Podcasts about software developers

Person who writes computer software

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Python Bytes
#303 This title is required or is it optional?

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 37:56


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by Microsoft for Startups Founders Hub. Michael #1: Human regular expressions revisited via Mikael Honkala We mentioned of Al Sweigart's humre in Python Bytes… Mikael went on a little search and compiled my findings into this repo. A lot of people feel that re needs some help. At least 3 of the "serious" packages I found came out in the last few months. Since a package like this is not overly complex to make, all the ways to approach the problem are clearly being explored. Unfortunately these seem to be mostly single-person efforts, and many have fallen to the wayside before long. Hopefully there's some consolidation on the horizon, to share some of the maintenance effort and establish some of the packages as here for the long haul. The list could be useful to you if you are: Looking for a tool: Check the list to get a quick idea of the "look and feel" of each package. Thinking about building a tool: Check the list for alternative approaches, and maybe consider if contributing to an existing package might be a better way to get what you need. Building a tool, or already have one: Use the list to clarify and communicate what the main differences and strengths of your solution are. Brian #2: Implicit Optional Types Will Be Disabled by Default … in a future mypy feature release (possibly the next one after 0.98x) … Thanks Adam Johnson for spotting this and letting us know Stop doing this: s: str = None Do one of these: s: str | None = None s: Union[str, None] = None s: Optional[str] = None ← but this has problems Optional != optional From python docs: ”Optional[X] is equivalent to X | None (or Union[X, None]).” “Note that this is not the same concept as an optional argument, which is one that has a default. An optional argument with a default does not require the Optional qualifier on its type annotation just because it is optional. “ Best described in FastAPI docs, Python Types Intro, starting at “Possibly None" Recommendation is to use: s: str | None = None for Python 3.10+ s: Union[str, None] = None for Python 3.9+ For 3.7, 3.8, you still have Optional as an option, I think. Why haven't you upgraded to 3.9? We're almost to 3.11, what's the problem?! Michael #3: cython-lint by Marco Gorelli A tool (and pre-commit hook) to lint Cython files, similar to how flake8 lints Python files, and works by parsing Cython's own AST (abstract syntax tree). Found quite a few nice clean-ups which could be applied on: pandas numpy scikit-learn cupy Brian #4: difftastic - structural diff “Difftastic is a structural diff tool that understands syntax.” “Difftastic detects the language, parses the code, and then compares the syntax trees.” Interesting story about building difftastic For one off git diff replacement use GIT_EXTERNAL_DIFF=difft git diff or GIT_EXTERNAL_DIFF="difft --syntax-highlight=off" git diff To always use difft with git, see https://difftastic.wilfred.me.uk/git.html Extras Brian: Oh My Git! - An open source game about learning Git! Python 3.11.0 is up to rc2 Michael: NextDNS Joke: I mean, who's wrong?

The New Stack Podcast
Paul Vixie: Story of an Internet Hero

The New Stack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 28:39


Paul Vixie grew up in San Francisco. He dropped out of high school in 1980. He worked on the first Internet gateways at DEC and, from there, started the Internet Software Consortium (ISC), establishing Internet protocols, particularly the Domain Name System (DNS). Today, Vixie is one of the few dozen in the technology world with the title "distinguished engineer," working at Amazon Web Services as vice president of security, where he believes he can make the Internet a more safe place. As safe as before the Internet emerged. "I am worried about how much less safe we all are in the Internet era than we were before," Vixie said in an interview at the Open Source Summit in Dublin earlier this month for The New Stack Makers podcast. "And everything is connected, and very little is understood. And so, my mission for the last 20 years has been to restore human safety to pre-internet levels. And doing that at scale is quite the challenge. It'll take me a lifetime." So why join AWS? He spent decades establishing the ISC. He started a company called Farsight, which came out of ISC. He sold Farsight in November of last year when conversations began with AWS. Vixie thought about his mission to better restore human safety to pre-internet levels when AWS asked a question that changed the conversation and led him to his new role. "They asked me, what is now in retrospect, an obvious question, 'AWS hosts, probably the largest share of the digital economy that you're trying to protect," Vixie said. "Don't you think you can complete your mission by working to help secure AWS?' "The answer is yes. In fact, I feel like I'm going to get more traction now that I can focus on strategy and technology and not also operate a company on the side. And so it was a very good win for me, and I hope for them." Interviewing Vixie is such an honor. It's people like Paul who made so much possible for anyone who uses the Internet. Just think of that for a minute -- anyone who uses the Internet have people like Paul to thank. Thanks Paul -- you are a hero to many. Here's to your next run at AWS.    

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers
#383: Textinator and Building macOS Apps with Python

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 66:08


For all the amazing powers of Python, deploying packaged apps that leverage native OS-level capabilities isn't one of them. But it can be done and we have a great guest, Rhet Turnbull, here to tell us how he built his distributable macOS app Textinator that uses macOS's native vision recognition framework through Python. Links from the show Rhet Turnbull on Twitter: @RhetTurnbull Textinator app: github.com Homebrew Python Is Not For You: justinmayer.com asdf: asdf-vm.com Space Force: spaceforce.com TextSniper app: textsniper.app Apple's Natural Language ML: developer.apple.com Apple's Vision ML: developer.apple.com py2app: py2app.readthedocs.io py2exe: pypi.org pyinstaller: pyinstaller.org RUMPS: github.com Michael's RUMPS app - URLify: github.com Home Brew: brew.sh pipx: github.com Gooey: github.com PLS CLI: github.com textX: pypi.org Join Space Force: spaceforce.com Beeware: beeware.org Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com Episode transcripts: talkpython.fm --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe to us on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors Sentry Error Monitoring, Code TALKPYTHON Talk Python Training

The New Stack Podcast
Deno's Ryan Dahl is an Asynchronous Guy

The New Stack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 20:37


Ryan Dahl is the co-founder and creator of Deno, a runtime for JavaScript, TypeScript, and WebAssembly based on the V8 JavaScript engine and the Rust programming language. He is also the creator of Node.js. We interviewed Dahl for The New Stack Technical Founder Odyssey series. "Yeah, so we have a JavaScript runtime," Dahl said. "It's pretty similar in, in essence, to Node. It executes some JavaScript, but it's much more modern. " The Deno project started four years ago, Dahl said. He recounted how writing code helped him rethink how he developed Node. Dahl wrote a demo of a modern, server-side JavaSript runtime. He didn't think it would go anywhere, but sure enough, it did. People got pretty interested in it. Deno has "many, many" components, which serve as its foundation. It's written in Rust and C++ with a different type of event loop library. Deno has non-blocking IO as does Node. Dahl has built his work on the use of asynchronous technologies. The belief system carries over into how he manages the company. Dahl is an asynchronous guy and runs his company in such a fashion. As an engineer, Dahl learned that he does not like to be interrupted by meetings. The work should be as asynchronous as possible to avoid interruptions. Deno, the company, started during the pandemic, Dahl said. Everyone is remote. They pair program a lot and focus on short, productive conversations. That's an excellent way to socialize and look deeper into problems. How is for Dahl to go from programming to CEO? "I'd say it's relatively challenging," Dahl said. I like programming a lot. Ideally, I would spend most of my time in an editor solving programming problems. That's not really what the job of being a CEO is." Dahl said there's a lot more communication as the CEO operates on a larger scale. Engineering teams need management to ensure they work together effectively, deliver features and solve problems for developers. Overall, Dahl takes it one day at a time. He has no fundamental theory of management. He's just trying to solve problems as they come. "I mean, my claim to fame is like bringing asynchronous sockets to the mainstream with nonblocking IO and stuff. So, you know, asynchronous is deeply embedded and what I'm thinking about. When it comes to company organization, asynchronous means that we have rotating meeting schedules to adapt to people in different time zones. We do a lot of meeting recordings. So if you can't make it for whatever reason, you're not in the right time zone, you're, you know, you're, picking up your kids, whatever. You can go back and watch the recording. So we basically record every every meeting, we try to keep the meeting short. I think that's important because nobody wants to watch hours and hours of videos. And we use, we use chats a lot. And chat and email are forms of asynchronous communication where you don't need to kind of meet with people one on one. And yeah, I guess I guess the other aspect of that is just keeping meetings to a minimum. Like there's there's a few situations where you really need to get everybody in the room. I mean, there are certainly times when you need to do that. But I tried to avoid that as much as possible, because I think that really disrupts the flow of a lot of people working."

