Podcasts about Document

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  • 2,436PODCASTS
  • 4,286EPISODES
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  • Oct 21, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about Document

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Latest podcast episodes about Document

Brave Bold Brilliant Podcast
Screw It Just Do It - Me Interviewed by Alex Chisnall

Brave Bold Brilliant Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 42:06


In this episode, Jeannette is interviewed by Alex Chisnall from the Screw It Just Do It podcast. They discuss how to get your business ready to respond to any scenario or change in market conditions.   They also cover how to put the right protocols in place, test and adapt them as the way the world works changes. How to recognise opportunities and be ready to take advantage of them. As well as spotting changes that may make it harder for you to compete, so you can quickly adapt and maintain market share.   KEY TAKEAWAYS   Taking stock is step one of managing a crisis.  Stay calm, don´t spook your team and make a firm decision. Don't procrastinate. Communication is key. Document protocols for all sorts of scenarios. Test and update them once a quarter. Market dynamics can change fast. Have processes in place to spot market shifts so that you are ready for trouble. Or, when that change is in your favour, to take advantage. When you see an opportunity, move fast. Get a minimal product out there. Then test, evaluate and learn. Prioritise innovations and opportunities then focus on them. In the podcast, Jeannette explains the 70/20/10 rule she uses to work out how to allocate resources. To be able to respond fast, you need to hire and develop the right people. Create the right culture for your team to perform at their best. Even solopreneurs can sit down once a month, create a bit of headspace to innovate and prioritise. Change is normal, so your business should be ready to cope with it. Often, the people who are dealing directly with your customers are the ones that have the best ideas.   BEST MOMENTS ‘Being a leader is all about making decisions with the information you have at the time, even if that´s imperfect information. ´ ‘Have a sense of calm, have the right people around you, make a decision and have a clear action plan.' ‘Often, it´s about getting a minimal viable product out there. Then testing and tweaking it as you go.' This is the perfect time to get focused on what YOU want to really achieve in your business, career, and life. It's never too late to be BRAVE and BOLD and unlock your inner BRILLIANCE. If you'd like to join Jeannette's FREE Business Impact Seminar just DM Jeannette on info@jeannettelinfootassociates.com or sign up via Jeannette's linktree https://linktr.ee/JLinfoot   VALUABLE RESOURCES Brave, Bold, Brilliant podcast series   ABOUT THE HOST Jeannette Linfoot is a highly regarded senior executive, property investor, board advisor, and business mentor with over 25 years of global professional business experience across the travel, leisure, hospitality, and property sectors. Having bought, ran, and sold businesses all over the world, Jeannette now has a portfolio of her own businesses and also advises and mentors other business leaders to drive forward their strategies as well as their own personal development.   Jeannette is a down-to-earth leader, a passionate champion for diversity & inclusion, and a huge advocate of nurturing talent so every person can unleash their full potential and live their dreams.    CONTACT THE HOST Jeannette's linktree  https://www.jeannettelinfootassociates.com/ YOUTUBE LinkedIn Facebook Instagram Email - info@jeannettelinfootassociates.com   Podcast Description   Jeannette Linfoot talks to incredible people about their experiences of being Brave, Bold & Brilliant, which have allowed them to unleash their full potential in business, their careers, and life in general. From the boardroom tables of ‘big' international business to the dining room tables of entrepreneurial start-ups, how to overcome challenges, embrace opportunities and take risks, whilst staying ‘true' to yourself is the order of the day. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

American Contractor Show Podcast
E100 - What is your legacy?

American Contractor Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 39:09


If today was your last day what kind of legacy would you leave behind? Have you thought of the person you want to be remembered as? Learn more- https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqa09rTG04dDFla0laTXlWLVh2a2ZEZ2tsZXhVQXxBQ3Jtc0tud2U4M2VXbGVxQjlPZ0hBUDJTMFZiX2UtLTE3TGhBY3JxcXhTYWR3ei1KTGtabHRON001TktyTXhDYzRFa09ieXktTU53cWgwQWFCSW9nOWJmUHFoUXBlVjZiNWR2VS1LcHJFU1lNQVB3eV90ZzhUbw&q=https%3A%2F%2Flinktr.ee%2FAmericancontractorshow (https://linktr.ee/Americancontractorshow) ~ https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqbnBCNDRLeG45UHMzUkFFRXVQaWZCTVU1VHA1UXxBQ3Jtc0tuY3plNkFSeXZ0ZVAwSkFXWVh6b0hZbEszTkFJX01kU0NpRmV1ZUhTMHg4NC1jMkYzbTFBZmpyVkY1SFZuSTcxXzE5NXgxamw3eTdaYUFtYko1UldTTm8zUUxZTDNXdlVMNlhpaEpKMFg0cUJtYjZMVQ&q=https%3A%2F%2Ffacebook.com%2Famericancontract (https://facebook.com/americancontract)... https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqa0I0SW9ySzA2cVlidDdsTkR4M1lfTWlkSDZhUXxBQ3Jtc0tucVM0TzQ2cGJxMldKNHkyRXI3UUxXY1F0cUNsdmNMT0Fvd01HVXZ6dko1WVFQOW5Wdmd4UEZaRjJWZVY0d0hUZ3d1NWpvb2d4cGFVZExXT1BKeTJNWjJldDY3Y0k2Y0ZpVEZjektRWk9Zc0JhZU53TQ&q=https%3A%2F%2Ftiktok.com%2F%40american.contract (https://tiktok.com/@american.contract)... https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqbExnYW9rU1hJdnhsdENtNlJOUGFtRGR2OExEZ3xBQ3Jtc0tuendRV0NxUmxqT1ZvSU0yMTlreGRJeG9zczBYa0xNeDhJWV96d19DMGMwSjRRU0ZSMHNvLWUzRVlrLWdQQ2RlNGpVcGJnWUp5VUdZQUw0cU1wcGlTUUw2Qm5WSEVNNWpuSzlYd2hXUW5JWjdsaEp5MA&q=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.instagram.com%2Famericancon (https://www.instagram.com/americancon)... **The American Contractor Show is made possible because of our sponsors!** Contractor Coach PRO - Coaching Contractors to Work On IT, Not IN It! Go to www.contractorcoachpro.com to learn more! Atlas Roofing - Shingles - Providing premium quality roofing and insulation products for distribution throughout the world. Go to www.atlasroofing.com to learn more! HailTrace - The most accurate hail mapping application in the world! Learn more at www.hailtrace.com 24Hr BookKeeper - Have confidence in your construction financials with 24Hr Bookkeeper! Sign up for a free consultation today! Visit https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqbUpTUFl4bzFRWDNKWDhyWDBlLUFtdmctTjVKUXxBQ3Jtc0tuZ0xCRDFyT0xCQWl6Y0lMNmZMbmJTbjkzOWJ3VTdueGticVoyMmpzZHZQWmtjRXlnNGNzVUptRUxpX3NDNnN4aWNnMV9uNVc0dlpsU0RuNkZINm5iem5TeGREMm94UHNZSXZWdXE5eEdoWGs3YmNPMA&q=http%3A%2F%2Finfo.24hrbookkeeper.com%2Fameric (http://info.24hrbookkeeper.com/americ)... C3 Group Inc. - Claims & Construction Consulting - Claims & Construction Consulting - C3 Group is a nationally connected team of Public Adjusters. They have been the industry experts on large loss, commercial claims for the past 8 years. For more information visit www.c3adjusters.com. Ingage - Close more deals with powerful sales presentation tools in the industry! Equip your team with the tools needed to compete in our industry. Learn more at www.ingage.io RoofScope by Scope Technologies, Inc. - RoofScope reports compiles all essential roofing measurements and images into an easy-to-read, environmentally friendly two-page report. Get started today at www.roofscope.com. CompanyCam - The only app every contractor needs. Document your jobs. Communicate with your crews. Cover your company's butt. Learn more at www.CompanyCam.com. Signpost - Signpost helps contractors text their customers, get online reviews, and drive loyalty with email marketing.- To learn more go to https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqbEpaUDBOTVZkTEVWT3pTUXUxYWlqeXlEY01yd3xBQ3Jtc0tua1h1TEpHTmtlWnVCYnY3bDJVN2xKZ0JiRDE1ZXdrX2h5cV9yaVVXczZtd2pTNURGYlRMVU05dGlqZWlRSVNOTVJNT2FqRmt3VVZ5NktNUWxnZ2FfWFFldmZ1SlJkdTJMb3Fwd05lVVc2eHBfaHJDdw&q=https%3A%2F%2Fsignup.signpost.com%2Fpartner%2Facs%2F...

The Bomb Hole
Pat Bridges | The Bomb Hole Episode 77

The Bomb Hole

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 232:47


The unofficial commissioner, historian, and encyclopedia of snowboarding, Pat “The Eye" Bridges has documented the sport for almost 27 years starting with E.I. then Snowboarder Mag and now Slush Magazine. In this episode we talk snowboarding journalism, early big air events, the Olympics, snowboard data, corporate companies getting into snowboarding, best tail block and hand plants of all time, Superpark, Jake Burton, and so much more! It's debatable whether Pat is the man who has seen more go down in snowboarding than any other human but without a doubt he remembers it better then anyone else. This week on The Bomb Hole we sit down with snowboardings encyclopedia and listen to him speak on the sport as seen through “The Eye”.Special ThanksLiquid Death- https://liquiddeath.com/bombhole/Ten Barrel Pub Beer- https://10barrel.com/beer/pub-beer/The Patreon Members, We would not do this without you!!- https://www.patreon.com/thebombholeIkon Pass- https://www.ikonpass.comVolcom- https://www.volcom.com post a good bail on instagram and #volcombombproof @thebombhole https://www.instagram.com/thebombhole/ @volcomsnow https://www.instagram.com/volcomsnow/ A Volcom rider will pick the best one each week and the winner will get a prize pack!!Bubs Naturals- https://bubsnaturals.comInstagramPat Bridges Instagram: @slushthemagazine https://www.instagram.com/slushthemagazine/@thebombhole: https://www.instagram.com/thebombhole...@Grendiesel : https://www.instagram.com/grendiesel/...@E_stone : https://www.instagram.com/e_stone/Hit Subscribe! Leave a comment, We love your feedback! If you like the show please leave us a review! It all helps us out a ton!!For all things Bomb Hole, go to : https://thebombhole.com/BOMB HOLE STORE: https://thebombhole.com/collections/allWatch the episode on YouTube- https://youtu.be/8LxnoGMe5JYJoin The Bomb Squad on our Patreon page! Props to all of our Patreon members for the support. We could not make these episodes happen without your help! Patreon members get the chance to ask guests questions and find out who we will be interviewing before anyone else. They also receive Bomb Hole merch and a custom Bomb Squad sticker!!! Find out more at https://www.patreon.com/thebombholeShow Notes-Whiskey | https://www.methodmag.com/videos/throwback-thursdays-whiskey-2.htmlThe Cage | http://www.snowboardinginsouthernvermont.com/the-cage.htmlSnowboarder Mag | https://www.snowboarder.comRide 1996 Spends 4.3 Million On Marking | https://sec.report/Document/0000891020-97-000488/0000891020-97-000488.txtSlush Magazine | https://slushthemagazine.comBig Snow American Dream | https://www.bigsnowamericandream.comMount Rushmore | https://www.nps.gov/moru/index.htmSuper Park Movie | https://www.snowboarder.com/featured/superpark-movie-full-movie/Super Troopers Maple Syrup | https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPHXfJZpSmsJake Burton Interview | https://www.snowboarder.com/featured/a-paper-trail-the-jake-burton-carpenter-interview/HBO Jake Burton Movie | https://deadline.com/2021/10/jake-burton-snowboarding-documentary-hbo-dear-rider-the-jake-burton-story-1234855039/Slush Subscription link | https://slushthemagazine.com/collections/shop/products/2021-slush-subscription

Only Murders in the Building Podcast

The finale. We know who killed Tim Kono! Don't listen if you haven't watched Episode 10. This week Elizabeth in KK sit down and chat with the one and only Martin Short. They go over his history with Steve Martin, how he got involved with the project, and what's next. PLUS more from Executive Producer Jess Rosenthal on how Only Murders started! AND a convo with Rachel Burger, co-writer of Episode 10 with John Hoffman; they discuss her journey as a writer, working backwards when writing a mystery, and the Document of Reveals! If you have a theory about who killed someone email us onlymurders@strawhutmedia.com From Straw Hut Media Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Lori Vallow & Chad Daybell Case
Zulema Pastenes: The Chandler Document Dump Part 4

Lori Vallow & Chad Daybell Case

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 43:44


Join us as we dive into the document dump on the Daybell case. We breakdown Zulema Pastenes' police interview. ..............Pretty Lies & Alibis is a true crime podcast located in Greenville, South Carolina. Pretty Lies covers a variety of cases across the United States. Join Gigi & Fruit Loop as they seek truth and travel the long road to justice. Make sure to follow Pretty Lies & Alibis on social media for more videos, details & information on the cases Gigi & Fruit Loop are currently covering... -Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PrettyLiesAndAlibis-Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/prettyliesandalibis/..............Special thanks to our sponsor, Too Cool T-Shirt Quilts, for their incredible support of our podcast! Click here to check out their products: https://www.toocooltshirtquilts.com/prettyliesandalibi

ThePrint
ThePrintPod: Lashkar offshoot circulated ‘how to target non-locals' document month before Kashmir killings

ThePrint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 5:55


In the document, The Resistance Front (TRF) also threatened to target civilians who help non-locals, & officials who help them get domicile certificates. ----more---- Read the full article here : https://theprint.in/india/lashkar-offshoot-circulated-how-to-target-non-locals-document-month-before-kashmir-killings/752707/

Manuel Milanés
TESTIMONIO DESGARRADOR || Emocional entrevista a PERIODISTA que vivió y documentó el 11J en Cuba

Manuel Milanés

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 37:22


TESTIMONIO DESGARRADOR || Emocional entrevista a PERIODISTA que vivió y documentó el 11J en Cuba --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/manuelmilanes/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/manuelmilanes/support

Lori Vallow & Chad Daybell Case
Lori Vallow: The Chandler Document Dump Part 2

Lori Vallow & Chad Daybell Case

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 32:25


Join us as we dive into the document dump on the Daybell case. ..............Pretty Lies & Alibis is a true crime podcast located in Greenville, South Carolina. Pretty Lies covers a variety of cases across the United States. Join Gigi & Fruit Loop as they seek truth and travel the long road to justice. Make sure to follow Pretty Lies & Alibis on social media for more videos, details & information on the cases Gigi & Fruit Loop are currently covering... -Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PrettyLiesAndAlibis-Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/prettyliesandalibis/..............Special thanks to our sponsor, Too Cool T-Shirt Quilts, for their incredible support of our podcast! Click here to check out their products: https://www.toocooltshirtquilts.com/prettyliesandalibi

Thriving in the Midst of Chaos: Parenting With Special Needs Kids
Journaling For Mindfulness With Guest Josephine Atluri

Thriving in the Midst of Chaos: Parenting With Special Needs Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 58:26


Episode 111: Journaling For Mindfulness With Guest Josephine Atluri   In this episode, Josephine Atluri discusses using journaling to help with mindfulness and parenting. She discussed ways to engage in mindfulness along with your child, as well as ways to communicate in a mindful way with your child. She provides examples for when mindfulness worked in parenting for her. Discussed the importance of examining expectations as a parent and to set intentions in your interactions with your children. Otherwise, you might be placing too much your child and placing extra demands on them. Use intentions to let things flow, rather than fighting obstacles to make things happen. It allows you to let unhelpful thoughts go. You can engage in emotional awareness by spending time being mindful just being aware of what you are doing and feeling. You can always set an alarm to check in with your body and your emotions. Then, give yourself whatever you need in the moment to care for yourself. Affirmations are really helpful to improve mood and self-esteem. It is a way of giving yourself extra love and caring. Document triggers throughout the week. This recognition of the patterns helps you to put strategies in place to avoid the situation or better cope with them in order to minimize anger or stress. You can better use stress management techniques and using what works for you. With practice, you can recognize other triggers more easily. Letting go and letting go of control is useful to allow the child to be who they are and to be able to enjoy therm. They will be heard and supported and that they were given what they needed in the moment. Take in the joy of others. Try to allow yourself to experience joy each day, without participating in it. Watch the happiness of your children. Help others. Enjoy a self-care moment. Links: The Mindfulness Journal For Parents Book Website Main Website Instagram Responding To Life Podcast     Email us if you have any questions or ideas! We are now on instagram! Check out updates on our website. Follow Thriving on Twitter. Check us out on Facebook! We are also on Pinterest!     Please subscribe to our podcast in the iTunes store, or wherever you find your podcasts, Leave us a 5-star review, to help us know what you like and what you don't like, and to make sure other like-minded people find support through this podcast. Show Music: Intro Outro: Intro Outro 2 by Mattias Lahoud under CC-BY 3.0 License (www.freesound.org) Theme Song: 90s rock style by monkeyman535 under CC-BY 3.0 License (www.freesound.org) Self Care Song: Green and Orange No Water by Duncan Alex under CC-BY 3.0 License (www.freesound.org)   Hosted by: Jessica Temple and Lewis Temple   Disclaimer: Our show is not designed to provide listeners with specific or personal legal, medical, or professional services or advice. Parents of children with health issues should always consult their health care provider for medical advice, medication, or treatment. Copyright 2021 Jessica Temple

TSF - Tubo de Ensaio - Podcast
Documentários de crimes na Netflix

TSF - Tubo de Ensaio - Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021


Edição de 14 de Outubro 2021

MIT Comparative Media Studies/Writing
Nick Thurston, "Document Practices: The Art of Propagating Access"

MIT Comparative Media Studies/Writing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 81:37


This talk introduces arguments and examples from Nick Thurston's current book project, Document Practices, which explores aesthetic and political frameworks for analyzing acts of re-publishing already public documents. With case studies that range from shadow libraries to experimental videos, and ideas about “the document” which haunt the sociology of literature as much as documentary arts practice, Nick sketches out the project's starting points and some of its key debates. Nick Thurston is a writer and editor who makes artworks. He is the author of two experimental books, Reading the Remove of Literature (2006) and Of the Subcontract (2013), the latter of which has been translated into Dutch (2016), Spanish (2019) and German (2020). He writes regularly for the literary and arts press as well as for independent and academic publications. His most recent book is the co-edited collection Post-Digital Cultures of the Far Right (2018). His recent exhibitions include shows at Transmediale (Berlin, 2018), Q21 (Vienna, 2018), MuHKA (Antwerp, 2018) and HMKV (Dortmund, 2019). He is currently Associate Professor in Fine Art at the University of Leeds, where he co-founded the Artists' Writings & Publications Research Centre and is a fellow of the Poetry Centre.

RNZ: Checkpoint
Carbon Zero 2050 discussion document out but clock is ticking

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 3:52


Fewer cars on the roads, more EVs, mass rapid transport in the big cities and congestion charges... Today Climate Change Minister James Shaw revealed an extensive consultation document aimed at reducing the country's carbon emissions in line with its obligations to get to net zero by 2050. But the clock is ticking for the government, with modelling showing if nothing changes the country will produce 7.7 million tonnes more carbon than it should over the next four years. Emma Hatton reports.

