Podcasts about Bronze Age

Prehistoric period and age studied in archaeology, part of the Holocene Epoch

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Best podcasts about Bronze Age

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Latest podcast episodes about Bronze Age

Tides of History
The Fall of Mycenaean Greece and the Trojan War

Tides of History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 46:46 Very Popular


Mycenaean Greece was one of the glittering jewels of the late Bronze Age world, but it fell to pieces in dramatic fashion: burned palaces, abandoned settlements, and the end of a centuries-old political tradition. Nor was Greece the only place in the Aegean to suffer: On the Asian side of the sea, a city we know as Troy was among those destroyed at this time. Was this the context that, centuries later, gave rise to Homer's famous tale of the Trojan War?Patrick's book is now available! Get The Verge: Reformation, Renaissance, and Forty Years that Shook the World in hardcopy, ebook, or audiobook (read by Patrick) here: https://bit.ly/PWverge Listen to new episodes 1 week early, to exclusive seasons 1 and 2, and to all episodes ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/tidesofhistory.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

MagicCity PodCast
Episode 77 Origin Story: Comic Books 1970's Welcome to the Bronze Age

MagicCity PodCast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 24:52


We've hit the Bronze Age of comics! Join us as we discuss the changes happening in comics throughout the 1970s. The comic book landscape starts to get a little darker as storylines inspired by social relevance start to take hold, allowing for a revision on the Comics Code, the return of horror inspired comic book characters, Marvel Comics continues on Boss Level status by revitalizing the X-Men to superstar status and pumping out new characters, DC almost self destructs, and so much more! You won't want to miss this one true believers! #bronzeagecomics #comicbooks #podcast https://linktr.ee/MagicCityPodcast Appease the Algorithm Gods! Hit us with a LIKE! Comment and Subscribe! Follow us on Instagram: Paul https://www.instagram.com/magiccitycomics/?hl=en Jimmy https://www.instagram.com/jmartcollectibles/?hl=en Jorge https://www.instagram.com/marvelpapi/?hl=en Check us out on TikTok. https://www.tiktok.com/@magiccitycomics --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/magic-city-podcast/support

Marvel by the Month
#174: March 1972 - "But Who Will Judge the Hulk?"

Marvel by the Month

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 84:10


For 25 more minutes of this episode, which includes our discussion of Iron Man #47 and Fantastic Four #123, support us at patreon.com/marvelbythemonth. Subscribers at the $4/month level get instant access to our bonus feed of content that contains nearly 60 extended and exclusive episodes — with more being added every week! Issues Discussed in this Episode: "Enter: Dr. Strange!" - Amazing Spider-Man #109, written by Stan Lee, art by John Romita, ©1972 Marvel Comics"Call Him Killgrave!" - Daredevil #88, written by Gerry Conway, art by Gene Colan and Tom Palmer, ©1972 Marvel Comics"But Who Will Judge the Hulk?" - Incredible Hulk #152, written by Gary Friedrich and Steve Englehart, art by Dick Ayers, Herb Trimpe, and Frank Giacoia, ©1972 Marvel Comics "Marvel by the Month" theme v. 3.0 by Robb Milne, sung by Barb Allen. All incidental music by Robb Milne.Visit us on internet at marvelbythemonth.com, follow us on Instagram at @marvelbythemonthand Twitter at @MarvelBTM, and support us on Patreon at patreon.com/marvelbythemonth.Much of our historical context information comes from Wikipedia. Please join us in supporting them at wikimediafoundation.org. And many thanks to Mike's Amazing World of Comics, an invaluable resource for release dates and issue information.

Comic Book Syndicate
Flea Market Fantasy #162 | Marvel Team-Up #74

Comic Book Syndicate

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 52:41


Cousin Brandon joins the Mikes for his sixth appearance. The cast of SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE cross paths with Spider-Man! In this bizarre Bronze Age brouhaha, Spider-Man gets mixed up with John Belushi, Dan Aykroyd, Bill Murray, Jane Curtin, Garret Morris, Laraine Newman, Gilda Radner, Lorne Michaels, and Ken Morrow, the Not-Ready-For-Primetime-Players. This classic story (which will likely never see print again), was written by Chris Claremont, pencilled by Bob Hall, and inked by Marie Severin.

The Imbalanced History of Rock and Roll
History Of Metal: The Bronze Age

The Imbalanced History of Rock and Roll

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 36:38 Very Popular


Markus and Ray always learn stuff doing this podcast. Moving forward on their study of Heavy Metal, through the ages, they focus on the impact of the Metal underground in the 70s at the turn of the decade into the 1980s! As Metal emerged there were ton of bands, leading to a discussion of the New Wave Of British Heavy Metal. This era is the bridge from the early bands, laying the foundation to the Iron Age, a massive Metal explosion lying ahead!Please check out our sponsors:Boldfoot Socks   https://boldfoot.comCrooked Eye Brewery   https://crookedeyebrewery.com/Don't forget that you can find all of our episodes, on-demand, for free right here on our web site: https://imbalancedhistory.com/

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Imbalanced History: History Of Metal The Bronze Age

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 36:38


Markus and Ray always learn stuff doing this podcast. Moving forward on their study of Heavy Metal, through the ages, they focus on the impact of the Metal underground in the 70s at the turn of the decade into the 1980s! As Metal emerged there were ton of bands, leading to a discussion of the New Wave Of British Heavy Metal. This era is the bridge from the early bands, laying the foundation to the Iron Age, a massive Metal explosion lying ahead!Please check out our sponsors:Boldfoot Socks   https://boldfoot.comCrooked Eye Brewery   https://crookedeyebrewery.com/Don't forget that you can find all of our episodes, on-demand, for free right here on our web site: https://imbalancedhistory.com/

Dear Watchers: a comic book omniverse podcast
What if The Riddler had one bad day inspired by Joker's Killing Joke? From DC Comics Batman: One Bad Day - The Riddler

Dear Watchers: a comic book omniverse podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 54:47 Transcription Available


Ep. 64 What if The Riddler had one bad day inspired by Joker's Killing Joke? Earth of an unknown designation (DC Comics)Batman: One Bad Day - The Riddler #1Reading list: Detective Comics #140 (1948 DC Comics) Detective Comics Annual #8 (1995 DC Comics) Batman: One Bad Day - The Riddler #1 (2022 DC Comics) Learn more about Dear Watchers:Visit DearWatchers.comTwitter @DearWatchersEmail Podcast@DearWatchers.comTheme music is Space Heroes by MaxKoMusic (Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0) ★ Support this podcast ★

The Longbox
Longbox Guys295: The Bronze Age Sandman

The Longbox

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 44:47


On this episode, the Longbox Guys discuss the comic book history of Simon and Kirby's Sandman.  Thanks for listening.

