Podcasts about Democratic National Convention

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Series of presidential nominating conventions of the United States Democratic Party

  • 1,352PODCASTS
  • 2,090EPISODES
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  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 21, 2021LATEST
Democratic National Convention

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Best podcasts about Democratic National Convention

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Latest podcast episodes about Democratic National Convention

The Ezra Klein Show
Fannie Lou Hamer and the meaning of freedom

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 59:34


Vox's Jamil Smith talks with Keisha Blain, associate professor of history at the University of Pittsburgh and author of Until I Am Free: Fannie Lou Hamer's Enduring Message to America. They discuss the legacy of Fannie Lou Hamer, a sharecropper-turned-civil-rights-activist, whose speech about voting rights at the 1964 Democratic National Convention changed how the Democratic Party viewed Black activism. They talk about how Hamer's ideas influence movements for human rights and racial equity today. Host: Jamil Smith (@JamilSmith), Senior Correspondent, Vox Guest: Keisha Blain (@KeishaBlain), author; professor of history, University of Pittsburgh References:  Until I Am Free: Fannie Lou Hamer's Enduring Message to America by Keisha Blain (Beacon Press; 2021) Fannie Lou Hamer's speech at the DNC (August 22, 1964) American Experience: Freedom Summer (dir. Stanley Nelson. PBS; 2014) Enjoyed this episode? Rate Vox Conversations ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts. Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of Vox Conversations by subscribing in your favorite podcast app. Support Vox Conversations by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts This episode was made by:  Producer: Erikk Geannikis Editor: Amy Drozdowska Engineer: Paul Robert Mounsey Deputy Editorial Director, Vox Talk: Amber Hall Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Make It Plain with Mark Thompson
Author and Historian Dr. Keisha N. Blain

Make It Plain with Mark Thompson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 37:51


How deeply do you understand the critical legacy of Fannie Lou Hamer? Dr. Keisha N. Blain is a historian and author of her latest book, “Until I Am Free: Fannie Lou Hamer's Enduring Message to America,” and she shows how Hamer's words still speak truth to power in our society and what that actually means. Dr. Blain familiarizes us with Hamer, who didn't know she could vote until she was 44 years old, but eventually found herself on stage at the Democratic National Convention in 1964. But she also faced tensions within the democratic party and experienced a lot of difficult resistance to her radical honesty. But her dedication to her home state of Mississippi and to the movement are still evident today, as her message endures. BUY the book here: https://bookshop.org/books/until-i-am-free-fannie-lou-hamer-s-enduring-message-to-america/9780807061503 Executive Producer: Adell Coleman Producer: Brittany Temple Distributor: DCP Entertainment For additional content: makeitplain.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Health Design Podcast
Sneha Dave, creator of the Health Advocacy Summit (HAS)

The Health Design Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 23:52


Sneha graduated from Indiana University in May 2020 where she majored in chronic illness advocacy as well as journalism. She created the Health Advocacy Summit (HAS) and its program the Crohn's and Colitis Young Adults Network (CCYAN) with support from foundations such as the Helmsley Charitable Trust to create support systems for adolescents and young adults with chronic medical disabilities across the U.S. and internationally. She is proud to work with a team composed entirely of young adults with chronic medical disabilities and also to keep the HAS and CCYAN and independent from the pharmaceutical and insurance industries. Sneha has completed an undergraduate research fellowship in health policy at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. She has also interned at numerous places such as Pfizer Global Headquarters in health economics and outcomes research for Inflammation and Immunology. Sneha has spoken on Capitol Hill, featured nationally on C-SPAN, and is a past contributor for U.S. News and World Report. She has served on the Democratic National Committee Disability Policy Subcommittee and recently joined the Midwest Comparative Effectiveness Public Advisory Council, an independent appraisal committee of the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review. Sneha was awarded two academic fellowships with the Association of Health Care Journalists. She was previously a national policy fellow at RespectAbility and now serves as the youngest director on the board for the national nonprofit. Sneha has spoken at the Democratic National Convention, Stanford Medicine X, the National Academies of Medicine, and other major avenues. For her work, Sneha was selected as one of the most influential teenagers in 2018 by the We Are Family Foundation and was recognized as an American Association of People with Disabilities Emerging Leader in 2020.

Politics Done Right
Norman Solomon: on the defense budget. Adam Schiff exposes Kevin McCarthy as a liar.

Politics Done Right

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 14:56


Congressman Adam Schiff exposes the dangerous liar that is House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, a bona fide scoundrel. The co-founder of RootsAction org, Norman Solomon, did not disappoint as he discussed the obscene nature of the Military-Industrial Complex. Norman Solomon is the cofounder and national coordinator of RootsAction.org. He was a Bernie Sanders delegate from California to the 2016 Democratic National Convention and is currently a coordinator of the relaunched Bernie Delegates Network. Solomon is the author of a dozen books include War Made Easy: How Presidents and Pundits Keep Spinning Us to Death. --- If you like what we do please do the following! Most Independent Media outlets continue to struggle to raise the funds they need to operate much like the smaller outlets like Politics Done Right SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube Channel here. LIKE our Facebook Page here. Share our blogs, podcasts, and videos. Get our books here. Become a YouTube PDR Posse Member here. Become a Politics Done Right Subscriber via Patreon here. Become a Politics Done Right Subscriber via Facebook here. Consider providing a contribution here. Please consider supporting our GoFundMe equipment fund here. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/politicsdoneright/support

Politics Done Right
Norman Solomon: on the defense budget. Adam Schiff exposes Kevin McCarthy as a liar.

Politics Done Right

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 57:38


Congressman Adam Schiff exposes the dangerous liar that is House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, a bona fide scoundrel. The co-founder of RootsAction org, Norman Solomon, did not disappoint as he discussed the obscene nature of the Military-Industrial Complex. Norman Solomon is the cofounder and national coordinator of RootsAction.org. He was a Bernie Sanders delegate from California to the 2016 Democratic National Convention and is currently a coordinator of the relaunched Bernie Delegates Network. Solomon is the author of a dozen books include War Made Easy: How Presidents and Pundits Keep Spinning Us to Death. --- If you like what we do please do the following! Most Independent Media outlets continue to struggle to raise the funds they need to operate much like the smaller outlets like Politics Done Right SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube Channel here. LIKE our Facebook Page here. Share our blogs, podcasts, and videos. Get our books here. Become a YouTube PDR Posse Member here. Become a Politics Done Right Subscriber via Patreon here. Become a Politics Done Right Subscriber via Facebook here. Consider providing a contribution here. Please consider supporting our GoFundMe equipment fund here. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/politicsdoneright/support

The John Batchelor Show
1739: The missed presidential ticket in 1972. Katrina vanden Heuvel @TheNation

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 10:50


Photo:  Mary Frances Farenthold. The missed presidential ticket in 1972. Katrina vanden Heuvel @TheNation https://www.thenation.com/article/politics/frances-farenthold-for-vp/ ..  ..  ..  Mary Frances Tarlton "Sissy" Farenthold (October 2, 1926 – September 26, 2021) was an American politician, attorney, activist, and educator. She was best known for her two campaigns for the office of Governor of Texas in 1972 and 1974, and for being placed in nomination for the office of Vice President of the United States, finishing second, at the 1972 Democratic National Convention. She was elected as the first chair of the National Women's Political Caucus in 1973.

Screaming in the Cloud
Security Challenges and Working for President Biden with Jackie Singh

