Podcasts about Bellingham

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  • 555PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about Bellingham

Show all podcasts related to bellingham

Latest podcast episodes about Bellingham

Earthkeepers: A Circlewood Podcast on Creation Care and Spirituality
Katharine Hayhoe on Her Book, "Saving Us: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Healing in a Divided World"

Earthkeepers: A Circlewood Podcast on Creation Care and Spirituality

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 34:41


In this episode we talk with Dr. Katharine Hayhoe, author of the new book Saving Us: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Healing in a Divided World. Katharine offers encouraging, practical advice about how to engage in conversations about earthcare and climate change with the people in our lives, finding common ground and avoiding politicized terms that can derail conversations. This interview was conducted before a live online audience, and was cosponsored by Village Books and the North Cascades Institute. Guest: Dr. Katharine Hayhoe - climate scientist Dr. Hayhoe's book: Saving Us - A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Healing in a Divided World Dr. Hayhoe's website: KatharineHayhoe.com Dr. Hayhoe's Tiktok account  Mentions: 2/3 of major cities within a few feet of sea level - UN Fact sheet (see page 6) 86% of people not talking about climate change - Yale Climate Opinions Map (scroll to bottom) Washington State Ferry Electrification Plan Washington state governor Jay Inslee Carbon emissions from ferry systemAP article on the effect of warming stream temperatures on salmon Yale Program on Climate Change Communication Yale study on dismissive, alarmed, concerned, cautious, disengaged and doubtful populations Science Moms website Survey on young people's anxiety about climate change Greta Thunberg - School Strike for Climate Infrastructure bill in US Congress - current status (10/19/2021); Congress.gov's status tracker for H.R. 3684 The Nature Conservancy The Nature Conservancy's link to tell your congresspeople to support the Infrastructure bill Original interview sponsored by: Village Books in Bellingham, WA and The North Cascades Institute Keywords: electric ferry, carbon emissions, orca, salmon, Cascade Mountains, Olympic Mountains, climate deniers, climate change, global warming, ecodespair, community development, environmental jus

Anesthesia Success
E119b: Follow-Up With Bellingham Anesthesia Assoc. Re: Noncompetes In Anesthesia w. Dr. Scott Vanderleest

Anesthesia Success

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 29:59


I recently released an episode talking about labor markets in anesthesia and the regional sensitivity around this issue, reviewing a specific case study recorded not far from Washington. Today I have the pleasure of talking to Scott Vanderleest, President at Bellingham Anesthesia Association. In this episode, Scott will be giving us some context regarding this circumstance and how his practice had to navigate it recently as it relates to employment agreements for their physicians. He also provides some helpful information to allow us to understand the way forward for private groups of his profile. Learn more: https://apmsuccess.com/119b      Watch the video: https://apmsuccess.com/119bv    

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast
Creating Lifetime Customers - Brittany Schindler [RR 684]

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 26:31


Brittany Schindler, GM of her father's shop in Rod's Japanese Auto Care in Bellingham, WA for over 10 years. She loves working at the shop and being able to help people every day. Brittany has learned so much over the years by going to classes with great trainers and having a great business coach. One of her main focuses is to raise the standard of the automotive service and repair industry. Listen to Brittany's previous episodes https://remarkableresults.biz/?s=%22brittany+schindler%22 (HERE) Key Talking Points No prices over the phone- This can be challenging at first. Giving prices can be wrong or misleading depending on the vehicle. Instead explain why prices can vary, ask them to come in first, explain warranty, DVI's, rental cars, etc. Vet the customer- are they looking for the cheapest price? Not every customer is right for your business. Performing the best digital inspections so your customers don't have to google anything and be consistent. Continue to simplify the writing so someone who doesn't know anything about cars can understand and learn about their vehicle. Add “what happens if you don't do XYZ” Write and edit inspections/customer reviews with your whole team for team buy-in. Getting customers to fix their "old" cars- list pros and cons of getting new/used cars. Make the investment and let them know the vehicle will be maintained properly, the laundry list won't grow and be behind. Selling Maintenance- oil changes, fluid changes etc. It is an easy win once everyone has to buy in for selling maintenance. Educate customers on why fluid changes are important. Cheaper to change fluid than change apart Making customers feel confident about repairs- texting DVI, lifetime warranty, “what to expect” card at dropoffs Connect with the show: http://youtube.com/carmcapriotto (Subscribe on YouTube) https://remarkableresults.biz/episodes (Visit us on the Web) https://www.facebook.com/RemarkableResultsPodcast (Follow on Facebook) https://remarkableresults.biz/insider/ (Become an Insider) https://www.buymeacoffee.com/carm (Buy me a coffee) https://remarkableresults.biz/books/ (Important Books) https://aftermarketradionetwork.com/ (Aftermarket Radio Network) Check out today's partners: This episode is brought to you by AAPEX, the Automotive Aftermarket Products Expo. AAPEX represents the $740 billion global automotive aftermarket industry and has everything you need to stay ahead of the curve.  The Virtual AAPEX Experience 2020 is in the record books. Virtual AAPEX lived up to presenting leading-technical and business management training from some of the industry's best and brightest. Now set your sights on the homecoming in Las Vegas in 2021. Mark your calendar now … November 2-4, 2021, AAPEX // Now more than ever. This episode is brought to you by Shop-Ware Shop Management. It's time to run your business at its fullest potential with the industry's leading technology. Shop-Ware Shop Management will increase your efficiency with lightning-fast workflows, help your staff capture more sales every day, and create very happy customers who promote your business. Shops running Shop-Ware have More Time and generate More Profit—join them! Schedule a free live demonstration and find out how 30 minutes can transform your shop at https://getshopware.com/carm (getshopware.com/carm)

Perfectly Acceptable Podcast by Comics Place
Episode 243: A Very Special Short Edition

Perfectly Acceptable Podcast by Comics Place

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 61:22


Le premiére podcast has returned for a brief but beautiful evening under the cold Bellingham windscape. Join us, mon freres, for some vino y queso, ciao?0:03:30 - Will Well Wellmiére!0:11:00 - Massive Comic News!0:12:50 - Arkham City: Order of the World #10:19:26 - A Righteous Thirst for Vengeance #10:24:08 - Amazing Spider-Man #750:30:03 - Chicken Devil #10:33:00 - Voicemail from NaBu!0:36:43 - Voicemail from Andrew!0:39:27 - Soul Plumber #10:46:20 - MORE NEWS?!0:52:45 - So you're still listening, huh?SPOILERS! Tread carefully dear listener, because we're going to talk about what happened in these books. So maybe pause this, read your books, and come back. We'll still be here!Subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you like to get your podcasts.Email in questions at jeff@thecomicsplace.com ! We love hearing from you and there's a good chance we will read it on air!You can also join the Comics Place Discord here: https://discord.gg/rW8EBftHx8

KUOW Newsroom
Bellingham youth shelter gets a new home

KUOW Newsroom

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 1:11


Whatcom Dads Podcast
Ep. 45 - Trick-or-Treating Info from Downtown Bellingham Partnership, Costume Ideas, Halloween Candy Bracket

Whatcom Dads Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 35:20


Link to Our Sponsor: Robinson & Kole Attorneys   Resources & Links Downtown Bellingham Partnership Halloween Safety - SafeKids.org Tips for Trick-or-Treaters - Mayo Clinic Boo at Depot Market Square Bellingham Bells Drive Up Trick-or-Treat Ferndale Mystery in the Park Whatcom Frightmare   Email the Show:  whatcomdadspodcast@gmail.com

DIY MFA Radio
378: The Inside Scoop on Book Reviews - Interview with Kiffer Brown

DIY MFA Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 60:20


Today, I have the pleasure of interviewing Kiffer Brown. Kathryn (Kiffer) Brown is the CEO and co-founder of Chanticleer Reviews and Chanticleer Int'l Book Awards (The CIBAs) that Discover Today's Best Books. The company differentiates itself with "under the hood" digital technology that increases the digital footprint of each book review and CIBA winner developed by her super-geek husband, Argus Brown.  Kiffer has presented at events such as: Writer's Digest Conference in NYC, IBPA University, Women in Publishing Summit, Pacific Northwest Writers Conference, RWA National Conference, Historical Novel Society, BEA UpubU, ALLi, Left Coast Crime Conference, and many more.  The annual Chanticleer Authors Conference held in Bellingham, WA features international best-selling authors such as Cathy Ace, Robert Dugoni, J.D. Barker, Ann Charles (and more!). The event focuses on marketing and book promotion, advanced writing craft, and Book-to-Film sessions.   In this episode Kiffer and I discuss: Why there has never been a better time to be an author than NOW. What makes something a review as opposed to a write-up and the four types of reviews. How advanced reviews help in promoting your book and when you should start getting them.   Plus, her #1 tip for writers. For more info and show notes: diymfa.com/378

I Always Wanted To
Play the Harmonica

I Always Wanted To

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 33:13


My guest, Mark Radel,  describes himself this way: I have always been around music.  I sang in the church choir, school choirs, acted in musicals in high school, was into music but never took up an instrument.  After my wife and I moved to Seattle my commute was 30 minutes and I was bored driving back and forth each day.  I thought about what I could do and saw a book named "harmonica playing for dummies", with it came a cheap C major harp and a cassette.  So each daly as I drove to and from work I practiced playing.  When we moved back to Bellingham, WA, I got serious and started playing with others.  Now I can sheepishly say I am a musician. Artists Mark mentions that he listens to: Kevin Moore, Taj Mahal Eric Clapton, Tracy Chapman, Jerry Portnoy, and Harry Manx. ********************* I want to get to know you better. Please fill out a 5-question survey at lizsumner.com/survey.  Let me know when you're done and I'll send you a coupon code for my online course, 8 Steps to Launch Your Dream Life. (launchyourdreamlife.com) ********************* Opening Remarks Today's guest is a dear friend that I've known half my life. Before we moved away many years ago Mark was a fan of our music, my husband Michael's and mine-- that's that Cohen music I mention later on. Mark would often come see us perform, but he never played.  It is such a pleasure in this interview to hear about his transformation as a harp player and acceptance of himself as a musician. This is what is possible when we try something we've always wanted to do. The story of Mark's journey is exactly what I was thinking about when I started this podcast. One of the things that's most interesting about Mark's process is that he started with improvisation. He didn't learn melodies or how to read music, but instead he plays by ear and instinctively. I think that's unusual and kind of courageous. Plus he is fortunate to have good friends to play with and challenge him. And I miss them all very much. I should mention that during our conversation I use some shorthand and don't explain everything because we know each other so well. Also during the interview Mark is fiddling with his harmonicas and you can hear them rattling a bit. It was a joy to reconnect with my friend and I look forward to joining in on one of the music nights he mentions in the near future. Full transcript available at https://ialwayswantedto.net

Football Daily
Euro Leagues: Bellingham's brilliance and madcap managers

Football Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 43:05


This week's edition of the Euro Leagues tries to answer all the big questions in European football at the moment, like why hasn't Messi scored at PSG and can Luciano Spalletti continue his winning formula at Napoli? Alistair Bruce-Ball is back in the hot seat this week and is joined by Julien Laurens, James Horncastle and Kristof Terreur. They also discuss how big a job Max Allegri has at Juventus and if he can turn things around at the Serie A club - not only that, Archie Rhind-Tutt drops in for a chat from Germany and gives the guys his insight into why Jude Bellingham is doing so well at Dortmund. And if that wasn't enough, they all dish the dirt on who they think are some of the most madcap managers in world football. Topics: 3'20 – Messi's scoring drought at PSG 8'15 – Luciano Spalletti at Napoli after getting five wins from five. 15'00 - Max Allegri and the huge task he has at Juventus. 21:45 – Archie Rhind Tutt on Jude Bellingham and the great form he's been in so far this season for Dortmund. 34'30 – The most madcap managers in world football.

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 2 - One city wants MORE policing

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 38:15


What's Trending: Federal Way Mayor pushes for more policing, Lenny Wilkens gets a crummy street named after him, Kshama Sawant is pushing for rent control, Big Local: Vaccine mandate comes to city workers in Bellingham; Snohomish County is next, and a Federal Way mom is upset with the districts quarantine policies.  WSDOT gets rid of the HOV narc program. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Liverpool FC - KopTalk Podcast
Bellingham, Haaland, Jonas, Adeyemi, De Laurentiis plan

Liverpool FC - KopTalk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 49:51


Free episodes are published throughout the week. Additional, exclusive bonus episodes are also recorded from time to time for those who support the podcast by becoming a Patron. These episodes are intended for our most passionate and loyal supporters. Patrons can also listen to every episode of this podcast completely ad-free. You can support your host by becoming a Patron at http://www.koptalkpodcast.com. More LFC content is also available on YouTube at www.KopTalk.tv.

The Gooner Talk
The Arsenal News Show EP15: Bellingham, Edu, Leno, Ramsdale, Wilshere, & More! #RawReactions

The Gooner Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 31:50


The Arsenal News Show EP15: Bellingham, Edu, Leno, Ramsdale, Wilshere, & More! #RawReactions SUBSCRIBE TO THE ARSENAL WAY: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAbau7DblBT5Kd943sBbEWQ Nkunku article: https://www.football.london/arsenal-fc/transfer-news/how-suarez-ceballos-stopped-arsenal-21585618 Tom – Arsenal Fan Brand Writer/Presenter at Reach & football.london https://www.football.london/authors/tom-canton/ If you would like to vote for us please TWEET the following: I am voting for @TheGoonerTalkTv in @The_FCAs for #BestClubCreator OR - You can use the below link and then edit the text. https://twitter.com/intent/tweet?text=I%20am%20voting%20for%20%40Nominee%20in%20%40The_FCAs%20for%20%23Category OR -If you do NOT have Twitter, go to the below website and in the Best Club Content Creator category simply write “The Gooner Talk” in the Premier League box. https://footballcontentawards.com/voting SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/the-gooner-talk Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1dThyaKjTVTqZALEtDkt4q?si=o_KpQoNURVWHFo9_4lAlTA iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/the-gooner-talk/id1555266302 Please leave us a nice review! Gooners vs Cancer: https://events.lls.org/pages/nca/goonersvscancer2021 Contact: DM open @TomCantonMedia Thanks to our sponsor Football Prizes: https://footballprizes.co.uk/competitions/ Become a member, help support the channel and get access to exclusive content and logos. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChxMBYdQ6ixNQk0b8rAuNRw/join Follow us on: Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheGoonerTalkTv Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thegoonertalk/?hl=en https://fantasy.premierleague.com/leagues/auto-join/j69rvc

Stories of Inspiring Joy
Margo Carroll

Stories of Inspiring Joy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 17:02


Margo Carroll is an email marketing strategist and sales funnel copywriter for online business owners. Through her company, Remedy Writing LLC, she helps trained experts sell their coaching, courses, and services with adaptable evergreen sales funnels that grow alongside their business. She supports entrepreneurs with her high-touch Funnel Build Intensives in Bellingham, WA and her signature group program, the Trailblazer Toolkit™️. In this week's new episode, Margo shares her journey moving from seeking accomplishment, to seeking joy. She shares how she's always been someone who sought the reward for achievement and executing on skills that she had developed. That started from a very young age - she was always at the front of the desk, or the one to finish her test first. She thought that a big part of her value came from her brain, and being rewarded for what she could accomplish. She shares her passion for working for social justice causes, working with international students, and becoming a social worker. She shares the highs and lows, the anxiety she experienced, and the difficulty she had finding joy in her journey. She shares the moment everything changed - and the questions she asked herself in that moment will remind you just how important it is to value, celebrate, and love your life, and every moment that we're given. To learn more about Margo and her work visit her website www.margocarroll.com and you can connect with her on Instagram @margocarroll and you can download your Trailblazer's Roadmap for Online Course Sales here: bit.ly/antiroadmap tories of Inspiring Joy is a production of Seek The Joy Media and created by Sydney Weiss. To learn more and submit your story, click here. *Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this episode are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of Stories of Inspiring Joy.

Tapped In | Bellingham's Craft Beer Podcast
Amtragic: Tales from King Street Station

Tapped In | Bellingham's Craft Beer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 34:37


After a long (ok, very long) absence, Tapped In is back with a rough and tumble episode from Seattle, where I sit down and talk to a couple of beer nerds from work. It's fun, loose, and hopefully begins a new chapter of Tapped In. If you're still here, thanks for hanging in there for over a year. Sheesh. Recorded February 2021 at King Street Station in SeattleEpisode hosted, engineered & produced by Dave MoralesContact: dave@taptrail.comIG: #tappedinbeercastMore information at https://tappedinbellinghamscraftbeerpodcast.simplecast.fm/

Ringer FC
Bellingham's Beer, Points for Palace, and More | Stadio Podcast

Ringer FC

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 62:33


Musa and Ryan begin in Germany this week, with arguably the game of the weekend taking place in the Bundesliga, as Dortmund were victorious over Bayer Leverkusen in a seven-goal thriller (05:17), as well as Bayern's win in Leipzig to continue a tricky start for Jesse Marsch (19:17) and first wins of the season for Gladbach and Hertha (23:00). Next up, it's the Premier League, with a huge win for Crystal Palace ending Spurs' 100 percent record (24:50), Manchester United's win over Newcastle United (35:44), plus a win for Chelsea and some other Premier League results. José Mourinho's Roma side delivered a stoppage-time winner as a present for his 1,000th match in charge (44:24) as they sit atop of Serie A, Real Madrid returned to the Bernabéu (49:27), and Atlético Madrid left the work for late—99 minutes, in fact—to defeat Espanyol, and more! Hosts: Musa Okwonga and Ryan Hunn Producer: Ryan Hunn Additional Production Assistance: Isaiah Blakely Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

ServantCast
Ep 125 Worship - 16th Sunday of Pentecost Virtual Worship, September 12

ServantCast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 42:31


This is the virtual worship service on the sixteenth Sunday of Pentecost, August 29, 2021, at Christ the Servant Lutheran Church in Bellingham, Washington. The Gospel reading is from the book of Mark. Despite the pandemic, the work of the church continues.  Here are a few ways that the church remains thriving at Christ the Servant: We are currently meeting live and in-person on Sunday Morning for worship services in the sanctuary.  Everyone is masking and physically distanced, and the music is provided by a cantor, singing from outside of the sanctuary.  9:30 am.  This service is also live-streamed on the CTS Facebook Page and the video will remain there afterwards as well.We have Facebook educational opportunities from Pastor Eric that happen throughout the week.We have youth events that are ever evolving!We have a Friday Morning breakfast fellowship on Zoom - sometimes live at Boulevard Park, weather allowing...We have a ministry team called Deep Waters, which is dedicated to helping install clean water systems to communities in Honduras.We are part of the Family Promise program, striving to help homeless families regain equilibrium.We have an active Justice Seekers ministry team, dedicated to achieving a more just society and church. Find out more - go to our web page or send us an e-mail.