Ditching Hourly
Paul Swail - Getting Paid To Uncover Value With Roadmapping Engagements

Ditching Hourly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 43:02


Serverless expert Paul Swail joined me on Ditching Hourly to share how he uses paid diagnostic engagements to help land large projects without the pressure of conducting a single sales interview. Paul's Links: https://serverlessfirst.com/ https://twitter.com/paulswail

Simple Programmer Podcast
973 Moving From Support Or Testing To Software Developer - Simple Programmer Podcast

Simple Programmer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 6:03


Simple Programmer is now BACK with a brand new YouTube Channel-SUBSCRIBE HERE: https://simpleprogrammer.com/subscribespyt

The Smart Community Podcast
Travel Infrastructure and Smart Community in Digital Nomad Life, with Joy Taylor

The Smart Community Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 52:05


Hi #SmartCommunity friends! This is a bit of a bonus episode of the Smart Community podcast because we are catching up with a former guest but it's a very different conversation than we usually have. So in this episode I have a brilliant chat with Joy Taylor, who you might remember from way back in Episode 154. Joy is a banker turned Coworking Space Founder and Startup Mentor, turned Software Developer and Digital Nomad. So when we last spoke, Joy was the Community Manager of Canvas Coworking space here in Toowoomba, but in this episode we talk about how that's changed as well as why and how she decided to re-train to work in tech. Joy tells us about where she has been travelling as a digital nomad this year, and we discuss the differences between levels of infrastructure compared to levels of community in big cities versus more regional or rural locations. We finish our conversation talking about the power of living by your values, and the importance of providing relevant, timely and easy-to-absorb information for people in order to elicit behaviour change. As always we hope you enjoy listening to this episode as much as we enjoyed making it! Connect with Joy on LinkedIn Connect with me via email: hello@mysmart.community Connect with My Smart Community via LinkedIn or Twitter and watch on YouTube Podcast Production by Perk Digital

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers
#382: Apache Superset: Modern Data Exploration Platform

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 68:16 Very Popular


When you think data exploration using Python, Jupyter notebooks likely come to mind. They are excellent for those of us who gravitate towards Python. But what about your everyday power user? Think of that person who is really good at Excel but has never written a line of code? They can still harness the power of modern Python using a cool application called Superset. This open source Python-based web app is all about connecting to live data and creating charts and dashboards based on it using only UI tools. It's super popular too with almost 50,000 GitHub stars. Its creator, Max Beauchemin is here to introduce it to us all. Links from the show Max on Twitter: @mistercrunch Superset: superset.apache.org 60 notebook environments: talkpython.fm SQL Fluff linter: sqlfluff.com DB API PEP: peps.python.org Preset Company: preset.io Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com Episode transcripts: talkpython.fm --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe to us on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors Sentry's DEX Conference Talk Python Training

The New Stack Podcast
How Can Open Source Sustain Itself Without Creating Burnout?

The New Stack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 17:36


The whole world uses open source, but as we've learned from the Log4j debacle, “free” software isn't really free. Organizations and their customers pay for it when projects aren't frequently updated and maintained. How can we support open source project maintainers — and how can we decide which projects are worth the time and effort to maintain? “A lot of people pick up open source projects, and use them in their products and in their companies without really thinking about whether or not that project is likely to be successful over the long term,” Dawn Foster, director of open source community strategy at VMware's open source program office (OSPO), told The New Stack's audience during this On the Road edition of The New Stack's Makers podcast. In this conversation recorded at Open Source Summit Europe in Dublin, Ireland, Foster elaborated on the human cost of keeping open source software maintained, improved and secure —  and how such projects can be sustained over the long term. The conversation, sponsored by Amazon Web Services, was hosted by Heather Joslyn, features editor at The New Stack. Assessing Project Health: the ‘Lottery Factor' One of the first ways to evaluate the health of an open source project, Foster said, is the “lottery factor”: “It's basically if one of your key maintainers for a project won the lottery, retired on a beach tomorrow, could the project continue to be successful?” “And if you have enough maintainers and you have the work spread out over enough people, then yes. But if you're a single maintainer project and that maintainer retires, there might not be anybody left to pick it up.” Foster is on the governing board for an project called Community Health Analytics Open Source Software — CHAOSS, to its friends — that aims to provide some reliable metrics to judge the health of an open source initiative. The metrics CHAOSS is developing, she said, “help you understand where your project is healthy and where it isn't, so that you can decide what changes you need to make within your project to make it better.” CHAOSS uses tooling like Augur and GrimoireLab to help get notifications and analytics on project health. And it's friendly to newcomers, Foster said. “We spend...a lot of time just defining metrics, which means working in a Google Doc and thinking about all of the different ways you might possibly measure something — something like, are you getting a diverse set of contributors into your project from different organizations, for example.” Paying Maintainers, Onboarding Newbies It's important to pay open source maintainers in order to help sustain projects, she said. “The people that are being paid to do it are going to have a lot more time to devote to these open source projects. So they're going to tend to be a little bit more reliable just because they're they're going to have a certain amount of time that's devoted to contributing to these projects.” Not only does paying people help keep vital projects going, but it also helps increase the diversity of contributors, “because you by paying people salaries to do this work in open source, you get people who wouldn't naturally have time to do that. “So in a lot of cases, this is women who have extra childcare responsibilities. This is people from underrepresented backgrounds who have other commitments outside of work,” Foster said. “But by allowing them to do that within their work time, you not only get healthier, longer sustaining open source projects, you get more diverse contributions.” The community can also help bring in new contributors by providing solid documentation and easy onboarding for newcomers, she said. “If people don't know how to build your software, or how to get a development environment up and running, they're not going to be able to contribute to the project.” And showing people how to contribute properly can help alleviate the issue of burnout for project maintainers, Foster said:  “Any random person can file issues and bug maintainers all day, in ways that are not productive. And, you know, we end up with maintainer burnout...because we just don't have enough maintainers," said Foster. “Getting new people into these projects and participating in ways that are eventually reducing the load on these horribly overworked maintainers is a good thing.” Listen or watch this episode to learn more about maintaining open source sustainability.

