Podcast appearances and mentions of James Joyce

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Irish writer, poet, teacher, and literary critic

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James Joyce

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Latest podcast episodes about James Joyce

The Seen and the Unseen - hosted by Amit Varma
Ep 253: Our Parliament and Our Democracy

The Seen and the Unseen - hosted by Amit Varma

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 183:28


A democracy is not just about voting, The rules of the game have to protect individuals, and institutions have to keep the government accountable. MR Madhavan joins Amit Varma in episode 253 of The Seen and the Unseen to discuss his efforts at empowering MPs and MLAs with knowledge -- and why we should not lose hope in our nation. Also check out: 1. PRS Legislative Research. 2. When You Could Only Buy Two Litres of Milk -- MR Madhavan. 3. The Functioning of the Indian Parliament -- MR Madhavan. 4. Dilli Door Nahin: Engaging With the Policy Process -- MR Madhavan. 5. Ulysses and Dubliners -- James Joyce. 6. Fixing Indian Education -- Episode 185 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Karthik Muralidharan). 7. Education in India -- Episode 77 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Amit Chandra). 8. Every Act of Government Is an Act of Violence -- Amit Varma. 9. Taxes Should Be Used for Governance, Not Politics -- Amit Varma. 10. Battles Half Won: India's Improbable Democracy -- Ashutosh Varshney. 11. A Life in Indian Politics -- Episode 149 of The Seen and the Unseen (w JP Narayan). 12. A People's Constitution -- Rohit De. 13. The First Assault on Our Constitution -- Episode 194 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Tripurdaman Singh). 14. The Right to Property -- Episode 26 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Shruti Rajagopalan). 15. The Federalist Papers -- Alexander Hamilton, John Jay and James Madison. 16. The Oxford Handbook of the Indian Constitution -- Sujit Choudhry, Madhav Khosla and Pratap Bhanu Mehta. 17. The Ideas of Our Constitution -- Episode 164 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Madhav Khosla). 18. India's Founding Moment — Madhav Khosla. 19. India's Greatest Civil Servant -- Episode 167 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Narayani Basu). 20. The Anti-Defection Law -- Episode 13 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Barun Mitra). 21. Speech to the Electors of Bristol -- Edmund Burke. 22. A Cricket Tragic Celebrates the Game -- Episode 201 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Ramachandra Guha). 23. Bindra's Wishlist -- Amit Varma. 24. The Business of Winning Elections -- Episode 247 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Shivam Shankar Singh). 25. Think Again: The Power of Knowing What You Don't Know -- Adam Grant. 26. The Gray Man -- Mark Greaney. 27. PG Wodehouse on Amazon. 28. The Three-Body Problem -- Cixin Liu. 29. Project Hail Mary -- Andy Weir. 30. A Gentleman in Moscow -- Amor Towles. 31. The Lincoln Highway -- Amor Towles. 32. The Paper Menagerie -- Ken Liu. This episode is sponsored by Intel. This episode is co-sponsored by CTQ Compounds. Check out The Daily Reader, FutureStack and The Social Capital Compound. Use the code UNSEEN for Rs 2500 off. Please subscribe to The India Uncut Newsletter. It's free! And check out Amit's online course, The Art of Clear Writing.

美文阅读 More to Read
美文阅读 | 不惋惜,不呼喊,不哭泣 No Sorrow, No Calls, No Tears (谢尔盖·叶赛宁)

美文阅读 More to Read

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 28:25


Daily Quote The successful warrior is the average man, with laser-like focus. (Bruce Lee) Poem of the Day No Sorrow, No Calls, No Tears Sergey Yesenin Beauty of Words Eveline (2) James Joyce

美文阅读 More to Read
美文阅读 | 伊芙琳 Eveline (詹姆斯·乔伊斯)

美文阅读 More to Read

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 28:25


Daily Quote Better a frank denial than unwilling compliance. (Victor Hugo) Poem of the Day November Hartley Coleridge Beauty of Words Eveline (1) James Joyce

The Great Books
Episode 205: 'Dubliners' by James Joyce

The Great Books

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 34:11


John J. Miller is joined by Lorraine Murphy of Hillsdale College to discuss James Joyce's book, 'Dubliners.'

Blooms & Barnacles
The Language of Flowers

Blooms & Barnacles

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 57:49


“Angry tulips with you darling manflower punish your cactus if you don't please poor forgetmenot how I long violets to dear roses when we soon anemone meet all naughty nightstalk wife Martha's perfume.”Kelly and Dermot untangle the mysterious language of flowers. Topics include James Joyce's affair with Marthe Fleischmann, the pitfalls of method acting, Kate Bush, the tonal shifts in Martha Clifford's letter to Henry Flower, narcissism and self-gratification, Martha's connection to the Otherworld, whether or not Bloom will ever meet Martha in person, the Victorian language of flowers, an angry vagina, a manflower and a Flower Man, cactuses v. lianas, coactus volui, nightstocks, how Martha's letter defies Chekhov's gun, a cigar that's not just a cigar, the correspondence of James Joyce and Nora Barnacle, Martha topping from the bottom, Martha as a talented kinkster, Giacomo Joyce, a possibility for that “other word,” Bloom's dirty letters to Molly, and the worst pick-up lines.Sweny's Patreon helps keep this marvelous Dublin landmark alive. Please subscribe!On the Blog:The Language of FlowersSocial Media:Facebook | TwitterSubscribe to Blooms & Barnacles:Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher

Wisdom-Trek ©
Day 1781 – Portals of Discovery – Daily Wisdom

Wisdom-Trek ©

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 4:00


Welcome to Day 1781 of our Wisdom-Trek, and thank you for joining me. This is Guthrie Chamberlain, Your Guide to Wisdom Portals of Discovery – Daily Wisdom Welcome to Wisdom-Trek with Gramps. We are on Day 1781 of our Trek, and it's time to explore another nugget of wisdom, which includes an inspirational quote along with some wise words from Gramps for today's trek. Wisdom is the final frontier in gaining true knowledge. We are on a daily trek to create a legacy of wisdom, seek out discernment and insights, and boldly grow where few have chosen to grow before. Hello, my friend; this is Gramps. Thanks for coming along on today's trek as we increase Wisdom and Create a Living Legacy. https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Proverbs%2016%3A16&version=NLT (Proverbs 16:16)  How much better to get wisdom than gold, and sound judgment than silver!    If you apply the words you hear today, over time, it will help you become more healthy, wealthy, and wise as you continue your daily trek of life.  So let's jump right in with today's nugget: Today's quote is from James Joyce, and it is: A man of genius makes no mistakes. His errors are volitional and are the portals of discovery. Portals Of Discovery Most of the time, we do not make mistakes on purpose, but a person of genius realizes that mistakes are part of life as if we did make them of our own volition.  Knowing that mistakes will happen, instead of allowing them to derail or destroy us or our plans, mistakes or errors provide us with an opportunity to learn and to discover why something didn't work out as planned.  Once we peer through that discovery portal, we can begin with the added knowledge that we learned from our mistakes. So never allow mistakes and failures to stop your progress. Instead, let them be the stepping stones required to continue towards your pursuits.  It is then that you are a person of genius. https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=James+3%3A17-18&version=NLT (James 3:17-18) But the wisdom from above is first of all pure. It is also peace-loving, gentle at all times, and willing to yield to others. It is full of mercy and the fruit of good deeds. It shows no favoritism and is always sincere.  And those who are peacemakers will plant seeds of peace and reap a harvest of righteousness. As you ponder this nugget of wisdom for yourself, please encourage your friends and family to join us and then come along tomorrow for another day of ‘Wisdom-Trek, Creating a Legacy.' If you would like to listen to any of our past 1780 treks or read the Wisdom Journal, they are available at Wisdom-Trek.com.  I encourage you to subscribe to Wisdom-Trek on your favorite podcast player so that each day's trek will be downloaded automatically. If you would also like to receive our weekly newsletter called ‘Wisdom Notes,' please email me at guthrie@wisdom-trek.com. Thank you so much for allowing me to be your guide, mentor, and, most of all, your friend as I serve you through this Wisdom-Trek podcast and journal. As we take this Trek together, let us always: Live Abundantly (Fully) Love Unconditionally Listen Intentionally Learn Continuously Lend to others Generously Lead with Integrity Leave a Living Legacy Each Day I am Guthrie Chamberlain….reminding you to 'Keep Moving Forward,' ‘Enjoy your Journey,' and ‘Create a Great Day…Everyday'! See you Tomorrow for more daily wisdom!

Les Nuits de France Culture
Atelier de Création Radiophonique - Fin (n) again ou autour de "Finnegans Wake" de James Joyce (1ère diffusion : 05/06/1983)

Les Nuits de France Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 140:59


durée : 02:20:59 - Les Nuits de France Culture - par : Philippe Garbit - Par Kaye Mortley - Avec Philippe Lavergne (premier traducteur de "Finnegans Wake"), Philippe Sollers (écrivain), Hélène Cixous (écrivain, dramaturge), Daniel Sibony (philosophe, psychanalyste), André Topia (professeur de littérature anglaise), Timothy Hennessy (artiste), Jean-Michel Rabaté (professeur de littérature anglaise, spécialiste de Joyce, traducteur, écrivain), Jacques Aubert (éditeur de Joyce, professeur émérite des Universités) et Jacques Darras (poète, essayiste, traducteur) - Avec en archive, la voix de James Joyce - Extraits de la lecture intégrale de "Finnegans Wake" par Patrick Hely à la galerie Annick Lemoine - Réalisation Marie-Ange Garrandeau

LitReading - Classic Short Stories
Araby by James Joyce

LitReading - Classic Short Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 15:18


James Joyce's “Araby” is ranked among the pantheon of greatest short stories ever written. In this timeless coming of age tale an adolescent boy, blinded by a hormonal fog, falls for a neighbor girl.Now considered one of the classics of literature, the 1914 collection of short stories, Dubliners, of which “Araby” was an early part was an initial failure selling less than 400 copies. Of those almost a third were purchased Joyce himself.

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show
So, You're a Weirdo

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 17:56


We're part of a society that constantly pulls us down into the collective no matter how high we want to fly -- only so that we cultivate a more agreeable (or amenable) behavior, mend our "weird" ways, and reduce ourselves to the average of the majority. But as I would ask (and I'm sure you would, too), is it really possible to average out things that we cannot even measure? Do you think we're programmed to be part of a randomly picked "data set"? That's why in this episode, I get into the importance of being authentically YOU. As the legendary novelist, poet, and literary critic James Joyce once said, "In the particular is contained the universal." YOU matter, and so do your opinions, thoughts, values, and aspirations. So if you're a "weirdo" or think you don't fit in the lot, then know that it's a gift you and I share in common. Learn to use it to your advantage. Design your world to your taste and be willing to be misunderstood. A few points to note from the episode: [14:18] You must actively take a role in being unapologetically you. [16:37] Be willing to be misunderstood [19:04] Be true to yourself [19:12] Know your unique gifts AND your weakness to know where you are and how you could get to where you want to be. Have a question? Shoot me a text at 1-206-309-5177. Enjoy! --- Today's episode is brought to you by CreativeLive. CreativeLive is the world's largest hub for online creative education in photo/video, art/design, music/audio, craft/maker and the ability to make a living in any of those disciplines. They are high quality, highly curated classes taught by the world's top experts -- Pulitzer, Oscar, Grammy Award winners, New York Times best selling authors and the best entrepreneurs of our times.

The CodeX Cantina
Counterparts by James Joyce - Short Story Summary, Analysis, Review

The CodeX Cantina

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 19:29


Welcome to the CodeX Cantina where our mission is to get more people talking about books! Today we talk about "Counterparts" by legendary James Joyce. While this one is not reviewed as frequently as other stories in the anthology, it's one that is very powerful to us. A great tale of abuse sprinkled with the usual Nationality and Religious overtones that Joyce always sneaks in there! Dubliners Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GTgYJiNAeg0&list=PLHg_kbfrA7YC5fRgJ6JpuJ1dw8mJC0SAH James Joyce Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ok3LgNktA18&list=PLHg_kbfrA7YBoy7yREia3iSb68vXh1IJw ✨Do you have a Short Story or Novel you'd think we'd like or would want to see us cover? Join our Patreon to pick our reads.

Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina
Santa Barbara Talks 83: James Joyce III and Wade Cowper

Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 52:36


James Joyce III nearly shocked the world on Election Night in Santa Barbara when he placed second, winning 7,125 votes in his bid for mayor. He finished in second, far ahead of incumbent mayor Cathy Murillo. While Joyce did not win the top spot, he showed that there was a lot of buzz and excitement around his campaign. Joyce was outspent heavily by his opponent, yet only finished 3,000 votes behind the top vote-getter Randy Rowse. In this podcast, Joyce talks about his campaign, the strategy, what worked and what didn't. He is joined by Wade Cowper, his political consultant, who talks breaks down the strategy for victory. Joyce also responds to critics who say he cost Cathy Murillo, another Democrat, the election. He also talks about Daraka Larimore-Hall, and responds to the criticisms of his candidacy. Joyce and Cowper join Josh Molina in his kitchen for a conversation unlike any other. Joyce also talks about his future in politics. Unfiltered. Uncensored. Unapologetic. If you like podcasts like, please subscribe to my You Tube Channel at Santa Barbara Talks and consider a donation directly at my www.santabarbaratalks.com web site.

Every Damn Thing
67. In-N-Out Burger, Portmanteaus (w/ Matt Hock)

Every Damn Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 39:14


Phil and Jake are joined by returning guest Matt Hock (from Space Cadet & The Explosion) to rank In-N-Out Burger, and word mash-ups aka portmanteaus on the List of Every Damn Thing.Get Space Cadet's record “Lion On A Leash” on Wiretap Records, listen to them on Spotify, and follow them on Instagram (@space_cadet_band). And go to one of their upcoming shows!If you have something to add to the list, email it to list@everydamnthing.net (or get at us on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook).SHOW NOTES: In the episode, Phil talks about @tweakseason on TikTok. Phil doesn't have TikTok but he has a summary of @tweakseason's activities on his desk every Monday morning. Here's a youtube compilation it's in the genre of "guy walking around NYC". Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser is a book about fast food in America. We read it a long time ago but we remember it was heavy on the Carl's Jr. One of the last chapters is about how everything they just said about how bad the industry is doesn't really apply to In-N-Out - they pay their workers better, produce better quality food, etc. Shake Shack is a fast-casual hamburger chain based in NYC (which is now nationwide). According to Phil, the burger is better than In-N-Out but it costs three times as much.  We mention Taqueria Diana in Williamsburg again. Go there. Dick's is the place where the cool hang out. The swass like to play, and the rich flaunt clout. It's a burger place in Seattle. In an alternate universe it took off in popularity instead of In-N-Out. Sir Mix-A-Lot is a Seattle-based rapper and HAM radio enthusiast. Waffle House is an all-day breakfast chain based in the Southeast. When fights happen at Waffle House, they often end up on social media. Veggie Grill is a vegetarian fast food chain on the West Coast, as well as in New York and Massachusetts. It's pretty much wherever coastal elites like to be, and it's good food. Taco Time is a Mexican fast food chain in the western U.S., but not California. El Pollo Loco deserves to be ranked later. It's Phil's favorite fast-food chain. "Thighvertising" came up in Phil's search for portmanteaus. He admits Jake was right it should be called “adverthighsing”. James Joyce coined the term “Scandiknavery” in Finnegan's Wake'. It's pretty specific but we're looking forward to using it.  Phil thinks “pegacorn is” a bad one because "Winged Unicorn" just sounds better. Other portmanteaus discussed include “bodacious”, “throuple”, “guesstimate” and “chillax”. After plugging his own shows, Matt makes sure to plug our good friend Dave Hause's upcoming shows in November. ALSO DISCUSSED IN THIS EPISODE:Jesus Christ * Animal Style * French fries * anti-vaxxers * * Popeye's chicken * Steven Seagal * QAnon * war * the Jersey Shore * Alice in Wonderland * Pompeii * goats * Jessica Rabbit * skorts * jorts * jeggings * Watchmen (TV series) * Below are the Top Ten and Bottom Top items on List of Every Damn Thing as of this episode (for the complete up-to-date list, go here).TOP TEN: Dolly Parton - person interspecies animal friends - idea sex - idea Clement Street in San Francisco - location Prince - person It's-It - food Cher - person Pee-Wee Herman - fictional character Donald Duck - fictional character Hank Williams - person BOTTOM TEN:204. Jenny McCarthy - person205. Jon Voight - person206. Hank Williams, Jr - person207. British Royal Family - institution208. Steven Seagal - person209. McRib - food210. war - idea211. cigarettes - drug212. QAnon - idea213. transphobia - ideaTheme song by Jade Puget. Graphic design by Jason Mann. This episode was produced & edited by Jake MacLachlan, with audio help from Luke Janela. Show notes by Jake MacLachlan & Phil Green.Our website is everydamnthing.net and we're also on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.Email us at list@everydamnthing.net. 

Blooms & Barnacles

Henry dear, do not deny my request before my patience are exhausted.In this episode, Kelly and Dermot try to figure out who Martha, Leopold Bloom's saucy penpal, could really be. Topics include Dermot's interest in Islam, Bloom's missing hour, Leah the Forsaken, jugginses and guttapercha, castration anxiety, hopscotch and marbles, senior infants, Martha's letter, Martha's possible true identity, why Martha is interested in Molly's perfume, Kelly harshly debunks popular theories about Martha's identity, possible reasons for Martha's lack of skill as a smart lady typist, piña coladas, Lizzie Twigg, wild speculation, Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine, Miss Dunne, Gerty MacDowell, Peggy Griffin, Bloom's secret cipher that may reveal Martha's identity, and why Ignatius Gallaher is definitely not Martha Clifford.Sweny's Patreon helps keep this marvelous Dublin landmark alive. Please subscribe!On the Blog:The Secret Life of Martha CliffordSocial Media:Facebook | TwitterSubscribe to Blooms & Barnacles:Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher

Stereoactive Movie Club
Ep 17 // 8 ½

Stereoactive Movie Club

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 78:38


It's Jeremiah's 3rd pick: 8 ½, the 1963 film directed by Federico Fellini. 8 ½ was Fellini's feature film follow-up to 1960s La Dolce Vita – with a segment for an anthology film produced in the interim. La Dolce Vita had been something of an international sensation when it came out, so perhaps the pressure of following that up led him to produce a film about the pressure on a director to make his next movie. It was released in February 1963 to much acclaim, especially from European critics, drawing comparisons to James Joyce's Ulysses and Orson Welles' Citizen Kane along the way. It then opened in the United States in June of that year, where it also earned mostly praise, but for a few critics (Pauline Kael among the detractors). And it ended up winning two Academy Awards, for Best Foreign Film and Best Costume Design (Black and White), while it was also nominated for Best Director, Best Original Screenplay, and Best Art Direction. As for our purposes, 8 ½ was first on the Sight & Sound critics survey in 1972, ranked as the 4th greatest film of all time. It Was then at number 5 in 1982, fell off the list in 1992, reentered at #9 in 2002 and ended up at #10 in 2012. Meanwhile, it's been on the directors survey each time they've had one so far, at #2 in 1992, at #3 in 2002, and then at #4 in 2012. Produced by Stereoactive Media --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/stereoactivemovieclub/message

RTÉ Radio Player: Latest Podcasts
Playback: Playback - Oct 30th

RTÉ Radio Player: Latest Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 43:09


This week on Playback. Crisis – what crisis? We get a guide to the pitfalls and pleasures of midlife. You're nothing but a soggy, slimy potato – we hear the best Irish insults. We learn just what happened when Nora Barnacle stood up James Joyce. And of course, Covid. All on Playback presented by Sinéad Mooney.