Trail Runner Nation
EP 537: When Your Doctor Says, "Stop Running"

Trail Runner Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 57:05


Most of us inevitably recruit a team that support our running.  This could be a running partner, coach, crew, pacers, etc.  One key teammate that you might consider is an Athletic Trainer.   Guest co-host, Krissy Moehl, shares her experience with having someone on her team that helps maintain her body through activation, recovery and treatment. Kerry Gustafson is owner of Prime Sports Institute, an athletic training facility providing a team approach to health care in Bellingham, Washington.  Kerry explains that athletic trainers are the "point guard" for your care.  Traditionally these athletic trainers are found on the sidelines of collegiate or professional sports teams.  Now their services are available for the amateur runner! To find an athletic trainer near you, try Go4Ellis.  Check out Prime Sports Institute's online Yoga for runners program or call for a remote consultation. Follow Prime Sports Institute on  Instagram Youtube Support Trail Runner Nation by becoming a Patreon supporter

On the Mic with Mike Peters
Dan Mills and the Grind of Producing

On the Mic with Mike Peters

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 82:43


Dan Mills began his comedy career about three years ago in Bellingham, Wash. A comedian on the clean side with a wife and two kids -- they still love him, too -- Mills has been producing some of the best lineups on Zoom over the last few months. Featuring Matthew Broussard, Jackie Kashian, Laurie Kilmarten, Caitlin Peluffo, Steven Rogers and several other big names, The Grind with Dan Mills has become a must-see show. We talked a lot about producing and hosting comedy shows.Follow Dan MillsInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/thereal.danmills/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thegrindwithdanmillsTwitter: https://twitter.com/danmillscomedySupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/bePatron?u=26369154)

KIRO Nights
Hour 1 : The Queens Finest Art

KIRO Nights

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 35:02


Jack responds to President Joe Biden's remarks on  the Delta variant and COVID-19 vaccinations. // Jack is joined by Nicole Jennings is in to share how a Bellingham woman was convicted in a 'Shunt' attack and  how Washington hospitals see 34% weekly increase in patients needing ventilators amid COVID-19 crisis. // Down syndrome girl who sent painting to Queen Elizabeth is ‘over the moon' after receiving an official reply. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Oddities
Ep. 29 - Miranda - Owner of Bright and Sunny

Oddities

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 59:49


We got a great episode today with local Bellingham business owner Miranda, who is the founder of Bright and Sunny! We go over how she got started and the ups and downs of running and growing her business. You can find her at the Farmers Market here in Bellingham selling her delicious Ginger Beer every Wednesday 4-7 pm and Saturday 10 am - 2 pm IG: brightandsunnygingerbeer  

KUOW Newsroom
Local newspapers are in peril, but Bellingham's local news coverage is set to expand

KUOW Newsroom

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 5:27


‘I really feel like my journalism bones have been awakened by this project. I think it's going to be really gratifying and an adventure one way or the other.'

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 3 - Recruiting WSP

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 39:02


The Monologue: WSP tweets out message about recruitment event in Arizona. The Interview: Nicole Jennings takes us through the trial out of Bellingham for two accused of terrorist attempts. The Monologue: Lake Washington school sends 81 home after two students test positive COVID-19. The Interview: Attorney James Buchal files a brief in support of a CHOP-related lawsuit against the city of Seattle on behalf of the National Police Association LongForm: Ryan Haberman, a WSDOT Supervisor, explains how many employees may actually leave due to the vaccine mandate.  The Quick Hit: Woke Corporate Rhetoric Builds Brands but Ignores Real Problems See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dr. Gameshow
68. Dr. Dirt

Dr. Gameshow

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 72:07


Hosts Jo Firestone & Manolo Moreno play listener-created games with callers via Zoom!Games played: It's A Living submitted by Veda Igbinedion from Washington, DC, Lickipedia submitted by Sandy Saxon from Denton, Texas, and Dr. Typotifiaf with rules by Alice Rehfeldt from Los Angeles, California and Quinn Murphy from Sammamish, WashingtonCallers: Regina from Corvallis, Oregon; Emily & Isaac (Ike) from Boise, Idaho; Bill from Dallas, Texas; Cory from Philadelphia, Pennyslvania; Stephanie from Flint, Michigan; Andrew & Carla from Hallowell, Maine; Annie from San Diego, California; Jake from Chicago, Illinois; Kait from Columbus, Ohio; Joan from Bellingham, Washington; Noah from Springfield, Virginia; Steve from Indianapolis, Indiana;  Andrew from Huntington, New YorkOriginal outro theme by Big HugeThis episode sponsored by: Magic Spoon - Go to magicspoon.com/GAMESHOW and use the code GAMESHOW to save $5 off!BetterHelp - Get 10% off your first month at betterhelp.com/GAMESHOW!

KGMI News/Talk 790 - Podcasts
Cliff Poage: New Charter School

KGMI News/Talk 790 - Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 9:43


KGMI's Joe Teehan talks to Cliff Poage about the new Whatcom Intergenerational High School opening this year in Bellingham.

Blood Red: The Liverpool FC Podcast
Liverpool.com Podcast: A look into Liverpool's midfield ‘future' | Trent, Henderson, Bellingham

Blood Red: The Liverpool FC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 29:38


Mo Stewart is joined by Matt Addison and Charlotte Coates for the latest Liverpool.com podcast to examine the future of the Liverpool midfield. After Gareth Southgate experimented with Trent Alexander-Arnold alongside Jordan Henderson and Jude Bellingham in the centre of the park for England, the panel wonder whether than could that be a future Reds line-up. Henderson's role as Liverpool club captain is analysed, as is the part he can play to help nurture the next generation, following his contract extension through to 2025. But what about the prospect of Trent in midfield? And could the dream of Bellingham leaving Borussia Dortmund for Anfield realistically happen? Enjoy.Get exclusive podcasts direct to your inbox every week for FREE by joining the Blood Red Club. Sign up at http://www.bloodredpodcast.co.ukWatch and subscribe to our Blood Red videos on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/BloodRedLiverpoolFCJoin our Blood Red podcast group on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1656599847979758/

The Game Football Podcast
Is Bellingham The Future of English Football?

The Game Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 59:09


Hugh Woozencroft is joined by Gregor Robertson, Matt Lawton and Henry Winter.England have recorded back-to-back wins in World Cup qualifiers. The last game saw Jesse Lingard and Trent Alexander-Arnold return - but what does the future hold for both? (00:00)The Times' Chief Football Writer, Henry Winter joins us with his thoughts on the England qualifier and whether Gareth Southgate has been grilled enough after the Euro 2020 final loss (16:18)We get the latest from the Wales camp with Gary Jacob, after Gareth Bale proved a few people wrong with a hat trick against Belarus. Scotland also did well, beating Moldova 1-0 (42:30)We unpack the madness after the game between Brazil and Argentina was abandoned after four players allegedly tricked their way into the country by saying they hadn't been the UK in the past fortnight. This lead to Government officials storming the pitch early in the game (50:18)The new WSL season got underway over the weekend and with increased media coverage this season, The Times' Molly Hudson joins us to discuss how this could be a pivotal year for the women's game in the UK (53:00)Get more of The Times and The Sunday Times for less than £1 a day. Start your free trial: thetimes.co.uk/thegame See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Totally Football Show with James Richardson

Jimbo welcomes Daniel Storey, Flo Lloyd-Hughes and Colin Millar into the pod on a weekend where crazy things are happening all around the world. While other nations are slipping up, England have become a machine in qualifying. Will a trip to Poland provide problems? And is Bellingham the future of the midfield? Elsewhere, it's a big week for Northern Ireland who have some scores to settle with the Swiss. Brazil v Argentina is stopped as authorities try to deport four Premier League players. And do we really want a World Cup every two years. The WSL is back with a new season and a new TV deal. The panel plead for patience in the development of the women's game on a weekend where champions Chelsea suffer a shock defeat. Plus the bloody Butcher and the renegade Rene Higuita.  RUNNING ORDER:    • PART 1: Two 4-0 wins for England (03m 30s) • PART 2: The wide world of World Cup qualifying (15m 00s) • PART 3: Brazil v Argentina admin chaos and a World Cup every two years? (30m 00s) • PART 4: The WSL returns (45m 00s) • PART 5: The odds with Paddy Power (60m 00s) • PART 6: On This Day - Bloody Butcher and Higuita's scorpion (62m 00s) SIGN UP TO THE ATHLETIC TODAY FOR 33% OFF THE PRICE OF AN ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION • theathletic.com/totally   GET IN TOUCH: • follow us on Instagram • find us on Facebook • send us a tweet: @TheTotallyShow   PARISH NOTICES: • we're sponsored by Paddy Power - home of the Money Back Special   READ STUFF ON OUR WEBSITE: • check out thetotallyfootballshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Vanished Podcast
Case Update: Ritchie Collins

The Vanished Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 89:45


58-year-old Ritchie Collins went missing in early 2019. The exact date of his disappearance is unknown. A neighbor reported seeing Ritchie at his home in Bellingham, WA, but that exact date is fuzzy. However, he had not texted or spoken to friends or family members since March of 2019. Ritchie has been described by those who knew him best as a loner, so it would not be uncommon for a few days or even weeks to go by without hearing from him. Ritchie's family had been trying to get ahold of him for weeks. Then on April 30, 2019, Ritchie's car was found parked at the Colonial Creek Campground at North Cascades National Park. The keys to his car had been placed on top of the vehicle. According to a park ranger, the vehicle had been there for weeks. We first brought you Ritchie's story in March of 2020. When we left off at the end of that episode, there were so many questions left unanswered. Over the July 4th weekend of 2021, some children playing at a camp area several miles from where Ritchie's car was found discovered the first clue that would help find Ritchie. Ritchie's daughter graciously joined us to give us an update on what has transpired and where her dad's case stands today.If you have any information regarding the disappearance and death of Ritchie Collins, please contact Detective Ken Gates at 360-778-6613 or contact the Whatcom County Sheriff's Office directly at 360-778-6600.This episode was sponsored by:Upstart- Find out how Upstart can lower your monthly payments today when you go to Upstart.com/Vanished.Noom- Sign up for your trial at noom.com/VANISHED.Nutrafol- Go to Nutrafol.com and use promo code VANISHED to get $15 off your first order and free shipping.Listen ad-free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad-free listening. Available in the Wondery App. https://wondery.app.link/thevanishedIf you have a missing loved one that you would like to have featured on the show, please fill out our case submission form: http://www.thevanishedpodcast.com/case-submission/.Follow The Vanished on social media at:FacebookInstagramTwitterPatreonSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Passive House Podcast
Mackenzie Stickney – [bundle] Design Studio

Passive House Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 47:34


To kick off Season 2 of the Passive House Podcast, Mary James and Ilka Cassidy interview Mackenzie Stickney, Project Manager at [bundle] Design Studio, a leader of sustainable design that works out of a PHIUS-certified Passive House tiny trailer in Bellingham, Washington. She's a Passive House practitioner, woodworker, and dynamic young innovator in climate-wise building design.

ServantCast
Ep 124 Worship - 15th Sunday of Pentecost Virtual Worship, September 5

ServantCast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 35:32


This is the virtual worship service on The Fifteenth Sunday of Pentecost, September 5, 2021, at Christ the Servant Lutheran Church in Bellingham, Washington. The Gospel reading is from the 7th chapter of the book of Mark.CTS is now holding socially-distanced indoor services, Sunday mornings at 9:30. You can bring a mask and join in person, or stream them live on the CTS Facebook page. Between Sundays, you can look for digital educational opportunities from Pastor Eric and Nicole Pridachuk.More information is available on our church website, ctslutheran.org, or from the weekly Thursday email notes. If you have any other questions, you can email us at servantcast@ctslutheran.org.

Oddities
Ep. 28 - QHHT Practitioner Lili McGovern with Lacey Summers

Oddities

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 124:09


In this episode we talk to Lili McGovern who is a Quantum Healing Hypnosis Technique (QHHT) practitioner here in Bellingham, Wa. Lacey and I both had a session with her and in this episode we talk about our experience and how much it's helped us. We both had experiences where we went back into our past lives and learned how those experiences are affecting us today. You can find more info about Lili and schedule an appointment at: IG: lilimcgovern https://www.heartevolutions.com Phone: 360-671-2010

Perfectly Acceptable Podcast by Comics Place
Episode 237: Super-Boys of Bellingham

Perfectly Acceptable Podcast by Comics Place

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 84:09


The crew is at it this week with quite a few Superman books and even more #1s! These boyos always fill our weeks with such joy and laughter, am I right? Just sit back and let Roman's soothing tee-hees settle you into slumber...0:08:50 - King Spawn #10:13:45 - Lester of the Lesser Gods #10:20:34 - Echolands #1SUPERMAN SHOWDOWN0:30:18 - Superman '78 #10:38:15 - Superman: Son of Kal-El #20:46:37 - Superman vs. Lobo #10:53:20 - Cable: Reloaded #10:55:05 - Voicemail!0:58:40 - Spider-Man Life Story Annual #!1:06:23 - Ice Cream Man #25SPOILERS! Tread carefully dear listener, because we're going to talk about what happened in these books. So maybe pause this, read your books, and come back. We'll still be here!Subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you like to get your podcasts.Email in questions at jeff@thecomicsplace.com ! We love hearing from you and there's a good chance we will read it on air!You can also join the Comics Place Discord here: https://discord.gg/rW8EBftHx8

ServantCast
Ep 123 Worship - 14th Sunday of Pentecost Virtual Worship, August 29

ServantCast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 36:02


This is the virtual worship service on the fourteenth Sunday of Pentecost, August 29, 2021, at Christ the Servant Lutheran Church in Bellingham, Washington. The Gospel reading is from the book of Mark.Despite the pandemic, the work of the church continues.  Here are a few ways that the church remains thriving at Christ the Servant:We are currently meeting live and in-person on Sunday Morning for worship services in the sanctuary.  Everyone is masking and physically distanced, and the music is provided by a cantor, singing from outside of the sanctuary.  9:30 am.We have Facebook educational opportunities from Pastor Eric that happen throughout the week.We have youth events that are ever evolving!We have a Friday Morning breakfast fellowship on Zoom - sometimes live at Boulevard Park, weather allowing...We have a ministry team called Deep Waters, which is dedicated to helping install clean water systems to communities in Honduras.We are part of the Family Promise program, striving to help homeless families regain equilibrium.We have an active Justice Seekers ministry team, dedicated to achieving a more just society and church.Find out more - go to our web page or send us an e-mail.

Medic2Medic Podcast
Joe Frank

Medic2Medic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 34:12


Episode 241 is Joe Frank. Joe is a Captain in the Bellingham Fire Department and leader of the Community Paramedic program here in Whatcom County. Joe started his career in 2008 with BFD and was promoted to Captain in 2017. Joe takes us through his path from a small town in Washington State, his introduction into EMS, & fire service, to Alaska, and to his current role. We talk about becoming a Paramedic, Paramedic school, and the beginning, current status, and the future of the Community Paramedic program in Whatcom County.

Oddities
Episode 27 - Serial Killers in Bellingham, Wa.

Oddities

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 48:09


Michelle and I cover 4 serial killers that have visited Bellingham, Wa. You can follow us on IG to see when future episodes come out @:oddities_podcast The Oddities coffee shop and gift store is the official sponsor of the podcast! Serving up organic coffee Tues-Sat 8am - 4pm Located at: 4182 Cordata Parkway, Bellingham, Wa 98226 IG: odditiespnw

KUOW Newsroom
Nation's first hydrogen-powered ferry launches in Bellingham

KUOW Newsroom

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 0:57


A hydrogen-powered ferry, the first of its kind in the United States, has launched in Bellingham.

