Podcasts about TAM

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  • 1,782PODCASTS
  • 5,230EPISODES
  • 42mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 21, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about TAM

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Latest podcast episodes about TAM

Podcasting 2.0
Episode 70: Testing the TAM

Podcasting 2.0

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022


Podcasting 2.0 for January 21st 2022 Episode 70: Testing the TAM Adam & Dave discuss the week's developments on podcastindex.org and welcome Thomas Barrasso to the board meeting, who's podcast app has 9 million users in India Download the mp3 Podcast Feed PodcastIndex.org Preservepodcasting.com Check out the podcasting 2.0 apps and services newpodcastapps.com Support us with your Time Talent and Treasure ShowNotes Positioning Boost Bait Thomas Barrasso (PodLP) Podcasts for the Next Billion. Designing a podcast client for KaiOS… | by Thomas Barrasso | Medium Google Bets Big on Feature Phones Future With $22 Million Investment in KaiOS | Beebom Images PodLP Blog Netflix devalues content The TAM Podcast font TODO Last Modified 01/21/2022 11:52:23 by Freedom Controller  

Miracle Voices
Ep 39 - Releasing The Symbols of Guilt - Derek Carlson

Miracle Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 63:12


Tam and Matt welcome Derek Carlson to the show. Derek shares two stories of forgiveness. The first with an ex-partner and the second about bodily pain. How Can You Support Miracle Voices? If you feel inspired to make a donation to support these podcasts you can donate here: https://acim.org/donate-miracles-voices-podcast/ Get Notified of New Episodes By Joining Our Email List at: https://www.miraclevoices.org/email Share Your Forgiveness Story on Miracle Voices: Do you feel your forgiveness story could inspire listeners? Simply fill out the form at https://www.miraclevoices.org/form and let us know you would like to be considered as a Miracle Voices Podcast guest. Topic or Question You Want Us To Cover? If you have topics that you would like Judy and Matthew to address, simply drop us a line at: https://www.miraclevoices.org/contact/ We Need Your Help Please leave a review for the podcast on whatever app or site you use to listen to this podcast. This helps new listeners that are trying to practice forgiveness find the show.

Publishing Secrets
8 Things Every Christian Author Should Do: Part 2

Publishing Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 15:28


In this episode, you'll also hear:The importance of doing what you can with what you have, and trusting God to provide the increaseCoach Tam's personal experience on the receiving end of a successful lead magnet – and advice on how to create your ownThe key component any successful business or organization must have to startAdvice on creating an exchange of value that makes people want to part with their moneyAdditional training to help you start building your audience (link below!) BIO:My name is Tamara "Coach Tam" Jackson and I am a published author, Facebook© Certified Digital Marketer, host of the Top 100 Publishing Secrets podcast, and founder of The Christian Authors Network (C.A.N.) Facebook© community. I specialize in helping mission-driven authors, coaches, and entrepreneurs increase their exposure, impact, and income through strategic self-publishing and digital media appearances. Just say yes and we will work together to attract a tribe of loyal followers that 1) "get you", 2) love what you do, and 3) are happy to invest in your book, business, cause, or movement. Plus, we will accomplish all of this without fake, salesy, sleazy, or manipulative tactics. Yes you CAN write, publish, and profit in a way that honors God; join the community today at https://christianauthors.net/fbgroup.   GET CONNECTED:Check out Part 2 of the Training: https://christianauthors.net/8ThingsPart2Connect with fellow Christian Authors: http://christianauthors.net/fbgroupDownload the Free Christian Author Marketing EBook: https://265point.com/secretsbook1Get Booked as a Guest Speaker for Free: http://christianauthors.netFollow Tam on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TamaraJacksonTransformationExpert/Interact with Tam on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fitnesstamara265/Learn more about 265 Point: http://www.265point.com

Corner Of The Galaxy
A 'Wet Noodle' and why you're going to hate Delgado

Corner Of The Galaxy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 65:45


- SUBSCRIBE TO OUR PODCAST: http://cornerofthegalaxy.com/subscribe/ - COG LA GALAXY DISCORD: https://discord.gg/drr9HFZY2P - COG MERCHANDISE (SCARVES, T-SHIRTS, BUTTONS, COASTERS): http://www.cornerofthegalaxy.com/SHOP COG STUDIOS, Calif. -- The LA Galaxy held their first media call of 2022, and Greg Vanney shared a lot of information on the club's hunt for a Designated Player and some additional TAM signings. So are you buying where he thinks the team is at? Hosts Josh Guesman and Sophie Nicholaou are here to talk about all the Galaxy news that dropped since Tuesday morning and why the club still isn't impressing the Cannon! Josh and Sophie will start with some housekeeping as they tell you about the Galaxy's newest goalkeeper and why he really doesn't fit the mold the club usually uses when getting a third-string 'keeper. Plus, was signing Victor Vazquez smart? Or was it a waste of an international slot? Then Josh will update you on the Marky Delgado trade and why Galaxy fans will hate him. But the numbers tell a story on Delgado that should have them saying "okay." Finally, Josh and Sophie will go through some highlights of the media call, tell you about Kelvin Leerdam and Raheem Edwards and get you ready for Goalchella (they didn't call it that). We're getting into our preseason form, and the show is suffering because of it! Time for the beep test!

GameSpot After Dark
#127 - Roll For Perception Check

GameSpot After Dark

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 85:10


This week the after dark crew talks about wanting to try D&D, why Dead or Alive Extreme is still the best volleyball video game, Lucy raves about Yellowjackets, and people are bullying Tam on stream while he plays Dark Souls 3. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Publishing Secrets
8 Things Every Christian Author Should Do: Part 1

Publishing Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 13:47


In this episode, you'll also hear:Why so many Christian leaders turn to writing books as part of their ministryHow T. D Jakes went from leading a tiny congregation to building a God-honoring empire – and why that growth mattersWhy writing and publishing books is the best way to grow your ministry or businessThe key to crafting a powerful brand that makes a difference in the worldWhy lots of people publish books, but few are profitable An invitation to get in on free training and support in your author journey (link below!) BIO:My name is Tamara "Coach Tam" Jackson and I am a published author, Facebook© Certified Digital Marketer, host of the Top 100 Publishing Secrets podcast, and founder of The Christian Authors Network (C.A.N.) Facebook© community. I specialize in helping mission-driven authors, coaches, and entrepreneurs increase their exposure, impact, and income through strategic self-publishing and digital media appearances. Just say yes and we will work together to attract a tribe of loyal followers that 1) "get you", 2) love what you do, and 3) are happy to invest in your book, business, cause, or movement. Plus, we will accomplish all of this without fake, salesy, sleazy, or manipulative tactics. Yes you CAN write, publish, and profit in a way that honors God; join the community today at https://christianauthors.net/fbgroup.   GET CONNECTED:Check out Part 1 of the Training: https://christianauthors.net/8ThingsPart1Connect with fellow Christian Authors: http://christianauthors.net/fbgroupDownload the Free Christian Author Marketing EBook: https://265point.com/secretsbook1Get Booked as a Guest Speaker for Free: http://christianauthors.netFollow Tam on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TamaraJacksonTransformationExpert/Interact with Tam on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fitnesstamara265/Learn more about 265 Point: http://www.265point.com

Miracle Voices
Ep 38 - Family, Forgiveness, and Peace - Gail Wisner

Miracle Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 50:14


Tam and Matt welcome Gail Wisner to the show. Gail shares about healing her family relationships. Gail can be reached at: gailwisner.com or gail.wisner@compass.com How Can You Support Miracle Voices? If you feel inspired to make a donation to support these podcasts you can donate here: https://acim.org/donate-miracles-voices-podcast/ Get Notified of New Episodes By Joining Our Email List at: https://www.miraclevoices.org/email Share Your Forgiveness Story on Miracle Voices Do you feel your forgiveness story could inspire listeners? Simply fill out the form at https://www.miraclevoices.org/form and let us know you would like to be considered as a Miracle Voices Podcast guest. Topic or Question You Want Us To Cover? If you have topics that you would like Judy and Matthew to address, simply drop us a line at: https://www.miraclevoices.org/contact/ We Need Your Help Please leave a review for the podcast on whatever app or site you use to listen to this podcast. This helps new listeners that are trying to practice forgiveness find the show.

Sincerely HER Podcast
Affirmations | I Make It Happen Like Michael Jordan | Note 430

Sincerely HER Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 2:52


What would Michael Jordan say? Jordan is not known for giving motivational speeches, but he has provided many inspirational quotes.   Show notes: Visit SincerelyTam.com/Notes.   Newsletter: Sign up for Tam's "Quick Bites" at Bit.ly./Tams3Tips   Connect: Twitter | @iamSincerelyTam Instagram | @iamSincerelyTam

Sincerely HER Podcast
Mindset | 3 Things To Do When You Want Different For Yourself | Note 429

Sincerely HER Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 1:49


You want something different for yourself, now what? Believe in yourself and know that anything is possible when you set goals and take action.   Show notes: Visit SincerelyTam.com/Notes.   Newsletter: Sign up for Tam's "Quick Bites" at Bit.ly./Tams3Tips   Connect: Twitter | @iamSincerelyTam Instagram | @iamSincerelyTam

Kryminatorium
Morderstwo studentki obok akademika w Lublinie | SPRAWA Z FILMU

Kryminatorium

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 19:27


Ten odcinek to wersja dźwiękowa filmu opublikowanego na kanale Marcin Myszka na YouTube. Tam znajdziesz dodatkowe zdjęcia i materiały związane z omawianą sprawą. ▶️ Link do filmu ► https://youtu.be/zL6TYtkPzX0 ⠀ Na początku 1991 roku nieznany do dziś sprawca zaatakował idącą przez Park Akademicki w Lublinie studentkę. Ciało odnalezione zostało dopiero po kilku dniach poszukiwań. Niedługo później do policjantów zaczęły docierać zgłoszenia o innych podejrzanych sytuacjach, do jakich miało dochodzić wcześniej w pobliżu miejsca zbrodni. Mężczyzna z portretu pamięciowego zaczepiał młode kobiety na chwilę przed śmiercią Jolanty. Czy ma on związek z zabójstwem? ⠀ Zamów mój audioserial o sprawie mordercy z czasów PRL https://www.kryminatorium.pl/sklep/ ⠀ kontakt: e-mail: kryminatorium@gmail.com Instagram: Marcin Myszka - Kryminatorium https://www.instagram.com/marcinmyszka1/

Sincerely HER Podcast
Motivational Quotes | If You Aren't Saying a Permanent No… | Note 428

Sincerely HER Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 1:35


Are a thousand noes worth a few precious yeses? Saying yes to everything without getting good at saying no is a prescription for burnout.   Show notes: Visit SincerelyTam.com/Notes.   Newsletter: Sign up for Tam's "Quick Bites" at Bit.ly./Tams3Tips   Connect: Twitter | @iamSincerelyTam Instagram | @iamSincerelyTam

Sincerely HER Podcast
Personal Development | Trust What You Want | Note 427

Sincerely HER Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 1:15


Do you expect success? You can dream about all the things you want or make them happen. It's up to you to believe great things will happen in your life.   Show notes: Visit SincerelyTam.com/Notes.   Newsletter: Sign up for Tam's "Quick Bites" at Bit.ly./Tams3Tips   Connect: Twitter | @iamSincerelyTam Instagram | @iamSincerelyTam

She Grows with Allyson Scammell
Astrological Insights to Help You Thrive in 2022

She Grows with Allyson Scammell

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 41:22


In today's episode, we explore:The key opportunities and challenges we can expect in 2022What has surprised Tam the most about what she sees in the year aheadHow to use The Energy Almanac in your daily life to set yourself up to THRIVEReferences: Listen to Episode #53 with Tam HERE Listen to Episode #10 with Tam HEREListen to Episode #17 HERETam's Resources: Visit Tam's website HEREBuy the Energy Almanac HEREAllyson's Resources: Purchase the Energy Almanac HEREDOWNLOAD a FREE Energy Upgrade Meditation HERE to amplify your energy, dissolve the doubt, and fill your business with soul clients.Join our community at the Soul Guide Circle HERE of over 1,500 soul-guided leaders, lightworkers, and entrepreneurs.Leave a review for Soul Guide Radio at: Apple Podcasts, Castbox, Podchaser, Podcast Addict 