RTÉ - Playback
Playback - Oct 30th

RTÉ - Playback

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 43:09


This week on Playback. Crisis – what crisis? We get a guide to the pitfalls and pleasures of midlife. You're nothing but a soggy, slimy potato – we hear the best Irish insults. We learn just what happened when Nora Barnacle stood up James Joyce. And of course, Covid. All on Playback presented by Sinéad Mooney.

Blooms & Barnacles
An Abode of Bliss

Blooms & Barnacles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 53:03


The Blooms' household is anything but an abode of bliss.In this episode, topics include: Plumtree's Potted Meat, Joyce's love for advertising, the narcotic effect of adspeak, why Plumtree's Potted Meat is the perfect metaphor for a modern Odysseus, M'Coy's various scams, Boylan's metaphorically significant gifts to Molly, Bloom's missing hour and how his cat helps solve this mystery, Love's Old Sweet Song, why M'Coy doesn't turn up at Dignam's funeral, Mrs. M'Coy, smallpox in Belfast, M'Coy as an unflattering mirror of Bloom, how Plumtree's Potted Meat reveals Bloom's connection to Moses, the symbolic motif of the plum in Ulysses, the ritual consumption of flesh, how waste product becomes meat through transubstantiation, Plumtree's Potted Meat as a magical spell, and what Plumtree's Potted Meat has in common with The Sopranos.Sweny's Patreon helps keep this marvelous Dublin landmark alive. Please subscribe!On the Blog:Plumtree's Potted M'CoySocial Media:Facebook | TwitterSubscribe to Blooms & Barnacles:Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher

The Nathan Barry Show
053: Kimberly Brooks - Taking Intentional Breaks To Reignite Creativity