5 Core Life
133. Gamify Your Legacy, How to Set Goals to Live Your Best Life | Nate Ritter, Tech Entrepreneur and Artist

5 Core Life

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 8:07


133. In Gamify Your Legacy, host Will Moore sits down with Nate Ritter, Tech Entrepreneur and Artist to discuss how to set goals and live your best life. Nate and Will discuss dive deep into what legacy means along with some of the scary predictions from the 1970s that are coming true. What's your core score? Take the FREE Life Evaluator Quiz to see where you currently stand in your five cores: www.mooremomentum.com/free-li... Like and Subscribe! Are you ready to fire on all cylinders? If so, let's go! MORE ABOUT 5 CORE LIFE & WILL MOORE: My #1 mission in life is to help you become the best version of YOURself so you can, in turn, pay it forward to make the world the best version of ITself. WHAT'S YOUR CORE SCORE? Take the FREE Life Evaluator Quiz to see where you currently stand in your five cores: https://www.mooremomentum.com/free-life-evaluation Like and Subscribe! FIND ME ON FACEBOOK, IG or TWITTER: @mooremomentum JOIN MY FACEBOOK GROUP: 5 Core Life: Become an Entrepreneur in the Five Crucial Areas of Your Life ⬇️ https://www.facebook.com/groups/buildamilliondollarbiz/ SIGN UP FOR OUR WEEKLY BLOG AS WELL! www.mooremomentum.com/blog Nate Ritter Bio: Nate has been a SaaS entrepreneur and tech consultant for 20 years for companies like Activision Blizzard, Microsoft, and Land Rover. He has appeared in publications such as Wall Street Journal, Wired Magazine, Fast Company, The Epoch Times, Lifehacker, and Mashable for his work with Chris Messina to create and popularize the hashtag. He's a stickler for high quality, expediency, and proof by metrics and is always interested in optimizing for the largest benefits of the company he works with. From San Diego, CA to Bellingham, WA, to Boston, MA and Paris, France, Nate has thoroughly enjoyed consulting on business strategies, marketing goals, and influencing and optimizing company operations. Website: https://roomsteals.com/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/5corelife/message

KUOW Newsroom
The United States' first hydrogen-powered ferry launches in Bellingham

KUOW Newsroom

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 0:57


ServantCast
Ep 122 Worship - 13th Sunday of Pentecost Virtual Worship, August 22

ServantCast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 37:58


This is the virtual worship service on The Thirteenth Sunday of Pentecost, August 22, 2021, at Christ the Servant Lutheran Church in Bellingham, Washington. The Gospel reading is from the 6th chapter of the book of John.CTS is now holding socially-distanced indoor services, Sunday mornings at 9:30. You can bring a mask and join in person, or stream them live on the CTS Facebook page. Between Sundays, you can look for digital educational opportunities from Pastor Eric and Nicole Pridachuk.More information is available on our church website, ctslutheran.org, or from the weekly Thursday email notes. If you have any other questions, you can email us at servantcast@ctslutheran.org.

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast
Brittany Schindler and Bruce Howes [AW 066]

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021 31:18


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RgJLWoYPx1w Guest host, Brittany Schindler, Rod's Japanese Auto Care, Bellingham, WA. Brittany's previous episodes https://remarkableresults.biz/?s=Brittany+Schindler (HERE) Virtual shop tour with Bruce Howes, Atlantic MotorCar Center, Wiscasset, ME. Bruce's previous episodes https://remarkableresults.biz/?s=Bruce+Howe (HERE) Trivia Challenge: What was the first car fitted with an alternator rather than a direct current dynamo?   Dorman gives people greater freedom to fix vehicles by constantly developing new repair solutions that put owners and technicians first. By always innovating, Dorman has led the way in growing the aftermarket. Here you will see a few examples of a Dorman OE Fix. An OE FIX is a Dorman repair solution you can't get from the original equipment manufacturer. It means they found a situation where they believe the OEM wasn't giving repair professionals what they wanted, so we fixed it. Everything Dorman does is centered around providing customer value, both in the quality of products, and the creativity of solutions. Our engineers and designers go out of their way to save repair technicians time and save vehicle owners money. Want to really go under the hood? Take the Dorman Virtual Tour athttp://www.dormanproducts.com/Tour ( www.DormanProducts.com/Tour)

Weather with Cliff Mass
The New UN Climate Report and the Weather Forecast for Next Week

Weather with Cliff Mass

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 14:30


This podcast provides my take on the new IPCC climate report and the big changes in the weather we will experience during the next week. The new climate report is actually quite optimistic about future climate change and far less apocalyptic than many media reports. The smoky weather of today will clear up by Monday, with normal temperatures returning. I also talk about the wild local heatwave yesterday in Bellingham.

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 2: Mask Mandates are Taking Over

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 38:50


 What's Trending: Major protests against the vaccine and mask mandates including in Puyallup and Bellingham, protestors burn American flag in New York while chanting everyone is racist and KKK members and  King County courthouse security guards plead for more tools to defend themselves //  Big Local: Thurston county will issue a mask mandate for indoor gatherings in public places regardless of vaccination, Auburn is considered a heat island for this coming heat wave and Lake Stevens cuts down 1,000s of trees for a Costco parking lot //  NFL has new rules when it comes to taunting which is now banned See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 2: We have to Change the Name of Mascots

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 39:00


 What's Trending: Delta variant making the return to school a more taboo topic, another historic heat wave comes to western Washington, The Colorado Rockies need to change the name of their mascot, ESPN Anchor accidentally uses the N word when talking about Albert Pujouls //  Big Local: 300 Bellingham residents including nurses come together to protest the vaccine mandate for health care workers, // anonymous King County Courthouse security guard speaks out about the lack of tools they have to defend themselves See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
Chris Mandell - SRAM / Zipp / RockShox and the new XPLR gravel line up

