story. Thank you for sharing that. So well, you've done a really nice job in your 2021 paper with Cherney that's cited in our show notes of addressing texting's  role in popular culture and the role it's taking in terms of a communication mode. Would you explain some of the ways that conversation and texting are similar and ways that they're different? Jaime Lee  17:45 That is a great question, Ellen and a question I have spent a lot of time reading about and thinking about. And there is a great review of research that used conversation analysis (CA) to study online interactions. This is a review paper by Joanne Meredith from 2019. And what the review tells us is that there are many of the same organizing features of face to face conversation that are also present in our online communications. So we see things like turn taking, and we see conversation and texting or apps unfold in a sequence. So what CA refers to as sequential organization.  We also see, just like in face to face conversation, there are some communication breakdowns or trouble sources in online communication. And sometimes we see the need for repair to resolve that breakdown. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  18:45 Yeah, Absolutely. I'm just thinking about auto corrects there for a moment. Jaime Lee  18:51 And they can cause problems too. When the predictive text or the AutoCorrect is not what we meant to say that can cause a problem.Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  18:59 Absolutely. Those are good similarities, I get that.   Jaime Lee  19:03 I think another big similarity is just about how conversation is co-constructed. It takes place between a person and a conversation partner and in texting, we have that too. We have a texting partner, or in the case of a group text, we have multiple partners. There's definitely similarities. And another big one is that purpose, I think we use conversation ultimately, and just like we're using texting to build connection, and that's really important Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  19:32 Yeah, I can really see all of those parallels. And there are some differences, I'm going to assume. Jaime Lee  19:39 Okay, yes, there are some definite interesting differences in terms of the social aspects of conversation. We do a lot in person, like demonstrating agreement, or giving a compliment, or an apology, or all of these nonverbal things we do like gesture and facial expression and laughter. Those nonverbal things help convey our stance, or affiliation, or connection. But in texting, we can't see each other. Right? So we have some different tools to show our stance, to show affiliation. What we're seeing is people using emojis and Bitmojis, and GIFs, even punctuation, and things like all capitals. We've all seen the all caps and felt like someone is yelling at us over text, that definitely conveys a specific tone, right? Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  20:34 I was just going to say emojis can be a real tool for people with aphasia, right? If the spelling is a barrier, at least they can convey something through an image. That's a real difference.   Jaime Lee  20:45 Absolutely, I think some of the problematic things that can happen and the differences with texting have to do with sequencing and timing. Because people can send multiple texts, they can take multiple turns at once. And so you can respond to multiple texts at once, or that can lead to some confusion, I think we're seeing, but texting can also be asynchronous, so it's not necessarily expected that you would have to respond right away Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  21:16 So maybe giving a person a little more time to collect their thoughts before they feel like they have to respond versus in a person-to-person exchange where the pressure is on?    Jaime Lee   Absolutely, absolutely.  Ellen Bernstein-Ellis Well, why might texting be a beneficial communication mode for individuals with aphasia, Jamie, because you have spelling challenges and all those other things.   Jaime Lee  21:37 Yeah, I think it comes back to what you just said, Ellen, about having more time to read a message, having more time to be able to generate a response. I know that texting and other forms of electronic communication like email, can give users with memory or language problems a way to track and reread their messages. And in some cases, people might choose to bank responses that they can use later. We know this from actually some of Bonnie Todis and McKay Sohlberg's work looking at making email more accessible for users with cognitive impairment. So I think there are some really great tools available to people with aphasia to feel successful using texting. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  22:30 That's great. I think banking messages is a really important strategy that we've used before, too.  Jaime Lee  22:37 So there's all these other built-in features, that I'm still learning about that are in some mobile phones, that individuals with aphasia can potentially take advantage of. I think some features might be difficult, but there are things like we've just talked about, like the predictive text or the autocorrect. And then again, all these nonlexical tools, like the emojis and the GIFS and being able to link to a website or attach a photograph. I think this is a real advantage to communicating through text. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  23:10 It lets you tell more of the story, sometimes. One of my members talks about when his spelling becomes a barrier, he just says the word and then that speech-to-text is really helpful. It's just one more support, I guess.   Jaime Lee  23:24 Yes. And we're needing to find out a little bit more about the features that people are already using, and maybe features that people don't know about, but that they would like to use like that speech-to-text. That's a great point.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  23:37 Well, how did you end up wanting to study texting for more than an amount of use or accuracy? In other words, what led you to studying transaction? Maybe we can start with a definition of transaction for our listeners?  Jaime Lee  23:51 Sure. Transaction in the context of communication is the exchange of information. So it involves understanding and expression of meaningful messages and content. And this is a definition that actually comes from Brown and Yule's concepts of transaction and interaction and communication. So Brown, and Yule tell us that transaction again, is this exchange of content, whereas interaction pertains to the more social aspects of communication. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  24:26 Okay, thank you. I think that's really good place to start. Jaime Lee  24:29 Part of the interest in transaction, first came out of that descriptive paper where we were trying to come up with systems to capture what was going on. So we were counting words that the participants texted and coding whether they were initiated or are they texts that are simple responses. We counted things they were doing, like did they use emojis or other multimedia? But we were missing this idea of how meaningful their text were and kind of what was happening in their texting exchanges. So this kind of combined with another measure we had, it was another measure in T-write really inspired by Pagie Beeson and Mira Fein's paper where they were using some texting scripts in their study.  We also love scripting. We wanted to just have a simple measure, a simple brief texting script that we could go back and look at. We had as part of our protocol a three turn script. And I remember we sat around and said, what would be a really common thing to text about? And we decided to make a script about making dinner plans. And so we're collecting these simple scripts. And as I'm looking at these data coming in, I'm asking myself, what's happening here? How are we going to analyze what's happening? What was important didn't seem to be spelling or grammar. What seemed most important in this texting script was how meaningful the response was. And ultimately, would the person be able to make dinner plans and go plan a dinner date with a friend. So it seemed like we needed a measure of successful transaction within texting. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  26:23 Jamie, I'm just going say that that reminded me of one of my very favorite papers, whereas you started out counting a lot of things that we can count, and it did give you information, like how much less people with aphasia are texting compared to people without aphasia, and I think that data is really essential. But there's a paper by Aura Kagan and colleagues about counting what counts, right, not just what we can count. And we'll put that citation and all the citations in the show notes-- you're  bringing up some wonderful literature. So I think you decided to make sure that you're counting what counts, right? In addition to what we can count.    Jaime Lee  26:59 Yes. And I do love counting. I was trained at the University of Oregon in single case experimental design. So really, behavioral observation and counting. So I am a person who likes to count but that sounds, like counting what counts. I love that. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  27:13 Yeah, absolutely. In that 2021 paper, you look at the way some researchers have approached conversational analysis measures and you acknowledge Ramsberger and Rende's 2002 work that uses sitcom retells in the partner context. And you look at the scale that Leaman and Edmonds developed to measure conversation. And again, I can refer listeners to Marion Leaman's podcast as a 2021 Tavistock distinguished scholar that discusses her work on capturing conversation treatment outcomes, but you particularly referred to Aura Kagan and colleagues' Measurement of Participation in Conversation, the MPC. We'll put the citation in the show notes with all the others, but could you describe how it influenced your work?   Jaime Lee  27:58 Yeah, sure. That's funny that you just brought up a paper by Aura Kagan, because I think I'll just first say how much Aura's work on Supported Conversation for Adults with Aphasia, SCA, how influential it's been throughout my career. First as a clinician and actually interacting with people with aphasia, and then later in facilitating conversation groups and helping to train other staff on the rehab team, the nursing staff. And now, it's actually a part of my coursework that I have students take the Aphasia Institute's free eLearning module, the introduction to SCA, as part of my graduate course, and aphasia, and all of the new students coming into my lab, do that module. So they're exposed really early on to SCA. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  28:50 I'm just gonna say me too. We also use that as a training tool at the Aphasia Treatment Program, It's really been a cornerstone of how we help students start to learn how to be a skilled communication partner. So I'm glad you brought that up. Jaime Lee  29:03 Absolutely. So yes, Kagan's Measurement of Participation in Conversation (MPC), was really influential in developing our texting transactional success rating scale. And this is a measure that they created to evaluate participation and conversation. And they were looking actually both at transaction and interaction, I needed to start simply and just look at transaction first. They considered various factors. They have a person with aphasia and a partner engage in a five minute conversation. And they looked at factors like how accurately the person with aphasia was responding, whether or not they could indicate yes/no reliably, and could they repair misunderstandings or miscommunications. And then the raters made judgments on how transactional was that conversation? So, we looked at that measure and modeled our anchors for texting transactional success after their anchors. We had a different Likert scale, but we basically took this range from no successful transaction, partial transaction, to fully successful. And that was really modeled after their MPC.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  30:17 Wow. Thank you for describing all of that. Jaime Lee  30:20 Yeah. Another big takeaway I'll add is that, and this really resonated with what we were hoping to capture, the scores on the MPC weren't necessarily related to traditional levels of severity. So Kagan and colleagues write that someone even with very severe aphasia, could score at the top of the range on the MPC. And I think similarly, what we feel about texting is even someone with severe writing impairments could be very successful, communicating via text message, really, depending on the tools they used, and perhaps, depending on the support they received from their texting partner.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  31:02 You and your colleagues develop this Texting Transaction Success tool, the TTS, right? What is the goal of this measure?    Jaime Lee  31:13 The goal of the TTS is to measure communicative success via texting. We wanted this functional measure of texting, not limited to accuracy, not looking specifically at spelling, or syntax, or morphology, but something that reflected the person with aphasia-- his ability to exchange meaningful information. I think the measure is really grounded in the idea that people with aphasia are competent and able to understand and convey meaningful information even despite any errors or incorrect output. So this is really relevant to texting because lots of us are using texting without correct spelling or without any punctuation or grammar. Yet lots and lots of people are texting and conveying information and feeling that benefit of connecting and exchanging information. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  32:08 It sounds like a really helpful tool that you're developing. Could you please explain how it's used and how it's scored? Jaime Lee  32:16 Sure. So the TTS is a three-point rating scale that ranges from zero, which would be no successful transaction, no meaningful information exchanged, one, which is partial transaction, to two, which is successful transaction. And we apply the rating scale to responses from an individual with aphasia on the short texting script that I was talking about earlier. So this is a three-turn script that is delivered to a person with aphasia where the first line there, we ask them to use their mobile phone or give them a device, and the prompt is: “What are you doing this weekend?” We tell the person to respond any way they want, without any further cues. And then the script goes on, we deliver another prompt, “What about dinner?” And then another prompt, “Great, when should we go?” Each of those responses, we score on the TTS rating scale. We give either a zero, a one or a two. We have lots of examples in the paper of scores that should elicit a zero, a one or a two.We feel like it should be pretty easy for readers to use.