The Nathan Barry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 66:51


Kimberly Brooks is a contemporary American artist and author. Kimberly integrates landscape, figuration and abstraction to address subjects of history, memory and identity. Her work has been exhibited and featured internationality.Kimberly received her bachelor's degree in literature from U.C. Berkeley, and was Valedictorian. She has taught art as a lecturer and adjunct faculty instructor, and was a featured speaker at TEDx Fullerton.In this episode, I talk with Kimberly about her work as an artist, author, and editor. We talk about how she uses ConvertKit to reach and grow her audience. We talk about what people can learn from fine art, and apply it to their newsletters. We also cover the path to becoming a successful creator, and much more.In this episode, you'll learn: The secret to achieving your breakthrough moment A job most creators should charge for, but rarely do What you should be doing instead of blogging Should you be posting on Instagram? Links & Resources Huffington Post ConvertKit Craft and Commerce Steve Jobs John Baldessari Adobe Photoshop Adobe Leonard Shlain Milton Glaser Macworld Walt Disney's Imagineering Warner Music Group Seth Godin Leonardo da Vinci Arianna Huffington Huffington Post: Fine Art Later Anderson Ranch Arts Center Otis College of Art and Design Kimberly Brooks's Links Find Kimberly on Instagram Kimberly's website Kimberly's Ted Talk Huffington Post article, “The Gap Logo, New Coke and the Legendary Walter Landor” Kimberly's book, The New Oil Painting Episode Transcript[00:00:00] Kimberly:The fundamental way to learn is, you imitate, assimilate, and then you can improvise with anything. You're going to be thwarted in the beginning many times, and you can't give up. You have to say, “Okay, well, I don't care if it sucks. I don't care if I'm going to fail. If I'm gonna fail, I'm gonna fail big. Let's just go on.”[00:00:29] Nathan:In this episode I talk to Kimberly Brooks. She is a fine artist. So, painting, she has all of her art in galleries, that whole world, which is super fascinating to me. She also plays in the creative world. Newsletters, podcasts, and interviews.She built the whole art editorial section of the Huffington Post. She built that to millions of readers. She's done all kinds of things in the design community from the early days. So, we riff on that; Mad Men-style ad agencies in the ‘80s and ‘90s. Some great stuff.Then she brings it all the way through to talking about what she does with ConvertKit. How she sets up her sequences, and everything else, and things that people can learn from fine art, and apply to their email newsletters and sequences.So, it's a fun episode. We have to do a part two, because we filled up all the time we had, and I think I only got through half my questions.So, anyway, I'm going to get out of the way and dive in. So, here we go.Kimberly, welcome to the show.[00:01:37] Kimberly:Thank you for having me, Nathan.[00:01:39] Nathan:There's so many things I to talk about, because you come to the creator world from a different perspective than I do, though we both share a love for Photoshop.[00:01:50] Kimberly:Oh, yeah.[00:01:51] Nathan:We'll start with where we met. It was at Craft and Commerce, some number of years ago.I can't even think. Three years ago? Four?[00:02:01] Kimberly:I think it was three years ago, and it was such a random whim. I don't even know how I ended up finding it. I fell in rabbit hole. And then I came upon ConvertKit.I was actively looking for a better way to send art show announcements. Because I'm a painter, I'm an artist.I just felt after my previous experiences, I knew how important having a subscriber-based service was. I don't want to get too nerdy, but I didn't really like the competitor who shall remain unnamed. But, I found you guys, and I started getting the advertisement for the conference, and it was in Boise, Idaho.And so I thought, I'll just go. It was like a Ted conference for really creative nerdy people like me, but it was exactly what I was wanting. It was about marketing, which is really such a weird word because it's really about sharing, and I loved the title.I loved everything about it. I met some of the people that I'm really, really close with now. Then the next year it was canceled because of the pandemic, but it was amazing, and I met you, actually.[00:03:28] Nathan:And, and we had a really fun conversation. one thing that I want to talk about, for you is the intersection between fine art, right. And painting and that world. And then now you're also in this world of being a writer and a creator in the sense, right. You you've been a writer and creative for a long time, but, but it's, it's like a different world of the selling things to your audience.And. Earning money directly in that way. And so I want, like, I want to hear that as you like weave in and out of these two worlds and then just your experience there.[00:04:02] Kimberly:Yeah, it's interesting. I, when I was in elementary school, we had a really competitive game of tetherball constantly going on on the playground. And it was just sort of that pole with a ball attached to a rope we would, people would line up and we would get it, and it was, see how many times, and it was just sort of like, it was very intense and I always felt like being an artist.Being an art to me was it was the pole, you know? So like my pole is art is making art and everything about what I do. I write about it. I interview people about it. I interview other artists about their work. I make paintings 90% of the time in my studio. Like, it's all about art, you know? So that's like the beginning.So I do see myself sashaying between different worlds. And I think everybody kind of does that. And then as the bicycle of technology was being built to use kind of like a vague reference to like Steve jobs is, you know, what happens if you put a man on a bicycle and you know, like how fast can he, as the bicycle was kind of entering our world, I thought, what if you kind of mixed art with the bicycle?You know, what, what happens if you, you know, Make an artist's website. So I was like one of the first people I knew that made an artist's website. And I remember, it was, I had, was having lunch with my mentor. Who's, the late John Baldessari. He was a great, great, great artist. And, he's famous for, you know, he burned all this stuff and graduate school and then became a conceptual painter, you know, very, you know, Howard work in, you know, conceptual anyway.So I brought my laptop to this Mexican restaurant in Venice, and I said, I wanted to show you something. I made a website and our studios were really near each other. And he said, Oh, I, I don't know if I would do that. If I were you, I was like, why not? He said, because you're, you'll piss off the dealers, the galleries, the galleries, you shouldn't be selling directly.It's going to take away from what their job is. You know, when you hang a show and you have art in the gallery, the gallery is selling the artist and it's their job, you know, and artists are supposed to be kind of this, you know, semi mute, black turtleneck wearing, you know, mysterious, mystical ShawMan goddess.I call it goddess on the hill. Like you're not supposed to really get in the way of what your artists about. And so I thought, oh gosh, you know, this is, and I had put the paintings for a show was about to have. And so I started making, so my postcard for that show had the name of the show and it had the name of the website, cause no galleries had website.Then this is in like the two thousands, you know, this is a long time ago. And I remember meeting people when I handed them a postcard. If like I felt comfortable with them, I would like secretly write a password so that they could see the website,[00:07:20] Nathan:Oh was you were, you had the website, but it was[00:07:24] Kimberly:Yeah. So I password protected it. I password protected it because John Baldessari told me that it's probably not a good idea to have a website.This is again, no artists ad website.[00:07:35] Nathan:How did the galleries and the community[00:07:37] Kimberly:The galleries didn't have websites either. And the galleries, I remember. They started it. Like some of them had websites, but it was super janky. It was like sometimes most of the time they did an, and it was just sort of this mysterious world that 99.9, nine, 9% of the public didn't understand.Doesn't understand it's better now. And you'd have to be walking down the street or you'd have to know somebody who knows somebody, you know, it's, it was just a different world then.[00:08:08] Nathan:But did any of those negative things come about? Like, did anyone look down on you on it for having a website and for[00:08:14] Kimberly:No, no, no. Eventually I just said, screw it. And I took the password off.And, interestingly, I don't want to date myself, but I think I already have, but the at the time flash was very. sexy. And it was like, and so artists would have, if they did have website, firstly, they would be horribly designed and they would have like a flash animation of a curtain opening and a door.And it was very like CD rom mentality. Like, you know, it was pre-internet thinking, you know, anyway, like I said, the big nerd here.[00:08:48] Nathan:Flash was big until 2000, like the iPhone 2007.[00:08:52] Kimberly:Until Steve jobs killed it, just took a knife. He took a sword and he just, during a keynote, just, you know,[00:09:01] Nathan:Yeah. Oh, and the two biggest reasons were, that the bandwidth of the phones couldn't handle it. And then also the battery life on the phones couldn't handle it.[00:09:10] Kimberly:Wasn't there another reason there was another technical reason that had to do with plays well with others. I can't remember exactly what it was,[00:09:20] Nathan:Yeah. I mean, it was a restricted technology. Like it was owned Macromedia. And so probably that apple was trying to do to get to play. And Adobe was playing hardball and apple was probably like, okay,[00:09:31] Kimberly:Yeah,[00:09:32] Nathan:You know, we'll play this[00:09:33] Kimberly:Yeah. It was, was, it was, it was just the evolution of, you know, of Photoshop and Adobe products. And so I grew up with Adobe. I learned I was an early adopter, always, you know, I just sort of like analogy. Yeah.[00:09:49] Nathan:I want to dive into all kinds of things. I want to talk about, more in the financial world and the business of that and everything else. But back and maybe start earlier in your career.[00:10:01] Kimberly:Than elementary school.[00:10:04] Nathan:I guess we didn't go to elementary school a little bit after elementary school. What what did the early days of your career look like[00:10:12] Kimberly:I was a, you know, I'm a first, or I guess I'm a second generation American, so, and I'm Jewish. So of course I was supposed to be a doctor. So my, we used to get, you can be anything you want just as long as you're a surgeon first. So I got the makings of a woman's surgeon and, you know, it was just like, as a book that was a book that I received many times in my middle school years.And then, you know, it was like, that's great, you're so talented. But you know, you really, you know, after you get out of medical school, you can, it was just sort of what you did in my family. And, and my father he was a well-known surgeon and he became an, I don't want to say artist. He became a writer, so he's a well-known writer.And he started writing. So he kind of became an artist before my eyes, you know, so as I was getting out, as I was graduating college, he published his first bestselling. That was just, and I would like sit at the book, you know, when he gave a lecture at an art gallery, because it was called art and physics.His name is Leonard Shlain so I would like sell, watch him, sell the books, you know, like give a lecture and then I would check out and I would get, take people's cash and then give them a book, you know, at the end of the lecture. And he used to tell me, he used to say, honey, you have to be shameless.You have to be willing to just talk in front of four people. It doesn't matter. You just need to do it. If it's just, it was just a big, it did. It made an imprint on me because I was watching him grow out of his own discomfort zone, which I still struggle with of talking to people like instead of through your paintings or, you know, talking to an audience saying being on video, it took me six months to figure out how to be on video, but I'm getting ahead of it.So you asked me like my CR about my career. So I was an English major. I went to an English, major architecture, minor at UC Berkeley. And at the time that I was graduating, painting was considered dead. And I know that that for artists today, they don't quite appreciate that. But after abstract expressionism, there was sort of this mood in the art world that everything had been done and like, forget about figuration was the last thing people wanted to see, you know, and I wanted to paint people.So I just figured, okay, I'm going to just do that on my own, but I'm going to, I love reading. I love writing. So I became an English major and I was valedictorian of, of the UC Berkeley English department. And so my first job, I wanted to combine my love for art and literature. So my first job was.Design. So my, so I, was mentored by a gentleman named Walter Lander, who is the founder of landlord associates. And he was sort of the west coast, Milton Glaser, Milton Glaser from a design point of view, like he was, he just recently passed in the last five or so years, but he like did the, I love New York, you know, like he's this famous, famous graphic designer because the field of graphic design is, is relatively new.It's relatively, it's like a century old, you know, like th the serious field of it. And Walter was a pioneer in it. And he did, you know, my first job was like working cause I, cause I minored in architecture was, helping design the shell oil, gas station, you know,So I was doing like architecture design, and then he asked me to write speeches.And so they had, their company was kind of designed like a brain. So they had like a language division and they had like the design division, like they did the loose soon milk and they were so famous then such leaders. They had 1800 people in offices all over the world and it was like a big deal. And they had an office on a ferry boat.So that was my first job out of college. I was a speech writer for Walter and I was in the, I was in the word department. Like I think I designed, I helped name, a cigarette, you know, like was just a weird, but it was fascinating, you know? And it was meeting fascinating people. The grateful dead would like come over on the boat after it was, it was, it was a wild time at, in San Francisco in the late eighties, early nineties.Totally wild. So, So I was like, so all the designers are starting to learn Photoshop. So there was this thing called Photoshop because they were doing everything by hand, you know? And then I was like, oh, so I got Photoshop 1.0, you know, and then I had th there was no layers. So you had to do everything in alpha channels.And it's interesting just to be a big nerd. Cause you're a designer too, right? I mean that's yeah. Yeah. So if you can try to imagine there was Photoshop without layers, it meant that you had to do everything inside the masking tool that's built in that nobody really uses or knows about now called alpha channels.So I had to create everything using masks, but it was very oddly more similar to what you did with your Exacto knife and ruler, know, I still think one of the biggest, the saddest things about Photoshop. I mean, I think everybody should know it, but it has some feature bloat, but I think it kind of buries the power of alpha channels.And I think that if people knew how to use it, it would like, it's like a little thing to know that would hugely leap them out of the more artificial aspects of doing those filters on things.[00:16:00] Nathan:Right.[00:16:01] Kimberly:Anyway, like I you have to be careful with me because I can go into real. I can crawl real deep into these nerdy things.But anyway,[00:16:08] Nathan:Are there other things from those early days of, of the graphic design art agency, like that kind of world, that you still take with you today[00:16:19] Kimberly:Thousands of Gillian percent. One of them is the four DS that every project is discover, design develop, deploy. And I know I lost that. I also saw that, like, if you could name it, you could charge it.[00:16:32] Nathan:Is there a story behind that? If you could name it, you could charge for it.[00:16:35] Kimberly:You know, you'd see these hundreds of thousands of million dollar contracts going out to these major people. And I used to have to help write the proposals and I would see how they would divide they'd phase out, like a lot of designers. Again, I don't, I hope we're so not too off topic, but a lot of designers will not charge for discovery.You know what I mean? Because they haven't named it. They didn't name it They'd Just be like, oh, let me Research all about your company. And then you're going to pay me to give you some designs, and then I'll give you the designs and then hopefully they're smarter. Anyway, like I said, big, big topic.[00:17:10] Nathan:Yeah. But think there are a lot of people listening who are in the either freelance or agency space and they, provide services to newsletters or creators or they're growing their own on the side. And I think it's a really important point that, if you're if you're structuring your proposals and all your interactions with clients around the deliverable, then you're failing to talk about a substantial portion of the work And probably the part of the work that differentiates you from the other freelancers who are just like, oh, you need a logo. And they dive like right into Photoshop or whatever tool. Whereas if you're good at what you do, you're probably taking a step back and looking at the whole landscape and spending probably more than half of your time in that Research discovery and learning stage rather than the deliverable stage.[00:17:56] Kimberly:It's actually the most important time intensive stage of any project. And so not just design. I mean, I think you saw my Ted talk, the creative process in eight stages. And I think I talked about how as an artist, I don't want to give anybody whiplash, but like you, as an artist, you have, a period of time where it's like a rest in music where you don't, you're not making work.It doesn't look like you're doing anything on the outside, but that's the most important part. And it's when. Gathering, but you're doing it in a subconscious, like in many different ways when I'm, when I'm making a painting, I'm having to listen a lot, you know, you have to listen and look and just inhale before you can exhale.So anyway, that, but I mean, we could, I think, I think we could do a whole hour on Landour. Cause that was just a, such an interesting, you know? And, and I was actually, I was actually there, I dunno. Well, you're, you probably weren't born, but there was a, Coke released a new design and they, they, and Landour was the leader of this new design.And I was like in the boardroom, in my. In pantyhose. Cause that's what we that's what, like you had aware that it was very far, it was like mad men. It was like mad men where like everybody smoked and the women were gorgeous and the men would like have these glass offices on the side of the boat. And they would like go in and light up a cigarette and call London, you know, like they were like, or Japan and, and they had, it was just extreme, chic, crazy environment, very male dominated.And I was like, I'll often the lone woman in a room, you know, but anyway, that's a separate side conversation and they were introducing the new Coke and it was a flop. It was like, it was like, there was a backlash against the new design because it had like big fat. It was like, whereas the old Coke kind of has that Victorian, which they still use now that, that very Sarah fee or Nate almost like your create above your head, but more, you know, whereas.Where the new version they were doing was super kind of chunky. It was like new Coke, you know, anyway. But, it was a wild experience. I wrote an essay about it and I'll, I'll give it to you if you, if[00:20:35] Nathan:Yeah, we'll put it the Shona[00:20:36] Kimberly:Yeah,[00:20:38] Nathan:On time on that.[00:20:39] Kimberly:Yeah, no, the whole, here's the thing. I wanted to be an artist, and a lot of times I believe a lot of, and I believe there's a lot of people who have an artist inside them and a lot of times they will, work in a field that brings them near art decisions to make themselves feel better.That they're not being an actual artist. And I was one of those people.[00:21:08] Nathan:Okay. So how did that play out for you of your you're close to the design and that sort of[00:21:14] Kimberly:I was like, yeah, it was, I couldn't be closer. I was like, I was like in, I was behind the curtain of Oz doing the, with the, with the best people and everything. Again, this is so long ago, but, but I felt like technology at the time, again, Photoshop was just starting. There was no whatever. I was like, you know, I needed, I need a break.I need to like push the table over. So I quit. I moved to Paris to paint for a year. I played piano in bars at night. That was like a whole other wild. We could do a whole show on that, but, you know, then I was like, well, I can't, I'm not going to be able to make a living doing this. Like I was painting, I was sitting at the sore bone and I was like, I had this little gig in this bar, but it was a couple of Franks and I wasn't legal in Paris.And I just had this big because of my literature background I have does such a, you know, I love you. I was so somewhat of afraid.[00:22:11] Nathan:So how old were you when you[00:22:14] Kimberly:I was in my early twenties.[00:22:16] Nathan:Okay. When you, quit and said it's time to do painting.[00:22:20] Kimberly:Yeah. I was like, it wasn't a straight line. And that's another thing. Like most artists don't like some artists grow up and everybody goes, oh, you're so talented.Which by the way, like hate that expression. I must like tell people, like don't ever tell people they're talented. Say you have great raw material, you know, just say, you know, just like great mom material, but like, you have to like do it for eight hours a day in order to like express something. Great. And then, then we'll talk about talent, but in any case, so some people have parents that say, you're honey, you're so talented.I want to send you to art school. I want to spend a couple hundred grand and I'm going to send you to art school. Undergrad, let's say a good, let's say a typical artist, a college education is this amount. And then I want you to get an MFA from Yale or the best school and have that checked off. And then I want you to go get in galleries and be an artist there's 0.01% of artists have that route.They have parents that say, we support this. This is good. This is a good plan. I would say that's like a very rarefied small group. Cause you have to have, well, there's so many things that need to happen in order to have that setup. Most people, most artists, even artists that I know, like one of my good friends Enrique he was a PA getting his PhD in physics read my dad's book, art and physics and decided he wanted to be a painter[00:23:49] Nathan:Okay,[00:23:50] Kimberly:So like, there's a whole bunch of artists that were doctors that were lawyer, you know, that, that, that they, they were catching the train of you know, the I'm a good student, I'm a diligent worker and they, they, you get routed onto a track and then you're on that track. And then suddenly you wake up at at 30 or whatever, and you say, you know, I'm here and I'm super successful, but this isn't necessarily really how I want to be spending my time.You know? I mean, th this is the conversation, right? You know, how do you, how do you decide and what you can want changes in your life? You know, but if you know what you're pull, the tether poll is like, if you know what, your deep inner core desires. are And, you know, and you, you have, you're remotely in touch with that and you, you need to go, you need to go towards that light.You need to go towards that center then everything will radiate out from you afterwards.[00:24:58] Nathan:Was there a catalyst that pushed you, you know, you were thinking about it, you're feeling this, but what was the thing that made you go like, all right, I'm[00:25:06] Kimberly:Well, okay. Like I said, we don't have enough time to get into all of this, but there were, I made three huge dramatic, you know what? I don't know. Maybe it's a Monty Python movie, I don't know. But like when you push the table over and you throw all the plates and you break everything, like you just come, it's not a reboot, it's way more violent than that.Just kind of like you take the tablecloth out and you just say I'm out of here. You know, I think I did that three times before I got closer to. You know what it is. And one of them was moving to LA after moving to Paris, I moved to New York and then, then I moved to LA and I was like, okay, this time is going to be it I'm being artist.Like, and you know, it's a couple of years later, it's after Paris. Like, you know, cause you have to get, you have to, I had to make money. You know, I had to make a, I had to have a job. And so I had to kind of like do, do design work and stuff like that. So when I moved to LA, my first, I went to a Mac conference, like it was like 60 booths.It was so small, like Mac was seen a teeny little thing and, and Microsoft was the big thing windows and,[00:26:18] Nathan:Yeah.[00:26:19] Kimberly:And I made a business cards and I said, it said artist. And then when I, I walked, went to this conference and I was practically like often the only woman, you know, and I would say, yeah, I'm an artist.And I know. And so the first job I got was making the first CD rom for apple computer that they said distributed to every single apple. So they distributed over 2 million copies worldwide, and my name was on it. And that kind of, that was a huge breakthrough because suddenly I was being offered insane jobs.And next thing you know, I was anyway, like, I don't want to dwell on this because we haven't talked about newsletters yet.[00:27:01] Nathan:That is okay. that is okay. So you just made a leap from, I went to this conference to,[00:27:08] Kimberly:Yeah, by the way speaking, we started with going to a conference.Yeah.[00:27:12] Nathan:A big deal. We are we talking about that as well, but this leap from going to the conference to your work, being on the CD,[00:27:19] Kimberly:Well, so they were, it was like, again, I was on the bleeding edge. I could not explain to my father Who would come down and visit me. In the warehouse. I, it was, it was an artist and a coder who, but they had both met in art school and they brought me on to be the creative director.And it was like, it was almost no money at first. And then it became like a bigger thing and apple, the more that apple saw it, the more they were like, wow, this is really good. so then the next conference I went to was in San Francisco was Macworld and my art was everywhere, everywhere, and I got job offers from Imagineering. They wanted me to design why the Disney, they wanted to be the head. Of Warner music was doing a new interactive division and digital don't digital.I can't remember the names, but it was very, it was a very heady time. It was very, it was very fun. I felt like, wow, I found this place that has it's the intersection of art design, narrative and technology. And it was exactly where I want it to be. And that was just, that was sort of, and I set up an easel in my office, I had a lot of people working for me and it was just, it got very, it got very fancy, you know, and I, and I took a lot of, I took a lot of like what I knew at Landour to attach in this before email this before the internet.[00:28:45] Nathan:You're talking early nineties at this point,[00:28:48] Kimberly:Yeah. Like you no, like a mid yeah. Mid nineties, you know, 96, maybe. So, yeah. So I took a lot of my, knowledge that I gleaned from working at land or like the discover design develop, deploy to whip these engineers and designers into shape, you know? And anyway, I was still stalking what I really wanted to do, you know?[00:29:10] Nathan:Okay. So tell me more about the difference between what you wanted to do and what you were doing, because you just described your art being on everything.[00:29:17] Kimberly:No, no, no, actually, honestly, honestly like I would listen to like Liz fairs, exile in Guyville, as I drove downtown by the toy factory in downtown Los Angeles back and forth, like every day, like at these, I was a big album listener.And when I was designing, I would listen to full albums and I was just like, wow, this is it. I am so excited and energized and everything. then I started studying painting again. So I started so like I had taken a hiatus. And then I got into the, Otis, which is the art school here, You know, when you get professional, when you become a professional in anything, even being an artist, there's a, single-minded rigor focus and clarity. one brings their whole self to what they're doing, you know? And if you know that if If you've been successful in anything else or anything like that, you can, if you bring that to your art, there's literally nothing that can stop.You. You become a wire cutter. It's like, you're going to munch through like, I, you know, really understanding, painting in the deepest way possible. Like I was thinking if I can understand alpha channels, I can figure out how to tone a canvas. You know, just like I just, because painting is a technology, honestly.I took everything in my being to it. And that was like a third moment. Like that was like another moment I skipped some moments, but there was like where I was knocking at the door, knocking at the door. And then I knew that in my art would become the, that I had when I started painting in full force.Like not just having it in my office, but saying this is what I'm going to do. And I'm going to do it as so ferociously, like stand back, everybody, nothing is going to get in my way.[00:31:13] Nathan:So you were painting, I mean, you had is this like painting a few hours a week, a few hours a day, and then you dove into doing that, just like.[00:31:22] Kimberly:This is like 40 hours. I mean, I basically gave myself an assignment and my assignment was I was going to paint a hundred new. Because that's the hardest thing to do as a body. Cause you have to deal with the translucency of skin. And I could literally talk about painting all day, but you have to deal with light form and shadow and thinking in three dimensions and it creates it's.I don't want to knock marketing and technology and the stuff that you do, but painting is that most people do, but painting is a true, like you have to really, it's a very intellectual as well as mindful and spiritual, but it's a very, it's a very deep, deep, deep way to approach the world. And when you become a painter or you actually like listen to the little voice inside you that says that they want to learn this.It's a skill, it's a skill. And when you do that, your brain expands and your world expands and you see things differently. So it's a very transformative thing and it takes years. It takes years and years. So my assignment was I'm going to paint a hundred nudes and, and if I have like 10 good ones, I can have a show.[00:32:41] Nathan:So I want to tie that to maybe the experience that other creators listening would have, or anyone who's on the fence about getting started. Right. It might not be painting that they're trying to do, but they've had these fits and starts of like, I'm going to, learn to code, start a podcast, start a newsletter, any of these things, you know, learning to play an instrument, whatever it is.And then like start and it goes, maybe it goes well for a week or a month, or like what, what advice would you[00:33:11] Kimberly:Isn't there, isn't there like a guru isn't there like a guru in the subject that calls it, the. Who's that guy. Do you know what I'm talking about? Yeah. Somebody told me that, cause I was saying this to somebody and they were like, oh yeah, that's somebody's Seth, Godin's the dip. But yes. You know, when I was younger and all through all through my, you know, middle school and high school and college, I played piano quite seriously.I was a classical pianist and whenever I would learn a difficult piece, I would play it over and over and over again. And I would have to, like, I would start to suck. I would get better, but then I would start to suck and I'd have to walk away and then come back at it the next day before I would be able to play it perfectly.Like, I mean, you know,[00:34:01] Nathan:Yeah.[00:34:04] Kimberly:Learning an instrument actually teaches you this better than anything, because if you make a painting at first and it sucks, you can be easily thwarted, like a, you know, a drawing or whatever. But, but in order to like worry the bone of like how to get that legato, right. And that Greek piano concerto or something like you got to just sort of do it again and again, and again and again, you know, like it's, the fundamental way to learn is you, you imitate, assimilate, and then you can improvise.So you have to like, you play these pieces. And so with anything, you're going to be thwarted in the beginning many times and you can't give up, you have to say, okay, well, I don't care if it even sucks. I don't care if I'm going to fail. If I'm gonna fail, I'm gonna fail big. Like I'm[00:34:52] Nathan:Right[00:34:52] Kimberly:Go all out.Let's just go on.[00:34:54] Nathan:But that specific assignment that you gave yourself of painting 100 nudes, do you think that an assignment like that is a good way to go as a creator of saying this is the commitment that I'm going to make, I'm going to get to a hundred podcast episodes or I'm going to, I don't know, write a hundred blog posts, and then I can decide if this is something I actually want to pursue.[00:35:13] Kimberly:Absolutely. I think that when you make a commitment like that, to devote your energy into building a body of work of any kind in any media, you, your life will change everything. You are going to gain skills that involve every facet of that media. So like, if you're a podcaster and let's say you record in iMovie you're going to learn iMovie or whatever they, whatever they edit podcasts.In And, and I think if, you know, if Leonardo DaVinci were alive today, trusts me. He would know Photoshop He would know he would be all over this stuff, you know, he would love, he would love it in this nether world space, because there's, I'm, I'm going off topic a little bit because there's a little bit of a prejudice in the art world where people were thinking they were resisting the newer technological versions of artwork.But back to process, what you were saying is that if you do something in a committed way and you basically measure it and say, I'm going to do it until I get to this point, I think a hundred might be excessive, but you're going to get the hang of it.[00:36:28] Nathan:Yeah[00:36:28] Kimberly:I mean, I haven't mixed feelings though, about blogging cause I started a blog again, when I was, really getting into.Consuming. I mean, consuming isn't the right word. When I was throwing my entire body into the art world, one of the things that I did to expand my own knowledge was to write about other artists. And I think that's also something that's super unspoken, especially in the art world, because a lot of artists are just saying Me me me I want attention.I want to get people to focus on my show and my work, and I want a gallery and I want this and that. And I think one of the most important, aspects of breaking through to any next level of anything is generosity. Generosity of your attention to other people who are doing the same thing. And that for me, that general, I mean, I didn't think of this.This is red, this is a in retrospect, but at the time when I look back on it, I was airlifting artists that nobody had heard of and writing about them along with other big art, you know? And so I had a successful weekly column where I was keeping a blog again, this was before social media and that's how, and then the Huffington post came along and then I started publishing it, the, having a post.And that's how I said, I was asked by Arianna Huffington to be the, to found an art section. And so I was like, I was perfectly positioned because I was, I was a big nerd. I had had these other experiences. I was a full-on painter. I was having shows galleries the whole thing. And then she was building this incredible Site to celebrate bloggers. And I was one of the bloggers So I had to build an audience from zero to 10 million people within two years. I didn't have to that's what happened.[00:38:26] Nathan:Right.I have so many things that I want to ask about in this, one thing that I want to highlight that you talked about is as you're doing the painting, there's the side of it, of, Research where you're researching other painters, learning from them and all that. Most people keep that Research to themselves, right?That is not a public thing that happens. And I think a lot of the most successful creators that I see are the ones who do that recent. And, and share their notes and share that and work in public and do the interviews and all of that that you were doing. because it does a couple things. One people follow you, not only for your own work, but then also for your notes on other people.And then too, it's incredible for meeting people. Like when you do a profile, either if they're a, say an upcoming artist or someone who's established either way, they're going to be like, when you, you know, when you send them an email, they'll like respond and be interested and engaged. And, you know, I mean, that's a reason that I do this podcast is so that I can meet and hang out with people that I want to more aboutIt's amazing for network.[00:39:30] Kimberly:Yes. I think you're exactly spot on. This is no different than what I did with artists, this, except for I wasn't involving video, I was writing about it and interviewing them. You're right. You're absolutely right. I also think that you can get too carried away with that though. Like you have to be careful, you have to make sure that you're, you know, I can become easily like Clydesdale the horse.I'm like, well, that's another month and I have to do another,[00:39:57] Nathan:It becomes more important than the art, which was the[00:40:00] Kimberly:Well, yeah,[00:40:01] Nathan:It feels more time than[00:40:02] Kimberly:Yeah, yeah. Like, so eventually I had to leave, because it was just sort of eclipsing. It became so much bigger than everything else I was doing that I had to like go, okay, this isn't, you know, I've got a show coming up. I can't devote all this time and energy. And then of course, social media kind of made it all really different.[00:40:24] Nathan:Like in what way?[00:40:25] Kimberly:Well, because not only we could, you know, writing a really thoughtful piece about an artist and looking at their work and, you know, relating it with art history. And I also found that if I could relate it to like a contemporary event, like there was this one painter who painted battle scenes and we were just going to war with Iraq, I think, anyway, we were going to war somewhere.You know, it was a horrible time, but like, I would talk about going, you know, this contemporary news event. And I would link it with the artist who was painting these battle scenes. And then seeing that it went, go.[00:41:04] Nathan:Right.[00:41:04] Kimberly:Was another, that was another big learning lesson is like, if you put a number in a headline, like 10 things, you, you should tell, you know, 10 rules for your kids and screens, you know, then people would read that more.So I could see the analytics of what people clicked on. You know, that was like a interesting learning experience. But when social media happened, then suddenly you also had to tweet it. You had to post it on Facebook and then you had to tweet about it and then it just got to be social media. here's my take, if I could just say one thing, because I want to get it out there.I think social media is great for first impressions so that when people see you for the first time they're going to go that person's like a real artist or they're a real whatever, and they're legit. And they don't just have like three things that they've said about the subject. They've actually like, I trust that they've done some deep things.Like me painting a hundred nudes, you know, like this person knows how to paint.So I think social media, it's just so easy to get carried away. I hope one day it goes away. Is that terrible to say? I think emails should be everything. It should just go away.[00:42:14] Nathan:I don't think it's terrible to say at all. You have something in your Ted talk. you talked about like the compulsion to paint being taken away by your smartphone and these distractions, And I'd love for you to talk about that because I think there's so many things of like, if I'm on Twitter or checking my email, or even interacting with the ConvertKit team 2,700 times a day, you know, it makes it so much harder as a creator.And so I like, I just want to hear more of your experience there.[00:42:45] Kimberly:Well, I mean, in order to even get into my zone mentally to paint, I have to like have at least 90 minutes where I haven't spoken with anybody. Like I just need to kind of like clear it. Like I need to, I mean, I can be in it and I've got all these, you know, because people everybody's different. Some people like beginnings, some people like middles, other people's like ends.So you have to get in touch with which person you are, you know? So I, I love middles and beginning. I actually like all of them, but like, I'm better at certain things. So whenever I go into the studio, I have to start in paintings that are in the middle, that many going on at once. so you have to get in touch with like what time of day you're best at.And I always begin things at the end of the day when I'm already like nice and a well-oiled machine, well-oiled creating Machine.I never begin things in the morning. I always begin. at the end of the day, I never begin paintings in the morning. I was beginning, you know, I mean, I, I'm not, I know I'm not answering your question.Your question is, compartmentalizing your time to protect it away from social media. I teach a master class and I teach a Masterclass with artists who are building their first body of work, or they, they want to build a body of work in the masterclass.I make them take an oath an Instagram oath Instagram is it's so draining psychologically, emotionally, mentally, and the effort that you put into it that you really have to like commit and, and, and artists feel pressure to post their progress and post once a day and stuff like that.And the truth is, that algorithm, the algorithm is so fraught right now because you really only see the last 20 people that you liked more often than not. And you're not, it it's just, it's not healthy. It's not healthy for a visual artist Because you'll be on it. You check it like a diabetic checking their insulin level.It's just like, oh, did it get enough? Likes all that. It's like, Ugh. So I use, later to post once a week because I don't really want to deal with it. So I'll do like four months at a time. But if like I have a museum show opening up on Saturday, so I have to make a post this week. And so that that's like in my brain, oh God, I got to make a post this week.And when my book was coming out, like that's a whole other topic about promote, you know, how to tell people and that a book is coming out. yeah. So I just kind of look at it like, you know, kind of like a creative sinkhole,[00:45:15] Nathan:Yeah. And so it[00:45:15] Kimberly:So it[00:45:15] Nathan:Makes sense to avoid it. I think we hear that advice from a lot of talented creators and it's easy to be like, yeah. Yeah. But I can, I'm the person who can sit down and write with a moment's notice, you know? And then you you get totally stuck on writer's block or whatever thing, because you're like, you actually didn't create that space.And, like you talked about in the Ted talk of that time to like daydream and to actually be there, present with yourself and your thoughts.[00:45:42] Kimberly:Yeah, it's true. I mean, there's this thing in neuroscience called empathetic mirroring. Do you know about[00:45:48] Nathan:I don't know.[00:45:49] Kimberly:It's this, it's like when you see somebody, for example, write on a chalkboard, the neurons in your brain, I'm not going to say this. Right? So if a neuroscientist says I'm like slightly wrong, but like, it, it, it has this effect where you feel like you're doing it, you know, like, and it's, that's why people love to watch people write things.That's why a chalkboard is an excellent device for, I actually have a chalkboard in my office because I started to. Take videos of me make with my talking points of me writing it on a chalkboard, because even though it's considered like, you know, yesteryear technology, it actually helps people receive the information better to see it written[00:46:34] Nathan:Rather than being next[00:46:36] Kimberly:Rather than just show a PowerPoint slide.Yeah. And so this, the act of seeing it rhythm, but so if, if you think about the power of empathetic mirroring, that's going on in your brain, when you look at something happening, think about how much it can pollute your brain. If you're watching a stream of all these things happening in your Instagram feed or your Facebook feed, it's like dangerous.Like you have to be protective of what is going inside your mind. It's that they say like garbage in, garbage out, you know,[00:47:04] Nathan:I want to hear about you getting into the world of, of like teaching classes and that side of it, and then you have a book as well. There's a lot.[00:47:12] Kimberly:Oh yes. So I have this book,[00:47:15] Nathan:There[00:47:15] Kimberly:So, you know, around a decade into, you know, being a serious painter, I started to feel bad from the fumes because painting isn't really taught the way other things are taught. Painting is sort of like, there's, there's been this somewhat mystical, you know, here's a bunch of art supplies go to the art store and then let's see what you come up with.And then the, the, the classes tend to be more about critiques, about what you've done versus about,[00:47:45] Nathan:How do something.[00:47:46] Kimberly:About the, the true, true granular house, you know, the, how, like the basics, like things that you should know. And, so I started to get sick and I happened to be the arts editor at the time of the Huffington post.And I reached out to, and blogging was a very interesting, it was around 2004 or five, I think. Maybe, maybe it was a little bit later, but it was an interesting time because other people were thinking what I was thinking and I could see it in search for it. Whereas I couldn't, I couldn't have done that a decade earlier.And so I would reach out to leaders in the field, scientists, whatnot, to write about this topic of safety, you know, like that. And, but then when I read and I had, by the way, been consuming, Disneyland books, everything about painting, and I just saw this huge gaping hole of knowledge of how. Communicated. So I started writing this book all about painting and the book that I ended up publishing with Chronicle books is just one small piece of it because it was kind of too big.It was like James Joyce's Ulysses, you know, it was like a tone. It was like a Magnum Opus. and it's one of the key things that people don't realize is that you don't need to use solvent's P many people believe that you need to have like an open can of turpentine or some kind of solvent to dip your brush and defend the oil paint.So it's like super basic and most people when they go to the art store, and this is just my short, my short, skinny on the book. As most people, when they go to the art store, it would be like only buying canned or prepackaged. They don't know what's in it, you know, they don't know like that you don't need all those things.Like, but if you were like learning how to cook, you would know the difference between a garlic and a shallot and when to use canola oil or olive oil extra-virgin, you know, so I wanted to create, to start a book called the Y that was like Strunk and White's elements of style, but for oil paintings. So that's like the famous book that most writers use and just sort of shows you.And it's funny, actually, it's like a great book. So I wrote that book and that's called the new oil painting and it's published by Chronicle and it came out in June and it's like staying at the top, like five books of oil painting, which is great, you know? So I'm very excited about that. But in any way, in that journey of writing the book, the book, the book deal I got was two years ago.It was like a while ago. And so Susan. Did that I thought, you know, I would be a fool to not have a class that went with the book. So to the summer of 2019, I had, I had like four solo exhibitions in a row and I thought, okay, I'm going to devote six months and I'm going to record videos and I'm going to do that.You know? So I created this class that I wish that I had, and it was way bigger than the book. It was like everything I've ever thought about oil painting and that's called oil painting, fluency and flow. And, so yeah, so I launched a class, so the classes are out there[00:50:52] Nathan:Are the classes something that, you know, you're teaching in an online course? Are you there in person or through a partnership with.[00:50:58] Kimberly:So once I, once I learned about. That you can oil paint anywhere like you, Nathan tomorrow could decide, you know what? I w I've got an artist in me. I want to, I want to learn how to paint and you could set it up next year, you know, like in a little side table next to your computer, and there would be no fumes, no nothing.And it's much better for the environment it's not made out of plastic. It's like, you know, you could do it. So I wanted to get the word out. And, so my first class is, and so I was started teaching at major institutions. So the Anderson ranch in Colorado and the Otis where I actually took lessons, I taught there.And then, I just thought to myself, you know, this is highly inefficient because I have to like schlep over there and go there for, you know, hours at a time. And I could reach so many more people if I recorded. Instruction. And so I made these recordings, that's a hybrid of recordings and live sessions and critiques.And I have, you know, I have about 78 students right now. They're from all over the world and it's like the boast enriching wonderful, fabulous thing I've ever done[00:52:08] Nathan:Yeah.[00:52:09] Kimberly:To being an artist, you know,[00:52:11] Nathan:And so how does that interact with the newsletter that you have?[00:52:14] Kimberly:Well, I mean, so all of my experience, just as an artist has taught me that you, your value that you bring to any situation is the people that you can tell about what you do. It's like a tree falls in the forest. Nobody knows you're having a show. You know, you can't just rely on your art dealer.And the The dynamic has changed where. People don't have one, rarely do people have one gallery that represents them. And then they've got a bunch of satellite galleries. So you kind of have to be a little bit more entrepreneurial as an artist. And so you need to gather an email list. And so I stopped blogging and instead I have a newsletter because I want, you know, and I I have a narrative of stories that I tell about creativity about, about like I'll crawl deeply inside the making of a single painting of mine, or maybe another one.And I, and each email I send out, I spend a lot of time on, and it's like a work of art by itself because it's, again, it may be a different thing. a newsletter may be slightly different than a blog, but it's still words and image and it's just how. It's like another work of art, it's another work of art.And I love, using ConvertKit. I mean, I really, really do I tell people about it. I tell people about it all the time, because I think it's, it's the first software I've encountered that, allows you to very easily create a sequence. And, you know, you can I tell people, I say like, if you want to think about it, you could unspool Tolstoy's war and peace.If you wanted, like you could, every week you could give like a little section and you can start at the beginning and it takes the pressure off needing to constantly have every email be a first impression. So you can really get, let people to get, to know you in a much deeper, more personal way, because you create a sequence of letters to them that[00:54:23] Nathan:Right[00:54:24] Kimberly:Over time.[00:54:24] Nathan:Well, I think that's a really important point about starting at the beginning, because when you're sending these one-off emails to your newsletter, you don't know where people are joining. Some people for years and other people that is the very first thing. And so every time I find myself adding these caveats are like, Hey, if you're new here, you know, any of those things and with a, an email sequence, you know, the automated series, it starts at the beginning every time and it works people through it.And so I've had that. I've had so much fun creating those because you can chip away at them. Like I have one that I'm kind of writing now on, I guess it's on personal finance, you know? And it's just things that I wish that I had known as like, Moderately successful creator. Like, Hey, you're now earning a full-time living, what what's next?And so I can just write about that when I feel like it and add to this, that's now like 10 or 12 emails long.[00:55:20] Kimberly:And what's your frequent.[00:55:22] Nathan:That one I said to every week, but if I don't write for it, everyone just kind of pulls up at the end and weights, you know, for the next email. So it's 10 emails And then I add to it. And so like last week I didn't add a new one. And so now there's like a hundred people that are all the way at the end and they didn't get an email last week,[00:55:41] Kimberly:Yeah, no, I have that situation. I have a two year sequence[00:55:45] Nathan:Oh, wow.[00:55:45] Kimberly:I mean, I know like I sound, I probably seem super extroverted and voluble and everything like that, but like, I, I, it's very difficult for me to sell. It's very, it's very not. It's not cool for an artist to be. So like, I mean, it's just hard.It's also just hard for me. It's my personality. Like I even posting on Instagram is like a stressful thing for me. It's like, did I get everything that, you know, like I just, it's just not, I'm not one of those people that just casually throw stuff out there. I just, I'm very thoughtful and I want it, you know, it to be meaningful.And, but anyway, I was having trouble announcing that a workshop was over. Like serious trouble. Like I would put it off and I'd say, I can't do it. I can't press the send button. Like I just, even though you have the schedule feature on the broadcast, I was like, I can't do it. I can't do it. And you know, I, I can't remember the name of the marketing guru who was, have the five day sequence or, you know, basically a launch sequence is a series of emails where you first email is all about it.The second email might address one's reservations about it. The third Emile email might be testimonials. And then the fourth and fifth email are like last chance to get it. Like that to me is like, I would rather have needle eyes surgery than do that, you know, so I built it in, so I basically have the sequence where every quarter there's a launch sequence.Is that crazy[00:57:13] Nathan:No, it's fantastic[00:57:14] Kimberly:Because then, so, so that way, like I can just set it and forget it, like back to the Crock-Pot thinking like, you know, like, you know, just set it and forget it. You're going to sign up. You're going to get an announcement for a walk shop, a workshop a couple months after you've gotten to know me.[00:57:30] Nathan:Do you think that, well actually I guess really quick, the thing that I love about that is you can be completely immersed in your painting, right? And there you are selling a workshop and you're like, you don't, you have to think about it or know about it. Cause you did that work once and now you've finished a whole day of, of painting.Start something new at the end of the day. Cause that's the way that you roll. And then also you can say like finish up and check those sales and check that engagement. See, oh, people.[00:57:58] Kimberly:Yyeah, yeah. I mean, it's, it's just, it's I think people before they're going to buy anything, need to feel. Most people need to feel, you know, a level of comfort about what that person is about. so, you know, I haven't touched you tube. I haven't really, I honestly, I haven't made, I haven't made a huge effort because I've had the book coming out and I F I ha I had a big exhibition in June because, I designed a series of, excuse me.I designed, I painted a series of abstract paintings, for the cover of the book, because I wanted the cover, the book to be stellar and represent like a specified stroke, like hanging in air, like, to just convey the idea of painting and not be like a landscape, because for some crazy reason, if you, if you look up oil, painting, all the books, About oil painting are so poorly designed.It's like, it's strange because you would think people who are artists would care about design, but it's like pink pallet, Tino, bold 14 point font over like a green sunset. it's[00:59:07] Nathan:Yeah, well, design and painting are not necessarily the same thing you happen to come from a world where you have a lot of this. Even those two worlds have intertwined for you a lot over your career. So it makes sense to[00:59:18] Kimberly:Yes, but, but when, when, but if you get, but the painting books, like if you see a PA a painting book that has like a landscape on it, what if you don't like the landscape or they all have a landscape, or it has like the, the, you know, a face that's loosely drawn with, you know, painted with turbine, you know, Alla prima anyway.I've had so many exhibitions and like, I have a, I have a show coming up on Saturday and I've got to tell people about it. So like, I have to be, I'm already out there as an artist. So I have two different sequences and newsletters. I've got like a workshops for people who express interest in a workshop within the main newsletter.Like if, if, like, I'll say like I have this one great newsletter where the subject line is, who is this gorgeous woman? And then I show a picture cause they used to paint these beautiful renditions of the faces of the Egyptian mummies inside the sarcophagus, like beyond gorgeous. Like if you looked it up, you'd say, oh my God, this most beautiful painting I've ever seen.And it looks a lot like Francesco Clemente, which is an artist that like paint uses the same aspect ratio. It's like, you sort of go, oh, that's where that guy got that idea, you know? But. I'll talk about the pigments and that they used to, like, they used to burn mummies and then take the ashes and make a pigment called mummy brown.I know that sounds really kind of gross, but like, but, but they that's what they did. And I I'll say like, if this interests you, you might be interested in like a workshop. then if they say yes, then they'll go into my workshop sequence and they'll get notified when I open them.[01:01:00] Nathan:Are there other things that you do with email and with your newsletter[01:01:04] Kimberly:Yeah. Like I, like, I really want, I really want people to easily update their preferences. So I created a jot form like that simple select, you know, check box check if you're no longer interested in, workshops. No problem. Let me know. And I don't get enough work. Ominous, but hopefully, hopefully you'll put that feature in soon.[01:01:30] Nathan:We're actually working on building that feature now. So,[01:01:33] Kimberly:Are you kidding? When does it come out[01:01:34] Nathan:It's one of those asking where the paintings are done. It'll be done when it's done.[01:01:40] Kimberly:The other thing that I do is I really think gifts are important. And I think the marketer, the marketing community is really cheesy about it. Like they always do like outtakes from friends for reaction shots.And it's just so horrible, but I mean, it's just corny and you know who I'm talking about, but, you know, anyway, a gift is a beautiful thing because it's a movie that plays automatically and it doesn't have sound and. it can be so beautiful and subtle, you know, so every time I make a news that I usually have like an, it's like a work of art to me, you know?And sometimes if I want to emphasize a word, I'll paint a picture of that word and I'll integrate it in it. So like I really spend, I really love making them special. Yeah. I have one about the creative process and about not, not the Ted talk that you saw, but like I have one that's on the lead up to talking about the masterclass.Where it's called the curse of perfection. And I show, I talk about how, when I was a kid, my mother used to always like, she would sometimes wear like super smudge makeup and it was psych, it was called the smoky eye. I mean, they still do it now, but now the beauty people make it super specific, but then it was not that it was a little bit more like, woo.And I found a beautiful GIF of like a smokey eye, like slowly opening and closing. And I then go off on this whole subject about how, you know, it's as a painter, you have to let go of that, of the chains of perfection. You have to let it go in order to.[01:03:22] Nathan:Yeah. Well, I love that you're taking a medium that you know, of email or gifts or any of these things that a lot of people use in one way. And you're bringing those styles in that like class and sophistication and really just the level of effort. I think a lot of people are like hearing. Oh, I'm supposed to have, images or gifts.I'm supposed to be funny. And so they just look for something and slap it in there. And there's a level of effort that's not happening there, but because you're doing these automated sequences and you know that if you put this effort into it, it will last and work for you for years, then it's worth it.You can do a custom painted, you know, word or something like that to illustrate a point.[01:04:04] Kimberly:I mean, I have the luxury of having hundreds of paintings, and pieces of paintings, and video of—there's nothing sexier and more beautiful than watching somebody mix paint. There's literally nothing more gorgeous than that—So, I'm lucky.And I understand that other creators have to find other things, but there's a way to do things that have like a metaphorical—I here's what I would say. I would recommend that people seek to enhance their ability to think in metaphor when they write.So if they're gonna talk about a subject, and they're talking about a roadblock, instead of drawing a boulder on a road, find some other image or GIF. I use a lot of GIFs from ballet. You can find beautiful GIFs just by searching “Swan Lake” GIF, and it implies a physical movement.It goes back into that empathetic mirroring, where you feel that your own body is doing these movements that are surrounding this idea. It's not directly about what you're talking about, but it's like a little bit to the left, or it's just kind of a metaphorical version of it. It creates the space in between what you're literally saying, and what you're actually seeing that ignites the imagination and the view.[01:05:35] Nathan:Yeah. I love that. Just putting that extra bit of effort into defining the thing that's adjacent, rather than blatantly the first thing that came to mind. I think that makes a huge difference.[01:05:46] Kimberly:Yeah,[01:05:46] Nathan:We need to do a part two, because I have like 25 more questions to ask you, and we're out of time.[01:05:52] Kimberly:I'm in. I'm in.[01:05:54] Nathan:This has been amazing. Where should people go to subscribe to the newsletter?[01:05:58] Kimberly:They should go to KimberlyBrooks.com. The newsletter's right there in the footer and on the top. I really love communicating this way, and it's been an honor to be on this podcast, because I really love the product you've created. I really couldn't do it without you—without ConvertKit.So, I just, I'm such a fan, and I'm an evangelist, so kudos to you.[01:06:19] Nathan:Wow, thank you.Well, we're exci