Snow Files
S3-EP42: Q&A: Sorry, Derek: Maurice Johnson - Alternative Suspects

Snow Files

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 67:28


Join co-hosts Lesley, Tam and Ray as they discuss the alternative suspect, Maurice Johnson in depth. We go really deep in this discussion! And you can also meet our new Intern, Melinda! So exciting! In 1992, just 11 months after the murder of young Clark Gas Station attendant Bill Little, Kroger Station attendant Derek Brooks was shot in the chest during an armed robbery gone wrong, just 2.6 miles away. Like with Bill, the robber attempted to kill him with two shots to the chest, but the gun jammed. A petty sum of cash was stolen and the assailant fled in a maroon colored coupe, with a female get away driver. After being apprehended that same night, and identified with matching footprints and fingerprints, Maurice Johnson admitted to the crime, was charged with attempted murder and armed robbery, apologized to the victim, and was sentenced to twenty five years in prison. The same officers, detectives, and crime scene technicians worked both cases, and were key trial witnesses against Jamie Snow. They received a tip that Maurice Johnson admitted to the Clark Station robbery and murder. However, we cannot find any documents to suggest Maurice Johnson was ever investigated for Bill Little's murder. Music: Theme Song: Black Moons, The 126ers The Stakeout: Christoffer Moe Ditlevson Support Documents http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP43-Sorry-Derek/kroger-maurice-johnson.pdf (Kroger Case File) http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP43-Sorry-Derek/Qik-n-ez_maurice-johnson.pdf (Quik N EZ Case File) 1979 Pontiac Bonneville Pics http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP43-Sorry-Derek/12790372-1979-pontiac-bonneville-std.jpg (http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP43-Sorry-Derek/12790372-1979-pontiac-bonneville-std.jpg) http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP43-Sorry-Derek/12790374-1979-pontiac-bonneville-std.jpg (http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP43-Sorry-Derek/12790374-1979-pontiac-bonneville-std.jpg) http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP43-Sorry-Derek/12790376-1979-pontiac-bonneville-std.jpg (http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP43-Sorry-Derek/12790376-1979-pontiac-bonneville-std.jpg) Newspaper Articles/Maps: http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP43-Sorry-Derek/maurice-newspaper-articles-maps.pdf (http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP43-Sorry-Derek/maurice-newspaper-articles-maps.pdf) Support this podcast

Sincerely HER Podcast
Self-Improvement | Stop Being Lazy | Note 426

Sincerely HER Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 1:31


What's your plan of action? While there are many reasons you may feel stuck in your laziness, including fear, shame, boredom, or depression, whatever the case may be, it's your responsibility to fix your life.   Show notes: Visit SincerelyTam.com/Notes.   Newsletter: Sign up for Tam's "Quick Bites" at Bit.ly./Tams3Tips   Connect: Twitter | @iamSincerelyTam Instagram | @iamSincerelyTam

Publishing Secrets
Publishing Secrets Season 2: New Year, New You?

Publishing Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 13:47


In this episode, you'll also hear:Words of wisdom from author and difference-maker Christine CaineWhy the attitude of “new year, new me” doesn't work – and what to do insteadWhat to expect in this new season of Publishing Secrets, including exciting upcoming interviews, bonus training, and more! BIO:My name is Tamara "Coach Tam" Jackson and I am a published author, Facebook© Certified Digital Marketer, host of the Top 100 Publishing Secrets podcast, and founder of The Christian Authors Network (C.A.N.) Facebook© community. I specialize in helping mission-driven authors, coaches, and entrepreneurs increase their exposure, impact, and income through strategic self-publishing and digital media appearances. Just say yes and we will work together to attract a tribe of loyal followers that 1) "get you", 2) love what you do, and 3) are happy to invest in your book, business, cause, or movement. Plus, we will accomplish all of this without fake, salesy, sleazy, or manipulative tactics. Yes you CAN write, publish, and profit in a way that honors God; join the community today at https://christianauthors.net/fbgroup.   GET CONNECTED:Connect with fellow Christian Authors: http://christianauthors.net/fbgroupDownload the Free Christian Author Marketing EBook: https://265point.com/secretsbook1Get Booked as a Guest Speaker for Free: http://christianauthors.netFollow Tam on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TamaraJacksonTransformationExpert/Interact with Tam on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fitnesstamara265/Learn more about 265 Point: http://www.265point.com

Sincerely HER Podcast
I Shape My Own Destiny | Note 425

Sincerely HER Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 3:15


Are you fighting for what you want? Your destiny starts with your mindset and your choices. I talked about it this week. But here's a friendly reminder. It's time to decide who you are and who you want to be.   Show notes: Visit SincerelyTam.com/Notes.   Newsletter: Sign up for Tam's "Quick Bites" at Bit.ly./Tams3Tips   Connect: Twitter | @iamSincerelyTam Instagram | @iamSincerelyTam   Today's show: This episode is brought to you by Podcastle. Podcastle helps podcasters, bloggers, journalists, educators, content creators, and marketers to let their voices be heard. An easy-to-use AI-powered, collaborative audio creation platform, Podcastle provides a way for professional and amateur podcasters to create, edit and distribute production-quality podcasts in seconds. For more information, visit Podcastle.ai.

Sincerely HER Podcast
Believe in Yourself | Note 424

Sincerely HER Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 2:48


Are you ready to get rid of your fears and self-doubt? If fear is something you are imagining, how is it stopping you? Understanding why and what you are afraid of is a sure way to begin to overcome your fear.   Show notes: Visit SincerelyTam.com/Notes.   Newsletter: Sign up for Tam's "Quick Bites" at Bit.ly./Tams3Tips   Connect: Twitter | @iamSincerelyTam Instagram | @iamSincerelyTam   Today's show: This episode is brought to you by Podcastle. Podcastle helps podcasters, bloggers, journalists, educators, content creators, and marketers to let their voices be heard. An easy-to-use AI-powered, collaborative audio creation platform, Podcastle provides a way for professional and amateur podcasters to create, edit and distribute production-quality podcasts in seconds. For more information, visit Podcastle.ai.

Kryminatorium
Czy służby PRL zabiły lekarkę z Częstochowy? | SPRAWA Z FILMU

Kryminatorium

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 24:54


Ten odcinek to wersja dźwiękowa filmu opublikowanego na kanale Marcin Myszka na YouTube. Tam znajdziesz dodatkowe zdjęcia i materiały związane z omawianą sprawą. ▶️ Link do filmu ►https://youtu.be/0iFtqE9Ml5g ⠀ Krystyna Miłoch-Maletz była znaną lekarką w Częstochowie. Zginęła w swoim mieszkaniu pod koniec 1987 roku. Wiele wskazuje na to, że udział w zbrodni mogły mieć komunistyczne służby. Rodzina Pani Krystyny od lat próbuje odkryć prawdę i poznać motyw zabójstwa. ⠀ Zamów mój audioserial o sprawie mordercy z czasów PRL https://www.kryminatorium.pl/sklep/ ⠀ kontakt: e-mail: kryminatorium@gmail.com Instagram: Marcin Myszka - Kryminatorium https://www.instagram.com/marcinmyszka1/

Sincerely HER Podcast
Be That Person | Note 423

Sincerely HER Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 3:27


Have you decided who you really want to be? The key for many things in life is to decide to be. There is no better time than now to gasp this life-altering concept.   Show notes: Visit SincerelyTam.com/Notes.   Newsletter: Sign up for Tam's "Quick Bites" at Bit.ly./Tams3Tips   Connect: Twitter | @iamSincerelyTam Instagram | @iamSincerelyTam   Today's show: This episode is brought to you by Podcastle. Podcastle helps podcasters, bloggers, journalists, educators, content creators, and marketers to let their voices be heard. An easy-to-use AI-powered, collaborative audio creation platform, Podcastle provides a way for professional and amateur podcasters to create, edit and distribute production-quality podcasts in seconds. For more information, visit Podcastle.ai.

Sincerely HER Podcast
Love Yourself and What You Do | Note 422

Sincerely HER Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 4:54


Do you do things you hate doing? Loving yourself and what you do isn't selfish. Self-love can mean many things to different people, but self-love, happiness, and self-compassion are vital to your mental health and well-being.   Show notes: Visit SincerelyTam.com/Notes.   Newsletter: Sign up for Tam's "Quick Bites" at Bit.ly./Tams3Tips   Connect: Twitter | @iamSincerelyTam Instagram | @iamSincerelyTam   Today's show: This episode is brought to you by Podcastle. Podcastle helps podcasters, bloggers, journalists, educators, content creators, and marketers to let their voices be heard. An easy-to-use AI-powered, collaborative audio creation platform, Podcastle provides a way for professional and amateur podcasters to create, edit and distribute production-quality podcasts in seconds. For more information, visit Podcastle.ai.

Sincerely HER Podcast
Be Happy | Note 421

Sincerely HER Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 4:02


Are you pursuing happiness? One sure way to be happier is to get rid of as much negativity as you can. Another way is to figure out what sparks joy for you. And find your why.   Show notes: Visit SincerelyTam.com/Notes.   Newsletter: Sign up for Tam's "Quick Bites" at Bit.ly./Tams3Tips   Connect: Twitter | @iamSincerelyTam Instagram | @iamSincerelyTam   Episode note: This episode is brought to you by Podcastle. Podcastle helps podcasters, bloggers, journalists, educators, content creators, and marketers to let their voices be heard. An easy-to-use AI-powered, collaborative audio creation platform, Podcastle provides a way for professional and amateur podcasters to create, edit and distribute production-quality podcasts in seconds. For more information, visit Podcastle.ai.

Plus Three
Power Tripping #5: House Full of Sh*t

Plus Three

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 94:26


What the hell is going on in this house full of shit? And where do we go from here? We don't have answers, but we have ideas and plenty of questions to unfold. Power Trip 5 was a montage of stories that illustrate a bigger picture. This episode of Power Tripping offers a complementary platter of ideas. From the structural features of the psychedelic therapy marketplace, to the cognitive biases that encourage conformity and groupthink, we explore how the status quo of psychedelic therapy encourages bad behavior and complicity. What if shit's not a bug, but a feature?   Support:   ☼Patreon: http://patreon.com/psymposia ☼Donate: https://www.psymposia.com/donate/   For full episodes, transcripts, supporting documents, and more, visit: https://psymposia.com/powertrip   Follow:   ☼Twitter: https://twitter.com/psymposia ☼Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/psymposia/ ☼Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/psymposia ☼Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/psymposia ☼Website: https://www.psymposia.com ☼Podcast: https://www.psymposia.com/plusthree ☼Newsletter: https://www.psymposia.com/subscribe/   Thank you to our Patreon podcast supporters:   Dave Hodges, James Hubbard, John Hanna, Dave Ayers, Tehseen Noorani, Myster Psoul, Samy Tammam, Amanda Alexander, Maryann Kehoe, Daniel McQueen, Annick McIntosh, Aaron Williams, Julia A, Christian Dawley, Dustin T, Leon Boroditsky, John Bannon, Atticus Kelbley, Daniel, Jason Gross, Clifford Hudson, Miller Hooks, Scott Martin, Sandra Dreisbach, zeph Tam, Rochella Martin, Gurpreet Saini, Jason Seidel, Will Petersen, Jeff Davis  

Zielony Podcast
Co nas czeka w 2022 roku w Polsce i na świecie? Justyna Piszczatowska, green-news.pl i Patryk Strzałkowski, zielona.gazeta.pl

Zielony Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 57:51


To już nasza mała tradycja, z redaktorami naczelnymi Justyną Piszczątowską z green-news.pl i Patrykiem Strzałkowskiem z zielona.gazeta.pl będziemy - w pierwszym Zielonym Podcaście w 2022 roku - rozmawiać o tym co przyniesie nowy rok i jak podsumowujemy ten, który już (szczęśliwie, sic!) się zakończył. Obserwujcie stronę www.facebook.com/ZielonyPodcast i mój profil www.instagram.com/krzysiekrzyman . Tam okazja do zadania pytań kolejnemu gościowi, albo gościni, a w relacjach (stories) zawsze dużo aktualnych zielonych informacji. Zapraszam, Krzysiek Rzyman

Publishing Secrets
2021 Reflections: You Are Still Here

Publishing Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 6:20


In this episode, you'll also hear:Reminders from the guests of 2021 about putting yourself out thereEncouragement for times of hardship that are sure to comeA special invitation to join a growing community for support and encouragement in your author journey BIO:My name is Tamara "Coach Tam" Jackson and I am a published author, Facebook© Certified Digital Marketer, host of the Top 100 Publishing Secrets podcast, and founder of The Christian Authors Network (C.A.N.) Facebook© community. I specialize in helping mission-driven authors, coaches, and entrepreneurs increase their exposure, impact, and income through strategic self-publishing and digital media appearances. Just say yes and we will work together to attract a tribe of loyal followers that 1) "get you", 2) love what you do, and 3) are happy to invest in your book, business, cause, or movement. Plus, we will accomplish all of this without fake, salesy, sleazy, or manipulative tactics. Yes you CAN write, publish, and profit in a way that honors God; join the community today at https://christianauthors.net/fbgroup. GET CONNECTED:Connect with fellow Christian Authors: http://christianauthors.net/fbgroupDownload the Free Christian Author Marketing EBook: https://265point.com/secretsbook1Get Booked as a Guest Speaker for Free: http://christianauthors.netFollow Tam on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TamaraJacksonTransformationExpert/Interact with Tam on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fitnesstamara265/Learn more about 265 Point: http://www.265point.com EPISODE SPONSOR: The Connect & Convert Content ClubSound familiar? You know how important it is to build an author platform BUT you're struggling! Deep down, you just want to glorify God, write, connect with your readers, and earn a comfortable living... NOT be stuck in a never-ending cycle of planning, researching, and creating content! Right? Then how would you like to have amazing, fresh, new, and engaging content EVERY MONTH yet NEVER have to worry about marketing again? It IS Possible!The Connect & Convert was created to relieve stress, save time, and help non-fiction Authors and Aspiring authors build a brand and following quickly - a following is that willing to invest in their book and the next step - a course, bible study, coaching program, or consultation.Ready to really connect with your audience and create a bigger impact? Click the link below to get started:https://265point.com/contentclub

Radek Kobiałko Nadaje
O moim Tacie i Wielkiej Rezygnacji.