American Contractor Show Podcast
E099 -How contractors can leverage TikTok! Secrets to grow on TikTok

American Contractor Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 30:28


How contractors can leverage TikTok. Learn from TikTok Superstars Dylan Mullins and TJ McCormack as they discuss how Tiktok has changed the dynamic of acquiring customers in the roofing industry Learn more- https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqbEVXbVljMm1ZU0twLWlMZ2tyemk0bWpocXpPUXxBQ3Jtc0tuNU5ZazZUZEhpeXpkRE1ybmtvUXJaTVlnc0dTVlduSDJUbjc5UDExX2xkOWlQT2poMWRrdVZGUTFTXzlFZ2x2REZwYm1kUEpLb0dDLU02d1NuazRKbDRrSUpKcEE3c09JNHJfNks3cmRKTGpjMG9LYw&q=https%3A%2F%2Flinktr.ee%2FAmericancontractorshow (https://linktr.ee/Americancontractorshow) ~ https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqa0x6SnNNWVFzMVlHWVI4QkdmV3ZnczNkQjdtUXxBQ3Jtc0tuSWQ1ZnptZF8yN3VUNDlZaVR3NTExUGM4TndXVTNTWXJpaG9VdzlSZlQwLWFWNEFZbnd5SG9wTUp6SHZ4aUZlUUV2b29PTXl2b2pONmp6UDc3MWdtODJFM0JMaE4xVlJWOGZxUXcyb0JMeUlpcGsxdw&q=https%3A%2F%2Ffacebook.com%2Famericancontract (https://facebook.com/americancontract)... https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqbERCOXM0UHkzWC16U010QlVKaHN6dnA2VzVTUXxBQ3Jtc0trc3l6cldyUzZJd05BNGpELVhvOEVBTXctNUloN2lsMHB2TjJ6OU01UlJVTEExVU9rSEEyeEVaRURENjlVZG9FLThSS2tCaHdaRF95b3dNUFdiOEJick45cTg5SkZOb196SWxmem53WHFvVUtSMzIxYw&q=https%3A%2F%2Ftiktok.com%2F%40american.contract (https://tiktok.com/@american.contract)... https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqa0lzRC16c21QS0xqTmtURFBhZ01GV3V1MmlXd3xBQ3Jtc0trdkczNlVyaC1QdEF3dVBIWjVUcHE3NThXOGw2MEszMi0tNFBzUjlkODZEN3V5ZXJxSzZ4bUV1ZG9mOGE3dkJ0T3o1aFBTbkk3QzBaY1RabG1EMFNvaFVIdlpXM3V0V2FMc2xlVzAyQzRfRmZ0TTJZOA&q=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.instagram.com%2Famericancon (https://www.instagram.com/americancon)... TJ McCormack Tiktok- @Worldsgreatestroofer Dylan Mullins Tiktok- @Bigdm50 **The American Contractor Show is made possible because of our sponsors!** Contractor Coach PRO - Coaching Contractors to Work On IT, Not IN It! Go to www.contractorcoachpro.com to learn more! Atlas Roofing - Shingles - Providing premium quality roofing and insulation products for distribution throughout the world. Go to www.atlasroofing.com to learn more! HailTrace - The most accurate hail mapping application in the world! Learn more at www.hailtrace.com 24Hr BookKeeper - Have confidence in your construction financials with 24Hr Bookkeeper! Sign up for a free consultation today! Visit https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqbC1PRTNHQjJFdEtfZnJ5YVN3TGtfTXBUY2Uwd3xBQ3Jtc0ttNkJpMkVhUDlaSkFhQ2lfa1R2M0pRVl9uNmtPQXllREl1LU1vRWFjSll4eWtnTGdhNUl3aWpud2FNQk1MRDZkYjIwSkpqNUtPQ1ZfSlJweTUzeVlMS3E3X25uSG43aHlFMGk1SC1fdFBLeEh3SXhMUQ&q=http%3A%2F%2Finfo.24hrbookkeeper.com%2Fameric (http://info.24hrbookkeeper.com/americ)... C3 Group Inc. - Claims & Construction Consulting - Claims & Construction Consulting - C3 Group is a nationally connected team of Public Adjusters. They have been the industry experts on large loss, commercial claims for the past 8 years. For more information visit www.c3adjusters.com. Ingage - Close more deals with powerful sales presentation tools in the industry! Equip your team with the tools needed to compete in our industry. Learn more at www.ingage.io RoofScope by Scope Technologies, Inc. - RoofScope reports compiles all essential roofing measurements and images into an easy-to-read, environmentally friendly two-page report. Get started today at www.roofscope.com. CompanyCam - The only app every contractor needs. Document your jobs. Communicate with your crews. Cover your company's butt. Learn more at www.CompanyCam.com. Signpost - Signpost helps contractors text their customers, get online reviews, and drive loyalty with email marketing.- To learn more go to...

Kevin & Fred's Next Level Podcast: Quick Tips for Realtors and Interviews from the best in the real estate business
How to Get Your Business Out of Your Brain: Chris Ronzio used this playbook and you can too!

Kevin & Fred's Next Level Podcast: Quick Tips for Realtors and Interviews from the best in the real estate business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 32:15


In today's episode, I sat down with Trainual's Chris Ronzio. As a super happy customer of Trainual, I'm excited to put Chris in the hot seat, hear the backstory of his company, from starting out as a one-man operation, to the mind blowing growth to 10,000 companies in 183 countries in 3 years!    Chris Ronzio is the founder and CEO of Trainual, a leading SaaS company that helps businesses automate their onboarding and training by documenting every process, policy, and procedure in one simple system. Chris is also the host of the “Process Makes Perfect” podcast, author of “The Business Playbook,” and Inc. Magazine contributor with a column called “The Process Playbook.” With Trainual, Chris is on a mission to make small business easier by helping business leaders find the time to do more of what they love and providing a way to document and delegate what they do.   In the early phase of a business, you could be forgiven for not having your policies, operations, process and best practices documented, but as you grow, bring people on and scale, your business can't just exist and run in your brain, on a piece of paper or an Excel spreadsheet. Having a structured training manual that your team can easily access is the difference between having a business that feels organized, not messy. At some point, it becomes necessary to “get your business out of your brain” to keep growing it.    Guest Info   Chris Ronzio is the founder and CEO of Trainual, a leading SaaS company that helps businesses automate their onboarding and training by documenting every process, policy, and procedure in one simple system. Chris is also the host of the “Process Makes Perfect” podcast, author of “The Business Playbook,” and Inc. Magazine contributor with a column called “The Process Playbook.” With Trainual, Chris is on a mission to make small business easier by helping business leaders find the time to do more of what they love and providing a way to document and delegate what they do.   For more information, visit https://trainual.com/ and follow @chrisronzio on Instagram.    Buy Chris' new book The Business Playbook: How to Document and Delegate What You Do So Your Company Can Grow Beyond You here.   

HistoryPod
9th October 1410: The Prague Astronomical Clock first noted in a medieval document

HistoryPod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021


Known as the Orloj, the astronomical clock was designed and built by the Imperial clockmaker Mikuláš of Kadaň and Charles University professor Jan ...

The Short Coat
The Obscure Document Residency Programs Use to Decide If You’re Worthy

The Short Coat

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 55:19


The Medical Student Performance Evaluation (or dean's letter) will be sent to all your potential employers. Let's talk about what's in it! TL;DR You may have heard of the dean's letter. It's sent to all residency programs, one of the things they'll use to choose who to invite for an interview. But do you know what's in it…and that it's creation begins on your first day of med school?YouTube announces blanket ban on vaccine misinformation, and axes the biggest misinformation peddlers.Can The Short Coats pass the 2021 IgNobel Prize Winners Quiz? Today's episode is sponsored by Panacea Financial, a division of Primis, Member FDIC. Check out their PRN Personal Loans to help cover board exams or application costs, with decisions in as little as 24 hours and great interest rates! To Dave, it sometimes feels like the process of medical education is as complex and opaque as the actual medical knowledge it works to impart to students. In this elaborate system, absolute transparency is difficult to achieve, but there's one thing Dave thinks students should keep in the backs of their heads from day one: the medical student performance evaluation (MSPE, or ‘dean's letter'). That's because this document will be sent to all their future employers, including their residency programs. And those programs will use it (and other data applicants and colleges supply) to decide whether to invite you for an interview. Yet Dave has the impression that many don't even know what's in this important document–which includes comments from residents and attendings on their personal qualities and performance–until just before they begin to apply for residency! That's a problem for some students who, upon reading it for the first time, find that there's a pattern of behavior that they should have addressed long ago. Dave discusses what all students need to know about this important document. Also, the 2021 IgNobel Prizes for improbable research have been awarded; YouTube bans all vaccine misinformation and the peddlers of bogus vax claims; and California begins using a controversial–but effective!–technique to help people who use drugs kick the habit: paying them to stay sober. We Want to Hear From You How'd we do on this week's show? Did we miss anything in our conversation? Did we anger you? Did we make you smile? Call us at 347-SHORTCT anytime  or email theshortcoats@gmail.com.  It's always a pleasure to hear from you! You deserve to be happy and healthy.

How Success Happens
Todd Gerber, Adobe's VP for Document Cloud Product Marketing, Discusses Technological Inflection Points

How Success Happens

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 29:46


Todd Gerber discusses the incredible work that both he and the Adobe doing as they continue to lead the way in bridging the gap between technology and art. Today's bonus episode is brought to you by Adobe Document Cloud, providing the world's leading PDF and electronic signature solutions so you can turn manual document processes into efficient digital ones. Learn more about the research discussed in this episode at adobe.ly/futureoftime.

American Contractor Show Podcast
E098 -Door to Door Sales

American Contractor Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 28:39


Dashaun Bryant and Ben Menchaca share their secrets and teach how to be a successful door to door salesman Learn more- https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqa0xwTU9pUVdkVnliUmMyMWNVR2R3RXBfRXB6d3xBQ3Jtc0tsSkg2TGhZZWVMRFV1bG1JcHB1V3hfdjhlRFcxWjJOT2d6d3NqQW1tTWpPUFRJVlozcFBxQ0gyYWs3bVY1M2FfLUlhYjdKQWRKYWpVa0lQcXdaQmlGdVJUR2RPMUdHdnpVZ0xDSFh2Y1N1TFRzN3hmdw&q=https%3A%2F%2Flinktr.ee%2FAmericancontractorshow (https://linktr.ee/Americancontractorshow) ~ https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqbml6R09BQ1QzeFdBWWx5ellBOU80d1BYOHI5UXxBQ3Jtc0tuU09NMjd5ckNhUFFXMU1VNTd2S1VzVTJNbUMwUThVTXlRUlVfMWlRbEVIOVl6T05uVU5WNml0RlpKaU1IeFhWTExUOExwbDBKSlJ2enl1dnpuWlhqQjhiVDB2Z2Q3eXdfWUlKU24zMWhPM3dDTmlQUQ&q=https%3A%2F%2Ffacebook.com%2Famericancontract (https://facebook.com/americancontract)... https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqblJoWE4yT1ZWNE9kb0tNQUpaUjg2eEQzdWdfQXxBQ3Jtc0tuNDRRam9Wcl9hZGVPazN5MTFuTm9uRW1GS2U3bzB5TXNObTBpd3VJdEpmZVh6THhRaE9TXzZvTHd2Y0RIaTRJNWtwN25OT1FRV1FCSmhvVUlqQ2tYUldjT2tNYzRVX1Mwcnptb2t3OTlwR0xSa1l1QQ&q=https%3A%2F%2Ftiktok.com%2F%40american.contract (https://tiktok.com/@american.contract)... https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqbnR3VDBMX3Rpb2RUZ0NoU3F3VWhDb09XTURRQXxBQ3Jtc0tuT29naHpRdUlqbjloazVHZmx4VEJJRnpucUR5UDA0bnc3TnRaVkVTNGVKNU5RdnlLTmw4bkFLVlk2djJPVi1hLVc2WVR5WTRLel9yV1RINnVqWDFWZE9CVU1LLWZ6TGlJYUY1LTQ2QzBlSG5FX3hTWQ&q=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.instagram.com%2Famericancon (https://www.instagram.com/americancon)... **The American Contractor Show is made possible because of our sponsors!** Contractor Coach PRO - Coaching Contractors to Work On IT, Not IN It! Go to www.contractorcoachpro.com to learn more! Atlas Roofing - Shingles - Providing premium quality roofing and insulation products for distribution throughout the world. Go to www.atlasroofing.com to learn more! HailTrace - The most accurate hail mapping application in the world! Learn more at www.hailtrace.com 24Hr BookKeeper - Have confidence in your construction financials with 24Hr Bookkeeper! Sign up for a free consultation today! Visit https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqbXNWcklnaXl0SXlIV0c3MEtnd0Y1WVU0RTBVZ3xBQ3Jtc0ttTlBmY2w0bFhJLXBzRXRfb3VIM20tQ2tOeUh2MzJSQUxIeHR6d3hNRzh2Y2ZMUUNhdEdDZE5mdmFqX3FDQlNoUkstLWx2WTd2d2tCd3RlTk5EQ282V21YR1h0YVFSMkg5eVRnamV6dkpmTzUtNnpNdw&q=http%3A%2F%2Finfo.24hrbookkeeper.com%2Fameric (http://info.24hrbookkeeper.com/americ)... C3 Group Inc. - Claims & Construction Consulting - Claims & Construction Consulting - C3 Group is a nationally connected team of Public Adjusters. They have been the industry experts on large loss, commercial claims for the past 8 years. For more information visit www.c3adjusters.com. Ingage - Close more deals with powerful sales presentation tools in the industry! Equip your team with the tools needed to compete in our industry. Learn more at www.ingage.io RoofScope by Scope Technologies, Inc. - RoofScope reports compiles all essential roofing measurements and images into an easy-to-read, environmentally friendly two-page report. Get started today at www.roofscope.com. CompanyCam - The only app every contractor needs. Document your jobs. Communicate with your crews. Cover your company's butt. Learn more at www.CompanyCam.com. Signpost - Signpost helps contractors text their customers, get online reviews, and drive loyalty with email marketing.- To learn more go to https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqbWs3NVZvYmNKQnFlMFMtVmxVT1FhWTJBcW1Td3xBQ3Jtc0ttVDBnc0NzNjI4UElYQkg5dHN5SHVtT0hGWWpnVENRbG9zRmpLVkRkZGl6Mk5KZ0FyQUZOYXdDcEM5dE9rQWY4ajdkSC1tMGp5ZHhUOGVlbFhFd2tVaXRUS09fb0IyWGUyTmpNc0VIRXdQOGFDNUwzbw&q=https%3A%2F%2Fsignup.signpost.com%2Fpartner%2Facs%2F (https://signup.signpost.com/partner/acs/).

Run to the Top Podcast | The Ultimate Guide to Running
Do You Ever Feel Like You're Not a “Real Runner”? Erin Azar Shows You How to Overcome That Mindset

Run to the Top Podcast | The Ultimate Guide to Running

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 38:26


Do you ever look at other runners, in person or on social media, and think “they are so much faster than me” or “they are real runners, not me”?  Well, you're not alone and unfortunately this mindset can prevent you from enjoying everything running can be. Well, Erin Azar is on the podcast today to… Help you overcome these negative thoughts and develop a stronger mindset Document her journey as a new runner and what helped her get feel like a “real runner” How to get over comparing yourself to other runners on social media and their seemingly  perfect running accounts. Win a FREE Copy of the Easy Running Plans book written by Coach Jeff! What I love about Erin is that she is everything that a real runner really is.  So many people who are starting off say, oh I'm not a real runner because I'm not fast or skinny or experienced.  Erin is changing all of that and to be honest, she's the only running account that I want to follow right now. I know you are going to love her as much as I do no matter what kind of runner you are. CONNECT, COMMENT, & COMMUNITY: Leave a review on Apple Podcasts!  A great FREE way to support the show! Follow RunnersConnect on Instagram Runners Connect Winner's Circle Facebook Community  RunnersConnect Facebook page Follow Erin on Instagram Follow Erin on TikTok This week's show brought to you by… LMNT When coaching endurance runners of all levels to be their best, I always emphasize the need for proper hydration with the right balance of electrolytes.  Most athletes I've coached are surprised to learn that their sodium needs are actually much higher than they expected and it's been hurting their performance.  Part of the reason athletes need much more sodium than they think is not just because they lose electrolytes through their sweat, but also because athletes tend to eat very healthy diets.  They've been told that salt is a bad thing in food and frequently don't get enough for their lifestyle.  Much of the science of sodium is based on people who eat highly processed diets which also are very low in potassium.  It could actually be the low potassium levels causing the issues that sodium has been blamed for!  What is clear is that both sodium and potassium at the proper levels are essential for high performance (and for life in general!).  That's why we partnered with LMNT to offer a free sample pack of their electrolyte mix. Head to drinklmnt.com/runnersconnect to get yours now. The Sample Pack includes 8 packets of LMNT (2 citrus, 2 raspberry, 2 orange, and 2 raw unflavored).