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 61:00


Exclusive interview with SRAM's Chris Mandell discussing the new XPLR line of product for gravel.  We dig into the SRAM XPLR components, the RockShox REVERB AXS wireless dropper post and finally RockShox's new gravel suspension fork, Rudy. Support the podcast Join The Ridership Full automated transcript (please excuse the typos): SRAM - Chris Mandell   [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: Craig Dalton. Hello and welcome to the gravel ride podcast. I'm your host, Craig Dalton. [00:00:08] We've got a big show for you this week. So I'm going to keep the intro short. I'm welcoming Chris Mandel from SRAM [00:00:14] To the show to talk about the new explore series just launched today, August.  [00:00:19] This is really three shows in one, as we talk about grupos dropper posts. And suspension forks. [00:00:25] I'm super excited to dive into this conversation. I've been testing the products a few weeks down here in Topanga, California. And really excited to bounce my ideas off of Chris.  [00:00:36] And get his insights about the new XPLR line.  [00:00:39] So with that, let's dive right in.  [00:00:41] Chris, welcome to the show.  [00:00:43] Chris Mandell: Thanks for having me. I'm real excited to be here.  [00:00:45] Craig Dalton: This is a conversation that I feel is eight or nine months in the works.  [00:00:49] Chris Mandell: Yeah, for sure. That's that's generally how these things go, your word developing and working on products for quite a long time before they actually make it out into the world. [00:00:59] Craig Dalton: So yeah, I'm really excited for this discussion and I'm super stoked that this is on the day of the big launch. So if you're listening on August 10th, which is when this podcast is first released, SRAM has got some things to talk about today. But before we get into that, I always like to get a little bit of information about you as a rider where you're living and how'd you get into the sport. [00:01:22] Chris Mandell: Yeah. Thanks for that. I've been a passionate cyclist for a really long time, my dad did a bit of road racing back in the day and we always had bikes around. Yeah. But I got distracted with American football in high school, and then ended up going to college to play American football and found really quickly in college that I did not want to keep playing at that level. [00:01:44] And so I stopped that and was really lucky in that the town that I lived in McMinnville, Oregon had a small but strong mountain bike scene. And the people there took me under their wing and I started mountain biking with them. And then eventually started working at the local bike shop Tony's and just fully embraced it and was obsessed with it. [00:02:02] And then after I graduated from college, I got a job working full speed ahead, which took me up to Seattle which was great. Cause there was ton of really good cross country riding outside of Seattle, but there was also. A lot of like free side and downhill riding. So at that point I branched and was, writing a commuter to, and from work riding and racing cross country, race bikes, and then also going up to the Whistler bike park and riding that as much as possible kind of fast-forward became a product manager at Kona bikes and developed full suspension bikes at cone bikes for a long time. [00:02:38] And then eventually made the jump to become the rear shock product manager at RockShox. Which had me moved from Bellingham where I was working for Kona, Bellingham, Washington to Colorado Springs, Colorado, and had a great four and a half years living in Colorado Springs, Colorado being really detailed, focused on full suspension, mountain bikes and what it takes to. [00:03:02] Tune shocks and developed shocks for OEM customers like specialized or Santa Cruz. And then at a certain point, unfortunately, due to some family reasons my wife and I needed to move back to Bellingham to be closer to her family. And so we, when we made that shift I switched over from working in product development, to working on the PR side of things, which is what has me on the phone with you. [00:03:25] But in this, in a similar timeframe, we also, I, had a child and I was getting a little bit older and I'd always like commuted and like dabbled in, in rode bikes a little bit, but I'd never really rode bikes. Never really grabbed a hold of me, but gravel bikes started to grab a hold of me. [00:03:42] And it was about that time about when I had, when we had our child that I got a gravel bike and really started riding one pretty consistently. Fell in love with a lot of what, the early days of cross country riding, where for me, which was exploring your local area and like finding the different nooks and crannies and gravel roads and going to the places that you hadn't been to before. [00:04:07] But also really being able to like physically push myself, on, on a mountain bike on one hour mountain bike ride, you go up and then you come down, but on a one-hour gravel ride, you're basically peddling your brains off the entire time. So like the fitness side of that was really helpful for me. [00:04:22] In addition to connecting with the original spirit of what caught me in the cross country, mountain biking back in the day. So yeah, and so now living in Bellingham and I started that gravel journey in Colorado. Which is a really excellent place for gravel riding, but now living in Bellingham, Washington, which we're obviously very well known for our mountain bike trails and the mountain bike trail network is super expansive between, Galbreath mountain, which is the hill with a lot of mountain bike specific built trails, right in town. [00:04:52] And then the Chuck nuts, which is a little bit south of town, which is more hiking trails with some bikes specific trails, but a much bigger, longer area. But there's actually quite a bit of graveling to do here. This area I'm actually mountain bike got started here in, in logging terrain. [00:05:07] It's all working for us in this part of the country. And in order to have a working forest you have to have fire roads. And so there's just fireworks roads running in every possible direction. And then a lot of those thyroids have single track connections to them. So you can really get out and go quite far on your gravel bike from your door and have some pretty, pretty amazing adventures and get to be able to see some pretty big mountains. [00:05:31] Craig Dalton: Amazing. What do the climbs look like in your neck of the woods? Are they long hour long climbs? Are they short and punchy stuff?  [00:05:39] Chris Mandell: Yeah, it really depends what really depends what you want. There's definitely like hours long, slow grinding climbs, and then much to my friends. [00:05:48] Dislike. One of my favorite climbs around here is this climate called pine the theater. And it's basically just straight up the hill for about 25 minutes. And you're pretty much searching for traction on your gravel bike the whole time. Cause it's the climb. So Steve, so yeah, it's all of that. [00:06:03] It's long slow slogging fire roads, and then there's also just straight up the hill hiking or single track climbs.  [00:06:10] Craig Dalton: Nice. It sounds like a great place for gravel riding. Cause it sounds like you can pick and choose whether you want just a logging road that doesn't have a lot of technical requirements, but you can also push your limits on the single track and mountain bike style trails. [00:06:23] Chris Mandell: Yep. Yeah, that's exactly. I think that's exactly the case, like from my house is about 12 minutes to Galbreath on a rails to trails, an old railroad grade that they've converted to an inner urban trail. So I can take that over to golf. Which is crisscrossed with fire roads and then single track. [00:06:42] And so I'll generally climb up single track and then descend down the fire road on my gravel bike, because, my perspective is a lot of the times like it's capable as a gravel bike is do do having my mountain bike on the single track a lot of the time, but it's like a great in terms of options and my friend. [00:06:58] And I'll always joke. Cause we can, you could look down at the dirt here cause we get quite a bit of moisture in a normal time and you can see how many people are starting to gravel bike on the hill because you can tell the gravel bike tires.  [00:07:11] Craig Dalton: That's amazing. Yeah. I love that. I If you're in the fortunate position of having both the gravel and a mountain bike and live in a place where you can take all these different, make all these different choices, it's so much fun. [00:07:22] Cause you just pick and choose your own adventure. I could go on and on talking and learning about Bellingham, because it's an area that I've heard a great things about, but we've got so much ground to cover with Schram's announcement today about the Explorer series. And I'd love to get into it. [00:07:38] I think we'd look at the componentry first and the wheels, and then we get into the hotly debated stuff that we'll talk about later.  [00:07:46] Chris Mandell: Yeah, totally. Yeah. I I think the round out the gravel side of things, the last thing I'd add there is I think the other thing that's nice about having a gravel bike and a mountain bike is you can get so much more out of your mountain bike if you spend time on your gravel bike, because your fitness just goes through the roof. [00:08:02] And that's one of the things that's been, I've been loving about having a gravel bike alongside the mountain bike.  [00:08:07] Craig Dalton: Yeah. And I also imagined, from, if I go back to my origin story and mountain biking, riding orig rigid bike, there's a certain skill level you acquire by learning how to pick your lines when you're riding a rigid. [00:08:19] Or a lightly suspended bike as it were versus when you jump on a full suspension bike, you can start off being pretty sloppy.  [00:08:27] Chris Mandell: Yep. For sure.  [00:08:28] Craig Dalton: Yeah. So let's talk about explore.  [00:08:32] Chris Mandell: Yeah. So this is pretty exciting moment for us. It's really three, three of our big brands coming together. [00:08:40] In a way that we think is really going to allow the gravel rider to have more complete experiences on their bikes. So from the Zipp side we're bringing a gravel specific wheelset from the SRAM road side of things. We're bringing a gravel specific drive train, and then most new to the market would be on the RockShox side of thing. [00:09:06] We're going to bring a fork and a seat post that are gravel specific into the market. And I think it's really cool that these three brands were able to come together and make this specific explore products collection. But I do think it's also important to note that we still think our entire product line is totally relevant in the gravel sphere. [00:09:29] So we have this specific collection of products that we designed for gravel use, but we have a ton of other products that will end up on gravel bikes. And we don't think that those parts shouldn't end up on gravel bikes. It's just, these are the ones that we've specifically designed for.  [00:09:45] gravel  [00:09:47] Craig Dalton: Interesting. [00:09:48] I'm sure there's someone who immediately heard the word suspension on gravel bike and is already hitting the internet to start a debate. We won't get into that listener. Don't worry. I'm super excited. I've been riding the fork and I have my opinions on, it's a super excited to talk to Chris further about it, but Chris, why don't we start off with that? [00:10:06] We'll set.  [00:10:08] Chris Mandell: Yeah. This has been in the gravel market for quite some time with the product line that we offer today, specifically the 303 S and the 303 Firecrest both of which are excellent products for gravel riders to use like their light. The internal width are appropriate for a larger size tire. [00:10:30] And they provide a good balance of aerodynamics. However, we recognize that there's like a full spectrum. Travel experiences out there. And there are people who are going to push the limit a little bit more on the aggressive riding side of things. And for those riders, they're looking for a different setup in terms of, like balancing comfort and control on the trail with aerodynamics. [00:10:58] And so that really pointed us to what we're already doing with zip on the mountain bike side of things, where we have the zero three Moto rim, which is a single wall, not Mike Ram that was designed to allow the rim to have what we call ankle compliance. So the rim is able to work with the tire to provide the rider with more control and conform to the ground better. [00:11:26] As we have that have had that wheel in the mountain bike side of things for a long time, we have a lot of customers and a lot of interest in like bringing something like that over into the gravel side of things. And so that's what we're doing with with the 1 0 1 wheel set and really what it gives the rider is the ability to have a wheel set. [00:11:44] That's going to decrease their fatigue when they're out riding because the rim is gonna work the terrain with the tire in a way that allows the rider to keep the bike going in the direction they're going to want and isolate the rider from a lot of the vibrations and other like hits to the rider that are to the overall bike system that would create fatigue. [00:12:06] Craig Dalton: So is there some sort of suppleness built into the rim? Is that what you're saying?  [00:12:11] Chris Mandell: Yeah, totally. So the way that the rim system is able to work is that the spokes are run through the center of the room. And because it's not a box section, then it's a single wall run. The rim is able to use what we call ankle compliance. [00:12:27] So when it sees a hit say on the left side of the rim is able to move up and out of the way a little bit and allow the front axle and the whole bike to continue to carry forward, but give a little bit in a way that provides more comfort and more control and becomes less fatiguing to the right. [00:12:46] Craig Dalton: Gotcha. And that 27 millimeter wide internal profile is that wider than the 3 0 3.  [00:12:54] Chris Mandell: Yeah. We've actually got like really nice steps from the 300, three S all the way up to the one-on-one. So the 303 is 23 millimeter. The 303 Firecrest is 25 and then the one-on-one is 27 inner. And really that's just optimizing for those different sizes of tires that you're going to have on there. [00:13:15] You're able to use quite a small tire on the one-on-one. But it's also going to give you a lot of good stability on the larger side tire.  [00:13:23] Craig Dalton: Yeah. We've had a discussion about that on the podcast before, and it seems like this trend towards that 27 millimeter is really beneficial for the gravel rider in terms of the contact patch of the tire and just how the overall rim performs. [00:13:38] Chris Mandell: Yeah, totally. And I I think it's, it's preference in tires and it's there's so many factors that go into what tire pressure you run with tires you run and all that stuff. And I think, having options is good in that space. And we really look at like the one-on-one. [00:13:53] If you're looking to take on more challenging terrain, if you're going to be spending long, long periods of time in the saddle over, not so great conditioned paved roads or rough gravel roads that extended period of time, but one-on-one is really going to bring a lot to you because it's going to save a lot of energy and it's going to, it's going to stop the vibrations and all the things that fatigue you on a gravel ride from getting up to you. [00:14:21] Craig Dalton: Nice. And for the listener, I'll just note that it's available in 700 C and six 50 B.  [00:14:27] Chris Mandell: Yep. Yeah.  [00:14:29] Craig Dalton: Did you want to talk about the G 40 exploratory?  [00:14:33] Chris Mandell: Yeah. Yeah, we can mention that one real quick. So the G 40 is a tire that we've offered for a while now, but we are rebranding it explored to fit into the rest of the collection. [00:14:45] And it's a pretty sweet tire. It's sitting right there in the middle at 40, which is I think a very common tire size for people to be using. It's got a nice center line rolling tread, which is really great for efficiency, but then it's got good, not too aggressive, but just aggressive enough cornering logs. [00:15:04] So you've got the grip in terms or when the ground gets soft, you're still able to dig into those cornering lugs and hold align really well. And then the thing that as a mountain biker I really appreciate it is it does have a robust sidewall, so you're not looking at getting getting flat tires that often. [00:15:21] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Nice. Let's move on to the driver.  [00:15:26] Chris Mandell: Yeah.  [00:15:28] Craig Dalton: So tell us about that. XPLR, drivetrain, and how it fits in you gave a little bit in your opening about it, but just contextualize it a little bit further and talk some of the details about what you guys are providing.  [00:15:40] Chris Mandell: Yeah, totally. I think if we look at where we're at with drive trains today, we offer a 10 36 1 by drive train, and we offer and through the access ecosystem, we're able to take our road hoods and connect them to a 10 50 mountain bike drive, train to provide, two pretty good experiences for the gravel rider. [00:16:05] The one by gravel rider looking to have either, very lightweight set up with the 10 36 and tight gearing stuff. Or with the 10 50, bigger gear steps, but a huge range which is greatly beneficial when you're like waiting the bike down or living in a place where there's really steep climbs. [00:16:22] And you're looking to just go straight up the hill, but for sure, we recognize that there's space in the middle of it. And for us, the one by experience is really what makes it makes the most sense on a gravel bike, where you're just looking to keep things clean and simple and straightforward. [00:16:40] Maybe he's got a dropper posts on your bag too. That's a whole lot of thing, different systems that you're managing on the bike and for the gravel rider, the one bike is a really good solution a week, but we saw that gap in between the 10 36 and the 10 15. We knew that there were writers who spend time in the mountains and need range, but also spent a lot of time on the tarmac and the tight gear steps. [00:17:04] And that's what brought us to this. 10 44 cassette and as well as a derailer that goes along with it and allows you to have a one by specific trailer, which will shift that 10 44. And we're offering that trailer hat red force as well as rival. So you can get in all three of those access price points and really be able to complete your experience from pavement to growl. [00:17:31] Craig Dalton: Gotcha. So these ones with the explore moniker on it are exclusively one by correct. They  [00:17:38] Chris Mandell: are exclusively one by, and a good way to think about that is when you're developing a derailer, you've got to optimize it for the cassette that it's running across. And then like how much chain it needs to take up. [00:17:50] So when you have a front derailleur system, you've got to think about the chainring moving between two pretty big sizes. So we changed the way we developed the cage and where we placed the pulleys. So it helps us provide a better shifting product and a lighter weight product. If we are able to divide those up a little bit. [00:18:08] So for this derailleur, we did end up making it one by specific, and we specifically built it to work with a 10 44 cassette, but it does also shift a 10 36  [00:18:18] Craig Dalton: cassettes. Gotcha. And for clarity, you mentioned this before SRAM's other group PO's are mix and match compatible. So for my friends like Jason at the Gravel Cyclist who rides to buy all the time, you've got a two by setup. [00:18:35] That's totally suitable for the gravel market.  [00:18:38] Chris Mandell: Yep, exactly. Yeah. And if that rider wanted to switch to one by specific setup or maybe like dabble in it. Yeah. You could take those same controllers and you could add one by rear derailleur to them and they would work just fine. It would just be a matter of repairing it to the new derailleur. [00:18:58] Craig Dalton: Yeah. It's been interesting. The demo bike that you provided to me, which is a canyon Grizl, we've set up with a mullet setup. And while I've been on SRAM on my personal bike for many years, this was the first access bike that I've had for a prolonged period of time. So it was fascinating to play around with the app pair, the different things that were on the bike in the app, and just understand that system a little bit more. [00:19:24] Chris Mandell: Yeah. And it seemed like it was pretty straight forward and working pretty easily for you. And that's really what we're going for with this, like we want to make this as user-friendly and. It just things like the shift log logic, like it's very easy for you to understand in your brain. [00:19:39] Oh, I pushed the left shifter to get the chain to move left forward on the cassette. And I pushed the right shifter to get it to move right on that cassette and all those little details and all that little, like ease of use stuff adds up to a better experience for everyone in the channel, from the person who's ending up riding the bike to the bike shop and setting it up. [00:19:59] Craig Dalton: Yeah, for sure. And the fact that, and we'll get into the dropper post later, but the fact that the dropper post and the rear derailleur are using the same battery just gives you that comfort. Should you ever get caught out of pocket? You can swap the battery around and give power to the rear derailleur and take it away from your dropper posts, for example. [00:20:17] Chris Mandell: Yep. Yeah. And that's a perfect example. I actually, probably because I was driving around with my bike on my car the other day I had to do that exact thing and it was totally fine. Took two seconds and I was back out on my bike and riding again. And to, like the batteries are real small. [00:20:33] And so you can actually just get an extra one and throw it in your pocket.  [00:20:36] Craig Dalton: The other fun thing you told me, that was a mixed sense, but I didn't realize it right off the bat was that there's a mini accelerometer in all the componentry, so that it wakes up essentially when it's, when you're moving and goes to sleep if it's in your garage. [00:20:54] Chris Mandell: Yeah, exactly. So the way all the access systems work is they add little, as you mentioned, little accelerometer in them and to save power they go to sleep, but they're like checking in and. When you grab your bike and, move it out of the stand or wherever you have it set, those components are able to wake up and immediately respond to whatever you're trying to get them to do. [00:21:15] And that allows us to save a lot of battery life so that you're not wasting battery when the bike is just sitting in the garage, but also allows us to immediately respond to your needs as a rider.  [00:21:24] Craig Dalton: Yeah. And the additional pro tip you shared with me is if you've got it on the back or top of your car, take the battery out, put the little safe plastic piece in there. [00:21:33] So it doesn't think it's awake for your six hour drive to a ride.  [00:21:37] Chris Mandell: Yep. Yeah, definitely take that step.  [00:21:41] Craig Dalton: You mentioned. The sort of mixed compatibility of explore group a with everything else. And I definitely appreciate it as running the mullet setups and having some components from the mountain bike side of your lineup, everything visually works together. [00:21:56] There's no standing out of the explore versus the mountain bike side of things.  [00:22:02] Chris Mandell: Yeah. So we definitely feel like the full suite of products that we offer should all be able to come together and work cross-functionally as much as they can. And one thing you'll notice on all of the explore products is the explore. [00:22:18] Call-out is pretty small and pretty subtle. And I think your bike is a good example of that is a gravel bike. It doesn't feature the 10 44 cassette. For you attend 50 was a better solution, but you could actually have a 10 44 set up for that bike and very easily just remove the cassette and the derailer and the chain, and then add a 10 44 set up to it with the trailer and the chain and the cassette, and then repair your shifters and go out and ride that 10 44 setup. [00:22:51] Craig Dalton: What's the difference between the chains in those two setups?  [00:22:56] Chris Mandell: So the Explorer 10 44 drive trains use the flat top chain that we have on the roadside. And then the mullet drive train that you're using the 10 50 and the Eagle rear derailer use a standard 12 speed.  [00:23:10] Craig Dalton: Gotcha. And not to get too much in the weeds, but I was curious about this the way SRAM's, what are referred to as a magic link works to put the chain together. [00:23:19] Is it true that you can pretty easily pop those off and take the chain out?  [00:23:25] Chris Mandell: Yeah. So you can pop those off and take the chain out. The one thing to keep in mind with that is we don't recommend that you reuse that quickly. And the reason we don't is if it's a press fit and that's what holds it together. [00:23:36] And when you break that link, you will, you do wear that pressed it up a little bit. So we don't recommend that you reuse that quick link, but it is like a really easy way to be able to take your drive, train apart without making your change shorter or anything like that. And in fact, park tool and a few other tool manufacturers actually make a tool that's specifically designed to, install the quick link, but also on installed the quick. [00:24:01] Craig Dalton: Ooh, I might have to take a look at those I, one of the things that tripped me out, I was on a trip with some of the guys from VeloNews and saw that one of them was riding access and in his bike bag, he had taken the chain off and just remove the derailer. And it was just, he, in fact, he traveled with the derailer in a separate bag, which was just a trip to me when he pulled it out of the box and was putting back all together. [00:24:24] And it's just such a handy, protective way of transporting the bike.  [00:24:30] Chris Mandell: Yeah, totally. I do the exact same thing when I travel, just because, even with a mountain bike, flying with a mountain bike that derailleurs like in a vulnerable place and those bike bags, and it's not supported by the rest of the system. [00:24:42] And I actually do the same thing and take it off the ticket off the bike. And, I'm able to put it in inside of a bag somewhere else inside of my bike bag, which is a great way to.  [00:24:53] Craig Dalton: Yeah let's get let's shift gears and let's start boiling some of the listeners blood by talking about dropper posts and suspension. [00:25:01] Let's start with the dropper posts.  [00:25:04] Chris Mandell: One, one not to jump ahead to our not to pull us back. But one thing I do want to mention really quickly is we will we, in addition to the 10 44 cassette and the 10 44 specific red forest and rivalry trailers that we'll offer for, with XPLR we will also offer a one by specific cranks. [00:25:26] So same crank arms at the red enforce and rival level, but it has a new lighter weight single ring, and it's available on 38 through 46 sizes. So yeah, just quick touch that  [00:25:37] Craig Dalton: way, jumping in the suspension. Yeah. So let's talk about the access reverb dropper seat. [00:25:47] Yeah, so draw, look, this is no surprise to anybody who listens to this podcast. I am pro dropper all the time for almost every situation.  [00:25:59] Chris Mandell: And what do you feel the dropper gives you when you're out riding your bike  [00:26:07] Craig Dalton: when I'm descending and this descending is not just oh, I know I'm going to be bombing downhill for 25 minutes. [00:26:13] It's basically anytime I'm going downhill, being able to lower the saddle ever so slightly and create a greater area of space in my, underneath my undercarriage between my undercarriage and the saddle enables me to corner with greater confidence. Pretty much do everything with greater confidence.  [00:26:35] Chris Mandell: Yeah. [00:26:36] Yeah. And that's the same. That we would, when we would speak to what you get out of a dropper post on the mountain bike side of things it's the same situation because you're able to move wherever you need to move from the front of the bike, to the back of the bike without being obstructed by your seat post or your saddle rather lends a huge amount of control to you because you can waste the front tire as you need to, you can weight the rear tire as you need to without worrying about catching yourself on the satellite as you're making those motions. [00:27:08] Craig Dalton: Yeah. And I like, go ahead, Chris,  [00:27:14] Chris Mandell: you got it.  [00:27:15] Craig Dalton: When when I talk about using the dropper post, I'm talking about it in not the extreme mountain biking style stuff exclusively. I use it all the time. So descending on the road, like I think the advantages are there. When you do get into the hectic stuff and a local rider here in Southern California tipped me off to this trail called horse drop, which I finally hit the other day. [00:27:39] And as the name would dictate, there was a bunch of drop-offs. It was truly a hectic trail for a gravel bike, but a ton of fun. And there's no way, I shouldn't say there's no way it would be super challenging to do those drops with your saddle fully extended and even using the 50 millimeter drop AXS. [00:27:59] REVERB I had, it was plenty of space to get the bike underneath me and allow it to come up to me as I was handling those drop-offs.  [00:28:10] Chris Mandell: Yeah, that makes total sense to me. And I think circling back to even in less extreme terrain, it still makes a huge difference. Like you imagine hitting the apex of a road corner. [00:28:23] You're going to want to be in a different position on your bike versus the way you entered the corner. You have to move your center of gravity and your body weight around to get the bike, to track well through a corner. And like any flat corner on a gravel bike where you're trying to use a little bit of subtle body English to move the bike through the turn. [00:28:45] If you have to, all of a sudden, move from the front of the bike, to the back of the bike and then raise your center of gravity up to move your body up and over your saddle, that's going to disrupt your grip on the ground. And I think it's one of the advantages of having a dropper  [00:29:00] Craig Dalton: posts. [00:29:01] Yeah, a hundred percent. I think in my mind, it's the number one upgrade in terms of how it will affect your performance on the bike that anybody can do. So this post, obviously rock shock has been making. Dropper posts for the mountain bike sizes for a long time and has a full range there. This REVERB AXS XPLR is in the 27 2 millimeter diameter. [00:29:24] It comes in 400 millimeter lens as well as three 50, the three 50 has a 50 millimeter drop. And I think the 400 has a 75 millimeter drop that. All correct, Chris?  [00:29:35] Chris Mandell: Yeah. The 400 is actually available also in the 50 millimeter drop. So you can get the 400 either in 75 or 15.  [00:29:43] Craig Dalton: Gotcha. And how did you guys decide on those length drops as being what you want it to be? [00:29:49] Chris Mandell: Yeah, that, that really came from riding these types of bikes around and thinking about how much they needed and then listening to rider feedback on how much they thought they needed. So it really was those two sides of us doing our own work internally. And then listening to rider feedback on it. [00:30:12] And I think too, before we already get too close to the tech side of things and, I think we just had a really great conversation on the advantage of a C post. I can go from top out to bottom out. When we were looking at the gravel market and thinking about what we needed to bring to the table, we did not think it was enough just to make a post that dropped, like for sure that was going to be an advantage for the gravel rider. [00:30:37] But we recognized that it was a different use case and we needed to bring more to the table to get a gravel rider, to understand the benefit of having a dropper post and want them to take that leap. And so one of the things that we did with is we actually Came up with a new internal design which allows us to have what we call active ride for anywhere from top out to when the seat post achieves full travel. [00:31:06] So that means like if you move the seat post and a millimeter, the seat post is giving you what we call active ride, which is a bit of compliance in the post so that the rider is able to stay seated through rough terrain and continue paddling without having to stand up and get their butt off the saddle. [00:31:26] So at full top out the post is rock solid, but anywhere after full top out the C post features active ride. And that is one of the things that we see as a huge advantage to a gravel rider. Who's going to spend a ton of time paddling across rough terrain, needing to stay on the gas and needing their butts to stay on. [00:31:49] Yeah,  [00:31:49] Craig Dalton: that's super thoughtful element of the design. If you think about riding across stutter bumps or anything where you're going to be needing to peddle being on the saddle, just being able to take it down a millimeter, which is likely what you'd like. Anyway, you get some advantage out of having a little bit more space there to have that sort of suppleness built in is gotta pay dividends over longer rides. [00:32:14] Chris Mandell: Totally. Yeah. One of the, one of the initial test riders for this post actually set his, see post height a little bit too high, and then he would just move the CBOs into the travel so that he was always riding in the active ride position, which is a great way to do it for me personally. I do having the, from top out and we think a lot of writers are going to want that. [00:32:34] So we actually, like just with the CBOs, you get to have your cake and eat it too.  [00:32:38] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Yeah. I think that for me, my setup's always been, I'm probably like that rider and yeah. My I set my droppers up slightly higher, maybe ever so slightly. So it feels comfortable early on in the day, but oftentimes I find myself running it a little bit lower as a more fatigued or just cruising home at the end of the day. [00:32:58] Chris Mandell: Yeah. I totally sad for me. One of the other things that I've really enjoyed about having a dropper post on a bike too, is a gravel bike is just like ease of getting on and off the bike because you do end up having to get off your gravel bike in difficult terrain sometimes. And it's helpful to be able to like, get the seat down before you finally step off the bike. [00:33:20] Craig Dalton: Totally agree with you there. And for clarity for the listener, this is an access product, which means that it has a wireless activation to it.  [00:33:29] Chris Mandell: Yep. Yeah. So this lives in our active ecosystem. So again, it uses the same battery as the drive trains. We were just talking about. And uses the same communication protocol. [00:33:40] One of the things that's huge advantage of that is that it's, we leave it open to the end user in terms of how they want to activate the system. So you can use a standard reverb access shifter on a flat bar setup to activate this seat post on a drop bar setup, you can use double click on the sh on the road shifters to do that. [00:34:05] And then if you have force or red shifters, you can get one of our blips or multiplex and plug that into your shifter and then use that to control your dropper posts. And then lastly, you can also get a blood box and plug a multi-client or a blip into that, and then use the blip blocks to flip the box, to control the seat post. [00:34:28] So there's a ton of options in terms of how you interact with a post. Craig, I think you have double tap on your bike right now. Correct?  [00:34:40] Craig Dalton: Yup. Yeah. And it's, it's interesting. I was laughing with you the other day that I found that I actually do have scenarios where I'm activating the dropper post with one hand, which seemed crazy. [00:34:50] Wow. We were talking about it, but I was out on the bike again yesterday. And it's oftentimes where I am. I'd be grabbing a sip of water while, beginning to start a downhill, not a, on a fire road or something. And then I found myself historically with my other SRAM bike where it's cable activated, I would swing the left lever and drop my post in anticipation for putting the bottle down and hitting it on the descent. [00:35:15] So it's funny to get used to that. So I am interested in trying the blip set up and I do think it's interesting that the blip box exists. So if you're a writer that maybe not be, is not on an access group oh. Today on your bike, but is looking forward. I think. Investing in this product and just getting the blip box so you can control it on any bike that does not have electronic shifting is a good future proof system and investment because when you do upgrade to the access shifters, you can easily repair it and remove the blip box from the scenario. [00:35:51] Chris Mandell: Yeah, totally super good solution. And it's the flexibility that we're given through access.  [00:35:58] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Any more comments on the dropper posts that you wanted to relay to the listener?  [00:36:04] Chris Mandell: Yeah. Yeah. I think the last thing I would touch on there is obviously, we hit on it's available in 50 and 75 millimeters of travel. [00:36:12] And then three 50 and 400 millimeter lengths. One of the other things too, to keep in mind with that C post is that the rail clamps are compatible. I don't know a meter or standard rounds or oval seven by nine. And then there is a separate clamp available for seven by 10. So we have all of the rail configurations covered in that oral as well. [00:36:34] Gotcha. Pretty excited for the CBOs to get out there and people will be trying it.  [00:36:38] Craig Dalton: Yeah, for sure. You ready to make people really mad?  [00:36:43] Chris Mandell: Yeah.  [00:36:45] Craig Dalton: So RockShox is introducing their Rudy explore suspension fork for gravel bikes today. [00:36:51] Chris Mandell: And I think, it's interesting making people mad cause I think it's also good. I think this is going to expire a lot of people too, if we go back to the origins of mountain biking, there was some hesitation and even moving to suspension in the first place on a mountain bike and. [00:37:05] We kinda know exactly how that ended up not suspension is the name of the game on a mountain bike these days. And I think, from RockShox perspective and from where we're coming to it, we look at any time a bike is getting off-road or even on a rough road as an opportunity for suspension to play a role and to really allow for more comfort and control and traction, which at the end of the day can equate to more speed or can equate to more fun. [00:37:37] And I think, we're all really riding our bikes at the end of the day to have more fun. However, you slice it's on me winning a race. That's what it means, but it means you need to go faster. So from the RockShox perspective, we looked at that and that was really what drove us to develop this part. [00:37:54] Craig Dalton: Yeah, it's clearly a natural place for part of the market to go. And I think you and I would be the first people to state that it's just part of the market, just as we've seen a trend towards bigger and bigger tires, wider handlebars, all these different configurations that riders around the world are discovering to customize these gravel bikes for their local terrain. [00:38:18] No one will sit here and say that bigger tires, wider handlebars suspension forks are for everybody. There's certainly vast parts of the country and world that riding without a suspension fork. And in fact, riding a glorified road bike is totally suitable for the gravel in your backyard, but as someone who rides mostly in Marine county or here in Southern California in the Santa Monica mountains, like I'm really embracing this product and seeing some huge advantages, just five or six rides into. [00:38:54] Chris Mandell: Yeah. From our side, we don't think there's a wrong way to gravel every time someone's getting on their bike and taking it from tarmac to gravel, to single track, and then back onto the tarmac, like that's their experience. And as a components manufacturer, what we're really looking to provide users with is the ability to tune their experience. [00:39:22] So the best that fits what they're trying to do and what's fit their needs. I think one of the things that's really interesting is with, and it's it's not totally unique to grab the gravel space, but it is like an interesting thing that's like pretty pure in the gravel side of things is you almost really build your bike. [00:39:39] You can build your bike really to you. Where you're lacking. So if you do you, aren't a good defender, but you're a great climber, that current for today, like that would point you to putting much bigger tires on your bike and trying to get more traction and get more control and a dissent just by, by putting bigger tires on your bike. [00:40:00] After today, that rider is able to go back to a smaller tire and use suspension and use a dropper post to get a lot more control in those situations where they feel anxious, because they don't necessarily have the confidence to, to be taking their bike down, down horse drops or whatever it is but using suspension and using a dropper post is another way to get that control back into the writer's hand and regain calm. [00:40:30] Yeah,  [00:40:30] Craig Dalton: exactly. I feel like I, the more and more that I advise people on how to get, how to purchase a bike and how to think about what gravel bike makes sense to them. There's all these levers that you're pulling. And it comes down to where you're riding, as you said, what your comfort level is and descents. [00:40:46] I can't tell you how many people I see out there who just are exceptional going uphill, but the moment they go downhill, they start to get terrified and really tense up and, white knuckle, the handlebar, and really have a bad experience on the bike. Whereas adding some elements of suspension, whether it be this fork or larger tires or suspension stem, like all of these things help alleviate some of those challenges, if that's where you're deficient as a cyclist. [00:41:14] Chris Mandell: Absolutely. And the Rudy. So the fork we're bringing is part of the Explorer product line is called the Rudy. And it really is. Bill with the gravel cyclist in mind in terms of providing more grip, getting more control into the rider's hands and allowing the rider to save their body for later in the ride and for pedaling and providing much more control and steering confidence in Russ stuff. [00:41:46] But honestly, even just bombing the regular tarmac road in America, you're going to get a better connected front tire to the ground and you're going to be able to carry more speed through that.  [00:41:58] Craig Dalton: Yeah. One thing I can say, and this is probably the least controversial thing I'll say all day is unequivocally with this fork on your bike, you can go down a hill faster. [00:42:07] So if you think of yourself as a six out of 10, in terms of descending skills, I think you've automatically bumped yourself up to a 7.5.  [00:42:17] Chris Mandell: Yeah, that's great. I love him.  [00:42:19] Craig Dalton: Yeah. And then I would say that, I did play around a lot with the lockout. Totally bombed, totally locked in. So if I was out on the road with this fork it's pretty easy to reach down. [00:42:29] I think just because of the geometry of gravel bikes, it was actually easier to reach down and reach the lockout lever than it was on the mountain bikes that I've written recently. And very easy, obviously to swing it back the other way I tended to climb off-road with it open because I've found that having the tire just be able to roll over the things that were coming in front of me was advantageous even on the climbing. [00:42:52] And I, I did not feel like I was losing a lot to set the stage for the listener. We're talking about 30 or 40 millimeter trout as the travel options in terms of what this fork provides today and tire clearance up to a 700 by 50.  [00:43:10] Chris Mandell: Yeah. So that's a good jumping off point to talk through some of the spec details on this fork. [00:43:16] So as you mentioned, 30 or 40 millimeters of travel is an air spring. And as an air spring that was specifically developed for the Rudy. And our vision with this air spring was to keep this air spring really supple and sensitive off the top so that the writer's hands felt good on the bars. And they were able to have good traction. [00:43:36] We also knew that we didn't want to have it bottoming out harshly at any point during the ride experience. So there's a big bottom out bumper in this fork, which catches it in the second half of the travel and really provides a lot of control as you're going towards Baltimore. The other, another feature that's really specific to this gravel and I think shows how much attention we were paying to the needs of the gravel road. [00:44:04] And we've got two different levels of vendor compatibility. So we have a short fender that we make and sell that bolt-on with three bolts to the arch of the lower leg. And then the fork features threaded holes at the bottom of the lower leg, which allow for standard full coverage vendors to Mount onto this fork as well. [00:44:28] And so no fender, a short fender or for the winter riders, full coverage fenders. We really tuned that in for the gravel experience.  [00:44:38] Craig Dalton: Gotcha. And from a visual design perspective, I found the fork to be as subtle as it could be. Obviously it's got telescoping legs and it's, it is what it is. [00:44:49] But I do find as you're glancing over the bike, it's not sticking out like a sore thumb in any way in my life.  [00:44:57] Chris Mandell: Yeah, that's great to hear. I think we spent a lot of time and effort in the work on this fork, refining it and making it as light and free moving as we possibly could so that it had the best suspension performance and the lightest weight package that we could get on it. [00:45:15] But we did pay attention to the fact that it was going to end up on mostly carbon fiber gravel frames, and it needed to have a clean aesthetic to it. And so we did spend a good deal of time looking at the existing carbon forks were out there on the market today, knowing that we wanted to build this fork in a traditional magnesium, lower leg, aluminum, upper tubes and aluminum crown fashion, because that provided us with the most opportunities for re refining the overall performance with four, in terms of weight and sensitivity. [00:45:49] And so we really spent a lot of time on that. So it's really great to hear that from you.  [00:45:53] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Awesome. And you've also got some OEM partners that are you're working with on this today, and I'm sure more will be dropping in the coming months.  [00:46:02] Chris Mandell: Yeah, totally. So we definitely have had a lot of OEM interest in uptake on this product, the canyon is one of those partners and they will have models dropping with this fork on it. [00:46:14] And we're pretty excited that they're working with us on that front. There will be numerous other OEMs who are out there also dropping dropping bikes featuring this product and the full product line. Yeah. I  [00:46:25] Craig Dalton: think it's going to be important that riders are able to test and take a look at these products and getting them out there on more bikes and hopefully bikes that might be out there and demo fleets in the future will be great because I think it's it's counterintuitive. [00:46:39] Bike performs with this fork on it. You think, you might think certainly if you have a mountain bike background that certain things are going to happen, you're going to experience certain things in a certain way, but it's clear that you guys had a ground up mentality to make this fork fit. [00:46:54] Gravel bikes.  [00:46:55] Chris Mandell: Yeah. Yeah, no, totally. I think that's an important thing here. That the RockShox is invested in improving the rider's experience on the trail or on the road. And we know and understand that like when we build a cross country fork, that means that we need to be laser focused on the needs of the cross country riders. [00:47:18] And then when we build a downhill race fork, we need to be laser focused on the needs of a downhill racer. And we brought that same approach when it came to developing the Rudy and developing the Rudy as a hyper-focused. Gravel product. It doesn't mean that we didn't pull from our experience on the cross-country and Enduro side of things. [00:47:42] We definitely pulled from that heritage space, the damper. So the thing that provides control on compression and control on rebound in this fork is a scaled down gravel specific version of our race day damper, which you find in our Sid and sit FL cross-country race corks. And that was really, and we developed that damper. [00:48:08] It was really a revolutionary, super lightweight, but very high performance in terms of the control it provided in open and then the way the lockout function. And we took that damper and we scaled it down. And tuned it to the needs of the gravel rider. Both in terms of the functionality for rebound and compression performance, but also just made that thing even lighter than it was before. [00:48:32] And that's the hard work and the nitty gritty details that we put into the forklift, into the Rudy to make it specific for gravel.  [00:48:41] Craig Dalton: Nice. I want to revisit something you commented on earlier. Cause I do think it's important. It's going to be interesting to see over time. Just the idea of suspension forks, helping with overall rider fatigue, obviously as you're going down super technical stuff, like it's immediately apparent what that looks like, but I also think it's going to be interesting over time that as we see these forks on beneath riders who are tackling 200 mile gravel events, et cetera, To see how they're walking away from those rides in terms of how their upper body feels and how that equates to their overall time and experience on these long courses. [00:49:23] Chris Mandell: Yeah, totally. I remember a conversation that I had with Meg Fisher he's an ambassador for us. And it was right when she found out that we were making this product and she was ecstatic on the phone. Cause she was telling me about how, in some of the longer gravel races she does, she ends up with blisters on her hand from the amount of like bumping and just like carnage. [00:49:46] That's getting transmitted from the road up through the entire system, to, to our hands on the bike. And she was really excited about trying to Rudy because she felt like that this is a way that she can isolate our hands and the rest of her body from those rough vibrations. Even on just a gravel road, race scenario. [00:50:09] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Yeah. Now it's going to be interesting. Right. And I, I'm always encouraging event organizers to add more sort of off-road technicality to their courses. Cause I just think it becomes more interesting when you see writers of different disciplines excelling in the events. I'm always a fan of the mountain bike background guys and girls doing well in these gravel races because of their technical skills, because I think they should be rewarded and course designers should continue to push those limits. [00:50:39] So I do think it's going to be super fascinating to see when we start seeing these Rudy forks underneath riders and who they are, are they elite athletes trying to gain a competitive advantage on a particular course? Or are they the rank and file athlete who is just looking to have a more pleasurable experience and less fatiguing experience over these long runs? [00:51:03] Chris Mandell: Yeah. I think without a doubt, you're going to see all of that. This, what this means for a rider is less body fatigue because you have less energy coming up from the road into the rider and you have more control as a rider. Your tire is going to be stuck to the ground more often. And that increase in control will give the rider more confidence and enable them to have more fun on their ride and allow them to push harder, allow them to go faster. [00:51:31] If they want to go faster or have more fun that the speed that they're going. And then the other thing, and I touched on this a little bit in the last one, but like more traction means that it's going to the bike is going to predict or is going to handle it in a more predictable fashion. And you are going to know more often than not where the front tire is. [00:51:54] You're going to be able to get it to where you're going. And you actually touched on earlier. Like obviously that plays a role in the sense, but even on, challenging climbs being able to keep your front wheel exactly where you want it to be is pretty important. And this fork allows for that, even on the Quan,  [00:52:12] Craig Dalton: the final area I wanted to explore with you is just the use and sale of this fork in the aftermarket. [00:52:20] So you've mentioned a number of companies are building kind of ground up designs around this fork, but what about the many listeners who have a bike that was designed prior to this date and time, and prior to the knowledge of the Rudy fork existing, how should they think about the changes in geometry they might experience when running one of these forks? [00:52:42] Chris Mandell: Yeah, totally. Just re I'll run through a couple they, aftermarket detailed side of things. So as you mentioned, it will be available in 30 or 40 millimeter. The Rudy fork will be available in 30 or 40 millimeters of travel. It will come in 45 offset. The come in two different colorways that will come in like a gloss black or what we call quicksand, which is which is a tan colored product that fits with our overall explore product line. [00:53:10] So what do you want to consider as you're looking to upgrade your existing bike with this fork is in most cases, it probably will resolve and that increase in the axle, the crown. [00:53:24] That is something we want to watch out for, but it's something, the thing that we think is actually a benefit. Gravel bikes today are built around the idea that you're going to be changing your tires around. You're going to be, maybe trying six 50 and then, or using 700. [00:53:40] So there's a whole lot of flexibility inside of the existing gravel frame. And there may be a result in an increase in actual crown versus the rigid fork that you have on your bike today. But in our testing so far, what we've seen is people appreciate that and the handling of the bike because of the added suspension element improved versus a rigid fork on the bike. [00:54:04] You do want to check with your manufacturer to make sure that their warranty covers having a suspension product to the frame. That's a good first step to do, but really at the end of the day, It's a matter of you decided that suspension is a good path for you. Riding out on an existing demo bike or taking the plunge and adding it to your friend it's available in and 1.5, our inch and a taper to 1.5. [00:54:29] So you're looking at needing to have that head tube on your  [00:54:32] Craig Dalton: bike as well. One of the things that we had discussed offline was, in my particular case, I tend to run, I couldn't say off the top of my head, but a fair number of spacers underneath my headset. And as this fork will naturally lift my head to about higher. [00:54:48] The very on-point suggestion you made was if you take those spacers out and slam the stem lower down in that stack, all of a sudden you mitigate some of the rise in handlebar position.  [00:55:03] Chris Mandell: Yeah, totally. And that's a really easy one to do, you just take it. The actual, the crown of your existing for today and subtract the actual, the crown of this fork. [00:55:12] And that's how many space or, whatever that number is. It's 10 millimeters. You just, move 10 millimeters of spacer from underneath your stem to above your stone.  [00:55:21] Craig Dalton: Yeah. That I think on my personal ride that would effectively be completely possible. And I think that's interesting. [00:55:30] And I think the point around, the changes in handling being pretty subtle, it's worth noting, but it also is worth noting that, your riders have not really commented much on the changes in geometry, on the bike.  [00:55:44] Chris Mandell: Totally. And I think, another important aspect of that is keep in mind, like these gravel bikes are built with a lot of this in mind. [00:55:51] We, I run 37 C tires all the way up to 45 C I have run all the way up to 45 C tires. The same gravel bike, so a lot of these bikes you're switching from like pretty big changes entire sizes. And that's what the bikes were built to accommodate. And it's it's no different on the fork side of things. [00:56:11] Yeah. Yeah.  [00:56:12] Craig Dalton: And anything else on the fork that you wanted to share, Chris?  [00:56:16] Chris Mandell: I think that covers it pretty well. You made the point about 700 by 50 being the tire clearance. And I think we've touched a lot of the points. I'm really excited for the Rudy. And I think it's going to be a, I think it's going to Herald the new age in the gravel experience. [00:56:30] Craig Dalton: Yeah. I share that enthusiasm. I think it's good for the market. I think there's going to be a lot of debate online about the existence of this product and what it means, but I guarantee that over time, People are going to see the advantages of a product like this. And we're going to see more and more bikes come straight out of the factory with suspension built into them because the advantages are super high for a lot of different types of riders in the gravel market. [00:57:00] Chris Mandell: Absolutely. And even with this product out there, like not every bike is going to end up with a Rudy on it, but the bikes that do end up with a Rudy on it is going to open a bunch of doors to a rider that would have been shot previously. So I think, there's no wrong way to gravel. And if this is something that makes sense to you as a rider, because you have the defense is a place that you struggle or on longer rides your stand start to hurt, or you just want to be able to. [00:57:29] Keep up with your friends a little bit better or drop your friends in certain instances, this is a great great way to have a little bit of fun on your, a little more fun on your gravel bike and add a little bit of capability. And, we didn't, I touched on this a little bit, but this is one of those things that can allow you to run a smaller, lighter tire because you don't need to rely on the tire as much as you were previously and what other doors can moving and trying suspension unlocked for you. [00:57:54] Craig Dalton: Yeah. I had that in the back of my head, cause we had talked about that earlier and I hesitated to open yet another can of worms around tire sizes, but point well taken like all these advances in technology. Whether it's the fork that dropper posts, et cetera, they're all changing things slightly and changing the considerations for any individual rider says, you said what might have driven me to a 50 millimeter tire previously, I may be able to draw back on that because I don't need the suspension elements of the fork, all sorry of the tire. [00:58:27] All of a sudden I'm getting that in the fork. So it's yet another thing as we've talked about time and time again, there's this long spectrum. And I think it can, it's even getting even longer today between a road pro plus style of gravel bike and something that's very, off-road, iSTYLE gravel bike. [00:58:44] There's not a definitive solution. That is the best for everybody across the world. But to your point, very early on in this conversation, SRAM RockShox zips. You're trying to be there for all those riders and give them a wealth of compatible componentry to build the rigs that are going to make them stoked to ride. [00:59:09] Chris Mandell: Exactly. Yeah. I, we are cyclists at strand and we are having the same writing experiences and want to have the same range of experiences. And you can just see that easily from our locations. The team in Chicago has thoughts. The team in Colorado Springs has thoughts. The team in San Luis Obispo has thought the team in Vancouver, British Columbia has thoughts. [00:59:30] The team in Taiwan has thoughts the team in Germany, out of Sox and all those come together and really push us to make products that allow writers to have full breadth of experience.  [00:59:42] Craig Dalton: Chris, thank you so much for all the time. Congrats on the explore launch. Super excited to get this out.  [00:59:48] Chris Mandell: Thank you so much for the time. [00:59:49] And I'm really excited to hear more about your rad experience on that bike. [00:59:54] Craig Dalton: Big, thanks for Chris for that long detailed conversation about the new XPLR series from SRAM, super excited about what they're bringing to the table.  [01:00:03] Natural. I'm particularly excited about the suspension fork.  [01:00:07] To be an exceptional product for some. for everyone, but I think it's going.  [01:00:14] And I'm confident it's going to continue pushing the gravel industry forward.  [01:00:18] As always thank you for your support of the podcast. Dot or even become a member. ride to make a one-time contribution. www.buymeacoffee.com/thegravelride www.theridership.com. I t's a free global cycling community for adventure and gravel cyclists. Deals. Until next time here's to finding some dirt under your wheels [01:00:52]   