Smart Software with SmartLogic
We're baaaack! Season 9 Teaser

Smart Software with SmartLogic

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 1:07


Hey everyone, Season 9 of Elixir Wizards is back! This season's theme is Parsing the Particulars, where we dive into particular subjects with our guests. Your returning hosts this season are Sundi, Owen and Dan! And we are excited to announce that we have a new host joining the show - Bilal Hankins! Bilal is a Software Developer at SmartLogic and is super excited to join us this season. Some of this season's guests include Dave Lucia, CTO at Bitfo, Tyler Young, Senior Software Developer at Felt, and Kate Rezentes, Junior Developer at SimpleBet. Can't wait to see you there! SmartLogic — https://smartlogic.io/ SmartLogic on Twitter — https://twitter.com/smartlogic SmartLogic on LinkedIn — https://www.linkedin.com/company/smartlogic-io/ SmartLogic on Facebook — https://www.facebook.com/smartlogic/ Bilal Hankins on LinkedIn — https://www.linkedin.com/in/hankins-bilal/ Sundi Myint on LinkedIn — https://www.linkedin.com/in/sundimyint/ Owen Bickford on LinkedIn — https://www.linkedin.com/in/owen-bickford-8b6b1523a/

The New Stack Podcast
Charity Majors: Taking an Outsider's Approach to a Startup

The New Stack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 34:17


In the early 2000s, Charity Majors was a homeschooled kid who'd gotten a scholarship to study classical piano performance at the University of Idaho. “I realized, over the course of that first year, that music majors tended to still be hanging around the music department in their 30s and 40s,” she said. “And nobody really had very much money, and they were all doing it for the love of the game. And I was just like, I don't want to be poor for the rest of my life.” Fortunately, she said, it was pretty easy at that time to jump into the much more lucrative tech world. “It was buzzing, they were willing to take anyone who knew what Unix was,” she said of her first tech job, running computer systems for the university. Eventually, she dropped out of college, she said, “made my way to Silicon Valley, and I've been here ever since.” Majors, co-founder and chief technology officer of the six-year-old Honeycomb.io, an observability platform company, told her story for The New Stack's podcast series, The Tech Founder Odyssey, which spotlights the personal journeys of some of the most interesting technical startup creators in the cloud native industry. It's been a busy year for her and the company she co-founded with Christine Yen, a colleague from Parse, a mobile application development company that was bought by Facebook. In May, O'Reilly published “Observability Engineering,” which Majors co-wrote with George Miranda and Liz Fong-Jones. In June, Gartner named Honeycomb.io as a Leader in the Magic Quadrant for Application Performance Monitoring and Observability. Thus far Honeycomb.io, now employing about 200 people, has raised just under $97 million, including a $50 million Series C funding round it closed in October, led by Insight Partners (which owns The New Stack). This Tech Founder Odyssey conversation was co-hosted by Colleen Coll and Heather Joslyn of TNS. ‘Rage-Driven Development' Honeycomb.io grew from efforts at Parse to solve a stubborn observability problem: systems crashed frequently, and rarely for the same reasons each time. “We invested a lot in the last generation of monitoring technology, we had all these dashboards, we have all these graphs,” Majors said. “But in order to figure out what's going on, you kind of had to know in advance what was going to break.” Once Parse was acquired by Facebook, Majors, Yen and their teams began piping data into a Facebook tool called Scuba, which ”was aggressively hostile to users,” she recalled. But, “it did one thing really well, which is let you slice and dice in real time on dimensions that have very high cardinality,” meaning those that contain lots of unique terms. This set it apart from the then-current monitoring technologies, which were built around assessing low cardinality dimensions. Scuba allowed Majors' organization to gain more control over its reliability problem. And it got her and Yen thinking about how a platform tool that could analyze high cardinality data about system health in real time. “Everything is a high cardinality dimension now,” Majors said. “And [with] the old generation of tools, you hit a wall really fast and really hard.” And so, Honeycomb.io was created to build that platform. “My entire career has been rage-driven development,” she said. “Like: sounds cool, I'm gonna go play with that. This isn't working — I'm gonna go fix it from anger.” A Reluctant CEO Yen now holds the CEO role at Honeycomb.io, but Majors wound up with the job for roughly the first half of the company's life. Did Majors like being the boss? “Hated it,” she said. “Constitutionally what you want in a CEO is someone who is reliable, predictable, dependable, someone who doesn't mind showing up every Tuesday at 10:30 to talk to the same people. “I am not structured. I really chafe against that stuff.” However, she acknowledged, she may have been the right leader in the startup's beginning: “It was a state of chaos, like we didn't think we were going to survive. And that's where I thrive.” Fortunately, in Honeycomb.io's early days, raising money wasn't a huge challenge, due to its founders' background at Facebook. “There were people who were coming to us, like, do you want $2 million for a seed thing? Which is good, because I've seen the slides that we put together, and they are laughable. If I had seen those slides as an investor, I would have run the other way.” The “pedigree” conferred on her by investors due to her association with Facebook didn't sit comfortably with her. “I really hated it,” she said. “Because I did not learn to be a better engineer at Facebook. And part of me kind of wanted to just reject it. But I also felt this like responsibility on behalf of all dropouts, and queer women everywhere, to take the money and do something with it. So that worked out.” Majors, a frequent speaker at tech conferences, has established herself as a thought leader in not only observability but also engineering management. For other women, people of color, or people in the tech field with an unconventional story, she advised “investing a little bit in your public speaking skills, and making yourself a bit of a profile. Being externally known for what you do is really helpful because it counterbalances the default assumptions that you're not technical or that you're not as good.” She added, “if someone can Google your name plus a technology, and something comes up, you're assumed to be an expert. And I think that that really works to people's advantage.“ Majors had a lot more to say about how her outsider perspective has shaped the way she approaches hiring, leadership and scaling up her organization. Check out this latest episode of the Tech Founder Odyssey.

My life as a programmer
Is there any way to prepare for being a junior software developer?

My life as a programmer

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 9:45


Video content can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0BAd8tPlDqFvDYBemHcQPQ/

Ditching Hourly
Dr. Jason Troyer - Bootstrapping from Academia to Authority

Ditching Hourly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 62:49


Dr. Jason Troyer joined me on Ditching Hourly to share the details of his journey from tenured academic to authority entrepreneur. Jason's Links: https://www.jasontroyer.com/ https://www.griefplan.com/

Python Bytes
#302 The Blue Shirt Episode

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 33:02


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by Microsoft for Startups Founders Hub. Brian #1: Can Amazon's CodeWhisperer write better Python than you? Brian Tarbox “Despite the clickbait-y title, whether CW's code is better or worse than mine is at the margins and not really important. What is significant is that it has the potential to save me a ton of time and mental space to focus on improving, refactoring and testing. It's making me a better programmer by taking on some of the undifferentiated heavy lifting.” Some decent code generation, starting with Amazon API examples. The generated dataclass method was neat, but really, the comment “prompt” probably took as much time to write as the code would have. The generated test case is workable, but I would not consider that a good test. Perhaps don't lump together construction, attribute access, and tests for all methods in one test function. That said, I've seen way worse test methods in my career. So, decent starting point. Related and worth listening to: Changelog #506: Stable Diffusion breaks the internet w/ Simon Willison Mostly an episode about AI generated art. There is a bit of a tie in to AI code generation, the ethics around it, and making sure you walk up the value chain. I'm planning on playing with GitHub CoPilot. I've been reluctant in the past, but Simon's interview is compelling to combine experienced engineering skill with AI code generation to possibly improve productivity. Simon does warn against possible abuse by Junior devs and the “just believe the code” problem that we also see with “copy from StackOverflow” situations. Michael #2: Apache Superset Apache Superset is a modern data exploration and visualization platform An intuitive interface for visualizing datasets and crafting interactive dashboards A wide array of beautiful visualizations to showcase your data Code-free visualization builder to extract and present datasets A world-class SQL IDE for preparing data for visualization, including a rich metadata browser A lightweight semantic layer which empowers data analysts to quickly define custom dimensions and metrics Out-of-the-box support for most SQL-speaking databases Seamless, in-memory asynchronous caching and queries An extensible security model that allows configuration of very intricate rules on who can access which product features and datasets. Integration with major authentication backends (database, OpenID, LDAP, OAuth, REMOTE_USER, etc) The ability to add custom visualization plugins An API for programmatic customization Brian #3: Recipes from Python SQLite docs Redowan Delowar Expanding on sqlite3 Python docs with more examples, including Executing individual and batch statements Applying user-defined callbacks: scalar and aggregate scalar example shows using a sha256 function to hash passwords as their inserted into the database Enabling tracebacks when callbacks raise an error Transforming types between SQLite and Python Implementing authorization control … much more … This is great for not only learning SQLite, but also, since these kinds of topics exist in other databases, learning about databases. AND a great example of learning a subsystem by creating little code snippets to check your understanding of something. One mod I would do in practice is to write these examples as pytest functions, because I can then run them individually while keeping a bunch in the same file.