45 Graus
#108 Aires Almeida - Para que serve a Arte?

45 Graus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 108:09


O convidado é licenciado e mestre em Filosofia pela Universidade de Lisboa. Tem-se dedicado sobretudo à filosofia da arte. Dirige a coleção Filosofia Aberta, da Gradiva e é autor de vários livros, entre os quais O Valor Cognitivo da Arte (2010) e A Definição de Arte: O Essencial (2019). -> Apoie este projecto e faça parte da comunidade de mecenas do 45 Graus em: 45graus.parafuso.net/apoiar Foi sobretudo este último -- sobre o que é, afinal, a arte -- o mote para a nossa conversa.  Já há muito tempo que queria falar sobre arte no 45 Graus. É um tema obviamente com muito pano para mangas; afinal, não há ninguém que não aprecie alguma forma de arte, seja ela a pintura, a música ou o cinema.  No entanto, faltava-me encontrar um convidado que tivesse a abordagem certa. Porque a verdade é que a arte, como depende muito da nossa sensibilidade individual, é um tema que se presta muito a análises, digamos, pouco… objectivas.  Ou é discutido numa lógica puramente subjectiva, do tipo: “adooooro o Tarantino” -- ou a Paula Rego (ou, pelo contrário eles “não me dizem nada”). Ou é discutido de uma forma quase religiosa, com uma admiração cega por tudo o que é de determinado artista, seja ele o David Bowie ou Picasso. (A nossa conversa começa precisamente por este ponto). Ou então, mesmo quando encontramos uma discussão acesa sobre arte, como é comum por exemplo na crítica de cinema, o que vemos, na verdade, muitas vezes, é uma discussão com superlativos a mais e objectividade a menos. De certa forma, pode dizer-se que estive este tempo todo à espera de um convidado como o Aires Almeida, que consegue falar sobre arte de forma cativante mas sem peneiras nem poses. O nome dele foi-me sugerido pelo Desidério Murcho, outro grande convidado do 45G, a quem agradeço. O ponto de partida para a nossa conversa foi o mais elementar de todos: o que é a arte? Que aspectos são comuns a formas tão diferentes de arte como a pintura, a música ou a literatura e que, no entanto, as distinguem de outras actividades humanas? E porque é que a arte é algo que consideramos valioso -- o que é que a arte nos dá? Dá-nos prazer, claramente, mas pode também ser uma fonte de conhecimento? Ou é simplesmente um tipo de experiência diferente dos outros todos? Foi uma longa conversa, na qual percorremos uma série destes aspectos da natureza da arte. _______________ Índice da conversa: (03:04) não devemos tratar a arte como algo sagrado, não tem valor intrínseco. (Noël Carroll, filósofo)  (12:34) Os vários problemas filosóficos em torno da arte | O que é arte? Diferentes tipos de definições. | Casos-fronteira. Gato Fedorento - Lusco Fusco | Fahrenheit 451, de Ray Bradbury (25:09) Porque é que, enquanto sociedade, valorizamos tanto a arte e os artistas? | O que é a Arte?, de Lev Tolstói (29:19) Há muita arte má. A falácia da divisão. | Gerhard Richter | Muita arte poderia ser destruída.  (35:55) A arte enquanto fonte de prazer. Robert Nozick e a “máquina das experiências” | O entretenimento é inimigo da arte? (41:27) A arte enquanto fonte de conhecimento? Jerome Stolnitz on the cognitive triviality of art | A arte enquanto estímulo dos sentidos. | A arte enquanto fonte de uma ‘experiência estética' que é única. | A música é universal?  (54:30) A arte enquanto meio para experienciar emoções que de outra forma não teríamos (ou sem ter o custo associado). (Porque é que as pessoas ouvem música triste e vêem filmes de terror?) (01:01:01) O papel no valor que a Humanidade da arte da admiração pelo/a génio do artista. (01:06:17) Por que admiramos mais o talento do que o esforço? | A ‘regra' das 10,000 horas de treino | Livro “Guitar Zero”, de Gary Marcus | Livro “The Sense of Style”, de Steven Pinker  (01:14:04) A intenção do artista importa para o valor da obra? | Ensaio “A morte do autor”, de Roland Barthes |  (01:20:43) Quando a arte se torna um mero adereço social (a “pose” dos artistas e dos críticos de arte). | Música atonal. | Os Abba (01:23:43) Quando a mesma música ou o mesmo filme nos despertam reacções diferentes em momentos diferentes da vida. | “Voando sobre um ninho de cucos” | A dificuldade em apreciar devidamente obras marcantes antigas que foram revolucionárias na altura. | Pulp Fiction. | Filmes de Manoel de Oliveira. | Ulysses, de James Joyce (01:33:07) Obras falsas podem ser consideradas arte? Documentário Netflix “Made You Look”. | Han van Meegeren. O falsificador que engazopava nazis. | Nelson Goodman (filósofo) | O urinol de Marcel Duchamp  (1:39:19) ...de volta ao problema da Definição da Arte: como classificar a arte de vanguarda? | Anti-humor | Nick Zangwill (filósofo) (1:45:54) Livro recomendado: “Investigações Estéticas - Ensaios de filosofia da arte”, de Jerrold Levinson  _______________ Obrigado aos mecenas do podcast: Tomás Fragoso, Gonçalo Murteira Machado Monteiro, Nuno Costa, Francisco Hermenegildo, Mário Lourenço, Carlos Seiça Cardoso, José Luís Malaquias, Tiago Leite, Carlos Martins, Corto Lemos, Margarida Varela, Filipe Bento Caires, Miguel Marques, Galaró family, Nuno e Ana, João Ribeiro, Miguel Vassalo, Bruno Heleno Gonçalo Matos, Emanuel Gouveia, Ricardo Santos, Ricardo Duarte, Ana Sousa Amorim, Manuel Martins, Sara Mesquita, Francisco Sequeira Andrade, ChaosSeeker , Gabriel Sousa, Gil Nogueira, Luis Brandão Marques, Abílio Silva, Joao Saro, Tiago Neves Paixão, Daniel Correia, Rita Mateus, António Padilha, Tiago Queiroz, Carmen Camacho, João Nelas, Francisco Fonseca, Diogo Sampaio Viana, José Soveral, André Oliveira, Andreia Esteves, João Bernardino, Luís Costa, Ana Teresa Mota, Isabel Oliveira, Arune Bhuralal Rui Baldaia, Joana Margarida Alves Martins, Luis Marques, Hugo Correia, Duarte , Francisco Vasconcelos, Telmo , Jose Pedroso, MANNA Porto, José Proença, Carlos Manuel Lopes de Magalhães Lima, Maria Francisca Couto, joana Antunes, Nelson Poças, Francisco López Bermúdez, Carlos Silveira, Diogo Rombo, Bruno Lamas, Fábio Mota, Vítor Araújo, João Pereira, Francisco Valente, Nuno Balsas, Jorge Amorim, Rui Vilão, João Ferreira, Luís Elias, José Losa, Hélder Moreira, Diogo Fonseca, Frederico Apolónia, André Abrantes, Henrique Vieira, João Farinha, Paulo Fernandes, Nuno Lages, João Diamantino, Vasco SÁ Pinto, Rui Carrilho, Luis Quelhas Valente, Tiago Pires, Mafalda Pratas, Renato Vasconcelos, João Raimundo, Francisco Arantes, Francisco dos Santos, Mariana Barosa, Marta Baptista Coelho, João Castanheira, Pedro , rodrigo Brazão, Nuno Gonçalves, Pedro Rebelo, Tomás Félix, Vasco Lima, Joao Pinto, João Moreira, José Oliveira Pratas, João Diogo Silva, Marco Coelho, Joao Diogo, Francisco Aguiar , Tiago Costa da Rocha, João Crispim, Paulo dos Santos, Abílio Mateus, João Pinho , Andrea Grosso, Miguel Lamela, Margarida Gonçalves, Afonso Martins, João Barbosa, Luis Filipe, Renato Mendes, António Albuquerque, Francisco Santos, juu-san, Fernando Sousa, Pedro Correia, MacacoQuitado, Paulo Ferreira, Gabriela, Nuno Almeida, Francisco Manuel Reis, Daniel Almeida, Albino Ramos, Inês Patrão, Patrícia Esquível , Diogo Silva, Miguel Mendes, Luis Gomes, Ana Batista, Alberto Santos Silva, Cesar Correia, Susana Ladeiro, Gil Batista Marinho, Filipe Melo, Cheila Bhuralal, Bruno Machado, Miguel Palhas, isosamep, Robertt , Pedro F. Finisterra, Cristiano Tavares, Pedro Vieira, Jorge Soares, Maria Oliveira, Bruno Amorim Inácio, Nuno , Wedge, Pedro Brito, Manuel Botelho da Silva, Ricardo Leitão, Vítor Filipe, João Bastos, Natália Ribeiro, Bernardo Pimentel, Pedro Gaspar, Hugo Domingues _______________ Esta conversa foi editada por: Hugo Oliveira _______________ Bio: Licenciado em Filosofia pela Universidade de Lisboa, onde também obteve o grau de Mestre em Filosofia da Linguagem e da Consciência (2005), com uma tese sobre filosofia da arte. É professor de Filosofia do ensino secundário, colaborador do Centro de Filosofia da Universidade de Lisboa (Grupo LangCog) e, desde 2017, é membro da direcção da Sociedade Portuguesa de Filosofia. É autor dos livros O Valor Cognitivo da Arte (2010) e A Definição de Arte: O Essencial (2019), coautor, com Desidério Murcho, de Janelas Para a Filosofia (2014, entretanto esgotado) e de vários outros livros didácticos de filosofia. Desde 2006 dirige a coleção Filosofia Aberta, da Gradiva Publicações. Vive em Portimão, mas é natural de Vila Nova de Foz Côa.

American Contractor Show Podcast
E097 -How to successfully market your business (Digital Marketing 2021)

American Contractor Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 31:35


How to successfully market your business on social media with Jonathan Sherwood, Nick Peret, Randy Brothers, and John Dye Learn more- https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqbDdlNEZBQlVIUmFmaVNYenUzSFdGalhiZHplQXxBQ3Jtc0tuNmp1SGxoQ2Y2amZYN3prb2o3TDVQMlh4X3p4RkpqLWhDS25CSm02YnNVbjhqZF9CemZpV28xUGdOTlhmVnluMl9heE1iemh3MVVob2tPYi1CLU9Gc0ZwVUIyQTBxQlZ4T1duU0pUSXN6SmZmZ01vSQ&q=https%3A%2F%2Flinktr.ee%2FAmericancontractorshow (https://linktr.ee/Americancontractorshow) ~ https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqbWl5VTMtMlhvSml4cXlxZ25jVVZOR2t2NmxfZ3xBQ3Jtc0tuLVdsNy04aTJydEppaDdidzg4b1p5a1RUTXFyV01reXpzQjVDTC05akd0c25iMkxaS2ZGZVdZQjJ0a3ZXVnZpVE9oN2NoTW1ldV9mNXljREo0SWVNWGRTc3AtdE9nVDhyeUJIVm1jTDBJSFlrWUNHWQ&q=https%3A%2F%2Ffacebook.com%2Famericancontract (https://facebook.com/americancontract)... https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqa0JoRWM0QUlTRTBURmpQVDFVbjJ2d0o3YkNkQXxBQ3Jtc0ttdy11dUprcnpKWU02TlhqVTBtR19iTDNaVmZNVllfMG9rOFlXblZLeWxNVHpKVHFkVldCSS1LeVhpYnNsSmp6NGhBZW5xZzlEb0NhdDFkTmo0cTlHbjA2Smc2R1hYdjhXQUJZQWhuS2ROOEFqV0ppQQ&q=https%3A%2F%2Ftiktok.com%2F%40american.contract (https://tiktok.com/@american.contract)... https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqbnAtZXQ0YjBMV2hMMmJBV1hjVWFYUFB0OHpnUXxBQ3Jtc0tsb1hCYzhwMUhBQUFQOFhhS2Z0a1ZyMkxBMW8yX19aRUZvYmZONUw1VzRZdm9RRjE1WE5uQ09ad2QyOXNjd2kzTHJZaGJYTDE4X2hWNnBwb0NIbFpvdTEweE9GbDExQTVYc0RtWHdZNVNBcERfelZzUQ&q=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.instagram.com%2Famericancon (https://www.instagram.com/americancon)... **The American Contractor Show is made possible because of our sponsors!** Contractor Coach PRO - Coaching Contractors to Work On IT, Not IN It! Go to www.contractorcoachpro.com to learn more! Atlas Roofing - Shingles - Providing premium quality roofing and insulation products for distribution throughout the world. Go to www.atlasroofing.com to learn more! HailTrace - The most accurate hail mapping application in the world! Learn more at www.hailtrace.com 24Hr BookKeeper - Have confidence in your construction financials with 24Hr Bookkeeper! Sign up for a free consultation today! Visit https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqbWdBQjREZUN6SjVmb3JKT2hMbmpybkM1cmdhQXxBQ3Jtc0tuUzNJWGhqYXJMS0JEUEpGZWR4NGFKZjJURWNiZG1WaHhxMzFwMGRzZlktbDlYZDRmaVpzQUFkWUNDSkQzN2o2TENnMS1VcmJkQThBTW9MTGI0R3V6VUJ2a1dXQ0lKZkdtSzJqX2JRZllKLXFacEdpbw&q=http%3A%2F%2Finfo.24hrbookkeeper.com%2Fameric (http://info.24hrbookkeeper.com/americ)... C3 Group Inc. - Claims & Construction Consulting - Claims & Construction Consulting - C3 Group is a nationally connected team of Public Adjusters. They have been the industry experts on large loss, commercial claims for the past 8 years. For more information visit www.c3adjusters.com. Ingage - Close more deals with powerful sales presentation tools in the industry! Equip your team with the tools needed to compete in our industry. Learn more at www.ingage.io RoofScope by Scope Technologies, Inc. - RoofScope reports compiles all essential roofing measurements and images into an easy-to-read, environmentally friendly two-page report. Get started today at www.roofscope.com. CompanyCam - The only app every contractor needs. Document your jobs. Communicate with your crews. Cover your company's butt. Learn more at www.CompanyCam.com. Signpost - Signpost helps contractors text their customers, get online reviews, and drive loyalty with email marketing.- To Learn more go to https://www.youtube.com/redirect?event=video_description&redir_token=QUFFLUhqbnBFTE9Idzh1NXZZR2FYMDROZnk0Y1Y4V0ZwQXxBQ3Jtc0tsOUkyRWk2ekI3Tnh2N3hrVUlFNE0ySzd6RmNINGFpQWlhUXZJZzRLZm9vXzVpSXFKNmZtb0Q1dFlMOEtBbDlNcnpaSXBlXzdiVjhCa012Qks4R1hHaUM0OEs0RDlXWHBYZnJ3aGRuT3RTaVJodlRVUQ&q=https%3A%2F%2Fsignup.signpost.com%2Fpartner%2Facs%2F (https://signup.signpost.com/partner/acs/).

Hacker Public Radio
HPR3437: The HTML document format

Hacker Public Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021


Klaatu asked us what document format we like and why, so this is a response to his podcast. In this podcast I talk about HTML and the importance of good document structure.

Very Good Trip
Les Beatles au travail : "Get Back", un document inespéré

Very Good Trip

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 53:56


durée : 00:53:56 - Very Good Trip - par : Michka Assayas - Ce soir, dans Very Good Trip on va réviser nos classiques mais on sans radoter pour autant, parce qu'on va apprendre des trucs inattendus.

The REAL David Knight Show
Fri 1Oct21 YouTube — “Chokepoints”: Banks & Google Attack 1A and 2A

The REAL David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 181:38


“Havana Syndrome” narrative changes — is leaked document an attempt to allay fears over 5G? “Chokepoint” banks pushing gun control excluded from market in Texas, gun manufacturers fleeing to Tennessee from Massachusetts In country after country, the direct correlation of high vaccination rates to an explosion in deaths Troops & nurses sue over vax mandate Will budget fight in Senate change the balance of power? “No jab, no pay” in Italy, now in Australia — why are they doing that instead of firing people? YouTube pulls back Ron Paul censorship — for now TOPICS by TIMECODE 3:17 Stern, matronly Australian dictator, Gladys Berejiklian, resigns after illicit affair discovered.  Like Cuomo, crimes committed against the public in her official capacity are NOT even considered 5:19 Listener letter — fired (in Texas) for not being vaccinated.  Why don't Abbott & the GOP stop the Biden mandates? And why don't GOP Governors do something to help military fired for their religious convictions, given a dishonorable discharge? 10:40 Competing polls give VERY different pictures of the public's view of Biden's jab mandate 17:47 The ugly caste system of vax apartheid. Unvaxed = Untouchable 25:26 Military, nurses and others sue over vax mandate.  Several large corporations employing a million Australians write letter to government saying ENOUGH! 35:00 “HerdImmunity”? THIS is WHY They Demand 100% Jab. They're trying to cover up their crimes against humanity 50:38 Listeners letters.  Should we ally on opposing mandates with those we would otherwise disagree with, letter examples for religious exemptions, CMS is turning private medical information over to unnamed “third parties” 1:06:35 Manchin & Sinema stop the radical left agenda and are vilified.  Will Manchin switch parties? 1:13:55 Radical Empowerment of Federal Reserve Proposed. Janet Yellen wants to do away with debt ceiling completely, but radical Biden appointee wants TOTAL control and central planning to be carried out by the Fed Reserve — in addition to Central Bank Digital Cash 1:28:15 Re-Greta: She's BACK! Blah-blah-blah. Idiocracy plus hate & anger as the masked NPC's cheer Greta on.  And Musk calls his cars “two-ton death machines.”  If only they didn't keep crashing into police cars & fire trucks. 1:37:41 “Misgendering” is becoming a crime. But Denzel Washington is working with a Christian group to help men find their lost purpose in life 1:52:06 Listeners' letters.. homeschooling 2:03:01 Putin used a dog to distract Merkel at a meeting, and he used an attractive female to distract Trump 2:06:03 “Havana Syndrome”: 5G Canary in the Coal Mine. Document “leaked” to BuzzFeed that concludes the effects are “psychogenic”.  Is it misdirection to allay concerns about 5G health effects? 2:17:29 Gun Control Shut Down by TX & TN. Big banks are still squeezing gun manufacturers/retailers with “ChokePoint” but Texas just shut them down with a new law.  Massachusetts tried to ban gun manufacturing and it backfired. And, the rise and fall of ammunition prices 2:44:54 In Nation After Nation, Jabs = EXPLOSION in Deaths. Australia, Malta, Gibraltar — when jab campaigns started deaths jumped by up to 20x's.   Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.com If you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-show Or you can send a donation through Zelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.com Cash App at:  $davidknightshow BTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7 Mail:          David Knight          POB 1323          Elgin, TX 78621

The David Knight Show
Fri 1Oct21 YouTube — “Chokepoints”: Banks & Google Attack 1A and 2A

The David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 181:39


* “Havana Syndrome” narrative changes — is leaked document an attempt to allay fears over 5G?* “Chokepoint” banks pushing gun control excluded from market in Texas, gun manufacturers fleeing to Tennessee from Massachusetts* In country after country, the direct correlation of high vaccination rates to an explosion in deathsTroops & nurses sue over vax mandate* Will budget fight in Senate change the balance of power?* “No jab, no pay” in Italy, now in Australia — why are they doing that instead of firing people?* YouTube pulls back Ron Paul censorship — for nowTOPICS by TIMECODE3:17 Stern, matronly Australian dictator, Gladys Berejiklian, resigns after illicit affair discovered. Like Cuomo, crimes committed against the public in her official capacity are NOT even considered5:19 Listener letter — fired (in Texas) for not being vaccinated. Why don't Abbott & the GOP stop the Biden mandates? And why don't GOP Governors do something to help military fired for their religious convictions, given a dishonorable discharge?10:40 Competing polls give VERY different pictures of the public's view of Biden's jab mandate17:47 The ugly caste system of vax apartheid. Unvaxed = Untouchable25:26 Military, nurses and others sue over vax mandate. Several large corporations employing a million Australians write letter to government saying ENOUGH!35:00 “HerdImmunity”? THIS is WHY They Demand 100% Jab. They're trying to cover up their crimes against humanity50:38 Listeners letters. Should we ally on opposing mandates with those we would otherwise disagree with, letter examples for religious exemptions, CMS is turning private medical information over to unnamed “third parties”1:06:35 Manchin & Sinema stop the radical left agenda and are vilified. Will Manchin switch parties?1:13:55 Radical Empowerment of Federal Reserve Proposed. Janet Yellen wants to do away with debt ceiling completely, but radical Biden appointee wants TOTAL control and central planning to be carried out by the Fed Reserve — in addition to Central Bank Digital Cash1:28:15 Re-Greta: She's BACK! Blah-blah-blah. Idiocracy plus hate & anger as the masked NPC's cheer Greta on. And Musk calls his cars “two-ton death machines.” If only they didn't keep crashing into police cars & fire trucks.1:37:41 “Misgendering” is becoming a crime. But Denzel Washington is working with a Christian group to help men find their lost purpose in life1:52:06 Listeners' letters.. homeschooling2:03:01 Putin used a dog to distract Merkel at a meeting, and he used an attractive female to distract Trump2:06:03 “Havana Syndrome”: 5G Canary in the Coal Mine. Document “leaked” to BuzzFeed that concludes the effects are “psychogenic”. Is it misdirection to allay concerns about 5G health effects?2:17:29 Gun Control Shut Down by TX & TN. Big banks are still squeezing gun manufacturers/retailers with “ChokePoint” but Texas just shut them down with a new law. Massachusetts tried to ban gun manufacturing and it backfired. And, the rise and fall of ammunition prices2:44:54 In Nation After Nation, Jabs = EXPLOSION in Deaths. Australia, Malta, Gibraltar — when jab campaigns started deaths jumped by up to 20x's.Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-showOr you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail: David Knight POB 1323 Elgin, TX 78621