The Morning Scroll
Parashat Nitzavim, September 23rd

The Morning Scroll

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 4:00 Transcription Available


This week's "Fun Size" parshah provides a fascinating insight into Bronze Age cardiology."If you seek eternal bliss / come to this aortic bris."-MosheProduced by Mishkan Chicago.  Music composed, produced, and performed by Kalman Strauss. See our upcoming Shabbat services and programs here, and follow us on Instagram and like us on Facebook for more updates. Check out Shabbat Replay on Contact Chai for more from Rabbi Deena.Transcript

Tides of History
How Ancient Economies Fell Apart: Interview with Professor Sarah Murray

Tides of History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 57:16 Very Popular


We're often told that trade was central to the interconnected world of the late Bronze Age, but what were people really trading? Why did trade matter so much? And what happened when that trade disappeared? Professor Sarah Murray is an archaeologist and an expert on the economy of Mycenaean Greece - and how and why it fell apart.Patrick's book is now available! Get The Verge: Reformation, Renaissance, and Forty Years that Shook the World in hardcopy, ebook, or audiobook (read by Patrick) here: https://bit.ly/PWverge Listen to new episodes 1 week early, to exclusive seasons 1 and 2, and to all episodes ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/tidesofhistory.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Fantastic Comic Fan
70: Thor 272

Fantastic Comic Fan

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 15:12


Billy D from A World on Fire is joining me today, and we're talking Thor 272-- a fantastic Bronze Age jumping on point!   Follow the Fantastic Comic Fan   A World on Fire Magazines and Monsters  

The History Of The Land Of Israel Podcast.

After the unexplained collapse at the end of the copper age, a new culture emerges from the ashes of the Chalcolithic. The Canaanites would dominate the land in the Bronze Age and bring give it a new name and identity. But almost immediately, they faced incursions from imperialist neighbors. How to Create a Glitch in the MatrixA useful guide on how to experience simulation theory, first hand. Based upon the books...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify

Marvel by the Month
#173: Oops, All Milestones! (w/The Comics Canon)

Marvel by the Month

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 67:40


The Comics Canon is the podcast that rates, reviews, and renders judgment on the greatest comic book stories of yesterday and today. If you like what we do, treat yourself to a podcast where two extremely knowledgable hosts usually only talk about comics that they stand a good chance of either liking or loving!For 45 more minutes of this episode, which includes our discussion of Sub-Mariner #50 and Thor #200, support us at patreon.com/marvelbythemonth. Subscribers at the $4/month level get instant access to our bonus feed of content that contains nearly 60 extended and exclusive episodes — with more being added every week! Issues Discussed in this Episode: "Whatever Gods There Be!" - Avengers #100, written by Roy Thomas, art by Barry Smith, Joe Sinnott, Syd Shores, and Barry Smith, ©1972 Marvel Comics"Mirror, Mirror...!" - Captain America #150, written by Gerry Conway, art by Sal Buscema and John Verpoorten, ©1972 Marvel Comics "Marvel by the Month" theme v. 3.0 by Robb Milne, sung by Barb Allen. All incidental music by Robb Milne.Visit us on internet at marvelbythemonth.com, follow us on Instagram at @marvelbythemonthand Twitter at @MarvelBTM, and support us on Patreon at patreon.com/marvelbythemonth.Much of our historical context information comes from Wikipedia. Please join us in supporting them at wikimediafoundation.org. And many thanks to Mike's Amazing World of Comics, an invaluable resource for release dates and issue information.

Comics In Motion Podcast
Earth-Two in the Bronze Age- Episode 2: “Vengeance of the Immortal Villain” from The Flash #137.

Comics In Motion Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 37:32


The JSA Returns! While they made an appearance in a flashback in The Flash #129, they get back into action in The Flash #137. It's Barry (Flash) Allen, Jay (Flash) Garrick and rest of the Justice Society of America vs. Vandal Savage! You can follow the show @ComicsLloyd on Twitter or send an email to ClassicComicsMBL@gmail.com. You can find me on Twitter @MattB_Lloyd and at www.dccomicsnews.com where I write reviews and edit news stories. You can also check out my chapter in “Politics in Gotham: The Batman Universe and Political Thought.” https://www.amazon.com/Politics-Gotham-Universe-Political-Thought/dp/3030057755 And: “Black Panther and Philosophy: What Can Wakanda Offer the World?” https://www.amazon.com/Black-Panther-Philosophy-Blackwell-Culture/dp/1119635845/ref=sr_1_1?crid=2F69N3WJBZMF3&keywords=what+can+wakanda&qid=1642053514&sprefix=what+can+wakanda%2Caps%2C256&sr=8-1 “Vengeance of the Immortal Villain” Links Jay Garrick at DC Fandom Wiki https://dc.fandom.com/wiki/Jason_Garrick_(New_Earth) Vandal Savage at DC Fandom Wiki https://dc.fandom.com/wiki/Vandal_Savage_(New_Earth) The Flash #129 at DC Fandom Wiki https://dc.fandom.com/wiki/The_Flash_Vol_1_129 The Flash #137 at DC Fandom Wiki https://dc.fandom.com/wiki/The_Flash_Vol_1_137 All-Star Comics #57 at DC Fandom Wiki “The Mystery of the Vanishing Detectives” https://dc.fandom.com/wiki/All-Star_Comics_Vol_1_57 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/comics-in-motion-podcast/message

Magazines and Monsters
The Bronze Age of Horror Comics Episode , DC Special 11, 1971 "Beware...the Monsters are Here!" with JJG!

Magazines and Monsters

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 89:15


Hey all you spooks! I'm back with another creepy episode of the show! It's time for another DC horror anthology title, and this one is awesome! And welcome back my regular cohost for these books, Jeremiah Jones-Goldstein! We get talking about this awesome book, and don't look back, but you can't give enough love for this spectacular Neal Adams cover! Inside there are six stories to bite into, plus multiple one-pagers by Sergio Aragonés! Plus, a one page prose piece by Len Wein! Oh, and did I mention two of the stories are by Jack Kirby?!?! Get ready for this giant sized comic! As usual, you can send any feedback for the show through email at Magazinesandmonsters@gmail.com or to the FB page, or by reaching out to me on Twitter @Billyd_licious, and you can find JJG there also @bigox737 (and definitely check put his blog by clicking here!). Thanks for listening!  --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/magsnmonsters/message

Dear Watchers: a comic book omniverse podcast
What if starring Hulk “the man, the monster” aka What If Bruce Banner was the monster and Hulk was a peaceful being made of star energy? With SPECIAL GUEST Ethan (MakeMineAmalgam)

Dear Watchers: a comic book omniverse podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 58:59


Ep. 63 What if starring Hulk “the man, the monster” aka What If Bruce Banner was the monster and Hulk was a peaceful being made of star energy?Earth-9691 (Marvel Comics)With special guest Ethan of MakeMineAmalgamReading list: Incredible Hulk #1 (1962 Marvel Comics) What If #91 (1996 Marvel Comics) Incredible Hulk #460 (1998 Marvel Comics) Learn more about Dear Watchers:Visit DearWatchers.comTwitter @DearWatchersEmail Podcast@DearWatchers.comTheme music is Space Heroes by MaxKoMusic (Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0) ★ Support this podcast ★

Tides of History
What was the Bronze Age Collapse?