Empire Life Podcast
Jill And Mary - Girls Mentorship And Business

Empire Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 39:06


In this Empire Life Podcast episode, we feature special guests Jill and Mary, the co-founders of The Girls Mentorship. They'll be coming on the Empire Life Podcast today to dive deep into engineering your life, girl's empowerment and mentorship, parenting advice, and more. Girls Mentorship is a personal growth and development company for girls. Jill and Mary started this business because they saw a huge need in the marketplace to help girls both understand and love themselves while simultaneously helping them build their confidence, self-esteem, and self-awareness. Jill and Mary believe your target demographic should essentially be a previous version of you; someone you can deeply relate to yet has grown from. This growth makes it easier to reach your hand back and help. How did we know there was a gap in the marketplace? During some of the most impressionable years of their lives, they were lost in that gap. They struggled to understand who they were, how to use their voices or stand up for what was important to them, how to recover from setbacks, how to manage expectations, how not to succumb to peer pressure, and their list goes on. For Jill and Mary, it took a lot of time, money, energy, and therapy to uncover who they were underneath all of that and be proud, plus confident in themselves. Today we stand before us as authentic, hilarious, inspiring, transparent, fun, engaging, and lovable women. We had a great time on the Empire Life Podcast! You'll find all the full episodes on the Empire Life podcast on YouTube, Spotify, iTunes, and Youtube, on our website, and here! Watch the highlights here: https://youtu.be/NifNkBDWhyA Find Us On YouTube here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiJSVhz5kEuLMkbZDMIpBsw Find us on Spotify here: https://open.spotify.com/show/2dyMUbwo1PG5lHMC3qNUGO?si=rOvqIPfIT3qYbmxGReCkrA And iTunes here: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/empire-life-podcast/id1281197037 Contact The Girls Mentorship, Jill And Mary Here: Facebook Business Page: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100063463931787 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/girlsmentorship/ Website: https://www.girlsmentorship.com/ TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@girlsmentorship Allison Ramsey is the best-selling author of the Redefine book (www.empirelifeacademy.com/book) and the Founder of Empire Life, Coaching and Mentoring Company. At Empire Life, Female Founders are Guided in Scaling Their Online Empires. Allison is also a Software Developer, Data Scientist, and College Professor. She also hosts the Empire Life Podcast, which broadcasts interviews with mega-successful empire builders from all around the world and publishes expert articles in the Empire Life Blog. With private clients, Empire Life guides clients in business strategy, structure, community building, authentic sales in scaling the technical infrastructure for membership sites, and systems, raising prices, and confidence, automation, sales funnels, and scales momentum with Facebook and Google Ads. The Empire Life Blog has tons of exposure and engagement every day as well. Allison is also an international speaker on women in tech, entrepreneurship, business, leadership, and business partnerships. She enjoys spending time with her loved ones in her free time. All of the female coaches and female-led businesses who implemented Empire Life's business strategies saw an increase in client leads, monthly income (often a 20X increase from when they started with Empire Life's support), and client retention after having Empire Life Mentorship, apply here: https://empirelife.typeform.com/to/KkGBfS

Brilliance Security Magazine Podcast
Zero Trust Network Access

Brilliance Security Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 29:20


In Episode S4E14, Steve Bowcut talks about Zero Trust Network Access with two well-informed guests. On the show are two executives from the cybersecurity firm Syxsense, Mark Reed, CTO, and Dave Taylor, CMO. The term Zero Trust is sometimes misapplied or misunderstood in the security industry, so our guests thoroughly describe what the term means and how they use it in their business. Mark and Dave explain the role of a zero trust strategy in today's endpoint protection and what it takes to be successful at zero trust, then talk about some of the challenges organizations face when implementing a Zero Trust strategy. Steve gets them to elaborate on how the new module recently announced by Syxsense enables endpoint compliance with Zero Trust Network Access policies. About Our Guests Mark Reed is a highly energized Software Developer and the CTO of Syxsense. He began his career as a Technical Support Manager at Intel before moving into a role as a Deployment Engineer, traveling to companies all over the world to help with new software infrastructure and implementation. Eventually, he worked his way up to a leadership role and now manages a team of software engineers while helping to push forward new innovations and being involved in all aspects of product development - from backend database design, web services, user interfaces, and client/server/cloud communications. Mark loves to travel, extreme sports and fitness, and spending time with his wife and four sons. He lives in Salt Lake City, Utah. Dave Taylor is a successful tech entrepreneur with five exits under his belt. Having started his career as a Product Manager at Intel Corporation, Dave has now run marketing as CMO at seven successive companies. He has always focused on demand generation - working closely with sales teams to hit revenue growth targets. Dave counts the recruitment and retention of amazingly high-performing marketing teams as his top skill. Born and raised in Boston, Dave has lived in the UK, South Africa, the Middle East, and all over the US, and he now resides in Utah and Montana. Be sure to listen in to learn more about the current state of zero trust network access.

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers
#381: Python Perf: Specializing, Adaptive Interpreter

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 68:53 Very Popular


We are on the edge of a major jump in Python performance. With the work done by the Faster CPython team and Python 3.11 due out in around a month, your existing Python code might see an increase of well over 25% in speed with no changes. One of the main reasons is its new specializing, adaptive interpreter. This episode is about that new feature and a great tool called Specialist which lets you visualize how Python is speeding up your code and where it can't unless you make minor changes. Its creator, Brandt Bucher is here to tell us all about. Links from the show Brandt Bucher: github.com Specialist package: github.com Faster CPython: github.com Faster CPython Ideas: github.com pymtl package: pypi.org PeachPy: github.com Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com Episode transcripts: talkpython.fm --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe to us on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors Microsoft RedHat Talk Python Training

The New Stack Podcast
How Idit Levine's Athletic Past Fueled Solo.io‘s Startup

The New Stack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 34:22


Idit Levine's tech journey originated in an unexpected place: a basketball court. As a seventh grader in Israel, playing in hoops  tournaments definitely sparked her competitive side. “I was basically going to compete with all my international friends for two minutes without parents, without anything,” Levine said. “I think it made me who I am today. It's really giving you a lot of confidence to teach you how to handle situations … stay calm and still focus.” Developing that calm and focus proved an asset during Levine's subsequent career in professional basketball in Israel, and when she later started her own company. In this episode of The Tech Founder Odyssey podcast series, Levine, founder and CEO of Solo.io, an application networking company with a $1 billion valuation, shared her startup story. The conversation was co-hosted by Colleen Coll and Heather Joslyn of The New Stack After finishing school and service in the Israeli Army, Levine was still unsure of what she wanted to do. She noticed her brother and sister's fascination with computers. Soon enough, she recalled,  “I picked up a book to teach myself how to program.” It was only a matter of time before she found her true love: the cloud native ecosystem. “It's so dynamic, there's always something new coming. So it's not boring, right? You can assess it, and it's very innovative.” Moving from one startup company to the next, then on to bigger companies including Dell EMC where she was chief technology officer of the cloud management division, Levine was happy seeking experiences that challenged her technically. “And at one point, I said to myself, maybe I should stop looking and create one.”Learning How to PitchWinning support for Solo.io demanded that the former hoops player acquire an unfamiliar skill: how to pitch. Levine's company started in her current home of Boston, and she found raising money in that environment more of a challenge than it would be in, say, Silicon Valley. It was difficult to get an introduction without a connection, she said:  “I didn't understand what pitches even were but I learned how … to tell the story. That helped out a lot.” Founding Solo.io was not about coming up with an idea to solve a problem at first. “The main thing at Solo.io, and I think this is the biggest point, is that it's a place for amazing technologists, to deal with technology, and, beyond the top of innovation, figure out how to change the world, honestly,” said Levine. Even when the focus is software, she believes it's eventually always about people. “You need to understand what's driving them and make sure that they're there, they are happy. And this is true in your own company. But this is also [true] in the ecosystem in general.” Levine credits the company's success with its ability to establish amazing relationships with customers – Solo.io has a renewal rate of 98.9% – using a very different customer engagement model that is similar to users in the open source community. “We're working together to build the product.” Throughout her journey, she has carried the idea of a team: in her early beginnings in basketball, in how she established a “no politics” office culture, and even in the way she involves her family with Solo.io. As for the ever-elusive work/life balance, Levine called herself a workaholic, but suggested that her journey has prepared her for it:  “I trained really well. Chaos is a part of my personal life.” She elaborated, “I think that one way to do this is to basically bring the company to [my] personal life.  My family was really involved from the beginning and my daughter chose the logos. They're all very knowledgeable and part of it.”