Neuro Persuasão Cast
[EPISÓDIO 3] Persuasão *NA PRÁTICA* – Documentário Neuro Persuasão – O Real Poder do Cérebro Humano

Neuro Persuasão Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 3:18


Você já reparou que todos os grandes líderes, empreendedores, profissionais dominam a arte da comunicação? É difícil dizer que é coincidência quando ocorre com todos os casos não? Aula 3 Liberada! Corra em: neuropersuasao.com.br/acessovip e assista a aula 3 + PDF! Venha descobrir como ativar por completo o cérebro de uma outra pessoa! Venha descobrir …

Scale Your Small Business
68 - Breaking Down Insurance Policies

Scale Your Small Business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 12:58


Welcome back to the Scale Your Small Business Podcast with your host, Jillian Flodstrom. Today, we're talking about insurance policies. These crucial aspects of your business can make or break you in moments when you need it most. Let's look at the tools you can use to make sure you're ready when the time comes.    The first tip may seem obvious: make sure you're working with an insurance agent. 800 numbers are great, but having an individual you know you can count on for answers, help, feedback, and act as team member for you is game-changing.    Carefully consider if you should file a claim or not. Sometimes, it just doesn't make sense when you take a look at your deductible. Plus, if you file small things constantly, you run the risk of your insurance agency dropping coverage. If that happens, you'll be high and dry when something significant occurs.    Make sure you understand your policy and keep it updated regularly. You don't want to find yourself in a situation where you're without a paddle and have no idea what's going to work.    Prepare yourself for how long the process of filing a claim can take. Be clear on what your insurance provider requires to file a claim and understand that if there is a question, things will not move forward until it's answered. It can take even longer the more parties are involved.    Document everything! Take pictures and keep them in a large, secure digital storage space. This way, you can share everything you know with your agent, and everything is on hand when it's needed.    Key Takeaways   Make sure you're working with an insurance agent. 800 numbers are great, but having an individual you know you can count on for answers, help, feedback, and act as a team member for you is game-changing.  Carefully consider if you should file a claim or not. Sometimes, it just doesn't make sense when you take a look at your deductible. Plus, if you file small things constantly, you run the risk of your insurance agency dropping coverage. Make sure you understand your policy and keep it updated regularly. Document everything! Take pictures and keep them in a large, secure digital storage space. This way, you can share everything you know with your agent, and everything is on hand when it's needed.

Hangar 18
Hangar 18 - Ep100 - Bastidores Documentário Varginha

Hangar 18

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 98:38


No episódio de hoje, um bate-papo INCRÍVEL com nosso "Ranger Azul" Marco Aurélio Leal, sobre os bastidores do documentário sobre o Incidente em Varginha, dirigido por James Fox, além de revelações inéditas sobre o caso. === ENVIE SEU RELATO === Caso você tenha algum relato que queira compartilhar conosco, mande via áudio no Whatsapp ou Telegram, juntamente com seu nome e cidade. +1(647) 884 3958 ou +1(647) 830 0422 === ASSINE O FEED DO HANGAR 18 === Você pode ouvir o nosso podcast nas principais plataformas de streaming como Spotify, iTunes e Google Podcasts e em muitas outras, ou você pode acessar o nosso site e ouvir diretamente pelo feed oficial. http://www.hangar18podcast.com.br === APOIA-SE === Apoie nosso podcast e ganhe descontos, sorteios e participações nos nossos grupos secretos! http://www.apoia.se/hangar18podcast === CAMISAS EXCLUSIVAS HANGAR 18 === E também temos uma loja de camisas, com desenhos exclusivos criados por nós: http://www.lojahangar18.com.br Apoia.se: https://apoia.se/hangar18podcast

RNZ: Morning Report
Court document delays hindering journalism

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 3:51


Journalists are sometimes waiting more than a year to get their hands on court documents. Some reporters say they don't even get a response to requests. They say the delays are preventing the public from knowing what's going on in the justice system. Naomi Arnold reports.

Reprograme Seu Cérebro Cast
977 — Minha Comunicação É Um Padrão Cerebral?

Reprograme Seu Cérebro Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 11:35


Documentário Neuro Persuasão: O Real Poder do Cérebro Humano. Não apenas você conhecerá a história evolutiva do Homo Sapiens, eu sei que somente isso já seria muito interessante e te faria ver com outros olhos o que realmente fez a nossa espécie ter tanto poder neste planeta. Mas essa é só a primeira parte. Nessa série você vai perceber que o mesmo elemento que levou nossa espécie ao domínio planetário, está presente nas pessoas de mais destaque atualmente. Pessoas que cativam, inspiram, pessoas que admiramos, pessoas que mudam a história. Seja através de negócios de impacto, carreiras de destaque, marcas inspiradoras, não importa, são pessoas que fazem parte do grupo que tem os melhores resultados, e consequentemente dominam a economia que vivemos. Gerando impacto positivo em todos os outros. E você vai perceber que, com um método é possível entender o processo decisório do cérebro humano, e ser muito mais claro, instigante, impactante, cativante e influente. Esse é nosso objetivo! Garanta a sua vaga em: neuropersuasao.com.br/acessovip Você está no podcast do BrainPower | A Sua Academia Cerebral. Aqui você receberá sacadas para conhecer mais e mais o seu cérebro, e ficar no controle das suas ações e emoções para deixar de lado a falta de energia, falta de foco, a procrastinação, e entrar em um novo mundo. O mundo de altos resultados, gerando valor para você mesmo e para as pessoas ao seu redor. E lembre-se sempre disso: "O Seu Futuro Começa HOJE"! #NoBrainNoGain Aguardo seu comentário no iTunes! :) Baixe o e-book Gratuito Reprograme Seu Cérebro (O Guia Definitivo) em: reprogrameseucerebro.com.br/podcast Venha participar da Jornada da Reprogramação Cerebral em: reprogrameseucerebro.com.br/jornada Instagram: brainpower.com.br/instagramBP Youtube: brainpower.com.br/youtube Facebook: brainpower.com.br/facebookBP Telegram: brainpower.com.br/telegram