Tides of History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 41:27 Very Popular


The term "Bronze Age Collapse" is by now common, but what do we actually mean when we talk about "collapse?" Is it a matter of political reorganization or something rather more drastic? In the case of the Bronze Age, we have a copious material and written record to help us understand what actually happened around 1200 BC, and how it affected the people who lived through it - and didn't.Patrick's book is now available! Get The Verge: Reformation, Renaissance, and Forty Years that Shook the World in hardcopy, ebook, or audiobook (read by Patrick) here: https://bit.ly/PWverge Listen to new episodes 1 week early, to exclusive seasons 1 and 2, and to all episodes ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/tidesofhistory.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Marvel by the Month
#172: MONSTER by the Month 03 (w/Stephen Bissette) - "Dracula"

Marvel by the Month

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 89:30


Stephen Bissette is a legend of comics and horror and horror comics. In 1984, he penciled a little story in Saga of the Swamp Thing #21 called “The Anatomy Lesson” and, with Alan Moore, Rick Veitch, and John Totleben, proceeded to turn the comics world on its ear. His Eisner Award-winning horror anthology Taboo featured a who's who of ‘80s and ‘90s independent creators, including Moebius, Neil Gaiman, Chester Brown, and Charles Vess and was the original home of Alan Moore and Eddie Campbell's From Hell.Check out his latest creaturiffic artbooks from Amazon's print-on-demand service, as well as his 700-page The Brood, the definitive book on David Cronenberg's film of the same name.For an additional 55 minutes of this episode — including our deep dive into the second Werewolf by Night story in Marvel Spotlight #3, as well as our conversations about Swamp Thing, the limitations of Marvel-style storytelling, where to find underground comics in Vermont in the 1970s, and two Gene Colan stories — support us on Patreon at the $4/month level to unlock our super-secret bonus feed of content, with nearly 60 extended and exclusive episodes! Stories Covered In Detail This Episode:"Dracula" - Tomb of Dracula #1, written by Gerry Conway, art by Gene Colan, ©1971 Marvel Comics"The Fear Within!" - Tomb of Dracula #2, written by Gerry Conway, art by Gene Colan and Vince Colletta, ©1972 Marvel Comics "MONSTER by the Month" theme and all incidental music by Robb Milne.Visit us on internet at marvelbythemonth.com, follow us on Instagram at @marvelbythemonth, and support us on Patreon at patreon.com/marvelbythemonth.Much of our historical context information comes from Wikipedia. Please join us in supporting them at wikimediafoundation.org. And many thanks to Mike's Amazing World of Comics, an invaluable resource for release dates and issue information.

Dear Watchers: a comic book omniverse podcast
Whatever happened to the man of tomorrow (aka What If Alan Moore wrote the final Superman story)? Special Guest ElliotComicArt

Dear Watchers: a comic book omniverse podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 84:06


Ep. 62 Whatever happened to the man of tomorrow (aka What If Alan Moore wrote the final Superman story)?Earth-unknown (DC Comics)With special guest Elliot of ElliotComicArtReading list: Superman #423 (1986 DC Comics) Action Comics #583 (1986 DC Comics) Learn more about Dear Watchers:Visit DearWatchers.comTwitter @DearWatchersEmail Podcast@DearWatchers.comTheme music is Space Heroes by MaxKoMusic (Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0) ★ Support this podcast ★

Historians on Housewives
"If you're going to curse me out, at least ask a god to turn my bowels to water on a cursed tablet” with Carly Silver

Historians on Housewives

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 91:02


In which the Historians discuss public history, the Bronze Age Mari and curse tablets in Roman Britain, the connections between soap operas with Bravo shows like Vanderpump Rules and RHOBH, contemplate Real Housewives' curses on each other, what Jax Taylor has to do with a legal record from 3,000 years ago, paralleling Yolanda's treatment of the Hadid sisters with imperial alliances of the Bronze Age, consider the relationships between ancient cure-alls and housewives' use of IV drips, rating travel journalism, and much, much more!For more from our guest, check out:CarlySilver.comIG: @bespectacledlegendTwitter: @CarlyASilverRecommended ReadingCarly Silver, "Do You Want to Build an Icehouse?: On the refrigerated innovations of ancient rulers," Laphams Quarterly, September 28, 2021 Carly Silver, "How Ancient Cure-Alls Paved the Way for Drug Regulation," The Atlantic, January 10, 2017Carly Silver, "This Corrupt Boss Was Charged With Sexual Harassment—3,000 Years Ago," Narratively, April 4, 2018Greg Jenner, You're Dead to Me podcastAtlas ObscuraJStor Daily Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Skepsis Telegraph
56. Virtual Babies 2070 | Brett Favre TANF Welfare Fraud | China Surveillance vs America | Post Vax Mandate Death Spike

The Skepsis Telegraph

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 61:36


We begin this episode talking about the drama and turn of events regarding UFC 279 while rolling right into an AI expert who touts virtual babies as the next biggest thing since the Bronze Age revolution. No, not a video game. Another solution to *you guessed it* climate change. If that doesn't make your skin crawl, we get into Brett Favre having been tied up in Mississippi's biggest welfare fraud ever. Apparently he got millions from the TANF welfare fund to build his daughter's volleyball gym, among other big names who got big checks too. The director of the welfare fun gave his nephew a.. well... you'll just have to tune in. It's fucked up! Not quite as fucked up as the encroaching security state in China. It's getting worse, but don't let me harp on China alone. America is no different and I'm convinced that anti-Chinese surveillance propaganda is designed to distract us from what our own country is up to. Everyone cares about Ukraine but no one cares about America having bombed the middle east for the last 20 years. We wrap up the show talking about the 78% spike in deaths directly after Biden's vaccine mandates last year. These numbers are from life insurance companies who, of all people, really really do care about why people actually die. So I trust the numbers they put out. It's fucked up, and I need not say more. Let's get into it! follow us on twitter, Gettr and Instagram, and youtube. @skepsistele (more or less) Check out our bands: Death of Skepsis Golgothan (Spotify) Golgothan (BandCamp) Alfred and the Teddinators CoolDill Metamorphicon Dillon Crozier --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/theskepsistelegraph/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theskepsistelegraph/support

Signal of Doom: A Comic Book Podcast
#281: Predator: Big Game, Deep in the Bronze Age, Orb Debts in Diablo, Dave Learns about Data Mining, Scooby Doo, Walking Dead News Update

Signal of Doom: A Comic Book Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 181:11


Welcome to Fresh Signal! We cover Predator: Big Game, Dave is DEEP in the Bronze Age, Orb Debts in Diablo, Dave learns about Data Mining, Scooby Doo, Walking Dead News Update, and Dave learns about the concept of Empathy! Weekly Comics Superman #276 Superman #287 Justice League of America #138 Patch #5 TRADE OF THE WEEK Predator: Big Game Please support the show on Patreon! Every dollar helps the show! https://www.patreon.com/SignalofDoom Follow us on Twitter: @signalofdoom Dredd or Dead: @OrDredd Legion Outpost: @legionoutpost Follow Dave on Twitter: @redlantern2051

The Mixed Reviews
119 - The Disney Dark Age (with guest Alex Brizard)

The Mixed Reviews

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 124:33 Very Popular


Everybody wants to be a cat! Or at least in our circle! This week on the show, a look back at the animated films of The Disney Dark Age or The Bronze Age with out guest Alex Brizard (Netflix's The Circle, Two Dudes Watch Cartoons). Walt is gone and the studio goes wild, from The Aristocats to Oliver and Company, The Black Cauldron to The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh, we cover it all! If you have any questions/comments/suggestions for the show, follow us on twitter @TheMixedReviews, like us on Facebook, e-mail us at reviewsmixed@gmail.com, visit our Instagram or TikTok for extra content, or stop by our shop and pick up some podcast merchandise! Don't forget to subscribe to us on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Spotify, Podchaser, Audible, or Google. 