Radek Kobiałko Nadaje

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 25:21


The Great Resignation. Trend z USA rozchodzi się po całym świecie. Tam tylko w 2021 roku poddało się mu miliony ludzi... Ilu dokładnie i co się kryje pod tym pojęciem tego dowiecie się słuchając podcastu. #greatresignation

Behind The Clipboard Expert Event Tips
Event Tips - Answering YOUR Questions

Behind The Clipboard Expert Event Tips

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 30:58


We are bidding goodbye to 2021 by answering a few questions from you, our stellar Behind the Clipboard family! We're also reflecting on our favourite eps of this season and giving you a sneak peek into Season 6, coming  in 2022. Come visit us at www.knownassociates.com.au for all the blogs on event tips to get you through to the next season. Happy New Year everybody! Tam and Mel xx

Zināmais nezināmajā
Kosmosa tūrisms un Marsa izpēte. Gads fizikā, astronomijā un kosmosa tehnoloģijās

Zināmais nezināmajā

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 47:04


Marsa izpēte, jauna ēra kosmosa tūrismā, citplanētu meklējumi un daudz citu negaidītu notikumu! 2021. gads ir bijis ļoti veiksmīgs kosmosa izpētē, jauni atklājumi bijuši arī fizikā un astronomijā, paplašinot mūsu zināšanas par Visumu. Aizvadīto gadu vērtē astronomijas entuziasts Raitis Misa, Tukuma ģimnāzijas fizikas skolotājs Valdis Zuters un Latvijas Universitātes Astronomijas institūta pētnieks Ilgonis Vilks. Tehnoloģiju atklājumi astronomijā un fizikā 2021. gads apliecinājis cilvēku vēlmi pētīt planētas, lidot kosmosā ar privātām raķetēm un noskaidrot līdz šim neizskaidroto fundamentālajā fizikā. Tam sekojām līdzi arī raidījuma sižetos, un šajā reizē atminēsimies dažus no mirkļiem gan Latvijas, gan Visuma mērogā. Šī gada marta beigās stāstījām par Eiropas Kosmosa aģentūras uzsāktu projektu, lai mēģinātu konstatēt tumšās matērijas esamību Zemei tuvējā kosmiskajā telpā. Tumšā matērija pašlaik ir viens no aktuālākajiem jautājumiem astronomijā. Šajā starptautiskajā eksperimentā līdzās tādām kosmosa lielvalstīm kā ASV, Austrālija, Krievija, Ķīna un Japāna iesaistījās arī Latvijas Universitātes Astronomijas institūts, kas veica mērījumus no lāzerstacijas Latvijas Universitātes Botāniskajā dārzā. Tad nu atsauksim atmiņā šobrīd zināmo par tumšo matēriju. Tā, iespējams, veido apmēram 85 procentus no kopējās Visuma masas. Starp tumšo matēriju un gaismu nenotiek mijiedarbība, tumšā matērija neuzsūc un neizstaro ne gaismu, ne elektromagnētisko starojumu.

Kerem Önder
Tam gün zikir! / Kerem Önder

Kerem Önder

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 46:50


جُنُوبِكُمْ ۚ فَإِذَا ٱطْمَأْنَنتُمْ فَأَقِيمُوا۟ ٱلصَّلَوٰةَ ۚ إِنَّ ٱلصَّلَوٰةَ كَانَتْ عَلَى ٱلْمُؤْمِنِينَ كِتَٰبًا مَّوْقُوتًا "Namazı kıldınız mı gerek ayakta, gerek otururken ve gerek yan yatarak hep Allah'ı anın. Güvene kavuştunuz mu namazı tam olarak kılın. Çünkü namaz, mü'minlere belirli vakitlere bağlı olarak farz kılınmıştır." (Nisa 103) Tam gün zikir! / Kerem Önder Burada bahsedilen "zikir"den murad, namazdır. Yani, "At koşturup kılıç sallamakla meşgul iken ayakta olarak; ok atmakla meşgul iken oturarak; çokça yaralanıp, böylece de yere düştüğünüzde, yan üstü yatarak namazlarınızı kılınız. Siz, harb sona erdiğinde, sükun ve emniyet içinde bulunduğunuzda ise, "namazlarınızı dosdoğru kılın ve koşar vaziyette kılmış olduğunuz namazları kaza ediniz..." demektir. Bu mana, namaz vakti girdiğinde, koşar vaziyette iken savaşan kimseye, namazın farz kılınmış olması; savaşan kimseler emniyet ve sükun haline ulaştıklarında da daha önce kılmış oldukları namazı kaza etmelerinin gerekli olduğu şeklindeki Şafiî'nin görüşüne delaleti açıktır. Allahü teâlâ, "Namazlara ve orta namaza devam edin" (Bakara 238) buyurmuştur. Bu ifadedeki "namazlar" kelimesi, (en azından) üç namazın farz olduğuna delalet eder; "Ve orta namaza..." ifadesi ise, orta namazın o üç namazdan biri olmasına manidir. Aksi takdirde bu, (lüzumsuz) bir tekrar olmuş olurdu. Binâenaleyh namazların sayısının üçten fazla olması gerekir. Farz namazların dört tane olması caiz değildir. Aksi halde, namazlar içinde "orta" sayılacak bir namaz bulunmaz. Binâenaleyh "orta namaz "in bulunabilmesi için, bunların sayısının beş tane olması gerekir. Âyet farz namazların beş tane olduğuna delalet ettiği gibi vitir namazının farz olmadığına da delalet eder. Aksi halde farz namazların sayısı, altıya çıkmış olur ki, bu durumda da "orta namaz" bulunamaz. Binâenaleyh âyet, farz namazların beş tane olduğuna delalet edip, bunların vakitlerine delalet etmemektedir. Web / https://keremonder.com Facebook / http://www.facebook.com/kereminden Instagram / http://www.instagram.com/kerem_onder Instagram / http://www.instagram.com/ihramcizader... Twitter / http://twitter.com/keremonder1 Podcast / https://anchor.fm/keremonder din,ilim,fıkıh,dini videolar,sohbet,sohbetler,dini sohbetler,kerem önder,kerem önder hoca,tefsir,Allah,ilim yayma,ihramcızade,ihramcızade ilim yayma,

Cassettes with William July
27: Tamás Danyikó

Cassettes with William July

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 58:58


Tamás Danyikó, aquascaper and car buff, joins me to talk about aquascaping, döner kebab, and Top Gear.Want to help Cassettes grow? Become a patron at patreon.com/cassettespodcast and get full-length episodes with double the content, 48 hours early.Follow Cassettes on...Instagram: @cassettespodcastTwitter: @cassettes_podSpecial thanks to Chris Maier, who did the music. Find him here.GUEST LINKSGreen Aqua's Youtube channelGreen Aqua's websiteGreen Aqua videos Tommy's 60P IwagumiTommy builds a shallow tankTommy and Viktor's 450L Nature Aquarium style tankGreen Aqua tours the Aqua Design Amano GalleryOther aquascaping videosCinescaper's 'The Log'Cinescaper builds an indoor pondJames Findley builds a shallow tankJames Findley's 'Arizona'THINGS WE MENTIONEDAquascapingTakashi AmanoIAPLC (aquascaping competition)Fiat CinquecentoTop Gear, The Grand Tour, Jeremy Clarkson★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Comiendo con María (Nutrición)
1168. El tejido adiposo.

Comiendo con María (Nutrición)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 20:32


El tejido adiposo es un órgano endocrino que regula múltiples funciones en nuestro organismo. Diferenciamos dos tipos, el tejido adiposo blanco (TAB) y el tejido adiposo marrón (TAM). Este último tiene una función de termorregulación y va disminuyendo con la edad, siendo los recién nacidos quienes lo tienen en mayor proporción. El TAB se distribuye por todo el cuerpo, a nivel intraabdominal encontramos los mayores depósitos alrededor del omento (omental), del intestino (mesentérico) y de las áreas perirrenales (retroperitoneal), y a nivel subcutáneo la grasa se localiza sobre todo a nivel de las nalgas, los muslos y el abdomen. Pero además de estos depósitos mayoritarios existen otras áreas en el organismo donde encontra- mos TAB, distinguiendo depósitos a nivel pericardial, perivascular o periarterial, periarticular, retro-orbital, intramuscular, médula ósea y cara.Existe, además, un dimorfismo sexual en cuanto a la distribución de la grasa corporal. Así, en el sexo masculino hay una mayor acumulación de grasa en la parte superior del cuerpo, lo que se conoce como distri- bución androide o de tipo manzana, mientras que en el sexo femenino la grasa predomina en la parte inferior del cuerpo, refiriéndose como distribución ginoide o de tipo pera.Cuando hay un exceso de grasa corporal aumenta el riesgo de padecer muchas enfermedades, debido a que en este hay unas sustancias llamadas adipocinas que regulan muchísimos procesos del organismo: intervienen en la regulación de la ingesta y del balance energético (leptina), en la regulación de la presión sanguínea (angiotensinógeno), en la hemostasia vascular (PAI-1), en el metabolismo lipídico (RBP-4, CETP), en la homeostasis glucídica (adiponectina, resistina, visfatina), en la angiogénesis (VEGF), así como factores de crecimiento y proteínas de fase aguda y respuesta al estrés (hap- toglobulina, ̨1-acid glycoprotein) El número de adipocitos en el adulto se mantiene relativamente constante, fijándose su número durante la infancia y la adolescencia, por este motivo es tan importante la alimentación infantil y crear bueno hábitos desde pequeños. Fuente: Ràfols, M.E. Tejido adiposo: heterogeneidad celular y diversidad funcional. Endocrinología y Nutrición, February 2014; 61, 2:100-112

Zielony Podcast
2021 - ależ to był rok!

