Podcasts about Gremlins

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1984 comedy horror film directed by Joe Dante

  • 2,980PODCASTS
  • 3,988EPISODES
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  • Dec 2, 2021LATEST
Gremlins

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Best podcasts about Gremlins

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Latest podcast episodes about Gremlins

The Pod and the Pendulum
GREMLINS (Part 2 of 2)

The Pod and the Pendulum

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 78:35


We're back this week to wrap up our discussion of Joe Dante's GREMLINS. As we get deeper into the movie we talk how it nails seasonal depression and just how hard the holidays can be for some people. We also talk some of the complicated racial stereotypes that are played for laughs in this movie, how Randall Peltzer embodies the mediocre white dude, and the unbridled chaotic energy of the bar  and Snow White scenes. Brian Keiper of Movies for Life and Stephen Foxworthy of the Disenfranchised pod are back as guests. 

Better Movie Club
#44 Gremlins (1984)

Better Movie Club

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 70:36


It's cold outside! The Better Movie Club watch Gremlins (1984) this week and honestly have way too many questions about the gremlin reproductive cycle. Plus: What happens if they eat a Stouffer's lasagna? Find out now!  Join us on Discord and follow the show on social media: Facebook | Twitter | Instagram Find us on your favorite platforms at www.bettermovieclub.com!

JoJo's Bizarre Podcast
Ep. 256 - Hard Done (Ranma 1/2, Eps. 1-3)

JoJo's Bizarre Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 87:31


[Ranma 1/2 talk starts at 35:24] One more blast to the past before getting back into JoJo: we watched Ranma 1/2 for the pod this week. We also talk about gender switcharoo movies, tsundere characters, True Detective Season 2, Tom & Jerry, Gremlins, and old dance music.Rate us nicely on Apple Podcasts Support us on Patreon Follow us on Twitter --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jjbpod/message

The Librocube
593 - Eight Legged Freaks is Gremlins with Spiders

The Librocube

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 44:20


Hello! Ringing someone's doorbell and running away was the original 'DoorDash.' Episode #593 Segmented Thusly:    Movie Monologue = The Grand Seduction, The Dungeonmaster, Halloween Kills and Eight Legged Freaks.   Television Talk = Lower Decks (Season 2, Episodes 6-10)     Book Banter = Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien   Game Gabbin' = Skyrim: The Librarian (An RP Longplay)

Under The Puppet
66 - Greg Ballora (Spider-Man 2, Ratched, Team America) - Under The Puppet

Under The Puppet

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 67:51


http://www.UnderThePuppet.com - Greg Ballora is a puppeteer and builder who has had an incredible career in the business starting out working on projects such as Timmy the Tooth, Muppets Tonight, and Spider-Man 2 through to today working on shows like Earth to Ned and Ratched.  Greg has also trained new puppeteers at the Disney Parks so there is a lot of great puppetry advice in the discussion ahead. Also, this month you can win a Monkey Boys Productions FLICK Beginner Puppet Building Kit!  Listen to find out how to enter. Transcript of this interview is available to the Saturday Morning Media Patreon Patrons! CONNECT WITH GREG BALLORA: Instagram - https://instagram.com/gregballora DISCUSSED ON THE SHOW: Magpie Time - https://vimeo.com/2050758 Bob Hartman - http://hartmanpuppetry.com  Lisa Sturz - https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0836456/ Len Levitt - https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0506229/ Marty Krofft - https://saturdaymorningmedia.com/2020/01/utp-36/ DC Follies - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D.C._Follies Jim Gamble - http://www.jimgamble.com Gremlins 2 - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gremlins_2:_The_New_Batch Robocop 2 - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RoboCop_2 Batman Returns - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Batman_Returns Men in Black II - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Men_in_Black_II Spider-Man 2 - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spider-Man_2 Timmy the Tooth - https://youtu.be/bi6eA-W_C4Y Phil Baron - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phil_Baron Allan Trautman - https://saturdaymorningmedia.com/2017/09/utp-007/ Michael Earl - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Earl_(puppeteer) Bruce Lanoil - https://saturdaymorningmedia.com/2017/12/utp-010/ James Murray - https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0615015/ Alef Bet Blastoff - https://youtu.be/dcrE7sx25jI Muppets Tonight - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muppets_Tonight Kevin Clash - https://saturdaymorningmedia.com/2020/10/utp-52/ Brian Henson - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brian_Henson The Mr. Potato Head - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mr._Potato_Head_Show Kevin Carlson - https://saturdaymorningmedia.com/2017/11/utp-009/ Michelle Zamora - https://saturdaymorningmedia.com/2021/06/utp-60/ Team America: World Police - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Team_America:_World_Police Bill Baird - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bil_Baird Peter Baird - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Baird Thom Fountain - https://saturdaymorningmedia.com/2017/07/utp-005/ Chiodo Brothers - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Chiodo_Brothers Tim Lagasse - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tim_Lagasse Crash & Bernstein - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crash_&_Bernstein Christine Papalexis - https://saturdaymorningmedia.com/2018/05/utp-16/ Ratched - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ratched_(TV_series) Ratched Clip (trigger warning) - https://youtu.be/IgTvmeSdShg Earth to Ned - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth_to_Ned Donna Kimball - https://saturdaymorningmedia.com/2017/06/utp-004/ Raymond Carr - https://saturdaymorningmedia.com/2020/02/utp-37/ Mr. World Commercial - https://youtu.be/22Vkdfxwfco CLIPS HEARD ON THIS EPISODE: Spider-Man 2 - https://youtu.be/P6mkjW5rAmU Mr. Potato Head Show - https://youtu.be/JbrEsZGwIGw CONNECT WITH THE SHOW http://www.instagram.com/underthepuppet http://www.twitter.com/underthepuppet CONNECT WITH GRANT http://www.MrGrant.comhttp://www.twitter.com/toasterboy https://instagram.com/throwingtoasters/ Art by Parker Jacobs Music by Dan Ring Edited by Stephen Staver Help us make more shows like this one.  Become a patron of Saturday Morning Media and get cool rewards!  Visit www.patreon.com/saturdaymorningmedia for info! ©2021 Saturday Morning Media - http://www.saturdaymorningmedia.com

Scary Time
Haunted Mexico Mexico's Haunted Hot Spots by Hidden In The Shadows

Scary Time

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 59:32


In this episode of Hidden In The Shadows, we explore Mexico's most unique haunted hot spots and strange encounter stories. Follow Hidden In The Shadows on Apple - https://apple.co/3jOb0QKFollow on Spotify - https://spoti.fi/3fCwNaFFollow everywhere else - https://bit.ly/34L3VJRMexico has a lot of rich history and the fact their history stems back all the way to the Aztec's creates some impressive paranormal activity.Explore with Megan and Isaac, Mexico's story of La Pascualita. A mannequin rumored and debated to either be a very uniquely created mannequin or the embalmed daughter of the shop owner. Or the house of tubes where unfortunately the daughter of a wealthy couple died and her ghost still haunts the property today. Have you heard of Gremlin bells? Yes, we talk about those too and a very intense encounter story from a biker vacationing in Mexico! This episode definitely has some unique stories as well as some theories as to why Mexico holds so much paranormal activity.Follow on Social MediaInstagram: @hiddenintheshadowspodcastTik Tok: @hiddeninthepodca2Twitter: @hiddeninthesha6~~~~~~~~~~~Indie Drop-InAll content legally licensed from the original creator. Thank you to Hidden In The Shadows for the great episode. You can find Indie Drop-In at https://indiedropin.comHelp Indie Drop-In support indie creators by buying us a coffee!https://buymeacoffee.com/indiedropinBrands can advertise on Indie Drop-In using Patreonhttps://patreon.com/indiedropin Twitter: https://twitter.com/indiedropinInstagram: https://instagram.com/indiedropinFacebook: https://facebook.com/indiedropinAny advertising found in this episode is inserted by Indie Drop-In and not endorsed by the Creator.If you would like to have your show featured go to http://indiedropin.com/creators~~~~~~~~~~~

The Pod and the Pendulum
GREMLINS (Part 1 of 2)

The Pod and the Pendulum

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 77:50


This movie is so massive we had to break our talk about it into two shows. Mike is joined by longtime friends of the pod Brian Keiper (Movies for Life podcast, Dread Central) and Stephen Foxworthy (Disenfranchised podcast) to talk about the 1984 horror comedy classic that thrilled and scarred children for life. We're talking Gremlins.   For the first part of our discussion, we talk about how this movie got made, where 1984 ranks in terms of best years ever for a movie and why the children's movies from this era still resonate nearly four decades later.  We break down whether Joe Dante is Martin Scorsese for the B-movie crowd and how Spielberg lent his magic touch to this one. We discuss the rules around the Mogwai and why that kitchen scene still scares the bejesus out of us today.

WORKIN FOR THAT SNOW
THE MAIN CHARACTER

WORKIN FOR THAT SNOW

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 50:05


No guests on this episode Our three hosts beam in from NYC, Wydaho, and Colorado. Grandma, Pizza, and Yuri talk: technology fails & rude grandma,puking main character vibes, workin with NFTs - they rad and we bout it,totally immersive art - Meow Wolf & Gremlin Gulch, Trap night at the Trap bar?adaptive skiing at Loveland, Tetraski using joy sticks & sit and puff devices,NYC traffic vs 1-70 traffic,the ribbon of death,house sitting,dog influencers, shetland ponies & wolves,& an artist call for our POD.Recorded 11.22.21WorkinForThatSnowalso thank you Dan the man at the Williamsburg Apple store in Brooklyn

PVD Horror
I Need You Dead interview with Rocko Zevenbergen and Estevan Muñoz

PVD Horror

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 76:18


On this episode we had the opportunity to get a sneak peak of the new film I Need You Dead and discuss with writer, director, actor Rocko Zevenbergen and the star of the film, Estevan Munoz. Aside from the film, we also had the chance to discuss Rocko's short films and music videos on Bad Taste Video and Estevan's rap project. We hope you enjoy this interview as it truly highlights true indie filmmaking!You can get all the Bad Taste info here...https://www.badtastevideo.net/Be sure to follow us on social media at...YouTubehttps://m.youtube.com/channel/UCOyloOb0puVCXDjJ_ZiPYqgInstagramhttps://www.instagram.com/pvdhorrorFacebookhttps://www.facebook.com/pvdhorror/Twitterhttps://twitter.com/PvdHorrorTik Tokhttps://vm.tiktok.com/ZMJBeoamE/Tumblrhttps://pvdhorror.tumblr.com/Intro Music courtesy of DJ Cryptkicker     IG: @djcryptkickerOutro Music Fortune Teller by Chaz Matador (a.k.a Estevan Munoz) 

The Film Flamers: A Horror Movie Podcast
The Exorcist III (1990)

The Film Flamers: A Horror Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 54:47


After recovering from last week's dive into Exorcist II, we're ending the month with the oft-misunderstood Exorcist III from 1990, written and directed by William Peter Blatty, the original author of The Exorcist. You don't want to miss this one, listeners, because there's some definite moments of horror zen in this grey sea of monologues. The film stars George C. Scott, Brad Dourif, Ed Flanders, Jason Miller, and Nicol Williamson. If you have anything to add to the discussion, please don't hesitate to do so by reaching out to us on social media @TheFilmFlamers, or call our hotline and leave us a message at 972-666-7733!             Watch The Exorcist III: https://amzn.to/3nAdq7O        Out this Month: Week 1: Shooting the Flames: November 2021 Week 2: The Exorcist Week 3: Exorcist II: The Heretic Week 4: The Exorcist III Week 5: Break!     Coming in December 2021: Gremlins: https://amzn.to/31cFsNX  Gremlins 2: https://amzn.to/31kwQ8b       Get in Touch:  Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/TheFilmFlamers  Visit our Store: https://teespring.com/stores/thefilmflamers Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheFilmFlamers/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheFilmFlamers NEW! Letterboxd: https://letterboxd.com/thefilmflamers/ Our Website: https://www.filmflamers.com  Call our Hotline: 972-666-7733     Our Patrons: Alvin BattleBurrito Benjamin Gonzalez Bennet Hunter Brandon Anderson Dan Alvarez Daveruff87 Dr. Joe DW Erica Huff GWilliamNYC Kimberly McGuirk-Klinetobe Kyle Kavanagh Lisa Libby Matthew McHenry Nicole McDaniel Nikki (phillyenginerd) Orion Yannotti Penelope Perfecta Erecta Poodie Castle Robert B. The Unknown Patron    Sweet dreams...      "Welcome to Horrorland" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ "Orange" - Topher Mohr and Alex Elena: https://youtu.be/Vh-FWjjtcTM 

Double Impact
Gremlins 2: The New Batch (Joe Dante, 1990)

Double Impact

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 71:45


145 - We have been wanting to do this one for a while - the only thing holding us back, was that there is no more Gremlins after this... for now at least. It's the sequel that dials the absurdity up to 11 and gets more Meta than Zuckerberg - but does it hold up today, or is it best left in the past? Tune in and find out!

Nightmares and Cold Ones
Episode 40: Never Feed Them After Midnight (Part 2)

Nightmares and Cold Ones

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 42:25


John and Jim finish their marathon discussion on Gremlins.

Nightmares and Cold Ones
Episode 40: Never Feed Them After Midnight (Part 1)

Nightmares and Cold Ones

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 70:08


John and Jim discuss Joe Dante's awesome Christmas-horror flick, Gremlins. The two get get a little nostalgic about Christmas, and their earliest impressions of this comedy horror mashup. John works on his impressions of Gremlins while Jim recounts the best Christmas gift he ever received. Sit back, crack a cold one and enjoy.