Endnote
Book Club 3 w/ Vikram Nijhawan and Alexander Lynch

Endnote

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 53:03


Vikram Nijhawan, L&L's writer's co-op coordinator, discusses metafictionality and the inextricable relation between fact and fantasy in Neil Gaiman's The Sandman: Dream Country; then, Alexander Lynch, L&L's podcast coordinator, examines representations of gender and of empire in James Joyce's “The Dead.” For the book list and transcript for this episode, visit hhlitandlib.ca/endnote.

KCSB
KCSB Covers the Candidates: Matt Kilrain

KCSB

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 10:10


Five candidates are running against incumbent Cathy Murillo to be the next mayor of Santa Barbara. Election day is November 2nd. Murillo's challengers include Randy Rowse, Deborah Schwartz, Mark Whitehurst, James Joyce, and Matt Kilrain. The winning candidate will serve a five year term. KCSB News reporters speak with each of the six candidates – and you'll be hearing from them on the KCSB 5'oclock news. You can tune into all of the mayoral candidate interview replays on KCSB FM's Soundcloud, Spotify, and kcsb.org. More information about voting in the mayoral election can be found at countyofsb.org. KCSB's Robert Stark sat down with candidate Matt Kilrain to discuss his qualifications and stance on pertinent issues including housing, houselessness, and business growth in Santa Barbara.

KCSB
KCSB Covers the Candidates: Mark Whitehurst

KCSB

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 9:30


Five candidates are running against incumbent Cathy Murillo to be the next mayor of Santa Barbara. Election day is November 2nd. Murillo's challengers include Randy Rowse, Deborah Schwartz, Mark Whitehurst, James Joyce, and Matt Kilrain. The winning candidate will serve a five year term. KCSB News reporters speak with each of the six candidates – and you'll be hearing from them on the KCSB 5'oclock news. You can tune into all of the mayoral candidate interview replays on KCSB FM's Soundcloud, Spotify, and kcsb.org. More information about voting in the mayoral election can be found at countyofsb.org. KCSB's Ashley Rusch sat down with candidate Mark Whitehurst to discuss his qualifications and stance on pertinent issues including housing, houselessness, and business growth in Santa Barbara.