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  33:33 Wow, that's going to be really important. I always appreciate when I can see examples of how to do things. Jaime Lee  33:40 We did some really initial interrater reliability on it. The tools are pretty easy to score. We're able to recognize when something is fully transactional, even if it has a spelling error or lexical error, we can understand what they're saying. And a zero is pretty easy to score, if there are graphemes letters that don't convey any meaning, there's no transaction. Where things are a little more interesting, are the partial transaction. I think about an example to “What about dinner” and the participant responded, “Subway, Mexico.” So that's a one because the conversation, the texting partner, would really need to come back and clarify like, “Do you want to get a Subway sandwich?”  Or “Do you want to go eat Mexican?” It could still be really transactional, and they could resolve that breakdown, but the partner would have a little bit more of a role in clarifying the information. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  34:36 When you were actually trying to validate the TTS and establish its interrater reliability in your 2021 article with Cherney you mentioned using the Technology Confidence Survey from the 2021 Kinsey et al. article. Having tools that allow us to understand our clients' technology user profile is really informative in terms of understanding what modes of communication might be important to them. We talked earlier about not assuming, right, not assuming what people want to do or have done. Can you describe the survey? And is it available? Jaime Lee  35:13 Sure, yes. This is a survey we developed for the T-write study, the ORLA Plus Electronic Writing study. It's a simple aphasia friendly survey with yes/no questions and pictures that you can ask participants or clients about their technology usage. from “Are you using a computer? Yes or No” or  “Are using a tablet?”, “Are you using a smartphone?”  We ask what kinds of technology they're using and then what are they using it for? Are they doing email? Are they texting? Are they looking up information? Are they taking photos?  It also has some prompts to ask specifically about some of the technology features like “You're texting? Are you using voice to text?” or “Are you using text to speech to help you with reading comprehension of your text?”  At the very end, we added some confidence questions. We modeled this after Leora Cherney and Ed Babbitt's Communication Confidence Rating scale. So we added some questions like, “I am confident in my ability to use my smartphone” or “I am confident in my ability to text” and participants can read that on a rating scale. We use this in the context of the research study to have some background information on our participants. I think it could be a really great tool for starting a conversation about technology usage and goals, with people who are interested in using more technology, or are using it in different ways. This (survey) is in the Kinsey et al. article. It's a supplement that you can download. It's just a really good conversation starter, that when I was giving the technology survey to participants, many times they would take out their phone or take out their iPad and say, “No, I do it. I use it just like this”. It was really hands on and we got to learn about how they're using technology. And I definitely learned some new things that are available. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  37:20 I think many of us use kind of informal technology surveys.  I'm really excited to see the very thoughtful process you went through to develop and frame that (technology use). That's wonderful to share. Jamie, can you speak to the role of the TTS in terms of developing and implementing intervention approaches for texting? You just mentioned goals a moment ago? Jaime Lee  37:42 Sure. I think we have some more work to do in terms of validating the TTS and that's a goal moving forward. But it's a great starting place. If you have a client who wants to work on texting, it only takes a few minutes to give the script and then score their responses and gives us a snapshot of how effectively they're able to communicate through text. But in terms of developing intervention, to support texting, that's really where we're headed with this. I mean, the big drive is to not just study how people are texting, but really to help support them and texting more effectively and using texting to connect socially and improve their quality of life. But with any kind of intervention, we need a really good outcome measure to capture potential changes. Another reason I'm motivated to continue to work on the TTS, if people with aphasia are going to benefit from a treatment, we need rigorous tools to capture that change and document that potential change. 38:50 Ellen Bernstein-Ellis Absolutely. Absolutely. Jaime Lee  38:53 At the same time, I'd say the TTS isn't the only method we are focused on, we're really interested in understanding what unfolds during texting interactions. What's happening in these interactions. So, most recently, I've been working with my amazing collaborator, Jamie Azios, who is an expert in Conversation Analysis. I've been working with Jamie to say, “Hey, what's happening here? Can we use CA to explore what's going on?”  Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  39:25 Well, Jamie, you probably heard this before, but Conversation Analysis can sometimes feel daunting for clinicians to use within their daily treatment settings. In fact, we've had several podcasts that have addressed this and have asked this question. What are you finding? Jaime Lee  39:40 I can definitely relate because I am still very new to CA and learning all the terminology. But Jamie and Laura and I are actually working on paper right now, a CAC special issue, because we presented some data at the Clinical Aphasiology Conference and then will have this paper. We'll be submitting to a JSHL on how we're applying CA to texting interactions. That goal is really based around understanding how people with aphasia and their partners are communicating via texting and looking at these naturalistic conversations to see what barriers they're coming across, and what strategies they are using to communicate in this modality. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  40:27 That makes a lot of sense. And it really circles back again to communication partner training. That does not surprise me. Jaime Lee  40:33 We're seeing some really interesting, creative, and strategic behaviors used both by people with aphasia and their partners. We're seeing people link to a website, or instead of writing out the name of a restaurant, you know, “meet me here” with a link, or using an emoji to help convey their stance when they can't meet up with a friend. They might have more of an agrammatic production. But that emoji helps show the emotion and we're seeing a lot of people with more severe aphasia using photographs really strategically. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  41:09 So those are the strategies are helping and I'm sure that CA also looks at some of the barriers or breakdowns, right?  Jaime Lee  41:15 Yes, we're seeing some breakdowns, trouble sources in the CA lingo. In some instances, we see the partner clarify, send a question mark, like, “I don't know what you're saying”. And that allows the person with aphasia, a chance to self-repair, like, “Oops, here, this is what I meant.” And that's really useful. We also have seen some examples of breakdowns that may not get repaired. And we don't know exactly what was happening. In those instances, I suspect there were some cases where maybe the partner picked up the phone and called the person with aphasia, or they had a conversation to work out the breakdown. But we really don't know because we're using these data that were previously collected. So a lot of this does seem to be pointing towards training the partners to provide supports, and also helping people with aphasia be more aware of some of the nonlinguistic tools, and some of the shortcuts that are available, but there's still a lot to learn. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  42:22 Well, Jamie, as you continue to explore this work, I know you're involved in a special project that you do with your senior undergrads at your university program at James Madison. Do you want to describe the student text buddy program? It sounds really engaging. Jaime Lee  42:38 Sure. This is a program I started here at JMU. JMU has a really big focus on engaging undergrads and research experiences. And we have students who are always asking for opportunities to engage with people with aphasia. Particularly during COVID, there weren't these opportunities. It just wasn't safe. But I know some of the participants from the T-write study and some people with aphasia in our community here in Harrisonburg, were looking for ways to be involved and continue to maybe practice their texting in a non-threatening situation. So this was a project and I was actually inspired by one of the students in my lab, Lindsay LeTellier. She's getting her master's degree now at the University of New Hampshire. But Lindsay had listened to an interview with one of our participants where she said she wanted a pen pal. And Lindsay said, “Oh, this participant says she wants a pen pal, I'd love to volunteer, I'll be her pen pal.” And I said, “Lindsay, that's great. I love the idea of a pen, pal. But if we're going to do it, let's make it a research project. And let's open it up and go bigger with this.” So Lindsey helped spearhead this program where we paired students with people with aphasia to have a texting pen pal relationship for four weeks. And in order to be able to kind of watch their texts unfold, we gave them a Google Voice number, so that we can watch the texts.  We've really seen some really interesting things. We've only run about 10 pairs, but all of the feedback has been really positive from the people with aphasia, they felt like it was a good experience. And the students said it was a tremendous learning experience.  We're seeing some interesting things. Using CA, Jamie and I presented this at IARC, sharing what the students/person with aphasia pairs are doing that's resulting in some really natural topic developments and really natural relationship development. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  44:39 Nice! What a great experience, and we'll look forward to hearing more about that. Jamie, I can't believe how this episode has flown by. But I'm going to ask you a last question. What are you excited about in terms of your next steps for studying texting? Jaime Lee  44:57 I think we definitely want to continue the Text Buddy project because it's such a great learning experience for students, so we'll be continuing to do that. Jamie and I have applied for funding to continue to study texting interactions and use mixed methods, which is a pairing of both of our areas of expertise. I think there's just more to learn, and we're excited to eventually be able to identify some texting supports to help people with aphasia use texting to connect and be more effective in their communication.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  45:35 Well, Jamie, this work is going to be really impactful on the daily lives and the daily ability for people with aphasia to have another mode of support for communicating. So thank you for this exciting work. And congratulations again on your Tavistock award, and I just am grateful that you are our guest for this podcast today. Thank you. Jaime Lee  45:58 Thank you so much, Ellen. This has been great, thanks. Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  46:01 It's been it's been a pleasure and an honor.  So for our listeners, for more information on Aphasia Access and to access our growing body of materials, go to www.aphasiaaccess.org. And if you have an idea for a future podcast series topic, just email us at info@aphasia access.org. And thanks again for your ongoing support of aphasia access. References and Resources  Babbitt, E. M., Heinemann, A. W., Semik, P., & Cherney, L. R. (2011). Psychometric properties of the communication confidence rating scale for aphasia (CCRSA): Phase 2. Aphasiology, 25(6-7), 727-735. Babbitt, E. M., & Cherney, L. R. (2010). Communication confidence in persons with aphasia. Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, 17(3), 214-223. Bernstein-Ellis, E. (Host). (2021, July 29). Promoting Conversation and Positive Communication Culture: In conversation with Marion Leaman (No. 73) [Audio podcast episode] In Aphasia Access Aphasia Conversations. Resonate. https://aphasiaaccess.libsyn.com/episode-73-conversation-and-promoting-positive-communication-culture-in-conversation-with-marion-leaman Brown, G., & Yule, G. (1983). Discourse analysis. Cambridge. University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511805226 Fein, M., Bayley, C., Rising, K., & Beeson, P. M. (2020). A structured approach to train text messaging in an individual with aphasia. Aphasiology, 34(1), 102-118. Kagan, A., Simmons‐Mackie, N., Rowland, A., Huijbregts, M., Shumway, E., McEwen, S., ... & Sharp, S. (2008). Counting what counts: A framework for capturing real‐life outcomes of aphasia intervention. Aphasiology, 22(3), 258-280. Kagan, A., Winckel, J., Black, S., Felson Duchan, J., Simmons-Mackie, N., & Square, P. (2004). A set of observational measures for rating support and participation in conversation between adults with aphasia and their conversation partners. Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, 11(1), 67-83. Kinsey, L. E., Lee, J. B., Larkin, E. M., & Cherney, L. R. (2022). Texting behaviors of individuals with chronic aphasia: A descriptive study. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 31(1), 99-112. Leaman, M. C., & Edmonds, L. A. (2021). Assessing language in unstructured conversation in people with aphasia: Methods, psychometric integrity, normative data, and comparison to a structured narrative task. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 64(11), 4344-4365. Lee, J. B., & Cherney, L. R. (2022). Transactional Success in the Texting of Individuals With Aphasia. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 1-18. Meredith, J. (2019). Conversation analysis and online interaction. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 52(3), 241-256. Ramsberger, G., & Rende, B. (2002). Measuring transactional success in the conversation of people with aphasia. Aphasiology, 16(3), 337–353. https://doi.org/10.1080/02687040143000636 Todis, B., Sohlberg, M. M., Hood, D., & Fickas, S. (2005). Making electronic mail accessible: Perspectives of people with acquired cognitive impairments, caregivers and professionals. Brain Injury, 19(6), 389-401. Link to Jaime Lee's University Profile: https://csd.jmu.edu/people/lee.html  mu.edu/people/lee.html 