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 41:45


About JackieJackie Singh is an Information Security professional with more than 20 years of hacking experience, beginning in her preteen years. She began her career in the US Army, and deployed to Iraq in 2003. Jackie subsequently spent several years in Iraq and Africa in cleared roles for the Department of Defense.Since making the shift to the commercial world in 2012, Jackie has held a number of significant roles in operational cybersecurity, including Principal Consultant at Mandiant and FireEye, Global Director of Incident Response at Intel Security and McAfee, and CEO/Cofounder of a boutique consultancy, Spyglass Security.Jackie is currently Director of Technology and Operations at the Surveillance Technology Oversight Project (S.T.O.P.), a 501(C)(3), non-profit advocacy organization and legal services provider. S.T.O.P. litigates and advocates to abolish local governments' systems of mass surveillance.Jackie lives in New York City with her partner, their daughters, and their dog Ziggy.Links: Disclose.io: https://disclose.io Twitter: https://twitter.com/hackingbutlegal TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at VMware. Let's be honest—the past year has been far from easy. Due to, well, everything. It caused us to rush cloud migrations and digital transformation, which of course means long hours refactoring your apps, surprises on your cloud bill, misconfigurations and headache for everyone trying manage disparate and fractured cloud environments. VMware has an answer for this. With VMware multi-cloud solutions, organizations have the choice, speed, and control to migrate and optimizeapplications seamlessly without recoding, take the fastest path to modern infrastructure, and operate consistently across the data center, the edge, and any cloud. I urge to take a look at vmware.com/go/multicloud. You know my opinions on multi cloud by now, but there's a lot of stuff in here that works on any cloud. But don't take it from me thats: VMware.com/go/multicloud and my thanks to them again for sponsoring my ridiculous nonsense.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by “you”—gabyte. Distributed technologies like Kubernetes are great, citation very much needed, because they make it easier to have resilient, scalable, systems. SQL databases haven't kept pace though, certainly not like no SQL databases have like Route 53, the world's greatest database. We're still, other than that, using legacy monolithic databases that require ever growing instances of compute. Sometimes we'll try and bolt them together to make them more resilient and scalable, but let's be honest it never works out well. Consider Yugabyte DB, its a distributed SQL database that solves basically all of this. It is 100% open source, and there's not asterisk next to the “open” on that one. And its designed to be resilient and scalable out of the box so you don't have to charge yourself to death. It's compatible with PostgreSQL, or “postgresqueal” as I insist on pronouncing it, so you can use it right away without having to learn a new language and refactor everything. And you can distribute it wherever your applications take you, from across availability zones to other regions or even other cloud providers should one of those happen to exist. Go to yugabyte.com, thats Y-U-G-A-B-Y-T-E dot com and try their free beta of Yugabyte Cloud, where they host and manage it for you. Or see what the open source project looks like—its effortless distributed SQL for global apps. My thanks to Yu—gabyte for sponsoring this episode.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. The best part about being me—well, there's a lot of great things about being me, but from my perspective, the absolute best part is that I get to interview people on the show who have done awesome and impressive things. Therefore by osmosis, you tend to assume that I'm smart slash know-what-the-living-hell-I'm-talking-about. This is proveably untrue, but that's okay.Even when I say it outright, this will fade into the depths of your mind and not take hold permanently. Today is, of course, no exception. My guest is Jackie Singh, who's an information security professional, which is probably the least interesting way to describe who she is and what she does. Most recently, she was a senior cybersecurity staffer at the Biden campaign. Thank you so much for joining me. What was that like?Jackie: Thank you so much for having me. What was that like? The most difficult and high-pressure, high-stress job I've ever had in my life. And, you know, I spent most of my early 20s in Iraq and Africa. [laugh].Corey: It's interesting, you're not the first person to make the observation that, “Well, I was in the military, and things are blowing up all around, and what I'm doing next to me is like—‘oh, the site is down and can't show ads to people?' Bah, that's not pressure.” You're going the other direction. It's like, yeah, this was higher stress than that. And that right there is not a common sentiment.Jackie: I couldn't anticipate, when I was contacted for the role—for which I had applied to through the front door like everyone else, sent in my resume, thought it looked pretty cool—I didn't expect to be contacted. And when I was interviewed and got through the interviews and accepted the role, I still did not properly anticipate how this would change my life and how it would modify my life in the span of just a few months; I was on the campaign for five to six months.Corey: Now, there's a couple of interesting elements to this. The first is it's rare that people will say, “Oh, I had a job for five to six months,” and, a, put it on their resume because that sounds like, “Ah, are you one of those job-hopper types?” But when you go into a political campaign, it's very clearly, win or lose, we're out of jobs in November. Ish. And that is something that is really neat from the perspective of career management and career planning. Usually is, “Hey, do you want a six-month job?” It's, “Why? Because I'm going to rage quit at the end of it. That seems a little on the weird side.” But with a campaign, it's a very different story. It seems like a different universe in some respects.Jackie: Yes, absolutely. It was different than any other role I'd ever had. And being a political dilettante, [laugh] essentially, walking into this, I couldn't possibly anticipate what that environment would be like. And, frankly, it is a bit gatekept in the sense that if you haven't participated on a campaign before, you really don't have any idea what to expect, and they're all a bit different to, like, their own special snowflake, based on the people who are there, and the moment in time during which you are campaigning, and who you are campaigning for. And it really does change a perspective on civic life and what you can do with your time if you chose to spend it doing something a little bigger than your typical TechOps.Corey: It also is a great answer, too, when people don't pay close enough attention. “So, why'd you leave your last job?” “He won.” Seems like a pretty—Jackie: [laugh].Corey: —easy answer to give, on some level.Jackie: Yes, absolutely. But imagine the opposite. Imagine if our candidate had lost, or if we had had data walk out the door like in 2016. The Democratic National Convention was breached in 2016 and some unflattering information was out the door, emails were hacked. And so it was difficult to anticipate… what we had control over and how much control we could actually exert over the process itself, knowing that if we failed, the repercussions would be extremely severe.Corey: It's a different story than a lot of InfoSec gigs. Companies love to talk like it is the end of the universe if they wind up having a data breach, in some effect. They talk about that the world ends because for them it kind of does because you have an ablative CSO who tries to also armor themselves with ablative interns that they can blame—if your SolarWinds. But the idea being that, “Oh yeah, if we get breached we are dunzo.”And it's, first, not really. Let's not inflate the risks here. Let's be honest; we're talking about something like you're a retailer; if you get breached, people lose a bunch of credit card numbers, the credit card companies have to reissue it to everyone, you get slapped with a fine, and you get dragged in the press, but statistically, look at your stock price a year later, it will be higher than at the time of the breach in almost every case. This is not the end of the world. You're talking about something though that has impacts that have impossible-to-calculate repercussions.We're talking about an entire administration shift; US foreign policy, domestic policy, how the world works and functions is in no small part tied to data security. That's a different level of stress than I think most security folks, if you get them honest enough, are going to admit that, yeah, what I do isn't that important from an InfoSec perspective. What you did is.Jackie: I appreciate that, especially having worked in the military. Since I left the military, I was always looking for a greater purpose and a larger mission to serve. And in this instance, the scope of work was somewhat limited, but the impact of failing would have been quite wide-ranging, as you've correctly identified. And walking into that role, I knew there was a limited time window to get the work done. I knew that as we progressed and got closer and closer to election day, we would have more resources, more money rolls in, more folks feel secure in the campaign and understand what the candidate stands for, and want to pump money into the coffers. And so you're also in an interesting situation because your resourcing is increasing, proportional to the threat, which is very time-bound.Corey: An inherent challenge is that unlike in a corporate environment, in many respects, where engineers can guard access to things and give the business clear lines of access to things and handle all of it in the background, one of the challenges with a campaign is that you are responsible for data security in a variety of different ways, and the interfaces to that data explode geometrically and to people with effectively no level whatsoever of technical sophistication. I'm not talking about the candidate necessarily—though that's of course, a concern—but I'm talking organizers, I'm talking volunteers, I'm talking folks who are lifelong political operatives, but they tend not to think in terms of, “Oh, I should enable multi-factor authentication on everything that I have,” because that is not what they are graded on; it's pass-fail. So, it's one of those things where it is not the number one priority for anyone else in your organization, but it is yours and you not only have to get things into fighting shape, you have to furthermore convince people to do the things that get them there. How do you approach that?Jackie: Security awareness [laugh] in a nutshell. We were lucky to work with Bob Lord, who is former CSO at Yahoo, OAuth, Rapid7, and has held a number of really important roles that were very wide in their scope, and responsible for very massive data sets. And we were lucky enough to, in the democratic ecosystem, have a CSO who really understood the nature of the problem, and the way that you described it just now is incredibly apt. You're working with folks that have no understanding or very limited understanding of what the threat actors were interested in breaching the campaign, what their capability set is, and how they might attempt to breach an organization. But you also had some positives out of that.When you're working with a campaign that is distributed, your workforce is distributed, and your systems are also distributed. And when you lose that centralization that many enterprises rely on to get the job done, you also reduce opportunities for attackers to compromise one system or one user and move laterally. So, that was something that we had working for us. So, security awareness was incredibly important. My boss worked on that quite a bit.We had an incredible IT help desk who really focused on connecting with users and running them through a checklist so everyone in the campaign had been onboarded with a specific set of capabilities and an understanding of what the security setup was and how to go about their business in a secure way. And luckily, very good decisions had been made on the IT side prior to the security team joining the organization, which set the stage for a strong architecture that was resistant to attack. So, I think a lot of the really solid decisions and security awareness propagation had occurred prior to myself and my boss joining the campaign.Corey: One of the things that I find interesting is that before you started that role—you mentioned you came in through the front door, which personally I've never successfully gotten a job like that; I always have to weasel my way in because I have an eighth-grade education and my resume—Jackie: [laugh].Corey: —well, tenure-wise, kind of, looks like a whole bunch of political campaigns. And that's fine, but before that, you were running your own company that was a focused security consultancy. Before that, your resume is a collection of impressive names. You were a principal consultant at Mandiant, you were at Accenture. You know what you're talking about.You were at McAfee slash Intel. You've done an awful lot of corporate world stuff. What made you decide to just wake up one day and decide, “You know what sounds awesome? Politics because the level of civil discourse there is awesome, and everyone treats everyone with respect and empathy, and no one gets heated or makes ridiculous arguments and the rest. That's the area I want to go into.” What flipped that switch for you?Jackie: If I'm completely honest, it was pure boredom. [laugh]. I started my business, Spyglass Security, with my co-founder, Jason [Shore 00:11:11]. And our purpose was to deliver boutique consulting services in a way that was efficient, in a way that built on prior work, and in a way that helped advance the security maturity of an organization without a lot of complex terminology, 150-page management consulting reports, right? What are the most effective operational changes we can make to an organization in how they work, in order to lead to some measurable improvement?And we had a good success at the New York City Board of Elections where we were a subcontractor to a large security firm. And we were in there for about a year, building them a vulnerability management program, which was great. But generally speaking, I have found myself bored with having the same conversations about cybersecurity again and again, at the startup level and really even at the enterprise level. And I was looking for something new to do, and the role was posted in a Slack that I co-founded that is full of digital forensics and information security folks, incident responders, those types of people.And I didn't hear of anyone else applying for the role. And I just thought, “Wow, maybe this is the kind of opportunity that I won't see again.” And I honestly sent my resume and didn't expect to hear anything back, so it was incredible to be contacted by the chief information security officer about a month after he was hired.Corey: One of the things that made it very clear that you were doing good work was the fact that there was a hit piece taken out on you in one of the absolute worst right-wing rags. I didn't remember what it was. It's one of those, oh, I'd been following you on Twitter for a bit before that, but it was one of those okay, but I tend to shortcut to figuring out who I align with based upon who yells at them. It's one of those—to extend it a bit further—I'm lazy, politically speaking. I wind up looking at two sides yelling at each other, I find out what side the actual literal flag-waving Nazis are on, and then I go to the other side because I don't ever want someone to mistake me for one of those people. And same story here. It's okay, you're clearly doing good work because people have bothered to yell at you in what we will very generously term ‘journalism.'Jackie: Yeah, I wouldn't refer to any of those folks—it was actually just one quote-unquote journalist from a Washington tabloid who decided to write a hit piece the week after I announced on Twitter that I'd had this role. And I took two months or so to think about whether I would announce my position at the campaign. I kept it very quiet, told a couple of my friends, but I was really busy and I wasn't sure if that was something I wanted to do. You know, as an InfoSec professional, that you need to keep your mouth shut about most things that happened in the workplace, period. It's a sensitive type of role and your discretion is critical.But Kamala really changed my mind. Kamala became the nominee and, you know, I have a similar background to hers. I'm half Dominican—my mother's from the Dominican Republic and my father is from India, so I have a similar background where I'm South Asian and Afro-Caribbean—and it just felt like the right time to bolster her profile by sharing that the Biden campaign was really interested in putting diverse candidates in the world of politics, and making sure that people like me have a seat at the table. I have three young daughters. I have a seven-year-old, a two-year-old, and a one-year-old.And the thing I want for them to know in their heart of hearts is that they can do anything they want. And so it felt really important and powerful for me to make a small public statement on Twitter about the role I had been in for a couple of months. And once I did that, Corey, all hell broke loose. I mean, I was suddenly the target of conspiracy theorists, I had people trying to reach out to me in every possible way. My LinkedIn messages, it just became a morass of—you know, on one hand, I had a lot of folks congratulate me and say nice things and provide support, and on the other, I just had a lot of, you know, kind of nutty folks reach out and have an idea of what I was working to accomplish that maybe was a bit off base.So yeah, I really wasn't surprised to find out that a right-wing or alt-right tabloid had attempted to write a hit piece on me. But at the end of the day, I had to keep moving even though it was difficult to be targeted like that. I mean, it's just not typical. You don't take a job and tell people you got a job, [laugh] and then get attacked for it on the national stage. It was really unsurprising on one hand, yet really quite shocking on another; something I had to adjust to very quickly. I did cry at work. I did get on the phone with legal and HR and cry like a baby. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yeah.Jackie: Yeah. It was scary.Corey: I guess this is an example of my naivete, but I do not understand people on the other side of the issue of InfoSec for a political campaign—and I want to be clear, I include that to every side of an aisle—I think there are some quote-unquote, “Political positions” that are absolutely abhorrent, but I also in the same breath will tell you that they should have and deserve data security and quality InfoSec representation. In a defensive capacity, to be clear. If you're—“I'm the offensive InfoSec coordinator for a campaign,” that's a different story. And we can have a nuanced argument about that.Jackie: [laugh].Corey: Also to be very clear, for the longest time—I would say almost all of my career until a few years ago—I was of the impression whatever I do, I keep my politics to myself. I don't talk about it in public because all I would realistically be doing is alienating potentially half of my audience. And what shifted that is two things. One of them, for me at least, is past a certain point, let's be very clear here: silence is consent. And I don't ever want to be even mistaken at a glance for being on the wrong side of some of these issues.On another, it's, I don't accept, frankly, that a lot of the things that are currently considered partisan are in fact, political issues. I can have a nuanced political debate on either side of the aisle on actual political issues—talking about things like tax policy, talking about foreign policy, talking about how we interact with the world, and how we fund things we care about and things that we don't—I can have those discussions. But I will not engage and I will not accept that, who gets to be people is a political issue. I will not accept that treating people with respect, regardless of how high or low their station, is a political issue. I will not accept that giving voice to our worst darkest impulses is a political position.I just won't take it. And maybe that makes me a dreamer. I don't consider myself a political animal. I really don't. I am not active in local politics. Or any politics for that matter. It's just, I will not compromise on treating people as people. And I never thought, until recently, that would be a political position, but apparently, it is.Jackie: Well, we were all taught the golden rule is children.Corey: There's a lot of weird things that were taught as children that it turns out, don't actually map to the real world. The classic example of that is sharing. It's so important that we teach the kids to share, and always share your toys and the rest. And now we're adults, how often do we actually share things with other people that aren't members of our immediate family? Turns out not that often. It's one of those lessons that ideally should take root and lead into being decent people and expressing some form of empathy, but the actual execution of it, it's yeah, sharing is not really a thing that we value in society.Jackie: Not in American society.Corey: Well, there is that. And that's the challenge, is we're always viewing the world through the lens of our own experiences, both culturally and personally, and it's easy to fall into the trap that is pernicious and it's always there, that our view of the world is objective and correct, and everyone else is seeing things from a perspective that is not nearly as rational and logical as our own. It's a spectrum of experience. No one wakes up in the morning and thinks that they are the villain in the story unless they work for Facebook's ethics department. It's one of those areas of just people have a vision of themselves that they generally try to live up to, and let's be honest people fell in love with one vision of themselves, it's the cognitive dissonance thing where people will shift their beliefs instead of their behavior because it's easier to do that, and reframe the narrative.It's strange how we got to this conversation from a starting position of, “Let's talk about InfoSec,” but it does come back around. It comes down to understanding the InfoSec posture of a political campaign. It's one of those things that until I started tracking who you were and what you were doing, it wasn't something really crossed my mind. Of course, now you think about, of course there's a whole InfoSec operation for every campaign, ever. But you don't think about it; it's behind the scenes; it's below the level of awareness that most people have.Now, what's really interesting to me, and I'm curious if you can talk about this, is historically the people working on the guts of a campaign—as it were—don't make public statements, they don't have public personas, they either don't use Twitter or turn their accounts private and the rest during the course of the campaign. You were active and engaging with people and identifying as someone who is active in the Biden campaign's InfoSec group. What made you decide to do that?Jackie: Well, on one hand, it did not feel useful to cut myself off from the world during the campaign because I have so many relationships in the cybersecurity community. And I was able to leverage those by connecting with folks who had useful information for me; folks outside of your organization often have useful information to bring back, for example, bug bounties and vulnerability disclosure programs that are established by companies in order to give hackers a outlet. If you find something on hardwarestore.com, and you want to share that with the company because you're a white hat hacker and you think that's the right thing to do, hopefully, there's some sort of a structure for you to be able to do that. And so, in the world of campaigning, I think information security is a relatively new development.It has been, maybe, given more resources in this past year on the presidential level than ever before. I think that we're going to continue to see an increase in the amount of resources given to the information security department on every campaign. But I'm also a public person. I really do appreciate the opportunity to interact with my community, to share and receive information about what it is that we do and what's happening in the world and what affects us from tech and information security perspective.Corey: It's just astonishing for me to see from the outside because you are working on something that is foundationally critically important. Meanwhile, people working on getting people to click ads or whatnot over at Amazon have to put ‘opinions my own' in their Twitter profile, whereas you were very outspoken about what you believe and who you are. And that's a valuable thing.Jackie: I think it's important. I think we often allow corporations to dictate our personality, we allow our jobs to dictate our personality, we allow corporate mores to dictate our behavior. And we have to ask ourselves who we want to be at the end of the day and what type of energy we want to put out into the world, and that's a choice that we make every day. So, what I can say is that it was a conscious decision. I can say that I worked 14 hours a day, or something, for five, six months. There were no weekends; there was no time off; there were a couple of overnights.Corey: “So, what do you get to sleep?” “November.”Jackie: Yeah. [laugh]. My partner took care of the kids. He was an absolute beast. I mean, he made sure that the house ran, and I paid no attention to it. I was just not a mom for those several months, in my own home.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense. Corey: Back in 2019, I gave a talk at re:Invent—which is always one of those things that's going to occasion comment—and the topic that we covered was building a vulnerability disclosure program built upon the story of a vulnerability that I reported into AWS. And it was a decent enough experience that I suggested at some point that you should talk about this publicly, and they said, “You should come talk about it with us.” And I did and it was a blast. But it suddenly became very clear, during the research for that talk and talking to people who've set those programs up is that look, one way or another, people are going to find vulnerabilities in what you do and how you do them. And if you don't give them an easy way to report them to you, that's okay.You'll find out about them in other scenarios when they're on the front page of the New York Times. So, you kind of want to be out there and accessible to people. Now, there's a whole story we can go into about the pros and cons of things like bug bounties and the rest, and of course, it's a nuanced issue, but the idea of at least making it easy for people to wind up reporting things from that perspective is one of those key areas of outreach. Back in the early days of InfoSec, people would explore different areas of systems that they had access to, and very often they were charged criminally. Intel wound up having charges against one of their—I believe it was their employee or something, who wound up founding something and reporting it in an ethical way.The idea of doing something like that is just ludicrous. You're in that space a lot more than I am. Do you still see that sort of chilling effect slash completely not getting it when someone is trying to, in good faith, report security issues? Or has the world largely moved on from that level of foolishness?Jackie: Both. The larger organizations that have mature security programs, and frankly, the organizations that have experienced a significant public breach, the organizations that have experienced pain are those that know better at this point and realize they do need to have a program, they do need to have a process and a procedure, and they need to have some kind of framework for folks to share information with them in a way that doesn't cause them to respond with, “Are you extorting me? Is this blackmail?” As a cybersecurity professional working at my own security firm and also doing security research, I have reported dozens of vulnerabilities that I've identified, open buckets, for example. My partner at Spyglass and I built a SaaS application called Data Drifter a few years ago.We were interviewed by NBC about this and NBC followed up on quite a few of our vulnerability disclosures and published an article. But what the software did was look for open buckets on Azure, AWS, and GCP and provide an analyst interface that allows a human to trawl through very large datasets and understand what they're looking at. So, for example, one of the finds that we had was that musical.ly—musical-dot-L-Y, which was purchased by TikTok, eventually—had a big, large open bucket with a lot of data, and we couldn't figure out how to report it properly. And they eventually took it down.But you really had to try to understand what you were looking at; if you have a big bucket full of different data types, you don't have a name on the bucket, and you don't know who it belongs to because you're not Google, or Amazon, or Microsoft, what do you do with this information? And so we spent a lot of time trying to reconcile open buckets with their owners and then contacting those owners. So, we've received a gamut of ranges of responses to vulnerability disclosure. On one hand, there is an established process at an organization that is visible by the way they respond and how they handle your inquiry. Some folks have ticketing systems, some folks respond directly to you from the security team, which is great, and you can really see and get an example of what their routing is inside the company.And then other organizations really have no point of reference for that kind of thing, and when something comes into either their support channels or even directly into the cybersecurity team, they're often scrambling for an effective way to respond to this. And it could go either way; it could get pretty messy at times. I've been threatened legally and I've been accused of extortion, even when we weren't trying to offer some type of a service. I mean, you really never walk into a vulnerability disclosure scenario and then offer consulting services because they are going to see it as a marketing ploy and you never want to make that a marketing ploy. I mean, it's just not… it's not effective and it's not ethical, it's not the right thing to do.So, it's been interesting. [laugh]. I would recommend, if you are a person listening to this podcast who has some sort of pull in the information security department at your organization, I would recommend that you start with disclose.io, which was put together by Casey John Ellis and some other folks over at Bugcrowd and some other volunteers. It's a really great starting point for understanding how to implement a vulnerability disclosure program and making sure that you are able to receive the information in a way that prevents a PR disaster.Corey: My approach is controversial—I know this—but I believe that the way that you're approaching this was entirely fatally flawed, of trying to report to people that they have an open S3 bucket. The proper way to do it is to upload reams of data to it because my operating theory is that they're going to ignore a politely worded note from a security researcher, but they're not going to ignore a $4 million surprise bill at the end of the month from AWS. That'll get fixed tout suite. To be clear to the audience, I am kidding on this. Don't do it. There's a great argument that you can be charged criminally for doing such a thing. I'm kidding. It's a fun joke. Don't do it. I cannot stress that enough. We now go to Jackie for her laughter at that comment.Jackie: [laugh].Corey: There we go.Jackie: I'm on cue. Well, a great thing about Data Drifter, that SaaS application that allowed analysts to review the contents of these open buckets, was that it was all JavaScript on the client-side, and so we weren't actually hosting any of that data ourselves. So, they must have noticed some transfer fees that were excessive, but if you're not looking at security and you have an infrastructure that isn't well monitored, you may not be looking at costs either.Corey: Costs are one of those things that are very aligned spiritually with security. It's a trailing function that you don't care about until right after you really should have cared about it. With security, it's a bit of a disaster when it hits, whereas with those surprise bills, “Oh, okay. We wasted some money.” That's usually, a, not front-page material and, b, it's okay, let's be responsible and fix that up where it makes sense, but it's something that is never a priority. It's never a ‘summon the board' story for anything short of complete and utter disaster. So, I do feel a sense of spiritual alignment here.Jackie: [laugh]. I can see that. That makes perfect sense.Corey: Before we call this an episode, one other area that you've been active within is something called ‘threat modeling.' What is it?Jackie: So, threat modeling is a way to think strategically about cybersecurity. You want to defend, effectively, by understanding your organization as a collection of people, and you want to help non-technical staff support the cybersecurity program. So, the way to do that is potentially to give a human-centric focus to threat modeling activities. Threat modeling is a methodology for linking humans to an effective set of prioritized defenses for the most likely types of adversaries that they might face. And so essentially the process is identifying your subject and defining the scope of what you would like to protect.Are you looking to protect this person's personal life? Are you exclusively protecting their professional life or what they're doing in relation to an organization? And you want to iterate through a few questions and document an attack tree. Then you would research some tactics and vulnerabilities, and implement defensive controls. So, in a nutshell, we want to know what assets does your subject have or have access to, that someone might want to spy, steal, or harm; you want to get an idea of what types of adversaries you can expect based on those assets or accesses that they have, and you then want to understand what tactics those adversaries are likely to use to compromise those assets or accesses, and you then transform that into the most effective defenses against those likely tactics.So, using that in practice, you would typically build an attack tree that starts with the human at the center and lists out all of their assets and accesses. And then off of those, each of those assets or accesses, you would want to map out their adversary personas. So, for example, if I work at a bank and I work on wire transfers, my likely adversary would be a financially motivated cybercriminal, right? Pretty standard stuff. And we want to understand what are the methods that these actors are going to employ in order to get the job done.So, in a common case, in a business email compromised context, folks might rely on a signer at a company to sign off on a wire transfer, and if the threat actor has an opportunity to gain access to that person's email address or the mechanism by which they make that approval, then they may be able to redirect funds to their own wallet that was intended for someone else or a partner of the company. Adversaries tend to employ the least difficult approach; whatever the easiest way in is what they're going to employ. I mean, we spend a lot of time in the field of information security and researching the latest vulnerabilities and attack paths and what are all the different ways that a system or a person or an application can be compromised, but in reality, the simplest stuff is usually what works, and that's what they're looking for. They're looking for the easiest way in. And you can really observe that with ransomware, where attackers are employing a spray and pray methodology.They're looking for whatever they can find in terms of open attack surface on the net, and then they're targeting organizations based on who they can compromise after the fact. So, they don't start with an organization in mind, they might start with a type of system that they know they can easily compromise and then they look for those, and then they decide whether they're going to ransomware that organization or not. So, it's really a useful way, when you're thinking about human-centric threat modeling, it's really a useful way to completely map your valuables and your critical assets to the most effective ways to protect those. I hope that makes sense.Corey: It very much does. It's understanding the nature of where you start, where you stop, what is reasonable, what is not reasonable. Because like a lot of different areas—DR, for example—security is one of those areas you could hurl infinite money into and still never be done. It's where do you consider it reasonable to start? Where do you consider it reasonable to stop? And without having an idea of what the model of threat you're guarding against is, the answer is, “All the money,” which it turns out, boards are surprisingly reluctant to greenlight.Jackie: Absolutely. We have a recurring problem and information security where we cannot measure return on investment. And so it becomes really difficult to try to validate a negative. It's kind of like the TSA; the TSA can say that they've spent a lot of money and that nothing has happened or that any incidents have been limited in their scope due to the work that they've done, but can we really quantify the amount of money that DHS has absorbed for the TSA's mission, and turned that into a really wonderful and measurable understanding of how we spent that money, and whether it was worth it? No, we can't really. And so we're always struggling with that insecurity, and I don't think we'll have an answer for it in the next ten years or so.Corey: No, I suspect not, on some level. It's one of those areas where I think the only people who are really going to have a holistic perspective on this are historians.Jackie: I agree.Corey: And sadly I'm not a cloud historian; I'm a cloud economist, a completely different thing I made up.Jackie: [laugh]. Well, from my perspective, I think it's a great title. And I agree with your thought about historians, and I look forward to finding out how they felt about what we did in the information security space, both political and non-political, 20, 30, and 40 years from now.Corey: I hope to live long enough to see that. Jackie, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. If people want to learn more about what you're up to and how you view things, where can they find you?Jackie: You can find me on Twitter at @hackingbutlegal.Corey: Great handle. I love it.Jackie: Thank you so much for having me.Corey: Oh, of course. It is always great to talk with you. Jackie Singh, principal threat analyst, and incident responder at the Biden campaign. Obviously not there anymore. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast provider of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a comment expressing an incoherent bigoted tirade that you will, of course, classify as a political opinion, and get you evicted from said podcast provider.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Arroe Collins
Brayden Harrington Releases The Book Brayden Speaks Up