Plane Talking UK's Podcast
Episode 391 - One heck of a 'States'

Plane Talking UK's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 104:34


Join Carlos, Nev and Armando for this week's programme. In this week's show, British Airways and Virgin Atlantic perform a double take off to JFK for the double jabbed, some new information regarding the missing MH370 aircraft and American Airlines has new regional jets that have rows of seats missing. In the military, the UK's Royal Air Force expands its fleet of T-6 Texans and King Air Intelligence aircraft, Gremlins are recovered and a German Hercules takes its maiden flight. Don't forget you can get in touch with us all at : WhatsApp +44 757 22 491 66 Email podcast@planetalkinguk.com or comment in our chatroom on YouTube.

Dork Dad Podcast
Now Watch This - Gremlins

Dork Dad Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 175:21


As we transition from Halloween to the Holiday season what better movie is there to watch than Gremlins. Its Christmas time and you need a gift for your kid, so why not get him a creature that you can not take care of and kill half the town! so watch along and enjoy this classic with us.

Attention Deficit Order
S22E12 Beta Rocky vs Gremlins

Attention Deficit Order

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 108:55


#BrassAgainstPissing #HaloLegend #PhoenixPoint #ShangChi #Gremlins #RockyIVRockyvsDrago #BetaTest

The Film Flamers: A Horror Movie Podcast
Exorcist II: The Heretic (1977)

The Film Flamers: A Horror Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 28:12


We're following up last week's deep dive into one of the best horror films ever made, The Exorcist, with one of the worst: Exorcist 2: The Heretic, a 1977 American Horror film directed by John Boorman. It stars Linda Blair, Richard Burton, Max Von Sydow and James Earl Jones. If you have anything to add to the discussion, please don't hesitate to do so by reaching out to us on social media @TheFilmFlamers, or call our hotline and leave us a message at 972-666-7733!             Watch The Exorcist II: https://amzn.to/31PcjZy       Out this Month: Week 1: Shooting the Flames: November 2021 Week 2: The Exorcist Week 3: Exorcist II: The Heretic Week 4: The Exorcist III Week 5: Break!     Coming in December 2021: Gremlins: https://amzn.to/31cFsNX  Gremlins 2: https://amzn.to/31kwQ8b       Get in Touch:  Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/TheFilmFlamers  Visit our Store: https://teespring.com/stores/thefilmflamers Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheFilmFlamers/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheFilmFlamers NEW! Letterboxd: https://letterboxd.com/thefilmflamers/ Our Website: https://www.filmflamers.com  Call our Hotline: 972-666-7733     Our Patrons: Alvin BattleBurrito Benjamin Gonzalez Bennet Hunter Brandon Anderson Dan Alvarez Daveruff87 Dr. Joe DW Erica Huff GWilliamNYC Kimberly McGuirk-Klinetobe Kyle Kavanagh Lisa Libby Matthew McHenry Nicole McDaniel Nikki (phillyenginerd) Orion Yannotti Penelope Perfecta Erecta Poodie Castle Robert B. The Unknown Patron    Sweet dreams...      "Welcome to Horrorland" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ "Orange" - Topher Mohr and Alex Elena: https://youtu.be/Vh-FWjjtcTM 

The UAV Digest
386 Fuel Cell Hydrogen

The UAV Digest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 25:53


Where to get Hydrogen for fuel cells, Boeing loyal wingman milestone, new drone rules for Oregon, Gremlins snatched in mid-air, drone attack on the U.S. power grid, and Black Friday drone deals.

Paranormal UK Radio Network
High Strangeness Factor - Donna Fink and Bray Road

Paranormal UK Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 96:00


Steve is joined by Andy and Brandi to talk with Donna fink about her experiences investigating the paranormal. In her adventures, she has run across Dogmen, Bigfoot, UFOs, orbs, Gremlins and even a Wereboy. Having interviewed and talked with many eyewitnesses of cryptids & UFOs, she knows to expect the unexpected.

Too Opinionated
Too Opinionated Interview #207: Robert Picardo

Too Opinionated

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 41:46


Today on Too Opinionated, the great Robert Picardo swings in to share some stories and Apple Pie! Actor Robert Picardo is known for his work as the Doctor on Star Trek Voyager. He is also known for roles in Stargate SG1, Atlantis, Universe, The Wonder Years, The Howling, China Beach, Small Soldiers, Star Trek First Contact, Gremlins 2, The Burbs, Innerspace, Legend, Back to School, and Star Trek Deep Space Nine. He can be seen currently on Dickenson on Apple TV.  Want to watch: YouTube Meisterkhan Pod

Jon & Chantel
2nd Date Update- Teeth Like a Gremlin

Jon & Chantel

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 9:22


Alex made a very specific cosmetic choice that may not be for everyone.

The Film Flamers: A Horror Movie Podcast

This month we're finally covering one of the most famous (and infamous) horror movies of all time, The Exorcist, directed by William Friedkin and written for the screen by William Peter Blatty based on his 1971 novel of the same name.  It is the first installment in The Exorcist franchise, and the story follows the demonic possession of a 12-year old girl and her mother's attempts to rescue her through an exorcism conducted by two Catholic priests. The film stars Ellen Burnstyn, Max Von Sydow, Lee J. Cobb, Kitty Winn, Jason Miller, and the unforgettable Linda Blair.   If you have anything to add to the discussion, please don't hesitate to do so by reaching out to us on social media @TheFilmFlamers, or call our hotline and leave us a message at 972-666-7733!             Watch The Exorcist: https://amzn.to/3CQ7k8C       Out this Month: Week 1: Shooting the Flames: November 2021 Week 2: The Exorcist Week 3: Exorcist II: The Heretic Week 4: The Exorcist III Week 5: Break!     Coming in December 2021: Gremlins: https://amzn.to/31cFsNX  Gremlins 2: https://amzn.to/31kwQ8b       Get in Touch:  Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/TheFilmFlamers  Visit our Store: https://teespring.com/stores/thefilmflamers Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheFilmFlamers/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheFilmFlamers NEW! Letterboxd: https://letterboxd.com/thefilmflamers/ Our Website: https://www.filmflamers.com  Call our Hotline: 972-666-7733     Our Patrons: Alvin BattleBurrito Benjamin Gonzalez Bennet Hunter Brandon Anderson Dan Alvarez Daveruff87 Dr. Joe DW Erica Huff GWilliamNYC Kimberly McGuirk-Klinetobe Kyle Kavanagh Lisa Libby Matthew McHenry Nicole McDaniel Nikki (phillyenginerd) Orion Yannotti Penelope Perfecta Erecta Poodie Castle Robert B. The Unknown Patron    Sweet dreams...      "Welcome to Horrorland" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ "Orange" - Topher Mohr and Alex Elena: https://youtu.be/Vh-FWjjtcTM 

Pop Culture & Movie News - Let Your Geek SideShow
The Flash Season 8 Poster, Gremlins 3 Update - November 6, 2021

Pop Culture & Movie News - Let Your Geek SideShow

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 1:16


The Flash Season 8 Poster, Gremlins 3 Update, Planet of the Dead Update, Hawkeye Promo. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

CarneCruda.es PROGRAMAS
Joe Dante, director de Gremlins (CARNE CRUDA #953)

CarneCruda.es PROGRAMAS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 87:12


Carne Cruda desde Curtas, el festival de cine fantástico de Vilagarcía de Arousa, con Joe Dante, Killer Barbies y dibujantes españoles de Marvel y DC Más información sobre este programa aquí: https://bit.ly/CarneCrudaCurtas Hazte productor aquí: http://www.carnecruda.es/hazte_productor/

Mystic Access Podcast: Where the Magic is in Learning

Show Notes coming soon.

The Film Flamers: A Horror Movie Podcast
Shooting The Flames Nov ‘21: On Black Friday, No One Can Hear You Scream

The Film Flamers: A Horror Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 36:27


As we mourn the passing of spooky season, we're resetting the Halloween countdown clock by bringing you November's Shooting the Flames episode, filled to the brim with your questions and comments, along with a huge amount of new trailers! If you have anything to add to the discussion, please don't hesitate to do so by reaching out to us on social media @TheFilmFlamers, or call our hotline and leave us a message at 972-666-7733!            News None!            Trailers Wheel of Time (Amazon, 11/2021): https://youtu.be/11ZozKfRqvA  Cowboy Bebop (Netflix, 11/2021): https://youtu.be/zrnz7T0KaLM  Black Friday (Theaters/VOD, 11/2021): https://youtu.be/cNHSmKYF7VA  The Witcher Season 2 (Netflix, 12/2021): https://youtu.be/TJFVV2L8GKs Scream (Theaters, 1/2022): https://youtu.be/dCZHMlnqU5Q  The Black Phone w/ Ethan Hawke (Theaters, 2/2022): https://youtu.be/3eGP6im8AZA  Unwelcome (Theaters, 2022): https://youtu.be/vQCAgCKQ5WY  Jeepers Creepers: Reborn (?, 2022): https://youtu.be/H4GeBn6043k        Out this Month: Week 1: Shooting the Flames: November 2021 Week 2: The Exorcist Week 3: Exorcist II: The Heretic Week 4: The Exorcist III Week 5: Break!     Coming in December 2021: Gremlins: https://amzn.to/31cFsNX  Gremlins 2: https://amzn.to/31kwQ8b       Get in Touch:  Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/TheFilmFlamers  Visit our Store: https://teespring.com/stores/thefilmflamers Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheFilmFlamers/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheFilmFlamers NEW! Letterboxd: https://letterboxd.com/thefilmflamers/ Our Website: https://www.filmflamers.com  Call our Hotline: 972-666-7733     Our Patrons: Alvin BattleBurrito Benjamin Gonzalez Bennet Hunter Brandon Anderson Charlotte Allen Dan Alvarez Daveruff87 Dr. Joe DW Erica Huff George Kimberly McGuirk-Klinetobe Kyle Kavanagh Lisa Libby Matthew McHenry Nicole McDaniel Nikki (phillyenginerd) Nina Yanez Orion Yannotti Penelope Perfecta Erecta Poodie Castle Robert B. The Unknown Patron    Sweet dreams...      "Welcome to Horrorland" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ "Orange" - Topher Mohr and Alex Elena: https://youtu.be/Vh-FWjjtcTM 

StabGab
StabGab – Episode 13: Pumpkinhead

StabGab

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 66:10


Donna & Andrew carve into the 1988 directorial debut of legendary creature-effects artist Stan Winston. Topics discussed: revenge-dispensing monsters; evil witches; Lance Henriksen; Stan Winston; dickhead teenagers; the hillbilly code; dirt-farming; ladybug wives; audible east coast rainstorms; the ALIEN series; Mayim Bialik; Jeff East; motocross vehicular manslaughter; man-to-Pumpkinhead psychic transference; My So-Called Life; the dog from GREMLINS.

Rev It Up Podcast
The History of the American Motor Corp Part Two

Rev It Up Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 46:01


In today's episode, Cliff continues with his talk about the history of the American Motor cooperation. Cliff talks about the different kinds of cars, and the start of the warranty. Highlights: {00:56} Review of the part One {01:08} The Gremlin {03:40} Other cars from this period {05:40} The Manidar {09:00} Cost of cars in the…Read More

12 Days Pod
20. Gremlins: Gimme the Grimmies

12 Days Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 29:26


Can you believe it? We've made twenty episodes. Wow. In this twentieth episode of 12 Days Pod, Dan and Cara discuss sweet baby Gizmo, drunk naked turkeys, and how much time Billy should have served in jail over the destruction of his town. Happy Halloween all you ghouls out there! If you're loving this second season of the podcast, be sure to screenshot where you are listening to it from and post it on your socials! You can tag us at @12dayspod both on Instagram and Twitter. Sharing your love for the pod means so much to us and we can never thank you enough. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/12dayspod/support

Alcohol Recovery Podcast | The ODAAT Chat Podcast
OC183 Dr Anna Lembke - Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance In the Age of Indulgence

Alcohol Recovery Podcast | The ODAAT Chat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 56:23