Python Bytes
#301 PyTorch Grows Up and Moves Out

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 31:10


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by Microsoft for Startups Founders Hub. Michael #1: PythonAnywhere: Our Commitment to Providing Free Accounts via Matthew Kramer In light of Heroku's cancelling their free tiers… They believe free tiers are important for beginners Two part solution: Limit outbound internet access for free accounts “Proof of life” to keep running - 3 months for apps, 1 yr for accounts BTW, they were acquired by Anaconda Inc. Brian #2: ruff: An extremely fast Python linter, written in Rust. Announcement article: Python tooling could be much, much faster Charlie Marsh Quite the star history, as it's a new repo as of Aug 30. Now at 1.8k. It is extremely fast. I installed it and tried it on a small project. It ran so fast I thought it didn't do anything. I went and added some errors to convince myself it was running. $ time flake8 src tests ... flake8 src tests 0.29s user 0.02s system 98% cpu 0.311 total $ time ruff src/ tests/ ... ruff src/ tests/ 0.01s user 0.01s system 162% cpu 0.011 total Michael #3: Meta spins off PyTorch Foundation to make AI framework vendor neutral PyTorch, which powers Tesla Autopilot and 150K other projects, will join the Linux Foundation. Its governing board includes representatives from Nvidia, Meta, Google, Microsoft, Amazon, and AMD. The PyTorch Foundation will strive to adhere to four principles, Remaining open Maintaining neutral branding Staying fair Forging a strong technical identity According to Meta, the transition to the PyTorch Foundation will not affect any existing PyTorch code Brian #4: Two string resources Python String Methods to Know Trey Hunner F-Strings Number Formatting Cheat Sheet Brian Allan Extras Brian: In Feb, on episode 271, we talked about Seaborn's new object interface Well, it's out now in seaborn 0.12 Interesting discussion about lazy imports. Other than that, I'm good with your extra.

FutureFi
Vanlife While Being A Software Developer w/ Geoffrey Huntley

FutureFi

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 58:31


https://twitter.com/GeoffreyHuntleyhttps://thenftbay.org/https://ghuntley.com/linktree/

Ditching Hourly
Dre Beltrami - Shut Up And Listen

Ditching Hourly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 50:24


Dre Beltrami returns to Ditching Hourly to drop her patented iconoclastic worldviews. This time around we talk about Google+, Pinterest, search vs feed, stealing longtail keywords, and for the love of god, just shutting up and listening. Dre's links:thesolopreneursociety.com

Middle Tech
Weekend Thoughts: Path to Software Developer

Middle Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 12:49


It may seem daunting to learn the ropes of software development... In this week's episode of Weekend Thoughts, Danny shares his journey to becoming a full-time software developer. If you were into playing with Legos, this may be right up your alley. Middle Tech socials: Instagram Facebook LinkedIn Visit us at MiddleTech.com

Ditching Hourly
The Pricing Seminar

Ditching Hourly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 0:54


Hello Dear Listener! I'm here to let you know that registration is now open for The Pricing Seminar. You need to know that TPS is not a DIY video course that you download and maybe someday finish watching. No, it's an interactive online workshop where you will learn by doing.  That's right, there's homework and people to help keep you accountable to doing it. As a group, we walk through the process of conceiving, researching, designing, marketing, pricing, and selling to clients who are anxious to buy.So if you're ready to finally start getting paid what you're worth, enroll now before it's too late. Lessons start Monday, and folks from over the world are already connecting in the private community.Go to https://thepricingseminar.com to enroll now. It only takes 60 seconds to sign up. That URL again is https://thepricingseminar.com.I hope you'll join us!

The New Stack Podcast
From DB2 to Real-Time with Aerospike Founder Srini Srinivasan

The New Stack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 28:25


Aerospike Founder Srini Srinivasan had just finished his Ph.D. at the University of Wisconsin when he joined IBM and worked under Don Haderle, the creator of DB2, the first commercial relational database management system. Haderle became a major influencer on Srinivasan when he started Aerospike, a real-time data platform. To this day, Haderle is an advisor to Aerospike. "He was the first one I went back to for advice as to how to succeed," Srinivasan said in the most recent episode of The New Stack Maker series, "The Tech Founder Odyssey." A young, ambitious engineer, Srinivasan left IBM to join a startup. Impatient with the pace he considered slow, Srinivasan met with Haderle, who told him to go, challenge himself, and try new things that might be uncomfortable. Today, Srinivasan seeks a balance between research and product development, similar to the approach at IBM that he learned -- the balance between what is very hard and what's impossible. Technical startup founders find themselves with complex technical problems all the time. Srinivasan talked about inspiration to solve those problems, but what does inspiration mean at all? Inspiration is a complex topic to parse. It can be thought of as almost trivial or superficial to discuss. Srinivasan said inspiration becomes relevant when it is part of the work and how one honestly faces that work. Inspiration is honesty. "Because once one is honest, you're able to get the trust of the people you're working with," Srinivasan said. "So honesty leads to trust. Once you have trust, I think there can be a collaboration because now people don't have to worry about watching their back. You can make mistakes, and then you know that it's a trusted group of people. And they will, you know, watch your back. And then, with a team like that, you can now set goals that seem impossible. But with the combination of honesty and trust and collaboration, you can lead the team to essentially solve those hard problems. And in some cases, you have to be honest enough to realize that you don't have all the skills required to solve the problem, and you should be willing to go out and get somebody new to help you with that." Srinivasan uses the principles of honesty in Aerospike's software development. How does that manifest in the work Aerospike does? It leads to all kinds of insights about Unix, Linux, systems technologies, and everything built on top of the infrastructure. And that's the work Srinivasan enjoys so much – building foundational technology that may take years to build but over time, establishes the work that's important, scalable, and has great performance.

My life as a programmer
How can a senior software developer get demoted?

My life as a programmer

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 8:40


Video content can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0BAd8tPlDqFvDYBemHcQPQ/

Action and Ambition
Jason Grad Helps Software Developers to Offer Premium Services To Their Users in Exchange For Their Underutilized CPU

Action and Ambition

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 31:57


Welcome to another episode of The Action and Ambition Podcast! Joining us today is Jason Grad, co-founder & CEO of Massive, an SDK that allows partners to offer their users a premium services in exchange for a little of their unused compute - instead of paying with money or watching ads. In 2022 Massive was selected by Will Reed as one of the top 100 Seed and Series A companies to work for based on mission and culture. Before Massive, he founded Cheerful Giving, a leading fundraising platform for charities, which was acquired by GoodWorld. Don't miss a thing on this. Tune in to learn more!