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 7:42


In February 2020, Brayden Harrington attended a campaign event for President Joe Biden in Concord, NH. Brayden's parents wanted their son to hear a speech from a person who was like Brayden: both President Biden and Brayden understand what it's like to speak with a stutter. After hearing of their shared experience, President Biden spent a half hour talking with Brayden about how he learned to feel comfortable giving speeches in front of many people. In August 2020, Brayden was invited to speak at the Democratic National Convention. In his speech, Brayden shared that President Biden helped him feel confident about speaking with a stutter. Brayden's speech went viral, receiving more than 3 million hits on Twitter, and counting. Brayden Speaks Up shows how Brayden's stutter is his greatest strength, making him an inspiration for all kids who feel different, and celebrates the importance of speaking up and using your voice. The book will include an author's note from Brayden and additional resources for those who stutter. Brayden Harrington is just a normal kid who enjoys spending time with his friends and family, and playing baseball, basketball, and video games. He lives in Boscawen, NH and enjoys following his favorite basketball team—the Boston Celtics as well as learning all he can about his favorite player of all time—Jayson Tatum. When he was thirteen years old, Brayden found himself in the national spotlight after he was introduced to then candidate for President, Joe Biden. The two bonded over their shared struggles with stuttering and Brayden was invited to speak at the 2020 Democratic National Convention. Brayden's speech electrified the nation, going viral. During this experience, Brayden learned that his biggest challenge was actually his greatest gift, as he was able to show others the importance of persevering.

Arroe Collins
Brayden Harrington Releases The Book Brayden Speaks Up

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 7:42


In February 2020, Brayden Harrington attended a campaign event for President Joe Biden in Concord, NH. Brayden's parents wanted their son to hear a speech from a person who was like Brayden: both President Biden and Brayden understand what it's like to speak with a stutter. After hearing of their shared experience, President Biden spent a half hour talking with Brayden about how he learned to feel comfortable giving speeches in front of many people. In August 2020, Brayden was invited to speak at the Democratic National Convention. In his speech, Brayden shared that President Biden helped him feel confident about speaking with a stutter. Brayden's speech went viral, receiving more than 3 million hits on Twitter, and counting. Brayden Speaks Up shows how Brayden's stutter is his greatest strength, making him an inspiration for all kids who feel different, and celebrates the importance of speaking up and using your voice. The book will include an author's note from Brayden and additional resources for those who stutter. Brayden Harrington is just a normal kid who enjoys spending time with his friends and family, and playing baseball, basketball, and video games. He lives in Boscawen, NH and enjoys following his favorite basketball team—the Boston Celtics as well as learning all he can about his favorite player of all time—Jayson Tatum. When he was thirteen years old, Brayden found himself in the national spotlight after he was introduced to then candidate for President, Joe Biden. The two bonded over their shared struggles with stuttering and Brayden was invited to speak at the 2020 Democratic National Convention. Brayden's speech electrified the nation, going viral. During this experience, Brayden learned that his biggest challenge was actually his greatest gift, as he was able to show others the importance of persevering.

Arroe Collins
Brayden Harrington Releases The Book Brayden Speaks Up

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 7:42


In February 2020, Brayden Harrington attended a campaign event for President Joe Biden in Concord, NH. Brayden's parents wanted their son to hear a speech from a person who was like Brayden: both President Biden and Brayden understand what it's like to speak with a stutter. After hearing of their shared experience, President Biden spent a half hour talking with Brayden about how he learned to feel comfortable giving speeches in front of many people. In August 2020, Brayden was invited to speak at the Democratic National Convention. In his speech, Brayden shared that President Biden helped him feel confident about speaking with a stutter. Brayden's speech went viral, receiving more than 3 million hits on Twitter, and counting. Brayden Speaks Up shows how Brayden's stutter is his greatest strength, making him an inspiration for all kids who feel different, and celebrates the importance of speaking up and using your voice. The book will include an author's note from Brayden and additional resources for those who stutter. Brayden Harrington is just a normal kid who enjoys spending time with his friends and family, and playing baseball, basketball, and video games. He lives in Boscawen, NH and enjoys following his favorite basketball team—the Boston Celtics as well as learning all he can about his favorite player of all time—Jayson Tatum. When he was thirteen years old, Brayden found himself in the national spotlight after he was introduced to then candidate for President, Joe Biden. The two bonded over their shared struggles with stuttering and Brayden was invited to speak at the 2020 Democratic National Convention. Brayden's speech electrified the nation, going viral. During this experience, Brayden learned that his biggest challenge was actually his greatest gift, as he was able to show others the importance of persevering.

Sylvia & Me
Tanya Selvaratnam: Writer, Artist, Activist, ‘Assume Nothing’

Sylvia & Me

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 29:32


‘Intimate Violence' is a term that is not well known. Tanya Selvaratnam is changing that in a big way. Her recently published memoir ‘Assume Nothing: A Story of Intimate Violence' is her story. A story of a committed relationship and the 'intimate violence' she endured. Meet the woman who helped bring down former NYC Attorney General, Eric Schneiderman. Tanya met Schneiderman at the Democratic National Convention. It started off as a fairytale romance that quickly turned into a nightmare.

Daily Kos Radio - Kagro in the Morning
Kagro in the Morning "Encore Performance" - September 4, 2012, airing September 6, 2021

Daily Kos Radio - Kagro in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 58:52


  Listen to our archived episodes: RadioPublic|LibSyn|YouTube Support the show: Patreon|PayPal: 1x or monthly|Square Cash * Back to 2012! David Waldman broadcast LIVE from the 2012 Democratic National Convention with appearances by Armando, Greg Dworkin, former president Bill Clinton, Dave Grohl, and the Foo Fighters! Not all got air time, as the show was truncated to only one hour, but here is how David described it at the time:   Organized chaos this morning. That's the best description of the scene on the ground in Charlotte, as Armando & I made our way to the PPL, the blogger's home away from home during the convention, to kick things off with our abbreviated morning segment. For chaos, things seemed to come out pretty well! We had Raven Brooks and Mary Rickles of Netroots Nation stop by for a few minutes, and they gave us a quick rundown on who's here, how many they expect, and what's in store for bloggers, new media and netroots types who choose to make the PPL their base. Be sure to check out the site, because they're streaming video from up in that place. And you know you love the video. Greg Dworkin joined us for his regular segment, which was an accomplishment in itself. And our phone lines kinda-sorta worked, at least enough to get Bill in Portland Maine on "air" with us!  

Today In History
Today In History - Protests at Democratic National Convention in Chicago

Today In History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021


https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/protests-at-democratic-national-convention-in-chicagoSupport the show on Patreon

This Week in Business History
This Week in Business History for August 9th: From a Single Air Mattress to $3.4B in Revenue- The Story of Airbnb

This Week in Business History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 17:01


In this episode of "This Week in Business History", host Scott W. Luton dives into the early days of Airbnb. You might be quite surprised at how the 2008 Democratic National Convention and discount cereal played a big role in the startup's early days. Scott will also share what instrumental individual compared the trio of Airbnb founders to "cockroaches" that just wouldn't die. They kept coming and coming! Finally, Scott will touch on the passing of the one and only Ron Popeil. Additional Links & Resources: Learn more about This Week in Business History: https://supplychainnow.com/program/business-history/ Subscribe to This Week in Business History and other Supply Chain Now programs: https://supplychainnow.com/subscribe This episode was hosted by Scott Luton. For additional information, please visit our dedicated show page at: https://supplychainnow.com/this-week-in-business-history-airbnb-60.

Tough Love:  Artist Management
Michele Fleischli

Tough Love: Artist Management

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 66:21


Michele Fleischli In this episode, we chat with Michele Fleischli. Michele has crossed paths with a handful of our previous guests and I really enjoyed the opportunity to connect with her here.  Michele currently owns Like Management, working with Tenacious D and Karen O of the Yeah, Yeah, Yeahs, among others.  Throughout her history, she's worked with an array of amazing talent, including Bad Religion, Rage Against The Machine, Sonic Youth, and Beck, to name just a few.  We cover a lot of that history, but we also touch on her interest in creating unique and memorable moments with artists, such as Rage's pop up performance at the Democratic National Convention in 2000 or Beck's “Song Reader” Book, a collection of songs only available in sheet music form. 

When She Founded
B-Side: She Who Sets the Agenda Wins

When She Founded

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 20:29


  When you fall short of having a strong agenda or lose control of the one you've set, the people you're leading will see you as disorganized, uncertain, insecure, and often defensive, it ain't a good look, y'all. - Somer Hamrick   Today on When She Founded: -We are always, always driving an agenda -The importance of agendas -The three keys to a clear agenda -The lesson from the 2020 Democratic National Convention  -The value of succinct talking points   Subscribe, Rate & Share Your Favorite Episodes!   Thanks for tuning into today's episode of When She Founded with your host, Somer Hamrick. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave a rating and review.   Don't forget to visit our website channelclinical.com/, connect with Somer on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/somer-hamrick-a053374/, and share your favorite episodes across social media. If you are a female founder who needs more support please visit and sign up on our Launch to Leads Lab https://launchtoleadslab.com website.

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry
A Senate Of The People with Malcolm Kenyatta

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 49:49


Our guest this week is Malcolm Kenyatta. Malcolm is a member of the Pennsylvania State Assembly and a candidate for the Democratic nomination for the United States Senate election in 2022. He's got an incredible personal story and an unparalleled commitment to justice. In 2016 and in 2020, he was elected as Delegate to the Democratic Convention, both times garnering the second-highest vote total of any delegate in the Commonwealth. He has also appeared on local and national media outlets to discuss systemic poverty, affordable education and childcare, and making government more accountable to citizens. He was the subject of an award-winning short documentary about his election run, ‘Going Forward' produced by Seven Knot Productions, which premiered on ‘The Atlantic Magazine Selects' in 2018. In 2020, he was chosen by President Joe Biden to give the keynote address at the Democratic National Convention along with a group of other ‘Rising Stars.' He was one of twenty Electoral College votes cast for Joe Biden and Kamala Harris, in Harrisburg on December 14, 2020. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/alyssa-milano-sorry-not-sorry/message

This Day in Quiztory
07.27_Brandon Larkins_Senator Obama's Keynote Address

This Day in Quiztory

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 0:51


#OTD Senator Barack Obama, who would become president four years later, delivered the keynote address at the Democratic National Convention. Actor Brandon Larkins narrates.

FiveThirtyEight Politics
Does Running For President Always Help Your Career?

FiveThirtyEight Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 62:35


Almost a year after the 2020 Democratic National Convention, the crew looks back at the record number of Democrats who ran for president in 2020 and assesses where they are now. They also review a new report from the American Association of Public Opinion Research on why election polls had a historically large error in 2020.