Please Subscribe For More Episodes!   iTunes: https://apple.co/30g6ALF Spotify: https://odaatchat.libsyn.com/spotify Stitcher: https://bit.ly/3n0taNQ YouTube Channel: https://bit.ly/2UpR5Lo   Purchase Her Book on Amazon! Be sure to follow me on Instagram for daily inspiration: @odaatpodcast and @arlinaallen Hello Loves,   Thank you for downloading the podcast, my name is Arlina, and I'll be your host.   In case we haven't met yet, I am a certified Recovery Coach and Hypnotist. I am obsessed with all things recovery, including neuroscience, reprogramming the subconscious mind, law of attraction, all forms of personal growth and spirituality. I have been practicing abstinence from drugs and alcohol since 4/23/94, and I believe in people finding what works for them.    Today I'll be talking with Dr Anna Lembke, she is Chief of the Stanford Addiction Medicine Dual Diagnosis Clinic at Stanford University and author of the #1 Bestseller “Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance In the Age of Indulgence”. It would be a vast understatement to say it was such an honor to interview her for the podcast.  If you've been listening to these interviews for any length of time, you'll know I love learning about ideas I can share that will help lead people out of suffering. Up til now I've been hyper focused on empathy largely based off of Brene Brown's work around vulnerability and she shared that empathy is the antidote to shame. I've also treasured the idea that “honesty without compassion is cruelty” so I've been pretty focused on empathy but it felt like something was missing.   Then I read this by Anna: “Empathy without accountability perpetuates victimhood”. I had an absolute “holy crap” moment. Not an “aha”, a holy crap. Because, I believe that I can't really help people who are stuck or committed to a victim mentality. Those are people who are unwilling or unable to accept personal responsibility and I actually have a visceral and negative response to that type of thinking.   I had to send Anna a follow up email and ask for more feedback, specifically around what to say to people who have relapsed, and this is what she said:   “I'm so sorry. I'm sorry for your suffering. That must be so hard.”  What this does is validate that the relapse happened, while also acknowledging the pain that person is experiencing. I think of it similar to what I would say to someone who told me their cancer which had been in remission came back.”   So brilliant. I just love her.   Anyway, that was a very long intro, but I wanted you to have that extra bit of wisdom from her.   I hope you enjoy this conversation as much as I did.   Arlina Allen  6:09   Okay, here we go. We'll talk to you. Thank you. Thank you so much for joining me on the podcast.   Unknown Speaker  6:15   Thank you for inviting me, I am very happy to be here.   Arlina Allen  6:18   I'm so excited. Listen, I say that all the time. But I really, really men it this time because I have been reading your book, and actually I listened to the audio book first while I'm walking, because I sort of like the first wash of like, all these concepts. And then I get the book because I'm a students. And I like to, you know, highlight and underline and Mark things. And this book was stuff. It has some pictures. Yeah. Picture like people like me, pictures are amazing. Yeah. But I just it's called dopamine, finding balance in the age of indulgence, I'm sorry, dopamine nation. And, wow, I have so many questions to ask. But I think a good place to start might be with maybe what what is dopamine? Really, because I think there's a lot of misconceptions about what dopamine is, there isn't like a dopamine pill. But you know, when people take drugs, I think they activate dopamine, but maybe I don't really have a good understanding. So I thought maybe I could sort of clarify what it really is, and, and why it's important.   Dr Anna Lembke  7:31   Yeah, so dopamine is a chemical that we make in our brain. And it's very important for the experience of motivation, reward, and pleasure, and also fundamental in this self reregulating kind of system, that's called homeostasis, that is so fundamental to our physiology, and also, you know, to our survival. So essentially, you know, in a kind of broad brushstrokes simplified form, if you imagine that there is a balance in your brain, kind of like a teeter totter in a kid's playground, when we do something pleasurable that balance tips one way, and when we do something that's painful, that balance tips the other way, or when we ingest a substance that's pleasurable, or when we have an injury, you know, we cut our finger to the side of pain. But one of the overarching rules governing that balance is that it wants to remain level or preserve what neuroscientists call homeostasis. And it will work very hard to preserve a level balance with any deviation from neutrality. So when we do something that is pleasurable, we release dopamine, the pleasure neurotransmitter in the brain's reward pathway, which is a special part of our brain that's been conserved over millions of years, and is the same across many different species, even very primitive organisms. And that balance tip slightly to the side of pleasure. But no sooner Has that happened, then our brain will try to reregulate to bring that balance level again. And it does that by down regulating dopamine production and down regulating dopamine transmission in the reward pathway. But it doesn't just bring dopamine back down to tonic baseline levels, it actually brings it below baseline. So what happens I think of that as these Gremlins hopping on the pain side of the balance to bring in level again, but they stay on until the balance is tipped and equal and opposite amount to the side of pain. Yes, and that's of course, the kind of looking at the book. There's a little graphic in there, right there. And with Gremlins, right, I'm also a visual thinker. And so I just, you know, wanted to create a simple metaphor.   Arlina Allen  9:52   This is Brian, on page 52 of the book. There's like the seesaw or the teeter totter that you mentioned. And I thought That was so interesting because it when you're talking about uh when we indulge in the dopamine like you know even on the little graph is chocolate social media gaming porn shopping in my case drugs alcohol all that stuff not to say that I don't indulge in social media those other are those other things shopping that we there is that deficit it's like the equal opposite   Dr Anna Lembke  10:26   yes right for every pleasure we pay a price yes price is the come down and sometimes can be very subtle outside of conscious awareness. But you know it's there. And you know if we wait long enough that feeling of wanting to buy one more thing or watch one more video or have one more piece of chocolate goes away and and homeostasis is restored. But if we continue to bombard our dopamine reward pathway with highly reinforcing drugs and behaviors, what ends up happening is that to compensate for that, let's say artificially high levels of dopamine and I call it artificial because you know, the fundamental difference between things that are addictive and those that are not are that addictive, things release a whole lot more dopamine in the reward pathway. And of course, technology has taken even things that were not addictive like food, and made them highly potent and turn them into drugs or human connection. Social media has drug A fight human connection. But as a result of constantly bombarding our dopamine reward pathways, what ends up happening is our brains are desperately trying to compensate. And so they're way down down regulate, our brains are down regulating our dopamine production, and we end up in this kind of chronic dopamine deficit state where we have, you know, 1000s, of Gremlins on the pain side of the balance, and they've kind of camped out there, right, they brought their barbecues, their tents, they're not going anywhere fast. And, and it lasts a long time, which I think is really fundamental to understanding a couple of things. The first thing is, why on earth do people with addiction, relapse, after months, or even years of recovery and abstinence and their lives are so much better? Why on earth would they go back to using the reason is because they're not necessarily walking around. With a level balance, they are potentially walking around with a balance tilted to the side of pain on a daily basis experiencing the universal symptoms of withdrawal, which can last for months to years. And those include anxiety, insomnia, irritability, depression, and craving or intrusive thoughts of wanting views. The other reason I think this is balances is really helpful, is because not only does it allow us to understand the disease of addiction and relapse and to have compassion for that. But also it might explain, and this is the fundamental hypothesis of dopamine nation. Why it is that despite the fact that we have all our survival needs met, and then some why our rates of depression, anxiety and suicide going up all over the world, especially in rich countries. And I do believe that's because we individually and collectively, are engaging in so many high reward high pleasure activities and substances, that in order for our primitive brains to compensate, we have collectively downregulated, our own dopamine transmission such that we're all more depressed and anxious.   Arlina Allen  13:22   Yeah, you know, in the beginning of recovery, a lot of people talk about boredom. And I think we're so overstimulated when we're using that, when we get sober and practice that, you know, those of us are practicing practicing abstinence, I am aware that there is like harm reduction, you know, and that's the thing I totally I feel like that's totally valid. I quit drinking alcohol on my 25th birthday and continued to smoke weed for five months. I didn't know that recovery is about complete apps. That's just, they called it the marijuana maintenance program back in the day. Uh huh. Anyway, now we're calling it harm reduction, just fine. But what I thought was so interesting is and this is what I have heard over the years is that when people first get sober, they're bored. And I listened to the interview you did with Dr. Andrew Huber many we're talking about boredom and anxiety, which at first blush, you wouldn't think that those two go together. But when all your needs are met, and you really have and you don't have a passion or in my case obsessions for different things. If you don't if you don't have that you like get bored and then it's like, creates anxiety. Right? I see that in my kids.   Unknown Speaker  14:37   Yeah, of course. Yeah. I mean, especially the way because we're living in a time when we're constantly able to distract distract ourselves from our own thoughts, and our own ruminations and even our own creativity really, such that when we take away those distractions, we're suddenly you know, plummeted into the abyss really existentially We are bored, and sort of then contemplate well, gee, I don't have anything to do like, What? What is the purpose of my life anyway. But I think the key really is number one to acknowledge that boredom can be an extremely painful emotion, literally, physically painful, and scary. But that if we can just sit with it, and not try to run away from it, it is also the progenitor of creativity, and a place where new things are born. And so you know, just thinking about, like, you know, open space, like, it's like, you need space before you can have a supernova, you know, you need to have that blankness in order to, you know, initiate something new. And the internet really allows us all to be in this constant state of reactivity, where we're always responding to some some kind of input, rather than, you know, sitting quietly and generating.   Arlina Allen  15:56   Yeah, no, it's, I have a question for you about the neurotransmitter. So it's my understanding, like, from a chemistry perspective, that, you know, your receptors, your brain cells have receptors on them that are the uptake with Deborah allow the cells to receive the dopamine. And if you flood your cells, I'm sorry, I don't know that is your neurotransmitters? Yes, yes. Okay. So the receptor if there, there's like little receptors that allow that uptake of the dopamine, but if it's flooded too much, your cells will retract those receptors. Exactly. Right. So this is the attic mind, how long does it take the brain to heal, meaning it puts back a normal amount of receptors, because in my mind, I was thinking, I took some physiology anatomy in college, and it was like, Oh, that's why when people first stop using, they don't feel anything, it's like they can't, because their brain was trying to protect them this whole time by retracting those receptors, not allowing them to uptake the dopamine. And so because they're not there, people feel flat, like they, they feel flat, and they can't feel it. And so everybody always says, Well, how long until I start feeling good again? Like, how long does it take their brain cells to put those little receptors back out? So people start feeling good?   Dr Anna Lembke  17:21   Yeah, so in my clinical experience, it takes a minimum of a month, and that's less bad, not bad. And let me just say, a minimum of a month to start to regenerate other receptors and regulate dopamine transmission. But I mean, the protracted abstinence syndrome can last many months to even years, in some cases, right? Yeah. pends on the person, it depends on the drug, it depends on how you know how much they used. But in my clinical experience, and again, this is supported by some evidence, if people totally abstain for one month, in weeks one and two, that pleasure, pain balance to transmission is below baseline, because it's exactly as you say, our neurons have retracted those dopamine receptors, so we're not getting, you know, that stimulation. And we're experiencing withdrawal. But by weeks, three or four, people typically start to feel better. And by week four, even people with some very severe addictions, will start to notice improvement. Now, one thing you have to be really careful about is cross addiction. So all addictive substances work on that same common pathway, don't mean is a universal currency for the process of addiction, at least as far as we know, at this point. So if you give up your cannabis, but you keep smoking cigarettes, you know, you're not going to get the same kind of upregulation. Because you're not going to be abstaining from nicotine, which is gonna be you know, it's not, you know, most of my patients are not willing to give up cigarettes and nicotine and alcohol and all of it at once. That's a lot to give up. So whatever they're willing to do is great. And often they will see improvements, even if they just give up one thing. But to really get the full benefit and really restore homeostasis, you kind of have to give it all up in order. What   Arlina Allen  19:12   about what about caffeine?   Dr Anna Lembke  19:14   Well, you know, caffeine is a stimulant. So it sort of depends on how much you're using. If you're one cup of coffee a day, it probably isn't going to make much difference and you can just keep doing that. But if you're at you know, eight cups of coffee a day, that's that's probably probably time to. And the truth is that, believe it or not, it sounds harder to give it all up at once. But it might in fact be easier. There are studies showing that people who quit drinking and quit smoking cigarettes at the same time have better outcomes than people who just quit drinking but keep smoking.   Arlina Allen  19:50   Or these people who were considered pretty heavy on the alcohol use disorder spectrum or you know, I don't think alcoholic is really a A clinical term any longer Is that true?   Unknown Speaker  20:02   That's true.   Arlina Allen  20:03   It's alcohol use disorder.   Dr Anna Lembke  20:04   Yes, that's right. So we're trying to the alcoholic comes from Alcoholics Anonymous. It's just not a medicalized term. It's a perfectly good term. But it's just not one that we're, you know, we're using in Medicine Today we're trying to use a more generic term that can crossover many different substances to now it's, we don't even use the term addiction, believe it or not in a lot. Yeah, strange, right? And that's, you know, believe it or not, it hasn't really been the term the medical term. Now, let me say I use it all the time. It's the broadly understood term for this process. It is used in neuroscience texts. It is in the name of the of NIDA, the National, its own National Institute of Drug Abuse, which is a term we don't use anymore. The language of addiction is changing. But in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, it's not called nicotine addiction, or alcohol addiction. It's called nicotine use disorder, alcohol use disorder, cannabis use disorder, and I'm like that.   Arlina Allen  21:01   Okay. So it is specific to the whatever people are using. Okay, that's so interesting. I did not know that. Listen, I kind of came up in Alcoholics Anonymous. So, you know, but I've noticed that, and I'm sure you've noticed this too, like, and maybe not because you're not on social media. Is that true? You're not on social media? That's not true. Yeah, that's true. But you are in the social dilemma. Right? Fascinating. Like I had resisted watching it, because I'm sorry, I was sort of in the camp of, you know, I use social media for good. You know, so I don't, I didn't maybe are good. Yeah, it can. Yeah, I mean, it's that's how I communicate all everything that I do. My podcast and everything that I do is I'm trying to disseminate information, you know, solution. And he's social media. So I'm like, it's all it hits like money. It's all in how you use it, right? Like you use your powers for good. Kind of like Spider Man. But, um, where am I going with that, but but it's there's a bit of self denial because I do find I'm, you know, sort of like the typical addict, let's say, have that sort of propensity for addiction or anything obsessive anything that I like, I want more, right, I don't really have that off switch. So it's like, oh, I found something I'm passionate about is helping people recovering, Alcoholics Anonymous, and so that's all I want to do. So he says, it seems like a healthier obsession.   