Zielony Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 2:00


W 2021 roku w każdą niedzielę mogliście słuchać Zielonego Podcastu! Udało się. W ostatnim odcinku w tym roku moje jedno życzenie do Was. Trzymajcie się ciepło! Obserwujcie stronę www.facebook.com/ZielonyPodcast i mój profil www.instagram.com/krzysiekrzyman . Tam okazja do zadania pytań kolejnemu gościowi, albo gościni, a w relacjach (stories) zawsze dużo aktualnych zielonych informacji. Zapraszam, Krzysiek Rzyman

What Are You Wearing?
Shopping For Swimwear Has Never Been Easier (Yes, Really)

What Are You Wearing?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 26:27


Today Tamara Davis and Deni Todorović are taking on one of the hardest things to shop for, SWIMMERS. But have no fear - Deni, Tam, and our wonderful fashion collective are here to help you feel confident on the beach, with tons of helpful tips and recommendations. It's the ultimate, realistic, fun guide to swimwear. Plus, how do you adapt corporate work wardrobe to fit a casual work vibe? We provide styling tips to keep your wardrobe versatile.  Big thanks to our collective for being involved this week; Katie Parrott Yatu Widders Hunt  Nikki Parkinson  Lottie Dalziel  Check out everything we talked about today on the Mamamia Style Instagram We have a Facebook group! Check out What Are You Wearing The list of clothes and accessories mentioned in this episode is below: Katie: Baiia swimwear Yatu: Liandra swim and Indii swim Nikki: Acquabrand, Marvell Lane, Saint Somebody and Capriosca Lottie: Winkisuits Deni: Lucy Folk towels Jets swimwear Triangl Camilla Billabong Roxy Ripcurl Kmart swimwear Cotton On Swimwear Tam:  Une Piece Sexie Rashie Hats from Cotton On Solaqua for towels Seafolly Zimmermann Baku swimwear Quay eyewear Le Specs BOUJIE Tam: Lack of Color hat Deni: Camilla sarong BUDGET Tam: Target linen shorts Deni: Aussie Bum CREDITS This podcast is produced by Rose Kerr Mamamia's Head of Podcasts is Elissa Ratliff GET IN TOUCH: Got a fashion question you want answered? Email us at podcast@mamamia.com.au or call the podphone on 02 8999 9386 Listen to more Mamamia podcasts here. Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. Just by reading our articles or listening to our podcasts, you're helping to fund girls in schools in some of the most disadvantaged countries in the world - through our partnership with Room to Read. We're currently funding 300 girls in school every day and our aim is to get to 1,000. Find out more about Mamamia here.  Support the show: https://www.mamamia.com.au See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Blízká setkání
Herec a moderátor Jan Čenský: Viděl jsem Ježíška a kouzlo Vánoc mi zůstalo

Blízká setkání

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 30:21


„Vyrůstal jsem v Orlických horách a nebyla televize. Tam se Vánoce prožívaly jinak,“ vzpomíná v Blízkých setkáních. Všechny díly pořadu najdete na webu Dvojky nebo v mobilní aplikaci mujRozhlas.

Karolina Cwalina PODCAST
#girlsTALK Karolina Cwalina x Justyna Szyc-Nagłowska, czyli czemu warto zmieniać zdanie

Karolina Cwalina PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 65:34


„Tylko krowa nie zmienia poglądów” mówi dobrze znane przysłowie. Dlaczego więc same mamy taki problem, żeby na zmianę sobie pozwolić? Moim kolejnym gościem w podcaście #girlTalk jest Justyna Szyc-Nagłowska, podcasterka, autorka audycji „Matka też człowiek” i „Nagłowska na głos”. Z tym, że w jej życiu pojawiały się zakręty, Justyna nigdy się nie kryła. Choć niektóre z nich, np. rozwód niektórzy potraktowaliby jak porażkę, ona wiedziała, że jest to cenna lekcja. Bardzo trudna i pełna emocji, ale też uwalniająca. Dziś mówi, że jednym z największych błogosławieństw jest to, że zrozumiała, że w życiu można zmieniać zdanie. Zdarza się, że czasem kurczowo trzymamy się pewnych myśli i zachowań, nie dostrzegając, że albo już tak naprawdę nie są nasze, albo zwyczajnie nas krzywdzą. Uwolnienie się od tych schematów i danie sobie prawa do zmiany zdania Justyna uważa za kluczowe.  Choć dziś znana jest jako świetna podcasterka, autorka serii Matka też człowiek i Nagłowska na głos, swoją przygodę z nagraniami zaczynała nie bez lęku. Wiedziała jednak, że jeśli nie spróbuje, to się nie przekona. Nie był to element większego planu, ale czuła fascynację światem podcastów i możliwością rozmawiania z ciekawymi dla niej ludźmi. Jak sama przyznaje lubi się troszkę bać, bo zdrowy dreszczyk emocji potęguje jej motywację, nie paraliżuje jej.  Wszystkim, którzy rezygnują ze swoich marzeń, bo boją się negatywnej oceny, mówi, że nie warto. Wygórowane oczekiwania w stosunku do siebie i innych niszczą zamiast budować.  _______ Nazywam się Karolina i jestem Coachem PCC ICF, Mentorką, autorką książek i przedsiębiorczynią. Dzięki mojemu wsparciu i determinacji, tysiące Polek na nowo poznały swoją wartość i zrozumiały, że „sexy zaczyna się w głowie”. Racjonalistka, którą ciężko zatrzymać w dążeniach do spełniania marzeń, jeśli czuje, że to po prostu MOJE! Regularne występy w mediach oraz masa działań na rzecz rozwoju, skłoniły mnie do stworzenia własnego Podcastu, gdzie znajdziecie cykl #girlsTALK. Porozmawiam tutaj z inspirującymi osobami, które nie boją się podzielić swoją historią.  Zapraszam również na mój kanał na Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/karolinacwalina Tam odcinki video z równie ciekawymi rozmówcami:) IG: https://www.instagram.com/sexyzaczynasiewglowie/ Cała ja!:) WEBSITE: www.karolinacwalina.pl

Partizán
„Megmondtam Révész Máriusznak, hogy propagandafilmet nem akarok csinálni” | Markoló

Partizán

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 45:23


Skrabski Fruzsina több mint tíz éve készít társadalmi, politikai témájú dokumentumfilmeket. Első és egyik legemlékezetesebb munkája a Novák Tamással közösen készített Biszku-film, a Bűn és bűntetlenség, most pedig a 2006-os rendőri erőszakot feldolgozó alkotással jelentkezett Skrabski, amit az atlatszo.hu főszerkesztőjével, Bodoky Tamással készítettek együtt. A konzervatív filmrendezővel beszélgetünk a film keletkezéstörténetéről, történelemszemléletéről és motivációiról, a Fidesz emlékezetpolitikájáról, az Elkúrtuk című filmről, 2006-ról.Hol találsz meg minket?Youtube-on: https://www.youtube.com/c/Partiz%C3%A1nm%C3%A9diaFacebookon: https://facebook.com/partizanpolitika/Facebook-csoportunkban: https://www.facebook.com/groups/partizantarsalgoInstagramon: https://www.instagram.com/partizanpolitika/Hogyan támogathatod a munkánkat?Legyél a patronálónk, hogy hozzáférj a vágatlan adásokhoz és extra tartalmainkhoz: https://www.patreon.com/partizanpolitikaPayPal-on keresztül is várjuk az adományodat, e-mail címünk: partizanalapitvany@gmail.comEgyszeri vagy rendszeres banki átutalással is segíthetsz! Ehhez a legfontosabb adatok:Név: Partizán AlapítványSzámlaszám: 16200106-11669030-00000000Közlemény: TámogatásHa külföldről utalnál, nemzetközi számlaszámunk/IBAN (International Bank Account Number): HU68 1620 0106 1166 9030 0000 0000BIC/SWIFT-kód: HBWEHUHB★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

More Than My Past
FESTIVE SPECIAL with Forward Trust Reunion attendees

More Than My Past

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 29:54


This festive edition of MTMP was recorded at the annual Forward Trust Reunion in Central London, which offers a chance for people who have been helped by the charity to celebrate their journey towards a life free from addiction or offending. Jason was there and found himself in the company of so many brilliant people, all under one roof and all more than their pasts. He asked some of them what their toughest Christmas period has been, how they got through it, and what advice they'd give to others who might be struggling through this often difficult time of year. Thanks to Jake, Tam, Ella, Vince, Joe, Andy, Natalie and Ilario for speaking to him - and thanks too to Rachel Wright for her co-production help. Remember, if you need someone to talk to, you can find Forward's online chat service by searching ‘Forward Reach Out' on Google – or, call the Samaritans on 116 123.For more information and to view dozens more stories, go to www.morethanmypast.org.uk See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

AggroChat: Tales of the Aggronaut Podcast
AggroChat #371 - Neon Kamigawa Lands

AggroChat: Tales of the Aggronaut Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 62:20


Hey Folks!  Sorry for no show last week but Bel was not able to record.  If you follow him on social media you might have an idea of the weekend he had.  Additionally we should probably talk about how this is going to be our last show of the year.  Time and space has conspired to make it so our recording days for the next two weeks are Christmas Day and New Years Day which yeah…  are not going to be days we record on.  So instead we will see you again in the new year with our traditional “Games of the Year” show.   Tonight however we start off by talking about how generally hard it is to actually play Final Fantasy XIV.  From there Bel talks about the Bungie 30th anniversary event and what he has been doing instead of FFXIV since he finished the MSQ.  From there we talk a bit about Warframe and how the beginning of a new year tends to be when Ash revisits the game.  We talk briefly about the Game Awards 2021 and how Tunic finally has a release date.  Tam talks about his experiences playing Summoner in FFXIV Endwalker.  We then talk about crossing the uncanny valley with the Matrix Awakens Unreal 5 Tech Demo.  Finally we wrap things up talking about how freaking cool the Neon Kamigawa Lands are and how probably hard it will be to get our hands on them. Topics Discussed Not Being able to play FFXIV Endwalker Ceasing Sale of Product Bungie 30th Anniversary Event in Destiny 2 Warframe Game Awards 2021 Tunic Release Date FFXIV Winning Awards Summoner in FFXIV Matrix Awakens Unreal 5 Tech Demo Neon Kamigawa Lands

GameSpot After Dark
GameSpot's 2021 Game of the Year

GameSpot After Dark

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 24:00


Lucy and Tam talk about GameSpot's choice for the best game of 2021. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

This Is My Story
Episode 70 – Merry Quizmaz

This Is My Story

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 84:30


Another week on the Hearts rollercoaster is now behind us. Join the lads as we try and pick out the positives and review the negatives from the match vs Rangers. We also preview the Dundee game at the weekend. We're quiz heavy this week! Kev has a McKenna's his players. Brads has some conundrums. Shanks is talking nonsense again and Tam is.....well he's Tam. Enjoy! Remember to get your Predictor entry in for the match vs Dundee - Predictor Get involved and reach out to us through the channels below; Email - admin@thisismystory.uk Twitter - @thismystorypod Instagram - @thisismystory1874