Marvel Movie Minute
IM2096: Lt. Col. James Rhodes ‘Make Salute'

Marvel Movie Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 24:56


Political faux pas! Rob breaks out his political history to catalog a connection between IM2 and the 2004 Democratic National Convention. Then, Rhodey is in the War Machine! We have some digression on Expo Security, a confused audience, and then — WHAT? — it's the MARK VI ARMOR! That's right, in the space of 60 seconds we are introduced to TWO armors we haven't seen before. Cue the swoon. Film Sundries Watch this film: Disney+ • iTunes • Amazon • YouTube Join the conversation on Discord Script Transcript Original theatrical trailer Original poster artwork Iron Man Tony Stark Justin Hammer

The Politicrat
Jesse Jackson ‘88: The Speech That Electrified America, 33 Years Ago Today

The Politicrat

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 46:38


In this Tuesday edition of THE POLITICRAT daily podcast: Exactly 33 years ago on July 20, 1988, Reverend Jesse Jackson Sr. spoke to a packed crowd at the Democratic National Convention. Jackson delivered one of the five best speeches by a person ever to run political office in the U.S. Omar Moore on Jackson, with an excerpt of the compelling speech. July 20, 2021. BRAND NEW: The Summer Sensation Series continues with the new MEDITATE DON'T HESITATE t-shirt at THE POLITICRAT daily podcast online store—buy now! (Designed by Omar) https://bit.ly/3vWqnKf FREE: SUBSCRIBE NOW TO THE BRAND NEW POLITICRAT DAILY PODCAST NEWSLETTER!! Extra content, audio, analysis, exclusive essays for subscribers only, plus special offers and discounts on merchandise at The Politicrat Daily Podcast online store. Something new and informative EVERY DAY!! Subscribe FREE at https://politicrat.substack.com Buy podcast merchandise (all designed by Omar Moore) and lots more at The Politicrat Daily Podcast Store: https://the/politicrat.myshopify.com The Politicrat YouTube page: bit.ly/3bfWk6V The Politicrat Facebook page: bit.ly/3bU1O7c The Politicrat blog: https://politicrat.politics.blog PLEASE SUBSCRIBE to this to this podcast! Follow/tweet Omar at: https://twitter.com/thepopcornreel

Teleforum
Courthouse Steps Decision Webinar: Brnovich v. Democratic National Convention

Teleforum

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 36:46


On July 1, 2021, the Supreme Court issued its decision in Brnovich, Attorney General of Arizona v. Democratic National Convention. The DNC sued the state of Arizona arguing that two of the State's election procedures—refusing to count ballots that were incorrectly cast out of precinct and forbidding most third parties from collecting vote-by-mail ballots for delivery—had a disparate impact on racial minority voters in violation of Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act (VRA). The DNC also alleged that the ballot-collection measure was enacted with discriminatory intent.Although the District Court found no violation of the Voting Rights Act and a panel of the Ninth Circuit affirmed, an en banc panel of the Ninth Circuit reversed finding disparate impact and that the District Court had clearly erred in finding no discriminatory intent. The Supreme Court reversed and remanded the Ninth Circuit's decision, holding 6-3 that Arizona's voting rules did not violate Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act and that the ballot collection measure was not enacted with discriminatory intent. Justice Alito delivered the opinion of the Court joined by Chief Justice Roberts and Justices Thomas, Gorsuch, Kavanaugh, and Barrett. Justice Gorsuch filed a concurrence in which Justice Thomas joined. Justices Kagan, Breyer, and Sotomayor dissented. Featuring:-- Derek T. Muller, Professor of Law, University of Iowa College of Law

Christian History Almanac
Friday, July 9, 2021

Christian History Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021 7:11


Today on the Almanac, we remember William Jennings Bryan's famous “Cross of Gold” speech at the Democratic National Convention. #OTD #1517 #churchhistory — SHOW NOTES are available: https://www.1517.org/podcasts/the-christian-history-almanac GIVE BACK: Support the work of 1517 today CONTACT: CHA@1517.org SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher Overcast Google Play FOLLOW US: Facebook Twitter Audio production by Christopher Gillespie (gillespie.media).

The Mad Mamluks
EP 238: AXIS OF JUSTICE | ABRAR OMEISH

The Mad Mamluks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 75:51


"The at-large Fairfax County School Board member sparked a heated local debate about one of the most contentious subjects in global politics last month when she recognized Eid al-Fitr, the Muslim holiday that concludes a month of fasting, with a tweet decrying Israel's treatment of Palestinians as “apartheid and colonization.” As the board's only Muslim member and the first Muslim woman elected to a school board anywhere in Virginia, Omeish says she felt a responsibility to speak up about the escalating violence that, at that time, had killed 10 people in Israel, including two children, and 192 people in Gaza, including 58 children." - Reston News   Abrar Omeish currently serves as a School Board Member At-Large in Fairfax County, overseeing a three billion dollar budget for 1.2 million constituents right outside of Washington, DC. She is the first Libyan ever elected in US history and the first Muslim and youngest ever elected in her role, earning over 161,000 votes. Abrar co-founded an organization providing thousands of underprivileged youth with free tutoring and mentorship in 20 locations over the past ten years. After serving in several appointed capacities locally and working as a senior organizer at the DNC, Abrar served as a legal fellow at a human rights and immigration law firm in Northern Virginia and has been a spokeswoman for the #NoMuslimBanEver campaign. Abrar was most recently a Virginia Co-Chair for the Bernie Sanders campaign and a Virginia PLEO and Rules Committee member to the Democratic National Convention. She holds a double bachelors with honors from Yale University and is a current dual MPP/JD student and Blume fellow at Georgetown.   Please support us: Patreon.com/themadmamluks or via PayPal themadmamluks.com/donate    E-mail us your feedback and questions at: info@themadmamluks.com   Follow us on Twitter, Instagram & Facebook @TheMadMamluks Follow SIM on Twitter: @ImranMuneerTMM     SHOW LESS    

Pedro Diaz Jr - The Hispanic Experience
Sarah Brady Gun Control Speech at Democratic National Convention 1996

Pedro Diaz Jr - The Hispanic Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2021 13:52


Sarah Brady Gun Control Speech at Democratic National Convention 1996 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/culturalbroker/support

The Muck Podcast
Li'l Muck Episode 30: Malcolm Kenyatta

The Muck Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 37:18


Hillary and Tina interview Pennsylvania State House Rep for District 181, Malcolm Kenyatta Representative Malcolm Kenyatta currently serves as Vice-Chair of the Philadelphia Delegation and as a member of the Governor'sTaskforce on Suicide Prevention and a host of committee leadershippositions. He received a B.A. from Temple University, a M.S. from Drexel University, and completed the Harvard Kennedy School's Executives in State and Local Government program. As the first openly LGBTQ person of color and one of the youngest members elected to the PA GeneralAssembly, he is deeply committed to creating an equitable and inclusive society. As a legislator, he has championed proposals to address generational poverty, raise the minimum wage, protect workers' rights, increase access to mental healthcare, common-sense measures to address gun violence, and protect our digital infrastructure. In 2016 and in 2020, he was elected as Delegate to the Democratic Convention (PA 2nd), both times garnering the second-highest vote total of any delegate in the Commonwealth. He has also appeared on local and national media outlets to discuss systemic poverty, affordable education and childcare, and making government more accountable to citizens. He was the subject of an award-winning short documentary about his election run, ‘Going Forward' produced by Seven Knot Productions, which premiered on ‘The Atlantic Magazine Selects' in 2018. In 2020 he was chosen by Vice President Joe Biden to give the keynote address at the Democratic National Convention along with a group of other ‘Rising Stars.' He was one of twenty Electoral College votes cast for Joe Biden and Kamala Harris, in Harrisburg on December 14, 2020. He lives in North Philadelphia with his partner Dr. Matthew Miller. For show notes and links to our sources, please click here (https://themuckpodcast.fireside.fm/articles/lmep30notes). Special Guest: Malcolm Kenyatta.

Hacks on Tap with David Axelrod and Mike Murphy
Rocky Road (with Stephanie Cutter)

Hacks on Tap with David Axelrod and Mike Murphy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2021 58:51


Democratic political strategist and communications expert Stephanie Cutter joins Axe and Murphy to discuss the efforts to save the bipartisan infrastructure deal after Biden's botched rollout, the early jockeying among '24 GOP presidential hopefuls to capture the Trump base, and whether Vice President Kamala Harris has been set up for success. Plus, the Hacks discuss the triumph that was the reimagined Democratic National Convention and inauguration celebration, both of which are eligible for Emmy Awards.  

Now I've Heard Everything

55 years ago African Americans were making historic gains in civil rights. But much work was still to be done. That year, 1966, Bobby Seale and his longtime friend Huey Newton created a new organization they called the Black Panther Party. In 1968 Seal made a name for himself during anti-Vietnam War protests outside the Democratic National Convention in Chicago. It was not his first run-in with the law and it would not be his last.

The United States of Anxiety
Why We Must Vote

The United States of Anxiety

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 49:30


New York City faces a consequential election. We look at the history of our local election laws. Plus, the mastermind behind new voting restrictions nationally. Senior Reporter Arun Venugopal guest hosts and sits down with WNYC's City Hall and Politics Reporter Brigid Bergin to discuss her reporting about voter turnout across New York City, the new ranked-choice voting system and how the history of the city's political machines continue to impact the lives of New Yorkers today. Then, Ari Berman, reporter at Mother Jones and author of Give Us the Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America, joins to talk about the coordinated attack on voting rights around the country and the forces that are determined to disenfranchise. Election Day is Tuesday, June 22nd, 2021 and polls will be open from 6:00am to 9:00pm. You can find your poll site, track absentee ballots and more at vote.nyc. Companion listening for this episode: Government: A Love-Hate Story (4/12/2021) How did Americans come to think so poorly of government? And how did Joe Biden come to be the first modern president who's even tried to change our minds? “It's My Party” (8/24/2020) For our first LIVE episode we take calls and reflect on last week's Democratic National Convention by exploring what it means to be a member in a party divided. BONUS: Juneteenth, an Unfinished Business (6/26/2020) As the nation grapples with a reckoning, we pause to celebrate Juneteenth. Our holiday special, for Black liberation and the ongoing birth of the United States. “The United States of Anxiety” airs live on Sunday evenings at 6pm ET. The podcast episodes are lightly edited from our live broadcasts. To catch all the action, tune into the show on Sunday nights via the stream on WNYC.org/anxiety or tell your smart speakers to play WNYC.  We want to hear from you! Connect with us on Twitter @WNYC using the hashtag #USofAnxiety or email us at anxiety@wnyc.org.

The Chuck ToddCast: Meet the Press
Behind the scenes at Biden's inauguration & the virtual DNC: Ricky Kirschner & Stephanie Cutter

The Chuck ToddCast: Meet the Press

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 33:30


Democratic political consultant Stephanie Cutter and Emmy-winning TV producer Ricky Kirshner joined up together in the midst of the pandemic to produce “Celebrating America,” the first virtual Democratic National Convention last August … and then again for “America United,” Joe Biden's inauguration.

Activist #MMT - podcast
Snippet from Ep78: Talking Killer Mike with Katrina Pilver

Activist #MMT - podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2021 10:32


An extended snippet from part one of my interview with first-year MMT activist Katrina Pilver, where we gush about rapper Killer Mike. (It starts somewhere at around the 53 minute mark.) It includes the full audio of a speech inspired by James Baldwin, which used by the 2020 Bernie Sanders campaign in a powerful commercial. I had the privilege of briefly interviewing Killer Mike at the 2016 Democratic National Convention, when I was a state delegate for Bernie Sanders, and he was a campaign surrogate. (I documented many hours of my experience as a 2016 Bernie Sanders delegate, which you can find here.) Killer Mike resources Bernie Sanders' 2016 hour-long interview with Killer Mike in his Atlanta barbershop, in 2016. Debate with T.I., Killer Mike, and Candace Owens (see Twitter screenshot below) Killer Mike's song, Reagan.