Classic Ghost Stories
Pallinghurst Barrow by Grant Allen

Classic Ghost Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 70:26 Very Popular


Pallinghurst Barrow by Grant AllenA horror story about spirits who linger in old places in the English countryisde. Published 1892. Suggested by Susan Tudor-Coulson If You Appreciate The Work I've Put In Here - You could buy me a coffee at https://ko-fi.com/tonywalker or join as a Patron for exclusive content here: https://www.patreon.com/barcudGrant AllenCharles Grant Blairfindie Allen was born in 1848 on Wolfe Island in Ontario in Ca nada and died in Haselmere in Surrey aged 51. His father was from Dublin and he was a protestant minister. He was educated at home and then when he was 13, his family moved to the USA, then to France then to Britain. He was educated at King Edward's School in Birmingham (where Tolkien later went amongst other famous alumni) and then at Merton College in Oxford. He went to teach in Brighton and in Jamaica. He returned to Britain from Jamaica and began to write professionally. He was most famous for his scientific essays. But he also wrote science fiction. He was an atheist and socialist. He was married twice. He died of liver cancer in 1899. He was a friend and neighbour of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.Chanctonbury Ring, Old Weird AlbionThe Old Weird Albion | Justin Hopper || Landscape, Memory & MythI mention how much I enjoy the work of Justin Hopper.  Chanctonbury Rings – a spoke word and music album made with folk artist Sharron Kraus and Ghost Box Records co-founder The Belbury Poly (Ghost Box). Long Barrows were the product of a late Stone Age civilisation with additions from Bronze Age folk. They are particularly to be found in Wessex and the south and west of England. But of course megalithic structures of similar types can be found all over Atlantic Europe. Nobody would suggest that the so-called Picts created them.Theosophists & Madam BlavatskyThe Theosophical Society was created mainly by Madame Helena Blavatsky who had a background in Spiritualism. This was a time of religious change with a huge upsurge in Spiritualism. The first lodge was in Scotland. There were influences from western Occultism, but also Hinduism and Buddhism and they talked about the ascended masters. These ascended masters included Abraham, Moses, Solomon, Jesus but also the Buddha, Confucious and Lao Tzu but also Mesmer, Bohme and Cagliostro.  Theosophy has evolved into the New Age.Mrs Bruce (the esoteric Buddhist) seems to be one of these.GhostsThe story reports that we only see the ghosts from periods within our knowledge.  But of course this is not true. Many ghosts are not really identifiable at all. Flint and ironThis is an old piece of folkloreCannabis IndicaIndeed. No wonder he saw visions.Fiddlers Green, Clint MarshFiddler's Green Peculiar Parish MagazineI love this 'zine. As the Clint Marsh says, *Fiddler's Green Peculiar Parish Magazine was born of a languid afternoon of conversation on a sunny tavern lawn. Taking its name from the pleasant afterlife dreamed into being by sailors, cavalrymen, and other adventurous spirits, Fiddler's Green gathers friends, good cheer, and a bit of magic to create a better world not someday, but now.*Tarantino's from Dawn til DuskThat genre shift from tense hostage movie to vampire killl-fest.  I see something similar going on here.  Support the show

Tides of History
Clashing Empires in the Late Bronze Age

Tides of History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 42:54 Very Popular


The late Bronze Age was a time of powerful empires and intense competition between them. Never before had true states covered such a large area, or had such resources to devote to politicking and fighting with one another. The result was war on a scale never before seen in human history.Patrick's book is now available! Get The Verge: Reformation, Renaissance, and Forty Years that Shook the World in hardcopy, ebook, or audiobook (read by Patrick) here: https://bit.ly/PWverge Listen to new episodes 1 week early, to exclusive seasons 1 and 2, and to all episodes ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/tidesofhistory.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Marvel by the Month
#171: February 1972 - "Iron Man: D.O.A."

Marvel by the Month

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 95:28


SEE MBTM AND MORE LIVE AT BOOKS WITH PICTURES!  From 6 - 10 pm on Saturday, September 10th, the Eisner Award-winning Books with Pictures will host Block with Party, an official Rose City Comic Con afterparty. Four of Portland's hometown Marvel-themed podcasts — Miles from Jay & Miles X-Plain the X-Men, Voice of Latveria, Werewolf by Night Podcast, and Marvel by the Month — will team up for Fan-Castic Four, a comics podcasting event, where we will come together to walk you through a milestone Marvel comic with something in it for each of us. Plus special guests! It's gonna be fun!For an additional 35 minutes of this episode, which includes our discussion of Daredevil #87 and Amazing Spider-Man #108, support us at patreon.com/marvelbythemonth. Subscribers at the $4/month level get instant access to our bonus feed of content that contains over 50 extended and exclusive episodes — with more being added every week! Deep Dives in this Episode: "Galactus Unleashed" - Fantastic Four #122, written by Stan Lee, art by John Buscema and Joe Sinnott, ©1972 Marvel Comics"Iron Man: D.O.A." - Amazing Adventures #12, written by Steve Englehart, art by Tom Sutton and Mike Ploog, ©1972 Marvel Comics Quick Summaries in this Episode:"-- They First Make Mad!" - Avengers #99, written by Roy Thomas, art by Barry Smith and Tom Sutton, ©1972 Marvel Comics"All the Colors... of Evil!" - Captain America #149, written by Gerry Conway, art by Sal Buscema and Jim Mooney, ©1972 Marvel Comics"When Monsters Meet!" - Incredible Hulk #151, written by Archie Goodwin, art by Herb Trimpe and John Severin, ©1972 Marvel Comics"Menace at Large!" - Iron Man #46, written by Gary Friedrich, art by George Tuska and John Verpoorten, ©1972 Marvel Comics"The Hounds of Helios!" - Marvel Premiere #2, written by Roy Thomas, art by Gil Kane and Dan Adkins, ©1972 Marvel Comics"And Spidey Makes Four!" - Marvel Team-Up #2, written by Gerry Conway, art by Ross Andru and Jim Mooney, ©1972 Marvel Comics“A Thunder of War Drums” - Red Wolf #1, written by Gary Friedrich and Roy Thomas, art by Syd Shores, ©1972 Marvel Comics"The Dream Stone!" - Sub-Mariner #49, written by Gerry Conway, art by Gene Colan and Frank Giacoia, ©1972 Marvel Comics"If This Be Death..!" - Thor #199, written by Gerry Conway, art by John Buscema and Vince Colletta, ©1972 Marvel Comics "Marvel by the Month" theme v. 3.0 by Robb Milne, sung by Barb Allen. All incidental music by Robb Milne.Visit us on internet at marvelbythemonth.com, follow us on Instagram at @marvelbythemonth and Twitter at @MarvelBTM, and support us on Patreon at patreon.com/marvelbythemonth.Much of our historical context information comes from Wikipedia. Please join us in supporting them at wikimediafoundation.org. And many thanks to Mike's Amazing World of Comics, an invaluable resource for release dates and issue information.