Dr Anna Lembke  22:37   You know, putting investing our energy into things that we care about, that gives us to me meaning and purpose that serve others that make the world a better place, those are all those are all good things, they can also cross the line into addiction, we can, you know, there is work addiction. People can get, you know, caught up in that in a way that's not healthy for themselves or others. But in general, you know, when we're serving others, those are usually healthy behaviors.   Arlina Allen  23:06   Yeah, I remembered my point of that little thing I just did. But with the social media, it's so interesting to see that the vernacular is changing in the world of social media, how people like me who are trying to disseminate information about recovery and sobriety, the vernacular is changing, because a lot of people, women, especially, actually are very, like anti a, because of the male dominated vocabulary. And, you know, there's this sort of patriarchal overtone, and overtures. And I kind of grew up in the church where I learned to, you know, you're supposed to read the Bible, and then you sort of decipher what it means to you. When I got sober. I was like, these people are like, Oh, you can solve that problem here. And I was like, I'm all in. And I would read the text and literature and I would just translate like, I had that ability to translate into what it means to me. So I didn't really get hung up on I was super desperate to be sober. So I didn't get hung up on terms like alcoholic or, you know, everything being in he him. There's like in the book, I'm sure you're familiar, a chapter to the lives, right? Yeah. As if we were, you know, the women were sort of secondary. And so there's all this discussion right now about how, like a lot of people I interview they talk about alcohol free, they won't even use the word like alcoholic seem shaming. Uh huh. Or have you have you experienced that and the people that come to see you.   Dr Anna Lembke  24:43   I certainly have, you know, encountered a lot of people who for whom a was not useful or effective, but I've encountered an equal number or more for whom a was absolutely you know, the lifesaver for them men and women. But I think it's important to put a into its historical context, it started in the 1930s. It was started by, you know, two men who met each other and support each other. It is one of the most remarkable and robust social movements in the last 100 years, totally peer driven, takes no financial outside support takes no political stance is free is everywhere. And I do agree with you that, you know, language was important and needs to change with changing times. And I think there have been some updates to the big book, you know, more more modern, and more accessible. And certainly, I've heard of certain I'm aware of abuses in the rooms and in a, I mean, I'm glad today that there are many options, different options for me to get into recovery online, in person. abstinence oriented, moderation oriented, and I think this is great. I think there are lots of paths to the top of the mountain. But I would not throw out a you know, I know, it's a really powerful philosophy and approach. And, you know, just absolutely miraculous for, you know, for people for whom it works and who actively participate.   Arlina Allen  26:15   Yeah, well, there you go, you have to actively participate. I'm a huge fan like it absolutely. There was not actually when I got sober 27 years ago, there wasn't really nothing else. Yeah, there was really nothing else, I was super grateful. And I lived in San Jose. So in the Bay Area, where you are, there are there were like 800 meetings a week. Yeah. And there were women's meetings and very specialized meetings, there was I used to go to a 6am meeting every day that attracts a certain crowd. So I was I was super lucky. And I know that's not the case everywhere. But   Dr Anna Lembke  26:51   the other thing to keep in mind is that the rates of alcohol use disorder and women have gone up 85% in the last two decades, 85%, the ratio of women who are addicted to alcohol, or men who are addicted to alcohol versus women has been in the range of five to one to two to one for many generations, but in the last generation, starting with the millennials, that is approached one to one. And so now women are as likely to present with an alcohol use disorder as men, which is a brand new phenomenon. And really, you know, therefore, I do appreciate that, you know, women, who are we have more women than ever, you know, addicted to alcohol, they're also wanting new ways that are better suited to women, possibly, you know, to get into recovery.   Arlina Allen  27:41   Yeah, I had a friend point out that, you know, the court system is sending people to a, who may or may not belong there, you know, predators, people with, you know, you know, violent histories or whatever that, you know, the court system is sending a lot of people there, too, I always tell women to go to women's meetings,   Dr Anna Lembke  28:00   I think that's a good place place to start. Or what I say to people is that, you know, going to meetings is a little bit. I mean, maybe this isn't a great analogy, but it's a little bit like dating, you have to, you know, meet a bunch of different meetings before you find one that you like, that's a great analogy. And there's a lot of frogs. Yeah. And then the truth is that recovery is better in some meetings than others. So you want to make sure you find a meeting where there's good recovery and recovery can change. I mean, these are very organic, human gatherings, and you can have a meeting that's really unhealthy and positive, and then it loses a few key people, or there's some other disruption of location or time you lose that frame and you lose the meeting. So it's important to, you know, to just make sure you're going to Good, good meetings.   Arlina Allen  28:47   Yeah, absolutely. And, you know, I've seen, like for women who have children like I, you for, so I was with my husband, and he's sober. And we didn't go to meetings together for like, 10 years when we first had kids, because number one, I never, I can't focus on funding to bring my kid to Yeah, it was just a variety mindset. Yeah, yeah. So there were so for women, when they have kids, it's like lifestyle changes, you know, affect your ability to go to, to meetings. I know. For some women, it was like, they're working full time. They have kids, it's like, you want me to go to 90 meetings in 90 days? That seems impossible. But you know, nowadays, it's a little different because we have online meetings and things like that. We have a little more, but gosh, it depends. I know the pandemic was really hard on a lot of people in a lot of ways. But it also presented has now provided new opportunities, because now women can go to meetings like we can literally, there's an international woman's meeting that goes 24 seven. Wow, that's cool. Yeah, it's been continuous for four months now. I want to ask you, I've so many questions. So we were talking about early recovery, people experiencing boredom and Takes about, you know, it takes some time for that to heal. So I think if people are aware of that that's coming that they can adapt to that. And to know that their passions for things will come back. Dr. Haberman described addiction as a narrowing of things that bring pleasure. And it's so interesting because as soon as we set it down, it's like, we start finding other things interesting again, when it comes to so I'm a mom, I know a lot of my listeners are your mom, you know, the whole video game thing, especially in this age of pandemic, where kids don't really have a whole lot to do and they're craving connection. It's been really confusing as a parent to know how to support your kids. It's like, Listen, I can't entertain their, you know, their teenagers, I can entertain them the whole time. It's like I have work to do. But I'm terrified about what's what happens to them sometimes in this in this age, and I have moms that are like, and our kids are so in touch with, like their neurosis now, like when I was coming up, we didn't know that my sister was struggling with clinical depression. We didn't know that that was the thing. The you know, whatever. 40 I don't know how overall I don't do math A long time ago. But now the kids are like, Oh, I have anxiety. I have depression. I have this. It's you know, the sex. Sexual orientation is so fluid. And it's like, as a parent, it's hard to know how to support your kids because we were kind of grew. I think you grew up with syrup. Did you grow up with like, a little bit of tough love?   Dr Anna Lembke  31:36   Yeah, you know, a little bit of healthy neglect. I think it's fair to say, maybe verging on unhealthy neglect. But yeah, baby nine.   Unknown Speaker  31:44   Is that a thing? benign?   Arlina Allen  31:45   Yeah, so that's Yeah, my mom was a total badass. Is that was like it was the whole Go figure. Figure it out? That's right. Yeah, for yourself. And, but we don't do that to our kids now, because we are aware of like the suicide rate. So I feel like we're in a rock between a rock and a hard place, because we can't really do the hardest thing anymore. Because our kids might kill themselves. And it's like, how, as a mom, am I supposed to help my kids through the difficult times without them getting addicted to video games? Or like, even if they're home all the time, they're not doing drugs and alcohol? They can still be, you know, porn. And listen, I don't even want to know. But video, let's just say video games, just like the online stimulation. How do I, as a mom, like your mom, how do you help your kids? How do we help our kids like self regulate?   Dr Anna Lembke  32:44   Well, I think an important important place to start is to talk about how pleasure and pain are processed in the brain. And how the brain really does want to assert this level balance or preserve homeostasis. And that any deviation from neutrality, whether it's on the pleasure side, or the pain side actually constitutes a stressor to the brains when we think about what's stressing kids out. Now, I would argue, as I do argue, in my book, that it's all of the feel good drugs and behaviors that's actually contributing to the stressors itself. Because when we're the kids are playing these video games, they're getting a huge bolus of dopamine in the reward pathway, then their brains need to compensate by down regulating their own dopamine transmission, bringing it bringing in those postsynaptic receptors. Such that you know, when those kids try to pull away from the video game, first of all, it's very hard to do that they will experientially describe that. And then they're depressed. So it's actually the gaming and the pornography and the social media that is causing the depression and anxiety and not the other way around. So what I counsel parents to do is to first understand something about that basic neurophysiology, explain it to their kids, talk to kids about how these online products can be great, but they can also be drugs and that they have been engineered to be drugs and to keep us clicking, and swiping and scrolling. And that we have to be really mindful of how we're using them and that in moderation, it's just fine. But just like you wouldn't get up and eat ice cream for breakfast, you probably don't want to get up first thing in the morning and, you know, be scrolling through social media and do that all day long. You know, the all all good things in moderation. Right, right. I mean, so we're all we all struggle with this. It's not just our kids. The other thing I say to parents, you know, so, as a family, talk about the dangers in talking about the good things about social media and video games and all that, but also talk about the dangers. Talk about how important it is to pay attention to not just how you feel when you're doing the activity, but also how it makes you feel afterwards. Talk about the importance of having some device free and tech free times in the day like maybe at dinner time or some other time with the family. Family, maybe taking tech free vacations, if you can do that, where maybe for a week at a time, everybody leaves their devices at home and goes and interacts in nature. These are all things that people, they just like they're horrified at the thoughts they get, right? Thinking about just leaving their phone behind, but But the truth is, that's really an indication of how addicted, we have all become. Even the thought of not bringing our phones with us, you know, generates anxiety. And you know, that's the same thing as my patients who are addicted to alcohol. And the thought of not having access to alcohol at that party, or at that gathering, or when I get home, you know, is absolutely terrifying to me. So I think we really have to, you know, conceptualize these behaviors as potentially highly addictive and, you know, be thoughtful about organizing our use around them to really respect the pathophysiology. In the   Arlina Allen  35:57   first the first thought they came up here and he said, Take a tech free vacation, I was like, isn't the first week off of addiction like your worst week?   Dr Anna Lembke  36:06   It is, it is. And frankly, that's why I do recommend a full month off in order to give it enough time to reset reward pathways so that you're not craving anymore. Yeah. And then and then if you want to go back to using or you have to go back to using because you need the smartphone for your work. Really, at that point, it's much easier to be intentional and thoughtful about using differently using less barriers.   Arlina Allen  36:31   Like the self binding you were talking about.   Unknown Speaker  36:34   Right? Okay, so   Arlina Allen  36:35   I'm going to jump to that since we just talked about it. So page 93 of the book, we talk about binding and I thought that was really interesting. I loved how he used Homer's Odysseus and the sirens, the story of the sirens, how's the captain would be back on his air in time self to the boat. You know what's funny is this whole time I thought the sirens were like mermaids. They're birds.   Dr Anna Lembke  36:57   They're half bird, half human creatures who spell bind sailors with their enchanting song, lure them to the rocks, and kill them that way. Kill him. I don't know. But yeah, so the story, right is that that he he but he asks his sailors to bind him to the mast, and to put beeswax in his ear so they can get through that passage without being lowered, lowered by the sirens.   Arlina Allen  37:22   What are some of those? Okay, so we mentioned, let's see, I have a list of I had a list of soft binding, things you mentioned, you know, first thing that came to mind was rehab, that's kind of a soft binding thing. And it's the first 30 days gives you a chance for your brain to reset. Obviously, like changing your environment, removing all temptations around your house when you were talking about video games, you know, or other devices. You had an interesting, I don't want to spoil the book for anybody, but you had an interesting client or patient that had a machine. Right, right, machine. But anyway, he broke in her head and did all kinds of crazy things to try to avoid it. bless his heart, that must have been awful. But yeah, so we do all kinds of self binding practices or so but I kind of wanted to relay that relate that to medications, would you consider medications a self binding? practice?   Dr Anna Lembke  38:25   Yeah, I think they really can be so for example, if you take a medication like now trek zone, which blocks the opioid receptor, that's been shown to help people reduce or stop opioids because obviously if the receptors blocked opioids like heroin or fake it in whatever it is, can't bind, but alcohol is also mediated through our own endogenous opioid system. So when the naltrexone is on the opioid receptor, alcohol is not as reinforcing. And so that can help people either stop drinking alcohol or reduce the number of drinks on drinking days. So it's a nice medicine to help people not only whose goal is abstinence, but also who have a goal of moderation. You know,   Arlina Allen  39:09   I have a client who has a family member, let's say is probably physically addicted alcohol is naltrexone use for somebody that you're chemically detoxing or medically detoxing. Is that a is that a drug that   Dr Anna Lembke  39:24   we we think of detox which is that period of helping somebody through acute withdrawal, especially potentially life threatening withdrawal and say that alcohol withdrawal can be life threatening benzodiazepine withdrawal can be life threatening that Xanax, Valium, Klonopin, advant opioid withdrawal can be life threatening. So if you're somebody who's so physically dependent on alcohol, benzos, or opioids, that you're going to go into life threatening withdrawal, you wouldn't want to just quit, you know, you would want to go see a doctor and have a medically supervised you know, medically managed withdrawal All we really think of addiction treatment or recovery as beginning, when acute withdrawal is over. Oh god, no, naltrexone is a medicine that we would use to help somebody get into and maintain recovery. It's not a medicine that we use in in acute withdrawal.   Arlina Allen  40:22   Okay, so that's after acute withdrawal. That's right. Yeah, that's important. Let's talk a little bit about I like that you have dopamine as an acronym on page 88. Okay, he had it summarized in that little, and a picture. I like pictures. Can we go over the what it stands for?   