Christian Apostolic Center
THE WORD APPLIED: "Words"

Christian Apostolic Center

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 4:47


DON'T MISS staying CONNECTED with C.A.C through our FACEBOOK page for current news, updates and even OUR LATEST  SERMON SERIES POST! It's sure to provide an Apostolic insight and practical application for the born again believer. C.A.C FACEBOOK:https://www.facebook.com/CACFlint/ALSO:Continue to catch up on the latest C.A.C Sermon ON THE ROAD!! Just tune into our local radio station SATURDAY @ 1pm & SUNDAYS @ 2:30 pm on WSNL A.M 600/F.M 106.5. A HUGE THANK YOU FOR YOUR CONTINUED SUPPORT!

Create The Next From ProCFO Partners
SaaS Companies and the Critical KPI's

Create The Next From ProCFO Partners

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 16:31


Software as a Service (SaaS) companies have to keep an eye on the usual business and financial metrics, but there are some Key Performance Indicators (KPI's) that are uniquely essential. For a long time venture capitalists encouraged a mindset of growth at any cost, but increasingly the bottom line and long-term sustainability are levers for important decisions. The health of the company, its strategic position and profitability potential, and its ability to attract investors rely on knowing some magical acronyms: CaC, LTV, and Revenue Churn from ARR or MRR.If you're keeping score - and you should be - that's a lot of letters that unlock important concepts.Today Shyam Desigan, Managing Director at ProCFO Partners and seasoned founder and financial expert for SaaS companies unpacks why Customer Acquisition Costs, Lifetime Value, and Annual Recurring Revenue or Monthly Recurring Revenue are the top-of-list KPI's for SaaS leaders to focus on and adjust to. Growth and profitability depend on it.

NGMC Continuing Medical Education
Georgia Heart Institute Grand Rounds: Vascular Calcification: From Bench Populations to Bedside

NGMC Continuing Medical Education

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 66:54


Enduring CME will expire on 9/7/2024 Disclosures: Grant/research support: Amarin, Amgen, Boehringer Ingelheim Objectives: 1. To review the cellular and molecular basis of vascular calcification 2. To review population studies of coronary calcification 3. To understand the clinical utility of coronary artery calcification (CAC) testing Accreditation and Designation: The Northeast Georgia Medical Center & Health System, Inc. is accredited by the Medical Association of Georgia to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The Northeast Georgia Medical Center & Health System, Inc. designates this live activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s) TM. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Mr. CAC and Me
How I'm Dealing with Personal Failure

Mr. CAC and Me

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 18:37


This episode is a rather personal one for Mr. CAC. Sure, last week was a discussion about his first-born daughter starting kindergarten, and in past interviews, he has gotten personal with guests within discussion topics, but this episode is a little different. For 18 minutes, CAC bares his soul as he records his raw thoughts, feelings, and emotions while dealing with a challenging time in his life. Not entirely sure how this episode will land with viewers, he still felt it was the right call to not only record but also to publish this episode. This is a cathartic act on his part, and not meant to be a therapy replacement. Please enjoy, as this may be part 1 of a continued discussion arc for CAC as he deals with, learns, grows, and reconciles these feelings currently manifesting within him. His mental health, his fears and anxiety, and his own curiosity if he happens to be entering a midlife crisis all lay before him! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mr-cac/support

Rage, You Nerds
Chicken Wings Flavored Lip Gloss & Finding Our Religion

Rage, You Nerds

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 51:29


Applebee's has a lip gloss line that has... flavors(?!)... inspired by their chicken wings. Shia LaBeouf finds religion in Catholicism... kinda. Mr. CAC pitches the best restaurant and other personal item brand crossover... EVER! Come rage, nerds, and listen as the Super Cagle Bros discuss, react, and go full degenerate in this latest episode! Topics Covered: Shia LaBeouf falls in love with Catholicism Insidious 5 updates and discussion (and an understanding that CAC and Jared don't know what happened in half of the previous movies) Matt Reeves' renews deal with the new Warner Bros and Discovery merger group Idris Elba calls out lazy reporters when it comes to asking about 007/James Bond casting Applebees has a new lip gloss line based on their chicken wings flavors Mr. CAC pitches his two best restaurant crossover branding ideas... and one of them is the best idea EVER! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rage-you-nerds/support

Christian Apostolic Center
THE WORD APPLIED: "Love One Another"

Christian Apostolic Center

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 4:52


DON'T MISS staying CONNECTED with C.A.C through our FACEBOOK page for current news, updates and even OUR LATEST  SERMON SERIES POST! It's sure to provide an Apostolic insight and practical application for the born again believer. C.A.C FACEBOOK:https://www.facebook.com/CACFlint/ALSO:Continue to catch up on the latest C.A.C Sermon ON THE ROAD!! Just tune into our local radio station SATURDAY @ 1pm & SUNDAYS @ 2:30 pm on WSNL A.M 600/F.M 106.5. A HUGE THANK YOU FOR YOUR CONTINUED SUPPORT!

Christian Apostolic Center
SERMON SERIES: "Law of the Harvest"

Christian Apostolic Center

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 51:26


DON'T MISS staying CONNECTED with C.A.C through our FACEBOOK page for current news, updates and even OUR LATEST devotional series: "THE WORD APPLIED" It's sure to provide an Apostolic insight and practical application for the born again believer. For more information, check out our Facebook page, as well as our website:C.A.C FACEBOOK:https://www.facebook.com/CACFlint/WEBSITE:  https://www.cacflint.comALSO:Continue to catch up on the latest C.A.C Sermon ON THE ROAD!! Just tune into our local radio station SATURDAY @ 1pm & SUNDAYS @ 2:30 pm on WSNL A.M 600/F.M 106.5. A HUGE THANK YOU FOR YOUR CONTINUED SUPPORT!

Zonebourse
322: L'action la moins chère du CAC40

Zonebourse

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 11:17


Profitons de cette rentrée pour nous amuser. Je vais appliquer les critères du livre culte de Benjamin Graham, "L'investisseur intelligent", aux valeurs du CAC 40. Combien vont passer le test ?

Valley Nordic
S4E10: Startup Financials - LTV and CAC in B2B SaaS

Valley Nordic

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 83:08


We are back after a long summer break. In this episode we get inside Arne's box of B2B SaaS and discuss CAC, LTV, Payback period, and other financial metrics. 

Three Things I Learned In SaaS, Sports, Tech & Live Events Podcast
Ticketing Week! SeatGeek's fresh $200m, NY all-in price laws, The PPC wars won't end and an oldie but repeaty

Three Things I Learned In SaaS, Sports, Tech & Live Events Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 4:01


Three Things I Learned In Saas, Sports, Tech & Live Events: Ticketing rumors and happening this week: 1. SeatGeek raised $238m from, essentially, the group that made up the cancelled SPAC. That's a sizable show of confidence. It means more deals are on the way. This late in the game (Series C), raises that size aren't speculative. They are usually meant to fund well-defined objectives which are already in the pipeline. The baseball deal is the most obvious (don't sleep on Ticketmaster making a run too), but we're sure there are more. Rumors of the deal were all over the ticket broker conferences in Vegas in July - even pinning the number at "just over $200m." 2. Rumors are Logitix hired a banker with the plan of making a run at competitors and then flipping the combined entity. Heard it from enough people we believe it to be true. 3. New York passed the "all-in" pricing law where ticket sites have to show the final price with all fees added in. Bad news for many who have built significant businesses manipulating fees through the buy process. Matter of time before we see other states follow. Just the first in what will be many regulations headed towards ticketing (as we discussed here in 2019. Covid simply delayed the inevitable.) 4. Vivid Seats took a dig at StubHub in their quarterly call claiming the competition is overpaying for PPC in an effort to "relive past glory." Back when there was discussion about Vivid Seats buying StubHub, one of the immediate synergies was how, together, they'd have to pay much less in the PPC wars. Looks like it is going the other way. CAC is expensive in the marketplace game. 5. Time kills all deals- part infinity. UCL and Crypto.com were set to do a $100m deal - the largest yet for UEFA. Had a mentor tell me about how he lost his business when they failed to sign the paperwork on time on 9/10/01. We've walk from some deals mid negotiation as better ones have shown up. If you really want the deal, get it done.