KCSB
KCSB Covers the Candidates: James Joyce III

KCSB

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 10:40


Five candidates are running against incumbent Cathy Murillo to be the next mayor of Santa Barbara. Election day is November 2nd. Murillo's challengers include Randy Rowse, Deborah Schwartz, Mark Whitehurst, James Joyce, and Matt Kilrain. The winning candidate will serve a five year term. KCSB News reporters speak with each of the six candidates – and you'll be hearing from them on the KCSB 5'oclock news. You can tune into all of the mayoral candidate interview replays on KCSB FM's Soundcloud, Spotify, and kcsb.org. More information about voting in the mayoral election can be found at countyofsb.org. KCSB's Ashley Rusch sat down with candidate James Joyce III to discuss his qualifications and stance on pertinent issues including housing, houselessness, and business growth in Santa Barbara.

KCSB
KCSB Covers the Candidates: Deborah Schwartz

KCSB

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 8:11


Five candidates are running against incumbent Cathy Murillo to be the next mayor of Santa Barbara. Election day is November 2nd. Murillo's challengers include Randy Rowse, Deborah Schwartz, Mark Whitehurst, James Joyce, and Matt Kilrain. The winning candidate will serve a five year term. KCSB News reporters speak with each of the six candidates – and you'll be hearing from them on the KCSB 5'oclock news. You can tune into all of the mayoral candidate interview replays on KCSB FM's Soundcloud, Spotify, and kcsb.org. More information about voting in the mayoral election can be found at countyofsb.org. KCSB's Robert Stark sat down with candidate Deborah Schwartz to discuss her qualifications and stance on pertinent issues including housing, houselessness, and business growth in Santa Barbara.

KCSB
KCSB Covers the Candidates: Randy Rowse

KCSB

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 9:29


Five candidates are running against incumbent Cathy Murillo to be the next mayor of Santa Barbara. Election day is November 2nd. Murillo's challengers include Randy Rowse, Deborah Schwartz, Mark Whitehurst, James Joyce, and Matt Kilrain. The winning candidate will serve a five year term. KCSB News reporters speak with each of the six candidates – and you'll be hearing from them on the KCSB 5'oclock news. You can tune into all of the mayoral candidate interview replays on KCSB FM's Soundcloud, Spotify, and kcsb.org. More information about voting in the mayoral election can be found at countyofsb.org. KCSB's Jennifer Yoshikoshi sat down with candidate Randy Rowse to discuss his qualifications and stance on pertinent issues including housing, houselessness, and business growth in Santa Barbara.

KCSB
KCSB Covers the Candidates: Cathy Murillo

KCSB

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 10:43


Five candidates are running against incumbent Cathy Murillo to be the next mayor of Santa Barbara. Election day is November 2nd. Murillo's challengers include Randy Rowse, Deborah Schwartz, Mark Whitehurst, James Joyce, and Matt Kilrain. The winning candidate will serve a five year term. KCSB News reporters speak with each of the six candidates – and you'll be hearing from them on the KCSB 5'oclock news. You can tune into all of the mayoral candidate interview replays on KCSB FM's Soundcloud, Spotify, and kcsb.org. More information about voting in the mayoral election can be found at countyofsb.org. KCSB's Terrie Jeon sat down with incumbent Cathy Murillo to discuss her qualifications and stance on pertinent issues including housing, houselessness, and business growth in Santa Barbara.

New Books in Intellectual History
José Vergara, "All Future Plunges to the Past: James Joyce in Russian Literature" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 58:45


All Future Plunges to the Past: James Joyce in Russian Literature (Cornell UP, 2021) explores how Russian writers from the mid-1920s on have read and responded to Joyce's work. Through contextually rich close readings, José Vergara uncovers the many roles Joyce has occupied in Russia over the last century, demonstrating how the writers Yury Olesha, Vladimir Nabokov, Andrei Bitov, Sasha Sokolov, and Mikhail Shishkin draw from Joyce's texts, particularly Ulysses and Finnegans Wake, to address the volatile questions of lineages in their respective Soviet, émigré, and post-Soviet contexts. Interviews with contemporary Russian writers, critics, and readers of Joyce extend the conversation to the present day, showing how the debates regarding the Irish writer's place in the Russian pantheon are no less settled one hundred years after Ulysses. The creative reworkings, or translations, of Joycean themes, ideas, characters, plots, and styles made by the five writers Vergara examines speak to shifting cultural norms, understandings of intertextuality, and the polarity between Russia and the West. Vergara illuminates how Russian writers have used Joyce's ideas as a critical lens to shape, prod, and constantly redefine their own place in literary history. All Future Plunges to the Past offers one overarching approach to the general narrative of Joyce's reception in Russian literature. While each of the writers examined responded to Joyce in an individual manner, the sum of their methods reveals common concerns. This subject raises the issue of cultural values and, more importantly, how they changed throughout the twentieth century in the Soviet Union, Russian emigration, and the post-Soviet Russian environment. José Vergara is Assistant Professor of Russian at Bryn Mawr College.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books Network
José Vergara, "All Future Plunges to the Past: James Joyce in Russian Literature" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 58:45


All Future Plunges to the Past: James Joyce in Russian Literature (Cornell UP, 2021) explores how Russian writers from the mid-1920s on have read and responded to Joyce's work. Through contextually rich close readings, José Vergara uncovers the many roles Joyce has occupied in Russia over the last century, demonstrating how the writers Yury Olesha, Vladimir Nabokov, Andrei Bitov, Sasha Sokolov, and Mikhail Shishkin draw from Joyce's texts, particularly Ulysses and Finnegans Wake, to address the volatile questions of lineages in their respective Soviet, émigré, and post-Soviet contexts. Interviews with contemporary Russian writers, critics, and readers of Joyce extend the conversation to the present day, showing how the debates regarding the Irish writer's place in the Russian pantheon are no less settled one hundred years after Ulysses. The creative reworkings, or translations, of Joycean themes, ideas, characters, plots, and styles made by the five writers Vergara examines speak to shifting cultural norms, understandings of intertextuality, and the polarity between Russia and the West. Vergara illuminates how Russian writers have used Joyce's ideas as a critical lens to shape, prod, and constantly redefine their own place in literary history. All Future Plunges to the Past offers one overarching approach to the general narrative of Joyce's reception in Russian literature. While each of the writers examined responded to Joyce in an individual manner, the sum of their methods reveals common concerns. This subject raises the issue of cultural values and, more importantly, how they changed throughout the twentieth century in the Soviet Union, Russian emigration, and the post-Soviet Russian environment. José Vergara is Assistant Professor of Russian at Bryn Mawr College.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
José Vergara, "All Future Plunges to the Past: James Joyce in Russian Literature" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 58:45


All Future Plunges to the Past: James Joyce in Russian Literature (Cornell UP, 2021) explores how Russian writers from the mid-1920s on have read and responded to Joyce's work. Through contextually rich close readings, José Vergara uncovers the many roles Joyce has occupied in Russia over the last century, demonstrating how the writers Yury Olesha, Vladimir Nabokov, Andrei Bitov, Sasha Sokolov, and Mikhail Shishkin draw from Joyce's texts, particularly Ulysses and Finnegans Wake, to address the volatile questions of lineages in their respective Soviet, émigré, and post-Soviet contexts. Interviews with contemporary Russian writers, critics, and readers of Joyce extend the conversation to the present day, showing how the debates regarding the Irish writer's place in the Russian pantheon are no less settled one hundred years after Ulysses. The creative reworkings, or translations, of Joycean themes, ideas, characters, plots, and styles made by the five writers Vergara examines speak to shifting cultural norms, understandings of intertextuality, and the polarity between Russia and the West. Vergara illuminates how Russian writers have used Joyce's ideas as a critical lens to shape, prod, and constantly redefine their own place in literary history. All Future Plunges to the Past offers one overarching approach to the general narrative of Joyce's reception in Russian literature. While each of the writers examined responded to Joyce in an individual manner, the sum of their methods reveals common concerns. This subject raises the issue of cultural values and, more importantly, how they changed throughout the twentieth century in the Soviet Union, Russian emigration, and the post-Soviet Russian environment. José Vergara is Assistant Professor of Russian at Bryn Mawr College.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Literary Studies
José Vergara, "All Future Plunges to the Past: James Joyce in Russian Literature" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 58:45


All Future Plunges to the Past: James Joyce in Russian Literature (Cornell UP, 2021) explores how Russian writers from the mid-1920s on have read and responded to Joyce's work. Through contextually rich close readings, José Vergara uncovers the many roles Joyce has occupied in Russia over the last century, demonstrating how the writers Yury Olesha, Vladimir Nabokov, Andrei Bitov, Sasha Sokolov, and Mikhail Shishkin draw from Joyce's texts, particularly Ulysses and Finnegans Wake, to address the volatile questions of lineages in their respective Soviet, émigré, and post-Soviet contexts. Interviews with contemporary Russian writers, critics, and readers of Joyce extend the conversation to the present day, showing how the debates regarding the Irish writer's place in the Russian pantheon are no less settled one hundred years after Ulysses. The creative reworkings, or translations, of Joycean themes, ideas, characters, plots, and styles made by the five writers Vergara examines speak to shifting cultural norms, understandings of intertextuality, and the polarity between Russia and the West. Vergara illuminates how Russian writers have used Joyce's ideas as a critical lens to shape, prod, and constantly redefine their own place in literary history. All Future Plunges to the Past offers one overarching approach to the general narrative of Joyce's reception in Russian literature. While each of the writers examined responded to Joyce in an individual manner, the sum of their methods reveals common concerns. This subject raises the issue of cultural values and, more importantly, how they changed throughout the twentieth century in the Soviet Union, Russian emigration, and the post-Soviet Russian environment. José Vergara is Assistant Professor of Russian at Bryn Mawr College.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies
José Vergara, "All Future Plunges to the Past: James Joyce in Russian Literature" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 58:45


All Future Plunges to the Past: James Joyce in Russian Literature (Cornell UP, 2021) explores how Russian writers from the mid-1920s on have read and responded to Joyce's work. Through contextually rich close readings, José Vergara uncovers the many roles Joyce has occupied in Russia over the last century, demonstrating how the writers Yury Olesha, Vladimir Nabokov, Andrei Bitov, Sasha Sokolov, and Mikhail Shishkin draw from Joyce's texts, particularly Ulysses and Finnegans Wake, to address the volatile questions of lineages in their respective Soviet, émigré, and post-Soviet contexts. Interviews with contemporary Russian writers, critics, and readers of Joyce extend the conversation to the present day, showing how the debates regarding the Irish writer's place in the Russian pantheon are no less settled one hundred years after Ulysses. The creative reworkings, or translations, of Joycean themes, ideas, characters, plots, and styles made by the five writers Vergara examines speak to shifting cultural norms, understandings of intertextuality, and the polarity between Russia and the West. Vergara illuminates how Russian writers have used Joyce's ideas as a critical lens to shape, prod, and constantly redefine their own place in literary history. All Future Plunges to the Past offers one overarching approach to the general narrative of Joyce's reception in Russian literature. While each of the writers examined responded to Joyce in an individual manner, the sum of their methods reveals common concerns. This subject raises the issue of cultural values and, more importantly, how they changed throughout the twentieth century in the Soviet Union, Russian emigration, and the post-Soviet Russian environment. José Vergara is Assistant Professor of Russian at Bryn Mawr College.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/russian-studies

跳岛FM
77 对话梁文道:约翰·伯格会梦见自己做播客吗?

跳岛FM

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 69:40


四十年前,有一位穿着花衬衫的公共知识分子登上电视,以一种石破天惊的方式解读古典艺术,破解广告对图像的使用,点明无处不在的男性凝视,与大众讨论“观看”的各种可能。 本期节目,我们请到一直致力于在国内推广约翰·伯格作品的知名媒体人梁文道,和主播祝羽捷一起,聊聊“观看之道”之外,约翰·伯格如三联画一般展开的人生经历和多重面向。 《幸运者:一位乡村医生的故事》《本托的素描簿》《我们在此相遇》……通过这些相对不那么知名的作品,我们得以看到“左派”“艺术评论家”“马克思主义者”等等标签之下的约翰·伯格。他一生的创作,可能都在尝试解决一个永恒的矛盾:一边是泥土、劳动和乡村,一边是革命、理想和现代主义,对于身处其间的这一代公共知识分子,传统和社群到底意味着什么?当一个艺术家想要对大众说话,而大众最喜闻乐见的却是肥皂剧和真人秀,他要不要采取大众传媒的语言习惯和“陈词滥调”?如果约翰·伯格活到今天,他会做播客吗? 【本期嘉宾】 梁文道,媒体人,《八分》主播。 【本期主播】 祝羽捷,作家,策展人。著有《羽来信》《人到了美术馆会好看起来》等,译有《简洁如照片》等。纪录片「 ZHU在英伦 」,播客「 艺术折叠 」主播。 【时间轴】 05:16 听说过《观看之道》,但有没有听说过被它隔空喊话的《文明》? 12:14 《观看之道》最大的意义,在于教会我们关心艺术的脉络 17:40 左派艺术评论者眼中的梵·高和卡拉瓦乔,和我们熟悉的大不相同 31:11 《幸运者》:书籍出版史上的创举,改变了图文结合的叙述结构 37:00 作为本雅明式“storyteller”的伯格:历史的完成与否取决于如何讲述 42:37 “如果约翰·伯格活在今天,说不定会用抖音做些什么。” 51:36 约翰·伯格晚期回归农村,是对传统的依恋,还是左派的浪漫? 58:00 我们为什么要在今天重读约翰·伯格? 【节目中提到的人】 肯尼斯·克拉克(Kenneth Clark),英国作家、艺术史家,著有《文明》; 雷蒙·威廉斯(Raymond Henry Williams),英国文化理论家、马克思主义思想家,著有《电视:科技与文化形式》《漫长的革命》《乡村与城市》等; 让·摩尔(Jean Mohr),瑞士纪实摄影师。让·摩尔与约翰·伯格先后合作出版过6本书,其中包括《幸运者:一位乡村医生的故事》《第七人》等; 卡拉瓦乔(Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio),意大利画家,善用明暗手法,对巴洛克画派形成有着重要影响; 塞尔丘克·德米雷尔(Selçuk Demirel),土耳其插画家,代表作《烟》《白内障》《海滩上的一个男人》; 斯宾诺莎(Baruch Spinoza),荷兰哲学家、政治思想家; 本雅明(Walter Bendix Schoenflies Benjamin),德国哲学家、文化评论家,著有《机械复制时代的艺术作品》; 爱德华·帕尔默·汤普森(Edward Palmer Thompson),英国历史学家、和平活动家。著有《英国工人阶级的形成》《共有的习惯》; 蒙德里安(Piet Cornelies Mondrian),荷兰画家、冷抽象派艺术家,代表作《红、黄、蓝的构成》; 杰克逊·波洛克(Jackson Pollock),美国画家、抽象表现主义艺术家,代表作《海神的召唤》《1948年第5号》; 皮埃尔·布尔迪厄(Pierre Bourdieu),法国社会学家、思想家,代表作《区隔》《艺术的规则》; 詹姆斯·乔伊斯(James Joyce),爱尔兰作家、诗人,代表作《都柏林人》《尤利西斯》。 【节目中提到的作品】 约翰·伯格作品:《观看之道》|《我们在此相遇》|《简洁如照片》|《本托的素描簿》|《毕加索的成败》|《白内障》(与塞尔丘克·德米雷尔 合著)|《幸运者:一位乡村医生的故事》(与让·摩尔 合著) 《文明》[英]肯尼斯·克拉克 著 《约翰·伯格的三重生活》[美]乔舒亚·斯珀林 著 《讲故事的人》[德]瓦尔特·本雅明 著 【本期推荐作品】 《成为波伏娃》[英]凯特·柯克帕特里克 著 《沙丘》[美]弗兰克·赫伯特 著 _Men to Devils, Devils to Men _ by Barak Kushner 【出品人】蔡欣 【主理人】猫弟 【节目编辑】何润哲 黄鱼 【后期制作】AURA.pote 【音乐】 片头 上海复兴方案 - Queen of Sports 片尾 上海复兴方案 - Spring in a Small Town 【视觉设计】孙晓曦 王尊一 【收听方式】 你可以在小宇宙App、网易云音乐、喜马拉雅、蜻蜓FM、荔枝FM、轻芒小程序,以及Apple Podcasts、Castro、Pocket Casts等泛用型播客客户端上找到我们,订阅收听「跳岛FM」。 【联系我们】 微信公众号:跳岛FM 微博:跳岛FM 邮箱:tiaodaoFM@163.com

Writ Large
Ulysses

Writ Large

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 33:27


Perhaps more than any other book, Ulysses has the reputation of being difficult—it is dense, allusive, and often hard to follow. But Joyce wasn't trying to be challenging for its own sake, or because he sadistically wanted to punish future students assigned his book. Quite the contrary. With Ulysses, Joyce wanted to explore and convey what it is to be alive. And just like his book, life is difficult and confusing, but also thrilling and joyful.  Catherine Flynn is Associate Professor, Affiliate of the Program in Critical Theory, Director of Berkeley Connect in English, and Director of Irish Studies at the University of California Berkeley. She is the author of James Joyce and the Matter of Paris. See more information on our website, WritLarge.fm. Follow us on Twitter @WritLargePod.