Dr Anna Lembke  40:44   Yeah. So the dopamine acronym is really just a framework for how to initially approach the problem of compulsive overconsumption, or in some cases, addiction. This is a framework that is good choice in people who are not so physically dependent, that they're going to go into life threatening withdrawal. And it wouldn't be a good framework for somebody who had already repeatedly tried to stop on their own and just was incapable somebody, for example, who was injecting heroin multiple times a day and just couldn't even go for a day without so that that would be somebody who would really need a higher level of care. But for those of us who have maybe mild to moderate addiction, or maybe aren't even addicted yet, but we're on our way to becoming addicted and or just engaging in compulsive overconsumption. This dopamine acronym kind of outlines a basic framework, and the D stands for data. And that's where I asked patients to describe to me what they're using, how much how often, and just by getting them to articulate to another human being what they're doing, that often brings into relief, their actual use in a way that they can be in denial about as long as it's just kind of this amorphous behavior in their heads. So I really like to start with just asking them in a non judgmental way, you know, how much are you on social media? How many hours a day? What are you doing? The O of dopamine stands for objectives. And this really gets into why why is it that you're doing that drug, or that behavior? What's positive about it for you, because I really do think that even irrational behaviors make some sense, subjectively, and so it's important for us to understand what's driving that individual's behavior. And then the P of dopamine stands for problems, that's when we get into, you know, what's problematic about your use, I understand why you do it, I understand what's good about it, what's problematic about it, and that can range to everything from you know, it's not working anymore. Like it used to do X, Y, and Z for me, and it's not doing those things, too, it costs a lot of money to it's interfering with my relationships work with my ability to do schoolwork, with my health. So there are many, many different reasons that people people will say, often, you know, in the way they do it, that it's, you know, to solve a problem, like anxiety or depression, but it may not be solving that problem anymore.   Arlina Allen  43:13   Sorry. So you get them sort of in touch with specifics. Yeah. So yeah, so you're not asserting pressure? Because I think I used to be a sales grown and sales, they teach you not to pressure people because it viscerally creates resistance. Yeah, right. Right. But when you ask somebody like, what, what problems is it caused? Like, what specifically what caught? What problems? Is it causing for you? They're coming up with their own. Like, I went through that experience to specific consequences that were a problem for me,   Dr Anna Lembke  43:47   right? Yeah, you basically ask them just to be objective and analytical about their own subjective experience. And just kind of, you know, go, Hey, you know, this is what I do. And this is, this is how it makes me feel.   Arlina Allen  44:00   You know, what I love about science when it comes to addiction? Is it kind of depersonalized is that because we experienced so much shame and guilt? And we did terrible? Listen, I did, did some terrible and embarrassing things when I was drinking and using they caused guilt and shame, right? Well, when I started to understand the mechanics of why I fell into the trap in the first place, was sort of depersonalized it a little bit, right and took away some of the guilt and shame. And I love this approach of objective analytical sciency stuff, because it does sort of make it more easier for me to then accept the solution.   Dr Anna Lembke  44:37   Yeah, you realize it's not about your it's not that you're a bad person, it's that it's a bad disease. And these are highly addictive substances and behaviors and they were engineered to hook us, right. The a of dopamine is really the the key intervention and that's where I ask patients to abstain from their drug of choice for 30 days. Why 30 days because that's an amount of time that most people can wrap their head around and I say never drink again. I'm Not going to be very persuasive, but I say, Hey, can you give it up for 30 days, please, I can, I can probably do that. The other thing again is that 30 days is the minimum amount of time it takes for those neural adaptation Gremlins to hop off the pain side of the balance for homeostasis to be restored, which is just another way of saying that's the amount of time it takes for us to up regulate our dopamine receptors and dopamine transmission so that we can widen our lens start to enjoy other things, but also look back and see true cause and effect because when we're chasing dopamine we really don't see the impact that it has on our lives.   Arlina Allen  45:37   It's so we get so blind that's like the denial part, right? Yeah, we lose completely lose perspective.   Dr Anna Lembke  45:43   That's right. The hard thing about getting patients to you know engage in this in this task is that many of them come in feeling bad already, right? They're looking fresh and anxiety and then I'm suggesting to do something that's going to actually make them feel worse and worse. But what I say to them it's kind of like getting you know treatment for cancer it's it's really hard when you're in it, but when you come out the other side of it, it'll it'll be worth it and potentially life saving, saving. Yeah. And then the The M is stands for mindfulness is just a way to sit with feelings, including negative, scary, strange feelings, without judgment and also without reaction without trying to get rid of those feelings. insight of dopamine acronym, just stands for how this this experiment really does give us an enormous amount of insight often into how addicted we really are. Because like I said, we were we will tend to minimize and normalize and you know, in the book, I talk about my my own romance novel reading addiction. So   Unknown Speaker  46:42   funny as all I'm right there with you, girl. Until I like, Oh, yeah, right. As it is embarrassing. my   Arlina Allen  46:48   mic, as   Unknown Speaker  46:49   I know, it is.   Arlina Allen  46:51   My boys are like sparkly vampires. What   Dr Anna Lembke  46:53   is right, right, I know, two additional ways that we are sort of incontinent around our desires is always shame producing. It's interesting. Yeah. But, but you know, this is really again, just a way to gather data, do an experiment, gain insight. And it's an embodied physical experiment, I think that's really key, too, because so much of our mental health interventions are asking patients to sort of just rearrange their thoughts. But this is a really physical thing where you know, you go into withdrawal, you know, when you feel that physically, and it's painful. So kind of asking people to embrace something that's painful in the service of feeling better in the long run. And then N stands for next steps. That's when people come back after a month, if they were able to do it, I say, Okay, do you want to keep abstaining? Or do you want to go back to using and most of them say they want to go back to using what they want to use in moderation? Yeah. And sometimes   Arlina Allen  47:48   disappointing for you to hear, like, does that make you nervous, you know,   Dr Anna Lembke  47:51   sometimes, because sometimes my choice for them really would be absence, and I kind of know that they're not going to be able to moderate. But you know, you got to meet patients where they are. And if I try to railroad them into it, it's not going to work pressure, sometimes they just have to go out and get more data and go through that loop a couple more times. And they're like, you know, what, I think I'm better off abstaining. I that's much more persuasive than if I try to tell them, that's not really gonna work for you. The other thing I would say is I have had patients who surprised me, and actually with enormous effort, were able to abstain sometimes even when they were able to do it, though they said it wasn't worth it, it took too much effort and energy, that it was easier to abstain. But importantly, there are no drugs that we use that we can't abstain from, like food, or like our smartphones so hard. Yeah. Or sex. I mean, I think most of us think of sex as, as a part of, you know, a healthy part of a healthy life. But then that idea of Well, how do we moderate becomes important, I think, for all of us, even for those of us who are trying to abstain from our drug of choice, because, because we're just bombarded by these highly rewarding substances and behaviors. And so we're all we're all challenged with, you know, abstention, and moderation and, and I really think that people in recovery, you know, as I say, in the book, our modern day profits for the rest of us kind of can show us how to live in this token saturated world. So just to finish off, then e of dopamine stands for experiment. That's where people go back out and implement what they've learned now with a pleasure pain pathway that's at the homeostatic level place. You know, so they can go out and have a better chance of being successful with moderation, or abstinence, or whatever it is.   Arlina Allen  49:39   Yeah. Thank you for going through that and being able to remember all the things you were super smart, I would not have been able to do that off the top of my head. A couple of questions came up from as you were going through that. So I just find it like such a paradox that you know, people with these use disorder. have such as high tolerance for pain on one hand like the consequences and on on the other hand we have such an in ability we have like this avoidance of emotional pain right and I just wonder I heard this I was watching this show things totally unrelated But anyway, I was watching the show called meat eater and this guy was talking about how and as a hunter, you know, human beings have something called shifting baseline syndrome. Have you ever heard of that idea? The idea is that as human evolution through human evolution or as societies change, we have good time feast and famine right? And so we have this ability to normalize lower standards of living, right and so in Alcoholics Anonymous that we talk about seeking lower companionship or like this is okay this is okay. Yeah, and so I was like that is so funny. But at the same time when it comes to paint like emotional pain tolerance, it feels like we're living in this really weird worldwide we're experiencing or we're creating all this pain for ourselves because we're you know, you drink in us you spend all your money and you're in all this pain and so what do you do you drink and use more to because you can't tolerate the pain you know, it's just such a weird place to be we have this and I feel like in all fairness that most people have an avoidance of emotional pain what are some of the ways I mean I feel like you know the great thing about a it was like we have community like it's a ready made community to help us get through emotional pain. I shared with you earlier that my mom is ill I just found out last week that she's terminally ill. And I'm not insensitive, and he might be a little bit maybe a little bit numb. But I have found I so I've been 27 years sober. It used to be if I got stood up on a date, I would go on a bender, like I couldn't tolerate it. Now I'm sober a long time. My mom is really sick. And it doesn't even occur to me to use what happened to my brain. From that, you know what I'm saying? It's like, yeah, oh, yeah. Now what happened to my brain?   Dr Anna Lembke  52:17   Well, I mean, your your brain is not any longer in that addiction cycle, your brain is at a homeostatic baseline. And it might even be tipped slightly to the side of pleasure such that you have the mental calluses and the resilience to withstand even enormously painful things like, you know, the potential loss of a loved one. Well, I'm again, I just think that thinking about the balance and the neurophysiology and that what happens when people are in their addiction loop is that they're essentially walking around with a pleasure pain balance tipped chronically to the side of pain, their dopamine transmission is at chronically lower levels. And so there's an enormous physiologic drive, to get their drug and to prioritize that drug over everything else, not to get high, but just to get out of pain and to feel normal. Whereas once you and that also means that even the nearest slight is going to make you feel more pain because you're already in this painful state. And that you know, what we call natural rewards, more modest rewards, food, clothing, shelter, a good conversation with a friend will no longer be adequate, right? Because you've got all these Gremlins camped out on the pain 10 pounds. Now you need a great big bolus of a supercharged potent drug, just to bring you level again. Whereas once you're in recovery, and you start to repair all of that and the Gremlins hop off and you start to upregulate, not just your own endogenous dopamine but also your endocannabinoid system, your endo opioid system, your serotonin or norepinephrine. Now you've got a pleasure pain balance, that's subtle, right? It's homeostatic it's level its sensitive, appropriately to small pleasures. It's sensitive to small pains but resilient enough to you know, quickly restore homeostasis in both directions. And you know, that's that's great. That's exactly where we want to be. Yeah, it   Arlina Allen  54:10   takes takes a lot of work takes a lot it does   Unknown Speaker  54:12   it takes a lot of vigilance and where it's you know, when you when I think about that pleasure, pain balance, it's sometimes I say it's like a teeter totter and a kid's playground, but really, it's more like a piece of plywood on a ball and you're standing on that piece and you're constantly having to move in order to keep in balance it's not a static process it's a really dynamic process that takes constant small adjustments   Arlina Allen  54:37   Yeah, and I'm glad you talked about that you're you know talking about balance and and and we only have a couple minutes and so I did want to touch on the scent. Thank you so much for writing this book. This was so such such an important book for people like me, who need to know why and need to know how and what to do about it right like we can we know ruminate on the problem. All day long, but I need to know what to do. Right? There are practical steps, tangible, practical, understandable, things to do to get better. And the idea is that and you did talk about like we can break our dopamine reward system, but you also said we can heal it. And that is the hope that this will give provides so much hope and like a real concrete, practical way that doesn't require like a you know, religion or you don't have to do like, like, I'm not knocking that at all right? Because I found that to be super helpful, but I don't know I'm a science girl at heart and I need to know why. I write I need to me, to me kind of girl at the end of the day, and at the end of the book on page 231 we're talking about your conclusion, which is the lessons of balance and you know, I've, you know, heard people say I think of balance is sort of a wide path that's not a razor's edge and I just gonna read under read you something that you wrote, you're like I already know. We all desire a respite from the world, a break from the impossible standards we often set for ourselves and others. It's natural that we would seek a reprieve from our own relentless ruminations. Oh, my God, the whole obsessive thinking, why did I do this? Why can't I do that? Look what they did to me? How could I do that to them? And then your question you pose is what if, instead of seeking oblivion by escaping from the world, we turn toward it? That is the challenge, right? That is the challenge is to, you know, Sheryl Sandberg said lean in, right, you know, but it's in the leaning in that, it we, you know, I'm always talking about let's process her resolution, right. And that requires leaning in,   Unknown Speaker  56:55   it does, yeah. And I think, you know, I mean, we're all seeking transcendence, and that loss of self, that non being where we're not ruminating and thinking about ourselves in the world, and, you know, escaping with drugs, or in my case in into fantasy novels, you know, is one way to do that, but not ultimately, a very adaptive way to do that, a better way to do that is actually to do the opposite. And really engage with the people around us with the life that we've been given, immerse ourselves in it. And when we invest in and immerse ourselves in, you know, in our real lives, they do become, you know, transcendental, they do take on a kind of luminous and numinous quality that's really enhancing that releases dopamine, but in a way that is enduring, and healthy. And so yeah, that's, I think, really the antidote to to to addiction, you know, instead of trying to run away, turn around, and immerse yourself in it.   Arlina Allen  57:57   That is the antidote simple, but not easy.   Unknown Speaker  57:59   That's not easy to do. Yeah, well, listen,   Arlina Allen  58:03   at the end of the day, that's why we all need each other. Right? You know, and, and I know from reading the book that you did your own work, and I really appreciated that about you, thank you for sharing those for your transparency and your vulnerability in the book of sharing your own, you know, struggles that you did your own work. So thank you. Thank you so much again, for this time, I'm so honored and and this was such an amazing book and where do people find? Find out more about you?   Unknown Speaker  58:32   Well, the book is available where books are sold, that's probably the best source of finding my work. It's also available on on Audible, as you mentioned, for people who'd rather listen than then read a physical book or a Kindle version. And then there's more about me on on Olympia calm or dopamine nation calm a website that was created for the book.   Arlina Allen  58:56   Listen, thank you so much for idea, tell Andrew I said “Hey”.   Unknown Speaker  59:03   All right. Yeah. Thank you so much.  