Two Ewes Fiber Adventures
Ep 167: Dominant and Submissive Colors in Stranded Knitting

Two Ewes Fiber Adventures

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2021 58:01


In stranded knitting what is the opposite of the dominant color?  Is it the submissive color? There are lessons we've apparently not learned about alternating skeins and we have a Patreon patron giveaway! Thank you to all our patrons! You can join them in supporting us at patreon.com/twoewes Show notes with full transcript, photos, and links can be found in the podcast section of our shop website: TwoEwesFiberAdventures.com.  Subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Subscribe on Android or Subscribe on Google Podcasts Marsha's Projects Atlas (Ravelry link) by Jared Flood using Navia Tradition. The pattern is also available at his website. I have attached the sleeves to the body and have knit about five rows of the colorwork. The Jared Flood video on stranded knitting was great and the tutorial on trapping the floats holding yarn in the right hand was very good except it did not show how to capture the floats with continental stitch. Knitting Help had a very good short video Trapping the Yarn (Continental). Kelly's Projects Dark Green Forest cardigan (Ravelry link) by Christina Körber-Reith. She also has the pattern at her website, Strickhauzeit. The yarn is an overdyed handspun CVM in a 3-ply (fingering to sport weight). I have completed the body and one pocket lining. This is the only knitting or spinning that I've done.  All my creative energy has been going to class materials for my two different online classes for fall. Classes start on August 30.  Patreon Pattern Giveaway! Thank you patrons! We appreciate your generous support! Patrons get a pattern of their choice up to $8.00. Contact Kelly with your pattern selection! Email twoewes@twoewesfiberadventures.com or message 1hundredprojects on Ravelry or Instagram.  Summer Spin In - Ends September 6th About a month to go! We have prizes generously donated by  Three Green Sisters. They make beautiful bags for your knitting, looms, spinning wheels or travel. They also have now have table linens.  Show Transcript Marsha 0:03 Hi, this is Marsha Kelly 0:04 and this is Kelly. Marsha 0:05 We are the Two Ewes of Two Ewes Fiber Adventures. Thanks for stopping by. Kelly 0:10 You'll hear about knitting, spinning, dyeing, crocheting, and just about anything else we can think of as a way to play with string. Marsha 0:17 We blog and post show notes at Two Ewes Fiber Adventures dot com. Kelly 0:22 And we invite you to join our Two Ewes Fiber Adventures group on Ravelry. I'm 1hundredprojects, Marsha 0:29 and I am betterinmotion. Kelly 0:31 We are both on Instagram and Ravelry. And we look forward to meeting you there. Both 0:36 Enjoy the episode. Marsha 0:42 Hi, Kelly. Kelly 0:43 Hey, Marsha. How are you doing? Marsha 0:45 I'm doing well. Kelly 0:46 Good. Do you have wine tonight? Marsha 0:49 No, I don't. Kelly 0:50 It's not morning. So we could be drinking wine! Marsha 0:53 No, it's uh, it's now let's see what time is. It's almost it's a little past five 5:30. Yeah. On Thursday. Yeah. And full disclosure. I already had a beer. Kelly 1:03 Okay. Well, I... that's why I don't have... I guess we're in the same boat because that's why I don't have a glass of wine. Because Robert and I went out to Monterey. And we took the dogs and we walked on the rec trail. And this is the first time I've been out on the rec trail. I'm pretty sure it's the first time I've been out there since since March of 2020. Marsha 1:28 Mm hmm. Kelly 1:29 So it was really nice as a beautiful day. We got to see-- we got to watch... There were two women there with SPCA shirts on. And they had these boxes that were like the pet store boxes like you know, you bring home an animal in with holes in the sides. Marsha 1:46 All right, yeah. Kelly 1:47 And so I saw that and then I saw their shirts and I thought, Oh, I bet they're releasing, releasing something from the Wildlife Center! On the edge of this little point where they were sitting was a gull, a seagull. And they were watching it and so Robert and I stopped to watch too and pretty soon-- and then the bird is making all kinds of noise and you know... And they're just standing you know, just kind of standing back and watching and and finally it takes off. And the one woman says, "Go, Falcon, go! And never come back!" So we watched, we got to watch a seagull be released for you know, who knows what was the reason that it was in the Wildlife Center. But that was pretty cool. And Beary had a good time. We did probably three miles on the rec trail with him. So he's he's doing better. Marsha 2:39 That's good. Kelly 2:40 Yeah, yeah. Yeah, he's gotten Marsha 2:42 and what's he like on those three miles? Is he huffin' and puffin'? Or is he doing pretty good? Kelly 2:47 He, by the end, he was kind of slow. And we... It was one of those kind of walks where, you know, we weren't just powering through it. We we stopped let him sniff and stopped to look at the scenery, you know. It's that kind of walk. So slower than Bailey would like to go. She's itching to just, you know, I mean, she likes to stop and sniff too, but she's itching to just take a walk where we just move, you know. Actually, I think she would probably like it if I ran. I don't know that that's gonna happen. But I think she would like that. So they had a good time. We had a good time. And then, but the reason I'm not having wine is not because I saw a bird on the rec trail, but because after that, this was our little date day, it was Robert's day off. We went to lunch and wine tasting at Taste of Monterey. We had our subscription to pick up for the month of August. And so Robert made reservations. And it was the first time I've been inside, like inside eating. Marsha 3:51 Oh, yeah? Kelly 3:52 Since, you know, since March. They had probably... it's a pretty good sized space. And they had I would say probably six tables, five tables, maybe was the most they had while we were there. And they had these big fans going and and we were all sitting you know, spaced apart. And you know, of course wearing masks when you arrive but you can't eat or drink wine with a mask. But they don't do wine tasting like where you stand at the bar and do the wine tasting where they pour you the, you know, the six little pours. They're doing flights. So we got our free flights. And oh my gosh! Marsha 4:41 Well, Kelly, I saw your Instagram posts today. And I know there was a lot of wine but there was no food. Did you have lunch? Kelly 4:49 We did! Yes. We started with wine first we had, well, we both had clam chowder, and then they have a like a flat... They have a lot of different food but we got this flatbread pizza. Then we each had a bowl of clam chowder. So, but yeah, I've had my wine for the day because we had the flight. And then one of the ones from the flight, I decided that I wanted a glass of it, but, but it was pretty, pretty generous flight! Kelly 5:03 I sometimes find that the wine tasting is a lot of wine. Yeah, it can add up to several classes. Kelly 5:21 Yeah, no, these were, I think... because they don't have a lot of customers. You know, it's all very restricted. We had to have reservations. And I think it was supposed to be three, two ounce pours, but I think these were more than that. Because they looked like they... they looked like very generous, very generous pours. So, but very good. I had white wine Robert had red. And it was a fun day. We, you know, I haven't done anything like that in a really long time. Well, like everyone else, you know? Marsha 5:53 Yeah. Yeah. Kelly 5:54 So. Marsha 5:55 So are they...? Sounds like they're pretty...they're still sort of strict about masks. And Marsha 6:01 oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. Marsha 6:03 Because it's interesting here in Seattle, they're still well, it's like, it's hard to know, people are out walking around without masks on. Kelly 6:11 Yeah, outside was mixed. Yeah. And I don't wear a mask outside unless... There was a couple of places on the trail where it got crowded... that, you know, I put my mask on. Just because there were so many people. Marsha 6:25 It's interesting, where you go in stores, like, I went, Oh, the hardware store everybody's masked up, the grocery store everybody's masked up. I went down...this was a couple weeks ago, I went down to pick up some Thai food, they are a masked up at the Thai place. But right next door, there's a bottle shop and I bought like a four pack a beer. Nobody in there had a mask on. So I don't know. Now that's several weeks ago, and now the Delta variant is now I guess, sort of taking off. Kelly 6:59 Yeah. Marsha 6:59 So maybe people are getting more cautious. I wear a mask. And I'm also trying to wear a mask, too, around... I'm not around a lot of children. But the the little girl across the alley from me comes over a lot. And you know, she's seven, I think right? And she can't get vaccinated. And I hear different stories that even if you're vaccinated, you can carry it. And then I've also heard you can't carry it. So I don't know. I thought it's better just to mask up when Frances comes over. Kelly 7:28 Well, if you're vaccinated, it's rare. It's rare, but you can actually contract it. Marsha 7:33 Right. Kelly 7:34 And if you do contract it, it's not generally as bad. The people who are ending up in the hospital, most of them are, are people who have not been vaccinated. But yeah, while you had it, if you had a breakthrough case, while you had it, you would be infectious. Marsha 7:50 It's not a hardship to wear a mask around Frances. So... Kelly 7:53 Right, right, Marsha 7:54 or out in public at all. So I'm still masking up in store. Kelly 7:57 Yes, me too. But well, I don't go to the store very often. But yeah, I have I have been been doing that. So. But it was nice to get out. Marsha and I were talking about this before the episode started. And she said to me, Kelly, have you been off the property since last March? Marsha 8:13 It sounds like maybe you have not been off? Kelly 8:17 Your answer to that is pretty much no. Where did I go? Oh, I know. I went to meet some work friends. We went to... we got together and we worked on some stuff to get ready for classes. And I mean, we're talking about, you know, Watsonville. So it was not that far away. Maybe 25 miles, maybe 35 miles. I was like, Oh my god, I don't think I've been in the car and gone this far in over a year! I mean, my longest car trip has been like to go pick up groceries or you go to the grocery store, which I don't do very often. That's, you know, during the worst of it, we had it delivered and then and then... or Robert would go get groceries. And then once everybody was vaccinated, Aunt Betty went back to doing some of the grocery shopping and Robert was doing the other grocery shopping so you know, I'm lucky to not have to do that. It's not my favorite task anyway. But honestly, that's the furthest I've gone! Marsha 9:20 You have staff. [laughing] You have staff to take care of you. [laughing] Kelly 9:26 Yes. And so and, and you know, there'll be days where I think oh, I'm going to go I'll go out to Monterey and walk on the rec trail. But you know, like Robert takes the car. The truck is almost always now parked in the backyard. It's a little bit of a... it's not like Oh, just run outside and jump in the car. Right? And then if I'm gonna take two dogs, I can't walk that far yet. So am I going to take one? What am I going to do? Am I going to take Bailey because she can go far? She could do a you know, a normal rec trail walk without stopping at every bush and, you know, lots of breaks. And then I If I leave Bailey home, or I mean, leave Beary home? What am I gonna do with him is Aunt Betty gonna be home? Can she watch him? Or she you know, does she have other things to do? So anyway, it's just my-- you know, it is just become, it's just become so easy to stay at home. So it was...I have to say it was really nice to blow the dust off. Get out and, and actually smell the ocean. Yeah, so that was really, really nice! Marsha 10:28 And dust off your restaurant manners. Kelly 10:31 Exactly. Marsha 10:32 Did you know how to behave? At the restaurant? Kelly 10:34 I did! Actually, yes, yes, I did! Marsha 10:38 I read in the New York Times that a lot of people don't want to go back to waiting tables because people are being so rude. You know, they they're out of practice going to a restaurant I guess. So well, I'll tell you why I had a beer already. I'm making an effort to get out of a certain room that's under my house. The name can't be mentioned. So I went for a hike today. I don't remember if I talked about this or not. But I went to visit. Kelly 11:07 You did, yes. Marsha 11:08 Ben up in Index. Yes, I did. That's what part of the discussion... Anyway, there was a woman who was on that hike with with me. And so I gave her my name and email address and she contacted me. And so we got together today. And we did a hike and a friend, another friend of hers. And so when I got home, I gave the dog a bath. Because he's very dusty. I took a bath. And then I poured myself a beer and I laid on the bed and knitted for a while until it was time to record. So that's why I had a beer so early. But anyway, it was a nice hike. And I'm just gonna say it was... People who live here in the northwest will know what I'm talking about. People who don't live in the northwest will be kind of amused by the name of where I went. Um, so the the hike was to Fragrant Lake. I don't know why it's called Fragrant Lake. It didn't smell bad. It didn't smell good. It just was a lake. But anyway, it's um, near Larrabee State Park, which is on-- this is the part that people are gonna laugh--Chuckanut drive. And so, Kelly, full disclosure, before we recorded we were looking at, I think when we first started when we first called you said what are you doing? I said, I'm trying to figure out why is it called Chuckanut. So and we figure it out. It's a ... it's a native name. Kelly 12:33 Yeah, and Wikipedia says that it's Chuckanut well there's mountain a mountain range and, and Chuckanut is a word for a long beach far from a narrow entrance. Okay, so just south of Bellingham is what it says. Yeah, Marsha 12:55 so it basically connects. It's about about 21 miles long. Oh, Kelly, we can walk it! Kelly 13:02 The trail? Oh, fun. Yeah. Marsha 13:04 21 miles, that's our number. Anyway, the it runs from about Burlington...No it's further north than Burlington up to Bellingham. Kelly 13:15 okay, Marsha 13:15 And it runs along the water so it reminds me very much of.. kind of Big Sur a lane in each direction, you know. Steep wall to one side and steep drop off to the other side down to the water and more trees than Big Sur but it's just as dramatic as that. Really pretty. So anyway, we went on that hike today so Kelly 13:36 but not 21 miles? Marsha 13:38 No, we didn't do 21 miles it's four or something. Kelly 13:41 Yeah, nice. Marsha 13:43 But I have been I have been out and about and I don't know if you saw my Instagram post, but the the in-laws or yeah, the... so well I should say actually, technically my former brother-in-law and sister-in-law and nephew, but they came to visit. And I have to say we had a great time. It was just a fun visit. And we did all kinds of things. But one of the things we did is I, as I talked about in the last episode, Ben is just obsessed with Index, Washington because that's the big-- where all the walls are for climbing. And that's where I had gone two weeks ago for the hike. Well, they were having on Saturday, July 31, they were having a kind of an art festival with music and and all different kinds of crafts for sale and he really wanted us to go up there for it. Okay, whatever. So we went. It was really fun, really good music. They had a brought in a... like a trailer with a woodfired pizza oven on it, you know, so you can get pizza there. And Kelly 13:43 Nice! Marsha 13:48 But so that was really fun. So we walked around, did that and then and then they were really wanting to do a hike. So Paul--no Ben said, Yeah, there's a couple of different hikes but the one I would recommend is one called Lake Serene. Now I know I have listeners that live here in the Pacific Northwest who are hikers, and they'll go, yes, Lake Serene. Ben said, "I don't know," he said. And I said, "How long is it?" He said, "So like maybe like six miles round trip. And you know, the elevation gain," he said, "I think it's less than 2000." Wrong! It's eight miles! I think... now I don't remember if it's 2400 or 2600 feet of elevation gain, they actually... Someone's done a great job on the trail where they've... so it's pretty easy going at the beginning kind of wide. And not a lot of rocks or roots, you know, on the trail. But the further you go, it becomes actually like stairs. Someone's done, built the trail, they've actually taken the rocks and put them in place where they actually form steps that you have to climb up. And then at certain points, they've actually brought up big like four by eight beams and made stairs. Kelly 16:00 Okay, Marsha 16:00 Yeah, it's, it was hard. It was really hard. And we started way too late, because Ben and I got to index about 10 o'clock in the morning. But the... my brother in law and sister in law and the nephew and Paul, they arrived, they got there about 12:15 even though we all left at the same time. They stopped and had breakfast and they did all this stuff along the way. So they were really late. They got there at 12:15. Looked at the Art Festival, then they decided they want lunch. So we get to the trail at 2:50. Which is way too late to be starting. And Kelly 16:33 oh yeah. Marsha 16:34 But I didn't know it was eight miles. Kelly 16:36 Oh my gosh. Marsha 16:37 Anyway, so we start out, it takes us about two hours to get to the top. I arrived at the top at five I think and we hung out there till six. And then we started the the trip back down. And we got back to the trailhead, probably around eight o'clock or 8:30, something like that. Then we had to go from the trail head back into Index. And the thing is, Index is such a small town. There's no restaurants there. And the pizza truck was gone. So we decided we have to find food. Because now it's like we've been out. And now we're you know, we get back in. I mean, now it's like the minutes are just ticking away. Kelly 17:13 Yeah. Marsha 17:14 And it's now like 9:30. And and so I think the only thing we can do is just start heading down the road, down Highway 2 back towards Seattle. And to see what we come up with. Well, everything's closed, right. So the nearest town we can find anything is the city of Monroe, which is... they have fast food and everything. Well, like, and but the thing is, if you're that starving, I don't think you could be that picky. But like nobody can eat McDonald's. Nobody can eat Taco Time. So we end up at this pizza place. But the pizza place is now...it's 10 o'clock and they start, they stop indoor dining at 10. So everybody walks away and I said but the door the door said they're open till 11. Well, they're open for takeout or delivery till 11. I said, let's just order the pizza and we'll just go sit in the car, because now it's Kelly 18:00 The voice of reason, Marsha! Marsha 18:03 I know! So it's now you know, it's like 10, 10:15, 10:30 we finally get this pizza. And my sister in law said to me, Well, are we going to go find a picnic table? Where are we going to eat this? I said, you're eating in the car. We're not finding a picnic table. We're not driving around in that hour of the night looking for a picnic table. And her son, my nephew said, we've got all those chairs in the back of the car that Paul had brought for us to listen to music. I said pull those chairs out. So we pull the chairs out and set them up in the parking lot of the pizza place. And we sit there till about 11:30 at night in a row in the strip mall parking lot eating pizza and salad and having root beer and anyways. I don't know, do you know how... do you ever have that experience where something should be awful, really the idea of being-you're so hungry and you're tired and you know you're super sweaty but now you're just really cold because you're wet and it's cold. But then you end up having like a great time sitting in the pizza place because was because we now we've been fed. And we're laughing and everybody sort of revived. It was like the funniest thing. And then in the middle of all of this, I posted a picture of this on Instagram and the video. It's the streetsweeper. The street sweeper arrived in the parking lot. So we're sitting there now with this truck going around. I don't know, the whole thing was so ridiculous... Kelly 19:28 Funny! Marsha 19:30 ...that I think in some ways it was sort of the highlight of the day in some ways. You know? Kelly 19:35 yeah, yeah, Marsha 19:36 Do you know what I mean. Like something that should be so awful ended up being so funny. Kelly 19:41 An adventure! Marsha 19:42 it's a kind of an adventure. Yeah. And I have to say my nephew is 14 and that's that age. That's the age grumpy and crabby. You know, honestly, and... Kelly 19:54 teenager... Marsha 19:57 Teenager truthfully! That's how they are. He is the most chipper kid! I mean, he's just cheerful. He didn't complain once on the hike. Happy. So it's like, oh my gosh, like, teenagers can be happy? [laughing] So yeah, just really just, he's a cool kid and it was just a really, really fun visit from the family. Kelly 20:23 Nice. That's really good. Marsha 20:24 So, yeah. Anyway, so those are my adventures in hiking. Because I have to get out of... as we know, we have to get out of a certain part of the house. Kelly 20:34 Well, and apparently, I just need to get off of the property. Marsha 20:40 You have to get off your property. Anyway. Well, okay, so we've now... this is... I'm looking at the clock here. That's 22 minutes and we haven't even gotten to fibers. Kelly 20:50 Yeah, I think you have the most interesting things to talk about. Marsha 20:55 So I've been working on, let me say I've been working on the Atlas. It's a pullover, colourwork pullover, by Jared flood. And it's been... it's been really interesting. So since we last recorded, I finished the second sleeve. I stayed up till... because today is Thursday... Tuesday night, I stayed up till 2:30 in the morning, because I became obsessed with the sweater. [laughing] Marsha 21:24 So I attached both sleeves. So as a reminder, this is you know, bottom up. You knit the bottom, you know the sweater from the bottom up, then knit the sleeves and attach them under, under the arms and then do the yoke. And when you Kelly 21:37 when you attach them, it seems like a really amazingly high number of stitches. Marsha 21:45 Seems like an amazingly high number of stitches! And it's also, I have to say, it's really hard to attach. Because you have the big circle of the body. And then you have these two little circles on the sleeves. And it's it's it's hard to get the, the... well, they're not...they're circular needles, but a certain section of the circular needles are straight, right, And it's really hard, it's not my favorite. Kelly 22:14 When I've done a sweater like that I've used two circular needles. So that... so that one of them is going like on the front part of one sleeve, the front of the sweater and then the front part of the other sleeve. And then the other circular needle... Marsha 22:28 Oh, that might be better... Kelly 22:29 ...the back part of the sleeve, the back of the sweater and the back part of the other sleeve. Yeah, I was not able... I did a baby sweater that way because I was trying to understand the construction before I did a sweater than I was making. And when I did the baby sweater I think that that's where I found that suggestion. Because in a baby sweater it's especially hard because the turns are so tight. Marsha 22:53 Yeah. really tight then, you know, yeah. Kelly 22:55 So it was like oh, okay, this is not just good for a small sweater. This would work really well. I was having that same trouble with the large sweater so I so I used the two circular needles. You know, you have to make sure you keep track of where the starting of your... where's the starting row marker supposed to go? Marsha 23:15 Right Kelly 23:16 I suggested that to Aunt Betty on a sweater that she was doing. And she was having a little bit of trouble at first because it was color work too. And so she had to kind of like rethink when the pattern says at the start of your round, the start of her round wasn't between the two needles. The two sets of circular needles. Like it wasn't the middle of the sleeve. If that makes sense? Marsha 23:42 Yeah, no, it does. I should have done that because it was it was kind of a struggle I have to admit it was not really-- but I wrestled it into submission. Kelly 23:50 but you're done, yeah, wrestled it Marsha 23:51 I wrestled the thing. So the sleeves are attached and so I that that night Tuesday as I say I stayed up till about 230 in the morning to attaching the sleeves and then I did two rows of the color work and then I was like okay, I'm still wide awake at 2:30. I thought, you have to go to bed, that's ridiculous Kelly 24:11 Well after that and still being wide awake if you if you did keep going, you could have been awake all night. [laughing] Marsha 24:21 So I've learned... so as everybody knows I've not really done color work. I did years ago and I did it the wrong way. You know, I just kept dropping and picking up the different colors and that's not the way you're supposed to do it. So I talked about this in the last episode, but Jared Flood has a great video which there's a link on the show notes about how to-- about color dominance. So we talked about that. So I do know that the the dominant color is in your left hand and I guess the submissive color... [laughing] is in your right hand. And so then he has a really good video too, about trapping the yarn. And so that that's excellent. What I did not know how to do though in this while I was doing the color work is there are some areas where you are... So let me just say, when the the submissive color is in your right hand you're throwing, right, and the dominant color in your left hand you're picking. I throw when I knit, I don't pick. I don't know what throwing is really called. I always have the yarn in my right hand and I throw and so I don't pick or continental with the yarn in my left hand. So I'm having to learn sort of get comfortable with that. So he talks about picking up or trapping the yarn. But I'm throwing so with the yarn is in your right hand. Kelly 25:52 I mean, it's with both colors in his right hand. Is that right? I think that's what you said. Marsha 25:57 That's true. Yeah, he was demonstrating holding the dominant color in your right hand. But he also does, he said he's more comfortable holding both colors in his right hand. So I had to watch a video, how do you trap the yarn, continental style. And so I put it... There is... I found one a really good one, it's short. It's only a minute long. And it's from knittinghelp.com. And they have a great video. It's just Trapping the Yarn, Continental in parentheses. So I have that in the show notes. So I had to figure that out. And there are you know, all these... Everybody says this, but what did we do before we had YouTube? Because there's so many tutorials, you can get a question answered instantly by