Podcasts about Gremlins

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard

1984 comedy horror film directed by Joe Dante

  • 3,450PODCASTS
  • 4,652EPISODES
  • 1h 7mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jul 3, 2022LATEST
Gremlins

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022



    Best podcasts about Gremlins

    Show all podcasts related to gremlins

    Latest podcast episodes about Gremlins

    Radio Free Nintendo
    Episode 777: Are We Really Doing the Banana Conspiracy?

    Radio Free Nintendo

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 150:55


    FEATURING: (00:03:59) James Jones' Xenoblade Chronicles 3 direct takes, Nintendo Mini partner showcase.(01:09:13) Four new Genesis games in July NSO update.(01:21:37) New Business - Monster Hunter Rise: Sunbreak.(01:30:313) ElecHead.(01:39:43) Dicey Dungeons. Citizen Sleeper. (01:54:46) TMNT: Shredder's Revenge. The 1990 TMNT movie. Gremlins. Puppets. Dick Miller.

    The Remote Real Estate Investor
    How much time and money can an investment mentor save you?

    The Remote Real Estate Investor

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 34:25


    Rich Fettke has a passion for helping people improve their businesses, grow their wealth, and live more fulfilling lives. He is the author of The Wise Investor, Extreme Success, and the audio program Momentum. Rich is also a co-founder of RealWealth®. Since 2003, the company has helped over 60,000 members improve their financial intelligence and acquire cash-flowing income properties — so they can live life on their own terms. As a licensed real estate broker and an active investor, Rich was selected as a Rich Dad Author for his expertise as a Wealth Mindset Expert.   The real estate industry is not easy for everyone to jump into. If you have just gotten your real estate license and feel you need extra support before getting your feet wet, or if you are an experienced agent looking to take it to the next level, you may decide to get a real estate coach. Rich who is a coaching mentor and investor will discuss the value of having a coach and mentor and what you can expect to find in his new book.   Episode Links: https://realwealth.com/ https://realwealth.com/the-wise-investor-book/ --- Transcript Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals.   Michael: Hey, everyone, welcome to another episode of the Remote Real Estate Investor. I'm Michael Albaum and today I'm joined by Rich Fettke, who is an author, investor, coaching mentor, surfer, among many other things, and Rich is going to be talking to us today about some of the mistakes he seen investors make the value of having a coach and mentor as well as what you can expect to find in his book, which is soon to be released. So let's get into it.   Rich, what's going on, man? Welcome to the Remote Real Estate Investor. Thanks for hanging out with me.   Rich: Good to be here. Great hanging out with you.   Michael: Super excited. So before we hit record here, you and I were chatting a little bit about some sports where you both share in common, but I would love if you could give our listeners a little bit of insight into who you are, where you come from and what it is that you're doing in real estate today.   Rich: Sure, absolutely. My name is Rich Fettke and yeah, interesting. The way we got into real estate investing, I'm an I'm an investor and my wife and I also have a company that helps investors but that was what really got us into it was despair. It was about it was exactly 20 years ago, I was on top of my game, I had a book deal, just signed with Simon and Schuster. I was a business and personal coach had a thriving coaching practice, I was giving keynote speeches all over the country. It was like I was just crushing it and I felt so good. I was 37 years old and then I was diagnosed with melanoma, which is an advanced skin cancer but that's not the biggest deal is that they thought it spread to my liver.   So they had me do a CT scan and ultrasound and it kept showing these masses on my liver and so I met with an oncologist and he said, you know, it looks like you got about six months to live and we had a 10 year old daughter. Yeah, it just rocked my world, I had a 10 year old daughter, a three year old daughter. My wife is amazing but she was a stay at home mom and so she was freaking in the sense of what am I going to do financially if Rich dies and so she started to she had a as a coach, we were doing things together, she was also a trained coach and so she had this small radio station in San Francisco that she used to do a radio show on about all areas of life being your best self and personal development and all and she said I gotta figure this out. So she started to help people on that were financially successful, and was interviewing them about how do they create wealth and how do they create financial success and most of them turned out to be real estate investors. No surprise, so she came home all excited. One of them was a mortgage broker and he said, if you get your license, you can come become a mortgage broker. This is about 2003. So you know, things were still the mortgage world is pretty easy back then. So she went and did that. In the meantime, we figured out I had a PET scan, which is the most advanced scan for cancer, and it showed me cancer free. So it was just it was a false diagnosis. It was just hemangiomas little clusters of blood vessels on my liver but that was enough for me to go for those three months of not knowing if I was going to be alive, it was enough to give us the kick in the butt to get out and, and make things happen. So Kathy, and I see after that after I was healed, we started to invest together. We bought a bunch of properties in the Dallas, Texas area and it just took off from there and then Kathy started to help other investors with their mortgages. We had a bunch of friends and family saying, tell us how are you doing this? We you know, how are you doing this out of state investing and so we started we formed a group that we thought would be just a small group of family and friends and people that listen to the radio show. We thought it'd be a couple 100 people and today it's over 64,000 members now at real wealth that we're helping invest.   Michael: It's pretty amazing. Richard, good for you guys, so I I'm curious in your coaching business before you got diagnosed, did you ever come across real estate investors?   Rich: That I coached? Yes. Yeah and my mindset was, I want to invest in real estate someday when I have enough money and so and I was thinking I needed, you know, several $100,000 you know, to buy that first rental property or first investment, not realizing the power of leverage and how much banks love to lend money on real estate and so that was that was the eye opener for us.   Michael: Okay, I love it and what made you go remote? I mean, you're in California and your wife live in in San Francisco. Why did you pick to invest outside California?   Rich: Actually Robert Kiyosaki. It was she because Kathy was on the San Francisco radio station she was and it got bigger and bigger or she was able to attract some pretty big names and then this guy who had just written a book called Rich Dad, Poor Dad, not long before that, and he had this cashflow game that he was promoting and we had a friend who was his distributor for crypto cash flow game back in the day and so he was on the radio show, and he warned Kathy's listeners to sell their overpriced California properties and to invest in Texas and so we took his advice. Not we didn't sell all our expensive property, sadly, because 2008 crushed us with our California properties but it was, you know, he just saying for cash flow and what's going to happen, he was currently kind of calling out what was going to happen in 2008-2007. That's what sent us out of state.   Michael: Love it. So you also recently have written a book, haven't you?   Rich: Yeah, I just finished my second book. 20 years later, well, I have an audio program back then, too but yeah, it took me 20 years to write my second book and it's called the wise investor and it's a lot different than my first book that was mostly coaching focused. It was a nonfiction, basically a personal development book and this book is a modern parable. So it's story forum, and it tells a story of creating financial freedom and but also living your best life.   Michael: That's awesome and why did you decide to write it?   Rich: Interesting process, you know, I've had my own coach, to walk the talk to over the last 25 years now, I started coaching 25 years ago, and this coach that I that I still talk to every week, or every other week, now, he kept kind of he had read my first book, so he's always kind of knocking on me saying, when are you going to write your next book? When are you going to write your next book and I was like, I'm too busy running this company, you know, we have 27 employees and but then what we did is we applied story branding to our company. Are you familiar with that story branding?   It's a guy named Don Miller. He wrote a book called Building a story brand and it's all about basically telling the hero's journey, Joseph Campbell's work, using the hero's journey, just like great movies, do great books do weaving a story where your customer is the hero, and you are the guide. So the company is the guide, you help your customers and so we changed everything on our marketing around that, and how we served our members as being the heroes and I just got into this whole storytelling thing. I'm like, this is fascinating the structure of how to write a story, a compelling story that engages people that elicits an emotional change all that and so one day when in a coaching session, I said, you know, if I was going to write a book, I'd probably tell a story and then he heard that and you just like, What do you mean, tell me more and then that was the spark. So then then I get obsessed with it and I'm like, I could write a parable about what I've learned over the last 20 years as an investor, what I've learned in the last 25 years as a coach, yeah, and kind of weave them together into a story.   Michael: How cool and without giving away too much of the book. I mean, what could people what should people expect to find when they when they get a copy?   Rich: Basically, it's about this family, man, his name is Ryan Brooks and he's like a hard worker. He's got a wife, he's got a couple kids, and he's making a decent six figure income maxing out his 401k but he has no time for his wife or his kids or even his life and he's not investing. He's basically what we call today, Henry, right? A high earner, not rich yet. So he's…   Michael: I love it.   Rich: Yeah, they're out there does a lot of people you know, especially in California, where I'm based, and that make a lot of money, make a good income, but they're not rich, they're not wealthy, and they're not investing their money. They're spending it on things and so this guy is, is in that same trap. So he just starts to learn from he meets this new friend and mentor, who takes him out on adventures. Of course, it takes him out climbing takes him out mountain biking in in the sessions, when they're having fun together. He teaches him about investing about how wealthy people think, how rich people operate, and how and how poor people operate and think and he really goes over the difference between, you know, truly wealthy people, and people with a lot of money. He even says, you know, I know some people who are so poor, all they have is money and I see that in Malibu, you know, where I live there's a lot of has a lot of money and some of the people are really stoked and really happy and getting the most out of life and investing their money at some of the people are grumpy and miserable and, you know, that's rich in money but not in life.   So there's a lot of lessons about helping Ryan Brooks and his mentor walks them through this on how to invest how to how to really look at life through a different lens. One of my favorite things a mentor says to his mentor is about assets and he just kind of puts it in a different frame. He's like, you know, assets is are anything that will provide you income, or better health or happiness or two time and liability is anything that detracts from your income, or your health or your happiness or your time. So it's kind of a cool that type of perspective is this mentor is like, he's the me I hope to be in the future. He's that in that wise investor who's you know, he's got it all together, he's got this sage advice. He's very stoic, but he shares these lessons. So it covers the journey of five years of when they first met, and Ryan Brooks is struggling and just doesn't know what to do and it shows five years later, what happens and how he becomes wealthy in more ways than just money. I love it in money, too.   Michael: I love it. I love it enrich. Where can people find the book?   Rich: It's on Amazon, all major booksellers, published through Rich Dad advisors. So Robert Kiyosaki wrote the foreword for me, which I'm very grateful for… Come full, full circle, right.   Michael: Totally.   Rich: Yeah. So it's on Amazon. It's called the wise investor. Subtitle is a modern parable about creating financial freedom and living your best life. I got the cover right here. So it's out on eBook. This is what the cover looks like. Perfect. So it's out on eBook. But the printed version, the hardcover and the audio book won't be out until August and it's because of just like real estate supply chain issues. There's not enough paper at the printers, so it's a long wait six, seven months now to get a book printed.   Michael: Holy smokes…   Rich: Isn't it wild?   Michael: Yeah, okay. Well, I'm interested, get your order in now, because it might be a while.   Rich: Right, yeah. So hopefully it all comes out in August. Hopefully it comes out earlier in August but yeah, and the audio book was, that was a fun challenge for me. Big goal, because, you know, it's a story and there's 10 different characters, females, older people, young kids, so I had to become, I had to learn some voice acting skills over the period of a couple of months and really practice it. Oh, how can I think I pulled it off, we'll see how the reviews are.   Michael: Right on. That's great. Well, Rich, I'm curious to get your opinion on something because you're a coach, I will also work as a coach and there are folks out there that say you can take the horse to water, but you can't make him drink and so thinking about kind of the Henry's out there, and I think a lot of our listeners might find themselves in this boat, too. They have friends, family, folks around them that don't get real estate investing, right? I have a six figure job, I got a great job, why would I bother investing, I can make more money at my job. So what do you say to all those people and really, how do you position investing in general or real estate investing specifically to the people that think they haven't really good as things stand?   Rich: Yeah, I mean, first of all, you know, as a coach, I'm going to help point out what is good first, you know, this is the way I coach, the gratefulness piece and, you know, it's like, well, you know, be stoked on that six figure job, or whatever it is and it's about creating freedom and so many people don't have that freedom and that's what the Henry's don't have. If they have a short runway, if they stopped if they lost their job, which we've seen happen, they don't have many months left of cash flow, to be able to live their lifestyle, or any type of lifestyle. So that's the biggest thing would be that, do you want to create freedom for yourself, and not have the stress of losing your job, or wanting to move to a different job, if you're not loving what you're doing, a lot of people stay trapped, struggling, just trapped in their jobs, because it's like, this is my income, this is the way this is what I need to make ends meet. So that's the biggest thing, it's really about having your money, make money, so you can create freedom in the future freedom of time and everything. I think that's the biggest one and then so then flipping on the other side, there's something too about America, in the world that we are preprogrammed.   When we think invest, we think stock market and you know, I have nothing against it and Kathy and I are and my wife and I are invested in the stock market, but our major focus and the big aha, back through that story is, you know, we were doing that we were contributing to our IRAs and, you know, doing everything we were supposed to do investing in the stock market. But when we learned about leverage the power of leverage and how you can like 5x your money, just through the power of leverage. I mean, that's a standout and that's one of the lessons the mentor goes over in the book. He, he has Ryan compared to say, say you have $200,000 to invest and you invest 200,000, and gold, you put 200,000 and you buy, you buy maybe 400,000 in the stock market on that, you just leverage it and then you invest that same amount into real estate and then he kind of plays it out over five years, and over 10 years, sorry. So he's like 10 years later, and he said, so how much would the gold be worth at the same appreciation that's gold has been at and they look at that outcome and he said, oh, now let's look at your stocks and he looks at that. It's like good, he's got a decent return. Another investment, you know, he's got home and he's like, almost tripled his money but then the real estate, he looks at it, and he's 5x his money and more and then he's like, and that doesn't include the cash flow. It doesn't appreciate all the depreciation write offs and the tax benefits. So it's kind of like an eye opener to be like, oh, wait a minute. Now I see the, you know that the angels sing about investing in real estate and all those amazing, amazing benefits.   Michael: Totally, totally. Yeah, that makes that makes complete sense and curious, rich to get your thoughts on when looking for a coach because I think that that's something that some people have trouble wrapping their head around, it's like, oh, I you know, I don't have a coach in life and so I would never be inclined to go get a coach or pay for coaching and so if people are inclined to do so if people are okay, accepting that, what are some things they should be looking for when selecting a coach, or a mentor or whatever, you'd have someone to help walk them through their journey?   Rich: Yeah and that's a great question. It's like, I'd actually like to start step back a little bit, because you said what if they want to coach I would even go as far as there's a lot of people that I meet who say, Why do I need a coach, you know, I can hold myself accountable. I, I know how to set goals. I know how to go after what I want and everything in so why would I… Yeah, like you said, Why would I even pay someone or do anything like that and it's, you know, it's that age old metaphor or an analogy of an Olympic athlete, right? Did they get to the Olympics without a coach? No, you need someone to point things out. So for me, I know the power of coaching has been incredibly amazing because I have a coach to basically hold up the mirror to ask me the questions that I'm not asking myself, to help me look at myself and be like, you know, asking those tough questions. How are you operating? Are you being your best self? Are you, where are you getting in your own way? What's that inner Gremlin in your head saying to you? What's your limiting beliefs and what are you going to do here, what and look at new perspectives, new ideas. So there's a power in that, that it's called, I'm certified in CO active coaching, which is two people, you know, when you come together, you come up with ideas that you neither would have thought about their own? So that's another powerful piece of coaching. So that's, that's the first part of my answer and then the second part is, when you're looking for a coach, I think it's really what you're looking for.   So are you looking for a mentor, which is I think, different than a coach, a mentor has kind of been there, done that, just like the mentor, and in the book I wrote, he's been there and done that. So he can say, if you just do what I did, you will be where I am, which is awesome, and very valuable and that's a mentor and I think some people are looking for training and consulting, where they sign up for a coaching program. But it's more about teaching to learn a specific skill and that's very valuable to so and then the third one would be looking for a coach who's more like that coactive approach where it's someone who I first shared, and what I've gotten from coaching is someone to ask the most powerful questions, someone who's intuitive, someone who can really help you shift your mindset and be your best self and operate at your best self. So that would be a another type of coach or a peer coach in my eyes and sometimes it comes together, you know, I'll say to my clients, do you mind if I throw on my consulting hat right now or my mentoring hat? So they know that I'm stepping out of that coat peer coaching role and be like, you know, I've invested in real estate for a while I can give you some advice here, I'm not going to have you, you know, go and search it and try to learn it elsewhere when I've got it right here, and I can share it with you. So I think that's it, it's like looking for what is it that you want? What are you looking for and that would be the first thing and when I was interviewing for a coach and looking for I've had several coaches over the past 25 years, when I interview a coach, I'm always coming from the place of like, what's the vibe? What's it feel like to be coached by this person?   Do they? Do they ask powerful questions? Are they really hearing me and are they into my vision? You know, I think the biggest thing would be connecting with that coach, and really, really noticing, like, is this coach, really seeing my vision? Do they really get me who I am and what I want what's going to help me be fulfilled in my life, and in my career, and it's just a sense thing. So you can get that sometimes you you're talking to a coach, it's like, oh, this guy's or gals just coaching for the money, you know, just looking for another client. Sometimes you talk to a coach, it's like, wow, this person is really like, wants to coach me on their ideal client and so you can sense that   Michael: Interesting and how should people be thinking about it for themselves? If maybe they're not sure if someone is just getting started out in this journey, they know they want to invest in real estate, that's the goal but they don't know how to approach it to the to coaching and mentoring a consultant. I mean, what are some questions that they could be asking or things they could be thinking about, as they're starting?   Rich: That process gets great, I mean, experience, I would ask for experience and you know, I think it's great, you can find you can definitely find a coach, you know, or whatever they call themselves. They might call themselves a mentor, but it's like asking those questions. and talking to that person, just you know. So here are some of my goals. I know that you invest in real estate, can you tell me about your real estate background? What's your investment, investment philosophy? What have you invested in and I would even ask the coach, you know, what's been your biggest challenge your biggest failure as a real estate investor, you know, get see how vulnerable and real they are and if they're willing to, you know, to share that, and what's been your biggest, you know, what's been your biggest win as a real estate investor and what's your greatest strength? So I would ask some of those questions of a coach and then also like, what's, where do you I mean, real estate investing so broad, right and so it's like, what do you specialize in? What do you know best? When it comes to real estate investing?   Michael: Yeah, I love that. You mentioned tell me your biggest failure, biggest flop. I had a mentor back in the day, and he said, I don't trust anybody without a limp. Yeah, because like the people that have only had successes don't know how to do save no right to ship when things go sideways, and they will go sideways.   Rich: They will, they will. Yeah, I know that people who got into real estate in 2010-2015, who are just, you know, knock it out of the park, and they think they're, you know, superheroes. Sometimes I'm like, oh, careful, careful   Michael: We are all superheroes in this, you know, the last decade.   Rich: Exactly. Yeah, yeah.   Michael: So Rich, talk to us a little bit about what you've seen. Some of your coaching students or mentees get right and what have they gotten wrong because you really we have the beauty of hindsight now…   Rich: When it comes to investing, specifically?   Michael: When it comes to investing specifically…   Rich: Yeah, wrong and it's the same mistakes that Kathy and I made too. And it's that you try to talk people out of it and it's like buying an overpriced property in a non-landlord friendly state that is maybe slightly negative cashflow, or just breakeven, and they're looking at and say, but look at how this is appreciating in five years, it's going to be worth this much and it's like, no, so honestly, that's the biggest mistake I can see and I can see it in single family all the way up to multifamily. You know, just speaking at these conferences and meeting with a lot of people are doing multifamily. They think they're superheroes. They're doing this short term, short term lending short term loans, and bridge loans and really dangerous stuff at this time in the market because it's what's worked in the past and they think that they just like, Well, yeah, it's like, I know, this is a I know, it's only a you know, 2% cap rate, but that's okay because, yeah, just a one in three years… Yeah, exactly, so there's something there's something about, there's something about that. Yeah, it's just it's fundamentals, I think that's what it is, is comes down to investing fundamentals and that's what we preach at our company. It's how we help our investors, it's just really coming back to the fundamentals. Make sure you're doing it right.   Michael: Yeah, that makes sense and what about the other side of that coin for the folks that you've really just seen knock it out of the park? What are they doing and you can't say the fundamentals, you have to pick a different answer go?   Rich: That's great. I love that. Agreed, yeah, what value is that? Really, it's the people who, what I've seen, it's the people who take the long term game plan to the boring investors, the ones who are not trying to do this rapid growth, and trying to 10x their portfolio or 20, exit, or whatever it is. So it's keeping that long term perspective and just, you know, making sure that you can control the properties through any type of downturn and so the lessons learned that that, you know, being going through the whole recession, the Great Recession, and the whole mortgage meltdown, and all that big lessons came from that and so that it's the people who take out long term, continuously reinvesting to so it's like, you start this small, small portfolio, whether it's passive or active, and then you just start expanding and expanding and expanding it and I would say, it's the people who focus on the overall cash flow, not just I mean, brink weaving into appreciation, but looking at it, like five years from now, this is what my portfolio will most likely be doing based on everything, even if there's a recession, or whatever and then looking out 10 years and looking at it 15 years.   So it's that big picture and then reinvesting. The opposite of that would be someone who's I have some friends who were only flipping, so very transactional, and they had to find the properties either flip it and that's where their income was coming through into constantly flipping it and they adjusted the wise ones and the smart ones adjusted and switch to the bur stead strategy and so they started to find these properties, fix them up, but then they would hold them and rent them out and now they're the ones that have amassed a good amount of wealth, whereas the other people who are flipping are still in the transaction game.   Michael: Yeah. Ah, that makes sense, that makes sense. Okay. We've had a pretty good debate on the show over episodes about something called an alligator, which I don't know if you know Michael Zuber at all he's an author of one rental at a time. He's a good friend of the podcast, but in his definition alligators any property, that's negative cashflow, you have to feed it every month to keep continue owning it. So as you're talking about big picture, are you okay? If you say for instance, take out a cash out refinance a property to make that property a go negative, but to buy property B and now your global cumulative cash flow is greater than that a property a alone.   Rich: I'm in the camp of no, don't, do not no, no negative cashflow and negative cash flow and I'll be completely honest and transparent that the house at Kathy and I were in in Malibu before this, we bought it, we fix it up, we bought it for $747,000 in Malibu, which is rare, hard to find, it's like unheard of. Yeah, it was like it was a one bedroom, one bath built in 1927 and we had to completely gutted it and rehab and we put about 300,000 into it and then we didn't get permits. So we got busted in that process and now there's still a lien on title from LA county building department and so we can't sell that place and we can't even get a refi until we get those liens off title and get it all permanent everything which is a, that's a whole different stories…   Michael: Trying to get us to do an entire podcast series…     Rich: Coastal Commission and all that stuff. So oh my gosh, so we have a tenant in there and it's slightly cash negative cash flow. So that's like 150 to 200 a month negative cash flow.   So being completely honest, we do have a negative cash flow, it drives me crazy and that house has gone up probably $400,000 over the last couple of years in value. So we could look at it that way. But we can beyond that everything that we hold is positive cash flow, even if it's just like $100 a month positive. That's fine and if we're going to do a cash out refi we make sure that it's appreciated enough where we can do that cash out refi and not have the loan payment, PTI go over what we're gonna get for rental income.   Michael: Yeah, makes sense. Well, I appreciate you sharing the misstep and the vulnerability here on the show but it wasn't intentional, that was just a series of consequences. That hadn't be negative. You wouldn't you would intentionally do that.   Rich: Yeah, we did bring it on ourselves and but yeah, wasn't intentional. We didn't want to get caught.   Michael: I've played that game before, too. It's a risky one.   Rich: It is. Yeah, so you're always looking out the window and yeah…   Michael: Who is coming in, roday gonna be the day get caught o maybe tomorrow?   Rich: Exactly. When we were almost done. We were building the final deck in the back and all of a sudden, this building inspector shows I'm investigating you because one of your neighbors called…   Michael: I was gonna say but it's probably one of your neighbors.   Rich: Yeah, because it would make the cut and concrete and it was so loud or for the whole week. I think it just drove this neighbor crazy and so it is what it is.   Michael: As soon as a quick aside one of the other hosts on the show with me, Tom he, one of his neighbors called on him he was adding an offer a small prefab office in the backyard of his property. neighbor called he gets in trouble. Same thing didn't pull permits. So now he's going through that whole rigmarole. But the funny part is the neighbor that called Tom found out that their fence is on Tom's property, it's on the wrong side of the property. He's like, thanks for calling and alerting me to that little fact.   Michael: Unbelievable.   Rich: So he's, he's playing that game. How do I how do I want to you know, play my next hand?   Rich: The revenge game…   Michael: That's it, that's it, best served cold on ice. Okay, Rich. Let's wrap up here. I'm curious to get your thoughts. We are in this very unique time in our economy in our market in this country and I'm just curious to kind of get your thoughts on what are you doing, personally as an investor and what are you doing in your business and what are you telling your students to do, as well?   Rich: Absolutely, yeah. I have the benefit of being married to Kathy Fettke, who has been around for a while she's on the on the market podcast on Bigger Pockets and so she's constantly doing her market updates every year, she does predictions and has done that for the last 15 years and then at the every quarter, she doesn't investor update and at the end of the year, she puts herself on the line says okay, here's what I predicted back in January. Let's see how accurate I am and yeah, and she's been really good. She's like almost 95% on her predictions, which is awesome. So I just listened to her. You know, she's always interviewing experts and she's connected with like John Chang from Marcus and Millichap and so many just, you know, experts, as I said, with Kiyosaki and all that. So what she's saying I'll just speak, you know, because I get to hear through her office door when she's doing all her interviews and everything she think He said interest rates are not going to go up that much more, maybe even dip a tiny bit for mortgages, and then maybe level off.   But even though the Feds gonna keep raising the rate, the lender and great mortgage rates can't kind of withstand that going up too much. So she thinks mortgage rates are going to hold around where they are and then there's such a glut in such a need for properties and not enough inventory. It's like a whole different world than 2008-2009. So yeah, I think we're, it's estimates are between three and 5 million homes shy right now, for housing units. So inventory still low and also, there's that whole thing where people are locked into these amazing interest rates, so they don't want to sell. So they just, it doesn't make sense to sell something and when you got a 3% mortgage or lower and go into a higher mortgage, so the real estate is gonna hold strong is what she's predicting, it's even going to increase a little bit rents are even going to increase a little bit surprisingly, even with, with the economy and inflation, rents are still gonna go up a little bit, that's her prediction and then a recession will hit well, most likely, sometime around late 2023, early 2024 but it will be a mild one, just kind of more of a correction that that's needed.   Michael: Okay. Okay and does either her or you think that there will be any kind of pullback in demand as folks go back into the office or are we going to be seeing remote work kind of indefinitely, which I think was a big driver of that single family rental demand?   Rich: Yeah, that's a big one. Yeah and the cool thing is like, we have teams that are like the boots on the ground. So there's different 15 different property teams in our company that find properties and so and we just did a mastermind with them in Tampa, Florida and we spent two days and we really talked about all this exact same stuff. So it's, it's something around not like a big hit on it. There still will be some availability, but not much different than if you look at today's current market right now is not going to be a lot different than that over the next year and a half.   Michael: So for instance, we don't expect there to be much pullback in terms of demand. Dude, because we're expecting people to continue remote working basically…   Rich: There's definitely a return to the office. There's there are definitely companies that are saying no, it's time to come back now that we want to look over your shoulder, we want to hold you accountable and all that stuff. It's so funny, because it's like the surfing lineups are getting a little bit lighter thinning. So funny. Go Oh, it's like why are so many people surfing? Oh, they're supposed to be orange. They think they're working. Their bosses think they're at work right now. Yeah. So I'm seeing a pullback there. So that's my gauge.   Michael: So funny.   Rich: Yeah, but not as much. There's definitely, with so many people how they've learned to use Zoom and GoTo Meeting and being remote and all that stuff. It's we're in a new world, there's no doubt about it. So I think there's going to be a slight pullback on buyers and transactions and all that. As far as the rate, but it's still not going to it's not going to drop to like dismal levels.   Michael: Okay, sweet. Well, we will definitely have to stay in touch and see how you do how you and your wife do on those percentages. Rich, this has been so much fun, man. Thank you again, if people want to learn more about you want to learn more about real wealth, where can they do that?   Rich: For the book? Like I said, it's on Amazon or if people want to learn more, before they buy it, just go to https://realwealth.com/the-wise-investor-book/  and then our website is just simple, real wealth: https://realwealth.com/   Michael: Perfect. Alright, thank you again and I'm sure we'll be chatting soon.   Rich: All right, man. Thank you, it was fun.   Michael: All right, everyone a big thank you to Rich for coming on. Super, super insightful. I know I learned a ton as a coach myself in what to look for in a coach and mentor going forward as well. So as always, thank you so much for listening, and we look forward to seeing the next one. Happy investing…