Una Página De Películas
S3. Ep26: Gremlins

Una Página De Películas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 9:37


¡UN CLÁSICO PARA VER EN HALLOWEEN… Y EN NAVIDAD! En el episodio de hoy hablamos de “Gremlins”. Una película de horror/fantasía que atrapó mi imaginación con diseños de criaturas espectaculares, un humor oscuro y un vibe que te puedes disfrutar tanto en Halloween como en las navidades. ¿Qué nos parece este clásico? ¿Saben las 3 reglas básicas para cuidar de un Mogwai? ¡Escucha y te dejamos saber! ¿Tienes alguna idea para los episodios? ¡Escríbenos! Email: Unapaginadepeliculas@gmail.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PdePeliculas Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/pdepeliculas_/?hl=es Twitter: https://twitter.com/PDePelicula --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/una-p341gina-de-pel355culas/support

All Geeks Considered Podcast
Halloween with a Showstopper!

All Geeks Considered Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 87:21


This time around Diego decided we're doing Halloween with a big musical number and that means we are watching Elvira: Mistress of the Dark, Gremlins, and Gremlins 2: The New Batch! 

WTF Happened To....?!
GREMLINS (1984)

WTF Happened To....?!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 15:04


Director Joe Dante's 1984 horror-comedy GREMLINS is a uniquely twisted Christmas classic. But it could have been a very different movie, with the beloved Gizmo nearly transforming into the vicious villain Stripe rather than becoming two separate characters! Producer Steven Spielberg steered the project from its disturbingly dark origins, but it was still met with major controversy. Let's break the first rule and shine some light on "WTF Happened to GREMLINS!"

The RSL Show
Real Salt Lake Gremlins

The RSL Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 49:43


Joshua Clark and Andy Muñoz are back to discuss RSL's 8th place Western Conference standing and the upcoming must-win match vs. Chicago Fire. We also cover Pablo Mastroeni's recent comments around club culture and coaching decisions.  The RSL Show is brought to you by KSL Sports and 1Wire Fiber. Stream our latest episodes at www.kslsports.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Movie Lovers Unite
Gremlins Review Featuring Switch The Envelope

Movie Lovers Unite

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 63:41


Get 20% OFF + Free international shipping @manscaped with promo code “MOVIELOVERSUNITE” at Manscaped.com! Your Balls Will Thank You! #sponsored Get 20% Off and Free Shipping with the code MOVIELOVERSUNITE at Manscaped.com. That's 20% off with free shipping at manscaped.com and use code MOVIELOVERSUNITE Unlock your confidence and always use the right tools for the job with MANSCAPED™. Imagine shaving with a sleek, well-designed, and optimized trimmer that makes shaving time your favorite time in the bathroom. I'm one of the first people to try the new 4.0 and I'm blown away by the performance. The craftsmanship and details on the 4.0 are next level! Hello Movie Lovers, for tonight's show John is joined by Switch The Envelope Podcast to give you their thoughts on the 1984 horror/comedy Gremlins. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/movieloversunite/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/movieloversunite/support

Dueling Decades
Man of 10,000 sound effects, Michael Winslow judges this battle between 1974, 1984 & 1994!

Dueling Decades

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 91:22


Dueling Decades returns with another nostalgic clash! Legendary comedic actor Michael Winslow steps behind the bench to judge this fantastic episode you have to hear to believe! Marc James is bad company as he brings the best of June of 1974. This week Mancrush goes crazy with June of 1984! The host of the Miscast Commentary Podcast, Joe Findlay returns to the show with June of 1994, brother! Micheal sounds off about his great film career, from working with Mel Brooks to Rowdy Roddy Piper. We get the inside scoop on the making of Gremlins and hear what it was like voicing one of the iconic characters. Joe tells us how long it took to download an Aerosmith song in 1994. Mancrush finds genes from extinct animals as Marc James uncovers the birth of the Seahawks. Michael tells us how he landed the role of Jones in Police Acadamy and if Rick Moranis is really as cool as everyone says! Mancrush makes us wonder what happens when you leave Gizmo out in the Purple Rain. Marc James takes a trip to Chinatown and The Juice is loose! We have a little bit of everything in this one and you never know who is going to show up! Michael invites some friends over to help him with his judgments. Red Fox, Pat Morita, Hulk Hogan, Ice T, Snoop Dogg, and even his old friends Cheech and Chong make a joint appearance on this one. We explore the longevity of music and the reality of reaction videos and was Chuck Norris really supposed to be in The Karate Kid? Do you agree with Michael's rulings? Need more? Come watch us on YouTube or Subscribe to the podcast now on Facebook! Please don't forget to subscribe and review! Want to share some of your own 1980s & 1990s memories? Join the other thousands of people in our Facebook group and get more original nostalgic content every day! If you're into the 1960s & 1970s, join our other group! Links below: https://www.duelingdecades.com (https://www.duelingdecades.com) https://www.facebook.com/duelingdecades (https://www.facebook.com/duelingdecades) https://www.youtube.com/c/duelingdecades (https://www.youtube.com/c/duelingdecades) https://www.twitter.com/duelingdecades (https://www.twitter.com/duelingdecades) https://www.instagram.com/duelingdecades (https://www.instagram.com/duelingdecades) https://www.facebook.com/groups/duelingdecades/ (https://www.facebook.com/groups/duelingdecades/) https://www.patreon.com/duelingdecades (https://www.patreon.com/duelingdecades) Support this podcast

Collecting Weekly
Episode 186: Should You Preorder

Collecting Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 136:25


The boys talk about the new Hot Toys Loki & Sylvie, several new third party DC figures, the movie Gremlins, and discuss whether you should preorder or not! Want to support our show? Check us out on Patreon: http://patreon.com/collectingweekly​== Channel Memberships: https://bit.ly/2SHjsHm Buy a shirt here: https://bit.ly/3wVXAHh Want to chat with us outside of the show? Check us out on Facebook! https://bit.ly/3seiNsv Want to see our clips highlights? https://bit.ly/3gqLMHf If you like our video podcast and want to hear our full library of audio releases check us out on Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/3uL64iE