looking at a YouTube video. What I'm at now, though, is, and I talked about this before, is the chart tells you...The color work has three colors, and it tells you which is going to be the dominant color each row. But let me restate that a better way. Each row indicates which is the dominant color and which is the submissive color. So and then some of the rows, you have the dominant color in your left hand and some of them you're going to have to submissive colors in your right hand. Okay, yeah, this has got me confused. I'm not sure how you manage, do yarn management, with two colors in your... well with three colors. So one in my left hand and two in my right hand. So I have to... I've stopped because I now need to go watch another... there's got to be a video about how you do that. Yeah, because right now I was started out and I'm just twisting the yarn, I mean, the yarn keeps getting twisted and twisted. And so there's got to be a way, perhaps his technique of holding the two colors where you twist your hand. To watch that again, Kelly 27:48 I had three colors when I did the Orcas Run sweater in some rows, very few. But there were some rows where I ended up with the the white, the dark brown and the beige color of the CVM. And I think I looked up something, but it was really a matter of just kind of like angling your finger one way or the other. Yeah, you didn't really have to twist it. It turned out that you didn't really have to twist anything. I could not describe it to you now. But when I was doing it, I do remember it was kind of like something about the angle of your finger holding the yarn. So yeah, I'm sure you can find something because I must have found it. I must have found it somewhere. Although I'm not... I'm not much of a video tutorial person. I would much rather see the words like a blog post. I'm sure I probably found a blog post somewhere. You know, what people used to do before, before we used to read blog posts. And then before that they had grandmothers and mothers who really taught them I guess or friends. It doesn't involve all that twisting. Although I guess your yarn could get twisted up as you're going but but you really aren't twisting things. Yeah. Marsha 29:04 So I've done...let's see how many rows have I done of this so far? I've done eight rows. Kelly 29:12 Okay. How's the color looking? Marsha 29:16 Oh, it looks pretty good. I've not done-- I've not done really any more than I did. I've not done as much as I did in my sample. Kelly 29:22 Oh, okay. Okay, because I remember with your swatch you were feeling... you were telling yourself to just keep going with that plan, but you were kind of questioning how it was gonna look. So I'm curious. Just, Marsha 29:38 I'm still questioning. But I'm planning ahead. Yeah, yeah. Because I have no choice. Kelly 29:45 Right. You have the yarn. You have the yarn you have. Yeah, Marsha 29:48 I have the yarn I have and I don't and there really are. I think there's only eight colors. And they're really--the only one that would possibly work is maybe like the cream would be more contrast? Kelly 29:59 Right. But that wasn't what Mark wanted. Marsha 30:03 No, and I and I, but everything else is sort of, I don't know, I just don't think that the work. So I'm plowing ahead and I, and I like this yarn. It's very, it's it's a woolly wall, and I'm finding all kinds of things in it. Straw and plastic. I'm not sure where that's from, oh, it's almost like they, they bundled the wool up in a, you know that that plastic, you know, like blue tarps? You know, they're sort of fibrous, Kelly 30:33 Kind of like feed bags. Yeah, this is the reason that you should never if you're a fiber producer, you should never store your fiber in a in a feed bag, those plastic feed bags, because that's basically what they are. They're woven. They're woven plastic strips. Yeah, they're woven out of plastic strips and those plastic strips break off and anyway, it gets in the wool, and that's what you're seeing. Marsha 31:03 Yeah, yeah. Like I and just before we started recording, I pulled this like, little piece and like, Oh, I'm gonna pull that out. Because that can't be comfortable. You know, having it in there. I'll pull it out. It's like, it's like it was about two inches long. Kelly 31:15 Yeah, spun into the wool. It really degrades the price of your of your wool. I can't even remember now where I heard this. It must have been at like a fleece judging where someone was talking about it, and how how bad it is for the price of your wool if you have if you have any of that plastic in it. So. So anyway, that's why when you said that it was like, Oh, I remember. I remember hearing about this stuff. Marsha 31:43 But that's all I have for projects either. Then I have not picked up my socks. I've not picked up my shawl. I have in the evenings in the nice weather, I just been sitting on the deck and spinning for about an hour or 45 minutes or so. So I'm, I'm still spinning but not any... No progress of any significance to report. Kelly 32:05 You still have quite a bit of that spinning to do before you're finished with that project. Marsha 32:09 Yeah, yeah. But I've just been obsessed with this sweater. Kelly 32:15 Well, that's cool. It sounds like it's gonna be really pretty. Marsha 32:18 I think it's gonna be pretty. It's shockingly bright. I mean, I don't think most men want to wear this sweater. But Mark is. He likes color. Kelly 32:29 Yeah, yeah. No, I think it's really it's gonna be really pretty. Yeah. Marsha 32:34 You'll see him on the beach from a mile away. Kelly 32:37 Right! Well, Robert has a couple of T shirts that are bright like that. He has a bright Kelly green one and bright orange. Marsha 32:45 And he likes bright socks too. Kelly 32:47 Yeah. Marsha 32:48 And Mark likes breaks. He likes brown socks too. So anyway. Well, enough of my projects. What about you? What's going on with your cardigan? Kelly 32:56 Well, yeah, I'm also pretty monogamous. And not, not very much has happened. Although I think from the last episode. I have actually finished and bound off the bottom. Marsha 33:11 Oh, wow! Kelly 33:12 Yeah, I think I was in the pockets. Marsha 33:14 Yeah, we were talking about pockets. Kelly 33:17 And so the pockets are, I want to say like six inches deep. I think I might have gone a little too far. I thought I was following the pattern and counting but maybe not. I think I was supposed to have five in the honeycombs. And that's what I have. So I have the the pockets. They're they're kind of... well it's not blocked, so you can't really tell and the ribbing on the top and the cables pull them in. But right now they look like skinny deep pockets. Marsha 33:49 Mm hmm. Kelly 33:50 But I think once it's blocked, they'll be more proportional and they won't... they actually won't look that deep. So I got past the point I finished the pockets. I did the... I think it's a one inch of ribbing or an inch and a half of ribbing at the bottom which seemed too short to me because I always put like... I love ribbing so I just do a lot at the bottom. But I didn't. I thought, This sweater is already long enough. Because it's it's tunic kind of. Well, like a sweater you could wear over leggings and you're behind will not show. Marsha 34:20 Right. Kelly 34:21 So I don't know if you'd call that tunic length but it is long. That was my--that's what I wanted and I looked on the project pages. Oh, by the way, the name of this sweater is called Dark Green Forest. And if you look on the pattern, I think on the pattern page it looks pretty long. But then if you look on the project pages, there are quite a few people who put quite a bit of length into the sweater. I mean it is designed to be long. The woman the the very first picture shows it like below the pocket you know, below the back pocket of a pair of jeans. So anyway, I'm excited about the progress that I've made because I got to bind off the bottom. But then once I bound off the bottom, it just sat for a while. And then the other night I picked it up and I needed something just mindless to do. So I, I work the pocket lining of one of the pockets. So while we've been sitting here, right now, I've picked up the stitches for the other pocket lining. But I'm not very good at counting. I think I've admitted that before. And for these pocket linings, I really want to make sure I do the right number of rows. So I'm not knitting on it right now because I know I would... It's such a short little bit of knitting that I know I would go across and back and across and be like, Oh, wait, am I on this row? Or did I just do two rows? And so I'm not knitting on it right now. I'm just sitting it on my lap and I'm, I'm petting it. But then I have to pick up the sleeves. And I'm gonna admit to something here. So how many conversations have we had about alternating skeins? Marsha 36:16 Oh, my God, Kelly. Don't tell me. Kelly 36:19 So I am alternating skeins. I am! Marsha 36:21 Okay. Kelly 36:22 And what did I tell you about your sweater? How you should like save off some of the yoke yarn for the sleeves. Marsha 36:32 Mm hmm. Kelly 36:32 So that you're not going to start the sleeves with a totally different skein? Marsha 36:36 Mm hmm, Kelly 36:38 Guess what I did not do? I did not save any of that yarn at that level where I separate it off for the sleeves. So I think it'll be all right... Marsha 36:49 Well, we're always good at giving advice, but not following advice, right? Kelly 36:52 Like what's the point of learning from your mistakes? Then after you've learned from the mistake, you make the same mistake again another time. I mean, I felt like I learned from my mistakes because I was able... as they say you know if you can teach another person, then you know something. And I taught you how to do that, I talked about it in the podcast, I taught all our listeners about that. And yet, I just plowed ahead. So there will be a color change mark. But there's a... it's very slight. And there's a color change mark when one of my skins ran out and I had to put another one in. It's just I mean, you know, hand dyed yarn. So I don't know, I'll look for the skein that looks the most. I mean, they all... this is the problem. They all look, they all look exactly the same. So maybe it will be more fine than I think. But I wish I had a few yards of... I wish I had a few yards of the yarn where I left off with the sleeve to blend into the next one. So anyway Marsha 38:05 Lesson learned--again. Kelly 38:07 I know. And I was trying to think well, could I undo it? And like rip back but you can't because if I rip back I'm gonna be ripping back across the body. Not doing that! So we'll see. I'll report back. It's a it's a, but it's not meant to be a you know, go out to dinner sweater. So it's not going to be a big deal if it's terrible. But I don't think it... I don't think it'll be terrible. I just wish I had remembered. It's dumb not to remember that. Marsha 38:39 Yes, it is. Both 38:40 [laughing] Marsha 38:44 But you know what I would have done? I mean, the thing is, you know I made a very similar... I mean, it's sort of the same vein as this sweater that--I don't even remember what it was called. Remember it was--we dyed the yarn at your house? That teal color. Kelly 39:01 Yeah, Recoleta? Marsha 39:03 No, wasn't the Recoleta Looking at my page... looking at this... Oh, here it is Northern Lights. Oh no, I'm sorry. It's called Iba I-B-A by Bonne Marie Burns, or Bonnie Marie Burns. And I called it Northern Lights Iba. And it's very... It almost looks like it's variegated yarn. If you look-- I'm looking at the pictures of it now. And that's what I did is, I knit the whole body and then I went to pick up the sleeves and they're completely different. So I had to rip the whole I ripped it all the way back and just recast on and redid the whole thing alternating. So dumb! Kelly 39:41 Yeah, cuz you didn't alternate at all. Marsha 39:42 I didn't. At all. Yeah, Kelly 39:44 Yeah. Well, at least I at least I managed to do that. And But yeah, I was like, yeah. Oh, well. Oh, well. Well, we'll see. I mean, maybe, maybe you won't even be able to tell I pick up the sleeves, but I think I think you probably will. Marsha 40:06 It's funny. I'm just it's just a comment. I haven't worn that sweater in years. And when did I finish that? 2018. I need to wear that sweater. Kelly 40:16 We should do...We should do a sweater round up on one of our episodes where we just get out all our sweaters. And we just talk about them and why we're gonna keep them, why we don't wear them, or why we don't wear them, what are the ones we do wear? Why do we wear them? That would be very interesting. We should do that. Let's do that next episode. Marsha 40:39 Okay, Let me write this down. Kelly 40:42 Okay. Yeah, I think that would be interesting. I would like to know... Well and the other thing about about skeins and handspun is that I... With a funky grandpa sweater, in that one I was saved by the stripes, because it has those little thin stripes of dyed color. Because that yarn when I... I mean that was a sweaters worth of wool that I carded and spun. And those skeins when I would put a new skein on. I mean, just because of the the variation in the wool. Those skeins were different colors. It was natural. I hadn't dyed it at all. It was just the natural gray but the skeins were different colors. And so even if I were making a sweater out of handspun that wasn't dyed, I might consider alternating skeins. When you have done a sweaters worth from a fleece you know they, the skeins, can be very different. Not the whole skein is different. But the part of the skein where you start the new skein can be different than the skein, the part of the skein, where you leave off, Marsha 42:02 right Kelly 42:03 and it can make a stripe. You know, you can have a sharp division of color. Whereas in within the skein, you have color variation, but it's not a sharp division of color. Marsha 42:16 Yeah. Kelly 42:17 So anyway, that's just a tip, if you're planning to do a handspun sweater with your summer spin in yarn. But that's where I am with my project. That's the only thing I worked on, I did not do any spinning, I don't think since the last, since the last episode. Really everything that I have, all my creative energy has been going toward getting my class materials ready for school. We don't start until... students come back on the 30th of August. So I still have a good chunk of summer left, which feels really good. But you know, we'll be online, I'm online. Our classes are-- they were trying to get back face-to-face with more classes. So they have some that are fully face-to-face. Very few. Some that are hybrid, where students will be on campus, one or two days a week, and then the rest of it is online. And that's that's a type of class we've always had. That's just not in the pandemic, we've always had hybrid classes and online classes. But we have many more online classes, you know, now with the pandemic, and very few hybrid or face-to-face, about maybe 40%, I think. But my classes are all online, because I've worked so dang hard to get them ready. Plus, plus, I am not confident that-- I'm not confident that we're going to stay. Marsha 43:48 Oh, in class? Kelly 43:49 ...any of the... Yeah, yeah, I think that at some point during the fall semester, it's likely that we might have to close down the face-to-face classes. So I didn't want to be in a position to have started with plans to do face-to-face and then ended up online anyway. So I just elected to do... I selected online classes. So anyway, I've been working on those. And actually, it's been fun. I've been enjoying that work. And it's been a long time since I've thought it was really fun to get my classes prepared. Yeah. So, you know, I've had some professional development and some of the things that we've done in these workshops, I'm now getting to implement and I'm feeling more comfortable with the system that we're using. So anyway, it's just been, it's been really fun. And it's quite a creative process because you have to create all these materials, you know, all the things I would have told... All this is obvious but but when you really think about all the things you would have told students while you were in class, because I'm doing an asynchronous online format. So everything I would have told students in class now has to be created to be provided to them on the, the, you know, the learning management system. So that's a lot of content creation. But it's creative. I mean, it feels creative to me. So it's been, it's been really, it's been pretty fun. Marsha 45:22 That's good. Because it, it didn't start out so fun. This whole online thing. So I'm glad you're having fun. Kelly 45:29 Yeah, then I won't go into a lot of detail about my pain. Everyone's heard it. But yeah, I'm getting some of the... I'm starting to reap some of the benefits of the learning that you know, all of that learning that I had to do. And so that's nice. It's nice when you move from rank novice, to feeling like you actually have a little bit of expertise. That is a good feeling. Marsha 46:00 Yeah. Kelly 46:01 It's taken a while, but, but I started to feel that way. So ask me again in November. [laughing] Marsha 46:09 Okay. Kelly 46:12 We'll see! We'll see whether I have progressed from rank novice to having some expertise or not. When it's not hypothetical, so. So anyway, yeah, that's all my all of my projects, I am going to just talk briefly about one of Robert's projects, because it's so interesting. So we have a toilet, that is 1938. I think the date stamped on the toilet is 1938. Purple. And it hasn't worked for a while. The mechanism on the inside was leaking. And he tried to get another one and it was still leaking. And so for a while we were using it like, turn the water off at the wall after using it, go back in to use it turn the water on at the wall, use it, turn the water off. Which is was terrible because the thumping in our pipes, I mean, something about that particular valve made that thumping sound happen in the pipes almost every time and sometimes it was like, Oh, my Gosh it's gonna shake them loose, and they're gonna break and that can't be good. So he took it out and put in a more modern toilet. Oh, the idea was, we're going to do this for now and then see what we can do with this. So anyway, he's been cleaning it out. Well, okay, it was not, it was not a dirty toilet. We-- it was cleaned before it was taken out of the house. So, but he's been cleaning off all of the deposits, mineral deposits from you know, since 1938. And so he's been working on this project for about, I don't know, five days, with different kinds of products. First starting with vinegar, and then moving on to hydrochloric acid. He brought me in a chunk, I took a picture and I showed it to Marsha, when we were first starting to get ready to record. He brought a chunk of this in that had just come off. And he said there were like four or five of them. It's like three eighths of an inch thick of calcium deposits. Marsha 48:22 It's shocking.I had no idea. Like, I.. Kelly 48:25 We'll put a picture in the show notes. Yeah. We have hard water. And then think, you know, 80 some years of hard water deposits. It's a, it's a chunk, a good three eighths of an inch thick, and about four inches long. And he said there were, I think at least four of them that came off like that. Four big pieces like that, plus a whole bunch of other, a whole bunch of other little bits that came off. But yeah, Marsha 48:56 yeah, who knew? I mean, it's just amazing. It really is kind of, I mean, Kelly 49:00 So and I could do the math, I'm kind of curious. I'm not-- I can't do it in my head here during the podcast. But you know, think about the circumference of the of the pipe, you know, where it flushes. The circumference, and think about going in three eighths of an inch all the way around. Like how much smaller that is. How much that restricts the flow. So anyway, very interesting. It's been an interesting project, he's found a place to get the interior workings of the toilet. He found out the model number. He's going to be able to I think get the interior workings but they're backordered. It's not the same kind of interior workings as a modern toilet has. So anyway, I'm excited about this project but very gross. The calcium I mean, it's just calcium, but Kelly 49:43 It's calcium, yeah. Kelly 49:59 But it's just it's, it's gross. Marsha 50:04 I find it less gross as more just sort of amazing. Well, what I want, I was like, what does it do to your insides? Like you're drinking that water? Right? Is it just passing it through? Kelly 50:18 Yeah, it doesn't sit. It doesn't just sit there. Well, it's calcium. Your body uses it. Marsha 50:22 Oh, that's true. Well then you're absorbing it I guess. Kelly 50:25 I think, yeah, yeah. I would think, I don't know. But this little chunk, it has all these striations like, archeology, Marsha 50:34 you need to count all those and see the rings. So yeah, like I like how many years is that? 1938 to 2021? Kelly 50:43 It's over eighty years. Marsha 50:45 Oh see this is why your the math teacher. Kelly 50:46 Yeah, it's over eighty years. Marsha 50:48 So you have like, in theory, you got 80 layers. Yeah, you need to get a bandsaw, cut it in half and count all the layers. Kelly 50:57 Yeah, when I was in, when I was in junior high we... I grew up in Fremont. And in Fremont. Well, right now it's the Tesla plant. But it was the GM plant, there was a GM auto plant there. And when I was in junior high, I took a class, a plastics class. And so we got to use all the like, tools, you know, lathe, and bandsaw, and sanding and all that, like they do in woodshop in metal shop, but it was with plastic. And one of the things that we got to work with, which was I thought was really fun. And it's the same idea. It's all the auto paint that had built up on the pipe over the, you know, there's like piping over the, I want to say conveyor belt, I don't know if that's the right, the right word, but in the, Marsha 51:45 in the assembly line, Kelly 51:46 assembly line. Yeah. So there's like a pipe and the paint spray. So these layers of paint build up on these pipes, and then they would crack them off. And you'd get this big chunk of layers of paint. And then, and then you could sand it down and make things out of it. So you know, people make rings or small things, but, but it was about probably, maybe three quarters of an inch thick. And round, you know, like, round on one side, because they've been attached to a, like a pipe. And then, and then you sand it down and shape it and all that. And it was really fun, because you could get some really cool colors. And you could see the rings, like the, the rings of, you know, in wood. And it was all different colors, depending on what they were painting. And so, so. So that's kind of cool. And it was, you know, kind of ugly at first because it was all rough you know. But I don't think you could polish this calcium. I don't know, maybe you could I'm not gonna do it. Marsha 52:55 Well, it'll be interesting to see, you know, if once he gets the new mechanism, how well it works, you know, because it probably was so constricted. There's no flow, you know? Kelly 53:05 Yeah, no, it didn't work very well before. But But I can Yeah, I can see why. So anyway, that that that's not my project. But it's something that has been going on here that I think is interesting to share. So all right, well, we do have the summer spin in and that ends in about a month. So keep spinning. And we are going to have prizes, we're going to have prizes provided by Three Green Sisters. And so get your finished objects into the finished object thread. There's one for skeins, finished skeins, and one for finished projects made out of handspun. So we don't have as many people participating as last year. But we do have quite a few people participating. And we do have a lot of people who are still weaving from the winter weave along. So that's kind of fun, to still be going into the winter weave along thread and... saying I have to get going to my Marsha 54:07 I have to get going on my spinning project. I have to finish it by the sixth. I have to get going. Kelly 54:12 You have a month. Yeah, well, you have time, you can do it, you have time. And then the other thing is we wanted to take some time to thank our patrons. So we have a Patreon account. And that's a way that listeners can contribute to the podcast if they like to, you sign up to be a patron at a particular a particular level and then you just, you, know make that contribution monthly. The idea of it is it's a, you know, monthly monthly contribution for however long you would like to support us. And we have some patrons that I want to thank so I'm going to just read off the names and then we also have a Patreon Patreon patron giveaway. So I just want to make sure that we thank Connie and Cheryl and Jan and Heddi, and Jane and Colleen, Mindy, Eman, Amy, and Patti and Joan. And we have Tammy and Teresa to thank and Kathy. And Nathalie, thank you so much. Martha, Melody, Angie, Joanne, JoyLaine. Thank you! Gretta, Barbara, Rachel W., Angela, Vicki, Charlene, Erika N. Debbie, Erica J, Rachel S. Pat, Carin, Catherine, Jenn, and Janine. So yeah, thank you so much. I really appreciate all of the support from our patrons and the funds that come in through the Patreon account go to our hosting fees, prizes, or shipping costs. All of those things. Our transcribe, transcribing to make the transcript. We have that expense. All that is covered by our patrons. So we really appreciate it! Yeah, we really appreciate all they do for the podcast, making it available to everyone. Marsha 56:12 So thank you. Kelly 56:13 Yeah. So what we're gonna do... Marsha 56:16 we're not done? Kelly 56:18 We're not done, Marsha 56:18 we're thanking them but we're thanking them in another way, too. Kelly 56:22 Exactly. any of our patrons can get a pattern of their choice up to $8. So all they have to do is contact me on Ravelry. Let me know what your pattern selection is. And you can... then I'll just go ahead and and get that pattern dropped into your Ravelry-- your Ravelry inbox. So yeah, we just want to let people know how much we appreciate their support. Marsha 56:48 So start looking at your patterns. Pick your favorite pattern and let us know! Kelly 56:52 Yeah, it's always interesting. We did this last summer and it was really interesting to see what people were were choosing. I got a few things added to my queue. . Marsha 57:01 Oh, yeah, dangerous. [laughing] Kelly 57:03 Yeah. Inspirational you could say, Marsha 57:06 Okay, well, anything else? Kelly 57:08 No, I think that will do it for us, Marsha. Marsha 57:11 Okay. Well, I'm gonna go back to my sweater. Kelly 57:16 Okay. Marsha 57:17 Get lost in color work. Kelly 57:19 Yeah, that sounds fun. Yeah, I'm looking forward to seeing it. Marsha 57:23 Hopefully, well...Hopefully when we record in two weeks, I'll have the yoke done. We'll see. Kelly 57:28 Oh, that'll be good. Yeah. See, anyway. Marsha 57:31 Alrig`ht. Kelly 57:31 Okay. Marsha 57:32 Okay. Well, we'll talk in two weeks. All right. Bye. Kelly 57:36 Bye bye. Thank you so much for listening. To subscribe to the podcast visit Two Ewes Fiber Adventures dot com. Marsha 57:44 Join us on our adventures on Ravelry and Instagram. I am betterinmotion and Kelly is 1hundredprojects. Until next time, Both 57:53 We're the Two Ewes doing our part for world fleece! Transcribed by https://otter.ai