Screaming in the Cloud
Corey Screws Up Logstash For Everyone with Jordan Sissel

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 43:34


About JordanJordan is a self proclaimed “hacker.” Links:Twitter: https://twitter.com/jordansissel TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by “you”—gabyte. Distributed technologies like Kubernetes are great, citation very much needed, because they make it easier to have resilient, scalable, systems. SQL databases haven't kept pace though, certainly not like no SQL databases have like Route 53, the world's greatest database. We're still, other than that, using legacy monolithic databases that require ever growing instances of compute. Sometimes we'll try and bolt them together to make them more resilient and scalable, but let's be honest it never works out well. Consider Yugabyte DB, its a distributed SQL database that solves basically all of this. It is 100% open source, and there's not asterisk next to the “open” on that one. And its designed to be resilient and scalable out of the box so you don't have to charge yourself to death. It's compatible with PostgreSQL, or “postgresqueal” as I insist on pronouncing it, so you can use it right away without having to learn a new language and refactor everything. And you can distribute it wherever your applications take you, from across availability zones to other regions or even other cloud providers should one of those happen to exist. Go to yugabyte.com, thats Y-U-G-A-B-Y-T-E dot com and try their free beta of Yugabyte Cloud, where they host and manage it for you. Or see what the open source project looks like—its effortless distributed SQL for global apps. My thanks to Yu—gabyte for sponsoring this episode.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at VMware. Let's be honest—the past year has been far from easy. Due to, well, everything. It caused us to rush cloud migrations and digital transformation, which of course means long hours refactoring your apps, surprises on your cloud bill, misconfigurations and headache for everyone trying manage disparate and fractured cloud environments. VMware has an answer for this. With VMware multi-cloud solutions, organizations have the choice, speed, and control to migrate and optimize applications seamlessly without recoding, take the fastest path to modern infrastructure, and operate consistently across the data center, the edge, and any cloud. I urge to take a look at vmware.com/go/multicloud. You know my opinions on multi cloud by now, but there's a lot of stuff in here that works on any cloud. But don't take it from me thats: VMware.com/go/multicloud and my thanks to them again for sponsoring my ridiculous nonsense.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I've been to a lot of conference talks in my life. I've seen good ones, I've seen terrible ones, and then I've seen the ones that are way worse than that. But we don't tend to think in terms of impact very often, about how conference talks can move the audience.In fact, that's the only purpose of giving a talk ever—to my mind—is you're trying to spark some form of alchemy or shift in the audience and convince them to do something. Maybe in the banal sense, it's to sign up for something that you're selling, or to go look at your website, or to contribute to a project, or maybe it's to change the way they view things. One of the more transformative talks I've ever seen that shifted my outlook on a lot of things was at [SCALE 00:01:11] in 2012. Person who gave that talk is my guest today, Jordan Sissel, who, among many other things in his career, was the original creator behind logstash, which is the L in ELK Stack. Jordan, thank you for joining me.Jordan: Thanks for having me, Corey.Corey: I don't know how well you remember those days in 2012. It was the dark times; we thought oh, the world is going to end; that wouldn't happen until 2020. But it was an interesting conference full of a bunch of open-source folks, it was my local conference because I lived in Los Angeles. And it was the thing I looked forward to every year because I would always go and learn something new. I was in the trenches in those days, and I had a bunch of problems that looked an awful lot like other people's problems, and having a hallway track where, “Hey, how are you solving this problem?” Was a big deal. I missed those days in some ways.Jordan: Yeah, SCALE was a particularly good conference. I think I made it twice. Traveling down to LA was infrequent for me, but I always enjoyed how it was a very communal setting. They had dedicated hallway tracks. They had kids tracks, which I thought was great because folks couldn't usually come to conferences if they couldn't bring their kids or they had to take care of that stuff. But having a kids track was great, they had kids presenting. It felt more organic than a lot of other conferences did, and that's kind of what drew me to it initially.Corey: Yeah, it was my local network. It turns out that the Southern California tech community is relatively small, and we all go different lives. And it's LA, let's face it, I lived there for over a decade. Flaking as a way of life. So yeah, well, “Oh, we'll go out and catch dinner. Ooh, have to flake at the last minute.” If you're one of the good people, you tell people you're flaking instead of just no-showing, but it happens.But this was the thing that we would gather and catch up every year. And, “Oh, what have you been doing?” “Wow, you work in that company now? Congratulations, slash, what's wrong with you?” It was fun, just sort of a central sync point. It started off as hanging out with friends.And in those days, I was approaching the idea of, “You know what? I should learn to give a conference talk someday. But let's be clear. People don't give conference talks; legends give conference talks. And one day, I'll be good enough to get on stage and give a talk to my peers at a conference.”Now, the easy, cynical interpretation would be, “Well, but I saw your talk and I figured, hey, any jackhole can get up there. If he can do it, anyone can.” But that's not at all how it wound up impacting me. You were talking about logstash, which let's start there because that's a good entry point. Logstash was transformative for me.Before that, I'd spent a lot of time playing around with syslog, usually rsyslog, but there are other stories here of when a system does something and it spits out logs—ideally—how do you make sure you capture those logs in a reliable way so if you restart a computer, you don't wind up with a gap in your logs? If it's the right computer, it could be a gap in everything's logs while that thing is coming back up. And let's avoid single points of failure and the rest. And I had done all kinds of horrible monstrosities, and someone asked me at one point—Jordan: [laugh]. Guilty.Corey: Yeah. Someone said, “Well, there are a couple of options. Why don't you use Splunk?” And the answer is that I don't have a spare princess lying around that I can ransom back to her kingdom, so I can't afford it. “Okay, what about logstash?” And my answer was, “What's a logstash?” And thus that sound was Pandora's Box creaking open.So, I started playing with it and realized, “Okay, this is interesting.” And I lost track of it because we have demands on our time. Then I was dragged into a session that you gave and you explained what logstash was. I'm not going to do nearly as good of a job as you can on this. What the hell was logstash, for folks who are not screaming at syslog while they first hear of it.Jordan: All right. So, you mentioned rsyslog, and there's—old is often a pejorative of more established projects because I don't think these projects are bad. But rsyslog, syslog-ng, things like that were common to see for me as a sysadmin. But to talk about logstash, we need to go back a little further than 2012. So, the logstash project started—Corey: I disagree because I wasn't aware of it until 2012. Until I become aware of something it doesn't really exist. That's right, I have the object permanence of an infant.Jordan: [laugh].That's fair. And I've always felt like perception is reality, so if someone—this gets into something I like to say, but if someone is having a bad time or someone doesn't know about something, then it might as well not exist. So, logstash as a project started in 2008, 2009. I don't remember when the first commits landed, but it was, gosh, it's more than ten years ago now.But even before that in college, I was fortunate to, through a network of friends, get a job as a sysadmin. And as a sysadmin, you stare at logs a lot to figure out what's going on. And I wanted a more interesting way to process the logs. I had taught myself regular expressions and it wasn't finding joy in it… at all, like pretty much most people, probably. Either they look at regular expressions and just… evacuate with disgust, which is absolutely an appropriate response, or they dive into it and they have to use it for their job.But it wasn't enjoyable, and I found myself repeating stuff a lot. Matching IP addresses, matching strings, URLs, just trying to pull out useful information about what is going on?Corey: Oh, and the timestamp problem, too. One of the things that I think people don't understand who have not played in this space, is that all systems do have logs unless you've really pooched something somewhere—Jordan: Yeah.Corey: —and it shows that at this point in time, this thing happened. As we start talking about multiple computers and distributed systems—but even on the same computer—great, so at this time there was something that showed up in the system log because there was a disk event or something, and at the same time you have application logs that are talking about what the application running is talking about. And that is ideally using a somewhat similar system to do this, but often not. And the way that timestamps are expressed in these are radically different and the way that the log files themselves are structured. One might be timestamp followed by hostname followed by error code.The other one might be hostname followed by a timestamp—in a different format—followed by a copyright notice because a big company got to it followed by the actual event notice, and trying to disambiguate all of these into a standardized form was first obnoxious, and secondly, very important because you want to see the exact chain of events. This also leads to a separate sidebar on making sure that all the clocks are synchronized, but that's a separate story for another time. And that's where you enter the story in many respects.Jordan: Right. So, my thought around what led to logstash is you can take a sysadmin or software IT developer—whatever—expert, and you can sit them in front of a bunch of logs and they can read them and say, “That's the time it happened. That's the user who caused this action. This is the action.” But if you try and abstract and step away, and so you ask how many times did this action happen? When did this user appear? What time did this happen?You start losing the ability to ask those questions without being an expert yourself, or sitting next to an expert and having them be your keyboard. Kind of a phenomenon I call the human keyboard problem where you're speaking to a computer, but someone has to translate for you. And so in around 2004, I was super into Perl. No shocker that I enjoyed—ish. I sort of enjoyed regular expressions, but I was super into Perl, and there was a Perl module called Regexp::Common which is a library of regular expressions to match known things: IP addresses, certain kinds of timestamps, quoted strings, and whatnot.Corey: And this stuff is always challenging because it sounds like oh, an IP address. One of the interview questions I hated the most someone asked me was write a regular expression to detect an IP address. It turns out that to do this correctly, even if you bound it to ipv4 only, the answer takes up multiple lines on a screen.Jordan: Oh, for sure.Corey: It's enormous.Jordan: It's like a full page of—Corey: It is.Jordan: —of code you can't read. And that's one of the things that, it was sort of like standing on the shoulders of the person who came before; it was kind of an epiphany to me.Corey: Yeah. So, I can copy and paste that into my code, but someone who has to maintain that thing after I get fired is going to be, “What the hell is this and what does it do?” It's like it's the blessed artifact that the ancients built it and left it there like it's a Stargate sitting in your code. And it's, “We don't know how it works; we're scared to break it, so we don't even look at that thing directly. We just know that we put nonsense in, an IP address comes out, and let's not touch it, ever again.”Jordan: Exactly. And even to your example, even before you get fired and someone replaces you and looks at your regular expression, the problem I was having was, I would have this library of copy and pasteable things, and then I would find a bug, and edge case. And I would fix that edge case but the other 15 scripts that were using the same way regular expression, I can't even read them anymore because I don't carry that kind of context in my head for all of that syntax. So, you either have to go back and copy and paste and fix all those old regular expressions. Or you just say, “You know what? We're not going to fix the old code. We have a new version of it that works here, but everywhere else this edge case fails.”So, that's one of the things that drew me to the Regexp::Common library in Perl was that it was reusable and things had names. It was, “I want to match an IP address.” You didn't have to memorize that long piece of text to precisely and accurately accept only regular expressions and rejects things that are not. You just said, “Give me the regular expression that matches an IP.” And from that library gave me the idea to write grok.Well, if we could name things, then maybe we could turn that into some kind of data structure, sort of the combination of, “I have a piece of log data, and I as an expert, I know that's an IP address, that's the username, and that's the timestamp.” Well, now I can apply this library of regular expressions that I didn't have to write and hopefully has a unit test suite, and say, now we can pull out instead of that plain piece of text that is hard to read as a non-expert, now I can have a data structure we can format however we want, that non-experts can see. And even experts can just relax and not have to be full experts all the time, using that part of your brain. So, now you can start getting towards answering search-oriented questions. “How many login attempts happened yesterday from this IP address?”Corey: Right. And back then, the way that people would do these things was Elasticsearch. So, that's the thing you shove all your data into in a bunch of different ways and you can run full-text queries on it. And that's great, but now we want to have that stuff actually structured, and that is sort of the magic of logstash—which was used in conjunction with Elasticsearch a lot—and it turns out that typing random SQL queries in the command line is not generally how most business users like to interact with this stuff, seems to be something dashboard-y-like, and the project that folks use for that was Kibana. And ELK Stack became a thing because Elasticsearch in isolation can do a lot but it doesn't get you all the way there for what people were using to look at logs.Jordan: You're right.Corey: And Kibana is also one of the projects that Elastic owned, and at some point, someone looks around, like, “Oh, logstash. People are using that with us an awful lot. How big is the company that built that? Oh, it's an open-source project run by some guy? Can we hire that guy?” And the answer is, “Apparently,” because you wound up working as an Elastic employee for a while.Jordan: Yeah. It was kind of an interesting journey. So, in the beginning of logstash in 2009, I kind of had this picture of how I wanted to solve log processing search challenges. And I broke it down into a couple of parts of visualization—to be clear, I broke it down in my head, not into code, but visualization, kind of exploration, there's the processing and transmission, and then there's storage and search. And I only felt confident really attending to a solution for one of those parts. And I picked log processing partly because I already had a jumpstart from a couple of years prior, working on grok and feeling really comfortable with regular expressions. I don't want to say good because that's—Corey: You heard it here first—Jordan: [laugh].Corey: —we found the person that knows regular expressions. [laugh].Jordan: [laugh]. And logstash was being worked on to solve this problem of taking your data, processing it, and getting it somewhere. That's why logstash has so many outputs, has so many inputs, and lots of filters. And about I think a year into building logstash, I had experimented with storage and search backends, and I never found something that really clicked with me. And I was experimenting with Leucine, and knowing that I could not complete this journey because that the problem space is so large, it would be foolish of me to try to do distributed log stores or anything like that, plus visualization.I just didn't have the skills or the time in the day. I ended up writing a frontend for logstash called logstash-web—naming things is hard—and I wasn't particularly skilled or attentive to that project, and it was more of a very lightweight frontend to solve the visualization, the exploration aspect. And about a year into logstash being alive, I found Elasticsearch. And what clicked with me from being a sysadmin and having worked at large data center companies in the past is I know the logs on a single system are going to quickly outgrow it. So, whatever storage system will accept these logs, it's got to be easy to add new storage.And Elasticsearch first-day promise was it's distributed; you can add more nodes and go about your day. And it fulfilled that promise and I think it still fulfills that promise that if you're going to be processing terabytes of data, yeah, just keep dumping it in there. That's one of the reasons I didn't try and even use MySQL, or Postgres, or other data systems because it didn't seem obvious how to have multiple storage servers collecting this data with those solutions, for me at the time.Corey: It turns out that solving problems like this that are global and universal lead to massive adoption very quickly. I want to get this back a bit before you wound up joining Elastic because you get up on stage and you talked through what this is. And I mentioned at the start of this recording, that it was one of those transformative talks. But let's be clear here, I don't remember 95% of how logstash works. Like, the technology you talked about ten years ago is largely outmoded slash replaced slash outdated today. I assure you, I did not take anything of note whatsoever from your talk regarding regular expressions, I promise. And—Jordan: [laugh]. Good.Corey: But that's not the stuff that was transformative to me. What was, was the way that you talked about these things. And there was the first time I'd ever heard the phrase that if a new user has a bad time, it's a bug. This was 2012. The idea of empathy hadn't really penetrated into the ops and engineering spaces in any meaningful way yet. It was about gatekeeping, it was about, “Read the manual fool”—Jordan: Yes.Corey: —if people had questions. And it was actively user-hostile. And it was something that I found transformative of, forget the technology piece for a second; this is a story about how it could be different. Because logstash was the vehicle to deliver a message that transcended far beyond the boundaries of how to structure your logs, or maybe the other boundaries of regular expressions, I'm never quite sure where those things start and stop. But it was something that was actively transformative where you're on stage as someone who is a recognized authority in the space, and you're getting up there and you're sending an implicit message—both explicitly and by example—of be nice to people; demonstrate empathy. And that left a hell of an impact. And—Jordan: Thank you.Corey: I wound up doing a spot check just now, and I wound up looking at this and sure enough, early in 2013, I wound up committing—it's still in the history of the changelog for logstash because it's open-source—I committed two pull requests and minutes apart, two submissions—I don't know if pull requests were even a thing back then—but it wound up in the log. Because another project you were renowned for was fpm: Effing Package Manager if I'm—is that what the acronym stands for, or am I misremembering?Jordan: [laugh]. We'll go with that. I'm sure, vulgar viewers will know what the F stands for, but you don't have to say it. It's just Effing Package Management.Corey: Yeah.Jordan: But yeah, I think I really do believe that if a user, especially if a new user has a bad time, it's a bug, and that came from many years of participating at various levels in open-source, where if you came at it with a tinkerer's or a hacker's mindset and you think, “This project is great. I would like it to do one additional thing, and I would like to talk to someone about how to make it do that one additional thing.” And you go find the owners or the maintainers of that project, and you come in with gusto and energy, and you describe what you want to do and, first, they say, “What you want to do is not possible.” They don't even say they don't want to do it; they frame the whole universe against you. “It's not possible. Why would you want to do that? If you want to make that, do it yourself.”You know, none of these things are an extended hand, a lowered ladder, an open door, none of those. It's always, “You're bothering me. Go away. Please read the documentation and see where we clearly”—which they don't—“Document that this is not a thing we're interested in.” And I came to the conclusion that any future open-source or collaborative work that I worked on, it's got to be from a place where, “You're welcome, and whatever contributions or participation levels you choose, are okay. And if you have an idea, let's talk about it. If you're having a bad time, let's figure out how to solve it.”Maybe the solution is we point you in the right direction to the documentation, if documentation exists; maybe we find a bug that we need to fix. The idea that the way to build communities is through kindness and collaboration, not through walls or gatekeeping or just being rude. And I really do think that's one of the reasons logstash became so successful. I mean, any particular technology could have succeeded in the space that logstash did, but I believe that it did so because of that one piece of framework where if a new user has a bad time, it's a bug. Because to me, that opens the door to say, “Yeah, you know what? Some of the code I write is not going to be good. Or, the thing you want to do is undocumented. Or the documentation is out of date. It told you a lie and you followed the documentation and it misled you because it's incorrect.”We can fix that. Maybe we don't have time to fix it right now. Maybe there's no one around to fix it, but we can at least say, “You know what? That information is incorrect, and I'm sorry you were misled. Come on into the community and we'll figure it out.” And one of the patterns I know is, on the IRC channel, which is where the logstash real-time community chat… I don't know how to describe that.Corey: No, it was on freenode. That's part of the reason I felt okay, talking to you. At that point. I was volunteer network staff. This is before freenode turned into basically a haven for Nazis this past year.Jordan: Yeah. It was still called lilo… lilonet [crosstalk 00:20:20]—Corey: No, the open freenode network, that predates me. This was—yeah, lilo—Jordan: Okay.Corey: —died about six years prior. But—Jordan: Oh, all right.Corey: Freenode's been around a long time. What make this thing work was that I was network staff, and that means that I had a bit of perceived authority—it's a chat room; not really—but it was one of those things where it was at least, “Okay, this is not just some sketchy drive-by rando,” which I very much was, but I didn't present that way, so I could strike up conversations. But with you talking about this stuff, I never needed to be that person. It was just if someone wants to pitch in on this, great; more hands make lighter work. Sure.Jordan: Yeah, for sure.Corey: And for me, the interesting part is not even around the logstash aspects so much; it's your other project, fbm. Well, one of your other projects. Back in 2012, that was an interesting year for me. Another area that got very near and dear to my heart in open-source world was the SaltStack project; I was contributor number 15. And I didn't know how Python worked. Not that I do now, but I can fake it better now.And Tom Hatch, the guy that ran the project before it was a company was famous for this where I could send in horrifying levels of code, and every time he would merge it in and then ten minutes later, there would be another patch that comes in that fixes all bugs I just introduced and it was just such a warm onboarding. I'm not suggesting that approach and I'm not saying it's scalable, but I started contributing. And I became the first Debian and Ubuntu packager for SaltStack, which was great. And I did a terrible job at it because—let me explain. I don't know if it's any better now, but back in those days, there were multiple documentation sources on the proper way to package software.They were all contradictory with each other, there was no guidance as to when to follow each one, there was never a, “You know nothing about packaging; here's what you need to know, step-by-step,” and when you get it wrong, they yell at you. And it turns out that the best practice then to get it formally accepted upstream—which is what I did—is do a crap-ass job, and then you'll wind up with a grownup coming in, like, “This is awful. Move.” And then they'll fix it and yell at you, and gatekeep like hell, and then you have a package that works and gets accepted upstream because the magic incantation has been said somewhere. And what I loved about fpm was that I could take any random repo or any source tarball or anything I wanted, run it through with a single command, and it would wind up building out a RPM and a Deb file—and I don't know what else it's supported; those are the ones I cared about—that I could then install on a system. I put in a repo and add that to a sources list on systems, and get to automatically install so I could use configuration management—like SaltStack—to wind up installing custom local packages. And oh, my God, did the packaging communities for multiple different distros hate you—Jordan: Yep.Corey: —and specifically what you had built because this was not the proper way to package. How dare you solve an actual business problem someone has instead of forcing them to go to packaging school where the address is secret, and you have to learn that. It was awful. It was the clearest example that I can come up with of gatekeeping, and then you're coming up with fbm which gets rid of user pain, and I realized that in that fight between the church of orthodoxy of, “This is how it should be done,” and the, “You're having a problem; here's a tool that makes it simple,” I know exactly what side of that line I wanted to be on. And I hadn't always been previously, and that is what clarified it for me.Jordan: Yeah, fbm was a really delightful enjoyment for me to build. The origins of that was I worked at a company and they were all… I think, at that time, we were RPM-based, and then as folks tend to do, I bounced around between jobs almost every year, so I went from one place that—Corey: Hey, it's me.Jordan: [laugh]. Right? And there's absolutely nothing wrong with leaving every year or staying longer. It's just whatever progresses your career in the way that you want and keeps you safe and your family safe. But we were using RPM and we were building packages already not following the orthodoxy.A lot of times if you ask someone how to build a package for Fedora, they'll point you at the Maximum RPM book, and that's… a lot of pages, and honestly, I'm not going to sit down and read it. I just want to take a bunch of files, name it, and install it on 30 machines with Puppet. And that's what we were doing. Cue one year later, I moved to a new company, and we were using Debian packages. And they're the same thing.What struck me is they are identical. It's a bunch of files—and don't pedant me about this—it's a bunch of files with a name, with some other sometimes useful metadata, like other names that you might depend on. And I really didn't find it enjoyable to transfer my knowledge of how to build RPMs, and the tooling and the structures and the syntaxes, to building Debian packages. And this was not for greater publication; this was I have a bunch of internal applications I needed to package and deploy with, at the time it was Puppet. And it wasn't fun.So, I did what we did with grok which was codify that knowledge to reduce the burden. And after a few, probably a year or so of that, it really dawned on me that a generality is all packaging formats are largely solving the same problem and I wanted to build something that was solving problems for folks like you and me: sysadmins, who were handed a pile of code and they needed to get it into production. And I wasn't interested in formalities or appeasing any priesthoods or orthodoxies about what really—you know, “You should really shine your package with this special wax,” kind of thing. Because all of the documentation for Debian packages, Fedora packages are often dedicated to those projects. You're going to submit a package to Fedora so that the rest of the world can use it on Fedora. That wasn't my use case.Corey: Right. I built a thing and a thing that I built is awesome and I want the world to use it, so now I have to go to packaging school? Not just once but twice—Jordan: Right.Corey: —and possibly more. That's awful.Jordan: Or more. Yeah. And it's tough.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Jellyfish. So, you're sitting in front of your office chair, bleary eyed, parked in front of a powerpoint and—oh my sweet feathery Jesus its the night before the board meeting, because of course it is! As you slot that crappy screenshot of traffic light colored excel tables into your deck, or sift through endless spreadsheets looking for just the right data set, have you ever wondered, why is it that sales and marketing get all this shiny, awesome analytics and inside tools? Whereas, engineering basically gets left with the dregs. Well, the founders of Jellyfish certainly did. That's why they created the Jellyfish Engineering Management Platform, but don't you dare call it JEMP! Designed to make it simple to analyze your engineering organization, Jellyfish ingests signals from your tech stack. Including JIRA, Git, and collaborative tools. Yes, depressing to think of those things as your tech stack but this is 2021. They use that to create a model that accurately reflects just how the breakdown of engineering work aligns with your wider business objectives. In other words, it translates from code into spreadsheet. When you have to explain what you're doing from an engineering perspective to people whose primary IDE is Microsoft Powerpoint, consider Jellyfish. Thats Jellyfish.co and tell them Corey sent you! Watch for the wince, thats my favorite part.Corey: And this gets back to what I found of—it was rare that I could find a way to contribute to something meaningfully, and I was using logstash after your talk, I'd started using it and rolling it out somewhere, and I discovered that there wasn't a Debian package for it—the environment I was in at that time—or Ubuntu package, and, “Hey Jordan, are you the guy that wrote fpm and there isn't a package here?” And the thing is is that you would never frame it this way, but the answer was, of course, “Pull requests welcome,” which is often an invitation to do free volunteer work for companies, but this was an open-source project that was not backed by a publicly-traded company; it was some guy. And of course, I'll pitch in on that. And I checked the commit log on this for what it is that I see, and sure enough, I have two commits. The first one was on Sunday night in February of 2013, and my commit message was, “Initial packaging work for Deb building.” And sure enough, there's a bunch of files I put up there and that's great. And my second and last commit was 12 minutes later saying, “Remove large binary because I'm foolish.” Yeah.Jordan: Was that you? [laugh].Corey: Yeah. Oh, yeah, I'm sure—yeah, it was great. I didn't know how Git worked back then. I'm sure it's still in the history there. I wonder how big that binary is, and exactly how much I have screwed people over in the last decade since.Jordan: I've noticed this over time. And every now and then you'd be—I would be or someone would be on a slow internet connection—which again, is something that we need to optimize for, or at least be aware of and help where we can—someone would be cloning logstash on an airplane or something like that, or rural setting, and they would say, “It gets stuck at 76% for, like, ten minutes.” And you would go back and dust off your tome of how to use Git because it's very difficult piece of software to use, and you would find this one blob and I never even looked at it who committed it or whatever, but it was like I think it was 80 Megs of a JAR file or a Debian package that was [unintelligible 00:28:31] logstash release. And… [laugh] it's such a small world that you're like, yep, that was me.Corey: Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. Let's check this just for fun here. To be clear, the entire repository right now is 167 Megs, so that file that I had up there for all of 13 minutes lives indelibly in Git history, and it is fully half of the size—Jordan: Yep.Corey: —of the entirety of the logstash project. All right, then. I didn't realize this was one of those confess your sins episodes, but here we are.Jordan: Look, sometimes we put flags on the moon, sometimes we put big files in git. You could just for posterity, we could go back and edit the history and remove that, but it never became important to do it, it wasn't loud, people weren't upset enough by it, or it didn't come up enough to say, “You know what? This is a big file.” So, it's there. You left your mark.Corey: You know, we take what we can get. It's an odd time. I'll have to do some digging around; I'm sure I'll tweet about this as soon as I get a bit more data on it, but I wonder how often people have had frustration caused by that. There's no ill intent here, to be very clear, but it was instead, I didn't know how Git worked very well. I didn't know what I was doing in a lot of respects, and sure enough in the fullness of time, some condescending package people came in and actually made this right.And there is a reasonable, responsible package now because, surprise, of course there is. But I wonder how much inadvertent pain I caused people by that ridiculous commit. And it's the idea of impact and how this stuff works. I'm not happy that people are on a plane with a slow connection had a wait an extra minute or two to download that nonsense. It's one of those things that is, oops. I feel like a bit of a heel for that, not for not knowing something, but for causing harm to folks. Intent doesn't outweigh impact. There is a lesson in there for it.Jordan: Agreed. On that example, I think one of the things… code is not the most important thing I can contribute to a project, even though I feel very confident in my skills in programming in a variety of environments. I think the number one thing I can do is listen and look for sources of pain. And people would come in and say, “I can't get this to work.” And we would work together and figure out how to make it work for their use case, and that could result in a new feature, a bug fix, or some documentation improvements, or a blog post, or something like that.And I think in this case, I don't really recall any amount of noise for someone saying, “Cloning the Git repository is just a pain in the butt.” And I think a lot of that is because either the people who would be negatively impacted by that weren't doing that use case, they were downloading the releases, which were as small as we can possibly get them, or they were editing files using the GitHub online edit the file thing, which is a totally acceptable, it's perfectly fine way to do things in Git. So, I don't remember anyone complaining about that particular file size issue. The Elasticsearch repository is massive and I don't think it even has binaries. It just has so much more—Corey: Someone accidentally committed their entire production test data set at one point and oops-a-doozy. Yeah, it's not the most egregious harm I've ever caused—Jordan: Yeah.Corey: —but it's there. The thing that, I guess, resonates with me and still does is the lessons I learned from you, I could sum them up as being not just empathy-driven—because that's the easy answer—but the other layers were that you didn't need to be the world's greatest expert in a thing in order to credibly give a conference talk. To be clear, you were miles ahead of me and still are in a lot of different areas—Jordan: Thanks.Corey: —and that's fine. But you don't need to be the—like, you are not the world's greatest expert on empathy, but that's what I took from the talk and that's what it was about. It also taught me that things you can pick up from talks—and other means—there are things you can talk about in terms of technology and there are things you can talk about in terms of people, and the things about people do not have expiration dates in the same way that technology does. And if I'm going to be remembered for impact on people versus impact on technology, for me, there's no contest. And you forced me to really think about a lot of those things that it started my path to, I guess, becoming a public speaker and then later all the rest that followed, like this podcast, the nonsense on Twitter, and all the rest. So, it is, I guess, we can lay the responsibility for all that at your feet. Enjoy the hate mail.Jordan: Uhh, my email address is now closed. I'm sorry.Corey: Exactly.Jordan: Well, I appreciate the kind words.Corey: We'll get letters on this one.Jordan: [laugh].Corey: It's the impact that people have, and someti—I don't think you knew at the time that that's the impact you were having. It matters.Jordan: I agree. I think a lot of it came from how do I want to experience this? And it was much later that it became something that was really outside of me, in the sense that it was building communities. One of the things I learned shortly after—or even just before—joining Elastic was how many folks were looking to solve a problem, found logstash, became a participant in the community, and that participation could just be anything, just hanging out on IRC, on the mailing list, whatever, and the next step for them was to get a better paying job in an environment they enjoyed that helped them take the next step in their career. Some of those people came to work with me at Elastic; some of them started to work on the logstash team at some point they decided because a lot of logstash users were sysadmins.And on the logstash team, we were all developers; we weren't sysadmins, there was nothing to operate. And a lot of folks would come on board and they were like, “You know what? I'm not enjoying writing Ruby for my job.” And they could take the next step to transition to the support team or the sales engineer team, or cloud operations team at Elastic. So, it was really, like you mentioned, it has nothing to do with the technology of—to me—why these projects are important.They became an amplifier and a hand to pull people up to go the next step they need to go. And on the way maybe they can make a positive impact in the communities they participate in. If those happen to be fpm or logstash, that's great, but I think I want folks to see that technology doesn't have to be a grind of getting through gatekeepers, meeting artificial barriers, and things like that.Corey: The thing that I took, too, is that I gave a talk in 2015 or'16, which is strangely appropriate now: “Terrible ideas in Git.” And yes, checking large binaries in is one of the terrible ideas I talk about. It's Git through counter-example. And around that time, I also gave a talk for a while on how to handle a job interview and advance your career. Only one of those talks has resulted in people approaching me even years later saying that what I did had changed aspects of their life. It wasn't the Git one. And that's the impact it comes down to. That is the change that I wanted to start having because I saw someone else do it and realized, you know, maybe I could possibly be that good someday. Well, I'd like to think I made it, on some level.Jordan: [laugh]. I'm proud of the impact you've made. And I agree with you, it is about people. Even with fpm where I was very selfishly tickling my own itch, I don't want to remember all of this stuff and I also enjoy operating outside of the boundaries of a church or whatever the priesthoods that say, “This is how you must do a thing,” I knew there was a lot of folks who worked at jobs and they didn't have authority, and they had to deploy something, and they knew if they could just package it into a Debian format, or an RPM format, or whatever they needed to do, they could get it deployed and it would make their lives easier. Well, they didn't have the time or the energy or the support in order to learn how to do that and fpm brought them that success where you can say, “Here's a bunch of files; here's a name, poof, you have a package for whatever format you want.”Where I found fpm really take off is when Gem and Python and Node.js support were added. The sysadmins were kind of sandwiched in between—in two impossible worlds where they are only authorized to deploy a certain package format, but all of their internal application developer teams were using Node.js and newer technologies, and all of those package formats were not permitted by whoever had the authority to permit those things at their job. But now they had a tool that said, “You know what? We can just take that thing, we'll take Django and Python, and we'll make it an RPM and we won't have to think a lot about it.”And that really, I think—to me, my hope was that it de-stresses that sort of work environment where you're not having to do three weeks of brand new work every time someone releases something internally in your company; you can just run a script that you wrote a month ago and maintain it as you go.Corey: Wouldn't that be something?Jordan: [laugh]. Ideally, ideally.Corey: Jordan, I want to thank you for not only the stuff you did ten years ago, but also the stuff you just said now. If people want to learn more about you, how you view the world, see what you're up to these days, where can they find you?Jordan: I'm mostly active on Twitter, at @jordansissel, all one word. Mostly these days, I post repair stuff I do on the house. I'm a stay-at-home full0 time dad these days, and… I'm still doing maintenance on the projects that need maintenance, like fpm or xdotool, so if you're one of those users, I hope you're happy. If you're not happy, please reach out and we'll figure out what the next steps can be. But yeah. If you like bugs, especially spiders—or if you don't like spiders and you want to like spiders, check me out on Twitter. I'm often posting macro photos, close-up photos of butterflies, bees, spiders, and the like.Corey: And we will, of course, throw links to that in the [show notes 00:38:10]. Jordan, thank you so much for your time today. It's appreciated.Jordan: Thank you, Corey. It's good talking to you.Corey: Jordan Sissel, founder of logstash and currently, blissfully, not working on a particular corporate job. I envy him, some days. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry comment in which you have also embedded a large binary.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Neuro Persuasão Cast
[EPISÓDIO 2] Documentário Neuro Persuasão – O Real Poder do Cérebro Humano