Historia Polski dla dzieci
108 - Style architektoniczne

Historia Polski dla dzieci

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 16:29


Dzisiaj nauczymy się jak rozpoznawać w jakim stylu budowano w przeszłości. Trudno jest rozpoznać style w jakich budowano, bo ludzie budowali w różnych stylach. Jedni kopiowali od drugich. Czasami mieszali kilka stylów. Będziemy dziś mówić o stylu romańskim, gotyckim oraz renesansie. Gdzie możecie znaleźć przykłady budynków w różnych stylach?Na banknocie 5 euro pokazano styl klasycystyczny, na 10 - styl romański, na 20 - gotyk, na 50 - renesans, na 100 - barok. Dlaczego my zaczęliśmy od stylu romańskiego, a nie klasycystycznego, który był wcześniej? Styl klasycystyczny to styl budowania w starożytnej Grecji oraz w starożytnym Rzymie. Budynki takie stawiano wszędzie tam gdzie dotarło cesarstwo rzymskie. Takie budynki albo ich ruiny są np. we Włoszech, w Hiszpanii, we Francji czy w Anglii. Rzymianie nigdy jednak nie podbili Polski tak więc w Polsce nigdy nie postawiono budynku w stylu klasycystycznym. Polska architektura zaczęła się dopiero od następnego stylu - stylu romańskiego i dlatego od tego zaczniemy.Zacznijmy od nazwy. Styl romański powstał na terenie dzisiejszych Włoch, Francji i Niemiec. Te tereny należały kiedyś co cesarstwa rzymskiego. Ono upadło w 5 wieku, ale ludzie dalej starali się budować w tym rzymskim stylu. Ludzie w średniowieczu starali się kopiować starożytny styl rzymian, ale nie potrafili skopiować wszystkiego. Np. w Rzymie od czasów starożytnych stoi Panteon. Budowla, która ma piękną kopułę na dachu. Ludzie w średniowieczu to widzieli, ale nie potrafili tego odtworzyć. Jak więc budowali?Budowniczowie w średniowieczu chcieli budować tak jak starożytni, ale nie potrafili. Budowali grube mury i bardzo małe okna. Były to budynki, które trudno było zdobyć. Np. kościół w stylu romańskim także miał grube mury i małe okna. Gdy zbliżali się najeźdźcy taki kościół zmieniał się w twierdzę, której bronili miejscowi ludzie. Ponieważ w takich murach były tylko małe okienka, to w środku było dość ciemno. Jak rozpoznać styl romański. Gdy zobaczycie budynek z kamieni lub cegieł, który ma małe okna zaokrąglone u góry to możecie być pewni, że to budynek w stylu romańskim.Jak się nazywał kolejny styl i skąd ta nazwa? Cesarstwo rzymskie upadło gdy przybyli barbarzyńcy tacy jak Wandalowie, Hunowie i Goci. Ci ostatni podzielili się na dwie duże grupy. Wizygotów, którzy zajęli dzisiejszą Hiszpanię oraz Ostrogotów, którzy zajęli dzisiejsze Włochy. Styl romański charakteryzował się okrągłymi łukami. Styl gotycki miał takie spiczaste łuki. Porównajcie na obrazku: styl romański to łuk okrągły, a styl gotycki to łuk z takim ostrym czubkiem. Skąd ta zmiana? Niektórzy twierdzą, że Goci mieli dużo kontaktów z wyznawcami Islamu, a oni budowali właśnie łuki z ostrym zakończeniem. Łuk w budowlach islamskich jest troszkę inny, ale ma właśnie ten czubek. Ale czym jeszcze charakteryzował się styl gotycki? Styl gotycki to oprócz tych spiczastych łuków miał także witraże. Witraże to takie kolorowe szybki, z których robiono obrazy. Styl gotycki był wykorzystywany do budowania wielu kościołów tak więc witraże także najczęściej przedstawiały obrazy religijne.Nie wszyscy lubili styl gotycki. Np. we Włoszech ludzie pamiętali, że Goci byli jednymi z barbarzyńców, którzy zniszczyli Rzym. Tak więc nazywanie stylu gotyckim oznaczało, że jest to brzydki styl barbarzyńców. Dzisiaj wielu ludzi lubi styl gotycki, ale w tamtych czasach wielu, szczególnie z Włoch nie lubiło tego stylu i nazwali go od Gotów - stylem gotyckim. W jakim więc stylu budowali Włosi gdy odrzucili styl gotycki? Stworzyli trzeci styl, o którym też sobie dzisiaj powiemy. Włosi postanowili wrócić do stylu starożytnych. Czym się charakteryzował ten styl? Zaczęliśmy dziś od stylu romańskiego. Jego nazwa pochodzi od słowa Roma czyli nazwy Rzymu. Styl ten naśladował to jak budowali starożytni. Niestety ludzie zapomnieli wiele rzeczy. Np. w Rzymie od czasów starożytnych stał Panteon czyli świątynią z piękną kopułą. W średniowieczu ludzie oglądali ten budynek, ale nie potrafili tak budować. Tak więc styl romański to były grube mury i małe zaokrąglone okna u góry. Później przyszedł styl gotycki z tymi spiczastymi łukami u góry. Renesans to prawdziwy powrót do architektury starożytnego Rzymu. Ponownie zaczęto robić okrągłe łuki. Różnica polegała na tym, że w stylu romańskim były małe okna z okrągłymi łukami, a w renesansie budowano wielkie okna z okrągłymi łukami. Znaleziono księgi starożytnego architekta Witruwiusza. Ludzie zaczęli je czytać i ponownie nauczyli się budować tak piękne rzeczy jak okrągłe kopuły na dachach.Tak więc renesans oznacza odrodzenie, czyli ponowne narodzenie sztuki i architektury starożytnej. Budowano tak jak starożytni Grecy i Rzymianie. Nie chodzi jednak tylko o takie elementy jak kolumny czy kopuły na dachach. Wrócono także do złotego podziału czyli boskiej proporcji. Aby zrozumieć co to jest złoty podział trzeba znać trochę matematyki. Fibonacci był włoskim matematykiem i opisał ciąg liczb, który dzisiaj nazywamy właśnie ciągiem Fibonacciego.Ciąg Fibonacciego to ciąg czyli taka lista kolejnych liczb: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13. Aby dowiedzieć się jaka będzie kolejna liczba trzeba dodać dwie poprzednie. Tak więc po liczbach 8 i 13 będzie liczba 21, bo 8 + 13 = 21. Kolejna liczba to 34 bo 13 + 21 = 34 itd. Te liczby widać w naturze np. w budowie muszli ślimaka, liczbie płatków w kwiatach czy liczbie rzędów nasion w słoneczniku. Okazuje się, że dla ludzkiego oka proporcja dwóch kolejnych liczb ciągu Fibonacciego jest bardzo ładna. Już starożytni Grecy zbudowali Partenon, w którym użyto złotej proporcji. Aby budynek miał tą złotą proporcję używa się dwóch kolejnych liczb z ciągu Fibonacciego, np. 8 i 13. Większą liczbę używa się jako szerokość, a mniejszą jako wysokość. Aby zobaczyć jak ładny prostokąt wychodzi nie musicie szukać budynku. Takie prostokąty są używanie nie tylko w architekturze. Np. karty kredytowe czy pocztówki także zachowują tą złotą proporcję. Ale dość matematyki, wróćmy do architektury.W Polsce budowano najpierw w stylu gotyckim: grube mury i małe zaokrąglone okna. Później w stylu gotyckim: cieńsze mury oraz wielkie spiczaste u góry okna z pięknymi witrażami. Potem rozpoczął się renesans, kiedy zaczęto budować kopuły i kolumny. Dzisiaj ludzie budują w wielu stylach. Np. wiele kościołów w Polsce buduje się dzisiaj w stylu neogotyckim. Czyli taki kościół ma wielkie okno ze spiczastym łukiem u góry oraz witrażami. Ale takie kościoły nie zostały zbudowane w okresie gotyku dlatego nazywa się ten styl neogotykiem czyli takim nowym gotykiem.To oczywiście nie są wszystkie style. Po stylu romańskim, gotyckim i renesansie przyszedł barok, potem klasycyzm itd. My jednak dzisiaj zajęliśmy się pokrótce trzema pierwszymi stylami architektonicznymi w Polsce. Czasami dość trudno jest rozpoznać te style. Ale jeżeli budynek ma malutkie, maluteńkie okna to prawdopodobnie jest styl romański. Gdy ma duże okna z witrażami zakończone ostro u góry to jest gotyk. Gdy budynek ma kopułę na dachu albo kolumny z przodu to prawdopodobnie jest renesans.Np. we Florencji jest katedra z kopułą na dachu. Jest tam kopuła, okna są zaokrąglone, a więc to renesans. Podobnie w Rzymie, w Watykanie jest Bazylika św. Piotra. Widać kopułę na dachu, a kolumny z przodu - to także renesans. Z kolei katedra Notre Dame w Paryżu ma ostro zakończone łuki - łatwo więc rozpoznać, że to gotyk. Podobnie kościół Mariacki w Krakowie. Najtrudniej jest znaleźć budynki w stylu romańskim z maleńkimi oknami. Np. Zamek Książąt Głogowskich był rozbudowywany przez całe wieki. Jego wieża jest w stylu romańskim, fragmenty muru są w stylu gotyckim, a sam zamek jest w stylu barokowym, którego dzisiaj nie omawialiśmy.Pamiętajcie też, że sporo budynków w Polsce, np. wiele kościołów ma właśnie duże okna z witrażami oraz mają ostro zakończone łuku u góry - można by więc powiedzieć, że to jest gotyk, ale najczęściej są to nowe kościoły, które zbudowano w starym stylu gotyckim. Tak więc nazywa się je neogotykiem. Jeden z następnych odcinków poświęcimy cmentarzowi na Powązkach. Tam stoi wiele kapliczek i grobowców, które są zbudowane właśnie w stylu neogotyckim.

Miracle Voices
Ep 37 - Listen and Follow - Svava Love

Miracle Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 58:25


Svava Love joins Tam and Matt to discuss her healing journey that started in Iceland. Follow Svava Love: https://svavalove.org/ https://music.apple.com/us/artist/svava/1455230807 https://open.spotify.com/artist/60mmDfuYL9SqUljqZf1tEX https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/into-the-mystic-with-svava-love/id1559822308 https://www.spreaker.com/show/into-the-mystic-with-svava-love https://www.facebook.com/SvavaLove https://www.instagram.com/svavakristinlove/ https://twitter.com/SvavaLove https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwNmxU-KVj81C3kq2V3Uk5Q Never Miss an Episode of Miracle Voices Join our Email List: https://www.miraclevoices.org/email How Can You Support Miracle Voices? If you feel inspired to make a donation to support these podcasts you can donate here: https://acim.org/donate-miracles-voices-podcast/ Topic or Question You Want Us To Cover? If you have topics that you would like Judy and Matthew to address, simply drop us a line at: https://www.miraclevoices.org/contact/ We Need Your Help Please leave a review for the podcast on whatever app or site you use to listen to this podcast. This helps new listeners that are trying to practice forgiveness find the show.

Snow Files
S3-EP42: Q&A: Big Jeff-Little Jeff: Jeff Durbin and Jeff Miller - Alternative Suspects

Snow Files

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 64:56


Join co-hosts Bruce, Lesley, Tam and Ray as they discuss the "Jeff's" in depth. An extra long episode for you listening pleasure. We also start with Bruce and Ray's thoughts on the Bible Story episode because they were unable to join us on the pop up episode. Lot's of interesting theories and laughs in this one! In August of 1991, just five months after the murder of young gas station attendant Bill Little, a string of other gas station robberies plagued Bloomington. Jeff Miller and Jeff Durbin colluded to rob gas stations together with a gun, for petty sums of cash. Durbin was the getaway driver, and planned to use doctored cab driver's log sheets to evade detection. Miller chose an Adam's Family Halloween mask. Regardless, Miller was identified by people who knew him when he behaved erratically after the last robbery, and the two eventually confessed, being sentenced to 38 years behind bars between the two. These known, convicted, and self-admitted robbers were never seriously investigated for the strikingly similar robbery and murder of Bill Little. Listen to hear how they avoided prosecution for Jamie's case, and the ominous remarks made by one of them, after coming face to face with Jamie, post conviction. Music: Epidemic Sound: https://www.epidemicsound.com/ (https://www.epidemicsound.com/) Ghosts Everywhere, Experia YouTube Audio Library: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music (https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music) Theme Song: Black Moons, The 126ers The Lone Woodlouse - Rachel K. Collier Support Documents: Leads http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP42-Big-Jeff-Little-Jeff/PR_111291DurbinandLeadSheet061593_Redacted.pdf (11-12-91: Police report, Jeff Miller's wife; 06-15-93; Crime Stoppers tip - Jeff Durbin) Newspaper Articles http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP42-Big-Jeff-Little-Jeff/02-05-91_News-Twin-City-Man-Cab-License.png (Twin City Man Restarts Effort for Cab License) http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP42-Big-Jeff-Little-Jeff/05-30-91_Mobile-Home-Fire.png (Mobile Home Destroyed in Fire) http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP42-Big-Jeff-Little-Jeff/mobile-home-fire-probe.png (Mobile Home Fire Probe) http://www.docs.snowfiles.net/S3-EP42-Big-Jeff-Little-Jeff/DurbinMillerArticles.pdf (Durbin-Miller Articles) Support this podcast

Ghosts-n-Heauxs
The Difficulties Kept Coming

Ghosts-n-Heauxs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 109:24


This week, Danielle discusses the Connecticut Witch Trials, aka the witch trials that America forgot, and Zee dives into the unsolved mystery of Tamám Shud and the Somerton Man. Stalk us here!Twitter - ghostsnheauxsInstagram - ghosts_n_heauxsFacebook - GhostsnHeauxsPodcastAnd don't forget to send your stories to ghostsnheauxs@gmail.com

Catfish: The Podcast
Tam/Jamina

Catfish: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 39:52


Tam met Jamena two years ago on Plenty of Fish. Things got serious very quickly, but whenever they made plans to meet, Jemena just ghosted her. After six months, Tam broke it off. But she couldn't seem to move on and eventually fell back into the relationship. There's been drama in the last year and a half and Tam knows that something's not right and needs Nev and Kamie's help to get to the bottom of it.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Colorsplash Mixes with DJ Jolene

1. First Stroke (Original Mix) - Demuir - ORIGINS RCRDS   2. I'm In Love Girl (Homero Espinosa Remix) - Small Talk - Moulton Music   3. Nobody Dubs Me Better (Original Mix) - The Stoned - Disco Balls Records   4. Chiringo - Jose Vilches - Induction Music   5. The Right Direction (Original Mix) - Local Options - No Fuss Records   6. I'll Be True (Original Mix) - Rick Marshall - Funky Revival   7. Let Me Tell You (Vertigini Remix) - Q Narongwate - Soul Beach Records   8. A Love Affair - Salmomé Le Chat/The Mekanism - Bambossa   9. A Little Something Different - Chocolate Dice - Grin Trax   10. Quiet Evening (B&S Concept Remix) - Vasily Umanets - Cyanide   11. Nobody (Main Vocal) - Mo'Cream - Creamo Music   12. You (Original Mix) - Jesusdapnk - HOUPH 13. Dancin In The D - Ash Lauryn - FWM Entertainment   You can find all these songs and more at www.traxsource.com

Market Dominance Guys
Is Cold Calling a Form of Slapstick?