Socially Democratic
Ep.93: The Trial of the Chicago Seven with Tess Farrell

Socially Democratic

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2021 71:33


Dunn Street founder Stephen Donnelly was joined by Socially Democratic's Pop Culture Correspondent, Tess Farrell.Tess returns to the show to review Aaron Sorkin's latest movie, The Trial of the Chicago 7, starring Sacha Baron Cohen. The 2020 Netflix special depicts the trial of anti-Vietnam War protestors charged with conspiracy and crossing state lines with the intention of inciting riots at the 1968 Democratic National Convention.Tess also shares her sage advice for surviving the latest Victorian lockdown and how to conduct research while watching historical movies. The presenting sponsor of the Socially Democratic podcast is Dunn Street. For more information on how Dunn Street can help you organise to build winning campaigns in your community, business or organisation, and make the world a better place, look us up at: dunnstreet.com.au

Bobby Owsinski's Inner Circle Podcast
Podcast #370 – German Copyright Uproar, Audio Mags Merge, And Production Manager Tim McKenna

Bobby Owsinski's Inner Circle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2021 40:40


NEWS German copyright is changing and artists hate that TikTok won't be paying Pro Sound News and Mix Magazine are merging GUEST Production manager for Boston House of Blues and the Xfinity Center Tim McKenna My guest this week again is Tim McKenna, who started his career as a stagehand/lighting tech at the legendary Paradise Rock Club in 1980 and now oversees production at the Boston House of Blues and the Xfinity Center. He has advanced well over 5000 shows in his career in venues ranging from 60 to 60,000 in capacity that include Orpheum Theater, Avalon Ballroom, Foxboro Stadium and Great Woods as well as many other venues throughout New England. Tim also produced special events for various radio stations, the Democratic National Convention and ESPN. During the interview, we spoke about learning club lighting without any direction, making the jump from lighting director to production manager, the current brain drain in the industry, predictions for the live music business after covid, and much more. On the intro I’ll take a look at the fight over German copyright laws, and more mergers in the music business. var podscribeEmbedVars = { epGuid: 'https://bobbyoinnercircle.com/?p=2850', rssUrl: 'https://bobbyoinnercircle.com/feed/podcast/', backgroundColor: 'white', font: undefined, fontColor: undefined, speakerFontColor: undefined, height: '600px', showEditButton: false, showSpeakers: true, showTimestamps: true };

The Opperman Report
Barack Obama's Promised Land: Deplorables Need Not Apply

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2021 60:01


Black Americans hoped Barack Obama would lead them to the “Promised Land,” and white Americans hoped he would reconcile the races, but by failing to understand his country or himself, Obama pulled the nation apart. In his introduction to the world at the 2004 Democratic National Convention, then state senator Barack Obama insisted, “There is not a liberal America and a conservative America—there is the United States of America. There is not a Black America and a White America and Latino America and Asian America—there's the United States of America.” But as his latest memoir, A Promised Land, makes clear, Obama inhabits a smug, elite liberal America in which conservatives are not welcome. Indeed, from Obama's perspective, their every thought, gesture, and vote is insincere and likely racist. Although the Obama memoir is obsessed with race, Obama as president and as writer has refused to address the one problem he knew to be at the heart of America's racial divide: the disintegration of the black family. While Obama and his peers have profited from the opportunities America offers, his lack of courage has doomed the black inner city to another generation of crime, drugs, and educational failure. To divert attention from his own failure, Obama has cast the right as the “other” in his ongoing melodrama—driving a wedge between black and white that will take generations to heal.

The Opperman Report'
Barack Obama's Promised Land: Deplorables Need Not Apply

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2021 60:01


Black Americans hoped Barack Obama would lead them to the “Promised Land,” and white Americans hoped he would reconcile the races, but by failing to understand his country or himself, Obama pulled the nation apart.In his introduction to the world at the 2004 Democratic National Convention, then state senator Barack Obama insisted, “There is not a liberal America and a conservative America—there is the United States of America. There is not a Black America and a White America and Latino America and Asian America—there's the United States of America.” But as his latest memoir, A Promised Land, makes clear, Obama inhabits a smug, elite liberal America in which conservatives are not welcome. Indeed, from Obama's perspective, their every thought, gesture, and vote is insincere and likely racist. Although the Obama memoir is obsessed with race, Obama as president and as writer has refused to address the one problem he knew to be at the heart of America's racial divide: the disintegration of the black family. While Obama and his peers have profited from the opportunities America offers, his lack of courage has doomed the black inner city to another generation of crime, drugs, and educational failure. To divert attention from his own failure, Obama has cast the right as the “other” in his ongoing melodrama—driving a wedge between black and white that will take generations to heal.

The Opperman Report
Barack Obama's Promised Land: Deplorables Need Not Apply

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2021 60:01


Black Americans hoped Barack Obama would lead them to the “Promised Land,” and white Americans hoped he would reconcile the races, but by failing to understand his country or himself, Obama pulled the nation apart. In his introduction to the world at the 2004 Democratic National Convention, then state senator Barack Obama insisted, “There is not a liberal America and a conservative America—there is the United States of America. There is not a Black America and a White America and Latino America and Asian America—there's the United States of America.” But as his latest memoir, A Promised Land, makes clear, Obama inhabits a smug, elite liberal America in which conservatives are not welcome. Indeed, from Obama's perspective, their every thought, gesture, and vote is insincere and likely racist. Although the Obama memoir is obsessed with race, Obama as president and as writer has refused to address the one problem he knew to be at the heart of America's racial divide: the disintegration of the black family. While Obama and his peers have profited from the opportunities America offers, his lack of courage has doomed the black inner city to another generation of crime, drugs, and educational failure. To divert attention from his own failure, Obama has cast the right as the “other” in his ongoing melodrama—driving a wedge between black and white that will take generations to heal.

Now More Than Ever
Bob Shrum Part 2

Now More Than Ever

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2021 43:48


Legendary political consultant and Director, The USC Center for The Political Future Bob Shrum keeps walking us through the history he continues to witness.  Last episode, Bob took us from meeting then-Senator John F. Kennedy as a high school student volunteer for the 1960 Democratic National Convention, on up to hiding below the stage to make sure the TelePrompTer didn't fail during Senator Ted Kennedy's concession/retrenchment-as-elder-statesman “The Dream Will Never Die” speech at the 1980 Democratic Convention. In Part Two, we talk about Ted Kennedy's loyalty and how it manifested itself in the “veterans” of his office always coming to his aid, a vast swath of Governors, Senators, Mayors and other elected officials, Bob's lowkey place in the pantheon of American gourmands, the continued need for good creative to do persuasion, and his deep and abiding love and admiration for his amazing wife Mary Louise Oates aka “Oatsie” – and her work in opening a homeless shelter in LA leads us back to that most southern thing of all: Football. It Just Means More! Dave does one of his favorite things, and invites a famous and accomplished guest to come visit him in Alabama, with the promise of a dinner at a Frank Stitt restaurant. This will continue to be a bug, until someone takes him up on it, when it will become a feature. You can learn more about Bob's work and the mission and programming of The Center for the Political Futuure via their website: https://dornsife-center-for-political-future.usc.edu/ Bob' twitter: https://twitter.com/BobShrum The Los Angeles Downtown Women's Center (for Oatsie): https://downtownwomenscenter.org/  

Desert Lady Diaries
DLD| Lorraine Salas |Ep 152

Desert Lady Diaries

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2021 35:29


Born and raised in the East Coachella Valley, Lorraine Salas has a lifetime of experience in the desert. "When most folks hear ‘Coachella’, they think of the annual music festival, but Coachella has a rich history in the United Farm Workers Union."   Lorraine is a special education teacher and like her grandmother and her father before her, she is also an environmental and social justice advocate.   Her spirit for environmentalism started while spending time on her grandmothers ranch in Coachella. Lorraine remembers finding seashells, adoring the plant life, the coyotes, which left her with a feeling of amazement that still fills her today.   Though her grandmother passed when Lorraine was only eight years old, Lorraine has heard about the work her grandmother did for the community. An initiator of one of the first Voter Leagues in the City of Coachella. grandmother was also a farm worker and a carpenter, participating in group builds, constructing homes for fellow farm workers in the East Valley. Grandmother was also involved with the United Farm Workers.   In this episode, Lorraine talks about the changing economic and demographic landscape of the East Coachella Valley with it’s new million dollar homes and ‘beach clubs’.   Lorraine’s time in the hi-desert has mostly been for her advocate and activist work, attending rallies and protests for the environment and racial justice. Lorraine enjoys going to these type of events to see what’s happening, pick up any literature and listen to the speakers. Lorraine feels the rally experiences are also educational and will sometimes change ones perspective on issues. One of her most memorable experiences has been attending meals and meetings of Food Not Bombs .   Lorraine was one of twelve delegates elected to represent the 42nd District of the California Democratic Party and was a national delegate, voting for Bernie Sanders to receive the national endorsement at the Democratic National Convention in 2016 and 2020.  

The Career Musician
Dancing With The Stars MD | Ray Chew EP. 115

The Career Musician

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2021 55:02


Music Director/Producer/Composer Ray Chew's work can be found across multiple networks in various TV offerings, both in front of the camera and behind the scenes. The sounds of the much sought-after Maestro were on full display during the inaugural season of Fox's new ratings juggernaut I Can See Your Voice – the Ken Jeong helmed musical game show that took the top spot as America's #1 new unscripted series of 2020. ABC's “Dancing with The Stars” crowned their season 29 Mirror Ball Champion with Ray Chew Live providing the soundtrack for 12 straight seasons – creating his vibrant takes on current and classic hits. Ray's mark across the TV landscape can also be found on various NBC Specials, including the 94th Annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, The Rockefeller Christmas Tree Lighting and their special supporting Broadway Cares – One Night Only: The Best of Broadway. Ray's on-stage performances at the helm of award-winning musical events with the world's most popular artists including Rihanna, Carrie Underwood, Pharrell Williams, Justin Beiber, Aretha Franklin, Lenny Kravitz, Pitbull, Queen Latifah, James Taylor, Pastor Shirley Caesar, Jennifer Hudson and Quincy Jones will live on forever thru YouTube and multiple streaming services. Ray's tenure as music director for Fox's “American Idol'; inspired some of the best talent in the competition's history and produced over 300 contestant iTunes downloads. He has also served as music director for several network television series including “It's Showtime at the Apollo” and BET's “Sunday Best”. During his tenure with the BET Network, Ray took charge of the music for their biggest annual events including “BET Honors'; “Celebration of Gospel” and the “BET Awards”. Ray's music direction is sought after for prestigious music specials and historic landmark events including the annual the 65th Primetime Emmy Awards, the Grammy Awards Premiere Ceremony, the 2008 Democratic National Convention, The President's Inaugural Neighborhood Ball and the 44th Annual NAACP Image Awards. A man of vision and purpose – Ray Chew remains steadfast in his commitment to philanthropy thru his Power 2 Inspire Foundation and fundraising efforts in partnership with the American Federation of Musicians to benefit out of work musicians affected by the Covid-19 pandemic. For more information, visit www.powertoinspire.org and www.youtube.com/raychewlive. https://www.raychew.com/ @thecareermusician @nomadsplace

Thoughts That Rock
Ep. 106: Josh Davies | Just Because You CAN, Doesn’t Mean You SHOULD