    BGMania: A Video Game Music Podcast
    Mount Rushmore of Composers (#MastersofVGM)

    BGMania: A Video Game Music Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 117:08


    Episode #240 of BGMania: A Video Game Music Podcast. This week on the show, Bryan and Bedroth from RPGera and special guest Shootkapow finally present their contribution to the #MastersofVGM community event that has been taking place during the month of June 2022! Who made the cut? Listen and find out! Or just check the show notes... Email the show at bgmaniapodcast@gmail.com with requests for upcoming episodes, questions, feedback, comments, concerns, whatever you want really! Special thanks to our Executive Producers: Jexak & Xancu. EPISODE PLAYLIST AND CREDITS Overture from Dragon Quest XI: Echoes of an Elusive Age [Koichi Sugiyama, 2017] Awakening + Will Power from Persona 5 [Shoji Meguro, 2016] Isaac's Battle Theme from Golden Sun [Motoi Sakuraba, 2001] Ventilation Shafts -Stage 2- from Gremlins 2: The New Batch [Naoki Kodaka, 1990] Promise from Silent Hill 2 [Akira Yamaoka, 2001] Wind Scene from Chrono Trigger [Yasunori Mitsuda, 1995] High Above the Land -The Flying Machine- from Shovel Knight [Jake Kaufman, 2014] Hills of Radiant Winds from NieR Replicant [Keiichi Okabe feat. Emi Evans, 2010] Steam Gardens from Super Mario Odyssey [Koji Kondo, 2017] Metal Beat from Metal Masters [Alberto Jose Gonzalez, 1993] To Make the End of Battle from Ys II: Ancient Ys Vanished - The Final Chapter [Yuzo Koshiro, 1988] Freezeezy Peak from Banjo-Kazooie [Grant Kirkhope, 1998] The Grand Finale from Mario & Luigi: Bowser's Inside Story [Yoko Shimomura, 2009] Fragments of Memories from Final Fantasy VIII [Nobuo Uematsu, 1999] SUPPORT US Patreon: https://patreon.com/rpgera CONTACT US Website: https://rpgera.com Discord: https://discord.gg/cC73Heu Twitch: https://twitch.tv/leveldowngames Twitter: https://twitter.com/OriginalLDG Instagram: https://instagram.com/bryan.ldg/ Facebook: https://facebook.com/leveldowngaming RPGERA PODCAST NETWORK Very Good Music: A VGM Podcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/bgmania/message