Ditching Hourly
Jason Resnick - Masterclass In Pragmatic Email Automation

Ditching Hourly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 80:50


Email automation guru Jason Resnick joined me on Ditching Hourly to geek out about serving subscribers more effectively with less effort.We ended up chatting for 90+ minutes, and Jason gave a master class on leveraging basic email automation techniques to create outsized results for your audience and your business.If you have a mailing list, this is a must-listen episode. If you don't, it's time to start :-)Jason's links: Jason Resnick NurtureKit Double Opt-in

Python Bytes
#300 A Jupyter merge driver for git

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 55:21


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by Microsoft for Startups Founders Hub. Special guest: Seth Larson Brian #1: Test your packages and wheels I've been building some wheels the last couple of weeks with various tools: flit, flit-core, and flit build hatch, hatchling, and hatch build setuptools, build_meta, and python -m build There are a few projects I've used to make sure my projects are in good shape wheel-inspect - you can inspect within Python code through inspect_wheel() function that converts to json. Or use on the command line with wheel2json check-wheel-contents - a linter for wheels tox - easily test the building, installation, and running of a package locally I actually start here, then utilize the other two tools Should have been obvious, but it wasn't to me Projects saved on git (such as gitHub) don't keep wheels in git. (this was obvious) When installing from git using pip install git+https://path/to/git/repo.git Your local pip will run the packaging backend to build the wheel before installing. Yet another way to test packaging. Michael #2: The Jupyter+git problem is now solved Jupyter notebooks don't work with git by default (they inherently have meaningless conflicts). With nbdev2, the Jupyter+git problem has been totally solved. Uses a set of hooks which provide clean git diffs, solve most git conflicts automatically, and ensure that any remaining conflicts can be resolved entirely within the standard Jupyter notebook environment. The techniques used to make the merge driver work are quite fascinating Seth #3: Help us test system trust stores in Python Package aiming to replace certifi called “truststore”, use system trust stores for HTTPS instead of a static list of certificates. Problem truststore is solving usually manifests in corporate networks: “unable to get local issuer certificate”. Experimental support added to pip to prove the implementation Users can try out the functionality and report issues. Brian #4: Making plots in your terminal with plotext Bob Belderbos Tutorial on using plotext - that's one t in the middle With the rise of CLI usage, plots are a nice addition. Bob's plot is great, but check out the options in the plotext docs lots-o-plots streaming data images subplots so fun Michael #5: jinja2-fragments Carson from HTMX (see podcast and course) wrote about template fragments. My jinja_partials project sorta fulfills this, but not really. I had a nice discussion with Sergi Pons Freixes who uses jinja_partials about this. He created Jinja2 fragments Seth #6: SLSA 3 Generic Builder for GitHub Actions GA Supply chain Levels for Software Artifacts, or SLSA (“salsa”) Tools to attest to and verify “provenance” of artifacts, ie “where it came from” Prove cryptographically that artifacts are built from a specific GitHub repository, commit, tag. Another future defense against stolen PyPI credentials/accounts. Generic builder means you can sign anything, like wheels/sdists Extras Brian: Bring your pytest books to PyBay, if you want them signed. I'm only bringing a small amount. I'll be presenting "Sharing is Caring - pytest fixture edition” at 3:05 “Experts Panel on Testing in Python” at 7:00 And be a zombie on my 8 am flight back unless I can change my reservation. That's this weekend, Sat Sept 10, in SF Michael: Heroku announces plans to eliminate free plans Banned paywalls PyPI phisher identified: Actor Phishing PyPI Users Identified and Actors behind PyPI supply chain attack have been active since late 2021 Major Python CVE: CVE-2020-10735: Prevent DoS by large int[HTML_REMOVED]str conversions Seth: Pyxel, retro game engine for Python, v1.8.0 added experimental web support with WASM Joke: Dev just after work

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers
#380: 7 lessons from building a modern TUI framework

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 67:49 Very Popular


Terminals seem like the very lowest common denominator for software platforms. They have to work over SSH. They only show text. You can't do much with them. Or can you? Will McGugan and team have been building Textual (based on Rich) which looks more like an animated web app than a terminal app. And he has learned a bunch of lessons trying to maximize terminal based apps. He's here to share his 7 lessons he's learned while building a modern TUI (text user interface) framework. Links from the show Will McGugan: @willmcgugan 7 things I've learned building a modern TUI framework post: textualize.io Prior Talk Python Episode: talkpython.fm Textualize: textualize.io Kitty terminal: sw.kovidgoyal.net Pydantic Immutability: pydantic-docs.helpmanual.io Monodraw: monodraw.helftone.com Async's lru cache: github.com Rich CLI: github.com Nerd Fonts: nerdfonts.com Oh My Posh: ohmyposh.dev Python Object Allocator ASCII Art: github.com Balsamiq wireframes: balsamiq.com Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com Episode transcripts: talkpython.fm --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe to us on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors Microsoft Sentry's DEX Conference AssemblyAI Talk Python Training

Python Bytes
#299 Will McGugan drops by

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 46:07


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by the IRL Podcast from Mozilla Michael #1: Careful with that PyPI email via John Hagen There is a widespread Phishing attack going on against PyPI users. The PyPA is currently tweeting about it: https://twitter.com/pypi/status/1562442188285308929 Brian #2: IEEE Top Programming Languages 2022 : Python's still No. 1, but employers love to see SQL skills by Stephen Cass Related: The Rise of SQL It's become the second programming language everyone needs to know by Rina Diane Caballar Good to see Python on top for Spectrum and Trending But interesting to see growth and strength in SQL SQL is actually top for Jobs SQL is a skill you can't ignore. Not only are relational databases just as important for large systems, they're increasingly more important for small and even local systems, and are ever growing the responsibility of developers, not left to database specialists. Will #3: Using Mypy in production at Spring by Charlie Marsh Michael #4: Django 4.1 Yes, I'm a bit slow to notice this, from August 3, 2022. Big deal for us async folks! Asynchronous ORM interface: QuerySet now provides an asynchronous interface for all data access operations. Asynchronous handlers for class-based views: View subclasses may now define async HTTP method handlers: Also: Validation of Constraints: Check, unique, and exclusion constraints defined in the Meta.constraints option are now checked during model validation. Check out Chris' Django: Getting Started course at Talk Python. Brian #5: You Should Be Using Python's Walrus Operator - Here's Why by Martin Heinz A fun look at some places where I've never considered using := Examples reusing a value while building a list regular expression match results cleaning up while loops (ok, that I'm using already, but it's great) accumulating data in place named values in f-strings for multiple formatting. wow, super cool. … Will #6: Humre By Al Sweigart Author of "Automate the Boring Stuff with Python" Human readable regular expressions§ Joke: Password PR

Career Adventure Audio Experience w/ Nate Clayberg
Noah Healy: Recreational Mathematician, Data Scientist, Software Developer (E.022)

Career Adventure Audio Experience w/ Nate Clayberg

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 27:38


Noah Healy is a data scientist, software developer, and recreational mathematician from Charlottesville. In high school, Noah excelled in math and studied Nuclear Engineering at the University of Virginia. After college, amid the dot-com bubble, he taught himself about algorithmic construction and computers. Over the years, Noah has worked at various startups and video game companies as a data scientist and software programmer. 0:45 High school and college 3:27 Engineering Degree 4:36 First job as a programmer 9:57 Reading and self-teaching 12:36 Various jobs 14:12 Data analytics and data science 17:12 Gaps, challenges, poor infrastructure 21:20 Advice 23:45 Recreational mathematician The links to reference from this episode: https://www.linkedin.com/in/noah-healy http://coordisc.com --- Continue to enjoy this journey, share, and subscribe to 'The That's a Job? Podcast on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. The That's a Job podcast is presented by Career Adventure Academy - Discover the work you are wired to do. Do you know a high school student looking to figure out their next step after graduation? CHECK OUT THE NEW COLLEGE & CAREER DISCOVERY COURSE; get lifetime access at www.nateclayberg.com Let the Adventure Begin! Nate Clayberg is a COLLEGE & CAREER NAVIGATOR that has guided hundreds of students to envision their future to purposeful life beyond education. Connect with Nate Clayberg on Social Media: · Instagram · LinkedIn · Facebook · Twitter This podcast is a need10 Media production www.nateclayberg.com