Market Dominance Guys

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 26:35


What makes a great cold caller? Our guest today on Market Dominance Guys, James Thornburg, Enterprise IT Strategist at Bridgepointe Technologies, defines the characteristics of a great cold caller as someone who puts in the hard work by having lots of conversations  — and also has a little charisma. James uses humor and ConnectAndSell's Lightning platform to connect to his prospects, and then shares his cold calls on LinkedIn for all to learn from — or be entertained by. Our hosts, Chris Beall and Corey Frank, are enthusiastic listeners, each touting the entertainment and educational value James provides with his cold-calling triumphs as well as his train wrecks. Listen in as these three sales guys discuss James Thornburg's ability to “pivot to a chuckle” on this Market Dominance Guys' episode, “Is Cold Calling a Form of Slapstick?” About Our Guest James Thornburg is the Enterprise IT Strategist at Bridgepointe Technologies, which offers a service that helps design IT or telecom projects for their clients and includes selecting the right supplier at the right price with no extra cost to their customers. ----more---- Here is the complete transcript to this episode. Announcer (00:06): Welcome to another episode with The Market Dominance Guys, a program about the innovators, idealists and the entrepreneurs who thrive and die in the high-stakes world of building a startup company. We explore the cookbooks, guidebooks and magic beans needed to grow your business. What makes a great cold caller? Our guest today on Market Dominance Guys, James Thornburg Enterprise IT Strategists at Bridgepointe Technologies defines the characteristics of a great cold caller as someone who puts in the hard work by having lots of conversations and also has a little charisma. James uses humor and ConnectAndSell's lightning platform to connect to his prospects and then shares his cold calls on LinkedIn for all to learn from. Or be entertained by. Our hosts, Chris Beall and Corey Frank, are enthusiastic listeners. Each touting the entertainment and educational value James provides with his cold calling triumphs as well as his train wrecks. Listen in as these three guys discuss James Thornburg's ability to pivot to a chuckle. On this Market Dominance Guys episode, is cold calling a form of slapstick? Corey Frank (01:16): Welcome to another episode of The Market Dominance Guys with Corey Frank and the prince [inaudible 00:01:22] and the prognosticator of all things sales, Chris Beall, my fabulous co-host here. So good afternoon, Chris. Chris Beall (01:30): Hey. Good to be here, Corey. Nice to see you. You look good. Corey Frank (01:33): Yeah, thank you. I think it's the lighting, it's all in the lighting with the black. Black, I heard, is slimming. I probably need to wear all black. But listen, we're in the presence of some royalty here. It's been a long time coming because we've talked about James several episodes. James, if you're one of our seven listeners, you know that your name has come up a number of times in some of the earlier episodes. So we have with us today, not only a titan of technology, the prince of pastures ... You're a farmer, you're a homesteader. But we have the one and only, the king of the cold call, James Thornburg with us. So welcome, James, to The Market Dominance Guys. James Thornburg (02:10): Thanks for having me. Appreciate it. Yeah. Corey Frank (02:12): Absolutely. So are you currently in the throne room? Is that what you call the cold call room you're in right now? James Thornburg (02:16): Yes, it's my basement downstairs. Chris Beall (02:21): James, I love your plain white background. It's so good. James Thornburg (02:24): It's great. For my calls, I've been using the Zoom background. We have some new branding here at Bridgepointe, but yeah, I like just the gray. Corey Frank (02:32): Yeah. Yeah. So James, we've been following you for a while, and obviously, you and Chris have known each other for a while, we've known each other for a few years. I've heckled and commented you on many a LinkedIn post. But you're the king of the cold call, you're not the earl of email or you're not the lord of LinkedIn, you chose the cold call as the channel of dominance for your business here at Bridgepointe. It's one of the principles at Bridgepointe. How come, in your sales career, why cold call versus ... Isn't email easier? Isn't LinkedIn easier? But you chose to have dominion as the king in probably one of the channels that most folks would shun. So why, for you, is the cold call king? James Thornburg (03:13): Well, I mean, I wasn't making a lot of calls for a lot of my career. I mean, when I first got out of college, I was making cold calls. I was selling insurance and I got into selling wireless phones and things like that for Nextel. So I was sitting the phones quite a bit then. And then I got into The Channel, and The Channel, you really just leveraged network relationships. And so I used those individuals to open up doors for me. And I did quite well when I was at my former company, Single Path, I was there for almost 12 years. And for about eight or nine of those years, I focused on working with networking partners and that's how I got introduced to opportunities. But things started to dry up, partnerships that I had before, they were acquired. Some of them were making so much money they just weren't active in terms of opening up opportunities and my pipeline was suffering because of it. So I started looking to figure out, hey, how am I going to net new opportunities? And I was thinking about it this weekend, I'm like, I don't even know how I got introduced to ConnectAndSell. I don't know if it was, I was Googling or whatever, but landed on ConnectAndSell and at that point I was reborn cold caller. And it kind of opened my eyes that, hey, I can open up a lot of opportunities using this platform and making dials. And then that put me in a position, I was at Single Path for about a year, year and a half on ConnectAndSell, using it as a full-time sales rep. And then I saw ConnectAndSell as my vehicle to basically start out. To go out on my own. That's basically what I did about two years ago. Corey Frank (04:50): Got you. Yeah, I think you and Ryan [inaudible 00:04:53] are birds of a feather there, that you put yourself out there. You both put yourself out there. And I think you pioneered this trend, James, that a lot of us can sit in the cheap seats, guys like me, and I can critique a call here and there. Chris and I certainly do our share of it. And we do our share of cold calls, certainly Chris is out there, he'll do it on stage. But James, you have a unique perspective that you actually do it on LinkedIn Live, you'll record your calls occasionally, and put them out there. Good, bad, ugly, warts and all. How'd you get started on that? What kind of crazy guy would do that and be that glutton for punishment? To put yourself so publicly out there? James Thornburg (05:28): I had a leased office in downtown Kalamazoo. I was still working at my former employer. The room was about four by seven with no windows, and I think it was in the middle of February, and I was bored one day. I was making these calls and I'm like, "Hey, why don't I just start recording these calls?" And I was like, "That was pretty funny about the VP of Technology that told me he was a teller." And so then I posted it on LinkedIn and got some traction and people seemed to be interested. And that's kind of where it started in terms of the videos for LinkedIn. Corey Frank (06:02): What do you think about that, Chris? I mean he certainly, as the CEO of his own company there, his own practice, James, he puts himself out there. You talked a lot about CEOs needing to do that, put themselves out there and do a certain amount of cold calls. I think James has certainly taken it to a different level. But what's your thoughts on that? Chris Beall (06:19): Well, I mean, James, what you've done at a different level is you're funny. And I actually think that that contrast between what people think about cold calling, which is the movies, the boiler rooms, the intensity, the screaming, all that stuff. And then we watch you and it's like, the very best part, to me, is that the camera is there for you. We're there. And you look at us and you use us. I mean, that's what fun. It's like, we're in the call because your feelings about it, especially that anticipation thing you do. Like, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, this might go, it might go. It's like, oh boom. And that, I think, is a completely new thing. Everybody's got different style, right? So Shane Mahey does his thing while he's along the banks of the Thames and he's making calls. And that's very much like calls. It's cool, but after, it's like making calls. Your stuff is not just cool, your stuff is funny. And I don't know, you don't think of yourself as a funny guy, I think. Right? James Thornburg (07:28): Not really. I mean, I'm trying to be funny today but it's not really working [crosstalk 00:07:32]. Trying to come up with something witty. Corey Frank (07:37): Great try. Great try. Chris Beall (07:38): Well, it's the thing that you do with the camera that I just think it's great. It's like, we're there. Because cold calling has this funny quality. Each call is an adventure, where you don't know what's going to happen. And somebody once asked me, some really intelligent person said, "Gosh, Chris, you seem to like sports, sporting events, more than most people who sport your particular mathematical inclinations." I think they said something about IQ or some nonsense like that. It's like, why? It's like, because I don't know how it's going to turn out. You get sucked into the little soap opera that is ... Or whatever, a game of some sort. Whatever it happens to. And every cold call is that kind of game. Even though it's not oppositional with this person, when we're there with you, I feel like we, the audience, are getting that sense of why the conversation ... And I'll make a distinction. Cold calls and cold conversations are two different things. If you had to cold call, you wouldn't do it. I wouldn't do it. Cold calling means not talking to anybody for an hour. That's crazy. Making cold conversations are pretty fun, if you're ready for the adventure. For us watching you, it's pure fun. Because we're not the ones who are dealing with the negative side, other than we get to deal with how you deal with it, which is funny. James Thornburg (08:59): Yeah. I mean it's fun to watch somebody get hung up on. Chris Beall (09:02): Who knew? Is it slapstick? That's a question. Is watching cold calling a form slapstick, where we don't have that much of that anymore, but are we getting a little Lucille Ball in there or whatever? A little Charlie Chaplin, I don't know. Corey Frank (09:18): I don't know. I think it's a little bit of schadenfreude, right? I mean, you see somebody else get his butt kicked. And you have a lot of good calls, a lot of successful calls. I think everybody wants to watch it for the train wrecks. And it does ... I know when I watch him, James, I feel like, wow, that was really clever. You start off with a joke, you're just very unassuming. You're not supplicative, you don't lose your status, but you really have this attitude where, "Listen, I'm a human, I'm looking for another human connection. And can we dispense with all the roles and all the accouterments of your title and role and just make a connection because you picked up the phone and I'm on the other end. And let's see if we have something that can benefit each other." And that's just very raw and authentic. Doing so many, and doing so many publicly, and certainly doing so many at scale, because you're the artisan of the ConnectAndSell weapon. What have you learned in cold calling? Because you said, most of your career, you didn't necessarily have to do it. And then you have just had probably more cold calls in the last couple of years, probably more than 99% of sales professionals in the B2B world, so what have you learned from this channel and from the reception that you get from decision levels? Decision level buyers? James Thornburg (10:40): Well, I mean it's really worked for my industry. Our offering, or what we do, is somewhat nuanced. I mean, we're helping IT leaders buy technology and it's hard to articulate that through any other medium. When you're able to have a conversation with somebody, it's easier to explain to them. Because like I said, I mean, what we do is somewhat nuanced, the concept is foreign to probably 90% of the people that we talk to. And I refer to it as speed dialing, ConnectAndSell. Just even using a power dialer or some manual dialing, then your power dialer. I mean, the challenge is, is that you're dealing with a lot of that minutia of cold calling, which is the reason why no one wants to make any calls. So to be able to just press a button and have some conversations. People think I work hard. I mean, it's a lazy way to do it. It makes things easier. You're just having conversations. Do you have the courage to press that button and talk to somebody? And if you don't, then what are doing in sales? And so, when you look at early on, I mean my pitch has evolved and things of that nature. I mean, people have a lot of opinions about the pitch, the openers and things of that nature, but gotten a lot better in terms of the tonality. Just my conversions are a lot higher and that's due to having a lot of at bats. Having a lot of conversations, you get better and better. I think people miss out on that. Everybody wants to talk about the conversions and things of that nature, but it's also, how do we make these reps better more quickly? And the way that you're going