    Break Things On Purpose
    Exploration and Resiliency with Mauricio Galdieri

    Break Things On Purpose

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 30:42


    In this episode, we cover: Mauricio talks about his background and his role at Pismo (1:14) Jason and Mauricio discuss tech and reliability with regards to financial institutions (5:59) Mauricio talks about the work he has done in Chaos Engineering with reliability (10:36) Mauricio discusses things he and his team have done to maximize success (19:44) Mauricio talks about new technologies his team has been utilizing (22:59) Links Referenced: Pismo: https://pismo.io/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/pismo/ TranscriptMauricio: That's why the name Cockroach, I guess, if there's a [laugh] a world nuclear war here, all that will survive would be cockroaches in our client's data. [laugh]. So, I guess that's the gist of it.Jason: Welcome to Break Things on Purpose, a podcast about Chaos Engineering and reliability. In this episode, we chat with Mauricio Galdieri, a staff engineer at Pismo about testing versus exploration, reliability and resiliency, and the challenges of bringing new technologies to the financial sector.Jason: Welcome to the show.Mauricio: Hey, thank you. Welcome. Thanks for having me here, Jason.Jason: Yeah. So, Mauricio, you and I have chatted before in the past. We were at Chaos Conf, and you are part of a panel. So, I'm curious, I guess to kick things off, can you tell folks a little bit more about yourself and what you do at Pismo? And then we can maybe pick up from our conversations previously?Mauricio: Okay, awesome. I work as a staff engineer here at Pismo. I work in a squad called staff engineering squad, so we're a bunch of—five squad engineers there. And we're mostly responsible for coming up with new ways of using the existing technology, new technologies for us to have, and also standardize things like how we use those technologies here? How does it fit the whole processes we have here? And how does it fit in the pipelines we have here, also?And so, we do lots of documentation, lots of POCs, and try different things, and we talk to different people from different companies and see how they're solving problems that we also have. So, this is basically our day-to-day activities here. Before that, well, I have a kind of a different story, I guess. Most people that work in this field, have a degree in something like a technical degree or something like that. But I actually graduated as an architect in urban planning, so I came from a completely different field.But I've always worked as a software developer since a long time ago, more than [laugh] willing to disclose. So, at that time when I started working with software development, I like to say that startups were called dotcoms that back then, so, [laugh] there was a lots of job opportunities back then, so I worked as a software developer at that time. And things evolved. I grew less and less as an architect and more as an engineer, so after I graduated, I started to look for a second degree, but on the more technical college, so I went to an engineering college and graduated as a system analyst.So, from then on, I've always worked as a software developer and never, never have done any house planning or house project or something like that. And I really doubt if I could do that right now [laugh] so I may be a lousy architect [in that sense 00:03:32]. But anyway, I've worked in different companies for both in private and public sectors. And I've worked with consultancy firms and so on. But just before I came to Pismo, I went working with a FinTech.So, this is where I was my first contact with the world of finance in a software context. Since then, I've digged deep into this industry, and here I am now working at Pismo, it's for almost five years now.Jason: Wow. That quite a journey. And although it's a unique journey, it's also one that I feel like a lot of folks in tech come from different backgrounds and maybe haven't gone down the traditional computer science route. With that said, you know, one of the things you mentioned FinTech. Can you give us a little bit of a description of Prismo, just so folks understand the company that you're working at now?Mauricio: Oh, yeah. Well, Pismo, it's a company that has about six years now. And we provide infrastructure for financial services. So, we're not banks ourselves, but we provide the infrastructure for banks to build their financial projects with this. So basically, what we do is we manage accounts, we manage those accounts' balances, we have connections with credit card networks, so we process—we're also a credit card processor.We issue cards, although we're not the issuer in this in the strict sense, but we issue cards here and manage all the lifecycle of those cards. And basically, that's it. But we have a very broad offering of products, from account management to accounting management, and transactions management, and spending control limits and stuff. So, we have a very broad product portfolio. But basically, what we do is provide infrastructure for financial services.Jason: That's fascinating to me. So, if I were to sum that up, would it be accurate to say that you're basically like Software as a Service for financial institutions? You do all the heavy lifting?Mauricio: Yeah, yeah. I could say that, yeah.Jason: It's interesting to me because, you know, traditionally, we always think of banks because they need to be regulated and there needs to be a whole lot more security and reliability around finances, we always think of banks as being very slow when it comes to technology. And so, I think it's interesting that, in essence, what you've said with trying the latest technology and getting to play around with new technology and how it applies, especially within your staff engineering group, it's almost the exact opposite. You're sort of this forefront, this leading edge within the world of finance and technology.Mauricio: Yeah. And that actually is, it's something that—it's the most difficult part to sell banks to sign up with us, you know? Because they have those ancient systems running on-premises and most likely running on top of COBOL programs and so on. But at the same time, it's highly, highly reliable. That they've been running those systems for, like, 40 years, even more than that, so it's a very highly reliable.And as you said, it's a very regulated industry, so it's very hard to sell them this kind of new approach to banking. And actually, we consider this as almost an innovation for them. And it's a little bit strange to talk about innovation in a sense that we're proposing other companies to run in the cloud. This doesn't sound innovating at all nowadays. So, every company runs their systems in the cloud nowadays, so it's difficult to [laugh] realize that this is actually innovation in the banking system because they're not used to running those things.And as you said, they're slow in adopting new technologies because of security concerns, and so on. So, we're trying to bring these new things to the table and prove them. And we had to prove banks and other financial institutions that it is possible to run a banking system a hundred percent in the cloud while maintaining security standards and security compliances and governance compliance and all that stuff. It's very hard to do so and we have a very stringent process to evaluate and assess new technologies because we have to make sure it complies with those standards and all those certifications that we need to have in order to operate in this industry. So, it's very hard, but it doesn't—at that same time, we have lots of new technologies and different ways we can provide the same services to those banks.And then I think the most difficult part in this is to map what traditional banks were doing into this new way of doing things in the cloud. So, this mapping, it's sometimes it gets a little confusing and we have to be very patient and very clear with our clients what they should expect from us and how we will provide the same services they already have now, but using different technologies and different ways. For instance, they are used to these communications with different services, they're used to things like webhooks. But webhooks are not reliable; they can fail and if they fail, you lose that connection, you lose connectivity, and you may lose data and you may have things out of sync using webhooks. So, now we have things like event streaming, or queues and other stuff that you can use to [replay 00:09:47] things and not lose any data.But at the same time, you have to process this, and then offline in an asynchronous manner. So, you have to map those synchronous things that they did before to this asynchronous world and this world where things are—we have an eventual consistency. But it's very difficult but it's also at the same time, it's a very fascinating industry.Jason: Yeah, that is fascinating. But I do love how you mentioned taking the idea of the new technology and what it does, and really trying to map that back to previously—you know, those previous practices that they had. And so, along with that, for folks who are listening again, Mauricio and I had a chat during Chaos Conf a while back, and he was sharing some of the practices that Pisma has done for Chaos Engineering. And I always liken that back to, you know, Chaos Engineering really is very similar to traditional disaster recovery testing, in many ways, other than oftentimes, your disaster recovery would never actually, you know, take things down. Mauricio, I'm curious, can you share a little bit more about what you've been doing with Chaos Engineering and in general, with reliability. Are there any new programs or processes that you've worked on within Prismo around Chaos Engineering and reliability?Mauricio: Well, I think that the first thing to realize, and I think this is the most important point that you need to have very clear in your mind when we're talking about Chaos Engineering is that we're not testing something when we're doing Chaos Engineering; we're experimenting with something. And there's a subtle but very important distinction between those two concepts. When you test for something, you're testing for something that you knew what will happen; you have an idea of how it should behave. You're asserting a certain behavior. You know how the system must behave and you assert that, and it makes sure the system doesn't deviate on that by having an automated test, for instance, a unit or integrated test, or even functional tests and such.But Chaos Engineering is more about experimenting. So, it's designed for the unknowns. You don't know what will happen. You're basically experimenting. It's like a lab, you're working in a laboratory, you're trying different stuff and see what happens, you have an idea of what should happen and we call this a hypothesis, but you're not sure if that is how we will behave.And actually, it doesn't matter if it complies with your expectations. Even if it doesn't behave the way you expect it to behave or the way you want it to behave, you're still gaining knowledge about your system. So, it's much more about experimenting new things instead of actually testing for some something that you know about. And our journey here into Chaos Engineering at Pismo, it all began about a year-and-a-half ago when we got a very huge outage on one of our major cloud providers here. And we went down with them; they were out for about almost an hour.But not only we were affected by it, but other digital banks here in Brazil, but also many other services like Slack, Datadog, other observability tools that were running at that time, using that cloud provider went down, together with them. So, it was a major, major outage here. And then we were actually caught off guard on this because we have lots of different ways to make sure the system doesn't go down if something bad happens. But that was so bad that we went down and we couldn't do anything. We were desperate because we couldn't do anything. And also we can even communicate properly because we use Slack as our communication hub, so Slack was down at that time, also, so we cannot communicate properly with our official channels.Also, Datadog that we were using at a time also went down and we couldn't even see what was happening in the system because we didn't have any observability running at the time. So, that was a major, major outage we had there. So, we started thinking about ways we could experiment with those major outages and see how we could find ways of still operating at least partially and not go down entirely or at least have ways to see what was happening even in the face of a major disaster. And those traditional disaster recovery measures that were valid at the time, even those couldn't cope with the kind of outages we were facing at that time. So, we were trying to look for different ways that we can improve the reliability of our services as a whole.So, I guess that's when we started looking into Chaos Engineering and started looking for different tools to make that work, and different partnerships we could find, and even different ways we could experiment this with our existing technology and platform.Jason: I really love how you characterized that difference between testing and Chaos Engineering. And I think the idea of being more experimental puts you into a mindset of having this concept of, you know, kind of blamelessness, right, around failure. The idea that, like, failure is going to happen and we want to be open to seeing that and to learning from it. More so than a test, right? When we test things, then there's the notion of a pass-fail and fails are bad, whereas with an experiment, that learning is, if it didn't happen the way you expect, there's learning around that and that's a good thing rather than a bad thing, such as failing a test.Mauricio: Yeah, and that works in a higher framework, I guess, which is resilience itself. So, I guess, chaos experiment, chaos engineering, and all that stuff, it's an important part of a bigger whole that we call resilience. And I guess a key to understand resilience is that this point exactly, the systems never work in unexpected ways. They always behave the way it is expected to behave. They're deterministic in nature. So, we're talking about machines here, computers. We told them what we want them to do.And even if we have complexity and randomness involved, say if a network connection goes down, it still will behave the way we programmed them to behave. So, every failure should be expected. What we have here is that sometimes they behave in ways we don't want them to behave. And sometimes they behave in ways we want them to behave. So, it's more of a matter of desire, you know? You want something, you want the system to behave a certain way.So, in that sense, success should be measured as a performance variability, you know? So, sometimes it will work the way you want and sometimes it will work your way in ways that you don't want it to behave. And I guess, realizing that, it's key also to understand another point that is, in that sense, success is the flip side of failure. So, either it works the way you want it or it works the way you don't want it. And what we can do to move the scale towards a more successful operation, the ways you can do this, you must first realize also that—let's go back a little bit then say, if you have a failure and you look at why it happened, almost never it is the result of one single thing.Sometimes it is, but this is very rare. Most of the failures and even mainly when we're talking about major failures, they're most likely the result of a context of things that happened that led to this failure. And you can see that the same thing, it's valid for successes. When you have a success at one point, it's almost never the result of one thing that you did that led to a successful scenario. Most of the time is a context of different things you did that maximizes your chances of success.So, to turn this scale towards success, you should create an environment of several things, of a context of things. And this could be tooling, this could be your organizational culture and stuff, all of those things that you do in your company to maximize their chances of success. It's not, you cannot plan for success in the sense because planning is one thing you can do, and planning doesn't involve strategy, for instance. Because planning should be done thinking about things you can do, tasks you can perform, while strategy, you should be turning tables to [laugh] think in terms of strategy. So, you have to put all of this in the same way in a table and try to organize your company and your culture, your tools and your technology in ways you maximize your chances of success and minimize your chances of failures.Jason: That's such an interesting insight. So, I'm curious, can you dive into some of the things that you and your team have done to maximize your chances of success?Mauricio: Okay. When we started working with Chaos Engineering, it was in this sense of trying to do one more thing to maximize our chances of success. And we partnered up with Gremlin and we saw that working with Chaos Engineering, using Gremlin mainly, it's so easy—that is, it's also easy to lose track of what you're doing. It's easy for you to go just for the fun of it and break things down and have fun with it and stuff. So, we had to come up with a way to bring structure to this process.And by doing so, we should also not be too bureaucratic in the sense of creating a set of steps you should take in order to run a chaos session. So, one way we thought about was to come up with a document. That is the bureaucratic part, so this was a step you should take in order to plan for your chaos session, but there is one part of it—and I think it's one of the most important parts of this chaos session planning—is that you should describe what you're going to test, but more importantly, why you're going to test this. And this is one of the most important questions because this is a fundamental question: why you're doing this kind of experiment. And to answer that, you have to think about all the things in context.What are the technologies you're using? Why it fails in the first place? Do the fails that I expect to see are actually fails or is it just different ways of behaving? And sometimes we consider failure in a business rule that was not complied, that was not met. So, this is an opportunity to think about, are those business rules correct? Should we make it more flexible? Should we change those business logic?So, when you start asking why you're doing something, you're asking fundamental questions, and I think that puts you in context. And this is one of the major starting points to maximize our chances of success because it makes every engineer involved in running a chaos session, think about their role in the whole process and the role of their services in the whole company. So, I think this is one powerful question to ask before starting any chaos session, and I think this contributes a lot to a successful outcome.Jason: Yeah, I think that's a really great perspective on how to approach Chaos Engineering. Beyond the Chaos Engineering, you mentioned that the staff engineering group that you're part of that Prismo is really responsible for seeing new technologies and new trends and really trying to bring those in and see how they can be used and applied within the financial services sector. Are there any new technologies that you've used recently or that you're looking at right now that has really been fruitful or really applied to finding more success as you've mentioned?Mauricio: Yeah, there are some things we're researching. One of those already went past research and we're already using it in production, which is data—cloud-based, multi-region databases and multi-cloud—also—databases. And we're working with CockroachDB as one of our new database technologies we use. And it's a database built from the ground up to be ultra resilient. And that's why the name Cockroach, I guess, if there's a [laugh] a world nuclear war here, all that will survive would be cockroaches in our client's data. [laugh]. So, I guess that's the gist of it.And we have to think about that in different ways of how we approach this because we're talking about multi-cloud data stores and multi-region and how we deal with data in different regions. And should we replicate all the data between regions and how we do partition data. So, we have to think in different ways, how we approach data modeling with those new cloud-based and multi-region and globally distributed databases. Another one that we're—this is more like of a research, is having a sharded processing. And that is, how we can deal with, how we group different parts of the data to be processed separately but using the same logic.And this is a way to scale processing in ways that horizontal scaling in a more traditional way doesn't solve in some instances. Like, when we have—for instance, let me describe one scenario that we have that we're exploring things along those lines. We have a system here called ‘The Ledger,' which keeps track of all of the accounts' balances. And for this system, if we have multiple requests or lots of requests for different accounts, there's no problem because we're updating balances for different accounts, and that works fine. And we can deal with lots and lots of requests. We have a very good performance on that.But when we have lots of requests coming in from one particular accounts, and they're all grouped for this particular account, then we cannot—there's no way around locking at some place. So, you have to lock it either at the database level, or at a distributed locking mechanism level, or at the business logic layer. At some point, you have to lock the access to this account balance. So, this degrades performance because you have to wait for this processing to finish and start another. And how can we deal with that without using locks?And this was the challenge we put that to ourselves. And we're exploring different ways, lots of different ways, and different approaches to that. And we have lots of restrictions on that because this system has to respond quickly, has to respond online, and cannot be in an asynchronous process; it has to be synchronous. So, we have very little space for double-checking it and stuff. So, we're exploring a sharded processing for this one in which we can have a small subset of accounts being routed to one specific consumer to process this transaction, and by doing so, we may have things like a queue of order transactions so we can give up locking at the database and maybe improve on performance. But we're still on the POC on that, so let's see what we come up with [laugh] in the next few months.Jason: I think that's really fascinating. Both from a, you know, having been there, having worked on systems where, you know, very transaction-driven, and having locks be an issue. And so, you know, back in my day of doing this, you know, was traditionally MySQL or Postgres, trying to figure out, like, how do you structure the database. So, I think it's interesting that you're sort of tackling this in two ways, right? You've got CockroachDB, which is more oriented towards reliability, but a lot of the things that you're doing there around, you know, sharding and multi-cloud also have effects for this new work that you're doing on how do you eliminate that locking and try to do sharded processes as well. So, that's all super fascinating to me.Mauricio: Exactly. Yeah, yeah. This is one of the things that makes you do better the end of the day, you know? [laugh].Jason: Yeah, definitely. As an engineer, you know, if anybody's listening and you're thinking of, “Wow, this all sounds fascinating and really cool stuff,” right, “Really cool technologies to be working with and really interesting challenges to solve,” I know, Mauricio, you said that Pismo is hiring. Do you want to share a little bit more about ways that folks can engage with you? Or maybe even join your team?Mauricio: Yeah, sure. We're hiring; we have lots of jobs open for application. You can go to pismo.io and we have a section for that. And also, you can find us on LinkedIn; just search for Pismo and then find us there.And I think if you're an engineer and looking for some cool challenges on that, be sure to check our open positions because we do have lots and lots of cool stuff going on here. And since we're growing global, you have a chance to work from wherever you are. And this also imposes some major challenges for [laugh] for new technologies and making our products, our existing products, work in a globally distributed banking system. So, be sure to check out our channels there.Jason: Fantastic. Before we wrap up, is there anything else that you'd like to promote or share?Mauricio: Oh no, I think those are the main channels. You can find us: LinkedIn and our own website, pismo.io. Also, you can find us in some GopherCon conferences, KubeCon, and other—Money20/20; we're attending all of those conferences, be it in the software industry or in the financial industry. You can find this there with a booth there or just visiting or participating in some conferences and so on. So, be sure to check that out there also. I guess that's it.Jason: Very cool well thanks, Mauricio for joining us. It's been a pleasure to chat with you again.Mauricio: Thank you, Jason. And thanks for having me here.Jason: For links to all the information mentioned, visit our website at gremlin.com/podcast. If you liked this episode, subscribe to the Break Things on Purpose podcast on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or your favorite podcast platform. Our theme song is called “Battle of Pogs” by Komiku, and it's available on loyaltyfreakmusic.com.

    Old Man Yells at Music
    Episode #105: June 2, 1984

    Old Man Yells at Music

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 50:20


    This time Roger goes back to a time when Gremlins and Ghostbusters were about to hit the screens and metal fans tore up the world's most famous arena. On the charts, there was a story of escaping bigotry for a better life, a big band throwing something together to fulfill a contract, swinging mood swings, an exhausted dark lord, rock and jazz legends embracing new sounds, a comedienne going retro, and the end of the world. See and here more on YouTube: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLDWLXjsOJPQmG24LGBK2SyTKDv22O_ct9 And if you'd like you can support the show on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oldmanyellsatmusic?fan_landing=true It is this episode you're looking for.

    Gremlins Strike Back
    GSB162: The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes, Sleuth & The Day of the Locust plus The Movie Alphabet

    Gremlins Strike Back

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 152:04


    In de laatste aflevering voor de zomerstop van 2022 nemen de Gremlins voorgoed afscheid van hun John June segment. Het stof wordt van The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes (1970), Sleuth (1972) en The Day of the Locust (1975) geblazen wat bij sommigen wat irritatie teweeg brengt. Sven heeft het over het totaal ontbreken van een verhaal, Maarten over meesterlijke acteerprestaties en Bart gijzelt een van zijn vrienden voor morele steun. Er worden lezersbrieven voorgelezen en aangezien we nog altijd met Batman prijzen mogen strooien, blijft Maarten on topic en voegt er een Weetjes Melee over Batman Returns aan toe. Hou onze social media kanalen in de gaten voor de releasedatum van de eerste summer special!

    Toys Reluctant Adult Podcast
    MURPH or Nothing!