Thoughts That Rock

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2021 40:14


In this episode, we talk with JOSH DAVIES, who is a speaker, trainer, consultant and the Chief Executive Officer of The Center for Work Ethic Development.THOUGHT #1Just Because You CAN, Doesn’t Mean You SHOULD THOUGHT #2 What's Helped with Saying NO to Others is Asking Myself First if I'm Saying YES Out of Guilt or Fear. If So, Then It's a Polite NO – Neil StraussCONNECT:Website: WorkEthic.orgEmail: jdavies@workethic.orgFacebook: @WorkEthicCenterLinkedin: DaviesJTTwitter: @WorkEthicCenterTwitter: @ResultsDriverYouTube: Bring Your A Game To WorkBRAND & RESOURCE MENTIONS:"9 to 5" (Dolly Parton) - Youtube.com"Flash Gordon" (Queen) - Youtube.com"Working My Way Back to You" (The Four Seasons) - Youtube.comTraining Magazine - TrainingMag.comPresident Biden - Whitehouse.govBrevard County, FL - BrevardFL.govCHART (Council of Hotel and Restaurant Trainers) - CHART.orgAndre Agassi - Wikipedia.comJim Collins - JimCollins.comCOVID-19 - CDC.govClubhouse - JoinClubhouse.comSkype - Skype.comDaymond John - DaymondJohn.comBarbara Corcoran - BarbaraCorcoran.comTiny Habits (BJ Fogg book) - TinyHabits.comWhite House Coronoviris Task Force - Wikipedia.comDr. Deborah Birx - Wikipedia.comNIH - NIH.govCDC - CDC.govDr. Anthony Fauci - Niaid.nih.govCoding Bootcamp - CodingDojo.comPilates - VeryWellFit.comNeil Strauss - NeilStrauss.comGhost Rider/Nicholas Cage - IMDB.comFOMO = Fear of Missing OutSri Lanka - Britannica.comKearny, Nebraska - VisitKearny.orgFreedom app - Freedom.toKSafe - TheKitchenSafe.comHard Rock International – HardRock.combookstarPR - bookstarPR.comThoughts That Rock – ThoughtsThatRock.comCertified Rock Star - CertifiedRockStar.comLeadership That Rocks: Take Your Brand's Culture to Eleven and Amp Up Results (Jim Knight) - LeadershipThatRocksBook.comCulture That Rocks: How to Revolutionize Your Company’s Culture (Jim Knight) – CultureThatRocks.comBlack Sheep: Unleash the Extraordinary, Awe-Inspiring, Undiscovered You (Brant Menswar) - FindYourBlackSheep.comRock ‘n Roll With It: Overcoming the Challenge of Change (Brant Menswar) – RocknRollWithIt.comCannonball Kids’ cancer – CannonballKidscancer.orgBig Kettle Drum - BigKettleDrum.comSpectacle Photography (Show/Website Photos) – SpectaclePhoto.comJeffrey Todd “JT” Keel (Show Music) - JT KeelJOSH DAVIE'S BIO:Josh Davies is passionate about helping others make a difference in their lives, jobs, and community. Through his work as a speaker and trainer, he has engaged and encouraged professionals across North America, the Middle East, and Asia. His engaging and connecting speaking style combined with relevant content make him an in-demand speaker, giving more than 75 keynote presentations and workshops to education, workforce, and corporate events annually. For the 2008 Democratic National Convention, Josh led the training for all 10,000 volunteers and more than 4,000 local service professionals for the event. Training Magazine named him as one of the top 10 trainers under 40 in America and the Denver Business Journal tapped him as one of Denver’s 40 Under 40.Davies is currently the CEO of The Center for Work Ethic Development, an organization committed to developing workplace skills in the global workforce. Partnering with organizations in all 50 states and 6 countries, they equip trainers and teachers to build the workforce of the 21st Century. A graduate of American University, Josh has been awarded the Mile High Energy Award by Visit Denver, and an honorary Doctorate of Foodservice by the North American Food Equipment Manufacturers Association for his contributions to the industry. He finished serving his second term on the Executive Board of the Colorado Workforce Development Council, where he chaired the State Education and Training Steering Committee. He also led the P-Tech Selection Committee for Colorado and served on the board of the Colorado Opportunity Scholarship Initiative. In addition to his work in the public sector, Josh also served on the Board of Directors for the National Association of Workforce Development Professionals, was President of the Council of Hotel and Restaurant Trainers (CHART) and co-chaired the Colorado State Youth Council.

Mother's Quest Podcast
Honoring Black Mothers: A Special Mother's Day Episode with Anna Malaika Tubbs, Author of The Three Mothers

Mother's Quest Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2021 33:15


Welcome to Season Six of the Mother’s Quest Podcast and this special Mother’s Day episode, which shines a light on the untold stories and far-reaching impact of mothers and in particular Black mothers. For this episode, I had the honor of talking with Anna Malaika Tubbs, the brilliant biographer of the groundbreaking book The Three Mothers: How the Mothers of Martin Luther King, Jr, Malcolm X, and James Baldwin Shaped a Nation.In addition to being a mother to a 1 year old boy with another child on the way, Anna is an author, advocate, educator, scholar and Ph.D. candidate in Sociology at the University of Cambridge. Growing up abroad and influenced by her exposure to all kinds of cultures and beliefs, and by her own mother’s work advocating internationally for women’s and children’s rights, Anna uses an intersectional lens to advocate for women of color and to educate others. During her time as an undergraduate student at Stanford University, Anna took from what she’d seen in her parents’ work and began honing her own identity as an activist. As the First Partner of Stockton, CA, she co-authored the first-ever “Report on the Status of Women in Stockton” to guide future policy decisions with the experiences of diverse women in mind. She’s published articles featured in the Huffington Post, For Harriet, Darling Magazine and Blavity, on issues ranging from mass incarceration to the forced sterilization of Black women, as well as the importance of feminism, intersectionality, and inclusivity. Throughout all her work and writing, she draws on her personal experience and extensive research to examine and make relevant gender and race issues in the US, especially the pervasive erasure of Black women. In this incredible debut book, The Three Mothers, Anna celebrates Black motherhood by telling the story of the three women who raised and shaped some of America’s most pivotal civil rights heroes: Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and James Baldwin. Alberta King, Louise Little and Berdis Baldwin were all born at the beginning of the 20th century, all were forced to contend with the prejudices of Jim Crow as Black women, all forged their own unique paths, using their beliefs and talents to shape not only their children but those around them, and all three had to bury their children, two of them after losing their sons to gun violence. In these mothers and their stories, amidst the pain and grief, there also existed vibrancy, love and conviction. One of my biggest takeaways from my conversation with Anna is the importance of acknowledging the continued injustices that Black women endure today and that although Black women continue to experience tremendous grief, they also experience joy and they are not “a conquered victim," but are living through life as whole human beings. My Mother’s Day wish is that you will find time and space to slow down and truly listen to Anna’s insights about the mothers whose stories she so beautifully tells, that you will get and read her book The Three Mothers, and that you’ll join me in saying “yes” to Anna’s challenge. She asks that all of us advance our understanding of different forms of motherhood. Picking up books she says, especially those that focus on Black mothers and Black motherhood, can bring healing for everybody.   Much appreciation, P.S. Know someone who would love this conversation? Pay this forward to a friend who may be interested. This Episode is Dedicated by: Sybrina Fulton After the death of her beloved son, Trayvon Benjamin Martin, in February 2012, Sybrina Fulton was charged with a new mission. A desire to transform family tragedy into social change allowed her to establish the Trayvon Martin Foundation in March 2012. As Fulton traverses the globe, she passionately embarks on a journey designed to bring awareness to senseless gun violence and serves as an advocate to families, the catalyst for her dream project, the “Circle of Mothers.” Winning the national support of president-elect Hillary Clinton, Fulton rallied to the forefront in 2016 at the Democratic National Convention with a cadre of African American trailblazing women known as “Mothers of the Movement.” The women, connected by tragedy, are the inspiration behind  “Black Lives Matter.” In 2017, Fulton co-authored her first book, Rest in Power, The Enduring Life of Trayvon Martin, a memoir recounting the death of her son, and the subject of a six-part docuseries, Rest in Power: The Trayvon Martin Story, produced by hip-hop mogul Shawn “Jay-Z” Carter for Paramount Network and BET (July 2018). Bestowed with many distinguished awards, Sybrina Fulton has represented the United States at the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland, to discuss racial discrimination; the National Urban League, Black Lives Matter, Rainbow PUSH Coalition, The Triumph Awards (2016), Essence Festival & Conference (2017, 2018), and was selected as the White House’s guest of honor for the unveiling of former President Barak Obama’s initiative, “My Brother’s Keeper.” Fulton is also one of the 2018 recipients of VH1’s Trailblazer Honor Award. A Miami native and graduate of Florida Memorial University, Sybrina Fulton, along with her son, Jahvaris, are on a mission to build better, safer communities. She is a proud member of the Miami Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. and the Metropolitan Dade County Section of the National Council of Negro Women, Inc. She created the Circle of Mothers to bring together mothers who have lost children or family members to senseless gun violence for the purpose of healing, empowerment, and fellowship towards the larger aim of community building.    Connect with Sybrina: Facebook  Twitter  Instagram Trayvon Martin Foundation   Give a Mother’s Day Gift: Help mothers heal from the loss of a loved one by supporting and donating to the Circle of Mothers, Sybrina’s weekend retreat for mothers who have lost a child to gun violence. You can support the cause here. Special thanks to Jill Daniel of Happy Women Dinners for introducing us to Anna and her work!    In This Episode We Talk About: Anna's commitment to fighting the erasure of Black women's stories. What inspired Anna to focus her first book on the mothers of sons of the Civil Rights Movement. How painful moments like George Floyd's murder, and joyful moments like Stacy Abram's organizing in Georgia, had Anna editing and adding more relevance right up until the book was published. Anna’s decision to focus on MLK Jr., Malcolm X and James Baldwin as the three famous sons, and their mothers, Alberta King, Louise Little, and Berdis Baldwin whose stories she would tell. The lessons revealed in Anna's book that all mothers can learn from across the E.P.I.C. guideposts. The importance of acknowledging that Black women are "not a conquered victim" but living through life as a whole human being. Anna's challenge for all mothers listening to expand our awareness through reading and her hope that this book will be seen as a celebration of Black womanhood.   This Episode's Challenge: Anna invites us to think about what we can all read to advance our understanding of different forms of motherhood. Picking up books that focus on Black mothers and Black motherhood can bring healing for everybody. The more we are informed, the more conscious we become.  Anna’s next recommendation after finishing her book: The Power of Purpose by Alicia Garza which begins with a powerful description of the impact of Alicia’s mother on her.    Learn More More About Anna: Anna Malaika Tubbs is an Author, advocate, educator, and a Ph.D. candidate in Sociology at the University of Cambridge. Anna grew up abroad in Dubai, Mexico, Sweden, Estonia, and Azerbaijan. Influenced by her exposure to all kinds of cultures and beliefs, Anna is inspired to bring people together through the celebration of difference. Motivated by her mother’s work advocating for women’s and children’s rights around the world, Anna uses an intersectional lens to advocate for women of color and educate others. During her time as an undergraduate student at Stanford University, Anna took from what she’d seen in her parents’ work and began honing her own identity as an activist. She served as the president of Stanford’s Black Student Union when she was only a sophomore and she was also the Executive Director of Stanford’s Alternative Spring Break. In these roles, she organized rallies and events focused on the concerns of the Black community, she fundraised money for women’s clinics in the Bay Area and grew her passion for advocacy and social justice. As the First Partner of Stockton, CA, she co-authored the first-ever “Report on the Status of Women in Stockton” to help guide future policy decisions with the experiences of diverse women in mind. Anna is also a diversity, equity, and inclusion consultant who has worked with companies and individuals interested in progressing their DEI goals. Anna has published articles on issues ranging from mass incarceration to the forced sterilization of Black women, as well as the importance of feminism, intersectionality, and inclusivity. Her work has been featured in the Huffington Post, For Harriet, Darling Magazine, and Blavity. Her first book, titled The Three Mothers: How the Mothers of Martin Luther King, Jr, Malcolm X, and James Baldwin Shaped a Nation, is being published by Flatiron Books in February 2021.Grab a copy of Anna’s The Three Mothers: How the Mothers of Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and James Baldwin Shaped a Nation HERE! Follow Anna: Twitter Instagram Anna Malaika Tubbs’ Website   Additional Resources: The Purpose of Power: How We Come Together When We Fall Apart by Alicia Garza Documentary: I Am Not Your Negro. Based on the unfinished manuscript by James Baldwin  Mother’s Quest Ep 55: From Grief to Advocacy and a Circle of Mothers with Trayvon Martin’s Mother Sybrina Fulton     Announcements: It’s Mother’s Quest May! Happy Mother’s Day! I hope you’ll seize this holiday as an opportunity to say “yes” to yourself. We’ve declared it Mother’s Quest May in our community and have so many wonderful things to share with you as the month progresses:  The podcast season launch with this episode My first publication the Mother’s Quest Inspiration Guide A self-guided version of the annual Mother’s Quest Manifesto Challenge  And a live virtual “Yes Day for Moms” that I’m co-facilitating with the amazing Graeme Seabrook.  Join the free Facebook Group and sign up for email updates at www.mothersquest.com to learn all the details and come along with us during this special month.     Acknowledgments: A big THANK YOU to our “patrons” for helping to bring these conversations to myself and other mothers through financial and/or in-kind support: Amanda Kruger Hill Graeme Seabrook Anne Armstrong Herve Clermont Samantha Arsenault Vickie Giambra Casey O'Roarty of Joyful Courage Kathie Moehlig or TransFamily Support Services Anne Ferguson of MamaFuel On the Move and etsuko Kubo Kate Amoo-Gottfried Nicole Lee Olivia Parr-Rud "Vince" of the While Black Podcast Sara Brannin-Mooser Lindsay Pera Julie Castro Abrams Alexia Vernon Brooke Markevicius Democracy Clothing Michael Skolnik Helgi Maki Kari Azuma Tamara Sobomehin Katie Krimitsos Carrie Caulfield Arick Rachel Rosen Chandra Brooks Jen Simon Monisha Vasa Celia Ward-Wallace Vanessa Couto Desiree Adaway Rachel Steinman Katie Hanus Denise Barreto Sage B. Hobbs Samantha Nolan-Smith Jody Smith Emily Cretella Collette Flanagan Titilayo Tinubu Ali Carly Magnus Hurt Lizzy Russinko Suzanne Brown Mara Berns Langer Mallory Schlabach Katharine Earhart Jessica Kupferman Jen Jenkins Dohner Genese Harris Tonya Rineer Liane Louie-Badua Cristin Downs Erin Kendall Niko Osoteo Erik Newton Claire Fry Divya Silbermann Rachel Winter Caren and Debbie Lieberman Cameron Miranda Fran and David Lieberman Debbie and Alan Goore The Sustainable Living Podcast Samantha Arsenault Attica Locke   Support the Podcast If you’d like to make a contribution to Mother’s Quest to support Season Four of the Podcast and/or help provide coaching scholarships for mothers, follow this link to make a contribution. If you would like to “dedicate” an upcoming episode to a special mother in your life, email me at julie@mothersquest.com   Mother's Quest is a podcast for moms who are ready to live a truly E.P.I.C. life. Join in for intimate conversations with a diverse group of inspiring mothers as they share how they are living an E.P.I.C. life, Engaging mindfully with their children (E), Passionately and Purposefully making a difference beyond their family (P), Investing in themselves (I), and Connecting to a strong support network (C). Join our community of mothers to light the way and sustain you on your quest at https://www.facebook.com/groups/mothersquest/