Questioning Medicine
Episode 203: 203. Medical Update 203 -- HEAD CT, Weekend warrior, REDUCE-IT, SGLT-2, HF, DMARD, Blood test

Questioning Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 28:14


https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.122.059410?af=RThe Biomarkers say REDUCE-IT was a scamhttps://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/article-abstract/2791663NO! Just NO-- stick with the calculator for nowhttps://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.122.059038start the SLGT-2 inhibitors early! maybe an early dischargehttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35849407/If we could get the EMR to do it automatically else you cant expect providers tohttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35727595/the head CT for psych stuff can probably be put on holdhttps://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/180135/continue the disease modifying agents

UgliVentures: Marketing for StartUps
Ep. 91: 3 Ways That CAC-LTV Ratio Can Help Your Startup Grow

UgliVentures: Marketing for StartUps

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 24:53


One of the most important metrics to understand for your start-up is the Client Acquisition Cost (CAC) to Customer Lifetime Value (LTV) ratio. The CAC to LTV ratio is the formula that will tell you exactly how much you can/ should be spending to on marketing to bring in new business. If your ratio is low, it could mean that you could be wasting money in the long term.   Let's start by understanding this.   COHORT WAITLIST: https://www.ugliventures.com/waitlist/   UGLIVENTURES WEBSITE: https://www.ugliventures.com/ UGLIVENTURES INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/ugliventures/

Suno Research
BANCOS CAEM APÓS AUMENTO DE IMPOSTO (ITUB4, BBAS3, BBDC4, ITSA4) | Petrobras (PETR4) paga dividendos

Suno Research

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 33:41


O Ibovespa hoje encerrou a quarta-feira (31) em 0,82%, aos 109.522,88 pontos, na mínima do dia. A máxima foi de 111.364,05 pontos. No mês, o índice acumulou alta de 6,16%. No ano, alta de 4,48%. Na semana até aqui, tem perda de 2,47%. O giro foi a R$ 31,4 bilhões. Apesar da perda de fôlego nas últimas sessões, aparando ganhos que chegaram a superar 10% nos melhores momentos do mês – parecendo encaminhá-lo então para a melhor performance desde novembro de 2020 -, o Ibovespa teve ainda assim um agosto estelar se comparado à correção nas principais bolsas do exterior. Dos maiores mercados de fora, apenas Tóquio (+1,04%) conseguiu evitar perdas no mês, que chegaram a 4,64% em Nova York (Nasdaq) e a 5,02% (CAC 40, de Paris) nos centros financeiros da Europa. Melhor desempenho do índice desde janeiro (então 6,98%), o ganho de 6,16% no Ibovespa em agosto fala por si, embora se tenha em vista que a recuperação ocorreu a partir de um fundo do ano a 96 mil pontos, em meados de julho, com retomada que se estendeu ao mês seguinte. Nesta quarta, pesou sobre as ações de bancos a aprovação, no Senado, de aumento de 1 ponto porcentual, de 20% para 21%, na Contribuição Social sobre o Lucro Líquido (CSLL) paga pelo setor, até o fim do ano. O texto segue agora para sanção presidencial.

Rage, You Nerds
She-Hulk Episode 1 Reaction (and other Nerdy Ranting)!

Rage, You Nerds

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 55:49


The Nerds, AL, TJ, and Mr. CAC, are discussing the latest happenings in the world of nerdom and geekiness. First, they discuss some weird youtube horror content. Next up they react to She-Hulk: Attorney at Law's first episode and air their grievances to the court of public opinion! After that, they discuss HBO Max cutting content as the WB and Discovery merger continues to have a lasting impact on DC and animated content. Lastly, TJ hops off the call as AL and CAC discuss Only Murders in the Building episode 9 of season 2! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rage-you-nerds/support

MegaMinds — E-commerce Growth & Personal Development

TikTok, YouTube Shorts, Google, UGC – what's working? What's not? Should I run "pretty ads" or "ugly ads"? Is UGC untrustworthy?

Afrobility: Africa Tech & Business
#55: Apollo Agriculture - How the AgriTech platform is supporting smallholder farmers to scale across Kenya & Africa

Afrobility: Africa Tech & Business

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 120:21


Overview: Today, we're going to talk about Apollo Agriculture, the Kenyan AgTech company - we'll explore the Apollo story across the following areas African agriculture context Apollo's launch & early history Product & monetization strategy Competitive positioning & exit options Overall outlook This episode was recorded on Aug 21, 2022 Companies discussed: Apollo Agriculture, The Climate Corporation (WeatherBill), Pula, FarmDrive, Monsanto, FairMoney & Kuda Bank Business concepts discussed: Agricultural Technology (AgriTech or AgTech), smallholder farmers, Risk mitigation, Debt funding, Customer acquisition costs (CAC) & Customer lifetime value (LTV, CLV) Conversation highlights: (01:30) - What Apollo agriculture is and why we're talking about it (06:10) - Agriculture context in Africa (21:00) - Context on Agriculture in Kenya (27:33) - Apollo founding story and founder background (40:55) - Fundraising and growth (55:14) - Product and monetization strategy (1:17:58) - Competition and exit options (1:27:53) - Bankole's overall thoughts and outlook (1:34:50) - Olumide's overall thoughts and outlook (1:49:36) - Recommendations and small wins Olumide's recommendations & small wins: Interested in investing in Africa Tech with Olumide: Read about Adamantium fund & contact me at olumide@afrobility.com Founders looking for funding: If you're a B2B founder working on Education, Health, Finance or food, please contact me for funding at olumide@afrobility.com Recommendation: Little Ways The World Works: Article by Morgan Housel. Great article talking about how learning from different fields is very helpful. He goes over learnings from evolution, astronomy, biology, anatomy, etc Recommendation: University of Berkshire Hathaway: Auto recommended by Kindle. Great. Chronicles 30 years of Berkshire Hathaway Annual meeting discussions Small win: Beach gathering with friends, it was fun Small win: Just got back from NYC 30 minutes before recording this episode, a lot of fun Bankole's recommendations & small wins: Recommendation: Soul In The Game - Vitaly Katsenelson && Asake - Terminator && For My Hand - Burna Boy and Ed Sheeran Small win: Beat my previous Readwise streak of 190 days! Other content: CIA Factbook on Kenya, FAOStat Food production, Interdependence and modularity - Christensen institute , All I Want To Know Is Where I'm Going To Die So I'll Never Go There: Buffett & Munger – A Study in Simplicity and Uncommon, Common Sense Investors, Operators, Entrepreneurs - We'd love to hear from you. Please email info@afrobility.com to share feedback

Startup Hypeman: The Podcast
S18E10: Reducing CAC Through A Distribution Flywheel with Asteya CEO Hadi Radwan

Startup Hypeman: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 52:21


When we work on investor pitch decks, one of our questions to founders is, "What's your G2M / distribution strategy?" Too often we hear, "Social media", "buying ads", or "SEO". Now, it's not that these channels don't work, it's that it usually requires a ton of upfront capital to even start to figure out what's working and what's not. Capital that you don't have yet, for CAC that won't pay you back for a long time (potentially ever). On top of that, once you do have the keyword or targeting figured out, the platform could change its algorithm overnight, leaving you back at square one. Hadi Radwan's insuretech startup, Asteya, has successfully raised $15 million, processed over $20M in Premiums, and achieved $5M ARR. At the core of their success is a B2B2C distribution flywheel. This model has significantly lower CAC than the aforementioned paths, with higher LTV, and way more control over the outcome. He steps to the mic in this week's episode to share exactly how they've done it. We also learn how his experience from Lebanon, to Boston, to London has shaped his communication style.Find Hadi online:LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/hadiradwan/Find Asteya online:Website: https://www.asteya.world/This episode is sponsored by Miquido - a full-service software development partner that supports companies in building their digital products. Learn more at miquido.com/hypeman Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

One in Ten
The Future of Possible in Children's Advocacy Centers

One in Ten

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 45:53 Transcription Available


We are complete nerds when it comes to research. This podcast was founded on it, and many listeners receive our weekly research-to-practice briefs. Over the last two decades, a growing evidence base has demonstrated the effectiveness of the Children's Advocacy Center (CAC) model. And no one has contributed more to that evidence base than Ted Cross through his sustained research over 20 years. Because of research partnerships, we know more about forensic interviews than ever before. More than about evidence-based mental health treatment than ever before. More about forensic medical evaluation than ever before. And yes, more about the difference CACs make in their own local community than ever before. But there are still significant research gaps, and the CAC model is still evolving and adapting every single day. What do we still need to learn to improve our work? How is the CAC model evolving to meet current needs, and future needs, and ever-changing needs? And how can we partner with researchers to improve our practice? Take a listen.Topics in this episode:Origin story (1:59)The flexibility of CACs for community response (9:26)Different potential partners (16:58)Unanswered questions (26:33)Advice and new partners for CACs (33:15)Polyvictimization (42:47)Vacation and future episodes (44:27)Links:Theodore P. Cross, Ph.D., research professor at Children and Family Research Center, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign“The Child Victim as Witness Research Report,” Whitcomb, D.; De Vos, E.; Cross, T.P.; et al, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (October 1994)“Practice in U.S. Children's Advocacy Centers: Results of a Survey of CAC Directors,” Cross, Theodore P.; Whitcomb, Debra; Maren, Emi. Children and Family Research Center, School of Social Work, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (March 2022)“Do Children's Advocacy Centers improve families' experiences of child sexual abuse investigations?” Jones, L.M.; Cross, T.P.; Walsh, W.A.; Simone, M. Child Abuse & Neglect (2007)Children's Advocacy Center of Suffolk CountyWynona's House“Faith, Trauma, and the Problem of Evil,” with Victor Vieth (May 13, 2019)New Jersey Children's AllianceFor more about polyvictimization: “Greater Than the Sum—Multiple Adversities in Children's Lives,” with Dr. Sherry Hamby (originally broadcast February 14, 2020, as “Mending the Tears of Violence”)For more information about National Children's Alliance and the work of Children's Advocacy Centers, visit our website at NationalChildrensAlliance.org. Or visit our podcast website at OneInTenPodcast.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast.Support the show

Mr. CAC and Me
Help! I'm a First Time Kindergarten Parent!