    Toys Reluctant Adult Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 67:42


    Just when we thought Obi-Wan Kenobi couldn't possibly be any dumber, it went and did something like this... and totally redeemed itself! Plus, NERF taps into our nightmares to introduce their new mascot, “Murph,” which coincidentally is also the sound our stomach makes when we see this abomination. And, NECA adds “don't undress them,” to the list of Gremlin rules. No matter how much he cries, no matter how much he begs, never feed him after The Reluctant Adult Podcast. TikTok @TheReluctantAdultPodcast Instagram @TheReluctantAdultPodcast Twitter @Reluctant_Pod Facebook Toy Sale Boat YouTube The Reluctant Adult Podcast Paul's Amazon Wishlist Bill's Amazon Wishlist

    Mama Needs a Movie
    Lightyear with Joan Ford

    Mama Needs a Movie

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 100:42


    Writer and animation connoisseur Joan Ford, (DC Super Hero Girls, Tiny Toons Looniversity), joins to discuss Pixar's new release, LIGHTYEAR starring Chris Evans, Keke Palmer, and Peter Sohn. The Angus MacLane-directed animated science fiction film is a (sort of) prequel to the Toy Story franchise, presented as a 1995 adventure movie that inspired the Buzz Lightyear toy. But does the movie-within-a-movie live up to the saga's gold standard? We get to the bottom of this question, stopping along the way for some trusty MNAM diversions into Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Child's Play 3, Ain't It Cool News, the lost roles of Tom Cruise, real life Tim Allen encounters, and of course, the AMC Stubs A-List. So buckle up, Star Command rookies, for a podcast that goes to infinity... and beyond!

    gude/laurance podcast
    GudeLaurance Podcast – Episode 329

    gude/laurance podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022


    Today on the show, Paul and Ben talk about stalling for time, Carlin vs Johannsen vs Wright, Goofus and Gallant, Gremlins, burning the necronomicon, Atlanta not highlighting the main cast in season 3, TV resolution, giving content freely to online platforms, ill-informed talk about the Jan 6th hearings, who's getting … Continue reading →

    The Tommy and Adam Hard To Name Podcast
    The Riot and Gremlins in the Studio Podcast

    The Tommy and Adam Hard To Name Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 135:29


    The Tommy and Adam Hard to Name Podcast Episode #18 Season #3: Adam has joined the ranks of Grandfatherdom! His grandson is here but that didn't stop him from recording an episode. The man has his priorities damn it. Because for the national “Wanna Get Away” Day Adam just wanted to go to Las Vegas as well. Rock History is full of stories about riots, Tommy injects himself into history on the island of Guam, and the lyric that will blown you away is Triumph's “Magic Power.” The fellows explore the cool Urban Dictionary for the Hip Hop Rappizzle Moment and the Rumpology Reading segment has a new voice and wait until you here what a great special is available to the LGBTQ Community this year for Pride Month. Even with the gremlins causing a few problems in the studio, this podcast made it out to you. It's all on the internet and to the embarrassment of their loved ones, they invite you to download/stream this episode on your favorite DSPs. Subscribe, share then write a comment/complaint or send us an email to TommyNAdamPod@gmail.com. Always hashtag with #TNAHTNPodcast.

    gibop
    Gremlins (1984)

    gibop

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 106:14


    Director Joe Dante and actors Dick Miller, Phoebe Cates, Zach Galligan, and Howie Mandel

    gibop
    Gremlins (1984)

    gibop

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 106:14


    Director Joe Dante, producer Michael Finnell, and creature effects designer Chris Walas

    King Me: The Stephen King Movie Podcast, Officially
    Dante Speak - 2 - Gremlins (1984) Preview

    King Me: The Stephen King Movie Podcast, Officially

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 8:25


    GRAMLINS?! The second episode of our Joe Dante miniseries covers an absolute masterpiece in the canon of both of our favorite genres: kids' horror comedy and live action cartoon genre. This ep is all about heaping praise on a perfect movie, and a bit of Old-Man-Yells-At-Cloud lamentation about the current state of the studio comedy feature film. More important than anything we have to say about the movie, though, is the introduction of our new segment: Grandpa Go To Bathroom Watch. Get the full ep at www.patreon.com/kingmepod

    Mundo Insólito Radio
    351/7. La máquina de la euforia. El hotel de las almas. El origen de los Gremlins. El baño del florecimiento.

    Mundo Insólito Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 146:26


    Dirige y presenta Juan Carlos Baruque Hernández Contacta: +34 687 39 80 12 - Solo WhatsApp mundoinsolitoradio@hotmail.com Sumario del programa JORGE RÍOS *El hospital fantasma. FRANK ESCANDELL *La máquina de la euforia. DANIEL GACÍA *El verdadero origen de los Gremlins. CONCHA VARA *Rituales de los baños del florecimiento. Canal YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCmLplSrcdqJIyVBh7wUBUw Nuestra Web: https://mundoinsolitoradio.es Escucha el episodio completo en la app de iVoox, o descubre todo el catálogo de iVoox Originals

    Milenio Opinión
    Jairo Calixto Albarrán .Alitititito, como un gremlin en tachas

    Milenio Opinión

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 3:06


    Supongo que Claudio XanaX, don Beltrone, la DinoSauri, Roque Villanueva y su Roque señal que tiene vida propia (amigui millenial, googlea “Roque señal”

    Gremlins Strike Back
    GSB161: No Sudden Move, Goodfellas & Escape from Absolom plus What Did the Watchmen Watch

    Gremlins Strike Back

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 139:44


    De voorlaatste aflevering voor de zomerstop van 2022 is een tribute aan de overleden Ray Liotta. No Sudden Move (2021), Goodfellas (1990) en Escape from Absolom (1994) worden besproken door de Gremlins. Maarten ergert zich blauw aan een gimmick, Sven is bijzonder gecharmeerd door een gimmick en Bart legt uit hoe die gimmick tot stand kwam. Nostalgie troef wanneer het trio the good old videotheek days ophalen door een filosofische vraag van Bart waarna in een rondje What Did The Watchmen Watch recente titels als Everything Everywhere All At Once, Hustle, Jurassic World Dominion en Last Night in Soho worden aangestipt. Een luisteraar met écht teveel vrije tijd kan bovendien een mooie prijs winnen!

    Cerise And Vicky Rank The Movies
    Episode 53: The Jurassic Park Episode

    Cerise And Vicky Rank The Movies

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 149:55


    Cerise and Vicky are back with an episode 65 million seconds in the making! Join them as they and special guest Sophie Lewis plumb the humid depths of the entire Jurassic Park franchise, including Jurassic World Dominion! Why do we think Steven Spielberg was so hyped to make Jurassic Park? At what point do the raptors basically become Gremlins? Is Colin Trevorrow the worst director we've ever covered? How many dinosaur names can three people mispronounce? Tune in and find out! 12:16 – Jurassic Park (1993, Steven Spielberg) 37:10 – The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997, Steven Spielberg) 54:54 – Jurassic Park III (2001, Joe Johnston) 1:10:53 – Jurassic World (2015, Colin Trevorrow) 1:39:00 – Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (2018, JA Bayona) 1:57:54 – Jurassic World Dominion (2022, Colin Trevorrow)

    I'll Be There For you
    The One With The Jellyfish

    I'll Be There For you

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 72:03


    Here's a rare treat, a season four highlight. In this episode Ross is still banging on about this ‘we were on a break' thing and we say hello to a couple of great Sub-Cs. We find out where Mantauk is but are confused about a Gremlin. We count the colours of our bedrooms, technicolour dreamcoats and crayola sets, just one colour for Mrs Hinch, mind. And if you do get stung by a jellyfish perhaps best not to follow the same drastic measures…. You had rambled on for 18 pages....FRONT AND BACK!

    En Caso de que el Mundo Se Desintegre - ECDQEMSD
    S24 Ep5281: Topos En El Jardín

    En Caso de que el Mundo Se Desintegre - ECDQEMSD

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 58:42


    Y así vamos, entre jardines con pozos, topos inoportunos, dichos que dicen que dicen y documentos que terminan demostrando las actividades que los poderosos desean ocultar. Y si bien todas las campañas electorales son sucias, hay unas que le suben una línea o dos. La de Colombia fue realmente áspera, con acusaciones cruzadas, con noticias falsas, con denuncias, descalificación y batallas épicas en redes sociales. Pero falta una semana. Y cuando todo parecía acercarse a la armonía de la recta final, Gustavo Petro salió al jardín y encontró pozos por todos lados. Noticias Del Mundo: La Britney se nos casó por tercera vez - Paris Hilton, Selena Gomez, Drew Barrymore y Madonna - Justin Bieber tiene parálisis facial - La carta ganadora - El poderoso San Antonio de Padua - El cumpleaños de Evaristo. Historias Desintegradas: Antorcha en la mano - Desafío ECDQEMSD - Curso de audio comprensión - Saludos al Novio - Plaza Sésamo - Gremlins y Critters - Blancanieves y las princesas - Los Pitufos - Facebook Parejas - Galleta de chocolate - La hora del Réquiem - Periodismo y Registro Civil - La maestra de Kinder y más...  https://www.canaltrans.com En Caso De Que El Mundo Se Desintegre - ECDQEMSD Daily Podcast 

    Nerdy Up North
    Episode 70 - Gremlins Review

    Nerdy Up North

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 70:12


    This weeks episode we take a trip back to the 80s and talk about a B-movie classic that pokes fun at a lot of horror classics. Remember dont get them wet, dont feed them after midnight and importantly dont let them come in contact with sun light. We talk about the Gremlins movies.

    Who Watches This Podcast
    Ep. 128 Critters was a rip off of gremlins!

    Who Watches This Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 60:06


    All rip off movies this month baby!Today we talk about:1986's critters about life forms that fall to earth and a group of people that have to fend off their attacks.If you guys have any request for future movie request please send us an emailat whowatchesthispodcast@gmail.comJoin the FB group page:https://www.facebook.com/WhoWatchesThisPodcast/ Our equipment:Mic: https://amzn.to/3o12CObMic: https://amzn.to/3lWg2t7Audio Interface: https://amzn.to/2GYxyydXLR cables: https://amzn.to/2T3ecKE  - Theme Music -Lee Rosevere - Arcade Montage - Music For Podcast 3https://leerosevere.bandcamp.com/

    A Dog's Life with Anna Webb
    A Purrcast with Zazie Todd

    A Dog's Life with Anna Webb

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 46:13


    This week Anna is joined by Zazie Todd (Companion Animal Psychology) talking about her new book Purr - the science of making your cat happy. Zazie has a PhD in Psychology, and an Advanced Certificate in Feline Behaviour from International Cat Care. Her award winning book Wag was featured in episode: 53 of A DOG'S LIFE and similarly covers all the essentials and latest science to work out how to make your pet happy. We chat about our own cats. Zazie is pet parent to Harvey and Melina and Anna's cat Gremlin gets a big up too. Often underestimated and misunderstood, Zazie puts us straight to what is an extraordinary sentient being : the cat! Zazie's websiteInstagram: @ZazieToddTwitter: @CompAnimalPsychFor more about Anna go to annawebb.co.ukMusic and production by Mike Hanson for Pod People ProductionsCover art by JaijoCover photo by Rhian Ap Gruffydd at Gruff PawtraitsTo advertise on or sponsor A Dog's Life email: info@theloniouspunkproductions.com

    Emergency Exit Podcast Network
    The Rewatch Party 101 - Gremlins 2 (1990)

    Emergency Exit Podcast Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 92:34


    Nick, Anthony, and Manny sit down to discuss and rate the re-watachablity of the film, Gremlins 2, from 1990.    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0099700/

    Everyday Black Men
    You Can Strip From Home

    Everyday Black Men

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 78:26


    This episode of the Everyday Black Men podcast finds our cast joined by special guests, the Black Libertarian and the Rider. We start this episode by picking up on how Kendrick Lamar messed up in challenging Drake's numbers. You can't trip over a rock without it mentioning how you feel about all of YSL getting locked up, so we had to discuss it. Sham questions if people understand the Gremlin thought process, and we go on one too many Kodak Black tangents. The Black Libertarian goes into one a graphic topic, and we mark it with a rated M for Mature for the two minutes we stay on it. Riker laments that men and women don't live the same lives, while the Rider questions how you can be a bum with average money. We close the podcast with more car facts than a dealer's report, Reed discussing how people can afford this current life living together, and much more before we bring the podcast to a close.

    Scaring is Sharing
    #83 – The Witches (1990) / Hunter Hunter

    Scaring is Sharing

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 63:48


    On this week's episode we talk about missing fans and Gremlins origins before Brandy Joe checks in for the night with The Witches and Jeremy goes on the prowl with Hunter Hunter. We'd love to hear from you! Send your terrorgrams to scaringissharing@gmail.com. Also, check out all the other awesome shows coming at you from the Planet Ant/Planet Ant Podcast multiverse! Find out more at https://scaring-is-sharing.pinecast.co Send us your feedback online: https://pinecast.com/feedback/scaring-is-sharing/01a0a9ee-5c90-4927-94af-ce212296262c This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

    Sci-Fi Malady
    Symptom 244: Hobgoblins, My Favorite One is Bounce Bounce

    Sci-Fi Malady

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022


    So what happens when a film wants to capitalize off of aliens, the Ghoulies or Gremlins films, and can only afford toy puppets? Why, Hobgoblins of course? As a side note, adding the band did not help.

    The Paper Outpost - The Joy of Junk Journals!
    S4 Ep 45: Craft Desk Gremlins?!! :)

    The Paper Outpost - The Joy of Junk Journals!

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 22:16


    S4 Ep 45: Craft Desk Gremlins?!! :) The Paper Outpost Podcast! The Joy of Junk Journals! :) I will put the tea on :) Sincerely, Pam at The Paper Outpost MY PODCAST!: The Paper Outpost Podcast! The Joy of Junk Journals! Free to Listen Anytime! Every Tuesday & Thursday! New audio material! Junk Journals, Paper Crafting, life of a crafter, answering crafty questions! Come have a listen on Apple Podcast, Spotify, Google Podcast or go to https://anchor.fm/the-paper-outpost You can make your own Podcast! It's easy at Anchor: Here is how!: anch.co/outpost SPECIAL! JUNE 2022 Get a Free Digikit called Flower Legends with any Fundle Purchase in June 2022. No codes needed! Grab a FUNDLE in my Etsy Shop!: 100 pieces of old and interesting papers to use in making junk journals! A mix of antique/vintage ledger pages, hand-dyed papers, old postcards, tea cards, handwritten paper, awesome book pages and so much more! Free Priority Shipping in the USA! :) Want to see a Fundle? Video!: https://youtu.be/KJnWd9RSpOQ Free Monthly Emailed Newsletter from The Paper Outpost! Sign Up here: https://bit.ly/paperoutpostnewsletter - Free Monthly Digital Printable! - Free Checklist of Junk Journal Supplies! - Free The Note From The Book Maker explaining what a junk journal is and how to use it! - Junk Journal Tips & Updates from Pam at The Paper Outpost! Want to Buy a Fundle? Etsy Shop: https://www.etsy.com/listing/1007331616/antique-vintage-ephemera-paper?ref=shop_home_active_6&frs=1&crt=1 ETSY SHOP: VINTAGE DIGIKITS! Amazing images to download & print out at home on your printer!: Etsy Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ThePaperOutpost PRINT & MAIL Option for Vintage Digikits! :) I heard your call :) No Printer? No Problem! :) I will print & mail 10 Digikits to you! Free Priority Shipping in the USA! :) 1. Buy the Print & Mail Digikit option in my Etsy shop! :) Direct Link here: https://www.etsy.com/listing/1071078687/printed-mailed-digikits-no-printer?ref=shop_home_active_1&frs=1&crt=1 2. Then select 10 names of digikits, & send me the list via Etsy message or email to pam@thepaperoutpost.com or simply say "Surprise me!" :) That's 50 Pages total on lightweight cardstock! See All My Digikits! https://www.etsy.com/shop/ThePaperOutpost MY AMAZON STORE!: 1. My Personal Favorite Products & Tools!: 2. Recommended Books for Junk Journal Makers! 3. Craft Storage Ideas 4. Sunshine's Fav's! Click here! https://www.amazon.com/shop/thepaperoutpost Sincerely, Pam at The Paper Outpost :)! Remember that Fun Can Be Simple! Go Forth and Create with Reckless Abandon! :) COME FIND ME AT :) All My Links: https://linktr.ee/thepaperoutpost ETSY Shop: https://www.thepaperoutpost.com INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/thepaperoutpost FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/ThePaperOutpost The Paper Outpost Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/ThePaperOutpost/ The Paper Outpost Podcast!: https://anchor.fm/the-paper-outpost AMAZON STORE: https://www.amazon.com/shop/thepaperoutpost PINTEREST: https://www.pinterest.com/thepaperoutpost TWITTER: https://twitter.com/thepaperoutpost YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/ThePaperOutpost #thepaperoutpost #paperoutpost #thepaperoutpost #digikits #junkjournal #junkjournals #howtomakeajunkjournal #junkjournalpodcast #thepaperoutpostpodcast #thejoyofjunkjournals #fundle --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-paper-outpost/support

    James Wit No Radio..
    Your Dreams Are NOT Gremlins...

    James Wit No Radio..

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 19:37


    This episode is Just a rant that stemmed from me listening to the Deep Dive playlist by Rick Ross on spotify. I was soft intrigued by the context of how he used the word Gremlin that I looked it up and I found something amazing. The 3 rules of Gremlins: Never expose them to the Light of Day Never get them Wet. Leave them dry Never Feed them after dark or Midnight. Now read this list and replace the Word Gremlin with Dreams. Sounds crazy but many people I know follow these same rules when it comes to their dreams and aspirations. Its more prevalent to hide them than to let them free.