Neuro Persuasão Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 3:02


Aula 2 Liberada! Corra em: neuropersuasao.com.br/acessovip e assista a aula 2 + PDF! Não Perca! HOJE é dia de Documentário: Neuro Persuasão – O Real Poder do Cérebro Humano. Venha descobrir como ativar por completo o cérebro de uma outra pessoa! Venha descobrir HOJE em neuropersuasao.com.br/acessovip! — Seja muito bem vindo ao universo da NeuroPersuasão. …

Neuro Persuasão Cast
{EXCLUSIVO} 1a AULA COMPLETA

Neuro Persuasão Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 29:51


Exclusivo, estamos na época do evento Documentário: Neuro Persuasão – O Real Poder do Cérebro Humano. Para facilitar para você por ai, deixamos como colher de chá a primeira aula 100% aberta aqui para você. Mas para assistir às outras, e baixar os materiais, pdfs, e ebooks entre em: https://neuropersuasao.com.br/acessovip Que nota você se daria …

Neuro Persuasão Cast
[Convite Exclusivo] Documentário Neuro Persuasão – O Real Poder do Cérebro Humano

Neuro Persuasão Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 8:52


Não Perca! HOJE é o dia do Documentário: Neuro Persuasão – O Real Poder do Cérebro Humano. Que nota você se daria para o seu poder de impactar, influenciar, cativar e persuadir as pessoas? Venha descobrir HOJE em neuropersuasao.com.br/acessovip! Seja muito bem vindo ao universo da NeuroPersuasão. Você chegou ao lugar certo para aumentar seu …

365 Message Center Show
Whiteboard/Document camera in Teams meetings - #212

365 Message Center Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 24:59


On this week's episode, Daniel and Darrell discuss the Content Camera for Microsoft Teams. Do you remember that feature in Teams that captures a whiteboard with a camera and shows the presenter as transparent? Do you remember that it was only available with special equipment and Teams Meeting Rooms? Well it's coming to Microsoft Teams Desktop - Point a camera at a whiteboard and use a real whiteboard in a Teams meeting!     In this episode:     - Content from camera now launched in Teams     - Image Utility Edit Control     - SPO View in File Explorer available in Microsoft Edge     - Restarting a Teams Live Event    

The Epstein Chronicles
David Boies Agree's To Hand Over Sealed Document To Andrew's Legal Team

The Epstein Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 18:27


David Boies, lead attorney for Virginia Roberts has agreed to hand over the document in question that the Prince's team thinks could get him off. According to David Boies, the document is irrelevant to the current issue at hand.Join me as I dive in!To contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comSource:https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10029821/Virginia-Roberts-agrees-hand-secret-document-exempt-Prince-Andrew.html

Que Crime Foi Esse?
Rainhas da Noite, feat. Chico Felitti - Mid-Season, Episódio 03

Que Crime Foi Esse?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 49:26


O episódio 03 da nossa mid-season não poderia ser mais especial: nós recebemos o jornalista, escritor, roteirista e podcaster Chico Felitti para um bate-papo sobre "Rainhas da Noite", seu novo audiobook lançado exclusivamente na plataforma Storytel no dia 29 de setembro. Narrado por Renata Carvalho, "Rainhas da Noite" fala sobre o cenário LGBTQIAP+ do centro de São Paulo entre 70 e 2000, e conta sobretudo a trajetória de três travestis que comandaram as noites da região: Andréa de Mayo, Cris Negão e Jaqueline Blábláblá. Suas histórias sofreram um apagamento que marginalizou por anos a comunidade T e drag queens - a chamada "violência arquival". *A entrevista foi feita a convite da Atômica, mas o episódio não foi patrocinado de forma alguma.Indicações do Chico citadas no episódio:- Série: Veneno (HBO Max) - Livro: Enverga, mas não quebra: Cintura Fina em Belo Horizonte, de Luiz Morando- Podcast: Passagem só de ida- Documentário: Divinas Divas- Documentário: Dzi Croquettes-----------------Você pode mandar seus comentários, sugestões, críticas e elogios em nossas redes:quecrimefoiesse@gmail.comtwitter: @quecrimefoiesseinstagram: @quecrimefoiesseVocês também podem nos encontrar em:Chico Felitti -twitter/instagram: @chicofelittipodcast: Isso Está Acontecendo - https://g1.globo.com/fantastico/podcast/isso-esta-acontecendo/podcast: Além do Meme - https://open.spotify.com/show/5ZAOBjP8ntoqf8PrfzR71W?si=269407898377439cAnna Lívia Marques -twitter/instagram/letterboxd: @annaliviamsyoutube.com/theannaliviamsquartaparedepod.podbean.comFernanda Rentz -twitter: @dotdotrentzinstagram/letterboxd: @heyrentzrentzstore.com.br

Pints & Polishing...an Auto Detailing Podcast
Use Video To Document Your Day, The Key To Succeeding With Social Media

Pints & Polishing...an Auto Detailing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 36:04


Marshall and Greg talk about how to succeed with social media. Making content constantly but what do I share, is that a question that you have? Simple answer, just document your day and what you are doing. Being on multiple platforms is also the key. If one of the platforms starts to die then your following starts to die so diversification is key to survival. This is a fun conversation we hope you enjoy it. Thank you for being a part of the community.

Apolonia Rockwell Show
How EHS Software Can Build Better Safety Culture

Apolonia Rockwell Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 32:41


In this episode, Apolonia talks with Thomas Carson of SOSPES, about how EHS software can best be utilized to organize and document tangible data within safety programs. As well as the importance of marrying organizational procedures and safety culture. In this episode, Thomas Carson and Apolonia discuss: * EHS software dashboards can be utilized to: Give structure to safety culture Show tangible data and results to leadership Document prevention, training progress, incidents, observations, safety concerns * The future of safety and where Thomas sees safety protocols and procedures are headed. Thanks so much to Thomas Carson for being a guest! Learn more about Thomas Carson and SOSPES at https://sospes.com/ Apolonia Rockwell is the Founder and CEO of True Safety Services and True Safety University. Learn more about “The True Safety Podcast with Apolonia Rockwell”: https://www.truesafetyservices.com/podcast. Subscribe to Apolonia Rockwell's YouTube channel (where we also post her podcasts): http://bit.ly/subscribe-Apolonia-Rockwell-YouTube. True Safety Services is Colorado's #1 provider in safety training and safety management services. Learn more about True Safety Services: https://www.truesafetyservices.com. True Safety University is a world class virtual training platform for individuals and companies: https://www.truesafetyuniversity.com. Connect with True Safety Services: * LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/true-safety-services. * Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/truesafetyservices. * Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/truesafetyservices. * Twitter: https://twitter.com/true_safety. Subscribe to the podcast: * Apple Podcasts: http://bit.ly/True-Safety-Apple-Podcasts. * Google Podcasts: http://bit.ly/True-Safety-Google-Podcasts. * Spotify: http://bit.ly/True-Safety-Spotify. * Stitcher: http://bit.ly/True-Safety-Stitcher. * Podfollow: http://bit.ly/True-Safety-PodFollow. This episode was produced by Story On Media & Marketing: https://www.successwithstories.com.

Daily Sales Tips
979: Document the Path (Cold Calling) - Ryan Reisert

Daily Sales Tips

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 4:17


"Document all this information the first time you're calling a number and what that will do is allow you the next time you call a number to quickly breeze through those 3 to 5 minute navigated dials and kick that down to about 45 seconds." - Ryan Reisert in today's Tip 979 How do you shorten up your navigation time to get more dials or more conversations? Join the conversation at DailySales.Tips/979 and learn more about Ryan! Have feedback? Want to share a sales tip? Call or text the Sales Success Hotline: 512-777-1442 or Email: scott@top1.fm

Speak Sex with Eve Eurydice
Ep. 95: Tools to Liberate Men from the Patriarchy, Balance Mind Body. Eve Eurydice w Michael Brody

Speak Sex with Eve Eurydice

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 58:47


Eurydice speaks with Michael Brody, co-founder of the Crested Butte Film Festival, about life in Boulder Colorado where they found spiritual and somatic awakening, film through Stan Brackage Michael's teacher at CU and literary writing. In this episode, Eurydice and Michael discuss being a man in the 21st century as a journey to integrate into wholeness and recast the masculine rites of passage into including the full spectrum of human relationship experience. Eurydice talks of Man's Burden of Social Debt & Self-Censorship. Patriarchy doesn't let man speak about everything man to man with nothing forbidden or diminishing; speaking truth in all the ways patriarchy has considered unmanlike. The restraints and censorships that the patriarchy (and the self raised snd trained in patriarchy) puts on men. Is man responsible for every birth he's inseminated? Is it an assumed burden? Gender is obsolete nowadays but the weight of our patriarchal history is real and cages us all in our prescribed roles that define us since birth. The old norm culture keeps creating false social emergencies to get our attention away from the real challenges of evolution. ⚡️ Crested Butte Film Festival starts on Sept. 24 and runs until Oct. 3rd. Go watch it online at https://CBfilmfest.org #cbfilmfestival ⚡️ Michael Brody has served as Co-Founder, Co-Director, and Artistic and Programming Director of Crested Butte Film Festival, in Colorado, named by MovieMaker Magazine as "one of the coolest film festivals in the world” for the past 11 years. Before that, he wrote, directed, and produced the feature film, "Document" and adapted several books into screenplays, including the Bill Duke directed, "Created Equal". ⚡️ For more Speak Sex, go to https://Speaksexpodcast.com ⚡️ For books, art, go to https://Eurydice.net ⚡️ For Apple podcast, subscribe to https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/speak-sex-with-eve/id1448261953 ⚡️For video episodes, subscribe to https://YouTube.com/SpeakSexwithEveEurydice ⚡️ For support, go to https://anchor.fm/speaksex/support ⚡️ #speaksex #eveEurydice ⚡️#boulder #freemenfrommanhood --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/speaksex/message

The Paper Fold
Juju & Ryan Kissick of Good Juju Ink

The Paper Fold

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021


I am in just in awe of all Ryan and Juliana Kissick of San Francisco's Good Juju Ink have done since going into quarantine in San Francisco with their 1-year-old daughter. First, in mid-March, as the world seemed to be falling apart, Ryan helped countless other small business owners by creating an amazingly concise, invaluable guide for navigating these times, hereafter to only be referred to as The Document. It's been viewed 1000s of times around the world across many industries. All via word-of-mouth and completely free — the best kind of viral!Then, Juju helped launch 18 Million Thanks. That's how many health care workers there are in the US — and that's how many thank-yous this collective of 13+ women-owned businesses are aiming to send them!https://www.goodjujuink.com/https://docs.google.com/document/d/1pZJughwutgU33m4XdpyUTzQcO0vWtFSGlhZ5EvGLoxA/edithttps://18millionthanks.com/**Thank You Sponsors**Please be sure to support these all-American, women-owned houses of paper.Girl w/Knife is your incredibly sharp new stationery BFF. Check out this award-winning, ultra-polished range that everyone's talking about — it slays on several brilliant levels!Kitty Meow Boutique was founded on the idea that your paper goods don't have to be a snooze fest. These stylish, laugh-out-loud selections are by turns sassy and sweet, all the while maintaining a consistent cool.

Futurum Tech Podcast
Digitizing HR Document Processes: A Gamechanger for HR Departments Everywhere

Futurum Tech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 41:38


In this Futurum Tech Webcast, Futurum Lead Analyst Shelly Kramer sits down with Gunter Appel and Jan Klockgeter of aconso for a conversation on digitizing HR documents and the difference this can make for enterprise organizations.  

American Contractor Show Podcast
E096 - New Florida Insurance Restoration Laws - What It Really Means For Contractors

American Contractor Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 82:15


We are joined by Attorney Remington Huggins to discuss the changes to the new Florida Law that is affecting contractors. We will learn the status of the law, what we can expect, and answer your questions about it. **The American Contractor Show is made possible because of our sponsors!** Contractor Coach PRO - Coaching Contractors to Work On IT, Not IN It! Go to www.contractorcoachpro.com to learn more! Atlas Roofing - Shingles - Providing premium quality roofing and insulation products for distribution throughout the world. Go to www.atlasroofing.com to learn more! HailTrace - The most accurate hail mapping application in the world! Learn more at www.hailtrace.com 24Hr BookKeeper - Have confidence in your construction financials with 24Hr Bookkeeper! Sign up for a free consultation today! Visit http://info.24hrbookkeeper.com/americancontractorshow C3 Group Inc. - Claims & Construction Consulting - Claims & Construction Consulting - C3 Group is a nationally connected team of Public Adjusters. They have been the industry experts on large loss, commercial claims for the past 8 years. For more information visit www.c3adjusters.com. Ingage - Close more deals with powerful sales presentation tool in the industry! Equip your team with the tools to needed to compete in our industry. Learn more at www.ingage.io RoofScope by Scope Technologies, Inc. - RoofScope reports compile all essential roofing measurements and images into an easy-to-read, environmentally friendly two-page report. Get started today at www.roofscope.com. CompanyCam - The only app every contractor needs. Document your jobs. Communicate with your crews. Cover your company's butt. Learn more at www.CompanyCam.com. Signpost - Signpost helps contractors text their customers, get online reviews, and drive loyalty with email marketing.- To Learn more go to https://signup.signpost.com/partner/acs/. #stormrestoration #insurancerestoration #roofingcompany #roofingsales #stormrestoration #roofing #supplementing #insuranceclaim #insurancerestorationpro #roofers #rooferslife #artofthesupplement #jointhemovement #roofersofinstagram #hail #stormers #atlasroofing #c3group #contractorcoachpro #roofscope #americancontractorshow #contractor #construction #constructionlife #contractorlife 

MedCast
#155 Empodere Seus Pacientes

MedCast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 21:31


Pessoa chega para consulta e, após os cumprimentos iniciais, você indaga sobre quais medicações está em uso e se está se dando bem com o tratamento. Sua paciente então responde: "Doutor, estou usando aqueles dois brancos grandes, e outro amarelo, e, salvo engano, um branco com azul para o estômago". Você esboça um sorriso e ainda tenta: "A senhora está com a receita aí?" E a resposta: "Vixe doutor… esqueci

The Innovative Mindset
Gene Baur, Co-Founder of Farm Sanctuary and Bestselling Author