Mr. CAC and Me

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 19:59


Mr. CAC is dealing with the trials and tribulations of sending his first child into one of the most mysterious, most unknown, most uncertain places ever... a public school kindergarten. Listen as he walks through his feelings, his daughter's feelings, and all the other emotions that got packed into this momentous family occasion. Are you a first-time parent sending your kid to their first day of school? Are you a veteran parent sending your kid off to college? Are you someone who has no interest in kids whatsoever? Are you a new parent still blissfully unaware of this looming life milestone? No matter the situation, I hope this episode relates and entertains. I just wanted an opportunity to unpack my own thoughts and words about this moment in my life, and I truly appreciate you taking the time to give it a listen! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mr-cac/support

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News
EP295 - Walmart, Target Q2 Earnings, and US Commerce July Data

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 45:27 Very Popular


Episode 295 is a breakdown of Walmart and Target Q2 earnings, as well as the US Department of Commerce retail sales data for July. Episode 295 of the Jason & Scot show was recorded on Thursday August 18, 2022. Transcript Jason: [0:23] Welcome to the Jason and Scot show, this is episode 295 being recorded on Thursday August 18th 2022 I'm your host Jason retailgeek Goldberg and as usual I'm here with your co-host Scot Wingo. Scot: [0:38] Hey Jason and welcome back Jason Scott showed listeners Jason how you doing how you been traveling a lot lately. Jason: [0:46] I have I have it's been interesting to spend so much time at the airport's they've been quite busy lately. Scot: [0:54] Yeah yep the there's cancellations it's total chaos at airports so hopefully now that we're in back-to-school season that'll slow down a little bit. Jason: [1:03] Knock on Woods October is a busy Commerce trade show month so I'll be on the road almost of October hopefully visiting some listeners but hopefully yeah travels a little smoother hopefully I can get some better seats on the airplane I'm a little bitter at the. Scot: [1:19] Yeah you have like 20 million miles and they're putting your life back in steerage. Jason: [1:24] That's a slightly milder version of that is true. Scot: [1:29] Cool and then I guess the big question is we've got two new series kicking off are you going to do Game of Thrones or Lord of the Rings or both. Jason: [1:39] I'm super excited about both I'm actually some people know I had knee surgery earlier in the year I'm actually contemplating getting the surgery on my other knee so I have an excuse just stay at home for a while a month and watch them both. Scot: [1:55] Yeah and then let's see the well ready to jump into some news. Jason: [2:02] I'm super excited to. Scot: [2:03] Cool well it wouldn't be a Jason Scott show without. Jason: [2:08] Amazon news new your margin is there opportunity. Scot: [2:21] Yes there is some Amazon news I wanted to just chat about with youth the 16th of August Amazon surprised both Wall Street and a bit and third-party sellers a lot with their first-ever peak season surge pricing for fulfillment by Amazon are commonly known as FBA so the way this is going to work is they've put out the dates October 15th through January 14th of 23 third-party sellers that you use fbar going to have a new fee and I hope you're sitting down it is 35 cents per item. [2:57] Now you may be saying to yourself Scott that's pretty small is that going to really move the needle and one of our friends of the show Colin Sebastian he actually did the math on this. So it turns out that last holiday if you look at the third party sell units sold during that period you had two point seven two two point eight billion you have a midpoint of 2.75 billion. He took that approximated in 34 so that went through yeah if ba you multiply that out and you get about 700 million dollars just drops right out of that 35 cents. So that is the power of an Amazon scale is a seemingly tiny little. Surcharge can be a big number so it's going to be interesting and you know that will be pure profit because the Amazon is not doing anything differently really. And then in the press release they basically said our expenses are reaching New Heights and it's making it harder for the company to absorb cost and they have to pass some of those on. But we still love our third-party sellers did you would you think about this video. Jason: [4:01] Yeah well I'm guessing third-party Sellers and investors didn't react exactly the same to that news. Scot: [4:07] Yes investors were happy third-party sellers it's kind of one of those things it's kind of tricky because you can't complain too much because it feels like 35 cents but you know if you're a seller selling couple of thousand items a day through F be a it's going to be material and I think, at the end of the day all this gets passed on to the consumers and that causes inflation which we're going to talk about a good bit on Today Show. Jason: [4:30] Yeah it's a, it's interesting it's kind of a mixed bag because well I feel like it is true that Amazon hasn't charged a true surge charge before the you know they change their terms and conditions all the time and that you know they'll like they'll narrow the window under which you can keep stuff in, in the warehouse before you start getting extra fees they'll make you take more stuff back they'll take less stuff and those all kind of. Have the effect of making F be a more expensive for some sellers. Well the 35 cents probably isn't a deal-breaker it is a good reminder to all these third-party sellers that your your kind of a digital sharecropper in the Amazon Echo System and what you know the two things that I think are most interesting are this kicks in in October, strong rumors that Amazon's going to try a second prime day in October so this could be insult to injury. They could be asking third-party sellers to like, load up the inventory and get ready for a second prime day and be charging them more so this actually could end up being even a little bigger than, was forecasted than Colin forecasted have. [5:44] Prime day ends up being a meaningful thing and then if you also remember earlier in the year Amazon launched check out with prime which was kind of a. First move to making fulfillment by Amazon available to non Amazon sellers or at least sellers off of the Amazon platform and so it's kind of interesting. You know shortly after they they're trying to make F be a more available there they're making it more expensive. Scot: [6:14] Yeah yeah the they've struggled with that because every time they've opened it up to people not selling on Amazon they have a surge of some kind and they have to kind of like pair that program back it's happened like four or five times it's crazy. Jason: [6:28] And the flip side is of course the other carriers you'd be shipping through the other common carriers the holiday search these are quite common so this is not not going to feel like a typical or out of line when you compare it to UPS or FedEx. Scot: [6:43] Yin haven't most of them put on a fuel surcharge already like an even though fuel is going down there. Jason: [6:47] There are there are surcharges on top of surcharges and you know some people feel like they haven't turned off the surge charges for two years. Scot: [6:55] Yeah yeah so it's hard out there in e-commerce land from a cost perspective that's for sure was there any Amazon news you found interesting. Jason: [7:03] Yeah yeah I would actually bundle two pieces of news and column two sides of the coin, the interesting Amazon test was revealed this company that monitors the Amazon App found a new feature, it appears like it's only been deployed to Amazon employees at this point, but it's basically a picture and video stream in the app so this is like the way that this is described as sort of like a tick tock like feature. Inside of the Amazon app which is interesting. Obviously in China a lot of people shop in the Chinese version of Tik-Tok which is called do Hyun. A lot of people get interested in buying products through tick-tocking us they haven't necessarily like. Checked out on Tick Tock in huge quantities yet but it's super interesting the Amazons kind of approach to social commerce, is get content creators and influencers and sellers. To create social content on Amazon's platform so I'm twitch on Amazon live and now this new Tick-Tock feature it's like Amazon's not partnering with Tick-Tock Amazon's trying to be tick-tock. [8:20] And I said two sides of the same coin because I mentioned in earlier tests Amazon did was Amazon live where they tried to take really popular, content creators that are calmer sea and entice them to create content on the Amazon platform and they're they're paying anywhere from like two to nine thousand dollars a month plus the. The affiliate commissions to get people to produce content on Amazon live and it didn't seem like content creators were super happy with those results, they weren't making a lot of money they were there was a lot of churn and now a bunch of this content creators that have moved off the platform are now organizing a boycott of Amazon, because they feel like Amazon's not treating their employees the way they would like so it just reminds everyone that like man there's this really interesting opportunity and you know side of the business around social commerce and kind of you know letting influencers and content creators into your Echo System but then the flip side is they don't always behave in the ways you you like and even more so when they're they're not on the payroll. Scot: [9:30] Yeah yeah the influencers live by the influencer die by the influencer The Tick-Tock things interesting I don't know, I think it is reading a lot into it to call it Tick Tock but you know they're definitely trying to figure out live streaming one thing we haven't talked about on the show in my world of Collectibles this Marketplace is really splashed onto the scene called whatnot and it's a whole live stream for Collectibles and you know the I think they've raised money around a three to four billion dollar valuation which would imply there gmv is pretty substantial I haven't seen any reports but it's pretty pretty interesting it's kind of an entertainment livestream like we see out of China but applied to Collectibles and I feel like that's a pretty good category for for this format because you can do these Pack openings and all these kinds of things and I've experimented with it and it's pretty neat you can, the streamers that can run auctions right in there and they can have kind of a three formats going at once they can kind of have a claim show an auction and then like a little e-commerce slider store over on the side it's a pretty interesting platform that if you're interested in Collectibles go check it out get started with collectible toys like these little Funko pops and then it's moved into it's got a vibrant sports card non-sports card and then and I've seen a lot of activity around the comics category so that's kind of an interesting new approach ahead and seen out there. Jason: [10:59] Yeah you know the whole live streaming thing is super interesting and complicated the quick Reader's Digest version. In China live streaming is super popular and it was born on the e-commerce platform so taobao live which is like kind of the equivalent of Amazon or Ebay. [11:18] Like launched a livestream video platform and they built a huge Commerce business and these influencers, the Alibaba paid like we're starting to sell like huge quantities there's this dude Austin Lee who sells lipstick Who Sold over a billion dollars in a single day, and over time in China the live streaming has moved off of the Retailer's platforms onto the social media platforms like Dao Yuan and WeChat, and so you look at China and you go oh my God live streams huge it's the future it's how all this stuff is getting sold I want to say it's like 15 or 16 percent of all e-commerce sales in China, but then here in the US has been a mixed bag there's a bunch of use cases like you just described where it works really well there's a bunch of Ed C lies streamers there's a bunch of like small retail boutiques that live stream during the pandemic to great effect. They're doing really well you know Tick-Tock which is the same companies do you know. Announced that they were delaying their live streaming feature in the US so they. You know it's not they're not rushing it to Market Instagram had a live streaming Commerce feature which they just retired last week. We've seen Walmart do some experiments in live-streaming we've seen Nordstrom do some experiments in live streaming it's not clear. The. [12:39] There's a a mass-market huge opportunity for live streaming that the Amazon live streaming Pilots haven't worked very well and so they're both like there's a bunch of niches and use cases where consumers really like it and you could see it working. But it doesn't seem like a slam dunk for any of the really big Commerce players that they just need to turn on this feature in the customers will come running so the. Lot of debate amongst my clients at the moment you know is China just ahead of the US and does everybody have to get ready for live streaming or is the u.s. going to evolve differently than China as it often does. Scot: [13:16] Yeah or like is it going to be one of those things where like we call talked about chat Commerce forever and it never really jumped jumped over you know it even though Facebook tried really hard to put Commerce and messenger and they hired the PayPal dude it just never really really translated to the US who next. Jason: [13:34] I know exactly so I yeah I'm not convinced the main way us consumers are shopping is ever likely to be live streaming but I do think it is. An important solution to particular Discovery problems in the US so I think it's part of the mix but I don't think it's that like, magic Panacea that's going to replace traditional e-commerce for example. Scot: [13:55] Yeah well I know you are tingly all over and super excited because the US Department of Commerce data came out and you have done your number crunching and I know I'm eager to hear what you learned. Jason: [14:08] Oh my God this week is like my leap year