    500 Section Lounge
    E131: Vacation Vault- Bob Bergen in the Lounge!

    500 Section Lounge

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 97:26


    This week the guys had some things that kept them from recording, so they all decided to re-release a past episode. Maybe one that was "overlooked" or one of their favorites.THIS ONE was both!The gentlemen decided to re-release episode 66 (January 12, 2021), when voice actor, Bob Bergen joined the Lounge and talked about his career!Take a look at the Show Notes from that episode, and enjoy a revisit to an episode with a fantastic guest!Show Notes, E66 (01/12/2022)W...W...What a fantastic show we had this w...w...week! Voice of Porky Pig (and so many other great voices), Bob Bergen joined the guys in the Lounge! Kicking off the show, Bob talks about the ability to be "unknown" in public even though he is a famous voice, and how that almost changed with a job he took! The guys ask about what it takes to develop a character that is already established compared to one he is asked to "make-up," and Bob has an interesting take! Is he the only person to be Pork Pig, after Mel Blanc passed? The answer might not surprise you, but the nugget he adds to that answer might! Sam asked him about Gremlins and his part in that movie, and again, that answer might surprise you! ALSO, from that question comes a conversation about a very popular entertainment "platform" that normally is looked at as the Gold Standard of reference! Does Bob remember doing all of the gigs he's done in his career? As you can imagine, having done so much, sometimes he needs reminding! How about the directors or producers he's worked with in his career... ever have issues with any of them? He talks about a job that wasn't going in the direction he thought was appropriate, and how that was handled! What a fabulous hangout the guys had with Bob! They want to have him back, and Bob seemed open to that possibility! SO, sit back, relax & g...g...g... #grabalisten, folks!Learn more about Bob at http://bobbergen.com/index.htmFollow him: Bob Bergen (Facebook), @BobBergen (Twitter), @bergen.bob (Instagram)Proud Founding Member of the OddPods Media NetworkShow Promo: Married with Television & BFYTWFollow us on Twitter (@500_section), Facebook (500 Section Lounge(, and find us at www.oddpodsmedia.com, along with the full family of #OddPodsMedia shows!

    A Lifetime of Hallmark
    Killer Grades Are Given for Aging Out of Being a Twink (like Menudo)

    A Lifetime of Hallmark

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 85:30


    Killer Grades Are Given for Aging Out of Being a Twink (like Menudo)   Les, Kurt, and Jason are still in the afterglow of their interview with the PornHub Math Teacher (check out the bonus episode that was released just before this episode), but they're here to explore the way the Amityville Intellectual Property is being exploited. Plus, Les and Jason explain to Kurt (in a very quiet soothing tone) what ASMR is. Then Kurt delivers A LOT of Blac Chyna news (She's being sued! She's doing celebrity boxing!) And, of course, the guys have to dissect a movie, and Killer Grades from Lifetime certainly offers a lot to discuss. If you're looking for intense nerds, Gremlins rules for dosing drugs, and an Academic Decathlon that makes an MMA fight seem quaint, then you've found the right movie (and the right podcast).    Facebook : lifetimeofhallmark Instagram : lifetimeofhallmarkpodcast

    Crack House Chronicles
    Ep. 115 Serial Killer Brian Dugan

    Crack House Chronicles

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 41:49


    In this episode of the Crack House Chronicles, Donnie and Dale discuss Brian James Dugan who is a convicted rapist and serial killer who was active between 1983 and 1985 in Chicago's western suburbs. He was known for having informally confessed in 1985 to the 1983 abduction, rape and murder of 10-year-old Jeanine Nicarico of Naperville, Illinois, which was a highly publicized case. He was already in custody for two other rape/murders, one of an adult woman in 1984 and the other a female child in 1985. He was sentenced to life after pleading guilty to the latter two crimes. https://crackhousechronicles.com/ Check out our MERCH! https://www.teepublic.com/user/crackhousechronicles Sponsors: https://betterhelp.com/chc If you use this link or Promo Code CHC, BetterHELP will give you 10% off your first months bill. Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brian_Dugan https://murderpedia.org/male.D/d/dugan-brian-james.htm https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-brian-dugan-serial-killer-interview-met-20141212-story.html  

    A Piece Of Business
    Viscous gunge or gremlins? A plagued podcast.

    A Piece Of Business

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 134:02


    In a episode plagued with internet issues we welcome @AWIP to discuss what's a jubilee and the British Monarchy, how Riddle is carrying WWE at the moment, MJFs promo, NXT 2.0, an In Your House PLE, two "Twats" of the week, NXTUK and when Jeremy has to tap out with recurring technical issues, Glenn and Brent give theirs and their respective pod partners HIAC predictions.

    King Me: The Stephen King Movie Podcast, Officially
    Dante Speak - 1 - Piranha (1978) Preview

    King Me: The Stephen King Movie Podcast, Officially

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 1:24


    https://www.patreon.com/kingmepod This is easily the most exciting miniseries (for us, at least) since Wall to Wall Carpenter: a review of four selections by the inimitable Joe Dante. We're starting with Dante's first-ish feature from 1978, PIRANHA. Despite (or, perhaps, THANKS TO??) the constraints of the Roger Corman school of filmmaking, PIRANHA features many signature Joe Dante elements: swarm of nasty little guys, Looney Tunes-esque climactic setpieces, and Dick Miller. Also coming up in this run will be Gremlins, The ‘Burbs, and Small Soldiers.

    Get The Ref! - Alberta's Blood Bowl Roundup

    Despite some technical glitches, we managed to salvage an episode for you all this month! We discus Mike Davis' Twitter question - what makes a great tournament?  We follow that up with a debrief of the Alberta Classic which included an interview with Scott Martin!  Finally, we chat breifly about upcoming tournaments. 

    Life Mastery Radio
    Stop Procrastinating and Expand your Possibility with Talia Dashow

    Life Mastery Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 55:20


    For Talia Dashow methods to stop procrastinating never worked, and advice to "just do it" made her feel even worse for not doing it. She developed methods to recognize her gremlin voice and how to use it to her advantage.Talia is both a professional procrastination coach, and a creativity expert who helps people play.Talia Dashow helps people use creativity to expand possibility. She has been coaching since 2001, helping people become more productive, procrastinate less, and feel more joy. Talia also runs Creativity Club, a Zoom room where creativity games are played.Talia has earned a BA in English at UC Berkeley, a certificate as a mediator, and a certificate to facilitate Lego Serious Play.