The FrogPants Studios Ultra Feed!
PLAY RETRO 34: The Age of Empires

The FrogPants Studios Ultra Feed!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 90:00 Very Popular


Age of Empires requires the player to develop a civilization from a handful of hunter-gatherers to an expansive Iron Age empire. To ensure victory, the player must gather resources in order to pay for new units, buildings and more advanced technologies. Resources must also be preserved, as no new resources become available as the game progresses, meaning if you cut a tree down, the tree will not grow back. Twelve civilizations are available, each with individual sets of attributes, including a varying number of available technologies and units. Each civilization has technologies unique to them, so that no civilization possesses all the technologies possible within the game. A major component of the game is the advancement through four ages. These are the Stone Age (Mesolithic/Paleolithic), Tool Age (Neolithic/Chalcolithic), Bronze Age and Iron Age. Advancement between ages is researched at the Town Center and each advancement brings the player new technologies, weapons, and units.

History Unplugged Podcast
Vikings Definitely Came to the New World Before Columbus. Did Celtic Monks, the Chinese, and Phoenicians Do So Also?

History Unplugged Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 65:47 Very Popular


Many brave sailors arrived in North and South America long before Columbus, suggesting that trans-oceanic voyages could be accomplished centuries before his voyage. Some think that the Atlantic was crossed as far back as the Bronze Age. While written records of such voyages are often poorly sourced, archeology keeps rewriting the story about Old World visitors to the New World.

Mythlok - The Home of Mythology
Arinnitti : The Sun Goddess

Mythlok - The Home of Mythology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 5:05


The sun goddess Arinnitti was the patron deity of the monarchy and the Hittite empire. Her consort, Tahrun, was also important but not as much, suggests that she may have originated during a matriarchal period. Her origin might have been linked to the fertility and earth goddess Anatolia. Arinnitti was a righteous woman with royal authority and functioned as a powerful protector whom the queen of the Hittites, Puduhepa, chose for her protection. Her seal showed that the queen embraced the goddess.In the city of Tarunpa, various solar disc statues were made and displayed. Each year, King Ulmi-Tsseup of Tarununta donated a Sun disc containing silver, gold, and copper to the goddess along with three sheep and a bull as gifts. Arinnitti was often depicted as a woman, and some of the statues depicted her with a halo and as a solar disc.Queen Puduhepa said she would give her many deer in exchange for the protection of the sun goddess. It is believed that the vessels used for the worship of the sun goddess were made from the remains of a deer. The golden deer statues that were found in the Kzlrmak River during the Bronze Age were also associated with the Sun goddess' cult.Read more at https://mythlok.com/arinnitti/

Comic Book Syndicate
Flea Market Fantasy #159 | Skull The Slayer #1

Comic Book Syndicate

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 41:40


A strange comic from a lost time called 1975, by Marv Wolfman and Steve Gan. Mike-DELL and Mike-EL review another Bronze Age gem. www.ComicBookSyndicate.com

Dear Watchers: a comic book omniverse podcast
What if the Fantastic Four had made it to the moon (and other retold origins, including Full Circle by Alex Ross)?

Dear Watchers: a comic book omniverse podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 53:28 Transcription Available


Ep. 61 What if the Fantastic Four had made it to the moon (and other retold origins)?Wha-Huh #1Earth 200513 (Marvel)Reading list: Fantastic Four #126 (1972 Marvel Comics) Wha-Huh #1 (2005 Marvel Comics) Fantastic Four: Full Circle by Alex Ross (2022 Marvel Comics & Abrams Books) Learn more about Dear Watchers:Visit DearWatchers.comTwitter @DearWatchersEmail Podcast@DearWatchers.comTheme music is Space Heroes by MaxKoMusic (Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0) ★ Support this podcast ★

Magazines and Monsters
The Bronze Age of Horror! Episode 9, Swamp Thing (vol 1) 11 and 12, 1974 with Paul Hix!

Magazines and Monsters

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 77:43


Hey there all you monsters out there! It's time for another episode featuring a new series! Paul Hix (the Waiting for Doom podcast) and I will be indexing Swamp Thing volume 1, starting with issues 11 and 12. Why you ask? Well, listen in to find out! We talk about these two cool issues from Len Wein and Nestor Redondo, plus our plans for some future episodes as well. Swamp Thing versus dinosaurs, confederate soldiers, mutated worm creatures, and yes, even a crocodile monster (sorry, Paul!). As always you can send any feedback to the show through email at MagazinesandMonsters@gmail.com or to me on Twitter @Billyd_licious and you can find Paul @Reading_Hix (and on his website WaitingforDoom.com where you can find all of his podcasting efforts)! Thanks for listening! (audio clips are property of their respective holders) --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/magsnmonsters/message

BBC Inside Science
Shaun The Sheep Jumps Over The Moon, Bronze Age Kissing and PPE Rubbish

BBC Inside Science

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 31:28 Very Popular


ESA announce that Shaun The Sheep will fly around the moon this month aboard Artemis-1 mission. Philippe Deloo tells Gaia Vince what's in store for the woolly astronaut this month. Philippe is the team lead on the European Service Module, the part of NASA's Orion spacecraft which will be the workhorse of the new moon missions, ferrying four astronauts at a time to the moon and perhaps even beyond one day. This first Artemis mission, slated for launch 29th August, will check all the engineering bravado of the new launch and orbital systems ready for subsequent human passengers in a couple of years. Christiana Scheib, of the Universities of Cambridge and Tartu, is part of a team who seem to have pinpointed in time the moment the Herpes virus that causes cold sores first spread across human populations. By obtaining genomes of HSV1 from four individuals who died between the iron age and medieval times, their analysis suggests an initial emergence sometime in the Bronze age. The intriguing hypothesis that accompanies the discovery is that the variant's emergence was facilitated by a new trend among bronze age folk of romantic kissing. But as she describes, it's hard to be certain for "there is no gene for kissing". One way of restricting the spread of many viruses is of course various forms of PPE. The last few years have seen billions more items of PPE used on our planet, often without a clear plan for their disposal, and they get accidentally dropped and even deliberately dumped all over the world. Alex Bond of the Natural History Museum at Tring observes and catalogues rubbish affecting wildlife. He took the BBC's Victoria Gill on a walk down a canal in Salford to discuss the issues with the tissues. Presented by Gaia Vince Produced by Alex Mansfield

Comics In Motion Podcast
Earth-Two in the Bronze Age- Episode 1: The Origin of Earth-Two from The Flash #123.