Running Book Reviews with Alan and Liz
Chase That Smile, by Harold Cabrera

Running Book Reviews with Alan and Liz

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 97:55


Chase That Smile is Harold Cabrera's autobiography and account of how he managed to train for 3 big endurance events in the year he turned 40: The Paris marathon, climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro (this one was with his wife Tania), and completing an Ironman Triathlon. The book has 3 sections that correspond to the 3 challenges. Each section is sub-divided with dates in chronological order like a journal, but the journal entries talk about more than just what happened that day. Harold has a full-time job and two young children so training for these big goals proves to be challenging because of the time required to complete the training. The Ironman training alone involves mid-week long runs and 6 hour bike rides, and then there are the hikes he does with his wife in order to be able to climb Kilimanjaro.    More than just a personal account of each training session he did, Harold also provides insight into his nutrition, the importance of training plans and most importantly how he developed the right mindset needed to take on these big endurance challenges. Harold Cabrera was born in the Philippines, grew up in Winnipeg, Canada and currentlu lives in London, England. He studied software engineering in Canada and currently works as a Software Developer and Data Scientist for Wise Traders where he develops stock trading systems. When he is not training for some difficult long-distance event, he spends most of his time with his family. Harold is not a first-time author. He co-authored and published C# for Java Programmers (Syngress Publishing, 2002) to help Java developers learn the C# programming language.If you would like to follow Harold, he has a website where you can see the book and also read his blog: https://chasethatsmile.comYou can also follow him on Instagram at: https://www.instagram.com/chase.that.smile/ If you are interested in getting a copy of Chase That Smile, it is available on Harold's website or on Amazon: https://www.amazon.ca/Chase-That-Smile-Harold-Cabrera/dp/180313075X   Big thank you to Harold for providing a review copy of the book and for speaking with us. Any feedback or suggestions on this review or any of our other podcast episodes would be greatly welcomed. Leave us a review using your favorite podcast player or contact us on social media.Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/runningbookreviews/Twitter: https://twitter.com/reviews_runningInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/runningbookreviews/Podcast webpage: https://runningbookreviews.buzzsprout.com If you have been enjoying the podcast and are wondering how you can help us out, you can now buy us a coffee! https://www.buymeacoffee.com/AlanSupport the show

Informonster Podcast
Episode 23: Discussing Gender Harmony

Informonster Podcast

Play Episode Play 30 sec Highlight Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 57:24


On this episode of the Informonster podcast, Charlie Harp is joined by Janet Campbell, Software Developer and Vice President of Patient Engagement at Epic, Chris Grasso, Chief Information Officer at Fenway Health and Carol Macumber, Executive Vice President at Clinical Architecture to discuss the HL7 Gender Harmony Project. 

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers
#379: 17 Libraries You Should Be Using in Django

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 80:32 Very Popular


Do you write web apps in Django? The framework has come a long way lately with versions 3 and 4 adopting many of the modern Python capabilities (async, for example). But there are so many other libraries and apps that you can use to do more with less code in plugin new functionality. I'm happy to have Christopher Trudeau here on talk Python to take us through his 17 favorite libraries you should be using in Django. Links from the show Chris on Twitter: @cltrudeau Django: Getting Started Course (by Chris): training.talkpython.fm Foundational libraries: coverage: coverage.readthedocs.io Sphinx: sphinx-doc.org Sphinx-rtd-theme: github.com pudb: documen.tician.de tox: tox.wiki Pillow (sort of Django, needed by ImageField): github.com Django libraries: Django Ninja: django-ninja.rest-framework.com DRF: django-rest-framework.org Grappelli: github.com django-import-export: github.com Django Debug Toolbar: github.com Django local flavor: github.com Django admin-extra-buttons: github.com django-awl: github.com django-airplane: github.com Django Extensions: github.com django-allauth: github.com awesome-django: github.com ‘Unstoppable' Python: infoworld.com asciimatics: github.com Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe to us on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors IRL Podcast Microsoft AssemblyAI Talk Python Training

Python Bytes
#298 "Unstoppable" Python

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 32:22


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by Microsoft for Startups Founders Hub. Brian #1: Uncommon Uses of Python in Commonly Used Libraries by Eugene Yan Specifically, Using relative imports Example from sklearn's base.py from .utils.validation import check_X_y from .utils.validation import check_array “Relative imports ensure we search the current package (and import from it) before searching the rest of the PYTHONPATH. “ For relative imports, we have to use the from .something import thing form. We cannot use import .something since later on in the code .something isn't valid. There's a good discussion of relative imports in pep 328 Michael #2: Skyplane Cloud Transfers Skyplane is a tool for blazingly fast bulk data transfers in the cloud. Skyplane manages parallelism, data partitioning, and network paths to optimize data transfers, and can also spin up VM instances to increase transfer throughput. You can use Skyplane to transfer data: Between buckets within a cloud provider Between object stores across multiple cloud providers (experimental) Between local storage and cloud object stores Skyplane takes several steps to ensure the correctness of transfers: Checksums, verify files exist and match sizes. Data transfers in Skyplane are encrypted end-to-end. Security: Encrypted while in transit and over TLS + config options Brian #3: 7 things I've learned building a modern TUI framework by Will McGugan Specifically, DictViews are amazing. They have set operations. Example of using items() to get views, then ^ for symmetric difference (done at the C level): # Get widgets which are new or changed print(render_map.items() ^ new_render_map.items()) Lots of other great topics in the article lru_cache is fast Unicode art in addition to text in doc strings The fractions module and a cool embedded video demo of some of the new css stuff in Textual Python's object allocator ascii art Michael #4: ‘Unstoppable' Python Python popularity still soaring: ‘Unstoppable' Python once again ranked No. 1 in the August updates of both the Tiobe and Pypl indexes of programming language popularity. Python first took the top spot in the index last October, becoming the only language besides Java and C to hold the No. 1 position. “Python seems to be unstoppable,” said the Tiobe commentary accompanying the August index. In the alternative Pypl Popularity of Programming Language index, which assesses language popularity based on Google searches of programming language tutorials, Python is way out front. Extras Brian: Matplotlib stylesheets can make your chart look awesome with one line of code. But it never occurred to me that I could write my own style sheet. Here's an article discussing creation of custom matplotlib stylesheets The Magic of Matplotlib Stylesheets XKCD Plots Michael: Back on 295 we talked about Flet. We now have a Talk Python episode on it (live and polished versions). Joke: Rakes and AWS

Ditching Hourly
Reverse Interview with Peter Mobley of Geogram

Ditching Hourly

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 60:01


Geogram President Peter Mobley reached out to ask if he could come on Ditching Hourly to interview me, and of course, I said yes. I'm not sure that's what happened but it was a unique conversation :-)Peter's links:  Geogram hello@geogram.com

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers
#378: Flet: Flutter apps in Python

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 60:21 Very Popular


Have you heard of Flutter? It's a modern and polished UI framework to write mobile apps, desktop apps, and even web apps. While interesting, you may have kept your distance because Flutter is a Dart language-based framework. But with the project we're covering today, Flet, many Flutter UIs can now be written in pure Python. Flet is a very exciting development in the GUI space for Python devs. And we have the creator, Feodor Fitsner, here to take us through it. Links from the show Feodor on GitHub: github.com Flet: flet.dev Flutter: flutter.dev Dart: dart.dev Flet Tutorials: flet.dev It's All Widgets Showcase: itsallwidgets.com Roadmap: flet.dev pglet: pglet.io Flutter Flow Designer: flutterflow.io Fluent UI for Flutter Showcase App: bdlukaa.github.io macOS UI: pub.dev Flet Mobile Strategy: flet.dev Michael's flutter doctor output: flutter-doctor.png Pyscript: pyscript.net Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com Episode transcripts: talkpython.fm --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe to us on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors Sentry's DEX Conference IRL Podcast AssemblyAI Talk Python Training

My life as a programmer
What to do if I have never worked with other software developers?