The Innovative Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 49:35


Gene Baur on the Animal Rights Movement, Big Agriculture, and Critical Thinking This episode is brought to you by Brain.fm. I love and use brain.fm every day! It combines music and neuroscience to help me focus, meditate, and even sleep! Because you listen to this show, you can get a free trial.* URL: https://brain.fm/innovativemindset If you love it as much as I do, you can get 20% off with this exclusive coupon code: innovativemindset Gene Baur has been hailed as “the conscience of the food movement” by Time magazine. Since the mid-1980s, he has traveled extensively, campaigning to raise awareness about the abuses of industrialized factory farming and our system of cheap food production. A pioneer in the field of undercover investigations and farm animal rescue, Gene has visited hundreds of farms, stockyards, and slaughterhouses, documenting the deplorable conditions, and his rescue work inspired an international farm sanctuary movement. He played a key role in the first-ever cruelty conviction at a U.S. stockyard and enacting the first U.S. laws to prohibit cruel farming systems. Gene has published two bestsellers, Farm Sanctuary: Changing Hearts and Minds About Animals and Food (Simon and Schuster, 2008) and Living the Farm Sanctuary Life (Rodale, 2015), which he co-authored with Forks Over Knives author Gene Stone. Through his ongoing writing, activism, and speaking engagements, Gene continues working to expose the abuses of factory farming and to advocate for a just and sustainable plant-based food system. Connect with Gene https://www.farmsanctuary.org/ https://www.instagram.com/genebaur/ https://www.instagram.com/farmsanctuary/ Other links https://www.localharvest.org/csa/   Episode Transcript [00:00:00] Gene Baur: A lot of the information we receive is more marketing than accurate descriptions of reality. And so I think just the first thing is to be discerning and to recognize that just because we read something doesn't necessarily mean we should believe it. [00:00:20] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Hello and welcome to the innovative mindset podcast. Izolda Trakhtenberg on the show. I interview peak performing innovators in the creative social impact and earth conservation spaces or working to change the world. This episode is brought to you by brain FM, brain FM combines the best of music and neuroscience to help you relax, focus, meditate, and even sleep. [00:00:40] I love it and have been using it to write, create and do some. Deepest work because you're a listener of the show. You can get a free trial head over to brain.fm/innovative mindset to check it out. If you decide to subscribe, you can get 20% off with the coupon code, innovative mindset, all one word. And now let's get to the show.[00:01:00] [00:01:00] Yes. [00:01:04] Hey there and welcome to the innovative mindset podcast. My name is Izolda Trakhtenberg. I'm your host and I'm thrilled. You're here and I'm so honored to have this week's guest. I've got to tell you about this gentlemen. I'm so I'm a little nervous. I'll be. Yeah. But here we go. So gene Bauer has been hailed as the conscience of the food movement by time magazine, since the mid 1980s, he's traveled extensively campaigning to raise awareness about the abuses of industrialized factory farming and our system of cheap food production. [00:01:33] And you know, how close to my heart that is a pioneer in the field of undercover investigations and farmers. Eugene has visited hundreds of farms, stockyards and slaughterhouses documenting the deplorable conditions and his rescue work inspired an international farm sanctuary movement. He played a key role in the first ever cruelty conviction at a us stock yard and enacting the first us laws to prohibit cruel farming systems. [00:01:57] Yes, Gina's published two [00:02:00] bestseller. Farm sanctuary, changing hearts and minds about animals and food. It's by Simon and Schuster and living the farm sanctuary life in 2015, which he co-authored with forks over knives, author, Jean Stone, through his ongoing writing activism and speaking engagements. Jean continues working to expose the abuses of factory farming and to advocate for adjust and sustainable plant-based food system. [00:02:23] Again. Yes, Jean I'm so grateful and honored that you're here. Thank you so much for being. [00:02:28] Gene Baur: Oh, thank you. It's old. It's great to be with you. And I, and I love talking about these issues, so I'm very, very much looking forward to this. [00:02:35] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I, I have so many questions, but I really want to start at the beginning. [00:02:40] What, what did it for you? You know, there's, there's a moment at which you decide the kind of person you're going to be and who you're going to stand up for. What was it for you that made you think to yourself? You know what? I'm going to do this. This is going to become my life. [00:02:55] Gene Baur: You know, it, it, there was really never any one moment. [00:02:58] It was a [00:03:00] series of moments. And I think the initial thinking was, I just don't want to cause unnecessary harm in the world. And it started actually even before farm sanctuary, you know, I was born in 1962, so I grew up with Vietnam on television. I grew up during the cold war about all these worries and stories about, you know, The violence, the violence in the world just bothered me and I didn't want to be part of it. [00:03:23] So as I learned about the food system, I came to recognize the enormous violence there and you know, in high school for a short time, I stopped eating animals. When, when I had come home once and my mother had made a chicken dinner and I saw the light, the bird, you know, full legs and wings attached on his or her back on the plate. [00:03:45] And that turned me off from eating meat for a while. But that, that vision kind of faded over time. Then I got back to the old habit of eating animals. And then in 1985, I traveled around the country. I started spending time with activists, learning more about [00:04:00] factory farming and recognizing it was possible to live with. [00:04:03] Killing and eating other animals and that, and I went vegan. And then in 1986, you know, I felt that people just are unaware of what is happening in the food system. And people are unwittingly supporting violence and abuse every day. And you know, our original thinking was that if we could. Document and expose what was happening and show people they would decide not to eat out. [00:04:26] So that was kind of the simple thing. And this is in 1980. And so we started going to farms and stock yards in slaughterhouses to document conditions. And we would find living animals thrown in trash cans or on piles of dead animals. So we started rescuing them and that's how the sanctuaries began. But at the time we didn't really have. [00:04:45] Like a five-year vision or a 10 year vision. It was just a series of events. You know, like finding Hilda, for example, a sheep could have been left on a pile of dead animals that then led us to recognize how Hilda and other [00:05:00] farm animals could become ambassadors, because people wanted to hear her story. [00:05:03] We wanted to hear about where she came from. And then we could tell that story and educate people about the abuses of animal agriculture. And so it's been a whole process. You know, and, and that process continues. When we started, there were no other farm sanctuaries. So we were the first and there are now hundreds around the world, which is great, but we also, I think, need to critically evaluate how can these sanctuaries have the biggest impact possible. [00:05:29] And ultimately, you know, we said this in the early days, and I'll say it again today is ideally we would love to put ourselves out of business. You know, it would be. If there was no need for sanctuaries, right. But, but there is at this time because billions of farm animals are exploited and treated horribly and we need to speak out against that. [00:05:50] We need to model different kinds of relationships with that. Yeah. As friends, not food, which, which I think is one of the key messages of farm sanctuary is [00:06:00] that these animals deserve respect. They deserve to be treated with kindness and doing so as good for the animals. And it's also good for us. So, so, you know, it's an ongoing evolution. [00:06:11] And in addition to trying to inspire individual choices we are recently. Re-engaging in efforts to change the food system, which I think can have significant. [00:06:26] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I'm taking a second to take it all in. Wow. Okay. So I, first of all, yes. And thank you. That's actually that recognition of what I was eating of, what I was putting in my mouth is what made me go vegan many years ago and something that I'm hearing you say, and I love that you're hearing that you're saying it this way is. [00:06:48] You're not talking about eating meat, you're talking about eating animals, even that I don't know if it's a conscious choice on your part, but even that is an awareness raiser. So I'm wondering [00:07:00] when you do that, when you speak to people, when you're doing not, let's talk about the direct action later, because I'll get so angry, I'll have to run out of the room and scream for a minute. [00:07:09] But when you're speaking to people and you are trying to open hearts and. How conscious are you of your mindset of what you are trying to educate them on? [00:07:25] Gene Baur: You know, it, it really depends on the particular venue and, you know, here, we're just sort of talking like friends, you know? And so when I say animals, Honestly, I wasn't even conscious of that. [00:07:36] I was just expressing, you know, the humans are eating other animals and it's something that we need to critically evaluate. Right. But you know, when I've done media, I will sometimes also talk about eating animals. And I think that puts it in very stark terms because people don't think about the animals. [00:07:54] And so I think it's a habit I've somewhat gotten into. Being particularly [00:08:00] conscious of it, at least at this point over the years, it has been something that, you know, I've thought a lot about and how do we best reach people? How do we best connect with people? How do we build bridges of understanding instead of putting up walls that cause people to say, don't tell me I don't want it. [00:08:17] Right. And I think this is one of the things actually that sanctuaries do. And it would tie into the idea of talking about eating animals or not eating animals is that at the sanctuary is, are clearly animals, individuals, cows, pigs, chickens. They're not that different than cats or dogs or even humans. [00:08:37] And so the sanctuary world. Yeah. Affords us the opportunity to talk about animals as individuals in a fairly robust and impactful way, and that then can be applied to the food system and the lives that animals and humans experience at sanctuaries are very different [00:09:00] than those that are experienced in the food system. [00:09:03] And at the sanctuary. The animals are our friends. We interact with them in positive ways. There has been research done to show that when we interact with our dogs or other animals in positive ways, like petting our dog, for example, it helps to lower our stress levels, lower our breath, blood pressure. [00:09:21] It's good for us. And it's good for the animals. And I would say the same thing about sanctuaries is that these are a, win-win when good for us. Good for other animals. Whereas you compare that to the factory farming system. And I sometimes ask people to consider what it would be like to work in a slaughterhouse. [00:09:40] You know, this is something that is obviously horrible for other animals, but I would also. Suggested it is bad for people and it causes us to lose our humanity and our empathy. So, so the factory farming system is bad for everybody involved, I believe. And I think in the vegan animal rights [00:10:00] movement, there has been a recent sort of evolution towards looking at the system more holistically. [00:10:06] Looking at, in some cases, people who are participating in these violent acts as cogs in a wheel and have in many cases, sort of disempowered individuals without agency who are in some ways, even acting outside of their own interests outside of their own values and, and humanity and, you know, figuring out systemic. [00:10:28] Yeah. How do we replace our current violent extractive system with one that is based more on mutuality. One that is good for us. Good for other animals. Good for the earth. Because if you step back and think about it, you know, the way we grow food and consume in this country today, we're eating food that is making us sick. [00:10:50] It's been estimated. We could save 70% on health care. By shifting to a whole foods, plant-based diet 70%. We could prevent [00:11:00] millions of premature deaths every year. We could also save enormous amounts of land and biodiversity and ecosystems by shifting away from animal agriculture to plant based in the S. [00:11:13] 10 times more land is used for animal agriculture versus plant-based. And then of course, animals who are not being exploited and killed also do better when we're not eating them. So this is a win-win across the board. And I think right now we're at a position, especially with concerns about the climate crisis and the loss of biodiversity on the planet that we have very compelling reasons to argue for a plant-based foods. [00:11:40] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Oh, absolutely. And for sure, it's interesting to me what you said about the people. It's almost like in order to be able to do that horrible job, they have to make themselves inner to the violence they're doing every single second. That must absolutely. Change [00:12:00] them on some fundamental levels. And yet the notion of going macro with it, like you were talking about just a second ago of changing the food system itself. [00:12:10] Yes. It's good for the environment. Yes, it's, it's obviously better for, for the animals. If we're not. Exploiting them and killing them and eating them. But the question becomes for me, how, how do we, is it, is it lobbying efforts in, in government? What, what do we need to do? What do you, what are you thinking of doing and what do you think the average person can do? [00:12:33] To make inroads to making those changes. [00:12:37] Gene Baur: Yeah. Yeah, no, it is a big question and it is a multi valence to response. I think that we need to make individual changes in terms of how we eat so that we are not subsidizing this system by buying factory farm to animal products. Because when we buy those products, we're in a sense voting with our [00:13:00] dollars to support those systems. [00:13:02] But we also have a government that is supporting the factory farming industry to the tune of billions of dollars every year. So one of the first things I think we need to focus on. Is taking the government support away from growing feed crops. For example, you know, corn and soy that are grown in the U S are used largely to feed farm animals. [00:13:26] And those crops are heavily subsidized in a variety of ways. So I think we need to stop supporting and enabling this harmful and inherently inefficient. So that's one of the first things is to stop subsidizing irresponsible practices. Also, our government has done a lot to promote the consumption of animal products, including through the school lunch program, where for decades, a school kids have been given a glass of cow's milk as part of supposed nutrition. [00:13:58] But really, yeah. A [00:14:00] large part marketing and promotions. So I think our government needs to stop promoting animal foods the way it has been doing. And so there's going to be, I think, systemic. Policy matters. There's going to be personal matters. And I think there's going to be a business element to this where, you know, today we are seeing enormous investments in plant-based meats and in companies that are developing alternatives to, to meat from. [00:14:27] Living feeling animals. And I think those are very positive steps. So business is gonna play a role. Individual choice is going to play a role. And the government also, I think, is going to play a very important role. And part of it is stopping, you know, enabling our current system and instead enabling an alternative and the alternative could look a variety. [00:14:50] And I sort of see kind of bi-modal food production in the future. We sorta see it today to where you. Large scale mass [00:15:00] production and that's the dominant system. So I think in order to shift that it's really good that you have companies like beyond meat, impossible, and others who are looking to slot in a plant-based burger instead of a meat burger. [00:15:16] But in addition to that, I think there's going to be a more grassroots. It's a ground up push to even grow one's own food. Yeah. A robust urban farming movement. Now there's a food, not lawns movement now. And we can grow a lot more food than we sometimes believe by local urban agriculture. So I think there's a lot of growth in that space as well. [00:15:39] So there are good signs and these sorts of shifts should also be supported by government policies. [00:15:49] Izolda Trakhtenberg: You're singing my song. I love it. So there, there are so many things here that as a, as a former NASA staffer, I, I think about in terms of [00:16:00] how much of our land is being used for agriculture and is that land being used for the best form of agriculture. So what you said about plants like corn and soy that are mostly being grown to feed them. [00:16:15] Animal agriculture practices, I guess, is the best way to put it. How, how would they transfer if, if the government went okay, let's do this. Let's transfer over from corn and soy to more, plant-based that, that, that is designed to feed people, not animals. I'll put it that way because that's the best language I have in the moment. [00:16:37] How would we make that shift? How would we get farmer buy-in to be able to do that? [00:16:43] Gene Baur: Yeah, well, a lot of this crop land is now owned by banks and financial institutions. So the reason that they have invested here is because it's profitable. So if we had government programs, for example, that did not incentivize. [00:16:59] Crop [00:17:00] land for feed, but instead incentivized crop land for food that would do a lot to shift acres that are growing corn and soy to feed animals into peas or corn or soy or other crops people. But, but one of the other sort of fundamentals. Issues we have with animal agriculture is that it requires enormous amounts of land, enormous amounts of resources which for a small number of people can be very profitable because if you're selling corn and soy and you have crop insurance and you're basically guaranteed a profit you keep doing it. [00:17:40] And that's kind of, what's gotten us to where we are today and it's been driven by this belief and this bias. That animal foods are somehow preferable to plant based foods. So that's a bias that has driven agriculture, and it's been supported by the increasing profits that, you know, crop producers and [00:18:00] feed producers and the machinery of agriculture has benefited from. [00:18:04] And this also includes the pesticide companies, the petrochemical industries and, and, and so it's a massive industry. It's a massive company. But removing the, the federal and other subsidies that make crop production for animal feed profitable. And instead just doing that actually would have a big impact. [00:18:27] And, and, and another part of this has to do with exports because, you know, Grow all these crops and what cannot be sold in the U S is an export. And so you also have international dimensions to this. So it's, it's a big, big machine and it has to be addressed over time in various ways, but. [00:18:46] Stopping the funding and then enabling of our current system is, is huge. And and if that happened, I think you would see a natural shift towards growing crops to feed people instead of [00:19:00] growing feed for farm animals. But it's going to require a shift because, you know, instead of, you know, A million acres, you could now use maybe a hundred thousand acres to feed as many people, which means you have all that extra land that could potentially be rewilding or used for other more healthy purposes. [00:19:20] But what it means is that whoever's now pro. From all that extra land would, would, would have to have a different business model. And so there's a lot tied up in this, but the feed side is enormous and that's an important place, I think, for us to try to work on policies, to discourage this, this ongoing irresponsible and frankly, inefficient practice. [00:19:44] It's only profitable because of government programs. [00:19:47] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Yeah. And that's the thing that I'm wondering about with, with government subsidies. For agriculture in that way, I keep coming back to lobbying Congress. I keep coming back to changing the minds of [00:20:00] people who represent South Dakota, Iowa, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Kansas, some of the. [00:20:07] Big farming states that are designed to th their, their practices are designed to keep this machine going. And so I keep coming back to which way do you address the problem? Do you address, do you address it as, as lobbying Congress? Do you address it grassroots with the, with the farmers or the banks? How, how do we innovate away from the current practice? [00:20:30] If there's so much it's like a locomotive there's so much force going in that particular direct. [00:20:37] Gene Baur: Yes. Yes. I think you do all of that. And I think from the standpoint of a lobbying, you know, at this point, you know, the vegan perspective, the Amorites perspective is very much a minority point of view. [00:20:50] And we're up against very entrenched, very embedded, very powerful agricultural interests who not [00:21:00] only have. Lots of money and lobbyists, but members of the agriculture committee and key members of Congress representing agricultural states have disproportionate power to maintain the status quo because it is profitable. [00:21:16] After spending time in Congress, then they go work at an agribusiness company and they come back and forth. You know, the USDA secretary today, Tom bill sack. And he was the secretary under Obama and he was better than Sonny Perdue who was under Trump. But when Villsac left the USDA in 2016, He went to work with the us dairy export council and was working to promote dairy exports around the world. [00:21:44] And then when Biden was elected, he came back and he's now the USDA secretary again. So that gives you an idea of the kind of entrenched industry interests throughout government. And there are cultural biases. Towards this idea that drinking cow's milk is [00:22:00] somehow beneficial and healthy. So that's a belief system, but I think we need to challenge you at the government level, but also culturally throughout the country and the world. [00:22:10] And, and then we need to be working on the machinery of the system. So it's a cultural thing and it's a structural thing. And I think it is important to lobby but we need to be realistic about what we're up to. And one of the issues that really concerns me right now. And it's one that I'm not terribly optimistic, we'll be able to, to, to remedy from a policy standpoint, although we're going to keep fighting away and raising awareness and trying to battle these kinds of subsidies, but you know, the concern about the climate crisis what agribusiness is very good at doing is greenwashing and parlay. [00:22:49] Concerned about the environment to benefit their own interests. And they're doing that right now with methane digesters and with, you know, this idea that if you take [00:23:00] these manure, lagoons and factory farms, which again, these places can find. Thousands of animals. They produce enormous amounts of waste, too much waste for the land to absorb. [00:23:09] So putting these cesspools and in a sense of greenhouse gases. So the solution industry has, and this is now tied to the oil industry as well is to take that waste and turn it into methane, which is entered this methane and you digest it and you turn it into energy and on the surface, that sounds good. [00:23:29] But when you step back, What these methane digesters ultimately do is they further entrench industrial animal agriculture by tying it now to the industry grid or to the energy grid. And if you look at the amount of greenhouse gases coming from animal agriculture, most of it like about half of it comes from the feed industry, not from the manure, which is about 10% of it. [00:23:55] So if you really wanted to deal with the greenhouse. Gases and the climate [00:24:00] crisis, you would not be constructing maneuver lagoon or rock methane digesters at these factory farms. But that is what the government is currently supporting. And, and it's it's, so it's a financial misstep and it's also a greenwash cause now these industries can talk about how they're ecologically aware when in fact what they're doing is very harmful still. [00:24:21] So. Again, that's an example of how our entrenched system is working, where certain interests are able to actually parlay a genuine concern. To a policy that actually enables irresponsible practices to continue. And so that's what we're up against. So we just need to be calling this stuff out and encouraging consumers to make changes supporting businesses that are making changes. [00:24:50] I think we do need to lobby but we also need to do a lot more, right. [00:24:58] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Taking all of that in. Wow. [00:25:00] Yeah. It's interesting. You know what you said about the land being able to take in these manure lagoons? I worked when I was at NASA, I worked in, in soil science and looking at the soil itself. The soil can do a lot as far as carbon sequestration and looking at this notion of filtration, but it certainly can't do as much. [00:25:24] Manure, you know, as much manure as is produced. So if we don't try to do it that way, if we, or if that's one arm. The grassroots way of doing things. If I'm a, if I'm a person living in the USA and I want to build awareness is there. And I have no idea if there is, and maybe we should create one. Is there any kind of a database or a website where I can go to start learning about some of this to start seeing companies that are practicing this greenwashing as you put [00:26:00] it, is there anywhere where we can get better educated on this? [00:26:04] Gene Baur: Yeah, that's a really good question because a lot of the information we receive is more marketing than accurate descriptions of reality. And so I think just the first thing is to be discerning and to recognize that just because we read something doesn't necessarily mean we should believe it. I think a lot of the important progress is going to happen at the local level. [00:26:28] And the reason I say that is because when you're. In a local area, you see what is happening and it's harder to be misled. You know, the further removed you are from the source of your food. The easier it is for those that are marketing that food to tell you stories that may not be accurate. So I think, you know, I've been very encouraged by what I've seen in recent years. [00:26:50] And I, you know, before the Corona virus pandemic, I did a fair bit of traveling and I would visit urban. And see what is happening in [00:27:00] communities. And I have been very inspired and impressed by, by the work of groups like Harlem grown in New York or green Bronx machine in New York, you know, both that are enabling the youth to learn how to grow their own food. [00:27:14] Ron Finley in Los Angeles is doing the same thing. You have a grow where you are an urban farm in Atlanta, eco suburbia, a veganic urban farm in Mesa, Arizona. So you have all these like local farming operations that are producing healthy food in sustainable plant-based ways. And also building soil w and, and, and creating a relationship of mutuality with them. [00:27:39] Instead of one of extraction, you know, because when we look at the factory farming system, you know, you have a lot of corn, for instance, that's grown in the Midwest. So there's all these petrochemical fertilizers that are added to get that crop to grow. And then that corn is transported. Sometimes it's used in Iowa, but sometimes, you know, in North Carolina, for [00:28:00] example, to feed pigs. [00:28:01] So you have all these nutrients, all this corn, all this material. It's now being dumped in North Carolina, fed through pigs and you have all this maneuver. So there's this massive imbalance. Whereas if you have, you know, local food produced in a responsible way for a local market you know, it's just more connected. [00:28:20] The food is fresher. The food is healthier and people know what they're getting. So I would encourage people to join a local CSA co what's a community supported agriculture program. And the nice thing about these structures is that consumers. Invest in the program with the farmer. So at the beginning of the growing season, the farmer has the capital. [00:28:41] They need to get seeds and whatever else to begin to plant and to grow. And over the course of the growing season, the farmer and the consumer share in whether it's been a bumper crop or not a very successful crop. And the consumer understands buying in [00:29:00] that, you know, You know, a certain amount of food, it might be more, it might be a little less depending on how the season goes. [00:29:05] So that's a way to spread out risk for farmers and to share that with consumers and also for consumers to get closer to the production system and understand farming more. So growing food locally is huge. There's also, I think, an opportunity to transition lawns. So for people who live in the suburbs or who have homes with gardens or with, with lawns, You know, how about a whole different industry, right? [00:29:31] Growing produce instead of just instead of a gardener coming and mowing the lawn and, you know, putting down fertilizer in some cases what if the gardener actually became a gardener and now this could be the homeowner, or it could be a service where instead of just mowing the lawn. They're growing produce. [00:29:49] So every week there's a box of, you know, fruits or vegetables or whatever that could then potentially be sold locally or bartered or traded with other neighbors. [00:30:00] So, so that's another, I think food, not lawns movement that could be very positive locally. And then I think at the local level, you can work on maybe city zoning policies to make it easier to grow, produce in your neighborhoods and, and maybe policies around why. [00:30:18] Maybe tax incentives or tax breaks for people who are growing food instead of having a lot. So those are some concrete policy, examples of ways to enable more of this type of activity in various communities. So, so those are just some thoughts, but I think local is going to be huge. I think we do need to work on federal policies. [00:30:40] But doing that. I think it's going to take some time for us to develop the kind of support base to be able to take on animal agriculture and, and another, you know, speaking to innovation. One of the things that I think is happening, you know, in recent years. And it's very positive is that the vegan movement, the animal rights movement [00:31:00] is coming to recognize more common ground with worker movements, with small farmers, with environmentalist's, with health advocates, and you put all these together and you find common ground. [00:31:13] And, you know, as a vegan, I'd love it to be all vegan and it might not be all vegan. Less meat. You know, so, so finding common ground with diverse interests and then promoting certain policies at the federal level, we might have some success. [00:31:34] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I really hope so. [00:31:37] Gene Baur: No. And then methane digesters is a good example of that, right? Where you have small farmers, you know, you know, whether they're vegan or whether they're raising a small number of animals, they would also begins to manure lagoons. So that's one of those examples where we might not agree on everything, but we can agree that these methane digesters should not be allowed. [00:31:57] We could potentially agree on certain crop [00:32:00] insurance. Federal subsidies, we could potentially agree on consolidation, you know, cause one of the things that's happened also is. Fewer and fewer larger farms producing food. So I think we need a more diversified food system. So those are the kinds of policy areas where I think we might have some opportunities at the federal level working with a broader coalition of aligned interest. [00:32:26] Izolda Trakhtenberg: That would be such an incredible feat and obviously an important one. That notion though of changing changing mindsets of, of people aligning themselves with, with other, with organizations, aligning themselves with other organizations who are working. At on parallel tracks, maybe if not the same track, there is no centralized body that says, Hey, let's do this together. [00:32:53] There is no movement, one movement that, that does that. And so it makes me, it makes me wonder [00:33:00] how do we broaden the minds of people who again, want to be involved who want to align themselves with these various movements, but don't know how to reconcile. The differences, like you said, for example, now it might not all be vegan. [00:33:15] And I know, I know lots of vegans are like, if you're not vegan, you're not worthwhile. And that, that is concerning to me because it you're cutting off your nose to spite your face at some point. So how, how would you encourage people to, to come together in those kinds of situations where they have what they might consider to be insurmountable? [00:33:39] Gene Baur: Yeah, no, I think it's important to try to find common ground and the build and then build from there. So in the case of a small, a farmer who is raising animals for slaughter, for example, now we would disagree. On the idea of killing animals for food. So that's obvious. And so we need to [00:34:00] accept that, but instead of focusing on that and, and creating more division around that particular problem, we can focus on the idea of local food. [00:34:11] We can focus in on the idea of. You know, no more subsidies for big ag. We can folk, we should find common ground and focus on that and build from there. And then my belief is that when you engage with people who may actually have a different perspective there's an opportunity for learning and and this can go both ways. [00:34:32] There are certain, yeah. Experiences different people have, and we can learn a lot from each other when we pay attention and we don't have to agree on everything, but if you can find common ground and build from there, I think that's the most important thing. Instead of looking at the disagreement. [00:34:47] Yeah. And continuing to pound on that. And in the vegan world, sometimes we tend to do that. And I don't think that it's necessarily helped. I understand the idea of holding onto a certain [00:35:00] ideal and I hold onto the ideal, but, you know, I can't control it. I can only control myself and I can try to encourage others and nudge others, but people, you know, have to make their own choices at the end of the day. [00:35:13] And if we can work with folks with aligned interests and, and we have an awful lot of opportunity. When we look at the factory farming industry and the harm, it causes to small farmers, to consumers, to rural communities, to urban communities to our health to animals, to the earth. When we look at all the harm, this industry causes indigenous populations, you know, around the world. [00:35:37] So there's so many ways that we can find common ground. When we look at the food system and specifically the factory farming. And so I think focusing there and then preventing. Again, government policies and subsidies that enable that abusive industry. So that to me is a very good starting point. And, and then once we [00:36:00] hopefully are able to stop subsidizing, irresponsible, unjust, inhumane animal, agricultural practices, we can then start looking at ways to reinvest that government money. [00:36:13] And, you know, some organizations like ours would only want to support, find funding plant-based alternatives. So that's where we would go a little further than some of these other allies, you know, who might be against the factory farming industry, but would still be for, you know, eating animal products, maybe fewer animal products. [00:36:33] So I think that's where the common ground is with those groups and individuals that we might not agree completely on. Less animal products is I think a very good comment. [00:36:44] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Yeah, this friend is, she works with farmers and she, and I have to keep focusing on that common ground instead of on, on where we diverge. Ironically, she's the one who told me what happens to dairy cows in wa and that's when I went vegan. So [00:37:00] so this notion of being able to. In some ways agree to disagree is your point is well taken. [00:37:07] I wonder if, if I could talk to you about this, this other notion, you said something about the protein and the nutrients. From from directly from plants versus from animals. There's, I've always in my head had this notion that there's, that there is a nutrients once removed situation happening. When you, when you try to get nutrients from, from eating an animal, I don't know what your, what your education level is on this, but could you talk a little bit about that notion that, that, that. [00:37:39] Primary nutrients from plants versus what nutrients we might be getting from animals, especially animals. Who've, who've been factory farmed. [00:37:49] Gene Baur: Yeah. You know, I don't have a whole lot of kind of academic knowledge in that space. You know, what I do know is I've been a vegan since 1985. I'm almost 60 years old now and [00:38:00] I, I get everything I need nutritionally from eating plants and no animals. [00:38:04] And I do know that. Eating animal products. The way we are in this country is causing enormous health problems. I know one of the primary nutrients we do not get in in this country is fiber and animal products have no fiber, whereas plant foods, whole plant foods. Full of fiber. So there there's some basic things I know in terms of the nutrients directly from plants. [00:38:29] I think it makes sense just from an efficiency standpoint, you know, to eat the plant directly from the earth instead of taking the plant and feeding it to an animal and then eating the animal. And I have also heard that, you know, the animals get their nutrients from the plant. So might as well go right to the plants. [00:38:46] So, so that all makes sense to me, although I'm not again, deeply knowledgeable about that nutritional question. But what I do know is I've been a vegan a long time and it works, and I know some of the best athletes in [00:39:00] the world have performed at their best eating a plant-based diet and people like Carl Lewis, for example, You know, did his best times as a vegan. [00:39:10] So, you know, we can perform at a very high level eating plants instead of here. [00:39:15] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Yeah, I love that documentary. I think it's called agents of change about ventures. Game-changers yes. Game-changers. I always get the two confused game-changers about, about the peak performing athletes who are all vegan plant-based I thought that, you know, if that's not going to inspire you to think about health as a vegan, I'm not sure will. [00:39:36] What will so I have just I know you, you have to go and I so appreciate you taking the time. I have just a couple of other questions. Can you, can you be a futurist for a second? And talk to me about your vision for 2040. What, what do you see? How do you see us doing, as you can talk about the climate crisis about. [00:39:57] You know, animal agriculture, [00:40:00] plant-based movement, veganism, anything. Where do you see us as a society and as a planet 20 years? [00:40:07] Gene Baur: Oh gosh. It's really hard to know exactly. But what I'd say is that it, it appears to me and it feels to me like there's a convergence of it. Yeah. You know, whether it's the ethical treatment of other animals, whether it's the destruction of the, by the, the ecosystems and the earth and, you know, the climate crisis whether it's our own personal health, whether it's our own emotional health and community health, you know, all of these things can be pinned to the factory farming industry, which is a contributor to them. [00:40:36] And the solutions are in eating healthier. A plant-based diet that is produced in a more sustainable eco-friendly way. So I think, you know, where things currently stand, there's an awful lot of investment in large efforts to replace animal foods in our fast food industry, in our mainstream food system. [00:40:59] And I think those are [00:41:00] positive. But I also am a very strong proponent of a more grassroots, localized food system where you have. You know, food, not lawns efforts, you have urban agriculture. You have people growing their own food. You have community gardens, you have community supported agriculture. [00:41:17] So I, I think that a robust grass roots food movement to me is something that really feels good. You could even have like rooftop gardens. You could have vertical farms and in some urban settings, so local food fresh. Plant food produce locally to me is, is great. And so that's the bi-modal system. [00:41:40] Again, you have this kind of localized versus a more industrialized plant-based options that will replace meat and current in the current machinery. So those are the two kind of. Parallel pushes happening and, and I support them both. Although, you know, as an idealist, I I'm a [00:42:00] bigger fan of the locals. [00:42:02] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Yeah, absolutely. The thing, the thing that that's always interested me about what you're saying is that you have to want to, right. The, the person who's got a, who lives in Brooklyn, New York has to want to, there's no lawn. I have no lawn. Right. So I have to want to go. To the closest a community garden. And I have to want to work in the soil and I have to want to tend the crops that I'm growing it. [00:42:28] Even if it's like a 10 foot by 10 foot plot, what would we do? How, how do we encourage people to even begin to think about it? Because I, I grew up in Detroit, even though I wasn't born in the USA, but I grew up in Detroit and the urban farming initiatives there. Blow my mind and, and people are, are really because, and it's because so much has been abandoned there that there are these plots of land doing nothing. [00:42:53] So people have started doing it. They've started these urban gardening and urban farming initiatives there, [00:43:00] but in a, in a, in a place like Brooklyn, there's not too much. That's abandoned. How do we talk to people in those areas and say, Hey, this is a possibility for you. Where do we need to start [00:43:11] Gene Baur: with. [00:43:12] Yeah, no. In places like Brooklyn, where, where land really as it, or is it a premium? It gets a lot tougher, you know, but there is, I think, a growing hunger for green space for open space and opportunities for gardening, even in very small plots even container gardening, like, you know, on the back porch, for example, you can sometimes have a container to grow some herbs if nothing else. [00:43:35] But you know, In addition to like the physical limitations, which I hear and understand are significant in places like Brooklyn, there are also just, how do you get people to want to do this? Part of it is just by seeing others do it. You know, we are social animals and if we see somebody else doing something. [00:43:52] You know, there's a good chance we might start doing it. So the more that this happens, you know, like in Detroit, as you were describing, I think the more [00:44:00] it will pick up momentum because I believe that being with the earth, having our hands in the soil is actually healing and it feels really good. So once people start doing that and they recognize how beneficial it is, I think more and more people are going to want to do it. [00:44:16] And in places like Brooklyn, you know, again, land is very limited. So maybe rooftop. Or one of the possible options public spaces, you know, some parks, you know, might be made available to have some, some gardening space. But I think expanding green spaces and adding food production in some of those could be a solution. [00:44:37] There are food forests. So, you know, Trees that are producing fruit. For example, in some of these green spaces could be another part of the solution. So it's going to be multi valence. It's not going to be one thing or another. It can be a variety [00:44:49] Izolda Trakhtenberg: of things. I, again, I hope so. I keep saying to your responses, I keep going. [00:44:55] Yes, I hope so. Yeah. And it's interesting to me, rooftop gardens do a [00:45:00] lot to cool the buildings, so it saves energy. In that way, too. And, and I hope that that keeps going and growing because there is an initiative to have that, to address the urban heat island effect in, in these urban areas. I would love, I, first of all, gene, I know you have to go, but I would love to find out from you and I'm going to put it in the show notes also. [00:45:20] Where, if someone, if someone wants to follow your work, where would they go to find you? And I'll put the links in the show notes, but I like people learn differently. So if you could say where someone would be able to locate your work and what you're doing, I would love to have that information. [00:45:36] Gene Baur: Yes, absolutely. [00:45:37] Well, you know, we have at farm sanctuary, we have a website, farm sanctuary.org. We also have an Instagram account, a Twitter account and a Facebook for farm sanctuary. And then also I have my own Twitter, Instagram and Facebook for Jean Bauer. So people can go to either or both of those to keep in touch with us and to track our work. [00:45:59] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:46:00] Fabulous. Thank you so much for saying that. And I will put all of that and game-changers. Do engagements have changed? I don't know why game changers and, and csa.org is the community supported agriculture link. I'll put all of that in the show notes so that if you're interested in finding out more about gene Bauer and his work farm sanctuary how to get involved in a CSA, you'll be able to do it from the show notes of the page. [00:46:23] Jean I'm. So. So grateful that you took the time to be here. I really appreciate it. I have just one last question and it's a silly question, but I find that it yields some profound answers. And the question is this. If you had an airplane that could sky write anything for the whole world to see, what would you say? [00:46:44] Gene Baur: Wow. I mean, probably kindness. I think kindness is one of those really important kind of unifying values. I don't think anybody says it's bad to be kind. I mean, they might, they might say, oh, you're being idealistic or you're [00:47:00] not being realistic for instance, but nobody, I think disagrees with the aspiration of kindness. [00:47:06] So kindness matters. Be kind. I think that is one of the most important things for us to aspire. [00:47:13] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Fabulous. I love it. I love it, Jean, once again. Thank you so much for being here. I appreciate you taking the. [00:47:20] Gene Baur: Absolutely. Thank you so much as all the great talking with you. [00:47:23] Izolda Trakhtenberg: This is Izolda Trakhtenberg for the innovative mindset podcast. [00:47:26] If you've enjoyed this episode, and I know you have share it out, tell your friends this is important work, gene Bauer and the farm sanctuary movement. They're doing incredible work on behalf of the whole place. All the animals, including us. I hope that you've enjoyed the episode and this is me reminding you to listen, learn, laugh, and love. [00:47:50] Thanks so much for joining me today. I really appreciate you being here. Please subscribe to the podcast if you're new and if you like what you're hearing, please review it and [00:48:00] rate it and let other people. And if you'd like to be a sponsor of the show, I'd love to meet you on patrion.com/innovative mindset. [00:48:08] I also have lots of exclusive goodies to share just with the show supporters there today's episode was produced by Izolda Trakhtenberg and his copyright 2020. As always, please remember, this is for educational and entertainment purposes. Only past performance does not guarantee future results, although we can always hope until next time, keep living in your innovative mindset.   * I am a Brain.fm affiliate. If you purchase it through the above links and take the 20% off, I'll get a small commission. And please remember, I'll never recommend a product or service I don't absolutely love!