Comics In Motion Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 30:11


We begin with the first appearance of the Earth-Two concept from The Flash #123 in the landmark, “The Flash of Two Worlds.” Barry Allen travels to a parallel Earth to meet his boyhood hero, Jay Garrick (also The Flash) whom Barry thought was only a character in comic books. You can follow the show @ComicsLloyd on Twitter or send an email to ClassicComicsMBL@gmail.com. You can find me on Twitter @MattB_Lloyd and at www.dccomicsnews.com where I write reviews and edit news stories. You can also check out my chapter in “Politics in Gotham: The Batman Universe and Political Thought.” https://www.amazon.com/Politics-Gotham-Universe-Political-Thought/dp/3030057755 And: “Black Panther and Philosophy: What Can Wakanda Offer the World?” https://www.amazon.com/Black-Panther-Philosophy-Blackwell-Culture/dp/1119635845/ref=sr_1_1?crid=2F69N3WJBZMF3&keywords=what+can+wakanda&qid=1642053514&sprefix=what+can+wakanda%2Caps%2C256&sr=8-1 “The Flash of Two Worlds” Links The Flash #123 at DC Fandom Wiki https://dc.fandom.com/wiki/The_Flash_Vol_1_123 Retro-Review of The Flash #123 from DC Comics News https://dccomicsnews.com/2014/09/24/reto-review-flash-123-flash-two-worlds/ The Flash #123 Facsimile Edition Review from DC Comics News https://dccomicsnews.com/2020/02/26/review-the-flash-123-facsimile-edition/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/comics-in-motion-podcast/message

New Books in Ancient History
Greg Woolf, "The Life and Death of Ancient Cities: A Natural History" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books in Ancient History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 50:53


The human race is on a 10,000 year urban adventure. Our ancestors wandered the planet or lived scattered in villages, yet by the end of this century almost all of us will live in cities. But that journey has not been a smooth one and urban civilizations have risen and fallen many times in history. The ruins of many of them still enchant us. The Life and Death of Ancient Cities: A Natural History (Oxford University Press, 2020) by Dr. Greg Woolf tells the story of the rise and fall of ancient cities from the end of the Bronze Age to the beginning of the Middle Ages. It is a tale of war and politics, pestilence and famine, triumph and tragedy, by turns both fabulous and squalid. Its focus is on the ancient Mediterranean: Greeks and Romans at the centre, but Phoenicians and Etruscans, Persians, Gauls, and Egyptians all play a part. The story begins with the Greek discovery of much more ancient urban civilizations in Egypt and the Near East, and charts the gradual spread of urbanism to the Atlantic and then the North Sea in the centuries that followed. The ancient Mediterranean, where our story begins, was a harsh environment for urbanism. So how were cities first created, and then sustained for so long, in these apparently unpromising surroundings? How did they feed themselves, where did they find water and building materials, and what did they do with their waste and their dead? Why, in the end, did their rulers give up on them? And what it was like to inhabit urban worlds so unlike our own - cities plunged into darkness every night, cities dominated by the temples of the gods, cities of farmers, cities of slaves, cities of soldiers. Ultimately, the chief characters in the story are the cities themselves. Athens and Sparta, Persepolis and Carthage, Rome and Alexandria: cities that formed great families. Their story encompasses the history of the generations of people who built and inhabited them, whose short lives left behind monuments that have inspired city builders ever since - and whose ruins stand as stark reminders to the 21st century of the perils as well as the potential rewards of an urban existence. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books Network
Greg Woolf, "The Life and Death of Ancient Cities: A Natural History" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 50:53


The human race is on a 10,000 year urban adventure. Our ancestors wandered the planet or lived scattered in villages, yet by the end of this century almost all of us will live in cities. But that journey has not been a smooth one and urban civilizations have risen and fallen many times in history. The ruins of many of them still enchant us. The Life and Death of Ancient Cities: A Natural History (Oxford University Press, 2020) by Dr. Greg Woolf tells the story of the rise and fall of ancient cities from the end of the Bronze Age to the beginning of the Middle Ages. It is a tale of war and politics, pestilence and famine, triumph and tragedy, by turns both fabulous and squalid. Its focus is on the ancient Mediterranean: Greeks and Romans at the centre, but Phoenicians and Etruscans, Persians, Gauls, and Egyptians all play a part. The story begins with the Greek discovery of much more ancient urban civilizations in Egypt and the Near East, and charts the gradual spread of urbanism to the Atlantic and then the North Sea in the centuries that followed. The ancient Mediterranean, where our story begins, was a harsh environment for urbanism. So how were cities first created, and then sustained for so long, in these apparently unpromising surroundings? How did they feed themselves, where did they find water and building materials, and what did they do with their waste and their dead? Why, in the end, did their rulers give up on them? And what it was like to inhabit urban worlds so unlike our own - cities plunged into darkness every night, cities dominated by the temples of the gods, cities of farmers, cities of slaves, cities of soldiers. Ultimately, the chief characters in the story are the cities themselves. Athens and Sparta, Persepolis and Carthage, Rome and Alexandria: cities that formed great families. Their story encompasses the history of the generations of people who built and inhabited them, whose short lives left behind monuments that have inspired city builders ever since - and whose ruins stand as stark reminders to the 21st century of the perils as well as the potential rewards of an urban existence. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
Greg Woolf, "The Life and Death of Ancient Cities: A Natural History" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 50:53


The human race is on a 10,000 year urban adventure. Our ancestors wandered the planet or lived scattered in villages, yet by the end of this century almost all of us will live in cities. But that journey has not been a smooth one and urban civilizations have risen and fallen many times in history. The ruins of many of them still enchant us. The Life and Death of Ancient Cities: A Natural History (Oxford University Press, 2020) by Dr. Greg Woolf tells the story of the rise and fall of ancient cities from the end of the Bronze Age to the beginning of the Middle Ages. It is a tale of war and politics, pestilence and famine, triumph and tragedy, by turns both fabulous and squalid. Its focus is on the ancient Mediterranean: Greeks and Romans at the centre, but Phoenicians and Etruscans, Persians, Gauls, and Egyptians all play a part. The story begins with the Greek discovery of much more ancient urban civilizations in Egypt and the Near East, and charts the gradual spread of urbanism to the Atlantic and then the North Sea in the centuries that followed. The ancient Mediterranean, where our story begins, was a harsh environment for urbanism. So how were cities first created, and then sustained for so long, in these apparently unpromising surroundings? How did they feed themselves, where did they find water and building materials, and what did they do with their waste and their dead? Why, in the end, did their rulers give up on them? And what it was like to inhabit urban worlds so unlike our own - cities plunged into darkness every night, cities dominated by the temples of the gods, cities of farmers, cities of slaves, cities of soldiers. Ultimately, the chief characters in the story are the cities themselves. Athens and Sparta, Persepolis and Carthage, Rome and Alexandria: cities that formed great families. Their story encompasses the history of the generations of people who built and inhabited them, whose short lives left behind monuments that have inspired city builders ever since - and whose ruins stand as stark reminders to the 21st century of the perils as well as the potential rewards of an urban existence. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

New Books in Military History
Greg Woolf, "The Life and Death of Ancient Cities: A Natural History" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books in Military History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 50:53