because you know US Department of Commerce data comes out every month so we always get excited about that but every three months, the e-commerce data comes out so yesterday the the retail data came out and tomorrow the e-commerce data came out and you were like a should we wait till tomorrow and do one show and I might know there's too much goodness here we need to shows one, to talk about the retail data today and then we'll do another one to talk about the e-commerce data after after that comes out. Scot: [14:38] Yeah on Wall Street I think they have a double and a triple jinx this is kind of a triple witching I don't know why they call it with you. Jason: [14:45] I do yeah so July retail sales were up 8.2% versus 2021. So that's very healthy robust growth. We've been talking about such big growth and with all these anomalies going on that like we've gone kind of used to it but just a reminder normal retail growth year over year, for the last 30 years the median growth is 4.5% so 8.2% is almost twice as good as you'd. And even more to the point year-to-date growth so January through June growth retail is up 8.9% so wit early twice what you would normally expect. So that is super exciting the. Wrinkle here is our friend inflation like every time I talk about this huge growth. A bunch of people chime in and go yeah but it's all inflation and for the last two years that we've had this enormous growth because of the pandemic and changes in purchase patterns all the economic stimulus all that stuff. I keep looking at inflation and inflation is a small part of the growth but not a meaningful part and so I have to keep telling people yeah information is in there but it's not a huge deal well that changes this year, so I mentioned year-to-date growth for this year's 8.9% if you adjust for inflation your today growth is 0.5%. [16:13] So that basically means all the growth we're getting in 2022 so far is directly a result of inflation and that's super interesting because, 20:21 was like the biggest year of retail growth in my lifetime and I jokingly told a lot of my friends and clients you know they should think about retiring because comping against that. 20:21 is gonna suck and then so far this year we've been comping quite well but it turns out the reason we're comping well is not because, consumer spending is like super robust and continuing but rather inflation has kind of filled in where that, that consumer momentum is starting to wane so that is a big story that we need to watch for the rest of the year. Again the actual. [17:04] Hyper actor e-commerce. Broad version of e-commerce called non store sales so for July they were up 18 percent versus last year. The year-to-date there up about 12%, I'll be really interested to see what the quarterly number is tomorrow you know in kind of Q4 of last year there was all this exuberant some for spending in retail stores and e-commerce continued to grow, but it's rate of growth slowed down a lot so for one of the you know only times in my lifetime. Brick-and-mortar retail grew faster than e-commerce and I have a feeling that we're going to see Q2 of next year that's Q 2 of this year tomorrow that that's not going to be the case that we're gonna returning to the normal trend of e-commerce growing. Meaningfully faster than brick and mortar. Scot: [18:01] We're not going to no till tomorrow I can't wait all-nighter. Jason: [18:05] I will give you one other thing to tease based on the q1 data which came out three months ago we've seen that q1 data show up in a bunch of earnings calls and the most famous one is Shopify right so Shopify, right before their earnings call they laid off like 10% of their Workforce and they said like. Man you know there was all this e-commerce growth during the pandemic we hired all these people we got ready for all this stuff and then the e-commerce growth regressed to the mean. Which toy surprised us we thought it would be more persistent and so we've got to lay off a bunch of people and cut a bunch of cops and they show this, this famous graph of the quarterly e-commerce data showing this big spike the last couple months and it kind of Dipping back down to the trendline. And I see that graph everywhere and the one thing I like to remind people about is regressing to the mean doesn't mean e-commerce. Didn't grow it meant e-commerce grew as fast as it used to be growing which is quite fast so, well Shopify weight off 10% of their people like I was screaming in the background e-commerce has grown 61% from 2022 2022 and it added four hundred and twelve billion dollars a year in space it's not like it's not like there's not a ton of growth there it's just the growth that we're used to seeing. So it'll be interesting to see what tomorrow brings. Scot: [19:33] Yeah seems like a lot of the the inflation is really starting to Ripple through at this point and we've seen that show up at some retailers but it's interesting to see it can work into the day-to-day with your. Jason: [19:45] I know that that brings up a good point like we have several omni-channel retailers that reported earnings this this week and it's a really mixed bag about. The the. Inflation indicators in their earnings calls and you know probably the biggest one is Walmart reported earnings two days ago and people economists watch Walmart's earnings reports really closely in a challenging economic time because. They're kind of the Bellwether for the American Consumer right like that they have the biggest chunk of consumer spending and they kind of as Walmart goes like the American economy goes so. The as a reminder about a week before their earnings they low they significantly lowered their their earnings guidance for the rest of the year, they said that they expect that that they expected their profitability to be considerably lower than they had previously. [20:40] Giving guidance there earlier guidance was like zero to one percent growth. And they reduced it to they think earnings are going to be 11 to 13 percent lower this year than they were last year. Um so fast forward a week, to their earnings and everyone was kind of braced for it being kind of a brutal quarter and it was a beat beat reiterate like, they beat their earnings Target they beat the revenue Target and they stuck with their guidance that earnings are going to be a lot lower the second half of the year but. Investors actually took that as good news they actually expected that that Walmart might have a miss and so the fact that. Q2 sales and Q2 earnings were reasonably robust at Walmart was kind of positive news and to kind of put that in perspective. U.s. comp retail sales for Walmart last quarter grew 6.5 percent so again normal retail growth is 4.5% so 6.5 is good e-commerce grew 12% and you can compare that with, Amazon e-commerce grew seven percent the same quarter so obviously Walmart's a lot smaller than Amazon but they're the second largest e-commerce site, in the US and they're they're drilling meaningfully faster than Amazon which is impressive they did. You know we made a big deal about Amazon is breaking out their ad sales. [22:04] Walmart didn't quite go that far they said that their ad sales which is called Walmart connect grew 30% which is. [22:12] I'm not faster rate of growth and Amazon's ad sales are growing Amazon's growing about 18% Walmart is growing at 30 but they didn't tell us what the base was and and you know it's certainly a way smaller base than Amazon so I'm not sure. That growth on the much smaller base is huge news but it was interesting to see them talking about it Doug mcmillon and the CFO both John rainy both made. You know a big deal about Walmart connecting being a big part the CFO joked about not being used to businesses with this kind of crazy margins before and. Doug actually talked a lot about how Walmart connect is gaining huge traction internationally so they're they're able to sell the ads in in India and China and some of the other other markets that they plan. Scot: [23:00] They were getting a lot of like why surface it now I don't understand the so Amazon started revealing it because they've had to like the SEC said this has become a material part of your business you have to unpack it a bit but this seems like they, decided to do any Mini. Jason: [23:17] Yeah I think just because it's a good number 30 percent growth sounds like a good number. And it's a yeah when when most of your news is about your earnings really being challenged talking about a super high margin part of your business. Growing really fast I feel like just reflects well right like I'm not I'm not confident we're going to see them report that number every quarter by the way. Yeah so we'll have to see how that goes but like to kind of, summarize why they're saying profits are likely to be much lower for the full 2022 essentially what Walmart is saying is they are seeing consumers change Behavior because of the recession, and one of the big ways is they're seeing consumers still spend a lot with Walmart but they're shifting from. [24:06] Wants to needs so they're buying a lot less clothes and consumer electronics and a lot more food, and the food in the essentials that Walmart sells are much lower margin, then the home and apparel categories that they're selling less of so the mix it Walmart is changing. Um which is hurting their profitability but not necessarily their income, and in fact they called out 11 funny anomaly of the income is in this High inflationary time, a lot more High income consumer start shopping at Walmart so people that make over a hundred thousand dollars a year spend more at Walmart in a tough economy than they do in a, really bullish economy and so they feel like they captured extra customers because of that that would have shop somewhere else but they're buying this alone margin stuff, and John rainy the CFO he specifically talked about how they're seeing consumers make different purchase decisions that there. [25:12] He called it a pronounced customer shift that people are trading down and he gave the specific example that we're selling a lot less deli meats were selling a lot less beef and instead we're selling a lot more hot dogs chicken and tuna, and that you know even vegetable based proteins like beans are starting to sell a lot better in those are all signs of, you know distress consumer that's trying to make their food budget go further every week. [25:39] So I would call that a mixed bag I feel like investors were thrilled that their earnings call wasn't worse but you know. I don't I don't feel like people saw Walmart's earnings and said oh my gosh we're out of the woods on the economy and things are going to be great for the second half of the year. Scot: [25:57] Yeah. Jason: [25:58] So then we move to Target and and Target was kind of a Miss meat, maintain right they miss their earnings pretty meaningfully so they the guy their expectation when 72 cents a share they came in at 39 cents a share so that's a big, drop it's actually 90% less profit than they made this quarter last year, so a huge drop in profitability they exactly hit the revenue Target which was 26 billion and their guidance kind of stayed the same that they're expecting to grow. Kind of in there two to four percent, um growth rate which would be a typical year and they're expecting six percent margins which would be significantly up from the 1.2 percent margins they got this quarter. [26:50] Digital for them was up nine percent which is a lot slower growth rate than than Walmart and slower even than Amazon even though targets a lot smaller than then Amazon. But what is interesting is. Target basically talked about not seeing any inflationary changes to consumer spending they did not talk about their mixed changing dramatically they did not talk about like seeing their customer change a lot, what they talked about is. They had too much of the wrong inventory because of the supply chain disruptions last year and then being forced to deeply discount a lot of product and they took like a 1.5 billion dollar haircut on their inventory. Um which they had warned us they were going to do but so what they're saying is man we're just having to sell a lot of this stuff cheaper and that's it's not necessarily because of inflation but more because. We have the wrong stuff. Scot: [27:51] That yeah got you think they had this supply chain problem and ended up with the stuff they ordered a year ago gosh when I open this door is. Jason: [28:00] That for sure is true like they all ordered like Walmart you know said similar things that Walmart's I think said if we had a magic wand we would make 1.5 billion dollars worth of our inventory just disappear. Um and you know they all like. Beefed up their orders around holiday and they you know they all went to these extraordinary expenses to get inventory they got inventory much more via much more expensive means you know from more expensive suppliers with more expensive Freight. Um a lot of those costs are coming down right now freight costs are coming down shipping costs are coming down, but you know a lot of that inventory rolled in and it you know it was the clothes they hope to sell for Christmas that you know is less appealing now. I would argue people are also just buying less clothes right now like and I do think that's partly because of the economy and inflation. You know Target saying it's not Walmart saying it is it's possible they're both right it's you know Walmart has a lower income customer than Target and so it is possible that the. The typical Walmart customers more affected by inflation and their behavior is changing more dramatically in the more affluent customer that shops at Target and Amazon, um that their behavior is changing less as a result of inflation so I you know it's not outside the realm of possibility that they're both they're both right from their. Scot: [29:26] Nursing did in their warnings they both talked about apparel any more color on that. Jason: [29:33] I mean again the the they're seeing home slow down a lot which is interesting because you know people were overspending on home when they couldn't travel you you've seen this in your business but like. A lot of people are back to travel there's a lot of Revenge travel people are also restaurants are having a moment restaurants are crushing grocery stores at the moment, as you know everybody I'm not sure covid zup officially over but like everybody's mentally of it over covid rushing back to restaurants