Slightly Foxed
36: Graphic Novels: A Comic Turn with Posy Simmonds & Paul Gravett

Slightly Foxed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 44:39


The cartoonist, writer and illustrator Posy Simmonds brilliantly captures the ambitions and pretensions of the literary world, and the journalist and curator Paul Gravett has worked in comics publishing for decades. Together they bring graphic novels and comic books to the foreground with the Slightly Foxed team. We draw moral lessons from the Ally Sloper cartoons of the 1870s, glimpse Frans Masereel's wordless woodcut stories of the 1920s, view the pictorial politics of Citizen 13660 by Miné Okubo in the 1940s and revisit Art Spiegelman's 1992 Pulitzer Prize-winning Maus before taking a closer look at more contemporary works. From a tragicomic summer with Joff Winterhart, nuclear explosions with Raymond Briggs, the shadow of James Joyce with Mary and Bryan Talbot and an Iranian childhood with Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis, the discussion moves through panels, frames, splashes and spreads to Posy Simmonds's own methods in bringing literature to life, including crosshatching to Vivaldi. Originally serialized in the Guardian, Posy's Gemma Bovery builds on the bones of Flaubert's Madame Bovary and Tamara Drewe draws from Hardy's Far from the Madding Crowd, while Cassandra Darke takes inspiration from Dickens's A Christmas Carol. Though rooted in the classics, the devil is in Posy's detail, be it real French coffee pots, the joy of characters' names, such as Kevin Penwallet, and fictional places, such as Tresoddit. We continue our travels off the beaten track with our usual round-up of reading recommendations, and a trip to Gilbert White's House and Gardens in Hampshire, where we view the landscapes that sparked his evergreen classic The Natural History of Selborne. (Episode duration: 44 minutes; 39 seconds) Books Mentioned We may be able to get hold of second-hand copies of the out-of-print titles listed below. Please get in touch with Jess in the Slightly Foxed office for more information. Ally Sloper: A Moral Lesson, cartoons by Marie Duval and words by Judy's office boy is out of print (4:48) Miné Okubo, Citizen 13660 (6:29) George Takei, They Called Us Enemy (7:25) Jules Feiffer, Passionella and Other Stories is out of print (9:05) Art Spiegelman, Maus (10:37) Mary M. Talbot & Bryan Talbot, Dotter of Her Father's Eyes (12:52) Joff Winterhart, Days of the Bagnold Summer (13:22) Raymond Briggs, When the Wind Blows (15:42) Raymond Briggs, Ethel & Ernest (17:07) Posy Simmonds, Gemma Bovery (17:48) Posy Simmonds, Tamara Drewe (17:48) Marjane Satrapi, Persepolis (28:31) Posy Simmonds, Cassandra Darke (29:04) Riad Sattouf, The Arab of the Future (30:24) Alison Bechdel, Fun Home (31:20) Posy Simmonds, Literary Life Revisited Paul Gravett, Posy Simmonds Emma Tennant, Burnt Diaries is out of print (34:20) Robert Macfarlane, The Old Ways (37:28) Our Time, an anthology commissioned by The Lakes International Comic Art Festival (38:29) Laurie Lee, As I Walked Out One Midsummer Morning. Published in our series of Slightly Foxed Editions, along with Cider with Rosie (39:54) Gilbert White, The Natural History of Selborne (41:24) Related Slightly Foxed Articles & Illustrations Underwear Was Important, Hazel Wood on the cartoons of Posy Simmonds, Issue 15 Cover illustration by Posy Simmonds, Issue 16 Inside cover illustration by Posy Simmonds, Issue 60 Touched with a Secret Delight, Melissa Harrison on Gilbert White, The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne, Issue 48 Other Links Posy Simmonds Close Up, Cartoonmuseum Basel, Switzerland. The exhibition runs until 24 October 2021 (2:39) The bd BOUM festival, Blois, France. The festival is chaired by Posy Simmonds and runs from 19-21 November 2021 Gosh! Comics, London, UK (31:58) The Lakes International Comic Art Festival, Kendal, UK (32:08) Thought Bubble, The Yorkshire Comic Convention, Harrogate, UK (32:26) Gilbert White's House & Gardens, Selborne, UK (41:13) Opening music: Preludio from Violin Partita No.3 in E Major by Bach The Slightly Foxed Podcast is hosted by Philippa Lamb and produced by Podcastable

Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina
Santa Barbara Talks Podcast 79: Daraka Larimore-Hall

Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 55:32


Please take a moment to visit Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina on You Tube and subscribe to see the video versions of the podcast. Dr. Daraka Larimore-Hall joins Josh Molina for nearly one-hour of political talk regarding the Santa Barbara Mayor's race and two City Council contests. Larimore-Hall defends Cathy Murillo's record and raises concerns and questions about those who are supporting the other Democrats in the race, James Joyce and Deborah Schwartz. Murillo has been endorsed by the Santa Barbara County Democratic Party. Daraka touches on gender, race and discrimination in politics and brings his big-thinking approach to unravel the complicated contests and explain the political landscape. Daraka references the Santa Barbara Independent endorsement of Joyce, and says the key driver of support should a person's record, not their personalities. Larimore-Hall grew up on Santa Barbara's Westside, in the Ladera Street projects. He has a doctorate from UCSB.

Tour Stories
The Check-In with Anand Wilder

Tour Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 37:50


Anand Wilder is a multi-instrumentalist, singer and songwriter.  After the break up of his band Yeasayer and the onset of a global pandemic, Anand felt it was time to buckle down and start and  finish and his solo record, I Don't Know My Words  (out 2022 on Last Gang records). Not only did he record the record himself at his home in Brooklyn, he co-wrote,  acted in and co-produced a gorgeous video for the first single Delirium Passes, which is an adaptation of the James Joyce story, The Boarding House and features actor Ben Sinclair.  In this episode,  Joe and Anand talk about his surprise half brother,  vasectomies,  Anand's drum recording technique, psychedelic frog licking and why Anand loved the process of making his video.   Also, Anand explains why he's taking a "weak" trio on the road rather than a "power" trio to support his new record.   And...... we get a surprise visit from the one and only Ryan Kattner, aka Honus Honus. https://lastgang.com/Music by Anand Wilder and Joe PlummerUse Code Fret10 for a free month of Music Production Suite Pro and a 10% discount on all other software. Visit Izotope.com

Blooms & Barnacles
M'Coy. Get rid of him quickly.

Blooms & Barnacles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 50:00


Leopold Bloom braves an awkward stop-and-chat.Topics in this episode include: Leopold Bloom's encounter with M'Coy, what Bloom has in common with Larry David, M'Coy as a character in “Grace”, M'Coy as an early prototype for Bloom, a quincunx, Bloom wrestles with his Shadow, Bloom trying to catch a glimpse of a woman's leg, outsider jaunting cars, Hoppy Holohan, Bob Doran, Bantam Lyons, more lotuses, Ivy Day, Charles Stewart Parnell and Home Rule, foostering, the symbolism of Bloom's interrupted ogling, the technic of narcissism, and the peri.Sweny's Patreon helps keep this marvelous Dublin landmark alive. Please subscribe!On the Blog:Plumtree's Potted M'CoySocial Media:Facebook | TwitterSubscribe to Blooms & Barnacles:Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher

45 Graus
#108 Aires Almeida - Para que serve a Arte?

45 Graus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 108:09


O convidado é licenciado e mestre em Filosofia pela Universidade de Lisboa. Tem-se dedicado sobretudo à filosofia da arte. Dirige a coleção Filosofia Aberta, da Gradiva e é autor de vários livros, entre os quais O Valor Cognitivo da Arte (2010) e A Definição de Arte: O Essencial (2019). -> Apoie este projecto e faça parte da comunidade de mecenas do 45 Graus em: 45graus.parafuso.net/apoiar Foi sobretudo este último -- sobre o que é, afinal, a arte -- o mote para a nossa conversa.  Já há muito tempo que queria falar sobre arte no 45 Graus. É um tema obviamente com muito pano para mangas; afinal, não há ninguém que não aprecie alguma forma de arte, seja ela a pintura, a música ou o cinema.  No entanto, faltava-me encontrar um convidado que tivesse a abordagem certa. Porque a verdade é que a arte, como depende muito da nossa sensibilidade individual, é um tema que se presta muito a análises, digamos, pouco… objectivas.  Ou é discutido numa lógica puramente subjectiva, do tipo: “adooooro o Tarantino” -- ou a Paula Rego (ou, pelo contrário eles “não me dizem nada”). Ou é discutido de uma forma quase religiosa, com uma admiração cega por tudo o que é de determinado artista, seja ele o David Bowie ou Picasso. (A nossa conversa começa precisamente por este ponto). Ou então, mesmo quando encontramos uma discussão acesa sobre arte, como é comum por exemplo na crítica de cinema, o que vemos, na verdade, muitas vezes, é uma discussão com superlativos a mais e objectividade a menos. De certa forma, pode dizer-se que estive este tempo todo à espera de um convidado como o Aires Almeida, que consegue falar sobre arte de forma cativante mas sem peneiras nem poses. O nome dele foi-me sugerido pelo Desidério Murcho, outro grande convidado do 45G, a quem agradeço. O ponto de partida para a nossa conversa foi o mais elementar de todos: o que é a arte? Que aspectos são comuns a formas tão diferentes de arte como a pintura, a música ou a literatura e que, no entanto, as distinguem de outras actividades humanas? E porque é que a arte é algo que consideramos valioso -- o que é que a arte nos dá? Dá-nos prazer, claramente, mas pode também ser uma fonte de conhecimento? Ou é simplesmente um tipo de experiência diferente dos outros todos? Foi uma longa conversa, na qual percorremos uma série destes aspectos da natureza da arte. _______________ Índice da conversa: (03:04) não devemos tratar a arte como algo sagrado, não tem valor intrínseco. (Noël Carroll, filósofo)  (12:34) Os vários problemas filosóficos em torno da arte | O que é arte? Diferentes tipos de definições. | Casos-fronteira. Gato Fedorento - Lusco Fusco | Fahrenheit 451, de Ray Bradbury (25:09) Porque é que, enquanto sociedade, valorizamos tanto a arte e os artistas? | O que é a Arte?, de Lev Tolstói (29:19) Há muita arte má. A falácia da divisão. | Gerhard Richter | Muita arte poderia ser destruída.  (35:55) A arte enquanto fonte de prazer. Robert Nozick e a “máquina das experiências” | O entretenimento é inimigo da arte? (41:27) A arte enquanto fonte de conhecimento? Jerome Stolnitz on the cognitive triviality of art | A arte enquanto estímulo dos sentidos. | A arte enquanto fonte de uma ‘experiência estética' que é única. | A música é universal?  (54:30) A arte enquanto meio para experienciar emoções que de outra forma não teríamos (ou sem ter o custo associado). (Porque é que as pessoas ouvem música triste e vêem filmes de terror?) (01:01:01) O papel no valor que a Humanidade da arte da admiração pelo/a génio do artista. (01:06:17) Por que admiramos mais o talento do que o esforço? | A ‘regra' das 10,000 horas de treino | Livro “Guitar Zero”, de Gary Marcus | Livro “The Sense of Style”, de Steven Pinker  (01:14:04) A intenção do artista importa para o valor da obra? | Ensaio “A morte do autor”, de Roland Barthes |  (01:20:43) Quando a arte se torna um mero adereço social (a “pose” dos artistas e dos críticos de arte). | Música atonal. | Os Abba (01:23:43) Quando a mesma música ou o mesmo filme nos despertam reacções diferentes em momentos diferentes da vida. | “Voando sobre um ninho de cucos” | A dificuldade em apreciar devidamente obras marcantes antigas que foram revolucionárias na altura. | Pulp Fiction. | Filmes de Manoel de Oliveira. | Ulysses, de James Joyce (01:33:07) Obras falsas podem ser consideradas arte? Documentário Netflix “Made You Look”. | Han van Meegeren. O falsificador que engazopava nazis. | Nelson Goodman (filósofo) | O urinol de Marcel Duchamp  (1:39:19) ...de volta ao problema da Definição da Arte: como classificar a arte de vanguarda? | Anti-humor | Nick Zangwill (filósofo) (1:45:54) Livro recomendado: “Investigações Estéticas - Ensaios de filosofia da arte”, de Jerrold Levinson  _______________ Obrigado aos mecenas do podcast: Tomás Fragoso, Gonçalo Murteira Machado Monteiro, Nuno Costa, Francisco Hermenegildo, Mário Lourenço, Carlos Seiça Cardoso, José Luís Malaquias, Tiago Leite, Carlos Martins, Corto Lemos, Margarida Varela, Filipe Bento Caires, Miguel Marques, Galaró family, Nuno e Ana, João Ribeiro, Miguel Vassalo, Bruno Heleno Gonçalo Matos, Emanuel Gouveia, Ricardo Santos, Ricardo Duarte, Ana Sousa Amorim, Manuel Martins, Sara Mesquita, Francisco Sequeira Andrade, ChaosSeeker , Gabriel Sousa, Gil Nogueira, Luis Brandão Marques, Abílio Silva, Joao Saro, Tiago Neves Paixão, Daniel Correia, Rita Mateus, António Padilha, Tiago Queiroz, Carmen Camacho, João Nelas, Francisco Fonseca, Diogo Sampaio Viana, José Soveral, André Oliveira, Andreia Esteves, João Bernardino, Luís Costa, Ana Teresa Mota, Isabel Oliveira, Arune Bhuralal Rui Baldaia, Joana Margarida Alves Martins, Luis Marques, Hugo Correia, Duarte , Francisco Vasconcelos, Telmo , Jose Pedroso, MANNA Porto, José Proença, Carlos Manuel Lopes de Magalhães Lima, Maria Francisca Couto, joana Antunes, Nelson Poças, Francisco López Bermúdez, Carlos Silveira, Diogo Rombo, Bruno Lamas, Fábio Mota, Vítor Araújo, João Pereira, Francisco Valente, Nuno Balsas, Jorge Amorim, Rui Vilão, João Ferreira, Luís Elias, José Losa, Hélder Moreira, Diogo Fonseca, Frederico Apolónia, André Abrantes, Henrique Vieira, João Farinha, Paulo Fernandes, Nuno Lages, João Diamantino, Vasco SÁ Pinto, Rui Carrilho, Luis Quelhas Valente, Tiago Pires, Mafalda Pratas, Renato Vasconcelos, João Raimundo, Francisco Arantes, Francisco dos Santos, Mariana Barosa, Marta Baptista Coelho, João Castanheira, Pedro , rodrigo Brazão, Nuno Gonçalves, Pedro Rebelo, Tomás Félix, Vasco Lima, Joao Pinto, João Moreira, José Oliveira Pratas, João Diogo Silva, Marco Coelho, Joao Diogo, Francisco Aguiar , Tiago Costa da Rocha, João Crispim, Paulo dos Santos, Abílio Mateus, João Pinho , Andrea Grosso, Miguel Lamela, Margarida Gonçalves, Afonso Martins, João Barbosa, Luis Filipe, Renato Mendes, António Albuquerque, Francisco Santos, juu-san, Fernando Sousa, Pedro Correia, MacacoQuitado, Paulo Ferreira, Gabriela, Nuno Almeida, Francisco Manuel Reis, Daniel Almeida, Albino Ramos, Inês Patrão, Patrícia Esquível , Diogo Silva, Miguel Mendes, Luis Gomes, Ana Batista, Alberto Santos Silva, Cesar Correia, Susana Ladeiro, Gil Batista Marinho, Filipe Melo, Cheila Bhuralal, Bruno Machado, Miguel Palhas, isosamep, Robertt , Pedro F. Finisterra, Cristiano Tavares, Pedro Vieira, Jorge Soares, Maria Oliveira, Bruno Amorim Inácio, Nuno , Wedge, Pedro Brito, Manuel Botelho da Silva, Ricardo Leitão, Vítor Filipe, João Bastos, Natália Ribeiro, Bernardo Pimentel, Pedro Gaspar, Hugo Domingues _______________ Esta conversa foi editada por: Hugo Oliveira _______________ Bio: Licenciado em Filosofia pela Universidade de Lisboa, onde também obteve o grau de Mestre em Filosofia da Linguagem e da Consciência (2005), com uma tese sobre filosofia da arte. É professor de Filosofia do ensino secundário, colaborador do Centro de Filosofia da Universidade de Lisboa (Grupo LangCog) e, desde 2017, é membro da direcção da Sociedade Portuguesa de Filosofia. É autor dos livros O Valor Cognitivo da Arte (2010) e A Definição de Arte: O Essencial (2019), coautor, com Desidério Murcho, de Janelas Para a Filosofia (2014, entretanto esgotado) e de vários outros livros didácticos de filosofia. Desde 2006 dirige a coleção Filosofia Aberta, da Gradiva Publicações. Vive em Portimão, mas é natural de Vila Nova de Foz Côa.

Les Nuits de France Culture
La Nuit de la traduction 3/12 : Sylvia Beach : "Joyce me disait que jamais je ne vendrais un exemplaire d'Ulysse, ce livre si ennuyeux !"

Les Nuits de France Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 24:59


durée : 00:24:59 - Les Nuits de France Culture - par : Philippe Garbit, Albane Penaranda, Antoine Dhulster - En 1948, Jacques Dombasle consacrait une émission de "Pour un club de traducteurs" au roman de James Joyce "Ulysse". Ce roman, condamné aux Etats-Unis, fut publié en 1922 en version originale, par Sylvia Beach, en France. Puis il fut publié en français, en 1929, par Adrienne Monnier. - réalisation : Virginie Mourthé - invités : Adrienne Monnier Libraire, éditrice parisienne (1892-1955); Sylvia Beach Libraire et éditrice, elle édita "Ulysse" de James Joyce.; James Joyce

Novel Dialogue
2.2 Adaptation: Tom Perrotta and Mark Wollaeger Go from Page to Screen (AV)

Novel Dialogue

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 40:27


Novelist, screenwriter, and HBO showrunner Tom Perrotta joins his old friend Mark Wollaeger (who also happens to be a top scholar of modernism) for a wide-ranging conversation about literature, television, and everything in between. Tom reveals that he has been reading a most peculiar self-help book: Richard Ellmann’s biography of James Joyce. Mark then sharesContinue reading "2.2 Adaptation: Tom Perrotta and Mark Wollaeger Go from Page to Screen (AV)"

Behind the Mic with AudioFile Magazine
MAYA AND THE ROBOT by Eve L. Ewing, read by Bahni Turpin

Behind the Mic with AudioFile Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 8:31


Narrator Bahni Turpin embraces every emotional moment in this inspiring story for middle grade science and IT enthusiasts. AudioFile's Emily Connelly tells host Jo Reed about the fun of listening to Maya's story all about friendship--and robots! Maya is excited to be starting 5th grade, until she discovers her best friends are in a different class. She struggles with loneliness and self-doubt, but she discovers a homemade robot named Ralph who helps inspire her to be herself and do good in the world. Turpin infuses the diverse characters with distinct and relatable personalities, creating a memorable listening experience. Read the full review of the audiobook on AudioFile's website. Published by Listening Library. Listeners can enjoy Homer's THE ILIAD, translated by Ian Johnston, and narrated by Anton Lesser, on AudioFile's Audiobook Break podcast. Find more audiobook recommendations at audiofilemagazine.com Support for Behind the Mic comes from Naxos AudioBooks. James Joyce's Finnegans Wake: In the rich nighttime and the language of dreams, here are history, anecdote, myth, folk tale and, above all, a wondrous sense of humor, colored by a clear sense of humanity. In this exceptional reading by the Irish actor Barry McGovern, with Marcella Riordan, the world of the Wake is more accessible than ever before. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Nerds Amalgamated
Crazy Dr Who News, PC Affordability & New Solar Cells