My life as a programmer

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 9:54


Video content can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0BAd8tPlDqFvDYBemHcQPQ/

Python Bytes
#297 I AM the documentation

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 22:36


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by the IRL Podcast from Mozilla Michael #1: SQLCodeGen via Josh Thurston This is a tool that reads the structure of an existing database and generates the appropriate SQLAlchemy model code, using the declarative style if possible. This tool was written as a replacement for sqlautocode, which was suffering from several issues (including, but not limited to, incompatibility with Python 3 and the latest SQLAlchemy version). Features: Supports SQLAlchemy 1.4.x Produces declarative code that almost looks like it was hand written Produces PEP 8 compliant code Accurately determines relationships, including many-to-many, one-to-one Automatically detects joined table inheritance Excellent test coverage Brian #2: The death of setup.py*, long live pyproject.toml for Python-only projects Juan Luis Cano Rodriguez tweet pip install --``editable . now works with setuptools, as of version 64.0.0 To be clear, setup.cfg also not required. So everything can be in pyproject.toml The * part: projects with non-Python bits may still need setup.py See also the newly updated tutorial by the PyPA: Packaging Python Projects Now with absolutely no mention of setup.py or setup.cfg It's all pyproject.toml Commentary: For Python only projects, is setuptools a decent flit contender??? stay tuned Michael #3: aiocache via Owen Lamont In the same vein as async-cache you might also be interested in aiocache. It has some cool functionality like an optional Redis backend for multi process caching. his library aims for simplicity over specialization. All caches contain the same minimum interface which consists on the following functions: add: Only adds key/value if key does not exist. get: Retrieve value identified by key. set: Sets key/value. multi_get: Retrieves multiple key/values. multi_set: Sets multiple key/values. exists: Returns True if key exists False otherwise. increment: Increment the value stored in the given key. delete: Deletes key and returns number of deleted items. clear: Clears the items stored. raw: Executes the specified command using the underlying client. Brian #4: Hatch : a modern, extensible Python project manager Another flit contender? While reading Packaging Python Projects tutorial update, I noticed some examples for hatchling, as an alternative to setuptools, flit-core, and pdm. Played with it some, but still have some exploring to do. features Standardized build system with reproducible builds by default Robust environment management with support for custom scripts Easy publishing to PyPI or other sources includes --repo flag to be able to publish to alternative indices. Awesome for internal systems. Version management Configurable project generation with sane defaults Responsive CLI, ~2-3x faster than equivalent tools This sounds great. I haven't verified this Commentary: Good to see more packaging tools and user workflow explorations around packaging. Extras Michael: M1 Support for PyPy Announced (via PyCoders) Joke: I am the docs

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers
#377: Python Packaging and PyPI in 2022

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 68:11 Very Popular


PyPI has been in the news for a bunch of reasons lately. Many of them good. But also, some with a bit of drama or mixed reactions. On this episode, we have Dustin Ingram, one of the PyPI maintainers and one of the directors of the PSF, here to discuss the whole 2FA story, securing the supply chain, and plenty more related topics. This is another important episode that people deeply committed to the Python space will want to hear. Links from the show Dustin on Twitter: @di_codes Hardware key giveaway: pypi.org OpenSSF funds PyPI: openssf.org James Bennet's take: b-list.org Atomicwrites (left-pad on PyPI): reddit.com 2FA PyPI Dashboard: datadoghq.com github 2FA - all users that contribute code by end of 2023: github.blog GPG - not the holy grail: caremad.io Sigstore for Python: pypi.org pip-audit: pypi.org PEP 691: peps.python.org PEP 694: peps.python.org Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe to us on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors RedHat IRL Podcast AssemblyAI Talk Python Training

Ditching Hourly
Coaching Call with Voice Coach Adrian Goldner

Ditching Hourly

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 7:22


Vocal coach and acapella group leader Adrian Goldner joined me on Ditching Hourly to brainstorm ways to package and price his expertise in more profitable ways. Unfortunately, I forgot to click the record button so I'll have to recap our conversation on my own. Whomp whomp :-(Anyway...Here's Adrian's background:- He's a vocal coach, certified in something called the CVT method- He runs an acapella choir group and makes a modest monthly income from membership dues and gig fee percentages- He has a handful or private vocal students who are not pros and mostly just sing for fun- He works a few hours per week teaching vocal lessons to students in a private university- He prefers working with pros than with beginners, so the university gig and the lessons for hobbyists are not particularly satisfyingOne of Adrian's biggest questions was how to take this patchwork of experiences and increase his fees through value pricing. He said that most buyer expectations for something like private vocal lessons is that the student would pay a fixed amount per lesson, and that the amount would be fairly low. He couldn't imagine justifying even doubling his lesson fees, never mind 10x-ing them.We talked about a few different business models that might make sense for someone like him. He didn't want to scale by hiring employees or starting a school or anything like that. He wanted to stay solo, and remain fairly hands on with his clients.So, the business model that felt like the best fit was the Authority Model. In general, the Authority Model has an MVP product ladder that looks something like this: - $50000+ Project (value priced custom engagement)- $5000 Roadmap (diagnostic with recommendations and execution plan)- $500 Call (one-off short paid consultation)The trick to the Authority Model is that you have to become the “go-to” person for solving an expensive problem for a very specific niche market, who ideally has a high degree of buying power. Adrian couldn't really get his head around the idea of value pricing a 1-on-1 vocal project, so the example I used to illustrate was this:Sting (former lead signer of the Police) can no longer hit the high notes in their smash hit Roxanne. So, he has to perform the song a couple of whole steps lower than the original. It's noticeable and it sounds weird. Kinda like a bad cover band. I betcha this drives Sting nuts.So...How much do you think Sting would pay to be able to go back to singing Roxanne in the original key?$50,000? $100,000?Maybe, maybe not... but it's a reasonable hypothesis.If Adrian wanted to pursue this particular angle, his positioning would look something like:“I am a vocal reconditioning coach who helps aging rock stars hit the high notes like they were 20 again.”With a positioning statement like this, it would be easy to make a list of ideal clients, and it would be easy to justify five-figure fees.The hard part would be creating a reputation for reliably delivering the kind of results that they crave. _ASIDE: Note that creating a reputation for delivering results is a _very different type of problem_ than trying to convince a singer in a local bar band to pay you $50,000 to increase their range by a fourth. A small increase in range simply isn't worth that much to a singer in a local bar band. So if you can't understand how value pricing could unlock huge profits for you, it might be because you're not imagining big enough clients._At this point it occurred to me that there probably are people who are already well positioned as "vocal coach to the stars" so I started thinking about what would make Adrian different. The thing that jumped out at me immediately was his experience with vocal groups, not just individual singers.This more focused target market immediately created a Rolodex moment for me with groups like Pentatonyx and BTS and Blackpink.Maybe Adrian could even combine the "hit the high notes like you're 20 again" with "voice training for vocal groups" and start out with a laser focus like:“I am a vocal reconditioning coach who helps old school boy/girl bands hit the high notes like they were 20 again. Unlike other vocal coaches, I specialize in the unique challenges of integrating multiple voices in harmony.”Adrian lit up a bit at this proposition because he immediately felt uniquely qualified to excel at this very specific intersection of niche market and specialized expertise.Is it a viable market position?I don't know, but there are ways to find out.As homework, I suggested that he research the number of groups who would fall into this niche, find out where they hang out to talk shop or who they listen to for advice, and to look for any other vocal coaches who serve the high end of the market to study what they're doing and how he (Adrian) would be considered meaningfully different by his ideal buyers.He said he would try that and report back.Keep your fingers crossed and stay tuned! I'll let you know if I get an update.