and fun fact. Inflation for restaurant food is much lower than inflation for grocery store food so it's actually a better deal right. So the food thing is weird the apparel thing is weird consumer electronics are really soft sales right now and they're they're actually. They have this weird counter effect like that's the one category that's having deflation TVs or less expensive this year than they were last year. And yet sales are still really soft I think Best Buy reports earnings tomorrow so that'll probably be a challenge for them. In the discretionary spending categories the one category that everyone has called out as an out performer is beauty. And I think that's this thing that we call affordable luxury that like you know when you're not feeling great about your finances but you want to treat yourself like what you do is you buy the premium whip. Instead of an expensive outfit or something like. Scot: [30:57] Nursing yeah kind of a can still feel good about yourself but you spent a lot less than a whole new. Jason: [31:03] Exactly I would argue that a better affordable luxuries to have someone do an amazing job detailing your car but that's just me. Scot: [31:09] Or a iced vanilla latte at Starbucks or 10. Jason: [31:15] Yeah yeah absolutely that's not that's not an affordable luxury Scott that's a necessity. Scot: [31:22] Were there any other omni-channel you want to cover because I had a. Jason: [31:26] Yeah yeah I think we probably spend enough time the Home Improvement guys did report it was kind of a in between Home Depot is decent their up 5.4% in their their comp sales which is kind of in between what we saw at Target and Walmart they talked about seeing their consumer business has slowed down and seeing their Pro businesses which is the contractors pick up so I do think consumer spending on their homes is slowing down I don't know where that pro-business is coming from at first glance so we'll have to dive into that deeper but the housing market is all topsy-turvy right now. Scot: [32:04] Yes I think that this kind of ties into the, bifurcation of the convenience already consumer in the more affluent and then the value of learning consumer that the pros being busy it was more Renovations are still going on at larger homes. Jason: [32:21] Yep that makes sense. Scot: [32:22] You know that that weird that like segment and maybe what's happening is you maybe you've outgrown your house you thought you get a new one interest rates went up are like well if I put that money into a expansion or something, you know that this may be a better use of proceeds than putting it towards paying the bank larger percentage I think that's probably what's going on there. Jason: [32:44] No that makes total sense I'll buy that yeah so then what's the last tranche of earnings we want to talk about Scott. Scot: [32:52] This was interesting because I was reading a couple articles and I saw you know Casper has a new CEO and and he came in and was basically saying, hey it's time to start stop losing money we need to be a profitable company, so then I started wondering you know he had that cluster of sa cluster in a positive way we had a grouping of companies go public that we talk a lot about that we're kind of in this, some of them were not 100% digitally native vertical Brands but in this kind of cohort over the last 18 months of IPOs, not 18 months calendar but with IPO windows open we had if you remember we had wish thread up Casper glossy a all birds. Warby and purple and a couple others go public. [33:39] So then I started poking around and it's basically a bloodbath out there for that cohort of companies so you know Casper's not doing very well. I'm thredup which you would think would do really well in recession because people would look at more Consignment type type of peril they had to do a pretty big layoff the 15% probably the most hit hard is wished which I've never 100% understood wished but you know far be it for me too to figure that out but you would think they would be doing well because they always had this super inexpensive stuff the trade-off was it took a while to get to you but if you needed like a phone little drone or I think one of their biggest sellers is hair extensions bridal gowns all kinds of stuff you wouldn't really expect for that value or to Consumer you think during recession that would do really well, their revenue is down 80 percent year over year so they are just basically coming unglued they did a Rebrand and their new brand is. Bargains made fund discovery made easy which to be hence that maybe Discovery was a problem and now they're trying to say hey we kind of. [34:47] You came to us before and you couldn't find what you're looking for but now we fix that kind of has that that kind of vibe to the new branding. One that's popular with the ladies in my house is glossy a they had to do a 33% layoffs and I can understand this because we went on a New York trip and that's one of the, places we make a trach tube and the store was closed and this is just like. [35:10] Four weeks ago so definitely post coded so that wasn't good and I think I know what's going on there, Albert's didn't 8% layoffs were be they had a weird mixed message they were doing some layoffs and talking about their losses mounting but then they announced their opening 40 stores and that they think it makes economic sense it's kind of like. Yeah I didn't feel like the best time to be doing that and they didn't really say anything other than we think that this is a good use of capital. We'll see and then you know so Casper is doing pretty poorly and then purple who's kind of a Casper clone if you will need to actually predate Casper's they wouldn't like that being called a butt yet another online mattress company their revenues down over 20% year-over-year I think during covid-19 we got new mattresses and now there's kind of a like a pull forward for that that that's a huge problem so that whole cohort is not doing well and kind of indexing much worse than kind of like what you saw in the data I want to ask you what if you think there's do you have a theory of what's going on with those guys. Jason: [36:14] I do like I think the whole direct-to-consumer model, I'm not saying it can't work but it's way more challenging than a lot of people. Um gave it credit for right like the fundamental problem with the direct-to-consumer model is customer acquisition right like there's 240 million households in the US and getting them to know about you and be aware of you and want to buy your product is, really hard right and if you're a direct-to-consumer company with no organic awareness and no reason for people to discover you the way you get people to find out about you is you buy ads right you buy that awareness and and all these d2c companies were. Using digital ads you know mainly on Facebook 22 by audiences and so one thing we know is customer acquisition costs have gone up because of, the Privacy changes in the less the lower efficacy of a lot of those those digital things. [37:17] You know even on the old pricing every subsequent customer gets more expensive than the last one like the first customers you can buy are the cheapest, but you know increasingly you have to bid higher and higher for an audience that's slightly a lower propensity to buy your stuff and so as you grow as you scale, it gets harder and harder to keep growing and so we've seen a ton of these d2c companies. Grow really fast from zero to something and then hit a plateau and slow way down and we were seeing that before the pandemic we were seeing it during the pandemic, some of these companies like we're partly aided by the pandemic and so maybe it gave them a little extra Runway some of these companies like. A way we're probably hurt by the pandemic and had less less Runway but I think what we're seeing is that. That the pure direct-to-consumer model without some other way of cup of consumers, cheaply making consumers aware of your products, is really challenging so you're seeing a bunch of these dtc's open their own stores that's the war be model you're seeing a bunch of these dtc's pivot to wholesale so glossy is moving into Ulta I think it is or it may be Sephora I apologize if I have it wrong, um but they're a bunch of these guys have moved into wholesale to get awareness. [38:43] And you know that changes the whole margin structure and does all these things I think there's a Warren Buffett quote, they're only when the tide goes out can you find out who's not wearing a bathing suit and I feel like that's that's kind of the situation we're in with these D disease is you know once we've come into a, challenging economic model Market the. The high cost of customer acquisition and the challenges with continuing the scale are really starting to be a parent for all these data see companies you buy that. Scot: [39:15] I do and a lot of them in our you know in our world we think about cackle TV and you kind of get in your head yeah it's you know I'm growing X percent macaque LTD is three or four and you feel like that's going to stay around forever right and then you hit recessionary period which apparently this isn't and hit some headwinds or some chop and suddenly you know that no one's buying that second mattress for that second pair of glasses or you know whatever it is and then, you know your whole economic model is built on this ratio of cacti LTD of three and suddenly it's one and a half and if you don't react quickly to that and if you don't have if all you have is paid mechanisms that are built on that that will ratio then you're in the horns of a dilemma where you're kind of like well I turn that off, the the acquisition spigot I can't grow Revenue but if I keep it on my my earnings are going to, go to heck in a hand basket because I'm effectively my cup my kak My overall economic side business have changed very dramatically and there's no way for me to. To deal with that and because these guys have such a big chunk of their you know their their revenue from Paid media it doesn't they don't have a lot of degrees to Pivot on so another way of saying what you said but I agree is the short route. Jason: [40:38] You know you reminded me one funny thing I think one of both of our favorite guests on the show Dan McCarthy. You know he talks about like every time he gets to look at the finances for one of these d2c companies that they they wildly underestimate their CAC and overestimate their LTV that like the math is also just flawed that like you know most most of these d2c companies feel like they're going to have like incredible retention and keep the these customers re spending every year for a long time that their data doesn't necessarily support so they they overestimate their ltvs because they don't account for enough turn and then you know they all just treat their ad costs as their total kak and you know it's customer acquisition cost it's all the costs to find that customer and get them to buy them and onboard it so all the customer service costs all the onboarding cost there's a lot of extra cost that should be in that cack number that a lot of first-time d2c CFOs don't don't tend to put in there so. I thought that was a funny observation as well. Scot: [41:44] Yeah and then a lot of times you know you'll be like let's say 20 million and you're just driving the business itself Google and you're like well this is amazing and but then Google Google searches are a pretty finite resource and at some point you kind of can get them all right so there's only so many people that are typing in mattress everything and then then you're like okay well I'll do you know I'll do Facebook I'll do this I'll do what not and then as you do you Whittle away Google is always one of the most effective advertising venues because the consumers given you their intent so they're at the bottom of the funnel, so then as you walk up the top of the funnel your cat goes way up and then you can have infinite spin there at the top of the funnel but. It doesn't really change the metrics Downstream so then that's that scaling problem so all these guys get to 100 million and then and it really Falls over because because they can't really get that incremental next dollar and if they do they're kak LTV ratio goes way up because they're spending so much more on, paid media LTD is stable so yeah it's a tough slog so I think reading between the lines when when were be says we want to open up stores that I think they're trying to you know cough ironically go from a pure online to being in foot traffic and getting people there which is you know what they're basically saying I think is that that may be cheaper than that next in Criminal online add-on. Jason: [43:11] 100% I wonder I when we're all retired and we look back on this market like I do think there's going to be a lot more d2c activity than we have today but I actually think most of it is going to look more like Nike it's going to look more like someone that was born as a wholesaler that created huge awareness affinity and love and eventually hit escape velocity where they didn't need that that wholesale model anymore and they were able to then go direct to Consumer and have a low customer acquisition cost and kind of growth hack and I'll bet you a lot more of the d2c brands that are dominant you know sort of 10 to 15 years down the road got there by starting wholesale and transitioning to d2c rather than being born D to C which is just I think a tough value. Scot that's a lot for one show and you know we've already teased people about a subsequent show on e-commerce so I feel like we should try to wrap up is there anything else we didn't cover that you were excited to talk about. Scot: [44:19] Not just want to give you good luck tomorrow I hope all your data flows or columns line up your Tableau is humming and I look forward to hearing your analysis on what comes out of the day tomorrow. Jason: [44:33] Awesome well my in-laws are visiting and they're commuting home tomorrow so they promised they're going to listen to Tonight Show in the car so I just want to give a shout-out sit to and Papa. Um and with that it's happen again we've used up our allotted time as always if this show for you some value if you're going to be a little smarter around the virtual water cooler tomorrow, the way you can repay us for this free show is you can jump on iTunes and leave us that five-star review that we so warmly deserve. [45:08] Happy commercing!