Break Things On Purpose
Leonardo Murillo

Break Things On Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 34:36


In this episode, we cover: 00:00:00 - Introduction  00:03:30 - An Engineering Anecdote  00:08:10 - Lessons Learned from Putting Out Fires 00:11:00 - Building “Guardrails” 00:18:10 - Pushing the Chaos Envelope  00:23:35 - OpenGitOps Project 00:30:37 - Where to Find Leo/Costa Rica CNCF Links: Weaveworks: https://www.weave.works GitOps Working Group: https://github.com/gitops-working-group/gitops-working-group OpenGitOps Project: https://opengitops.dev Github.com/open-gitops: https://github.com/open-gitops Twitter: https://twitter.com/murillodigital LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/leonardomurillo/ Costa Rica CNCF: https://community.cncf.io/costa-rica/ Cloudnative.tv: http://cloudnative.tv Gremlin-certified chaos engineering practitioner: https://www.gremlin.com/certification TranscriptJason: Welcome to the Break Things on Purpose podcast, a show about our often self-inflicted failures and what we learn from them. In this episode, Leonardo Murillo, a principal partner solutions architect at Weaveworks. He joins us to talk about GitOps, Automating reliability, and Pura Vida.Ana: I like letting our guests kind of say, like, “Who are you? What do you do? What got you into the world of DevOps, and cloud, and all this fun stuff that we all get to do?”Leo: Well, I guess I'll do a little intro of myself. I'm Leonardo Murillo; everybody calls me Leo, which is fine because I realize that not everybody chooses to call me Leo, depending on where they're from. Like, Ticos and Latinos, they're like, “Oh, Leo,” like they already know me; I'm Leo already. But people in Europe and in other places, they're, kind of like, more formal out there. Leonardo everybody calls me Leo.I'm based off Costa Rica, and my current professional role is principal solutions architect—principal partner solutions architect at Weaveworks. How I got started in DevOps. A lot of people have gotten started in DevOps, which is not realizing that they just got started in DevOps, you know what I'm saying? Like, they did DevOps before it was a buzzword and it was, kind of like, cool. That was back—so I worked probably, like, three roles back, so I was CTO for a Colorado-based company before Weaveworks, and before that, I worked with a San Francisco-based startup called High Fidelity.And High Fidelity did virtual reality. So, it was actually founded by Philip Rosedale, the founder of Linden Lab, the builders of Second Life. And the whole idea was, let's build—with the advent of the Oculus Rift and all this cool tech—build the new metaverse concept. We're using the cloud because, I mean, when we're talking about this distributed system, like a distributed system where you're trying to, with very low latency, transmit positional audio, and a bunch of different degrees of freedom of your avatars and whatnot; that's very massive scale, lots of traffic. So, the cloud was, kind of like, fit for purpose.And so we started using the cloud, and I started using Jenkins, as a—and figure it out, like, Jenkins is a cron sort of thing; [unintelligible 00:02:48] oh, you can actually do a scheduled thing here. So, started using it almost to run just scheduled jobs. And then I realized its power, and all of a sudden, I started hearing this whole DevOps word, and I'm like, “What this? That's kind of like what we're doing, right?” Like, we're doing DevOps. And that's how it all got started, back in San Francisco.Ana: That actually segues to one of the first questions that we love asking all of our guests. We know that working in DevOps and engineering, sometimes it's a lot of firefighting, sometimes we get to teach a lot of other engineers how to have better processes. But we know that those horror stories exist. So, what is one of those horrible incidents that you've encountered in your career? What happened?Leo: This is before the cloud and this is way before DevOps was even something. I used to be a DJ in my 20s. I used to mix drum and bass and jungle with vinyl. I never did the digital move. I used DJ, and I was director for a colocation facility here in Costa Rica, one of the first few colocation facilities that existed in the [unintelligible 00:04:00].I partied a lot, like every night, [laugh] [unintelligible 00:04:05] party night and DJ night. One night, they had 24/7 support because we were collocations [unintelligible 00:04:12], so I had people doing support all the time. I was mixing in some bar someplace one night, and I don't want to go into absolute detail of my state of consciousness, but it wasn't, kind of like… accurate in its execution. So, I got a call, and they're like, “We're having some problem here with our network.” This is, like, back in Cisco PIX times for firewalls and you know, like… back then.I wasn't fully there, so I [laugh], just drove back to the office in the middle of night and had this assistant, Miguel was his name, and he looks at me and he's like, “Are you okay? Are you really capable of solving this problem at [laugh] this very point in time?” And I'm like, “Yeah. Sure, sure. I can do this.”We had a rack full of networking hardware and there was, like, a big incident; we actually—one of the primary connections that we had was completely offline. And I went in and I started working on a device, and I spent about half an hour, like, “Well, this device is fine. There's nothing wrong with the device.” I had been working for half an hour on the wrong device. They're like, “Come on. You really got to focus.”And long story short, I eventually got to the right device and I was able to fix the problem, but that was like a bad incident, which wasn't bad in the context of technicality, right? It was a relatively quick fix that I figured it out. It was just at the wrong time. [laugh]. You know what I'm saying?It wasn't the best thing to occur that particular night. So, when you're talking about firefighting, there's a huge burden in terms of the on-call person, and I think that's something that we had experienced, and that I think we should give out a lot of shout-outs and provide a lot of support for those that are on call. Because this is the exact price they pay for that responsibility. So, just as a side note that comes to mind. Here's a lot of, like, shout-outs to all the people on-call that are listening to this right now, and I'm sorry you cannot go party. [laugh].So yeah, that's telling one story of one incident way back. You want to hear another one because there's a—this is back in High Fidelity times. I was—I don't remember exactly what it was building, but it had to do with emailing users, basically, I had to do something, I can't recall actually what it was. They was supposed to email all the users that were using the platform. For whatever reason—I really can't recall why—I did not mock data on my development environment.What I did was just use—I didn't mock the data, I actually used just to a copy of the production [unintelligible 00:07:02] the users. I basically just emailed everybody, like, multiple times. And that was very embarrassing. And another embarrassing scenario was, one day, I was working on a firewall that was local to my office, and I got the terminals mixed up, and I shut down not my local office firewall, but the one that was at the colocation facility. And that was another embarrassing moment. So yeah, those are three, kind of, self-caused fires that required fighting afterwards.Ana: The mock data one definitely resonates, especially when you're starting out in engineering career where you're just like, “Hey, I need to get this working. I'm trying to connect to pull this data from a production service,” or, “I'm trying to publish a new email, I want to see how it all goes out. Yeah, why not grab a copy of what actually usually is being used by my company and, like, press buttons here? Oh, wait, no, that actually is hitting a live endpoint? I did not know that.”Which brings me to that main question; what do you end up learning when you go through these fires? After you went through this incident that you emailed all of your customers, what is something that you learn that you got to take back.Leo: I learned how you have to pay attention. It's hard to learn without having gone through this experiences because you start picking up on cues that you didn't pick up in the past. You start seeing things that you didn't pay attention to before, particularly because you didn't know. And I'm pretty sure, even if somebody would have told me, “Don't do this,” or, “Don't do that. Be careful,” you still make those mistakes.There is certain things that you only achieve through experience. And I think that's one of the most important things that I realized. And I've actually see the analogy of that with my children. There's certain things that I, no matter how well I articulate, they will not learn until they go through those experiences of themselves. But I think that's one of the things that I'd argue, you ha—you will go through this, and it's—it's not okay, but it's okay.Everybody makes mistakes. You'll also identify whether—like, how supporting your team is and how supportive your—the organization you're working with is when you see the reaction to those errors. Hopefully, it wasn't something too bad, and ideally there's going to be guiderails that prevent that really, really bad scenario, but it's okay to make mistakes. You learn to focus through those mistakes and you really should be paying attention; you should never take anything for granted. There is no safety net. Period.So, you should never assume that there is, or that you're not going to make a mistake. So, be very careful. Another thing that I learned, how I can I work in my development environment. How different patterns that I apply in my development environment, how I now I'm very careful to never have, kind of like, production [x 00:10:11] readily available within my development environment. And also to build those guiderails.I think part of what you learn is all the things that could go wrong, might go wrong, so take time to build those guiderails. I think that's important. Like anything else that comes with seniority, when you have a task to accomplish, the task itself is merely a margin, only a percentage of what you really should consider to reach that objective. And a lot of the times, that means building protection around what you're asked, or thinking beyond that scope. And then leverage the team, you know? If you have people around you that know more, which is kind of great about community and collaboration. Like, being—don't—you're not alone.Ana: I love that you mentioned guardrails and guardrails being a way that you're able to prevent some of these things. Do you think something like chaos engineering could help you find those guardrails when you don't know that you don't have a guardrail?Leo: I think it definitely. The more complex your job, the more complex your architecture, the more complex of the solution you're building—and we've gotten in an increase in complexity over time. We went from monoliths to microservices to fully distributed architectures of services. We went from synchronous to asynchronous to event-driven to—like, there's this increase in complexity that is basically there for a reason because of an increase in scale as well. And the number of possible failure conditions that could arise from this hugely diverse and complex set of variables means that we've gotten to a point that likely always was the way, but now it's reached, again, and because of targets aligned with this complexity, new levels of scale, that there is currently more unknown unknowns than we've ever had.The conditions that you can run into because of different problem states of each individual component in your distributed architecture, brings up an orders-of-magnitude increase in the possible issues that you might run into, basically a point where you really have to understand that you have no idea what could fail, and the exercise of identifying what can fail. Or what are the margins of stability of your solution because that's, kind of like, the whole point, the boundaries? There's going to be a set of conditions, there's going to be a combination of conditions that will trigger your—kind of, will tip your solution beyond that edge. And finding those edges of stability can no longer be something that just happens by accident; it has to be premeditated, it has to be planned for. This is basically chaos engineering.Hypothesizing, given a set of conditions, what is the expected outcome? And through the execution of this hypothesis of increasing or varying scope and complexity, starting to identify that perimeter of stability of their solution. So, I guess to answer your question, yes. I mean, chaos engineering allows you to ide—if you think about that perimeter of stability as the guardrails around your solution within which have to remain for your solution to be stable, for instance, there goes—[unintelligible 00:13:48] chaos engineering. I was actually talking to somebody the other day, so I'm the organizer for the Costa Rica Cloud-Native Community, the chapter for [unintelligible 00:14:00], and I have this fellow from [unintelligible 00:14:04] who, he works doing chaos engineering.And he was talking to me about this concept that I had not thought about and considered, how chaos engineering can also be, kind of like, applied at a social level. What happens if a person xyz is not available? What happens if a person other has access to a system that they shouldn't have? All these types of scenarios can be used to discover where more guiderails should be applied.Jason: You know, you start to learn where the on-call person that's completely sober, maybe, is unavailable for some reason, and Leo comes and [crosstalk 00:14:45]—Leo: Right. [laugh]. Exactly. Exactly. That's what you have to incorporate in your experiment, kind of like, the DJ variable and the party parameter.Jason: It's a good thing to underscore as well, right? Back to your idea of we can tell our children all sorts of things and they're not going to learn the lesson until they experience it. And similarly with, as you explore your systems and how they can fail, we can imagine and architecture systems to maybe be resilient or robust enough to withstand certain failures, but we don't actually learn those lessons or actually know if they're going to work until we really do that, until we really stress them and try to explore those boundaries.Leo: Wouldn't it be fantastic if we could do that with our lives? You know, like, I want to bungee jump or I want to skydive, and there's a percentage of probability that I'm going to hit the ground and die, and I can just introduce a hypothesis in my life, jump, and then just revert to my previous state if it went wrong. It would be fantastic. I would try many, many things. [laugh].But you can't. And it's kind of like the same thing with my kids. I would love to be able to say, “You know what? Execute the following process, get the experience, and then revert to before it happened.” You cannot do that in real life, but that's, kind of like, the scenario that's brought up by chaos engineering, you don't have to wait for that production incident to learn; you can actually, “Emulate” quote-unquote, those occurrences.You can emulate it, you can experience without the damage, though, if you do it well because I think that's also part of, kind of like, there's a lot to learn about chaos engineering and there's a lot of progress in terms of how the practice of chaos engineering is evolving, and I think there's likely still a percentage of the population or of the industry that still doesn't quite see chaos engineering beyond just introducing chaos, period. They know chaos engineering from calling the Chaos Monkeys kill instances at random, and fix things and, you know, not in the more scientific context that it's evolved into. But yeah, I think the ability to have a controlled experience where you can actually live through failure states, and incidents, and issues, and stuff that you really don't want to happen in real life, but you can actually simulate those, accelerates learning in a way that only experience provides. Which is the beauty of it because you're actually living through it, and I don't think anything can teach us as effectively as living through [unintelligible 00:17:43], through suffering.Ana: I do also very much love that point where it's true, chaos engineering does expedite your learning. Not only are you just building and releasing and waiting for failure to happen, you're actually injecting that failure and you get to just be like, “Oh, wait, if this failure was to occur, I know that I'm resilient to it.” But I also love pushing that envelope forward, that it really allows folks to battle-test solutions together of, “I think this architecture diagram is going to be more resilient because I'm running it on three regions, and they're all in just certain zones. But if I was to deploy to a different provider, that only gives me one region, but they say they have a higher uptime, I would love to battle, test that together and really see, I'm throwing both scenarios at you: you're losing your access to the database. What's going to happen? Go, fight.” [laugh].Leo: You know, one thing that I've been mentioning to people, this is my hypothesis as to the future of chaos engineering as a component of solutions architecture. My hypothesis is that just as nowadays, if you look at any application, any service, for that application or service to be production-ready, you have a certain percentage of unit test coverage and you have a certain percentage of end-to-end coverage of testing and whatnot, and you cannot ignore and say I'm going to give you a production-ready application or production-ready system without solid testing coverage. My hypothesis is that [unintelligible 00:19:21]. And as a side note, we are now living in a world of infrastructure as code, and manifested infrastructure, and declarative infrastructure, and all sorts of cool new ways to deploy and deliver that infrastructure and workloads on top of it. My theory is that just as unit testing coverage is a requirement for any production-ready solution or application nowadays, a certain percentage of, “Chaos coverage,” quote-unquote.In other words, what percentage of the surface of your infrastructure had been exercised by chaos experiments, is going to also become a requirement for any production-ready architecture. That's is where my mind is at. I think you'll start seeing that happen in CI/CD pipelines, you're going to start seeing labels of 90% chaos coverage on Terraform repos. That's kind of the future. That I hope because I think it's going to help tremendously with reliability, and allow people to party without concern for being called back to the office in the middle of the night. It's just going to have a positive impact overall.Ana: I definitely love where that vision is going because that's definitely very much of what I've seen in the industry and the community. And with a lot of the open-source projects that we see out there, like, I got to sit in on a project called Keptn, which gets a chance to bring in a little bit more of those SRE-driven operations and try to close that loop, and auto-remediate, and all these other nice things of DevOps and cloud, but a big portion of what we're doing with Keptn is that you also get a chance to inject chaos and validate against service-level objectives, so you get to just really bring to the front, “Oh, we're looking at this metric for business-level and service-level objectives that allow for us to know that we're actually up and running and our customers are able to use us because they are the right indicators that matter to our business.” But you get to do that within CI/CD so that you throw chaos at it, you check that SLO, that gets rolled out to production, or to your next stage and then you throw more chaos at it, and it continues being completely repetitive.Leo: That's really awesome. And I think, for example, SLOs, I think that's very valuable as well. And prioritize what you want to improve based on the output of your experiments against that error budget, for example. There's limited time, there's limited engineering capacity, there's limited everything, so this is also something that you—the output, the results, the insights that you get from executing experiments throughout your delivery lifecycle as you promote, as you progress your solution through its multiple stages, also help you identify what should be prioritized because of the impact that it may have in your area budgets. Because I mean, sometimes you just need to burn budget, you know what I'm saying?So, you can actually, clearly and quantifiably understand where to focus engineering efforts towards site reliability as you introduce changes. So yeah, I think it's—and no wonder it's such a booming concept. Everybody's talking about it. I saw Gremlin just released this new certification thing. What is it, certified chaos engineer?Jason: Gremlin-certified chaos engineering practitioner.Leo: Ah, pretty cool.Jason: Yeah.Leo: I got to get me one of those. [laugh].Jason: Yeah, you should—we'll put the link in the [show notes 00:23:19], for everybody that wants to go and take that. One of the things that you've mentioned a bunch is as we talk about automation, and automating and getting chaos engineering coverage in the same way that test coverage happens, one of the things that you're involved in—and I think why you've got so much knowledge around automation—is you've been involved in the OpenGitOps Project, right?Leo: Mm-hm. Correct.Jason: Can you tell us more about that? And what does that look like now? Because I know GitOps has become this, sort of, buzzword, and I think a lot of people are starting to look into that and maybe wondering what that is.Leo: I'm co-chair of the GitOps Working Group by the CNCF, which is the working group that effectively shepherds the OpenGitOps Project. The whole idea behind the OpenGitOps Project is to come to a consensus definition of what GitOps is. And this is along the lines of—like, we were talking about DevOps, right?Like DevOps is—everybody is doing DevOps and everybody does something different. So, there is some commonality but there is not necessarily a community-agreed-upon single perspective as to what DevOps is. So, the idea behind the OpenGitOps Project and the GitOps Working Group is to basically rally the community and rally the industry towards a common opinion as to what GitOps is, eventually work towards ways to conformance and certification—so it's like you guys are doing with chaos engineering—and in an open-source community fashion. GitOps is basically a operating model for cloud-native infrastructure and applications. So, idea is that you can use the same patterns and you can use the same model to deploy and operate the underlying infrastructure as well as the workloads that are running on top of it.It's defined by four principles that might resonate as known in common for some with some caveats. So, the first principle is that your desired state, how you want your infrastructure and your workloads to look like is declarative. No, it's—you're not—there's a fundamental difference between the declarative and imperative. Imperative is you're giving instructions to reach a certain state. The current industry is just… defining the characteristics of that state, not the process by which you reached it.The current state should be immutable and should be versioned, and this is very much aligned with the whole idea of containers, which are immutable and are versioned, and the whole idea of the Gits, that if used… [unintelligible 00:26:05] if used following best practices is also immutable and versioned. So, your declared state should be versioned and immutable.it should be continuously reconciled through agents. In other words, it eliminates the human component; you are no longer executing manual jobs and you're no longer running imperative pipelines for the deployment component of your operation. You are allowing your [letting 00:26:41] agents do that for you, continuously and programmatically.And the fourth principle is, this is the only way by which you interact with the system. In other words it completely eliminates the human component from the operating model. So, for example, when I think about GitOps as a deployment mechanism, and for example, progressive delivery within the context of GitOps, I see a lot of… what's the word I'm looking for? Like, symbiosis.Jason: Yeah. Symbiosis?Leo: Yeah. Between chaos engineering, and this model of deployment. Because I think chaos engineering is also eliminating a human component; you're no longer letting humans exercise your system to find problems, you are executing those by agents, you are doing so with a declarative model, where you're declaring the attributes of the experiment and the expected outcome of that experiment, and you're defining the criteria by which you're going to abort that experiment. So, if you incorporate that model of automated, continuous validation of your solution through premeditated chaos, in a process of continuous reconciliation of your desired state, through automated deployment agents, then you have a really, really solid, reliable mechanism for the operation of cloud-native solutions.Ana: I was like, I think a lot what we've seen, I mean, especially as I sit in more CNCF stuff, is really trying to get a lot of our systems to be able to know what to do next before we need to interfere, so we don't have to wake up. So, between chaos engineering, between GitOps, between Keptn, [unintelligible 00:28:32] how is it that you can make the load of SRE and the DevOps engineer be more about making sure that things get better versus, something just broke and I need to go fix it, or I need to go talk to an engineer to go do a best practice because now those things are built into the system as a guardrail, or there's better mental models and things that are more accurate to real conditions that can happen to a system?Leo: Actually, I sidetracked. I never ended up talking more about the OpenGitOps Project and the GitOps Working Group. So, it's a community effort by the CNCF. So, it's open for contribution by everybody. You're all in the CNCF Slack, there is an OpenGitOps Slack channel there.And if you go to github.com/open-gitops, you'll be able to find ways to contribute. We are always looking to get more involvement from the community. This is also an evolving paradigm, which I think also resonates with chaos engineering.And a lot of its evolution is being driven by the use cases that are being discovered by the end-users of these technologies and the different patterns. Community involvement is very important. Industry involvement is very important. It would be fantastic and we're an open community, and I'd love to get to know more about what you're all doing with GitOps and what it means for you and how these principles apply to the challenges that your teams are running into, and the use cases that and problems spaces that you're having to deal with.Jason: I think that's a fantastic thing for our listeners to get involved in, especially as a new project that's really looking for the insight and the contribution from new members as it gets founded. As we wrap up, Leo, do you have any other projects that you want to share? How can people find you on the internet? Anything else that you want to plug?Leo: I love to meet people on these subjects that I'm very passionate about. So yes, you can find me on Twitter. I guess, it's easier to just type it, it's @murillodigital, but you'll find that in the show notes, I imagine. As well as my LinkedIn.I have to admit, I'm more of a LinkedIn person. I don't, I hope that doesn't age me or made me uncool, but I never figured out how to really work with Twitter. I'm more of a LinkedIn person, so you can find me there. I'm an organizer in the community in Costa Rica CNCF, and I run.So, for those that are Spanish speakers, I'm very much for promoting the involvement and openness of the cloud-native ecosystem to the Hispanic and Latin community. Because I think language is a barrier and I think we're coming from countries where a lot of us have struggled to basically get our head above water from lesser resources and difficult access to technology and information. But that doesn't mean that there isn't a huge amount of talent in the region. There is. And so, I run a—there's a recent initiative by the CNCF called cloud-native TV, which is we're ten shows that are streaming on Twitch.You go to cloudnative.tv, you'll see them. I run a show called Cloud Native LatinX, which is in Spanish. I invite people to talk about cloud-native technologies that are more cloud-native communities in the region.And my objective is twofold: I want to demonstrate to all Hispanics and all Latin people that they can do it, that we're all the same, doesn't matter if you don't speak the language. There is a whole bunch of people, and I am one of them that speak the language that are there, and we're there to help you learn, and support and help you push through into this community. Basically, anybody that's listening to come out and say these are actionable steps that I can take to move my career forward. So, it's every other Tuesday on cloudnative.tv, Cloud Native LatinX, if you want to hear and see more of me talking in Spanish. It's on cloudnative.tv. And the OpenGitOps Project, join in; it's open to the community. And that's me.Ana: Yes I love that shout-out to getting more folks, especially Hispanics and Latinx, be more involved in cloud and CNCF projects itself. Representation matters and folks like me and Leo come in from countries like Costa Rica, Nicaragua, we get to speak English and Spanish, we want to create more content in Spanish and let you know that you can learn chaos engineering in English and you can learn about chaos engineering in Spanish, Ingeniería de Caos. So, come on and join us. Well, thank you Leo. Muchisimas gracias por estar en el show de hoy, y gracias por estar llamando hoy desde Costa Rica, y para todos los que están oyendo hoy que también hablen español...pura vida y que se encuentren bien. Nos vemos en el próximo episodio.Leo: Muchas gracias, Ana, and thanks everybody, y pura vida para todo el mundo y ¡hagamos caos!Jason: For links to all the information mentioned, visit our website at gremlin.com/podcast. If you liked this episode, subscribe to the Break Things on Purpose podcast on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or your favorite podcast platform. Our theme song is called, “Battle of Pogs” by Komiku, and it's available on loyaltyfreakmusic.com.