    Break Things On Purpose
    KubeCon, Kindness, and Legos with Michael Chenetz

    Break Things On Purpose

    Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 27:57


    Today we chat with Cisco's head of developer content, community, and events, Michael Chenetz. We discuss everything from KubeCon to kindness and Legos! Michael delves into some of the main themes he heard from creators at KubeCon, and we discuss methods for increasing adoption of new concepts in your organization. We have a conversation about attending live conferences, COVID protocol, and COVID shaming, and then we talk about how Legos can be used in talks to demonstrate concepts. We end the conversation with a discussion about combining passions to practice creativity. We discuss our time at KubeCon in Spain (5:51) Themes Michael heard at KubeCon talking with creators (7:46) Increasing adoption of new concepts (9:27) We talk conferences, COVID shaming, and blamelessness (12:21) Legos and reliability  (18:04) Michael talks about ways to exercise creativity (23:20) Links: KubeCon October 2022: https://events.linuxfoundation.org/kubecon-cloudnativecon-north-america/ Nintendo Lego Set: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08HVXMQ87?ref_=cm_sw_r_cp_ud_dp_ED7NVBWPR8ANGT8WNGS5 Cloud Unfiltered podcast episode featuring Julie and Jason:https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/ep125-chaos-engineering-with-julie-gunderson-and-jason/id1215105578?i=1000562393884 Links Referenced: Cisco: https://www.cisco.com/ Cloud Unfiltered Podcast with Julie and Jason: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/ep125-chaos-engineering-with-julie-gunderson-and-jason/id1215105578?i=1000562393884 Cloud Unfiltered Podcast: https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/solutions/cloud/podcasts.html Nintendo Lego: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08HVXMQ87 TranscriptJulie: And for folks that are interested in, too, what day it is—because I think we're all still a little bit confused—it is Monday, May 24th that we are recording this episode.Jason: Uh, Julie's definitely confused on what day it is because it's actually Tuesday, [laugh] May 24th.Michael: Oh, my God. [laugh]. That's great. I love it.Julie: Welcome to Break Things on Purpose, a podcast about reliability, learning from each other, and blamelessness. In this episode, we talk to Michael Chenetz, head of developer content, community, and events at Cisco, about all of the learnings from KubeCon, the importance of being kind to each other, and of course, how Lego translates into technology.Julie: Today, we are joined by Michael Chenetz. Michael, do you want to tell us a little bit about yourself?Michael: Yeah. [laugh]. Well, first of all, thank you for having me on the show. And I'm really good at breaking things, so I guess that's why I'm asked to be here is because I'm superb at it. What I'm not so good at is, like, putting things back together.Like when I was a kid, I remember taking my dad's stereo apart; wasn't too happy about that. Wasn't very good at putting it back together. But you know, so that's just going back a little ways there. But yeah, so I work for the DevRel at Cisco and my whole responsibility is, you know, to get people to know that know a little bit about us in terms of, you know, all the developer-related topics.Julie: Well, and Jason and I had the awesome opportunity to hang out with you at KubeCon, where we got to join your Cloud Unfiltered podcast. So folks, definitely go check out that episode. We have a lot of fun. We'll put a link in the [show notes 00:02:03]. But yeah, let's talk a little bit about KubeCon. So, as of recording this episode, we all just recently traveled back from Spain, for KubeCon EU, which was… amazing. I really enjoyed being there. My first time in Spain. I got back, I can tell you, less than 24 hours ago. Michael, I think—when did you get back?Michael: So, I got back Saturday night, but my bags have not arrived yet. So, they're still traveling and they're enjoying Europe. And they should be back soon, I guess when they're when they feel like they're—you know, they should be back from vacation.Julie: [laugh].Michael: So. [laugh].Julie: Jason, how about you? When did you get home?Jason: I got home on Sunday night. So, I took the train from Valencia to Barcelona on Saturday evening, and then an early morning flight on Sunday and got home late Sunday night.Julie: And for folks that are interested in, too, what day it is—because I think we're all still a little bit confused—it is Monday, May 24th that we are recording this episode.Jason: Uh, Julie's definitely confused on what day it is because it's actually Tuesday, [laugh] May 24th.Michael: Oh, my God. [laugh]. That's great. I love it. By the way, yesterday was my birthday so I'm going to say—Julie: Happy birthday.Michael: —happy birthday to myself.Julie: Oh, my gosh, happy birthday. [laugh].Michael: Thank you [laugh].Julie: So… what is time anyway?Jason: Yeah.Michael: It's all good. It's all relative. Time is relative.Julie: Time is relative. And so, you know, tell us a little bit about—I'd love to know a little bit about why you want folks to know about, like, what is the message you try to get across?Jason: Oh, that's not the question I thought you were going to ask. I thought you were going to ask, “What's on your Amazon wishlist so people can send you birthday presents?”Julie: Yeah, let's back up. Let's do that. So, let's start with your Amazon wishlist. We know that there might be some Legos involved.Michael: Oh, my God, yeah. I mean, you just told me about a cool one, which was Optimus Prime and I just—I'm already on the website, my credit card is out and I'm ready to buy. So, you know, this is the problem with talking to you guys. [laugh]. It's definitely—you know, that's definitely on my list. So, anything that, anything music-related because obviously behind me is a lot of music equipment—I love music stuff—and anything tech. The combination of tech and music, and if you can combine Legos and that, too, man that would just match all the boxes. [laugh].Julie: Just to let you know, there's a Lego Con. Like, I did not know this until last night, actually. But it is a virtual conference.Michael: Really.Julie: Yeah. But one of the things I was looking at actually on Lego, when you look at their website, like, to request one of their speakers, to request one of their engineers as a speaker, they actually don't do that because they get so many requests for their folks to speak at conferences, they actually have a dedicated part of their website that talks about this. So, I thought that was interesting.Michael: Well listen, just because of that, if they want somebody that's in, you know, cloud computing, I'm not going to go talk for Lego. And I know they really want somebody from cloud computing talking to Lego, so, you know… it's, you know, quid pro quo there, so that's just the way it's going to work. [laugh].Julie: I want to be best friends with Lego people.Michael: [laugh]. I know, me too.Julie: I'm just going to make it a goal in life now to have one of their engineers speak at DevOpsDays Boise. It's like a challenge.Michael: It is. I accept it.Julie: [laugh]. With that, though, just on other Lego news, before we start talking about all the other things that folks may also want to hear about, there is another new Lego, which is the Van Gogh Starry Night that has been newly released by the time this episode comes out.Michael: With a free ear, right?Julie: I mean—[laugh].Michael: Is that what happens?Julie: —well played. Well, played. [laugh]. So, now you really got to spend a lot of time at KubeCon, you were just really recording podcast after podcast.Michael: Oh, my God. Yeah. So, I mean, it was great. I love—because I'm a techie, so I love tech and I love to find out origin stories of stuff. So, I love to, like, talk to these people and like, “Why did that come about? How did—” you know, “What happened in your life that made you want to do this? Who hurt you?” [laugh].And so, that's what I constantly try and figure out is, like, [laugh], “What is that?” So, it was really cool because I had, like, Jimmy Zelinskie who came from CoreOS, and he came from—you know, they create, you know, Quay and some of this other kinds of stuff. And you know, just to talk about, like, some of the operators and how they came about, and like… those were the original operators, so that was pretty cool. Varun from Tetrate was supposed to come on, and he created Istio, you know? So, there were so many of these things that I just geek out knowing about, you know?And then the other thing that was really high on our list, and it's really high from where I am, is API quality, API testing, API—so really, that's why I got in touch with you guys because I was like, “Wow, that fits in really good, you know? You guys are doing stuff that's around chaos, and you know, I think that's amazing.” So, all of this stuff is just so interesting to me. But man, it was just a whirlwind of every day just recording, and by the end that was just like, you know, “I'm so sorry, but I just, I can't talk anymore.” You know, and that was it. [laugh].Jason: I love that chatting with the creators. We had Zack Butcher on who is also from Tetrate and one of the early Istio—Michael: Yeah, yeah.Jason: Contributors. And I find it fascinating because I feel like when you chat with these folks, you start to understand the context of why things were built. And it—Michael: Yes.Jason: —it opens your brain up to, like, cool, there's a software—oh, now I know exactly why it's doing things that way, right? Like, it's just so, so eye-opening. I love it.Julie: With that, though, like, did you see any trends or any themes as you were talking to all these folks?Michael: Yeah, so a few real big trends. One is everybody wants to know about eBPF. That was the biggest thing at KubeCon, by far, was that, “We want to learn how to do this low-level kernel stuff that's really fast, that can give us all the information we need, and we don't have to use sidecars and things like that.” I mean it was—you know, that was the most excitement that I saw. OTel was another one for OpenTelemetry, which was a big one.The other thing was simplification. You know, a lot of people were looking to simplify the Kubernetes ecosystem because there's so much out there, and there's so many things that you have to learn about that it was super hard, you know, for somebody to come into it to say, “Where do I even start?” You know? So, that was a big theme was simplification.I'm trying to think. I think another one is APIs, for sure. You know, because there's this whole thing about API sprawl. And people don't know what their APIs are, people just, like—you know, I always say people can see—like, developers are lazy in a good way, and I consider myself one of them. So, what that means is that when we want to develop something, what we're going to do is we're just going to pull down the nearest API that does what we need, that has the best documentation, that has the best blog, that has the best everything.We don't know what their testing strategy is; we don't know what their security strategy is; we don't know if they use other libraries. And you have to figure that stuff out. And that's the thing that—you know, so everything around APIs is super important. And you really have to test that stuff out. Yes, people, you have to test it [laugh] and know more about it. So, those are those were the big themes, I think. [laugh].Julie: You know, I know that Kerim and I gave a talk on observability where we kind of talked more high-level about some of the overarching concepts, but folks were really excited about that. I think is was because we briefly touched on OpenTelemetry, which we should have gone into a little bit more depth, but there's only so much you can fit into a 30-minute talk, so hopefully we'll be able to talk about that more at a KubeCon in the future, we [crosstalk 00:09:54] to the selection committee.Michael: Hashtag topics?Julie: Uh-huh. [laugh]. You know, that said, though, it really did seem like a huge topic that people just wanted to learn more about. I know, too, at the Gremlin booth, a lot of folks were also interested in talking about, like, how do we just get our organization to adopt some of these concepts that we're hearing about here? And I think that was the thing that surprised me the most is I expected people to be coming up to the booth and deep-diving into very, very deep, technical-level questions, and really, a lot of it was how do we get our organization to do this? How can we increase adoption? So, that was a surprise for me.Michael: Yeah, you know what, and I would say two things to that. One is, when you talk about Chaos Engineering, I think people think it's like rocket science and people are really scared and they don't want to claim to be experts in it, so they're like, “Wow, this is, like, next-level stuff, and you know, we're really scared. You guys are the experts. I don't want to even attempt this.” And the other thing is that organizations are scared because they think that it's going to, like, create mass hysteria throughout their organization.And really, none of this is true in either way. In reality, it's a very, very scripted, very exacting stuff that you're testing, and you throw stuff out there and see what kind of response you get. So, you know, it's not this, like, you know—I think people just have—there needs to be more education around a lot of areas in cloud-native. But you know, that's one of the areas. So, I think it's really interesting there.Julie: I think so too. How about for you, Jason? Like, what was your surprise from the conference or something that maybe—Jason: Yeah, I mean, I think my surprise was mostly around just seeing people coming back, right? Because we're now I would say, six months into conferences being back as a thing, right? Like, we had re:Invent last year in Vegas; we had KubeCon last year in LA, and so, like, those are okay events. They weren't, like, back to normal. And this was, I feel like, one of the first conferences, that it really started to feel back to normal.Like, there was much better attendance, there was much more just buzz and hallway tracking and everything else that we're used to. Like, the whole reason that we go to conferences is getting together with people and hanging out and stuff, and this one has so far felt the most back-to-normal out of any event that I've been to over the past six months.Michael: Can I just talk about one thing that I think, you know, people have to get over is, you know, I see a lot online, I think it was—I forget who it was that was talking about it. But this whole idea of Covid shaming. I mean, we're going to this event, and it's like, yeah, everybody wants to get out, everybody wants to learn things, but don't shame people just because they got Covid, everybody's getting Covid, okay? That's just the point of life at this point. So, let's just, you know, let's just be nice to each other, be friendly to each other, you know? I just have to say that because I think it's a shame that people are getting shamed, you know, just for going to an event. [laugh].Julie: See, and I think that—that's an interesting—there's been a lot of conversation around this. And I don't think anybody should be Covid-shamed. Look, I think that we all took a calculated risk in coming—Michael: Absolutely.Julie: To this event. I personally gave out a lot of hugs. I hugged some of the folks that have mentioned that they have come up positive from Covid, so there's a calculated risk in going. I think there has been a little bit of pushback on maybe how some of the communication has come out around it. That said, as an organizer of a small conference with, like, 400 people, I think that these are very complicated matters. And what I really think is important is to listen to feedback from attendees and to take that.And then we're always looking to improve, right?Michael: Absolutely.Julie: If everything that we did was perfect right out of the gate, then we wouldn't have Chaos Engineering because there'd be nothing [crosstalk 00:13:45] be just perfectly reliable. And so, if we take away anything, let's take away—just like what you said, first of all, Covid, you should never shame somebody for having Covid. Like, that's not cool. It's not somebody's fault that they caught an illness.Michael: Yes.Julie: I mean unless they were licking doorknobs. And that's a whole different—Michael: Yes. [laugh]. That's a whole different thing, right there.Julie: Conversation. But when we talk about just like these questions around cultural adoption, we talk about blamelessness; we talk about learning from failure; we talked about finding ways to improve, and I think all of that can come into play. So, it'll be interesting to see how we learn and grow as we move forward. And like, thank you to re:Invent, thank you to KubeCon, thank you to DevOpsDays Boise. But these conferences that have started going back in-person, at great risk to organizers and the committee because people are going to be mad, one way or the other.Michael: Yeah. And you can see that people want to be back because it was huge, you know?Julie: Yeah.Michael: Maybe you guys, I'm going to put in a feature request for Gremlin to chaos engineer crowds. Can we do that so we can figure out, like, what's going to happen when we have these big events? Can we do that?Julie: I mean, that sounds fun. I think what's going to happen is there's going to be hugs, there's going to be people getting sick, but there's going to be people learning and growing.Michael: Yes.Julie: And ultimately, I just think that we have to remember that just, like, our systems aren't perfect, and neither are people. Like, the fact that we expect people to be perfect, and maybe we should just keep some mask mandates for a little bit longer when we're at conferences with 8000 people.Michael: Sure.Julie: I mean, that's—Michael: That makes sense.Jason: Yeah. I mean, it's all about risk management, right? This is, essentially what we do in SRE is there's always a risk of a massive outage, and so it's that balance of, right, do what you can, but ultimately, that's why we have SLOs and things is, you can never be a hundred percent, so like, where do we draw the line of here are the things that we're going to do to help manage this risk, but you can never shoot for a perfectly, entirely safe space, right? Because then we'd all be having conferences in padded rooms, and not touching each other, and things like that. There's a balance there.And I think we're all just trying to find that, so yeah, as you mentioned, that whole, like, DevOps blamelessness thing, you know, treat each other with the notion that we're all trying to get through this together and do what we think is best. Nobody's just like John Allspaw said, you know, “Nobody goes to work thinking that, like, their intent is to crash everything and destroy the company.” No one's going to KubeCon or any of these conferences thinking, “Yeah, I'm going to be a super-spreader.”Julie: [laugh].Michael: Yeah, that would be [crosstalk 00:16:22].Jason: Like, everyone's trying not to do it. They're doing their best. They're not actively, like, aggressively trying to get you sick or intentionally about it. But you know—so just be kind to one another.Michael: Yeah. And that's the key.Julie: It is.Michael: The key. Be kind to one another, you know? I mean, it's a great community. People are really nice, so, you know, let's keep that up. I think that's something special about the, you know, the community around KubeCon, specifically.Julie: As we can refine this and find ways, I would take all of the hugs over virtual conferences—Michael: Yes.Julie: Any day now. Because, as Jason mentioned, is even just with you, Michael, the time we got to spend with you, or the time I kept going up to Jfrog's booth and Baruch and I would have conversations as he made me a delicious coffee, these hallway tracks, these conversations, that's what no one figured out how to recreate during the virtual events—Michael: Absolutely.Julie: —and it's just not possible, right?Michael: Yeah. I mean, I think it would take a little bit of VR and then maybe some, like, suit that you wear in order to feel the hug. And, you know, so it would take a lot more in order to do that. I mean, I guess it's technologically possible. I don't know if the graphics are there yet, so it might be like a pixelated version, like, you know, like, NES-style, or something like that. But it could look pretty cool. [laugh]. So, we'll have to see, you know?Julie: Everybody listening to this episode, I hope you're getting as much of a kick out of it as we are recording it because I mean, there are so many different topics here. One of the things that Michael and I bonded about years ago, for our listeners that are—not years ago; months ago. Again, what is time?Michael: Yeah. What is time? It's all relative.Julie: It is. It was Lego, though, and so we've been talking about that. But Michael, you asked a great question when we were recording with you, which is, like—Michael: Wow.Julie: Can—just one. Only one great question.Michael: [laugh].Julie: [laugh]. Which was, how would you incorporate Lego into a talk? And, like, when we look at our systems breaking and all of that, I've really been thinking about that and how to make our systems more reliable. And here's one of the things I really wanted to clarify that answer. I kind of went… I went talking about my Lego that I build, like, my Optim—not my Optimus Primes, I don't have it, but my Voltron or my Nintendo Lego. And those are all box sets.Michael: Yep.Julie: But one of the things if you're not playing with a box set with instruction, if you're just playing with just the—or excuse me, architecting with just the Lego blocks because it's not playing because we're adults now, I think.Michael: Yes, now it's architecting. Yes.Julie: Yes, now that we're architecting, like, that's one of the things that I was really thinking about this, and I think that it would make something really fun to talk about is how you're building upon each layer and you're testing out these new connection pieces. And then that really goes into, like, when we get into Technics, into dependencies because if you forget that one little one-inch plastic piece that goes from the one to the other, then your whole Lego can fall apart. So anyway, I just thought that was really interesting, and I'd wondered if you or Jason even gave that any more thought, or if it was just fleeting for you.Michael: It was definitely fleeting for me, but I will give it some more thought, you know? But you know, when—as you're saying that though, I'm thinking these Lego pieces really need names because you're like that little two-inch Lego piece that kind of connects this and this, like, we got to give these all names so that people can know, that's x-54 that's—that you're putting between x-53 and x-52. I don't know but you need some kind of name for these parts now.Julie: There are Lego names. You just Google it. There are actual names for all of the parts but—Michael: Wow. [laugh].Julie: Like, Jason, what do you think? I know you've got [unintelligible 00:19:59].Jason: Yeah, I mean, I think it's interesting because I am one of those, like, freeform folks, right? You know, my standard practice when I was growing up with Legos was you build the thing that you bought once and then you immediately, like, tear it apart, and you build whatever the hell you want.Michael: Absolutely.Jason: So, I think that that's kind of an interesting thing as we think about our systems and stuff, right? Like, part of it is, like, yeah, there's best practices and various companies will publish, like, you know, “Here's how to architect such-and-such system.” And it's interesting because that's just not reality, right? You're not going to go and take, like, the Amazon CloudFormation thing, and like, congrats, you're done. You know, you just implement that and your job's done; you just kick back for the rest of the week.It never works that way, right? You're taking these little bits of, like, cool, I might have, like, set that up once just to see what's happening but then you immediately, like, deconstruct it, and you take the knowledge of what you learned in those building blocks, and you, like, go and remix it to build the thing that you actually need to build.Michael: But yeah, I mean, that's exactly—so you know, Legos is what got me interested in that as a kid, but when you look at, you know, cloud services and things like that, there's so many different ways to combine things and so many different ways to, like—you know, you could use Terraform, you could use Crossplane, you could use, you know, any of the services in the cloud, you could use FaaS, you could use serverless, you could use, you know, all these different kinds of solutions and tie them together. So, there's so much choice, and what Lego teaches you is that, embrace the choice. Figure out and embrace the different pieces, embrace all the different things that you have and what the art of possibility is, and then start to build on that. So, I think it's a really good thing. And that's why there's so much correlation between, like, kind of, art and tech and things like that because that's the kind of mentality that you need in order to be really successful in tech.Jason: And I think the other thing that works really well with what you said is, as you're playing with Legos, you start to learn these hacks, right? Like, I don't have, like, a four-by-one brick, but I know that if I have three four-by-one flats, I can stack those three and it's the same height as a brick, right?Michael: Yep.Jason: And you can start combining things. And I love that engineering mentality of, like, I have this problem that I need to solve, I have a limited toolbox for whatever constraints, right, and understanding those constraints, and then cool, how can I remix what I've got in my toolbox to get this thing done?Michael: And that's a thing that I'm always doing. Like, when I used to do a lot of development, you know, it was always like, what is the right code? Or what is the library that's going to solve my problem? Or what is the API that's going to solve my problem, you know?And there's so many different ways to do it. I mean, so many people are afraid of, like, making the wrong choice, when really in programming, there is no wrong choice. It's all about how you want to do it and what makes sense to you, you know? There might be better options in formatting and in the way that you kind of, you know, format that code together and put them in different libraries and things like that, but making choices on, like, APIs and things like that, that's all up to the artist. I would say that's an artist. [laugh]. So, you know, I think it all stems though, when you go back from, you know, just being creative with things… so creativity is king.Jason: So Michael, how do you exercise your creativity, then? How do you keep up that creativity?Michael: Yeah, so there's multiple ways. And that's a great segment because one of the things that I really enjoy—so you know, I like development, but I'm also a people person. And I like product management, but I also like dealing with people. So really, to me, it's about how do I relate products, how do I relate solutions, how do I talk to people about solutions that people can understand? And that's a creative process.Like, what is the right media? What is the right demos? What is the right—you know, what do people need? And what do people need to, kind of, embrace things? And to me, that's a really creative medium to me, and I love it.So, I love that I can use my technical, I love that I can use my artistic, I love that I can use, you know, all these pieces all at once. And sometimes maybe I'll play guitar and just put it in the intro or something, I don't know. So, that kind of combines that together, too. So, we'll figure that piece out later. Maybe nobody wants to hear me play guitar, that's fine, too. [laugh].But I love to be able to use, you know, both sides of my brain to do these creative aspects. So, that's really what does it. And then sometimes I'll program again and I'll find the need, and I'll say, “Hey, look, you know, I realized there's a need for this,” just like a lot of those creators are. But I haven't created anything cool, but you know, maybe someday I will. I feel like it's just been in between all those different intersections that's really cool.Jason: I love the electric guitar stuff that you mentioned. So, for folks who are listening to this show, during our recording of the Cloud Unfiltered you were talking about bringing that art and technical together with electric guitars, and you've been building electric guitar pickups.Michael: Yes. Yeah. So, I mean, I love anything that can combine my music passion with tech, so I have a CNC machine back here that winds pickups and it does it automatically. So, I can say, “Hey, I need a 57 pickup, you know, whatever it is,” and it'll wind it to that exact spec.But that's not the only thing I do. I mean, I used to design control surfaces for artists that were a big band, and I really can't—a lot of them I can't mention because we're under NDA. But I designed a lot of these big, you know, control surfaces for a lot of the big electronic and rock bands that are out there. I taught people how to use Max for Live, which is an artist's, kind of, programming language that's graphical, so [NMax 00:25:33] and MSP and all that kind of stuff. So, I really, really like to combine that.Nowadays, you know, I'm talking about doing some kind of events that may be combined tech, with art. So, maybe doing things like Algorave, and you know, things that are live-coding music and an art. So, being able to combine all these things together, I love that. That's my ultimate passion.Jason: That is super cool.Julie: I think we have learned quite a bit on this episode of Break Things on Purpose, first of all, from the guy who said he hasn't created much—because you did say that, which I'm going to call you out on that because you just gave a long list of things that you created. And I think we need to remember that we're all creators in our own way, so it's very important to remember that. But I think that right now we've created a couple of options for talks in the future, whether or not it's with Lego, or guitar pickups.Michael: Yeah.Julie: Is that—Michael: Hey—Julie: Because I—Michael: Yeah, why not?Julie: —know you do kind of explain that a little bit to me as well when I was there. So, Michael, this has just been amazing having you. We're going to put a lot of links in the notes for everybody today. So, to Michael's podcast, to some Lego, and to anything else Michael wants to share with us as well. Oh, real quick, is there anything you want to leave our listeners with other than that? You know, are you looking to hire Cisco? Is there anything you wanted to share with us?Michael: Yeah, I mean, we're always looking for great people at Cisco, but the biggest thing I'd say is, just realize that we are doing stuff around cloud-native, we're not just network. And I think that's something to note there. But you know, I just love being on the show with you guys. I love doing anything with you guys. You guys are awesome, you know. So.Julie: You're great too, and I think we'll probably do more stuff, all of us together, in the future. And with that, I just want to thank everybody for joining us today.Michael: Thank you. Thanks so much. Thanks for having me.Jason: For links to all the information mentioned, visit our website at gremlin.com/podcast. If you liked this episode, subscribe to the Break Things on Purpose podcast on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or your favorite podcast platform. Our theme song is called, “Battle of Pogs” by Komiku, and it's available on loyaltyfreakmusic.com.

    Kaiju Curry House
    The One with Crabs! ft. Pierce Berolzheimer

    Kaiju Curry House

    Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 69:59


    Episode 95 – The One with Crabs! Welcome to our podcast. This is episode 95 of Kaiju Curry House – The One with Crabs. Please download or stream from your...Continue Reading››

    Emergency Exit Podcast Network
    The Rewatch Party 100 - Gremlins (1984)

    Emergency Exit Podcast Network

    Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2022 152:50


    Nick, Antony, Coach, and Manny all sit down to discuss and rate the re-watchability of the film, Gremlins, from 1984, and also celebrate the sows 100th episode!    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0087363/

    SpyHards Podcast
    SpyMaster Interview #23 - Mary Claypool

    SpyHards Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 96:52


    Agents Scott and Cam welcome writer Mary Claypool to the podcast to discuss her experiences creating the English language localization script for 1995's Ghost in the Shell. She also shares stories about working on iconic films like Ghostbusters, Gremlins 2: The New Batch and Batman Returns.  Become a SpyHards Patron and gain access to top secret "Agents in the Field" bonus episodes, movie commentaries and more! Pick up exclusive SpyHards merch, including the new "What Does Vargas Do?" t-shirt by @shaylayy, available only at Redbubble Social media: @spyhards View the NOC List and the Disavowed List at Letterboxd.com/spyhards Podcast artwork by Hannah Hughes.

    The Weedsmen Potcast
    The Adults on the Streamer

    The Weedsmen Potcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022


    On this week's show Chris and Aaron talk about: the blood moon, mushroom gummies, Bill Maher, Kids in the Hall review, The Man Who Fell to Earth, George Carlin, Arby's milkshake pisser, HBO's Gremlins animated series, Chip and Dale reboot, and Mike Meyers. Please follow us on Twitter @TheWeedsmen420, Instagram @TheWeedsmenPotcast, and on Facebook at... The post The Adults on the Streamer first appeared on Christopher Media.

    BEHIND THE VELVET ROPE
    COREY FELDMAN (on Child Actors, Michael Jackson, Being Cancelled, His Own "Me Too" & Being An 80s Icon)!

    BEHIND THE VELVET ROPE

    Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 75:41


    Corey Feldman steps Behind The Rope. Corey Feldman is one of the most recognizable names and faces in all of Pop Culture. An Icon who has been written about non stop since his break out teen years with starring roles in classic films such as “The Goonies”, “Gremlins”, "Stand By Me”, “Lost Boys”, and those don't even begin to scratch the surface. Corey is brutally honest about the highs and lows of show biz, his career and personal life which has involved drugs and alcohol addiction, the loss of friends such as one half of “The Two Coreys” - Corey Haim and Michael Jackson, each way before their time. Corey also opens up about his documentary, “My Truth: The Rape of Two Coreys” in which he exposed many of Hollywood's male elite as having sexually abused him in his youth. We chat cancel culture, the current state of “me too” in Hollywood, the biggest misconceptions he has heard / read about himself, and the concept of “fame” in current day Hollywood versus the eighties and nineties. On a lighter note, we chat about Corey's new music, “Love Left 2.1”, the Corey Hologram, his musical influences, and what is next for this eighties Icon that has ben involved in every aspect of the biz and won't be slowing down anytime soon. @cdogg22 @behindvelvetrope @davidyontef BONUS & AD FREE EPISODES Available at - www.patreon.com/behindthevelvetrope BROUGHT TO YOU BY: DAME - www.dameproducts.com (Enter Code VELVETROPE For 15% Off Your Order) PAIR EYEWEAR - www.paireyewear.com/VELVET (15% Off Your First Purchase) ADVERTISING INQUIRIES - Please contact David@advertising-execs.com MERCH Available at - https://www.teepublic.com/stores/behind-the-velvet-rope?ref_id=13198 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Talk Film Society Podcast
    Monsters Never Die: Gremlins Knock-Offs

    Talk Film Society Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 60:51


    The Spooky Boys Matt (TheRealMattC) and Jacob (Jacob_deNobel) are back and there's something weird nipping at their ankles! That's right, this month they tackle the varied iterations of Gremlins Knock-Offs! From Critters, to Ghoulies, to Munchies, and back to the Gremlins themselves, the Spooky Boys have a blast and a half talking about these weird little guys being weird little dudes. Enjoy and stay tuned because the Spooky Boys shall return.