Keen On Democracy
Seth Goldenberg on the Philosophy of Asking Deeper Questions in Order to Grow

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2021 30:18


In this episode of "Keen On", Andrew is joined by Seth Goldenberg, the author of "Radical Curiosity: Questioning Commonly Held Beliefs to Imagine Better Futures", to discuss why questioning the status quo is a necessary precondition for progress. Seth Goldenberg is an entrepreneur and thought-leader working at the intersection of design, business, and culture. Since founding Epic Decade, Goldenberg has led a series of high-profile projects to help organizations build their capacity for ambitious change. He was previously co-CEO of the research insights group Now What, interim chief marketing officer of the state of Rhode Island, chief marketing officer of Intarcia Therapeutics, VP of Bruce Mau Design Studio, executive director of Massive Change, where he led major client engagements such as Oprah Winfrey Network, Disney Imagineering, and Myspace, and founder and curator of the civic engagement program for the 2008 Democratic National Convention, “Dialog:City.” His work has been featured in the New York Times, Wired, Fast Company, and HuffPo. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Curious City
Art, Protest And The Trial Of The Chicago 8

Curious City

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2021 23:27


In 1969, Chicago was home to one of history’s most high-profile trials. Known as the Trial of the Chicago 8 — and sometimes the Trial of the Chicago 7 — the trial pitted anti-war protesters against the federal government. Eight men were accused of conspiring to incite a riot during protests that took place in Chicago during the Democratic National Convention of 1968. Outside the courtroom, protesters and onlookers gathered. Some chanted to free the men. Some came with signs and posters of protest and solidarity. In this episode, reporter Arionne Nettles explores the intersection of art and protest movements as she tries to track down the artist behind one of these posters.

You Booked It - How to create a successful entertainment career!
Chloe Arnold - EMMY Nominated Choreographer | Creator of SYNCOPATED LADIES

You Booked It - How to create a successful entertainment career!

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2021 37:22


Chloe Arnold is an  Emmy Nominated Choreographer and founder of Syncopated Ladies. Chloe was discovered at a young age in Washington, DC by Debbie Allen, and her choreography has been featured on hit television shows such as So You Think You Can Dance, Good Morning America, The Ellen Show, The Talk, and over 30 episodes of The Late Late Show With James Corden.With Chloe paving the way and carving out Syncopated Ladies' own place in the industry, they have garnished over 50 million views online, receiving praise from Beyonce, Whoopi Goldberg on The View, as well as many other celebrities and news outlets around the world. Some of their credits include The Ellen Show, Good Morning America, So You Think You Can Dance, Global Citizen Week, New York Fashion Week, Essence Fest, Imagine Justice (featuring Common, J Cole, and Andra Day), Glamour Women of the Year Awards, Billie Jean King Leadership Initiative at the US Open, CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund, The Women in the World Summit, Democratic National Convention, Beyonce's Ivy Park Launch, and many more.   @chloearnoldtaps https://www.chloearnold.com @syncladies   THE YOU BOOKED IT COMMUNITY Join 120+ members from Broadway, Grammy's, Emmy's and more! Unlimited LIVE Masterclasses | Develop Industry Relationships | Create a Successful Career

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk
415: Suneel Gupta - How To Get People To Take A Chance On You

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2021 64:33


Text LEARNERS to 44222 for more... Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12  https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12 Suneel Gupta is on faculty at Harvard University. He's the author of Backable - The Surprising Truth Behind What Makes People Take A Chance On You Notes: Let’s start with the obvious -- when lots of people are applying for the same spot, you have to find a way to stand out. You can’t just check a box, you have to leave an impression.  (But backable people “go beyond Google” and dig for insights that other people interviewing for the job may not find. They talk to customers, they attend shareholder meetings, they test-drive the product. (But backable people “go beyond Google” and dig for insights that other people interviewing for the job may not find. They talk to customers, they attend shareholder meetings, they test-drive the product. ) Suneel comes from a family of highly backable people—including his mother, Damyanti Hingorani, the first woman engineer for Ford Motor Company, and his brother Sanjay Gupta, chief medical correspondent for CNN. Reid Hoffman recruited Suneel to Mozilla... Name someone early in your life who backed you. Call them and say 'thank you.' Hire "high ceiling" leaders: Suneel was a speechwriter in 2004. He was backstage at the Democratic National Convention. There was a State Senator from Illinois. Suneel watched him speak from behind the curtain. "He created an electric wave of energy when he spoke." It was President Barack Obama. After that, Suneel became obsessed with following the work of the State Senator. He studied President Obama's history and learned that he went from a dry speaker to inspiring through preparation and practice. He worked on his skill to communicate and got better. The "It" quality -- People get a job because others want to take a chance on them. They're backable. Specifics to make this happen: Play exhibition matches -- Prepare, practice, rehearse They develop a level of mastery so that they don't have to think when it's time to perform. Their preparation allows them to flow Ella Fitzgerald performed in Berlin... She forgot the lyrics and improvised the words for the next half of the song. She rehearsed a lot. That allowed her to perform even when she forgot the words. Confidence comes from believing something will go wrong and that you've practiced enough to be able to handle it. "Build your recovery muscle." Surround yourself with great people - Early adopters need to feel part of the build.  Steer Into Objections. Anticipate three key objections to your idea. When pitching, don’t avoid those objections; steer into them. Don’t Pitch Prematurely. Instead of sharing an idea before it’s ready, nurture it until you’re ready. It’s not charisma that convinces people, it’s conviction. Don’t Overshare. Share what it could be, not how it has to be. Share just enough to get the essence of your idea across, then open up the conversation. Build Your Backable Circle. Don’t rely on just one person to help you with your pitch. Surround yourself with a trusted group of people who bring different perspectives. Humans are not risk takers - We do whatever we can to avoid a loss. You need to neutralize that fear. "Don't just talk about why it's new, but why it's inevitable." "Backable people convince themselves first. It's not charisma that convinces people, it's conviction." "Most new ideas are killed inside hallways. We share too early. Before they're ready. Nurture your ideas behind the scenes. They need an incubation time. Write it out. Draw..." Quiet time is so important to hone ideas. It's critical to the creative process "Ken Robinson was not that charismatic, but you believed everything he was saying." He believed it first. He had conviction. Storytelling - "You need to cast a central character." "Re-write the book for on person as the reader... 'I'm writing this book for my daughter to read.'" "Don't talk about the market, talk about one person." Life advice: "Figure out what makes you come alive. I left Groupon and created a list of ideas."

The Successful Screenwriter with Geoffrey D Calhoun: Screenwriting Podcast
Ep44 - The Trial of the Chicago 7 - Film Analysis with Geoffrey D. Calhoun and Kristy Leigh Lussier

The Successful Screenwriter with Geoffrey D Calhoun: Screenwriting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2021 23:54


Logline: The story of 7 people on trial stemming from various charges surrounding the uprising at the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, Illinois.Available on Netflix.Geoffrey D. Calhoun and Story Analyst Kristy Leigh Lussier discuss this historical courtroom drama.Enter your screenplay for a chance to win a contract with a Hollywood Talent Manager at https://www.scriptsummit.com/Visit https://www.thesuccessfulscreenwriter.com/ for everything and anything screenwriting!

Battleground with David Plouffe & Steve Schmidt
"No One Should Have That Much Money" with Rev. James Martin, SJ

Battleground with David Plouffe & Steve Schmidt

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2021 38:35


Although he is far too humble to admit it, the Rev. James Martin, SJ, is a beacon of moral clarity. He is the editor-at-large of "America" magazine, where he recently published the article "How Catholic Leaders Helped Give Rise to Violence at the U.S. Capitol," a consultor to the Vatican’s Dicastery for Communication, and a best-selling author. His latest book, published this month, is "Learning to Pray: A Guide for Everyone." Father Martin is also known for delivering the closing benediction at the Democratic National Convention last year and for maintaining a strong and unflinching presence on Twitter. David and Steve talk to Father Martin about the role religion played in the insurrection at the Capitol, the spell Donald Trump seems to have cast over some religious leaders, how to think about forgiveness in context of the insurrection, and the current state of American capitalism. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Battleground with David Plouffe & Steve Schmidt
"No One Should Have That Much Money" with Rev. James Martin, SJ

Battleground with David Plouffe & Steve Schmidt

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2021 33:05


Although he is far too humble to admit it, the Rev. James Martin, SJ, is a beacon of moral clarity. He is the editor-at-large of "America" magazine, where he recently published the article "How Catholic Leaders Helped Give Rise to Violence at the U.S. Capitol," a consultor to the Vatican's Dicastery for Communication, and a best-selling author. His latest book, published this month, is "Learning to Pray: A Guide for Everyone."Father Martin is also known for delivering the closing benediction at the Democratic National Convention last year and for maintaining a strong and unflinching presence on Twitter. David and Steve talk to Father Martin about the role religion played in the insurrection at the Capitol, the spell Donald Trump seems to have cast over some religious leaders, how to think about forgiveness in context of the insurrection, and the current state of American capitalism. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders
Presenting 'Fresh Air': Aaron Sorkin on 'The Trial of the Chicago 7'

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2020 38:43


Sam sits in the Fresh Air host chair to talk with writer and director Aaron Sorkin. His latest film The Trial of the Chicago 7 covers the events at the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago when several prominent anti-war activists were accused of conspiring to start a riot.Wanna show your love for 'It's Been a Minute'? Support your local NPR station: donate.npr.org/sam

Fresh Air
Best Of: President Obama / The Chicago 7

Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2020 50:22


President Barack Obama talks about birtherism and fake news, and reflects on what he misses most about being president — and why he still has faith in democracy. The first volume of his memoir about his presidency is 'A Promised Land.'Also, Justin Chang reviews 'Small Axe,' a series of five films by Steve McQueen. The Chicago 7 were anti-war activists who were charged with conspiracy to incite a riot at the 1968 Democratic National Convention. The trial is the subject of a new movie written and directed by Aaron Sorkin. We talk with author Jon Wiener about his book, 'Conspiracy in the Streets.'