Slashers
What Makes a Good Horror Sequel?

Slashers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 62:38


How are you liking Talktober so far? Are you liking the more conversational style? Are you liking this more conversational style of episode description? Let us know. You know how to find us. You're smart. That's why you listen to us instead of the 10,000,000 other horror podcasts. This week, Doug's topic is horror sequels, and what makes them great. The gang talk about their favorites, spanning from Creep Show 2, to Child's Play, with basically every key franchise in between. What sets apart Nightmare on Elm Street 2, to the other sequels, remakes, and reboots? How does Guillermo Del Toro take a quaint idea of vampire vampires and turn it into the best of the Blade franchise (so far, because there's hope with Mahershala Ali)? Why does Jake love Gremlins 2: The New Batch, but hate Evil Dead II? If you ever have feedback or recommendations on future episodes, please let us know at slasherspod@gmail.com. You can always find us on our social media: Instagram, Twitter, Slasher App: @slasherspod; Facebook: /slasherspod Reddit: u/slasherspod; https://www.youtube.com/c/slasherspodcast You can find our merch, and links to all our online presence here: linktr.ee/slasherspod Theme song is I wanna Die by Mini Meltdowns. https://open.spotify.com/artist/5ZAk6lUDsaJj8EAhrhzZnh ; https://minimeltdowns.bandcamp.com/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/slasherspod/support

Cobra Guys
Gremsters vs. Hulksters

Cobra Guys

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 121:48


This week Mikey & Jeremy watch Gremlins 2: The New Batch. They discuss Gremlin boobies, John Glover, and Murray Fudderman.  

The Alternate Route Podcast
EP. 290 - MONSTERS OF THE NIGHT!: THE BABADOOK; GREMLINS; DEMON GHOST DOGS; BASEMENT BOGEYMAN; MONSTER UNDER THE BED; OUR FEAR OF THE DARK; MONSTER DREAMS & CHILDHOOD MONSTERS; PSYCHOLOGICAL TERROR/FEAR; ALIEN EXPLANATION(?); IS MIKE THE BABABURP, or

The Alternate Route Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 108:14


MONSTERS of the NIGHT!!  Need we say more?  We ALL have an innate FEAR of THINGS THAT GO BUMP in the NIGHT...Is the BABADOOK real?  Do we CONJURE it to physical existence through FEAR and BELIEF?  Stories of war-time GREMLIN attacks; Are they ALIEN-based?  Have DEMON GHOST DOGS existed since before TIME, as we know it?  What is your personal BOGEYMAN and MONSTER UNDER THE BED?  Our embedded FEAR OF THE DARK...CHILDHOOD DREAMS of MONSTERS, PSYCHOLOGICAL HORROR and the POWER OF THE MIND....Of course, LEVITY abounds, as per usual...Is Mike a BABABURP, or BABABELCH (for example)?  ha! 

Holochronicles
When Customs Go Wrong | Also Gremlins?

Holochronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 74:39


Ep. 91 Josh and Andy discuss how and when customs and other Star Wars props/merch just don't make the cut... But A for effort! Also a little Gremlins discussion because why not... The Holochronicles Podcast is devoted to the collecting of Star Wars memorabilia/toys, old and new. Hosts Josh Most and Andy Lemiere share their 20+ years of experience collecting all things Star Wars, as well as discuss topics ranging from the movies, books, fan theories and what's next for Disney/LucasFilm. Links: www.patreon.com/holochronicles Twitter: @holochronicles Instagram: Holochronicles YouTube: Holochronicles iTunes (and all other major podcast platforms): Holochronicles Podcast *If you enjoyed the podcast, don't forget to rate and review us on any of the major podcast platforms or on YouTube. We'd love to interact with you so feel free to get ahold of us on social media or email us at: holochronicles@gmail.com or DM us on Twitter @holochronicles - and thank you for sharing with a friend.

Drop Da Mic.
EPISODE 239 Pt 2: THE COLONY (THE HOWLING 81' Film Discussion)

Drop Da Mic.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 95:44


Here is part two of our creature feature double review! This episode we chat about 1981's ‘THE HOWLING + pop culture news updates for: Scream, Marvel, DC, and much more. New content released every week! Segments by: Admiral Atlas.Music by: Onarres.Happy Birthday, Em.

David Feldman Show
Build Back Better Gets Built Back Worse, Episode 1282

David Feldman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 406:53


D.C. Comics announces Superman is gay, which means his kryptonite is now Vanderpump Rules; That wasn't a Twilight Zone tribute when William Shatner looked out the window and saw a Gremlin. That was just Bezos waving goodbye. (3:00) David Does the News (1:30:40) Jon Ross (comedian and gentleman farmer) (1:58:42) The Herschenfelds: Dr. Philip Herschenfeld (Freudian psychoanalyst), and Ethan Herschenfeld (his new comedy special "Thug, Thug Jew" is streaming on YouTube) (2:29:45) "Feldman Made Me Do," Written and Performed by Professor Mike Steinel (2:36:01) Emil Guillermo (host of the PETA Podcast, and columnist for The Asian American Legal Defense And Education Fund) (3:01:00) The Rev. Barry W. Lynn (Americans United for Separation of Church and State) (4:06:22) The Professors And Mary Anne: Professors Mary Anne Cummings, Jonathan Bick, Ann Li, other PhDs TBD (5:13:53) Professor Harvey J. Kaye ("FDR on Democracy") and Alan Minsky (executive director of Progressive Democrats of America)

NostalgiaCast
Episode 44: EXPLORERS (1985)

NostalgiaCast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 64:22


NostalgiaCast returns for another fun-filled season of revisiting your childhood favorite films through adult eyes. Speaking of childhoods, fellow film fanatic Judd Harris joins Jonny and Darin for a discussion of Joe Dante's kiddie classic EXPLORERS, starring River Phoenix and Ethan Hawke. But how does this wannabe blockbuster stack up against Dante's other classics, GREMLINS and INNERSPACE? Adventure awaits!

InObscuria Podcast
Ep. 97: Arcane Sounds From The Big SCREAM

InObscuria Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 95:54


Be prepared to spill your popcorn this week as we check out songs from spooky flicks! That's right, we are going to the movies and we're prepared for blood n' gore n' frights! Did you ever hear about rock bands selling their souls to the devil, and if you listen to their music or play their albums backwards that you will turn into a demonic zombie??? The 70s, 80s, and 90s were full of films about horrific demons and metal n' punk bands either having their songs featured in the movie, or were themselves featured as the subject of the film. Grab your Reeses Pieces, large Coke, a severed limb, and hum along.What is it we do here at InObscuria? Every show Kevin opens the crypt to exhume and dissect from his personal collection; an artist, album, or collection of tunes from the broad spectrum of rock, punk, and metal. This week Robert gets a glimpse into another collection of lost and forgotten songs from the silver screen SCREAM! Our hope is that we turn you on to something new… and that you make it to the end of movie!Songs this week include:Fastway – “Stand Up” from Trick Or Treat – Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (1986)W.A.S.P. – “Scream Until You Like It” from Live… In The Raw (1987) Roky Erickson – “Burn The Flames” from Return Of The Living Dead (1985)Rollins Band – “Fall Guy” from Tales From The Crypt Presents: Demon Knight (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) (1995)Black Roses – “Dance On Fire” from Black Roses: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (1988)Monster Magnet – “Silver Future” from Heavy Metal 2000 (2000)Thor – “We Live To Rock” from Tritonz: The Edge Of Hell (1987)Echo & The Bunnymen – “People Are Strange” from The Lost Boys Soundtrack (1987)Be sure to check out the Roky Erickson documentary: You're Gonna Miss Me and the Jon Mikl Thor documentary I Am Thor!Please subscribe everywhere that you listen to podcasts!Visit us: https://inobscuria.com/https://www.facebook.com/InObscuriahttps://twitter.com/inobscuriahttps://www.instagram.com/inobscuria/Buy cool stuff with our logo on it!: https://www.redbubble.com/people/InObscuria?asc=uIf you'd like to check out Kevin's band THE SWEAR, take a listen on all streaming services or pick up a digital copy of their latest release here: https://theswear.bandcamp.com/If you want to hear Robert and Kevin's band from the late 90s – early 00s BIG JACK PNEUMATIC, check it out here: https://bigjackpnuematic.bandcamp.com/Check out Robert's amazing fire sculptures and metal workings here: http://flamewerx.com/

Par Jupiter !
Les Gremlins

Par Jupiter !

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 5:10


durée : 00:05:10 - La Master Classe de Par Jupiter ! - Pour sa JupiMasterClasse de cinéma, Arthur Jugnot a décidé de nous parler de son film préféré, Les Gremlins...

Good Morning Aurora
Tuesday | 10/12/2021 | Live News & Aurora Updates feat: A Gremlin

Good Morning Aurora

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 58:25


Iced Matcha Latte, coffee, and all the news. Happy Tuesday :) - Tomorrow will be a great event, Wine & Books at McCarty Mills from 5 to 7 pm. Our friend and author Victoria J. Hyla will be in the house with books for purchase and wine samples by Sable Creek Winery. This is going to be a great event, shouts out to our friends the Soto Family and Victoria! - Noticias y Mimosas part 3! Yes! On November 7th from 10 am to 1 pm we will be live once again at Tavern On Broadway with news and special guest Tracy Duran showcasing Aurora history. We will also detail our local news topics and from noon to 1 pm will be networking. Mimosas are $4, come on out for a great time! - Aurora Downtown is gearing up for Sugar Skull City activities. This will take place from October 15th thru November 7th. Get to know Aurora Downtown and all they do by visiting their website here: https://www.auroradowntown.org/ And that, as they say, is the news for the day. We hope you all had a great time with us this morning. We love and appreciate you all for tuning in. Have a blessed day and subscribe to the show on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/GoodMorningAuroraPodcast The second largest city's first daily news podcast is here. Tune in everyday to our FB Live from 8 am to 9 am. Make sure to like and subscribe to stay updated on all things Aurora. Twitter: goodmorningaur1 Instagram: goodmorningaurorail Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/6dVweK5Zc4uPVQQ0Fp1vEP... Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/.../good-morning.../id1513229463 Anchor: https://anchor.fm/goodmorningaurora #aurorail #positivevibes #positiveenergy #downtownaurora #kanecountyil #bataviail #genevail #stcharlesil #saintcharlesil #elginil #northaurorail #auroramedia #auroranews #goodmorning #goodmorningaurora #news #dailynews #subscribe #youtube #podcast #spotify #morningshow #morningnews #tuesday --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/goodmorningaurora/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/goodmorningaurora/support

Three Dogs North
S11 Episode 9 – Box of exploding kittens

Three Dogs North

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 37:04


In this episode, the dogs talk about how to take care of Gremlins (2:10) and exploding kittens (4:40). Connor shares his fear of unmet expectations (6:30) and they all discuss what it means to ultimately trust that God is a good father (11:30) who will provide for his children (13:00). Rob asks for grace on […]

Feminist Wellness
Ep #137: The Inner Critic: 3 Steps to Manage Your Gremlins

Feminist Wellness

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 24:58


This week, I'm sharing 3 tools I've used to manage my inner critic. I'm showing you how your inner critic is just a human part that we all have, why we so often believe what it tells us, and how to begin discerning between your gremlin and your highest, most loving self.   Get full show notes and more information here: https://victoriaalbina.com/137