    Sarc Fighter: Living with Sarcoidosis and other rare diseases
    Episode 62 | Garrie Farrow had troubles wearing her cute shoes. The problem was in her lungs.

    Sarc Fighter: Living with Sarcoidosis and other rare diseases

    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 65:42


    Garrie Farrow has been fighting sarcoidosis for 15 years, and maybe longer.  It has spread from her lungs to other parts of her body including her ears.  Yet she is still working - and still fighting.  In fact she spends a great deal of time helping other Sarcoidosis patients as well.  In Episode 62 of the Sarc Fighter podcast, Garrie shares the story of how sarcoidosis started out in her lungs, how doctors may have mishandled the early diagnosis and how sarc has had a tragic impact on her family. Show notes Learn about the clinical trial from Novartis: https://bit.ly/3o9LXKk Juliet's fundraising page: https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/julietcoffer2 Remember these hashtags for April!  #WhatIsSarcoidosis #MakeItVisible  Universal Barriers Podcast:  https://www.stopsarcoidosis.org/sarc-fighter-podcast/ More on Universal Barriers https://www.stopsarcoidosis.org/events/universal-barriers-in-dealing-with-a-chronic-disease-a-sarcoidosis-perspective/ Ignore No More https://www.stopsarcoidosis.org/ignore-no-more-foundation-for-sarcoidosis-research-launches-african-american-women-sarcoidosis-campaign/ Sarcoidosis Awareness Film: https://www.purpledocumentary.com/ Nourish by Lindsey: https://www.nourishbylindsey.com/ Dr. Jinny Tavee's book, The Last Day of Suffering: https://www.amazon.com/Last-Day-Suffering-Health-Happiness/dp/0615542751 Read about the patient trial with aTyr 1923 https://investors.atyrpharma.com/news-releases/news-release-details/atyr-pharma-announces-positive-data-phase-1b2a-clinical-trial Also -- Note that investors also believe in the promise of aTyr 1923: https://investors.atyrpharma.com/news-releases/news-release-details/atyr-pharma-announces-closing-863-million-public-offering Yale University and sarcoidosis skin treatment | Dr. William Damsky: https://news.yale.edu/2018/12/26/yale-experts-treat-severe-disfiguring-sarcoidosis-novel-therapy Stanford University Clinical trial | Dr. Mathew Baker: https://med.stanford.edu/sarcoidosis/clinical-trial.html MORE FROM JOHN Cycling with Sarcoidosis http://carlinthecyclist.com/category/cycling-with-sarcoidosis/ Watch the Prednisone Town Hall on YouTube https://youtu.be/dNwbcBIyQhE More on aTyr Pharma: https://www.atyrpharma.com/ Do you like the official song for the Sarc Fighter podcast?  It's also an FSR fundraiser! If you would like to donate in honor of Mark Steier and the song, Zombie, Here is a link to his KISS account.  (Kick In to Stop Sarcoidosis)  100-percent of the money goes to the Foundation.  https://stopsarcoidosis.rallybound.org/MarkSteier The Foundation for Sarcoidosis Research https://www.stopsarcoidosis.org/ Donate to my KISS (Kick In to Stop Sarcoidosis) fund for FSR  https://stopsarcoidosis.rallybound.org/JohnCarlinVsSarcoidosis?fbclid=IwAR1g2ap1i1NCp6bQOYEFwOELdNEeclFmmLLcQQOQX_Awub1oe9bcEjK9P1E My story on Television https://www.stopsarcoidosis.org/news-anchor-sarcoidosis/ email me  carlinagency@gmail.com The following is a web-generated transcript of my interview with Garrie.  Please excuse any spelling or punctuation errors.  jc Welcome back to the Sarc Fighter podcast. And joining me now is Gary Farrow, uh who plays many roles within the foundation for Sarcodosis Research as a volunteer and is coming up on 16 years as a Sarc survivor. Garrie, welcome to the podcast. Garrie Farrow: Thank you. Thank you. So much for having me today. John Carlin: So you said it's 15 years plus almost 16 years. And you knew the anniversary date, didn't you? Garrie Farrow: It's actually uh August. I started getting my appointments in April. So for me, April is the anniversary. But I didn't get the official diagnosis until August 16 years ago. John Carlin: 16 years. That's a long time. And I want to hear about when did you first know something was wrong? Garrie Farrow: Honestly, I knew something was wrong 20 years ago. Um uh I have a thing that I love, cute shoes and purses, and I have these fantastic boots that I love to wear. They were the greatest thing ever. And my feet and ankle started to swell. And um I used to play basketball in high school, so I'm used to ankle Springs. I know what my feet and ankles will do, but this was not normal. So probably uh about four or four and a half years in total going to different primary care doctors. And I am um a taller, larger woman. And so I've always been told, well, you need to lose weight. Like, I exercise every day. I'm not losing any more weight. But they're saying the reason my feet and ankles were swelling was because of the weight. So I went and lost more weight. Still couldn't wear the shoes, moved to uh a different city, found a uh new primary care position. Actually, my second one here in Tallahassee was the one who went, this is not normal. You are uh about 30, 31 at the point. This is not normal. Let's send you for a chest Xray. And that's how my journey officially started. John Carlin: Wow. Chest X. You ankles hurt. So the first thing they do is send you for a chest X ray, which wouldn't seem intuitive, but I guess the doctor must have been thinking pulmonary sarcoidosis. Garrie Farrow: Then she kind of mentioned she goes, It could be your lungs, it could be your heart. She goes for your feet and ankles be swelling. There's something vascular going on, and we don't know why. She goes, I'm listening to just using. I'm listening to your lungs. It sounded fine. You're exercising, um you're uh not complaining. You have any shortness of breath. So let's figure out what's happening with you. John Carlin: Okay? Was that conclusive or was that just the next clue? Garrie Farrow: The chest X ray was the next clue. They um realized at that point because you could see my lymph nodes on X ray and the lungs looked suspicious. And at that point, I was sent for a media style oscopy. Basically, biopsy ended up with a brand uh new scarf. And that's where they definitely confirmed that, yes, this was circadosis because after the chest X ray, they said this could be leukemia or Sarcodosis. The way I remember it was, I heard leukemia and possibly sarkidosis. And the leukemia scared me because I hadn't uh heard of soccer doses before in any major detail other than burning Mac. John Carlin: Right. So after they figured out it's sarcoidosis with the lymph node biopsy then. Did they start with the normal prednisone routine? Garrie Farrow: No. I um was seeing a pulmonologist local to my city, and I was told stage one, that four stages. And since I was at stage one, I had no other symptoms happening. There was no reason for me to go on any medications. And that if I ever started coughing or becoming short of breath while exercising, to basically come back. And I had one appointment a year later, just everything's still the same. But at no point was medication even talked about. I did go back to my um primary and asked, okay, now I've been diagnosed with Psychnosis. What does that mean? And she told me she didn't know. She goes, I could tell you this much of what I remember from medical school. I can't answer any of your questions. Go back to the surgeon and went back to him. And it was, yeah, you have stage one, but that's good because four is horrible. You're at one, so there's nothing to do. My um current pulmonologist, who specializes in Sarcodosis, uh she said, no, stage one is no better uh than stage four. You had symptoms, you just weren't coughing. She goes, Your lungs did not look good. There should have been some treatment started then, but that took um another shoot. I think it probably was probably about another three to four years before I started any official treatment. John Carlin: That just amazes me. And I'm curious about the um stage one, stage two, stage three, stage four, which is the terminology that we're used to hearing for cancer patients. And I've heard other patients that I've interviewed on the podcast talk about it a little bit. No one has ever uh used that term with me. Can you describe the difference between stage one and stage four? Other than that, it's worse. Garrie Farrow: Yeah. What I was told originally was that, yes, my lungs um were cloudy, but they were not completely infiltrated. And you could see my lymph nodes on Xray. Stage four is pretty much you're on oxygen. The lungs are completely Gray uh and looks like um ground glass completely covers the entire lungs. At stage four is how it was described um to me initially, that each stage, your lungs get a little cloudier, a little bit more ground glass until it gets to the point where you're not able to breathe. What I've been told uh recently and confirmed with more research is that, yes, the um stages do impact how the lungs appear, but you could be on oxygen at stage two. You could be um walking around not fine, but without oxygen uh at stage four, it's just showing what the impact on your loans looks like when you're just trying to look at the X ray or the MRI or CT. Go um ahead and actually, stage one, I believe, only includes the link notes and um any of the others only impact just what the ones look like. John Carlin: So you and I are both on a number of committees with the foundation for Sarcodosis Research. And uh what I'm hearing and maybe, you know, maybe you don't. But what I'm hearing is this stage one through 4 may be just reserved for pulmonary patients because everything you've described is lung involvement. Whereas with cancer, my understanding is when you have stage four cancer, let's say it starts in your kidneys or whatever, it then has spread to other parts of your body and it's metastasized. So when we talk about stage four with sarcoidosis, we're not talking about it spreading to other parts of your body, even though that can happen. But that's not what the stages describe exactly. Garrie Farrow: Which I find interesting because it would make more sense that they actually classified it that way as they do in cancer, because technically, thankfully, due to one medication, my lungs are clear. My lymph nodes have shrunk in size from being really big to not being outfit. But I had other um organs being impacted by sarcotosis. So to me, following the cancer way of being, I'm probably more of a stage three just because I uh have multiple organs impacted by sarcosis. But currently it's only for lungs. John Carlin: Got it. All right. And is it still currently after almost 16 years, is it still just in your lungs or has it spread? Garrie Farrow: It's spread. And it actually took about ten years um to spread. John Carlin: Um. Garrie Farrow: I noticed some skin issues, went to my local dermatologist. And first I was told Eczema, then I was told Psoriasis, then I was told I had both went to sarcosis. Um dermatologist. No, this is sarcoid. That's what this is. And so, yeah, the past five years. So past five years, skin, eyes, bones. And now um I lost hearing in the left ear. Um and that's on immune suppressors. Um. John Carlin: You said after about four years, a doctor said, oh, no, you need treatment. Garrie Farrow: Yes. John Carlin: What treatment did they come at you with first? And how has that progressed? Garrie Farrow: The lovely steroids. The lovely steroids. I was on 60 milligrams for um about a year and a half. A little under. And um that, of course, weight gain, prediabetic, hypertension, um you name it. The moon face. All of it was taken off of that because of the impact. But at that point, there still was not a lot of discussion about new medications. And it was pretty much okay, your lapse look good. We're just going to kind of watch you. Then the eyes started, well, the skin. So then it was steroid injections directly into the skin and steroid creams, which thankfully um no over whole body and past. Then when the eyes and the bones kicked off, that's when I was put on methotrexate. No steroids at that point, thankfully. But then when the um bones kicked off, that's when they said, okay, I started low dose steroids and about five milligrams for three years. That pushed me over the edge with the diabetes. And let's see, um at that point, I think it was year two is when I went back, because by that point, I'm taking metformin and even though they said five um milligrams of steroids you shouldn't be gaining weight. I probably took uh 60 mg. I gained £80. Finally, after not being on steroids for a while, I had lost about 40 started the low um dose and they said you should be fine. Five milligrams is not going to impact you. I probably ended up gaining back 30. And so after year two, I said, okay, look, I need to switch because steroids and I are not working out. You're telling me I need to lose weight? I'm doing the things I need to do and yet my weight is not going in the right direction. It's still keeping up. So that's when I was taking off the steroids and put on the flutter mine, I think I believe I'm saying that correctly, but yeah, and I had to take off methotrexate and switch to uh Humera, which didn't work because of the bones. And I'm now doing rimicate infusions um or Influx map infusions with the Lip global cage. John Carlin: Is that working so far? Garrie Farrow: Actually uh going June to get repeat X rays of my fingers. Uh they showed no further damage is what it was last year. So we're hoping it remains the same now. John Carlin: We've kind of just jumped right to I want to hear more about your eyes and your bones. Sure. When you have sarcoidosis uh in your bones, what does that look or feel like? How do you know it's there? What is the deal? Garrie Farrow: I know it's kind of hard to see on uh camera, but the fingertips of these three fingers are actually about now only about two times the size of the fingers on this hand. And uh what started off as just a finger swelling then turned into I would go to pick up a pen or I'd go to pick up my purse or anything and um I could literally feel something crunching in my fingertips. And I was just like weird um because every once in a while your fingers might pop or you crack something. But I went, no, that is literally in the fingertips. I went to my local PCP and he told me it was finger clubbing due to socketosis and lack of oxygen. My sister actually has or has finger clubbing. She was diagnosed after I did because I pushed her. And so I've seen what finger um clubbing looks like and all her fingers were impacted. John Carlin: I've never heard that word before. Finger clubbing. Fingers look like little clubs. Garrie Farrow: Yes. I don't know if you can kind of tell on camera. You see how this one's more rounded than the other? John Carlin: Yeah. Garrie Farrow: It becomes very bulbous is the other word that they like to use. And your nail bed actually changes shape where instead of being just if you look at your hands, just regular nail bed, they actually expand because since the tip of your finger is getting bulbous, your nail bed has to go with it. And it actually started splitting because my nail bed couldn't keep up with the growth of the finger. So it was splitting. And as I initially pushed um back because I told him that every time I come to see you or see my specialist, my oxygen gets recorded at 98%. 99%. I'm not wheezing that I'm uh aware of, and nobody's told me otherwise. And I've had breathing tests. And if that was the case, all of these should be bulbusy and look funny. It is literally. These three went to see my Pomodologist, and I was on methotrexate. And so they were really concerned about any of the other side effects that method track state could have. And she goes, okay, is there anything else going wrong with you? Because your loans look great. I don't normally see patients like you because phenomenologist. So I'm not used to seeing healthy loans anymore. Anything else going on? And I went, look. Uh and she goes, that is not normal. And I haven't seen that with methotrexate patients. Let's send you for a hand Xray, which then worked into a whole body bone scan. And I now have a Rheumatologist because they realize that uh on Xray, my um fingertips, all of them, actually. But these three are the worst. My body has attached the bones um to the point to where it is broken down and my body is reabsorbing the bone. So the reason they're swelling is because um there's fluid, and that's what causes the swelling. And I actually have four toes involved as well. But all of them, you can tell all of them have been attacked. It's just these three were hit the worst because I dropped a box on them while moving. John Carlin: Sorry, is it painful? Not dropping the box, but I'm just walking around every day with your toes. And does it hurt? Garrie Farrow: Yes, it depends upon what I've done that day. Um some days are worse than others. I am a trainer, so I constantly um typing. And I love playing video games. So playing video games, typing certain things. Um there are days where I don't want to use my fingers. It's not worth it. Or I have become very adept at using my thumb and my ring finger on the right hand because um it's not sensitive to touch per se, because doing this does not hurt. But actually going to grab something unless I can um figure out a way to grab it down here. Think of the worst bruise um that you've ever had. You'll get that you hit it just right, and it doesn't really hurt until you get it in the right place. That's what it feels like. John Carlin: Okay, let's talk about your eye. Garrie Farrow: Yes. John Carlin: What were your symptoms initially? Garrie Farrow: Just a lot of redness. Tallahassee knowns for pollen. Uh and so I just put it off that it's the pollen. Um it is the green season, and it's uh a lot of redness. And then the conjunctive not conjunctivitis, but outside of your eyes were constantly inflamed, like, felt like I had dirt in them. And again, pollen. I just pushed that off. It wasn't until I have glasses that actually with a tent. I just lost the name of it that you go outside. The sunlight and your lenses. John Carlin: Yeah, they get darker. Yeah. Garrie Farrow: I walked outside. Even with that on, literally stopped in my tracks, uh shut my eyes, and was like, oh, my God, the Sun's too bright. My eyes literally hurt. The only way I could um describe it is like a shooting pain through my eye. And I stood there just going, oh, my. Okay, this isn't normal. John Carlin: When was that? How long ago was that? Garrie Farrow: That was probably about uh six years ago. Yeah, about six years ago. Um and again, I went to my local Icare uh provider, and it was like, yeah, this is arthritis. And was um prescribed steroid drops. Then it continued, and I was diagnosed with Uvitis and ended up getting referred to an ophthalmologist uh because I kept going to my optometrist because, of course, my glasses. And they were like, yeah, this is a Sarcodosis issue, not just, you know, you have recurring eye infection. And so that's how the eyes joined up. John Carlin: Wow. Is that controlled? Garrie Farrow: Currently, yes. Thankfully, with the eyedrops, uh uh I think I was on the eyedrops for about a year, and I go back in right now, thankfully, because the last test, uh my last exam came back fine. I'm set to not have to see them for a year, but when my eyes are unhappy, I probably see the ophthalmologist about every three months. And drops and tests I do because of the last one, has a beginning of a glaucoma in one eye because of the recurrent flares in my eyes. So we're kind of watching that. John Carlin: You said the magic word flare, which is what a lot of Sarcodosis patients fear. Garrie Farrow: Yes. John Carlin: You get everything under control, and then all of a sudden you wake up one day and things aren't right, and the Sarcodosis has become active wherever it is in somebody's body. When you just use the word flare, are you talking about flare, as in bright light hitting your eye or a flare up of the Sarcodosis in your eye? Garrie Farrow: Flare of the sarcidosis in my eye. Uh for me, the paint, it feels like a flare of a light in my eye, but my body has um flared itself. There's something in my immune system that has gone into overdrive and done its attack like it usually likes to do. John Carlin: You mentioned Humera, and that didn't work. You said, because of the bones, I think, is what you said. What is the connection between Humera and bones? Garrie Farrow: Actually, none. The only reason I was put on humor was an experiment because um the methotrexate obviously worked perfect for the lungs. But because my bones were starting to go, she was like, okay, we can't put you back on steroids, obviously. So what can we do? And at that point, um Humera. Uh it wasn't officially approved for off label use, but it was showing some impact on the immune system with patients that had Crohn's disease um and really severe, I believe IBS, um and I