The Big Story
How far do you go to fight for Indigenous rights and climate action?

The Big Story

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 21:53


On November 28, 2020, a 24-year-old was arrested for installing a shunt—a wire that mimics the electrical signal of a train and causes oncoming trains to derail—along the railway tracks near Bellingham, Washington. She is now facing 20 years in prison and terror charges. Reports suggest she was acting in solidarity with the Wet'suwet'en movement fighting to stop the construction of the Coastal Gaslink pipeline.This is a form of radical and often dangerous act of protest that people are turning towards to demand change. Are these acts effective? And how far is too far?Guest: Hilary BeaumontGuest-host: Fatima Syed 

The Megacast
MegaCast 08/04/21 "Dad Vibes"

The Megacast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 35:29


This week Ted and Steve chat about Limp Bizkit performing at Lollapalooza! The guys also chat about Steve wrestling in Bellingham at 5CC Wrestling over the weekend, and Ted hit up a festival on Saturday. The guys also chat about buying Kraken tix! Follow us on Twitter: @TheMegaCast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 2 - Masking confusion

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 39:37


What's Trending: Former Biden adviser blames the administration and the CDC for providing too much confusion, one expert wants parents to mask up at home around their children, Trans BLM band performs outside LA spa where male genitals were allegedly exposed in women's section, and more workplaces are mandating vaccines. Big Local: A blood drive in the south Puget sound are gets canceled due to the mobile units having their batteries stolen, a woman pleads guilty to a terrorist charge on Bellingham train tracks, and a Yakima county woman threw rocks at police officers before being arrested.  Seattle's Union Gospel Mission seeks Supreme Court ruling on hiring case See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Family Home Evening with Bad Mormons
The Legend Of The 419

Family Home Evening with Bad Mormons

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 68:31


Charlotte, Mandi, and special guests have some fun at Josh Hawley's expense, we add another "R" to our favorite things to poke fun at. Charlotte gets a lesson on the freshness and quality of the "Taco Time" restaurant chain. We share with you some of the ridiculous adventure stories from the infamous 419 in Bellingham, WA. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/fhebadmormons/support

Blood Red: The Liverpool FC Podcast
Analysing Anfield: Liverpool homegrown players transfer picks | Barnes, Bellingham, Madueke

Blood Red: The Liverpool FC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 51:56


Following Liverpool links with Jarrod Bowen as well as speculation over the future of Jordan Henderson and Nat Phillips, the Reds could well be in need of more homegrown players. With that in mind, Josh Williams is alongside Guy Clarke for the latest Analysing Anfield podcast to explore the options that may be available to Michael Edwards. From more experienced options such as Leeds United's Kalvin Phillips to PSV Eindhoven's 19-year-old Noni Madueke we look through the data and analytics to prove six options. Borussia Dortmund's Jude Bellingham, Leicester City's Harvey Barnes, Wolves' Morgan Gibbs-White and Rangers' Ryan Kent, of course a club-trained player too, are all considered. Enjoy.Get exclusive podcasts direct to your inbox every week for FREE by joining the Blood Red Club. Sign up at http://www.bloodredpodcast.co.ukWatch and subscribe to our Blood Red videos on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/BloodRedLiverpoolFCJoin our Blood Red podcast group on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1656599847979758/