The human race is on a 10,000 year urban adventure. Our ancestors wandered the planet or lived scattered in villages, yet by the end of this century almost all of us will live in cities. But that journey has not been a smooth one and urban civilizations have risen and fallen many times in history. The ruins of many of them still enchant us. The Life and Death of Ancient Cities: A Natural History (Oxford University Press, 2020) by Dr. Greg Woolf tells the story of the rise and fall of ancient cities from the end of the Bronze Age to the beginning of the Middle Ages. It is a tale of war and politics, pestilence and famine, triumph and tragedy, by turns both fabulous and squalid. Its focus is on the ancient Mediterranean: Greeks and Romans at the centre, but Phoenicians and Etruscans, Persians, Gauls, and Egyptians all play a part. The story begins with the Greek discovery of much more ancient urban civilizations in Egypt and the Near East, and charts the gradual spread of urbanism to the Atlantic and then the North Sea in the centuries that followed. The ancient Mediterranean, where our story begins, was a harsh environment for urbanism. So how were cities first created, and then sustained for so long, in these apparently unpromising surroundings? How did they feed themselves, where did they find water and building materials, and what did they do with their waste and their dead? Why, in the end, did their rulers give up on them? And what it was like to inhabit urban worlds so unlike our own - cities plunged into darkness every night, cities dominated by the temples of the gods, cities of farmers, cities of slaves, cities of soldiers. Ultimately, the chief characters in the story are the cities themselves. Athens and Sparta, Persepolis and Carthage, Rome and Alexandria: cities that formed great families. Their story encompasses the history of the generations of people who built and inhabited them, whose short lives left behind monuments that have inspired city builders ever since - and whose ruins stand as stark reminders to the 21st century of the perils as well as the potential rewards of an urban existence. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/military-history

New Books in History
Greg Woolf, "The Life and Death of Ancient Cities: A Natural History" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 50:53


The human race is on a 10,000 year urban adventure. Our ancestors wandered the planet or lived scattered in villages, yet by the end of this century almost all of us will live in cities. But that journey has not been a smooth one and urban civilizations have risen and fallen many times in history. The ruins of many of them still enchant us. The Life and Death of Ancient Cities: A Natural History (Oxford University Press, 2020) by Dr. Greg Woolf tells the story of the rise and fall of ancient cities from the end of the Bronze Age to the beginning of the Middle Ages. It is a tale of war and politics, pestilence and famine, triumph and tragedy, by turns both fabulous and squalid. Its focus is on the ancient Mediterranean: Greeks and Romans at the centre, but Phoenicians and Etruscans, Persians, Gauls, and Egyptians all play a part. The story begins with the Greek discovery of much more ancient urban civilizations in Egypt and the Near East, and charts the gradual spread of urbanism to the Atlantic and then the North Sea in the centuries that followed. The ancient Mediterranean, where our story begins, was a harsh environment for urbanism. So how were cities first created, and then sustained for so long, in these apparently unpromising surroundings? How did they feed themselves, where did they find water and building materials, and what did they do with their waste and their dead? Why, in the end, did their rulers give up on them? And what it was like to inhabit urban worlds so unlike our own - cities plunged into darkness every night, cities dominated by the temples of the gods, cities of farmers, cities of slaves, cities of soldiers. Ultimately, the chief characters in the story are the cities themselves. Athens and Sparta, Persepolis and Carthage, Rome and Alexandria: cities that formed great families. Their story encompasses the history of the generations of people who built and inhabited them, whose short lives left behind monuments that have inspired city builders ever since - and whose ruins stand as stark reminders to the 21st century of the perils as well as the potential rewards of an urban existence. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Italian Studies
Greg Woolf, "The Life and Death of Ancient Cities: A Natural History" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books in Italian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 50:53


The human race is on a 10,000 year urban adventure. Our ancestors wandered the planet or lived scattered in villages, yet by the end of this century almost all of us will live in cities. But that journey has not been a smooth one and urban civilizations have risen and fallen many times in history. The ruins of many of them still enchant us. The Life and Death of Ancient Cities: A Natural History (Oxford University Press, 2020) by Dr. Greg Woolf tells the story of the rise and fall of ancient cities from the end of the Bronze Age to the beginning of the Middle Ages. It is a tale of war and politics, pestilence and famine, triumph and tragedy, by turns both fabulous and squalid. Its focus is on the ancient Mediterranean: Greeks and Romans at the centre, but Phoenicians and Etruscans, Persians, Gauls, and Egyptians all play a part. The story begins with the Greek discovery of much more ancient urban civilizations in Egypt and the Near East, and charts the gradual spread of urbanism to the Atlantic and then the North Sea in the centuries that followed. The ancient Mediterranean, where our story begins, was a harsh environment for urbanism. So how were cities first created, and then sustained for so long, in these apparently unpromising surroundings? How did they feed themselves, where did they find water and building materials, and what did they do with their waste and their dead? Why, in the end, did their rulers give up on them? And what it was like to inhabit urban worlds so unlike our own - cities plunged into darkness every night, cities dominated by the temples of the gods, cities of farmers, cities of slaves, cities of soldiers. Ultimately, the chief characters in the story are the cities themselves. Athens and Sparta, Persepolis and Carthage, Rome and Alexandria: cities that formed great families. Their story encompasses the history of the generations of people who built and inhabited them, whose short lives left behind monuments that have inspired city builders ever since - and whose ruins stand as stark reminders to the 21st century of the perils as well as the potential rewards of an urban existence. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/italian-studies

Dear Watchers: a comic book omniverse podcast
INTERVIEW: Conversation with Tim Hanley (comic book scholar, author of Not All Supermen: Sexism, Toxic Masculinity, and the Complex History of Superheroes, & much more)

Dear Watchers: a comic book omniverse podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 67:41


Ep. 60 Interview: Conversation with Tim HanleyOn this special episode of Dear Watchers, we have a COMIC SCHOLAR & AUTHOR INTERVIEW! Join in on our conversation with Tim Hanley, author of books on Wonder Woman, Catwoman, Betty & Veronica, and Lois Lane, as well as "Not All Supermen: Sexism, Toxic Masculinity, and the Complex History of Superheroes" to discuss the multiverse as opportunity for better stories, wanting the best for characters, diversity in storytelling, Marvel vs DC, how reboots treat women, using historic data to understand comics, gender, and sexism, and much, much more!Follow Tim Hanley on TwitterVisit Tim Hanley's websiteOrder "Not All Supermen" wherever you buy books or from the publisherLearn more about Dear Watchers:Visit DearWatchers.comTwitter @DearWatchersEmail Podcast@DearWatchers.comTheme music is Space Heroes by MaxKoMusic (Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0) ★ Support this podcast ★

Tides of History
The Interconnected World of the Late Bronze Age

Tides of History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 41:29 Very Popular


We know the late Bronze Age world eventually collapsed, but what made it a world in the first place? The answer lies in the intense connections - trade, politics, and culture - that tied together a vast area of the ancient world, from Mycenaean Greece to Elamite Iran and the Caucasus Mountains to the Upper Nile in Nubia.Patrick's book is now available! Get The Verge: Reformation, Renaissance, and Forty Years that Shook the World in hardcopy, ebook, or audiobook (read by Patrick) here: https://bit.ly/PWverge Listen to new episodes 1 week early, to exclusive seasons 1 and 2, and to all episodes ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/tidesofhistory.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Titan Up The Defense
Episode 367: Titan Up the Defense 293- Iceman (1984) 1-4

Titan Up The Defense

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 116:30


For Love! Cory is off dimension hopping again, so the brilliant Sara Century joins Hub to help him try to make sense of the 1984 Iceman miniseries. They talk about: psychedelic rugs, unsettling animation, terrible parents, queer subtext in Bronze Age comics, and what makes Bobby Drake such an interesting character. Enjoy! Enjoy! Find more of Sara's work at bitchesoncomics.com or queer spec.com If you enjoy the show and would like access to bonus materials, please consider donating at patreon.com/ttwasteland You can get into touch with us at ttwasteland@gmail.com or Titan Up the Defense PO Box 20311 Portland, OR 97294

Dear Watchers: a comic book omniverse podcast
What if She-Hulk from Earth-721 took a holiday in the Marvel universe (Earth-616) and had sex with Juggernaut?