Nerds Amalgamated

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 58:37


Rusty is coming back to Doctor Who. No, not that one. It's Russell T Davies, back to regenerate the greatest show on TV with his old production team. It remains to be seen whether he can recapture the magic, but the BBC must be desperate. Gaming PCs are incredibly rare, and they're likely to get even rarer. This means people will pay a massive premium, and that entry level parts don't really exist anymore. This makes us sad. Everyone should have the opportunity to build a PC and learn about electronics. Maybe in the post apocalyptic future there will be enough supply to meet demand. An Aussie team has created a significantly cheaper and easier to make solar panel that outperforms traditional panels. The sunniest place on Earth could really use some of those. They still need to scale up, but it's great to see Aussie scientists making huge strides. Doctor Who: A New Hope? - https://twitter.com/bbcdoctorwho/status/1441405833997217798 Affordable PCs are now a pipe dream- https://www.pcgamer.com/rip-cheap-graphics-cards/Tech Start Up makes new Solar Cell- https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-09-21/australian-start-up-creates-world-s-most-efficient-solar-cell/100476152Other topics discussedBBC - 5 things the Doctor does in any worrying situation | @Doctor Who - BBC- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l0ED6CGmjm4Russell T Davies (a Welsh screenwriter and television producer whose works include Queer as Folk, The Second Coming, Casanova, the 2005 revival of the BBC One science fiction franchise Doctor Who, Cucumber, Years and Years and It's a Sin.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russell_T_DaviesTorchwood (a British science fiction television programme created by Russell T Davies. A spin-off of the 2005 revival of Doctor Who, it aired from 2006 to 2011.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TorchwoodBad Wolf (production company) (a British television production company founded by Julie Gardner and Jane Tranter in 2015, with its headquarters in Cardiff, Wales.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bad_Wolf_(production_company)Olly Alexander set to be new Doctor Who as first gay actor to play Time Lord- https://www.thesun.co.uk/tv/15405348/olly-alexander-doctor-who-actor-gay/Ruth Clayton (a human identity assumed by the Fugitive Doctor, who hid on Earth using a Chameleon Arch.)- https://tardis.fandom.com/wiki/Ruth_ClaytonJo Martin (Jo Martin played Ruth Clayton/Fugitive Doctor in the Doctor Who television stories Fugitive of the Judoon and The Timeless Children, alongside Jodie Whittaker's Thirteenth Doctor. She was the first non-white actor to be cast in the role of the Doctor in the DWU.)- https://tardis.fandom.com/wiki/Jo_MartinDoctor Who: actor Christopher Eccleston reveals he has anorexia- https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/49719101Christopher Eccleston is the Doctor!- https://www.bigfinish.com/news/v/christopher-eccleston-is-the-doctorMurray Gold (an English composer for stage, film, and television and a dramatist for both theatre and radio. He is best known as the musical director and composer of the music for Doctor Who from 2005, until he stepped down in 2018 after the tenth series aired in 2017. He has been nominated for five BAFTAs.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murray_GoldDaleks and Cybermen- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UCsXO7r6-z4Bob Baker (scriptwriter) (a British television and film writer. Baker and Martin devised for Doctor Who the robotic dog K-9 (created for The Invisible Enemy), the renegade Time Lord Omega (created for The Three Doctors, Doctor Who's 10th anniversary story) and the Axons. K-9 was originally intended to appear in one story only, but the BBC decided to make it a recurring character. )- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Baker_(scriptwriter)Elisabeth Sladen (an English actress. She became best known as Sarah Jane Smith in the British television series Doctor Who, appearing as a regular cast member from 1973 to 1976, alongside both Jon Pertwee and Tom Baker, and reprising the role many times in subsequent decades, both on Doctor Who and its spin-offs, K-9 and Company (1981) and The Sarah Jane Adventures (2007–2011).)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elisabeth_SladenSarah Jane Smith (a fictional character played by Elisabeth Sladen in the long-running BBC Television science fiction series Doctor Who and two of its spin-offs.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarah_Jane_SmithThe Sarah Jane Adventures (In addition to Sladen, the first series of the programme stars Yasmin Paige as Maria Jackson, Sarah Jane's 13-year-old neighbour in Ealing, west London, and Tommy Knight as a boy named Luke, who is adopted by Sarah Jane at the conclusion of the introductory story.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sarah_Jane_Adventures#Cast_and_crewSadie Miller (an English actress and author. She is known for her portrayal of Natalie Redfern in the Sarah Jane Smith audio drama series by Big Finish, her novel, Moon Blink, from Candy Jar Books's series, Lethbridge-Stewart, as well as her association with the science fiction series, Doctor Who. She is the daughter of actors Brian Miller and Elisabeth Sladen.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sadie_MillerSean Pertwee (the son of Jon Pertwee, who played the Third Doctor. He briefly appeared as himself in the 50th anniversary story The Five(ish) Doctors Reboot.)- https://tardis.fandom.com/wiki/Sean_PertweeJon Pertwee (played the Third Doctor from 1970 to 1974, beginning from Spearhead from Space to Planet of the Spiders.)- https://tardis.fandom.com/wiki/Jon_PertweeGotham (TV series) (an American crime drama television series developed by Bruno Heller, produced by Warner Bros. Television and based on characters published by DC Comics and appearing in the Batman franchise, primarily those of James Gordon and Bruce Wayne.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gotham_(TV_series)Showrunner Russell T. Davies wants a Doctor Who Cinematic Universe- https://winteriscoming.net/2021/01/25/doctor-who-cinematic-universe-russell-t-davies/The Day of the Doctor (a special episode of the British science fiction television programme Doctor Who, marking the programme's 50th anniversary.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Day_of_the_DoctorJourney's End (TV story) (Journey's End was the thirteenth and final episode of series 4 of Doctor Who. It was the final regular appearance of all the Tenth Doctor's companions, though they would all appear in cameos in The End of Time (barring Catherine Tate and Bernard Cribbins who prominently feature) to commemorate David Tennant's final story.)- https://tardis.fandom.com/wiki/Journey%27s_End_(TV_story)Torchwood: Miracle Day (the fourth series of the British science fiction television programme Torchwood, a spin-off from the long-running show Doctor Who.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torchwood:_Miracle_DayDay One (Torchwood) (the second episode of the first series of the British science fiction television series Torchwood. The episode centres on Gwen Cooper (Eve Myles) working her first case with the alien hunters Torchwood in Cardiff, when she lets loose a purple alien gas that survives on the energy of orgasms. Over the course of the episode, the team hunt for Carys before the gas kills her.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Day_One_(Torchwood)Everything Changes (Torchwood) (the first episode of the British science fiction television programme Torchwood, which was first broadcast on 22 October 2006. The story is told from the perspective of Gwen Cooper (Eve Myles), who comes across the Torchwood team through her job as a police officer with the South Wales Police, who are investigating a series of strange deaths in Cardiff.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Everything_Changes_(Torchwood)Resurrection gauntlet (The resurrection gauntlet — also known as the resurrection glove or just the glove, and, jokingly, the risen mitten — was a metal gauntlet that had the ability to revive the dead for a limited time, though with unfortunate and usually deadly consequences.)- https://tardis.fandom.com/wiki/Resurrection_gauntletTorchwood: Children of Earth (Children of Earth is the banner title of the third series of the British television science fiction programme Torchwood, which broadcast for five episodes on BBC One from 6 to 10 July 2009.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torchwood:_Children_of_EarthRyzen (a brand of x86-64 microprocessors designed and marketed by Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) for desktop, mobile, server, and embedded platforms based on the Zen microarchitecture. It consists of central processing units (CPUs) marketed for mainstream, enthusiast, server, and workstation segments and accelerated processing units (APUs) marketed for mainstream and entry-level segments and embedded systems applications.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RyzenWhy is there a chip shortage?- https://www.bbc.com/news/business-58230388Nvidia sold $155 million in crypto mining chips last quarter, but PC gaming remains its biggest market- https://www.cnbc.com/2021/05/26/nvidia-pc-gaming-still-more-important-than-crypto-for-revenue.htmlThe Life of a Miner - Crypto Mining Farm at Apartment | August 2021 Update- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VB7NV7SR3bAChubbyemu - A Bitcoin Miner Heatstroked In His Sleep. This Is What Happened To His Organs.- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fr8bp8a2QS4PCPartPicker - Asus Radeon RX 580 8 GB DUAL Video Card- https://au.pcpartpicker.com/product/jkFXsY/asus-radeon-rx-580-8gb-dual-video-card-dual-rx580-o8g?history_days=730China's top regulators ban crypto trading and mining, sending bitcoin, rivals tumbling- https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-09-25/chinas-top-regulators-ban-crypto-trading-/100491122Chrome OS (a Gentoo Linux-based operating system designed by Google. It is derived from the free software Chromium OS and uses the Google Chrome web browser as its principal user interface. Unlike Chromium OS, Chrome OS is proprietary software.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chrome_OSSolarCity (a publicly traded company headquartered in Fremont, California that sold and installed solar energy generation systems as well as other related products and services to residential, commercial and industrial customers.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SolarCityElon Musk's Battery Farm Has Been a Total Triumph. Here Comes the Sequel.- https://www.popularmechanics.com/science/green-tech/a34598095/elon-musk-battery-farm-sequel-australia-tesla-powerpack/Hornsdale Power Reserve (a 150MW/194MWh grid-connected energy storage system owned by Neoen co-located with the Hornsdale Wind Farm in the Mid North region of South Australia, also owned by Neoen. During 2017 Tesla, Inc. won the contract and built the Hornsdale Power Reserve, for a capital cost of A$90 million, leading to the colloquial Tesla big battery name.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hornsdale_Power_ReserveHornsdale Power Reserve (Elon Musk placed a wager that the battery would be completed within "100 days from contract signature", otherwise the battery would be free. Tesla had already begun construction, and some units were already operational by 29 September 2017, the time the grid contract was signed. The battery construction was completed and testing began on 25 November 2017. It was connected to the grid on 1 December 2017. The 63 days between grid contract and completion easily beat Musk's wager of "100 days from contract signature", which started when a grid connection agreement was signed with ElectraNet on 29 September 2017, 203 days after Musk's offer on 10 March (in Australia).- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hornsdale_Power_Reserve#ConstructionNorwich Games Festival - Ashens - Gallery of Shame - 1 June 2019- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wFF9O73iwkoS.S. Antarctica (a battleship owned by the penguins of Antarctica.)- https://simpsonswiki.com/wiki/S.S._AntarcticaSS Penguin (a New Zealand inter-island ferry steamer that sank off Cape Terawhiti after striking a rock near the entrance to Wellington Harbour in poor weather on 12 February 1909.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_PenguinElden Ring (an upcoming action role-playing game developed by FromSoftware and published by Bandai Namco Entertainment. The game is a collaborative effort between game director Hidetaka Miyazaki and fantasy novelist George R. R. Martin.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elden_RingBandai Namco Selects “My Dark Souls Story” Contest Winners- https://www.gameinformer.com/b/news/archive/2016/03/11/bandai-namco-selects-my-dark-souls-story-contest-winners.aspxNerdy, Inc. - My Dark Souls Story: Biography of the Chosen Undead - The Dark Souls Story- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mbiLl-m0Ry4NASA's Mars Rover Curiosity Had Planetary Protection Slip-Up- https://www.space.com/13783-nasa-msl-curiosity-mars-rover-planetary-protection.htmlAmazon Women in the Mood (the first episode in season three of Futurama.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amazon_Women_in_the_MoodApocalypse Now (a 1979 American epic psychological war film directed and produced by Francis Ford Coppola. It stars Marlon Brando, Robert Duvall, Martin Sheen, Frederic Forrest, Albert Hall, Sam Bottoms, Laurence Fishburne, Harrison Ford, and Dennis Hopper.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apocalypse_NowCast Party: A Dungeons & Dragons Podcast (TNC podcast)- https://www.patreon.com/CastPartyShout Outs 20th September 2021 – Mick McGinty, Legendary Video Game Artist, passes away - https://www.nintendolife.com/news/2021/09/legendary_street_fighter_ii_artist_mick_mcginty_has_passed_away Mick McGinty, an artist that produced cover art for video games like Street Fighter II and Streets of Rage 2, has died. While many gamers might not know McGinty by name, those that grew up in the '90s will immediately recognize his art. The artist contributed some of the most iconic images in all of gaming, telling stories that immediately captivated players. McGinty was an immensely talented artist, as is evidenced by the impressive collection of work on his personal site, but for gamers of the '90s, his output will be almost synonymous with video game covers. He is perhaps most famous with Nintendo fans for creating the western cover artwork for the SNES version of Street Fighter II. While many people took issue with the 'westernisation' of the artwork at the time, it was very common practice for companies like Nintendo to commission entirely new artwork which was better suited to a particular region. McGinty's cover – which features Chun-Li fighting Blanka over the prone body of Ryu – has gone down as one of the most recognisable video game covers of all time. McGinty's association with Street Fighter would continue with Street Fighter II: Champion Edition on the Mega Drive / Genesis, Street Fighter II Turbo on the SNES and Super Street Fighter II.21st September 2021 – Endangered South African penguins killed by swarm of bees near Cape Town - https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-58622482Sixty-three endangered African penguins have been killed by a swarm of bees in a rare occurrence near Cape Town, bird conservationists in South Africa say. The protected birds, from a colony in Simonstown, were found on the shore with multiple bee-stings. They had no other physical injuries. National parks officials told the BBC this was the first known attack at the world-famous Boulders Beach, which attracts up to 60,000 visitors a year. "Usually the penguins and bees co-exist," said Dr Alison Kock, a marine biologist with South Africa's national parks agency (SANParks). "The bees don't sting unless provoked - we are working on the assumption that a nest or hive in the area was disturbed and caused a mass of bees to flee the nest, swarm and became aggressive," she added. "Unfortunately the bees encountered a group of penguins on their flight path." Post-mortems found that the birds had been stung around the eyes and on their flippers. That is because "those are the parts that are not covered by feathers," Dr Katta Ludynia, from the Southern African Foundation for the Conservation of Coastal Birds (Sanccob), told the BBC. Penguins have pink sweat glands around their eyes and "that area is particularly thin - similar to human fingers," explained Shanet Rutgers, senior penguin keeper at Cape Town's Two Oceans Aquarium. One of the penguins had been stung 27 times. African penguins are distinctive for their small size, and live on the coast and islands of South Africa and Namibia - though some have been spotted as far north as Gabon.Their populations are rapidly declining, the International Union for Conservation of Nature says. The national body said in a statement on Sunday that it was still conducting toxicity and disease checks on the birds, and would continue to monitor the situation.22nd September 2021 – 10th Anniversary of Dark Souls - https://www.glitched.online/landmark-rpg-dark-souls-celebrates-its-10th-anniversary-today/ Ten years ago to the day, Japanese video game developer From Software released the critically acclaimed dark fantasy action RPG, Dark Souls, which would go on to change the gaming landscape forever. Refining the formula already established in Demon's Souls while introducing a bevy of new mechanics that have been adopted and replicated by other titles, Dark Souls would spearhead an entirely new sub-genre of gaming. Today, Dark Souls officially celebrates its 10th anniversary. Dark Souls‘ history is relatively straightforward in comparison to many other success stories in gaming. From Software first dabbled in the dark fantasy setting with Demon's Souls, showcasing their ability to tell epic but narratively mysterious tales featuring fantastical beasts, ambiguous NPCs and deceptively challenging gameplay. The last part has remained the foundation of all From Software games since, increasing their difficulty in newer titles like Bloodborne and Sekiro while still retaining their creative power for captivating and immersive stories, worlds and characters. Dark Souls was well-received by fans, often cited as their favourite game of all time. It's success went on to spawn two sequels, Dark Souls II and Dark Souls III; two creative spiritual successors in Bloodborne and the upcoming Elden Ring; and a Tenchu-styled action title Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice that heavily borrowed elements from From Software's trademark style. Demon's Souls may have been the first, but it was really Dark Souls that put the Japanese studio on the map, leaving behind a legacy that has been the source of inspiration for a number of games like the Nioh series, The Surge, Lords of the Fallen, Mortal Shell, and numerous others. Dark Souls is not only remembered for its staple difficulty, but inspired world design, creative boss encounters, a plot that simply begged to be dissected and explored further, and a blueprint for a new style of game that bounced off the success of this defining RPG.24th September 2021 – 20th anniversary of Ico - https://www.nme.com/en_au/features/gaming-features/ico-minimalist-masterclass-in-cinematic-and-emotional-storytelling-3051674 Released between those two films in 2001 and 2002, Ico (pronounced ‘ee-ko' – but don't worry if you get it wrong, I did so too for a very long time) is a single-player action-adventure game developed by Sony's Japan Studio. This game kicked off the career of Fumito Ueda. It was the first in a series of games that featured similar themes, including beloved titles like Shadow of the Colossus and The Last Guardian. Ico is special in the way it handles abandonment and isolation. Devoid almost entirely of all dialogue, Ico essentially works like a silent film. There's a clear sense of loneliness that's present throughout the entire game. But there's also a feeling of hope. Ico's soundtrack is almost suffocating at times, though it also presents a number of beautiful pieces. “Heal,” for example, is one of the best save themes in any game. Ico's soundtrack is almost suffocating at times, though it also presents a number of beautiful pieces. “Heal,” for example, is one of the best save themes in any game. One of the game's fans is also Hidetaka Miyazaki of FROM Software. Miyazaki, the creator of Demon's Souls, and in turn the Souls series, is one of the biggest game industry figures of the last decade. Much in the way the game would inspire Straley and Druckmann, Miyazaki cites Ico as a game that showed him the different possibilities that video games as a medium had to offer.Remembrances21st September 1954 – Mikimoto Kōkichi - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mikimoto_K%C5%8DkichiA Japanese entrepreneur who is credited with creating the first cultured pearl and subsequently starting the cultured pearl industry with the establishment of his luxury pearl company Mikimoto. He was inducted into the house of peers by imperial decree and posthumously awarded the Grand Cordon of the Order of the Sacred Treasure. On April 18, 1985, the Japan Patent Office selected him as one of Ten Japanese Great Inventors. The company was ranked as one of the world's most luxurious brands by Women's Wear Daily Magazine and Mikimoto was considered one of the best Japanese financial leaders of the 20th century by Nihon Keizai Shimbun. He is also known as the founder of Mikimoto Pharmaceuticals, a company specialising in beauty products containing pearl calcium. Mikimoto Pearl Island is named after him. In addition, the "Phoenix Mikimoto Crown" used by Miss Universe winners as well as the pageant crown used by Miss International is credited to his patented work. Mikimoto began his search of an alternative method to produce pearls as the chairman of the Shima Marine Products Improvement Association. At this point the demand for pearls had severely outweighed the supply, prompting the consideration of an effort to protect the oysters. In 1888, Mikimoto obtained a loan to start his first pearl oyster farm at the Shinmei inlet on Ago Bay in Mie prefecture with his wife and partner Ume. On 11 July 1893, after many failures and near bankruptcy, he was able to create the hemispherical cultured pearls. The pearls were made by seeding the oyster with a small amount of mother of pearl. In 1927, Mikimoto met with inventor, Thomas Edison, who was in awe of Mikimoto's cultured pearls as it was "supposed to be biologically impossible". He died at the age of 96 in Japan.Famous Birthdays21st September 1902 – Allen Lane - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allen_LaneA British publisher who together with his brothers Richard and John Lane founded Penguin Books in 1935, bringing high-quality paperback fiction and non-fiction to the mass market. In 1967 he started a hardback imprint under his own name, Allen Lane. He rose quickly at Bodley Head, becoming managing editor in 1925 following the death of his uncle. After conflict with the board of directors who were wary at first—for fear of being prosecuted—of publishing James Joyce's controversial book Ulysses, Lane, together with his brothers Richard and John, founded Penguin Books in 1935 as part of the Bodley Head. Penguin Books became a separate company the following year. The legend goes that on a train journey back from visiting Agatha Christie in 1934, Lane found himself on an Exeter station platform with nothing available worth reading. He conceived of paperback editions of literature of proven quality which would be cheap enough to be sold from a vending machine; the first was set up outside Henderson's in Charing Cross Road and dubbed the "Penguincubator". Lane was also well aware of the Hamburg publisher Albatross Books and adopted many of its innovations. Most booksellers and authors were against the idea of paperbacks. They believed that paperbacks would result in individuals spending less money on books. Lane was a person that was very stubborn when it came to his company. He operated mainly on intuition and imagination. "He thrived in an atmosphere of crisis and came most fully alive under the challenge of great dilemmas." He was a creative genius that once he had an idea he would not stop until it came to fruition. Once he decided on creating paperbacks he set about in deciding what the books should look like and finding a name. He had decided that the books would be reprints so he also needed to approach other publishers to see if they and their authors would be willing to sublease the rights of the books. He was quoted as saying, "I have never been able to understand why cheap books should not also be well designed, for good design is no more expensive than bad." He was born in Bristol.Events of Interest21th September 2003 – The Galileo spacecraft is terminated by sending it into Jupiter's atmosphere. - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galileo_project#End_of_mission_and_deorbit When the exploration of Mars was being considered in the early 1960s, Carl Sagan and Sidney Coleman produced a paper concerning contamination of the red planet. In order that scientists could determine whether or not native life forms existed before the planet became contaminated by micro-organisms from Earth, they proposed that space missions should aim at a 99.9 percent chance that contamination should not occur. This figure was adopted by the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) of the International Council of Scientific Unions in 1964, and was subsequently applied to all planetary probes. The danger was highlighted in 1969 when the Apollo 12 astronauts returned components of the Surveyor 3 spacecraft that had landed on the Moon three years before, and it was found that microbes were still viable even after three years in that harsh climate. An alternative was the Prime Directive, a philosophy of non-interference with alien life forms enunciated by the original Star Trek television series that prioritized the interests of the life forms over those of scientists. Given the (admittedly slim) prospect of life on Europa, scientists Richard Greenberg and Randall Tufts proposed that a new standard be set of no greater chance of contamination that that which might occur naturally by meteorites. Galileo had not been sterilized prior to launch and could have carried bacteria from Earth. Therefore, a plan was formulated to send the probe directly into Jupiter, in an intentional crash to eliminate the possibility of an impact with Jupiter's moons, particularly Europa, and prevent a forward contamination. On April 14, 2003, Galileo reached its greatest orbital distance from Jupiter for the entire mission since orbital insertion, 26 million km (16 million mi), before plunging back towards the gas giant for its final impact. At the completion of J35, its final orbit around the Jovian system, Galileo impacted Jupiter in darkness just south of the equator on September 21, 2003, at 18:57 UTC. Its impact speed was approximately 48.26 km/s (29.99 mi/s).21st September 1994 – Dinosaur Island premiered in Japan - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0109627/ On this day in 1994 in Japan, Dinosaur Island enjoyed its premiere on home video. The Fantasy/Comedy feature starred Griffin Drew and Michelle Bauer, and here's the premise: "An army captain is flying three misfit deserters home for a court martial when the plane has engine trouble and they must land on an uncharted island. There they find a primitive society of cave women who routinely sacrifice virgins to appease The Great One, the top dog dinosaur on the the island. Mistaken for gods, the men must destroy The Great One or face death, but meanwhile they fall in love."The cavewomen's ranch was constructed on a remote portion of David Carradine's ranch.Shot in 12 days.Almost every day was extremely hot during the shooting of this film except one.A sequence with a stop-motion animation dinosaur attacking people on the beach was changed to a hand puppet dinosaur in post-production.The filmmakers paid an additional four thousand dollars for the poster art used to advertise this film.Antonia Dorian said she was nervous filming her first love scene in this film, especially since she was going to be topless. She'd danced topless in Vegas shows and in videos, but that wasn't the same as being on a small set surrounded by male actors and crew just a few feet away, all staring at her. Jim Wynorski gave her wine to calm her nerves. He also limited how many people would be on set. That and the wine helped her finally get through the scene.When the female warriors are chasing the dinosaur towards the ocean, you can see Malibu homes in the background hills.Wynorski said that Roger Corman asked he and Fred Olen Ray to make the film after Jurassic Park came out. "It wasn't so much a Jurassic Park rip off as a cavewoman movie", Wynorski said.Wynorski and Ray said they rewrote the script entirely. They knew who they were going to cast, employing actors they had worked with before, and tailored the script accordingly. They based the characters of the soldiers on characters in Stripes. Another influence was The War that Time Forgot, part of the Star Spangled War Stories comic book series.The movie was shot at Vasquez Rocks and David Carradine's ranch at Sun Valley over ten days. Wynorski says he and Ray made it "on a wing and a prayer".Wynorski later said, "I'd never co-directed a movie before, but it was smooth sailing all the way. When one of us got tired, the other would take over. I'd usually go back to the comfort of the air-conditioned motor home and hang out with the girls. You really can't beat that."Wynorski says he was at a party when he met Joe Pesci who told him he loved the film, saying "everytime I watch it I feel like I want to go there."IntroArtist – Goblins from MarsSong Title – Super Mario - Overworld Theme (GFM Trap Remix)Song Link - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-GNMe6kF0j0&index=4&list=PLHmTsVREU3Ar1AJWkimkl6Pux3R5PB-QJFollow us onFacebook- Page - https://www.facebook.com/NerdsAmalgamated/- Group - https://www.facebook.com/groups/440485136816406/Twitter - https://twitter.com/NAmalgamatedSpotify - https://open.spotify.com/show/6Nux69rftdBeeEXwD8GXrSiTunes - https://itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/top-shelf-nerds/id1347661094Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/nerds_amalgamated/Email - Nerds.Amalgamated@gmail.comSupport via Podhero- https://podhero.com/podcast/449127/nerds-amalgamated See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