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Our Daily Bread Podcast | Our Daily Bread

In memorializing his grandfather’s work, Peter Croft wrote, “It is my deepest desire for the person who picks up their Bible, whatever version they use, to not only understand but experience the scriptures as living documents, just as relevant, dangerous, and exciting now as they were those thousands of years ago.” Peter’s grandfather was J.B. Philips, a youth minister who undertook a new paraphrase of the Bible in English during World War II in order to make it come alive to students at his church. Like Phillips’ students, we face barriers to reading and experiencing Scripture, and not necessarily because of our Bible translation. We may lack time, discipline, or the right tools for understanding. But Psalm 1 tells us that “Blessed is the one . . . whose delight is in the law of the Lord” (vv. 1–2). Meditating on Scripture daily allows us to “prosper” in all seasons, no matter what hardship we are facing. How do you view your Bible? It is still relevant with insight for living today; still dangerous in its call to believe and follow Jesus; still exciting in the intimate knowledge of God and humanity that it imparts. It’s like a stream of water (v. 3) that provides the sustenance we need daily. Today, let’s lean in—make time, get the right tools, and ask God to help us experience Scripture as a living document.

Global News Podcast
FBI releases document on Saudis and 9/11

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 22:29


The memo records contact between Saudi nationals and hijackers but does not implicate the government. Also on the programme, a deal is reached on monitoring Iranian nuclear sites, and some gorillas have tested positive for Covid.

Entrepreneurs on Fire
Maria Bamford's Commencement Address

Entrepreneurs on Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 10:47


Maria Bamford's Commencement Address at University of Minnesota 2017. Sponsors: Trainual: Pre-order a free copy of The Business Playbook: How to Document and Delegate What You Do So Your Company Can Grow Beyond You at Trainual.com/eofire! Helium10: Become a seller on Amazon, the world's largest online retail site, with minimal startup costs. Get 50% off your first month of a Helium10 Platinum account at Helium10.com/fire!