Dear Watchers: a comic book omniverse podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 52:00 Transcription Available


Ep. 59 What if She-Hulk from Earth-721 took a holiday in the Marvel universe (Earth-616) and had sex with Juggernaut?She-Hulk Vol 2. #21Earths 616 & 721 (Marvel)Reading list: Sensational She-Hulk #1 (1989 Marvel Comics) Uncanny X-Men #435-436 (2004 Marvel Comics) She-Hulk #21 (2007 Marvel Comics) Learn more about Dear Watchers:Visit DearWatchers.comTwitter @DearWatchersEmail Podcast@DearWatchers.comTheme music is Space Heroes by MaxKoMusic (Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0) ★ Support this podcast ★

Magazines and Monsters
The Bronze Age of Horror Comics Episode 6, House of Secrets 150, 1978 "A god by Any Other Name"

Magazines and Monsters

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 58:22


Welcome back to the crypt, as a guest and I peel open the pages of another creepy comic book from the Bronze Age! In this episode, Jeremiah Jones-Goldstein and I enter the House of Secrets, and tackle this anniversary issue (150). Typically, this was an anthology title, but this particular issue has one story in it, and it delivers the goods! How can you go wrong with a cover by Jim Starlin?!?! There's a guest star in this story as well, so hold on to your seat, as we present a thriller from DC comics! If you want to contact the show you can do so through email at MagazinesandMonsters@gmail.com or by reaching out to me on Twitter @Billyd_licious and you can find JJG on Twitter @bigox737 or on his blog at comicscomicscomics.blog (and he's a part of Super-blog Team-up as well)! Thanks for listening, and be right back here in two weeks and I'll have another ghoulish guest and another great comic! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/magsnmonsters/message

Matt Brown Show
MBS445 - Stories Dice and Rocks That Think With Byron Reese

Matt Brown Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 50:32


What makes the human mind so unique? And how did we get this way?This fascinating podcast explores the three leaps in our history that made us what we are—and will change how you think about our future.Look around. Clearly, we humans are radically different from the other creatures on this planet. But why? Where are the Bronze Age beavers? The Iron Age iguanas? In Stories, Dice, and Rocks That Think, Byron Reese argues that we owe our special status to our ability to imagine the future and recall the past, escaping the perpetual present that all other living creatures are trapped in. 

Marvel by the Month
#167: The KREE-SKRULL WAR with BRIAN MICHAEL BENDIS!

Marvel by the Month

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 94:02


For an extra 45 minutes of this episode, including Bendis's behind-the-scenes commentary on how Marvel approaches producing comics events, how Secret Invasion came about, Roy Thomas's underrated contributions to the concept of a "shared universe," the fundamentals of good collaboration, the pros and cons of the Marvel Method, and NEAL FREAKIN' ADAMS' pitch for a Secret Invasion follow-up, in his OWN WORDS, subscribe at patreon.com/marvelbythemonth for just $4/month and get access to our bonus feed of more than 50 extended and exclusive bonus episodes, with more being added every week!As for our guest: we're pretty sure that the Venn diagram of "listeners of this podcast" is completely encircled by "people who know who Brian Michael Bendis is," but here's the TL;DR just in case — he's the second-most important writer in Marvel Comics history after Stan Lee.Here's the slightly longer version: Brian Michael Bendis is a five-time Eisner Award-winning comics creator who spent 18 years writing virtually every character in the Marvel Universe, with critically and commercially successful runs on Jessica Jones: Alias, Daredevil, Avengers (Dark, Mighty, New, and original flavor), Moon Knight, X-Men (Uncanny and All-New), Guardians of the Galaxy, Iron Man (Invincible, International, and Infamous), and Defenders. He was one of the chief architects of Marvel's Ultimate Universe, writing story arcs for Ultimate Marvel Team-Up, Ultimate X-Men, Ultimate Fantastic Four, Ultimate Power, Ultimate Origins, and every single issue of Ultimate Spider-Man. His 111-consecutive-issue run on Ultimate Spider-Man with Mark Bagley holds the record for longest continuous writer/artist partnership in Marvel Comics history.Bendis was also the driving creative force behind Marvel's biggest events of the 21st century, including House of M, Civil War, Secret Invasion, Dark Reign, Siege, Avengers vs. X-Men, Age of Ultron, X-Men: Battle of the Atom, and Civil War II. With his artistic collaborators, he's responsible for co-creating some of Marvel's most significant new characters of the last two decades, including Miles Morales, Jessica Jones, Maria Hill, Ronin, Riri "Ironheart" Williams, and Daisy "Quake" Johnson.That doesn't even include his creator-owned work, currently being published by Dark Horse Comics, which includes Joy Operations, Pearl, United States vs. Murder, Inc., Scarlet, Cover, Powers, and the Jinxworld line of crime comics (Goldfish, Fire, Jinx, and Torso).He's also writing some "detective comics" about a league of justice or superhero legion or something, but we weren't able to find any information about that. Sorry! ¯_(ツ)_/¯  Issues Covered in this Episode: "This Beachhead Earth" - Avengers #93, written by Roy Thomas, art by Neal Adams and Tom Palmer, ©1971 Marvel Comics"More Than Inhuman!" / "1971: A Space Odyssey" / "Behold the Mandroids!" - Avengers #94, written by Roy Thomas, art by Neal Adams, John Buscema, and Tom Palmer, ©1971 Marvel Comics"Something Inhuman This Way Comes..!" - Avengers #95, written by Roy Thomas, art by Neal Adams and Tom Palmer, ©1971 Marvel Comics"The Andromeda Swarm!" - Avengers #96, written by Roy Thomas, art by Neal Adams, Tom Palmer, and Adam Weiss, ©1971 Marvel Comics"Godhood's End!" - Avengers #97, written by Roy Thomas and Neal Adams, art by John Buscema and Tom Palmer, ©1971 Marvel Comics "Marvel by the Month" theme v. 3.0 by Robb Milne, sung by Barb Allen. All incidental music by Robb Milne.Visit us on internet at marvelbythemonth.com, follow us on Instagram at @marvelbythemonth and Twitter at @MarvelBTM, and support us on Patreon at patreon.com/marvelbythemonth.