time tv women google australia new zealand japanese japan television events california american national shot earth war queer lords english doctors south africa las vegas mars star trek space moon british europa shadow hamburg batman dc comics nintendo demon galileo folk nature bbc fremont conservation harrison ford warner bros planet sony stripes african thomas edison francis ford coppola released fallen jurassic park software tesla henderson rage agatha christie souls futurama musk mood streets wales rusty antarctica davies rpg casanova spiders south australia malibu sin zen dennis hopper apollo aussie david tennant exeter miyazaki baftas shame james gordon dark souls bloodborne street fighter colossus bbc one sequels ulysses torchwood sarah jane smith sladen cybermen pc carl sagan welsh jupiter international union catherine tate heal marlon brando penguin books committee namibia roger corman richard greenberg cardiff snes spearhead bruce wayne jodie whittaker torchwood children ryu star spangled war stories cape town james joyce affordability fall in love ealing penguins robert duvall ico gotham tv street fighter ii blanka dark souls ii martin sheen solar cells laurence fishburne amazon women david carradine julie gardner tenth doctor russell t davies prime directive john lane brian miller miss universe doctors reboot time lord charing cross road carys npcs second coming sun valley big finish surge thirteenth doctor third doctor judoon elisabeth sladen bad wolf christopher eccleston tom baker jon pertwee sarah jane adventures sarah jane torchwood miracle day bernard cribbins time forgot lethbridge stewart fugitive ume bob baker cucumbers michelle bauer fred olen ray sekiro joe pesci jim wynorski utc google chrome international council great one chun li albert hall mistaken surveyor bruno heller axons miss international refining bbc television gabon vasquez rocks devoid neoen cpus chrome os mcginty jovian apus sekiro shadows die twice amalgamated nioh hidetaka miyazaki dinosaur island last guardian dark souls iii bandai namco entertainment fumito ueda three doctors fantasy comedy allen lane mega drive genesis olly alexander wynorski gaming pcs mid north tenchu gentoo linux elden ring george r super street fighter ii japan studio simonstown two oceans aquarium chromium os invisible enemy mortal shell podhero
The Biblio File hosted by Nigel Beale
Michele K. Troy on The Albatross Press and the Third Reich

The Biblio File hosted by Nigel Beale

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 75:39


Michele K. Troy is professor of English at Hillyer College at the University of Hartford. She studies Anglo-American literary modernism in continental Europe and is the author of Strange Bird: The Albatross Press and the Third Reich, the first book to be written about the Albatross Press, a Penguin precursor, that entered into an uneasy relationship with the Nazi regime to keep Anglo-American literature alive under fascism. The press was, from its beginnings in 1932, a “strange bird”: a cultural outsider to the Third Reich but an economic insider. It was funded by British-Jewish interests. Its director was rumored to work for British intelligence. It distributed fiction in English by both mainstream and edgier modernist authors such as D. H. Lawrence, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, and Ernest Hemingway to eager continental readers. Yet Albatross printed and sold its paperbacks from the heart of Hitler's Reich. Michele and I talk about how weird this is, among other things. 

Fire in The Belly
E231: “My Mission Is To Bring Joy Back To Education” - Danny Brassell Interview.

Fire in The Belly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 96:44


The inspirational Dr Danny Brassell joins the show today to share the reason why he dedicates his life to inspiring people around the world to achieve greater happiness in their lives as well as sharing his passion for reading. Together, they discuss how we can bring joy back into education, why it is important to look at things from other peoples' perspectives and why you don't have competition, only potential collaborators.   KEY TAKEAWAYS It doesn't matter what you read, what matters is how much you read. It doesn't matter if you are reading James Joyce or James And The Giant Peach, people who read more will be able to read better. We will get more success with children of all ages if we base reading on their interests. Think of a book like a piece of food, if you take a bite and don't like it then you put it down, if you don't like the first chapter in a book you are probably not going to like the second chapter. There were over 4 million books written last year in English, don't waste your time on a book you're not interested in. Every person in the world has different points of view. We always look at things from our perspective. We can learn so much from other people if we just put our egos aside. You have to guard yourself, you're the same today as you'll be in five years except for two things, the people you meet and the books you read. Make sure you make wise choices by surrounding yourself with people that lift you and make sure you fill your mind with things that also build you up. You have no competition, only potential collaborators. You can talk about the same thing as somebody else but in a different way. Just because you've heard one song does not mean you should only listen to that one song. Everybody has their take on things.   BEST MOMENTS “My mission is to bring joy back into education.” “Travel is the most important thing in education.” “you're the same today as you'll be in five years except for two things, the people you meet and the books you read.” ABOUT THE GUEST Danny inspires audiences around the world to achieve greater performance, engagement and happiness by discovering their motivation. Infusing humour, inspiration and simple techniques to initiate positive change – both at home and in the workplace – Danny has been dubbed “Jim Carrey with a PhD” for his high-energy, world-class keynotes, seminars and customized retreats. Website: https://dannybrassell.com LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dannybrassell ABOUT THE HOST The ‘Mighty Pete Lonton' from the ‘Mighty 247' company is your main host of ‘Fire In The Belly'. Pete is an Entrepreneur, Mentor, Coach, Property Investor, and father of 3 beautiful girls. Pete's background is in Project Management and Property, but his true passion is the ‘Fire in The Belly' project itself. His mission is to help others find their potential and become the mightiest version of themselves. Pete openly talks about losing both of his parents, suffering periods of depression, business downturn and burn-out, and ultimately his years spent not stoking ‘Fire In the Belly'. In 2017, at 37 years of age that changed, and he is now on a journey of learning, growing, accepting, and inspiring others. Pete can connect with people and intuitively asks questions to reveal a person's passion and discover how to live their mightiest life. The true power of ‘Fire In The Belly' is the Q&A's - Questions and Actions! The ‘Fire In The Belly' brand and the programme is rapidly expanding into podcasts, seminars, talks, business workshops, development courses, and rapid results mentoring. CONTACT METHOD https://www.facebook.com/mightypetelonton/ https://uk.linkedin.com/in/mightypete https://www.facebook.com/groups/430218374211579/         Support the show: https://www.facebook.com/groups/430218374211579/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Blooms & Barnacles
Henry Flower, Esq

Blooms & Barnacles

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 55:05


Mr. Bloom runs a mysterious errand at the Westland Row Post Office.Topics include hidden lotuses, Corny Kelleher, Leopold Bloom's missing hour, tooraloom tooraloom tay, Orientalism and Bloom's fantasy of the Far East, stereotypes about climate's affects the character of a culture, Tom Kernan, how Bloom succumbs to the Lotus Eaters, Henry Flower, what Bloom has hidden in his hat, Major Tweedy and the Royal Dublin Fusiliers, the Lotus Eaters of the British military, Maud Gonne's awkward activism, Edward VII's freemasonry.Sweny's Patreon helps keep this marvelous Dublin landmark alive. Please subscribe!On the Blog:Maud GonneGround Control to Major TweedySocial Media:Facebook | TwitterSubscribe to Blooms & Barnacles:Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher

Book Dumb
Ep. 37: Dark Academia

Book Dumb

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 49:43


In this episode, Kendra and August share their favorite dark academia reads ('tis the season!). This episode is completely spoiler-free. Books mentioned in the episode: Bunny by Mona Awad (2019) Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte (1842). Frankenstein by Mary Shelley (1818) A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara (2015) Maurice by EM Forester (1913/1971) Portrait of an Artist by James Joyce (1916) Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy (1895) Dracula by Bram Stoker (1892) Howard's End by EM Forester (1910) Stoner by John Williams (1964) The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde (1890) The Maidens by Alex Michaelides (2021) Ninth House by Leigh Bardugo (2019) Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte (1847) The Secret History by Donna Tartt (1992) My Dark Vanessa by Kate Elizabeth Russel (2020) Vicious by V.E. Schwab (2013)

Pathways with Joseph Campbell
BONUS: Mythic Themes in the Works of Mann and Joyce

Pathways with Joseph Campbell

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 22:42


For more information on the MythMaker Podcast Network and Joseph Campbell, visit JCF.org. Pathways with Joseph Campbell is hosted by Brad Olson, PhD and is a production of the Joseph Campbell Foundation. It is produced by John Bucher and Ilya Smirnoff. Executive Producer, Robert Walter. Audio and editing services provided by Seth Bailin. All music exclusively provided by APM Music (apmmusic.com)

Intelligence Squared
Salman Rushdie: Touchstones with Razia Iqbal

Intelligence Squared

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 53:47


Salman Rushdie, award-winning novelist and author of Midnight's Children and Quichotte, discusses his cultural touchstones, from James Joyce to Bob Dylan. Rushdie was in conversation with BBC journalist and broadcaster Razia Iqbal. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

In Our Time
Samuel Beckett (Summer Repeat)

In Our Time

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 49:24


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss Samuel Beckett (1906 - 1989), who lived in Paris and wrote his plays and novels in French, not because his French was better than his English, but because it was worse. In works such as Waiting for Godot, Endgame, Molloy and Malone Dies, he wanted to show the limitations of language, what words could not do, together with the absurdity and humour of the human condition. In part he was reacting to the verbal omnipotence of James Joyce, with whom he'd worked in Paris, and in part to his experience in the French Resistance during World War 2, when he used code, writing not to reveal meaning but to conceal it. With Steven Connor Professor of English at the University of Cambridge Laura Salisbury Professor of Modern Literature at the University of Exeter And Mark Nixon Associate Professor in Modern Literature at the University of Reading and co-director of the Beckett International Foundation Producer: Simon Tillotson

Spot Lyte On...
Spot Lyte On...Gabrielle Basha - Joseph Campbell Foundation

Spot Lyte On...

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 58:05


Gabrielle Basha is a writer and educator based in Cambridge, Massachusetts. In addition to her lifelong study of American folklore and pop culture, she holds a BFA in art history and illustration and an MFA in writing for young people from Lesley University. She's currently working on behalf of the Joseph Campbell Foundation, a 501.c3 devoted to preserving the work of Joseph Campbell. Joseph Campbell was an American professor of literature at Sarah Lawrence College who worked in comparative mythology and comparative religion. His work covers many aspects of the human experience. Campbell's best-known work is his book The Hero with a Thousand Faces (1949), in which he discusses his theory of the journey of the archetypal hero shared by world mythologies, termed the monomyth.Since the publication of The Hero with a Thousand Faces, Campbell's theories have been applied by a wide variety of modern writers and artists. His philosophy has been summarized by his own often repeated phrase: "Follow your bliss." He gained recognition in Hollywood when George Lucas credited Campbell's work as influencing his Star Wars saga.Campbell has also influenced Alan Watts, Jim Morrison, Steven Speilberg, and many many others. You can read a recent piece by Gabrielle Basha about Campbell's influence on the show Ted Lasso.Don't forget to RSVP for a live podcast taping TODAY (Sept 9, 2021) with Jeeyoon Kim at 3pm PT. Learn more about Lyte.  

18Forty Podcast
Agnes Callard: A Philosophy of Change [Teshuva 3/5]

18Forty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 69:26


In this episode of the 18Forty Podcast, we talk to Agnes Callard - professor of philosophy and author - about the philosophy of change.Many decisions in life can be made by weighing our values: if an action accords with our values, then we do it, and if it doesn't, then we don't. But when it comes to deciding what our values should be, we may need a different paradigm.- How do we make decisions in relation to our values?- What decisions don't function in this normal paradigm?- How can we decide to change our values themselves?Tune in to hear a conversation about the philosophy of change.References:Aspiration: The Agency of Becoming by Agnes Callard https://www.amazon.com/Aspiration-Agency-Becoming-Agnes-Callard/dp/0190639482Transformative Experience by L. A. Paul https://www.amazon.com/Transformative-Experience-L-Paul/dp/0198777310A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce https://www.amazon.com/Portrait-Artist-As-Young-Man/dp/1503221431The Neapolitan Novels by Elena Ferrante https://www.amazon.com/The-Neapolitan-Novels-Boxed-Set/dp/1609455053 For more, visit https://18forty.org/podcast/teshuva. Professor Agnes Callard is a professor of philosophy at the University of Chicago, specializing in ancient philosophy and ethics. Professor Callard received a Masters of Arts in Classics and a PhD in philosophy from the University of California, Berkeley. Unlike many academics of philosophy, her writing is powerfully accessible, making her a popular voice on issues of contemporary ideas. Agnes's book Aspiration: The Agency of Becoming is a stunningly deep exploration of the foundational aspects of change, and is a must-read for anyone interested in the philosophy and psychology of personal growth. Agnes joins us to talk about self-creation, growth, and the philosophy of transformation.