to be able to do that is more conversations. I don't know if that answered your question. Corey Frank (12:18): No, you really have to get frequent before you get good, is what I hear you saying. And you've been able to condense 20 years of cold calling, that most of us had to come up through the ranks using old rotary phones, and you've been able to condense it in the last two and a half years or so with a ConnectAndSell type of weapon, it sounds like. James Thornburg (12:36): Listen, I'm a little old school too. I didn't use a rotary phone, but I had index cards. Corey Frank (12:41): Sure. Sure. James Thornburg (12:43): I had index cards and I was writing on that, that was my follow-up. Corey Frank (12:46): Yeah, yeah. Right. With the volume of calls that you've made, and Chris and I would be interested in knowing, okay, because you had such a very tight learning curve over ... Not that you've never made cold calls, but I'm saying in this type of volume over the last 24, 36 months or so at volume, what doesn't work at a cold call? You say a lot of folks will say, "James, I have some opinions on your opener and I have opinions on X and Y and Z." Okay, well you do it at scale. So, in your opinion, what have you learned that doesn't work in a cold call, that you probably see a lot of folks still doing? James Thornburg (14:06): I don't know if I can answer that. I don't have strong opinions about openers, technique, and things of that nature. I don't like the, how are you, though. As the opener. I don't think that's a very good idea. But I think if you have the right tonality and it doesn't sound like you're reading off of some type of script, and you're putting in the work, you're going to have success. But I can't really pinpoint something that doesn't work in cold calling. I mean, what are your thoughts? Chris Beall (14:34): I've got some. I have ideas of what does work. So my two favorite people to listen to, having actual cold calls, are you and Cheryl Turner. And the reason is, both of you have the ability to pivot to a chuckle better than any other people out there. You're light enough with the situation that it's like, you've done the hard work, you've pushed the button, now you're going to be light with this person and let it roll and talk to them. And when something kind of funny comes up, or they challenge you in some way, that the best answer isn't to fight them, it's to laugh. Like the one the other day where the guy basically says something about being retired or whatever. And you go, "Well, we get these lists from these list providers and blah, blah, blah," and it was funny. I mean, it was funny but it was also like, it's not funny like me against you kind of funny. It's funny like, we're all in this together kind of funny. Like life is funny, kind of funny. And you and Cheryl both do it and you do it like ... I was with Helen a couple of weeks ago and we were going through a bunch of Cheryl's calls and listening to them. Because Helen has an interest in trying ConnectAndSell in a very special kind of way, with a huge, huge company out there that she might be calling into. And this is new to her. And she asked, "Well, what really makes it work?" And I said, "Let's go listen to Cheryl and listen to James. And I will break this down for you like I'm Howard Cosell, it's Ali/Frazier. I'm going to take you through this punch by punch. And I'm going to redirect your eyes from the gloves down to their feet so you can see what they're really doing." And what was so interesting was that EQ, on the spot, that it takes to laugh with somebody. I actually think that is the most interesting thing that both of you do. And it's spectacular. James Thornburg (16:33): Yeah. I mean, I don't know. It's just- Chris Beall (16:37): You think things are funny. James Thornburg (16:38): People get so upset about it, about cold calls and things of that nature. And it's just, I don't know. I mean, there's a lot of other problems in the world. I mean, somebody calling you and everything and it's just like ... I mean, even the retired people. Sometimes I got to leave them with a joke because it's like, hey, you're retired. You're mad that I called you, I know that you get calls, but it's like, hey, lighten up a little bit. Let me leave you with a joke. And then I leave them with the five cold caller joke. Chris Beall (17:03): Yeah. I don't know if everybody knows the joke, but could you give us the joke? I mean, let's have Corey be all pissed off at you. Corey, you're retired, right? Or you're pretty much retired, as far as I can tell. James Thornburg (17:15): Corey, Corey. Hey, listen, let me at least leave you with a joke. What do you call five cold callers at the bottom of the ocean? Corey Frank (17:25): I don't know, James, what do you call five cold callers at the bottom of the ocean? James Thornburg (17:28): A good start. Corey Frank (17:31): That's right. See? And you made a human connection, right? Chris Beall (17:36): By the way, let me make a technical point there. This is something that our friend Chris Boss would call tactical empathy. Show the other person you see the world through their eyes, what do they think if they could think clearly about five cold callers at the bottom of the ocean? They'd think it's a good start, right? So some of these things, they sound very natural because they are. James, Cheryl, these people are true geniuses at this. Corey Frank (18:02): Oh yeah. Oh yeah. Chris Beall (18:04): Henry [inaudible 00:18:05] is now converting at 40%. And he's a guy you wouldn't have thought was a natural, but he's picked up a whole bunch of things from Cheryl. He works closely with Cheryl and some magic is going on. If Scott Webb, the 75.9% converter, he just sounds like he's your friend who knows you, who's calling you, and really thinks it's a good idea for you that we should have a meeting. And by the way, I got to go. So he's out of there, I got to. "Hey, I got call. I'll shoot you something." Boom. Done. So these folks all have something in common, which is, in the ring, so to speak, they're relaxed. They're excited and want something to happen, but still relaxed enough to laugh and make these simple-looking moves, that I know as an expert on this, are not that simple to master. Corey Frank (18:58): What do you guys think? Is that nature? Is it nurture? Is it is a little bit of Morgan Freeman in Shawshank Redemption, where he only gets parole once he doesn't give a crap anymore? And it's that attitude, it's tough to teach somebody right out of school that ... It's not apathy. Like you said, it's more ... Because I'm not losing my status. It's very cool in the pocket. Is that something that's taught or is that something that can be learned? [crosstalk 00:19:25] Chris Beall (19:26): Did you have to learn it? Did you just fall into it? James Thornburg (19:31): I'd say repetition and personality. I mean, there is a little personality element to it. And I don't know how teachable that is. Chris Beall (19:40): I don't either. It's like being tall for basketball, you could be Spud Webb and you can be great, but there were never 30 Spud Webbs in the league. James Thornburg (19:53): I mean, I don't think you have to be a James Thornburg and have my personality. I mean, people bring different gifts to the game. And mine just happens to be hard work and maybe a little bit of charisma. Chris Beall (20:05): And more chickens. Corey Frank (20:07): Maybe it is. The homesteader lifestyle has certainly, probably contributes to the mellow nature, the connection, empathy. We screenplay the uh's and the um's in our screenplays that we use for outbound calling. And we got a lot of folks who say, "Doesn't that make you sound unsure? Does that make you sound like, don't know what you're talking about? And if you're talking with a C-Level or director level, they're going to go ..." It's like, no, makes you sound human. Chris and I talked about this last time, never trust a person who doesn't walk around with a little bit of a limp. And so, we screenplay that in. And I think that the brilliance of the 27 seconds is that, even if I don't have this high emotional intelligence, off the chart like you do, or Cheryl or Scott, that at least is a little bit of a verbal crutch to help get you there. That 27 seconds.              It's not, can I have a minute? 27 seconds. Chris was talking to me, we call it the playful curious. Can James come out and play? That's what we teach, that's what they teach in the flight school at ConnectAndSell, that is the perfect encapsulation of how to think. What the director's notes for the actor are on the screenplay. Playful curious, can James come out and play? That's how you say that in 27 seconds. And even if I blew the other part, I'm at least going to buy myself another few seconds by saying that. And you're a big advocate of the 27 seconds, certainly, James [inaudible 00:21:36]. James Thornburg (21:36): I'd be interested in Chris's opinion. I mean, how much of it is the call? I'd say it's 90% of the call. If they buy into the 27 seconds, they buy you more time, then you can tell your story and hopefully get some more information or book a meeting or get a follow-up, right? Chris Beall (21:51): Yeah, it's funny. Today I was talking with Donny Crawford about this and we were going pretty deep on this question of, what's the purpose of the cold call? And I pointed out to him, Donny, a great conversion rate is 10%. So that means 90% of the purpose is what happens when you don't convert? And he kind of stopped and he went, huh? He said, "Yeah, we get into that, don't we? That the purpose is to get the meeting." It's like, no, the outcome is to get the meeting when that's the right thing for both parties. Which is more often than you might think. But the purpose is to establish trust, and the caveat is, don't blow it. Once you've established trust in that first seven seconds, don't blow it. Because you're going to talk to this person later. They're in a cohort, it's called people who answer the phone. They're yours to talk with, over and over, 11/12 of them are in market right now. Now James sells something that's very nuanced. At ConnectAndSell, we sell something that's anti-nuanced but isn't in a category either. You can't go up to somebody and say, "Hey, you know what? I got something that's going to get you 10 times more conversations and you're going to love it." And they're going to go, "Wow, really? Here's my checkbook." They're going to go, "Huh, you're either an idiot or a charlatan. I don't know if I want to stick around to find out which." That's how it works and that was Cheryl's response to me in a test drive. I thought the guy was an idiot or a charlatan. She went off and used it, came back in 10 minutes and said, "I was wrong. You may well be an idiot and charlatan, we'll establish that later. But this stuff works, man." So I think that the whole game is at the beginning. When you look at it one way, 100% of cold calls succeed if you get that person to trust you and you don't blow it. And James, you never blow it. I never hear you blow it. Now, maybe you deep [crosstalk 00:23:48]. James Thornburg (23:47): I show the videos of the ones that I'm not blowing. Chris Beall (23:54): Well, people blow it. It's easy to blow it. You want to blow it, sell to them. Corey Frank (23:59): Yeah. Chris Beall (23:59): I get you to trust me, and then I sell to you, I'm kind of toast. Corey Frank (24:03): Yeah. I thought we were friends, what are you doing selling to me? Chris Beall (24:05): Exactly. Exactly. I love Scott Webb's point of view is, he says, "When I insist somebody take the meeting, my internal image is that I'm putting my hand out and slapping him in the chest and pulling them back so they don't step in front of a speeding bus. That's how I feel about that person. I'm saying them from something they didn't see, which is the disaster of not attending a meeting in which I'm going to teach them valuable stuff." Corey Frank (24:34): So he emotes that intent? Chris Beall (24:37): Yes. Yeah, we had a discussion once where he called me and said, "My mindset's wrong, I'm going to fix it." And he was converting 35%. And so he calls me back an hour later and says, "I fixed it. Five for five." And he's dragging that 35% tail into a 75.9% conversions. So he still got that statistical, that big hunk of bad back there, which he thinks is bad. And the rest of us go, "Woo, woo, that's pretty exciting." But it was a mindset change where he said, "You know what? I have an ethical obligation to this person, to make sure they come to this meeting, to learn what they don't even know can be learned. And I am going to satisfy that obligation by insisting they attend with me. That they take it. And if all I get is the verbal, and I just send them an invite, that's progress compared to no verbal. So I'm going to get the verbal, even if it doesn't have a date on it, and I'll send them an invite for something." I tell you what, the numbers don't lie. Corey Frank (25:35): Yeah, for sure. Announcer (25:37): Selling a big idea to a skeptical customer, investor, or partner is one of the hardest jobs in business. So when it's time to really go big, you need to use an uncommon methodology to gain attention, frame your thoughts, and employ successful sequencing that is fresh enough to convince others that your ideas will truly change their world. From crafting just the right cold call screenplays, to curating and mapping the ideal call list for your entire TAM, Branch 49's modern and innovative sales toolbox offers a guiding hand to ambitious organizations in their quest to reach market dominance. Learn more at branch49.com. Never miss an episode, go to any of your favorite podcast venues and search for Market Dominance Guys. Or go to marketdominanceguys.com and subscribe.