Fitness Confidential with Vinnie Tortorich
Heart Disease & The Obesity Epidemic- Episode 2171

Fitness Confidential with Vinnie Tortorich

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 61:33 Very Popular


Episode 2171 - On this Friday's show Vinnie Tortorich welcomes Dr. Mark Cucuzzella and they discuss the obesity epidemic, heart disease, calcium scores and cholesterol, and more. https://vinnietortorich.com/2022/08/obesity-epidemic-heart-disease-episode-2171 PLEASE SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS THE OBESITY EPIDEMIC Vinnie welcomes and gives a little refresher on Dr. Mark's background. (1:45) They then discuss the rise in obesity and sugar and high carb food consumption especially in kids, and how the number is growing and has become a worldwide obesity epidemic. (6:10) They mention Dr. Lewis Cantley, who is one of the leading researchers in the world on the relationship between sugar and cancer. (7:00) They also discuss a few other experts who have been talking about these subjects, but for some reason still struggle to get the word out. The effects of policies are impacting our kids in a big way, and not in a good way. They also chat about how Dr. Mark is a runner, very lean, and has a specific diabetes issue, which he describes in detail. (25:40) HEART DISEASE, CAC SCORES, & CHOLESTEROL The conversation then switches and Vinnie asks Dr. Mark to explain exactly what a CAC (calcium score) is. (38:25) As a result Dr. Mark gives a breakdown of the test, how it works, and what information about heart disease and cholesterol you can learn from it. They also discuss the confusion around the need for statins, as well as the challenges of diabetics and calcium results. PURCHASE BEYOND IMPOSSIBLE The documentary launched on January 11! Order it TODAY! This is Vinnie's third documentary in just over three years. Get it now on Apple TV (iTunes) and/or Amazon Video! Link to the film on Apple TV (iTunes):  Then, Share this link with friends, too! It's also now available on Amazon (the USA only for now)!    Visit my new Documentaries HQ to find my films everywhere: REVIEWS: Please submit your REVIEW after you watch my films. Your positive REVIEW does matter! FAT: A DOCUMENTARY 2 (2021) Visit my new Documentaries HQ to find my films everywhere: Then, please share my fact-based, health-focused documentary series with your friends and family. The more views, the better it ranks, so please watch it again with a new friend! REVIEWS: Please submit your REVIEW after you watch my films. Your positive REVIEW does matter! FAT: A DOCUMENTARY (2019) Visit my new Documentaries HQ to find my films everywhere: Then, please share my fact-based, health-focused documentary series with your friends and family. The more views, the better it ranks, so please watch it again with a new friend! REVIEWS: Please submit your REVIEW after you watch my films. Your positive REVIEW does matter!  

Le Panier
#177 - Catch-up Superprof : 19 millions de profs et 41 pays plus tard, avec Wilfried Granier

Le Panier

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 75:43


“Il existera un jour un leader mondial du cours particulier, une place de marché un peu comme Airbnb où on ne se pose pas de question quand on cherche les meilleurs profs. Je suis intimement convaincu que c'est Superprof qui va réussir ce challenge”. 2 ans après leur première rencontre par écrans interposés, en juin 2020, Laurent Kretz retrouve Wilfried Granier, cofondateur et CEO de Superprof. Depuis, la plateforme qui met en relation des professeurs particuliers triés sur le volet et leurs futurs élèves est devenue une véritable machine de guerre. Mais c'est surtout sur le front de l'internationalisation que la machine s'est accélérée, passant de 28 à 41 pays. Wilfried nous partage ses objectifs pour s'imposer comme le leader mondial des cours particuliers. Du refus de se faire accompagner par des fonds, au recrutement de Country managers locaux basés à Paris, il a posé chaque brique de son business de manière à préserver sa liberté et l'agilité de sa plateforme. Dans ce catch-up, on fera aussi le point sur la stratégie d'acquisition de Superprof. Wilfried nous explique comment il a su adapter son branding, sa stratégie SEO et sa strate techno à 41 pays différents. On s'intéressera plus particulièrement au plus grand d'entre eux, les Etats-Unis, et comment le marché américain est en passe de dépasser la France en matière de CA. Dans ce nouvel épisode du panier, vous trouverez des apprentissages en : Autofinancement : pourquoi se faire accompagner par des fonds est la pire stratégie quand on veut exploser à l'international [05”40] ; Algorithme de matching : trier ses profs particuliers sur le volet en prenant en compte 50 critères et en les resserrant selon la maturité du marché [20”15] ; Internationalisation : la méthode de lancement parfaite n'existe pas. Il faut partir d'un tronc commun, l'améliorer et l'adapter en permanence [28”30] ; Marché américain : diviser son CAC par 3 en multipliant les canaux d'acquisition et en se positionnant sur des requêtes de niche [42”14] ; Acquisition : travailler son taux de transformation pour piloter intelligemment son pricing et maximiser son CA [59”57] ; Branding : aller chercher ses futurs clients avant même qu'ils ne formulent leur besoin grâce aux campagnes télé et affichage [1”08”45] ; Pour en savoir plus sur les références abordées dans l'épisode : #42 – Superprof : Croissance externe et SEO, les ingrédients d'une hyper-croissance auto-financée Le Bootstrap Club Buzzman - l'agence de pub derrière la future campagne télé de Superprof L'épisode de GDIY avec Georges Mohammed-Chérif, à la tête de Buzzman Inscrivez- vous à la newsletter sur lepanier.io pour ne rater aucun conseil des invités du Panier et cartonner en e-comm ! Pour découvrir tout ça, c'est par ici. Si vous préférez Apple Podcasts, par là si vous préférez Podcast Addict ou encore ici si vous préférez Spotify. Et n'oubliez pas de laisser 5 étoiles et un commentaire sympa sur Apple Podcasts si l'épisode vous a plu. Le Panier est un podcast du label Orso Media, produit par CosaVostra.

Sinica Podcast
China's space program, with NASA astronaut Leroy Chiao

Sinica Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 60:46


This week on Sinica, Kaiser and Jeremy welcome Leroy Chiao, a NASA astronaut who flew three shuttle missions and served as commander of the International Space Station for over six months. Leroy is also very knowledgeable about China's space program and was the first American astronaut to visit the Astronaut Center of China outside of Beijing. He discusses the abortive history of Sino-American space collaboration, attitudes toward China's space program in the U.S., and China's impressive accomplishments and its grand ambitions for space.4:27 – How Leroy became an astronaut9:09 – The effects of long-term weightlessness15:10 – Leroy's access to the Astronaut Center of China18:16 – The peak years of Sino-U.S. collaboration in space exploration23:11 – The Wolf Amendment and the end of Sino-American space collaboration26:36 – Leroy on the most impressive accomplishments of the Chinese space program37:53 – U.S.-China competition as a driver of advances in space technologies48:04 – Sino-Russian space cooperation?49:12 – The weaponization of outer space52: 58 – RecommendationsA complete transcript of this podcast is available on SupChina.com.Recommendations:Jeremy: Nuremberg Diary by G.M. Gilbert.Leroy: Old Henry, a micro-Western filmKaiser: Putin by Philip Short; and a preview of a forthcoming paper about the Cyberspace Administration of China, CAC, written by Jamie HorsleySee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.