apologize if I'm incorrect on that one, but it was definitely used in Chrome's. She said, okay, let's try something, because obviously your body is still in overdrive. Let's find a different method to shut off uh your immune system. Humera was picked because there uh was another medication, and I'm blanking on it right now that again, it was another off label cancer medication, but there were so many other side effects, and one of them because of uh where my weight and my diabetes were. Uh she was really hesitant to use that one. So that's why Humor was used. And it was just a test to see. Would it help with my fingers? Because at this point, my options were limited. John Carlin: And uh you ran it, what, for six months? Garrie Farrow: I've been on actually a year because they said it's six months just to figure out if things are going left or right. And the first six months was to make sure my loans did not reengage, for lack of a better word, be changed in how they were going. The bones, after um six months at least, didn't show further damage. They were like this, and I'm never going to regrow the bone, but at least it didn't look like it had uh gotten worse. The reason I had to switch from Humera to the influx of Infusions is the bones remained where they were, but then I lost um the hearing in the left ear, and they're like, okay, so obviously something is not quite right again. So Humor kind of stable things, um or at least shut up my immune system enough, but not enough. So that's why I'm on infusions. John Carlin: Let's talk about your ear. What happened there. Garrie Farrow: Again? My wife and I woke up one Sunday morning with a sinus infection. I'm sorry. Through all of this with the whole eye things, I've had problems with my sinuses um um for quite a while, but it was after the eyes I ended up Sarcodosis caused me to have polyps um inside my nose and in the back of my throat had the polyps removed. They're like, yes, this is definitely sarcoidosis, but you're already on all these other medications. That's um what we would have prescribed for you. So call us back if something changes. I woke up one Sunday with a very bad sinus infection. Um the usual signs and symptoms. And that's um when I woke up that Sunday morning and my boyfriend asked me something, but he was on this side of me and I did not um hear him at all. And he thought I was mad at him. So it was later on the day, um throughout the day, he was like, okay, what did I do to make her mad at me that she wouldn't respond to me? And it wasn't until later on that day that he um asked, I said, I didn't hear you. And so he went over to that site and said something I'm like, I literally can't hear you. I had the same day appointment Monday. And they were like, oh, that's um your sinus infection. Once your sinus is clear, here's an antibiotic. Your hearing will return three weeks later. Found out um my ear hairs are fine. I have no tumor pressing on the nerve. Further research. It's just one of the uh symptoms that you get. Single sided hearing loss caused by sarcosis. John Carlin: That is just amazing to me. Garrie Farrow: Yeah. John Carlin: So you're walking around your job is you are a trainer. What kind of training do you do? Garrie Farrow: Software. Technically, the official Titles application is Trainer. Well, the full name is Electronic Health Record System. I focus more on the practice management side, but when we do major upgrades and releases, both of us end up training the doctors, the nurses uh and receptionists on how to use our system and what changes come into being. John Carlin: You have the sarcoidosis all over your body. How does that impact your ability to just live your life day to day? Garrie Farrow: It has an impact. And of course, the medication side effects play a greater role in how far I do things. The pain, like I said, it's preventing um me from I used to knit as well. I don't do that anymore because my fingers get in the way. And then eventually after time, it really hurts too. Nit I saved my typing for work so I don't play online um video games as much as I used to. Just because I need to be able to type at work. Just anything, to be honest with you, um gripping a jar to try and open it. So I bought a jar opener hearing AIDS so that I can hear on the left side. Um because the other part I realized with me not hearing, I was starting to lose how well I was enunciating words. Uh i won't call it slowing my words, but I was losing just um how well I was speaking. I parse um out my time, to be honest with you, if I know I'm going to take a trip, I don't do much before the trip and I'm definitely not doing a lot after it because I'm just that tired. And when I say trip, my doctors are in Gainesville, which is about a two and a half hour drive from where I am. And going to see a doctor is a trip. Because if I do it in a day, uh when I come back, I'm not going out to eat. I'm not doing what I usually do. John Carlin: You're not talking about going to Paris? Garrie Farrow: Yeah, I wish. I really wish. No, I'm just going to see my doctor. My father lives two and a half hours in the other uh direction. So even just that most people it's just a day trip. No, just a day trip is a lot of energy. John Carlin: The fatigue is real. Then. Do you take a lot of naps? Do you need the naps? Do you need extra sleep at night? Garrie Farrow: Yes. Problem is, you get to that point where you're so tired. Even though you lay down, you can't fall asleep certain days. I'm like that I've laid down. I would uh love to go to sleep, and I'm just that tired of where I can't. But yeah, naps are real. Naps are required. John Carlin: Wow. Um sorry. Something's going on with Zoom on. My end used to be if there's just two people, you could talk as long as you wanted. And it's now telling me that I've got that 40 minutes time limit that you used to only get when there were more than two people. And I'm afraid it's going to time out on me. I've still got a lot more things I want to ask you. Speaker UNK: Sure. John Carlin: Let's end this meeting and go back um and click that same link again and see if it'll let us start another one. Speaker UNK: Absolutely. John Carlin: And if it doesn't, I'll go in and I'll get another link and send um it to you. Just watch your email. Speaker UNK: Okay. John Carlin: All right. So I'm going to end it and then let's click the link and see if we can rejoin. Speaker UNK: Okay. Perfect. Garrie Farrow: Okay. John Carlin: All um right. Garrett, you're doing a lot of work with the foundation for Sarcoidosis Research, as we mentioned just a moment ago. And one of them is you're on the Women of Color committee. For people who aren't up to speed on that, what is that? Committee's responsibility? Garrie Farrow: Sarcasm actually impacts the African American women. I was going to African American community, and it does. Uh but women are more impacted by the disease that if there's going to be a higher hospitalization rate, higher mortality rate, it impacts African American women about up to 13 times more often than African uh American men, even though they are impacted by the disease. Unfortunately, my sister died um from her circuit is three years ago. That's um what made me um join FSR. John Carlin: We buried the lead. I'm so sorry. Garrie Farrow: That's um okay. No, actually, it's not that I don't talk about it, but it's really uh the reason I joined FSR and why I applied in the first place, because um of her experience, um the difference between her experience and mine. When I saw the Women of Color committee come up, that really made me go, okay, I need to be a part of this because of her experience and mine and just in general uh and talking with different African American people and some of our residents and going um to see a physician, I don't want to say it's lack of exposure um to certain diseases and a lot of us are more prone to I'm always tired. I don't feel well. I don't have time to go to the doctor. So he's just going to tell me or she's just going to tell me what I already know. So I'm just not going to go. And I wanted to be a part of that committee to help get more word out there that this is not a disease, that you can just be like, oh, it'll be fine. I'm tired. I'll be tired tomorrow. I'll be tired next week. Let's just wait it out. Um and it's this disease. You cannot just wait. The longer you wait, the more damage that's done. And you can't recover from that damage. Once it's damaged, it is damaged. So that's what made me decide to join up. John Carlin: What was your sister's name? Garrie Farrow: Sharon. Sharon. John Carlin: And she had pulmonary sarcoidosis. Garrie Farrow: Pulmonary and skin. She never went in and got diagnosed for skin, but the spots on her face, um like you have the exact same thing. Go see a dermatologist. Don't have time, don't feel good. From the city that we were from. Um and her doctor uh only used prednisone. Steroids was their fallback. Even when with my methodrest state, when I realized what it was doing for uh me, I was on the road from Gainesville back home, calling her. Go see your doctor, get methotrexy. I promise you, it impacted her lungs away. I'm not sure if it was just due to time. She was a year and a half older than I was, so I'm not sure if it's just due to age, just due to um if Sarcodosis had been passing or a whole lot longer. Um so, yeah, by the time they caught it, by the time with steroids, her lungs couldn't take it literally. At the end, they said that we could um not use any more medication to get any of the fluid off of her lungs. Her lungs are filling up faster than we can get it off of her. And that's what actually killed her. John Carlin: Oh, that must have been so sad. Garrie Farrow: It was devastating on the family, because that's not what's supposed to happen. As my father said, you're not supposed to bury your children. So it was hard. John Carlin: So you stepped up and reached out to the foundation for Sarcodosis Research, even though you had been dealing with Sark yourself for a good long time at that point, yes. And so now you are a fellow advocate, and our role as advocates is to help other Sarcidosis patients. Garrie Farrow: Yes. John Carlin: You're on the Women of Color committee. You're on the patient advisory committee with me. And are uh you a Navigator as well? Garrie Farrow: I've um applied to be a Navigator. The application is uh closed in a couple of weeks, I believe. John Carlin: Okay, so what does it feel like these days when your job is outreach and counseling other people with Sarcoidosis, and what do you say to them? Garrie Farrow: It's a weird sensation, to be honest, because um it's not where I saw my life going. Even though I'm a trainer, I'm an introvert. And training for me is easy because I'm talking about the software. It's not talking about me in working with FSR, doing the advocacy. Um it's a different place for me to be because I'm talking about yes, I'm talking about the disease, but I'm talking about my experience with it. So it's pushing me outside myself in ways that I'm not usually used to, even though I do speak publicly for a living. So it's a different place. But I have to um admit that I do like it because getting the word out about psychedosis helps. Unfortunately, my coworker, I think she's okay with it because um I was so vocal about it at work. She was running into some health issues and was diagnosed with pulmonary psychnosis end of last year. Yeah. And it was just like, oh, okay. I'm sad that you're part of my club, but I'm glad you got diagnosed. Right. Because otherwise she was having some interesting things that kept coming and um went and had a biopsy. John Carlin: So many people say they don't know anybody else that has sarcidosis. You had a sister and now you got a coworker. Garrie Farrow: Yes. John Carlin: It's amazing. So your coworker is doing okay? Garrie Farrow: Yes. She's currently on methotrexate, and I think the last time they did uh the CT scan, things were looking good and they were going to keep her on the same dose. But she's in the first six months. I believe so, yeah. She's got that the milestones to hit before you can really say things are going well. John Carlin: Is she also an African American woman? Garrie Farrow: No. John Carlin: Okay. So it uh just keeps on coming then. But I'm sure that she was curious because she had you as a resource. Garrie Farrow: Yes. And it was one of those kind of different um conversations because it's not like she works in my Department, but she's not like a close coworker. So it was one of these we had to kind of talk to you for a second. And she goes, yeah, I'm going in. And I don't know quite what to do or what to expect. So I put on the FSR hat. So the first thing you need to do is go out to the FSR website, go to stocksoccervices.org, have your husband go out there as well, because your life is going to change, even though you haven't been feeling well and it's already been changing. If any medications are involved, then please don't do steroids. Do some, see what you can do. Your life is going to change and how it impacts you and your family. And she's got grandchildren. Um and you need to do this research now and don't think it can only stay within the loans. You need to think whole uh body. Don't just discount. Well, I'm older. This must be arthritis pain. It's like maybe it is, maybe it isn't. John Carlin: Uh are you doing support groups or anything like that? Garrie Farrow: I'm not. I thought about it, and my introvert little Gremlin was like. John Carlin: Um. Garrie Farrow: Uh I thought about it and looked and um I think this is the introvert part. There's nothing local to me. And so I was just like, okay, I never um done the next step. John Carlin: I was down the road a little bit with starting. We were going to have an event and maybe have a support group grow out of that here in my region in Roanoke, Virginia. And then the pandemic hit and everything got canceled. And that was also about the time I started the podcast for me. I kind of feel like the podcast is my support group because people are listening to you right now, and they're hearing what you're saying. They're hearing what you're going through. And at least if they're looking for answers, they're hearing some of what is normal if there is such a thing with Sarca Dosis. So they may have similar symptoms or similar issues with the prednisone or with the methytrexate or with the ramicade you've mentioned all these things are things that I've been on as uh well. Initially. I'm just curious because you um said for a long time you didn't reach out to FSR and you wrote an op Ed for your local paper, and you said you didn't really research Sarquidosis at first. Was it because you just didn't want to know? Or you just kind of trusted your doctors to know what needed to be known and you were going to take your medication and go on with your life, go back to that time and think what was going on with you then? Garrie Farrow: I trusted my doctor in that stage one. And again, my problem was I was so focused in on leukemia. That was my fear. And I had come home, and I found one dot Gov website that mentioned sarcoidosis and lung involvement. I was like, okay, but leukemia was huge. So once I got that diagnosis of sarcoidosis, I was so relieved that it wasn't leukemia that uh I didn't push further on myself or the doctor. Because, of course, now hindsight being 2020, even stage one, I um should have said, Excuse me, are we sure I don't need to do something else? Anything else. I didn't even think about getting um a second opinion. And even the only thing I will say, thankfully, when I went back to um my primary and she told me she didn't know anything about Psychro dosage and couldn't answer any of my questions and go see the surgeon, I ended up switching to an internist who knew about Sarcodosis. Uh but even then again, I put that trust in the physicians, um didn't educate myself on it until things started changing. John Carlin: Yeah. And then all of a sudden, you jump in. I hear the same thing from people that and it can be kind of scary. I've been on some of the online threads where people just say such terrible, awful things about what's going on with Sarcodosis, but they're not saying it in a reasonable, thoughtful way, which isn't their job to do that. But I just didn't want to see it, and I didn't want to know. Terrible disease, terrible medication, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. And then it would just stop. There wasn't any further explanation because people were just typing responses to one another, almost like reading a Facebook thread on a controversial issue, and people were just going after each other. Garrie Farrow: And nobody's talking about that. Okay, yes, sarcoidosis is not a fun disease, but there are ways to function that yes, your life has changed, but this is not this is not the end of it. There's other things that you can do. Nobody likes to put that on the thread. That's not as interesting when you're looking at posts, right? John Carlin: Yeah. People just have to be so sensational with their posts, but they're probably on that thread because they're either bored or mad or both. And so you're seeing the worst of I just stopped looking, honestly. But I found that I probably should have looked further faster. And I'm hearing you say the same thing. Garrie Farrow: Absolutely. And I'll admit because I was surprised that I didn't know how long um FSR had been around. That when I started searching for sarcoidosis. Originally, I only got the Gov um sites, Medline, WebMD, and I just lost the name of the other one that has a symptom um checker on it that no doctor loves. And uh I did not start finding out about FSR until I probably was starting to search. Every week I would go out and just um Sarcodosis, pulmonary Sarcodosis. Let me see what I can find, because this is ridiculous, that I know it's rare. And at that time, I think it was 200,000 in the US were being affected. But there has to be more. There has to be more that this um can't be just this couple of sites. And luck was on my side and FSR popped up because I was starting to get to that point to where I think I've been doing that for about a couple of months. Uh i was starting to get frustrated because the information was always the same short little info or like you said, the posts that were just depressing me, making feel like, okay, I'm not going to die tomorrow, but I'm going to pass soon. I don't want to hear this anymore, uh but I found that it's our site. John Carlin: Right. Is there anything else you want to add to this conversation? I appreciate you kind of bearing your soul here with our listeners. Garrie Farrow: Honestly, if one person okay, not one. But if um more people would, if you're ever finding yourself going, okay, this is discounting your own symptoms and you're thinking, well, it must just be allergies, oh, I'm just tired. And I'm always tired. Sarcoidosis doesn't just impact the lungs. The um heart can be impacted. Your eyes, the skin, bones, you name it. It can um impact the body. And even with I don't have time, I don't have the energy. Just go to that one appointment and talk to your physician, um even if you're not the one having the symptoms. Everybody talks to their friends, everybody talks to their family. And you always hear that common issue with that family member, with that friend, talk to them, get them to go. Because even if it's not Sarcodosis, it could be anything and everything else they need to go in and be seen. And it's not to say that don't trust your doctors, um but if they tell you, okay, we think you have this or we have confirmed this diagnosis. Do your research go out there? The internet is huge. Yes. You're going to run into some information that's when you do more research just because you found one answer, you found one source you don't stick with just that one source. You look at everything as much as you can and get that knowledge for yourself so you know what you're going to have to live with and that helps better prepare you for your next office visit. John Carlin: Find a doctor that is a specialist in sarcoidosis. Yes, there are lots of doctors who may have one or two Sarcoidosis patients. That's not the same thing. Garrie Farrow: No, not even close to it. As you are well aware, Sarcidosis is so varied that there's a commonality amongst all of us. But how sarcadosis impacts you is different than how it impacts me and yes, it is a disease of granuloma but how your body takes that granuloma you really need someone who has a breadth of knowledge not just like you said, one or two Z is not enough knowledge for this disease, right? John Carlin: thank you for joining me on the Sarfighter podcast. Garrie Farrow: Thank you thank you for having me. I love listening to you. I've watched your podcast before so this is fantastic. This was fun. John Carlin: Great. Thanks. Garrie Farrow: Thanks. Bye.