Scottish Liberty Podcast
Tam on New Political Voices

Scottish Liberty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 43:55


Tam on a show called New Political Voices. Episode 198.

GameSpot After Dark
#123 - Fortnite Is The Lost Of Video Games

GameSpot After Dark

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 76:28


Lucy and Tam in LA for the Game Awards so this week Jean-Luc and Jordan are joined by GameSpot's newest editorial members, Mark Delaney and Jessica Howard. The crew talks Halo Infinite's campaign, Fortnite Chapter 3, Chorvs, and Solar Ash. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News
EP281 - Mark Mahaney, author and top internet analyst

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 55:38


EP281 - Mark Mahaney, author and top internet analyst  Mark Mahaney is Senior Managing Director at Evercore ISI, Research Division, he's one of the original and longest lasting internet analysts on Wall Street. He recently published “Nothing but Net: 10 Timeless Stock-Picking Lessons from One of Wall Street's Top Tech Analysts.” We cover a variety of fun topics including the beginning of his career with with Mary Meeker. His initial evaluation of EBay. His long positions on Amazon, Netflix, and Priceline, and butting heads with Jim Cramer over Google. We also discuss what's next for Amazon, and where the best investments of the future might be. Episode 281 of the Jason & Scot show was recorded on Thursday, November 18th, 2021 http://jasonandscot.com Join your hosts Jason "Retailgeek" Goldberg, Chief Commerce Strategy Officer at Publicis, and Scot Wingo, CEO of GetSpiffy and Co-Founder of ChannelAdvisor as they discuss the latest news and trends in the world of e-commerce and digital shopper marketing. Transcript Jason: [0:00] Welcome to the Jason and Scot show this is episode 281 being recorded on Thursday November 18 20 21. I'm your host Jason retailgeek Goldberg and as usual I'm here with your co-host Scott Wingo. Scot: [0:16] Hey Jason and welcome back Jason Scott show listeners. Jason as you and the listeners know I am a huge scene in b.c. junkie and you can't turn on CNBC Durning Earth during earning Seasons without seeing Mark mahaney he is one of the top internet analyst. He was actually on recently talking about the artist previously known as Facebook meta Mark has a new book out called quote-unquote Nothing But net and is joining us tonight give listeners an early peek of what is sure to be the best seller in the bookmark covers some of our favorite companies including Amazon Apple Facebook / meta Google Netflix Twitter and Uber Mark welcome to the show. Mark: [0:56] Thanks for having me on guys. Jason: [0:58] Mark we are thrilled the chat with you is you know Scott is a huge Amazon fan boy so I anytime he gets a chance to talk Amazon he's excited. And I'm super excited because after tonight show I'm going to be smart enough to get rich like you and Scott so that's pretty pretty exciting for me. But before we jump into all that we always like to give listeners a little bit of a feel for our guests background and in your case I know I think you're officially the the oldest analysts on Wall Street is that true. Mark: [1:29] Well that's the oldest and longest lasting internet analyst on Wall Street but I don't look the part so how about we do that yes I've been covering Internet stock since 1998 do a series of bank said I started, working with this tremendous analysts her name was Mary Meeker her name is Mary Meeker and started the first Friday I was on Wall Street I got a call from the CFO of this tiny little online auction company that sold Pez dispensers and was looking to see whether any banks would be interested in their IPO that company was eBay so I wasn't there at the beginning of the internet but I was there pretty close to the beginning of the commercial for the public market to internet and it's been a fascinating ride and I thought there were a lot of lessons I could draw both from the successes the market and failures in the market and my personal successes and failures as a stock picker. Scot: [2:20] Cool what's so name some of the firm's so in my recollection you've probably worked at six firms like how many firms have you worked out over or that career. Mark: [2:30] Yeah now I don't want you to think I you know I jump around too much but I started off at Morgan Stanley also worked at Citibank Royal Bank of Canada. A small boot wonderful Boutique called American Technology research and I'm currently at evercore isi but I've been doing nothing but net. Hence the title of the book that's been my email tagline or always online is one of those two it's been my email tagline for 25 years but nothing but net and that's just doing my best to try to stay ahead of these internet stocks the early ones the the eBay's the Amazons the Yahoo excite if you might remember them infoseek. And then and then AOL and then and then later on some of the more Dynamic ones came out ended up with names like uber including most recently one you talked about Warby Parker so it's been a fascinating span and arguably one of the most dynamic. Parts of Wall Street I guess if you were working as an analyst on Wall Street. Or portfolio manager portfolio manager if you could have picked two sectors to be a part of to track over the last 25 years one of them has to have been the internet just how explosive it's been a been plenty of – explosions in there but there's been some wonderful wealth creation the other sector would probably be software just just too wonderful Industries I got lucky I was I was part of the internet. Scot: [3:49] Yeah I'm glad you didn't pick Mall Focus treats that would have been a bad choice. So you know as Jason mentioned there's kind of this auspicious title that you have of the oldest I would say wisest and most longest lasting internet unless. Tell us about some of the as you reflect in the book is kind of got some really good stories and you've been kind of on the front row seat of a lot of cool stuff maybe tell us what was your worst pick and best pick in the span of the career there. Mark: [4:22] Well I had a sale on Google it close to its IPO I was brought on to CNBC show and told by none other than Jim Jim Cramer that I was an analyst with a three-egg omelette on my face because of my cell phone call he was right I was wrong so you know one doesn't pretend one doesn't tend to forget moments like that on public television being told that you know you're pretty much an ass. But it does happen you know there are axes and then there are you know others and so I made plenty of mistakes I had to buy on Blue Apron although the lessons from that turned out to be different than I thought I got the call wrong but the lessons were different than I thought I kind of dissect that a little bit in the book. So those are some of my some of my worst calls I think my to my three best calls have frankly been sticking with a buy on Amazon for pretty much the last 15 years Netflix for the last 12 years and Priceline and now now booking for. [5:18] For a solid 12 years both Netflix of all three of those were really decades-long S&P 500 Best in Class stocks for a variety of different reasons and in the book I try to call out what were those reasons what were the what's that what's the pattern recognition so that you know we as investors can find the next Netflix and the next Amazon doesn't mean and Amazon and Netflix can't perform well from here but what are the things you can see in common that can help you as a stock picker you know kind of see ahead what really kind of started a lot of the the insights the idea of the book was this wonderful book that was written in 1980 called that one up on wall by Peter Lynch kind of a Bible or primer for anybody really looking to invest invest in the market with some wonderful advice and I really had any wrote it based on some wonderful examples of successful stocks and companies of his generation and I thought somebody needed to write one about our generation and you know these phenomenal money-making we know wealth-creating stocks that have. [6:19] That have soared the charts top the charts over the last 20 10 5 and even two years that have been dramatic dramatic winners from the covid crisis to I try to keep it long term in duration and frankly that's one of the big lessons I have in my book is. Is you know long-term I've found stocks do follow fundamentals they just do companies get bigger more Revenue more profits their stocks go higher almost always that's the case if you're a patient long-term investor so you can make money just investing you don't need to day trade and I think that was the last thing that really inspired me to write this book there about 15 million new. [6:53] Trading accounts that have opened up over the last two years you know the mean Traders the Robin Hood accounts and I just wanted to step back and say look you can have very good returns in the markets by buying high quality companies especially Tech and growth companies you don't have to day trade you can sleep better at night I got plenty of examples of companies that created wonderful. Shareholder returns over time and their stories you can take your time and really understand and stick with and anyway that's it this is this book is a little bit of little bit of personal Memoir but really more of a history of the Great. Companies and the ones that failed and then what are the lessons you can draw to apply going forwards. Jason: [7:32] Got it so I know it's not in your coverage area but you would have a buy on GameStop is that what you're saying no. I Nostalgia requires me to ask though I am staring right now at a pets.com. Puppet still in the box that's like sort of a Memento I have on my on my desk like we're you covering like those guys at the at the. Dot-com boom. Mark: [8:00] No no I didn't but I refer to that in the book and I make this I draw the comparison you know pets.com and smoke you know pets.com went public with trailing 12 month month revenues of 5 million I don't know if you heard that right five million dollars. [8:16] Trailing 12 months they had been an operating company for under two years I mean how that thing got out you know in hindsight is is is pretty shocking but wait a second go you know go forward 15 years and what came out. To e.com chewy.com went public with 3 billion in trailing sales and you knows the same sort of basic value proposition to Consumers it's just that the market was a lot bigger it allowed for a lot more scale and a bunch of other things came out o like cell phones smartphones cloud computing which allowed companies to scale up at much lower costs and so the markets really were proved out at that you know the time of pets.com there were three unknowns is there really an internet Market are there really good management teams and other really good business models today the first question is emphatically yes they are huge Market opportunities and they've been proven in in the Internet space advertising retail entertainment a lot of different ways you can cut it and there's some business models have generated enormous amounts of free cash flow and then there are yes of course there's always a few select excellent management teams who find that right combination it can be it's proven to be a great path to making money in stocks and chewy has been a stock that I've really liked since its IPO even though it's the next pets.com and that's the cynicism that people be placed in front of it when they went public. This was a very different puppy. Jason: [9:39] Yeah it does it seems like timing it seems obvious but timing is such a big. Part of all that you referenced Peter Lynch and I know you know there's. There's all the old Netflix stuff I actually started my career at Blockbuster entertainment and so in my in my industry everyone makes fun of Blockbuster that we got Netflix stand and all those sorts of things and I always have to point out. You know we sold Blockbuster for 18 billion dollars in 1995 like five years before Netflix was invented. Then it was a good business with a good exit you know every every business has it it's it's moment and it's time and you know the the railroads aren't the investment that they once were either. Mark: [10:28] Netflix is a fascinating story so let me let me let me jump to it a little bit you know one of the things the punchline of I asked people if you're going to remember one thing for my book I hope you'll still buy it but if you're going to remember one thing from my book it's dhq it's not DQ That's Dairy Queen dhq is dislocated high-quality companies and. You know time you mentioned timing I was thinking in terms of stock timing I thought those were your going to take us I think it's very hard to the time stocks but you know you can clearly see when stocks are dislocated I either traded off twenty Thirty forty percent so that's usually you know time if you think it's high quality asset and it dislocates them they all dislocate from time to time even the best highest quality names. That's when you can kind of Step In add the positions by the stock knowing that you in a way mitigated some of the valuation risk as investors your tries an investor you're trying to do two things mitigate valuation risk and mitigate fundamentals risk you know the chance that Revenue falls off a cliff margins get crushed the way you mitigate that fundamentals. Risk is to focus on companies with large Tam's excellent management teams great product Innovation and superb customer value prop and Netflix screen so well for me on those four things I'll just take this off super quickly if you don't mind. [11:42] The industry Vision so let's see Reed Hastings invented or started Netflix back in 1997 Netflix the name itself sort of implies that somehow we're going to be doing some streaming thing and this is a 1997 when it would have taken you four hours to download the first five minutes of Terminator like there was no streaming Market there but yet. [12:02] That was the premise of the company in 10 years later you know you look at the first initial interviews with Reed Hastings I mean this is where he was going to take the company all along so I was just giving him kudos for industry vision and the fact that he was willing to cannibalize his existing DVD business first dreaming business very few entrepreneurs can do that so management you know checks My Box customer value proposition the best way to tell whether a customer a company has a great value proposition is do they have pricing power will do people love it so much that they'll pay more for starting in 2014 Netflix started increasing pricing just about every other year and there's some ads accelerated that's a compelling that's evidence of compelling value proposition third is this product Innovation and you know they just don't have a lot of things not just streaming but there's a lot of these little tweaks that the side like binge watching you know kudos to Netflix for just rolling out new series all at once I mean practically invented binge-watching and of course you know they sort of invented the streaming thing or the people who founded music really did that but but Reed comes in a close close second on that and then you know I'm finally in terms of Tam's large Tam's total addressable markets. [13:13] You can add it up a couple of different ways but you know home entertainment video consumption it's it's a couple of hundred billion dollars in total you know Market opportunity and then who knows these things come along like smartphones and all of a sudden the majority of usage is on smartphones that tells you that these markets could be a lot bigger than we traditionally thought just like Spotify blew out the market for what really could be music advertising revenue and music subscription Revenue Netflix is did the same thing with me with Video subscription Revenue they blew up the tan they made it a lot bigger so that's right you know I love that story about the stories about Netflix I gave him a tremendous amount of Kudos I think the sometimes people under appreciate just because it's kind of a singular company just you know video video streaming I think they I think they don't get enough credit for what they've done and what they could still do because I think there's still one more one more trick up Reed Hastings sleeve and I think it's gaming and he's reached they've received such so much skepticism about this pivot or missing expansion in the gaming but you know management team to figured out dvd-by-mail streaming original content International expansion mount give them the benefit of the doubt that they can figure out an Innovative new way. To deliver gaming and therefore further increase their value proposition you'd want to stick with a company like that I stick with the stock like that. Scot: [14:34] Ever kind of a random question let's say there was I'll pick something at random a company that was Reinventing Car Care and making it mobile and digital would you call that a dhq. Mark: [14:45] I think that yes yes absolutely. Scot: [14:51] All right leading the witness. I do have to give you Kudos because in the Netflix section you do have a Star Wars reference you talk about the Disney death star which is which is appropriate because they now own the Death Star it's got a part of there is one of their IPs. Mark: [15:09] But by the way that was you know there were a couple of Netflix there's a rocky stock Rocky stock here that's right that's a that's a rocky stock for you it's had there were two times they miss Subs because of uncertainty over the price increases and they got some pushback it was an obvious that they had pricing power but they proved it over time and then they've got this great competitor risk with Disney and I think what the market missed on that this is just kind of leaving aside the book of just talking about stock picks is you know people are going to sign up for multiple streaming services now not now not five six or seven but they'll sign up for two or three if there's original content and they have original content I mean there's some things you will you have to sign up for Disney Plus for if you if people are like use God and you know dramatic. [15:52] Star Wars fans of course you can sign up for Disney plus but you know there's because its original content if you want to watch squid game there's one and one only place you can go for that and you know there's going to be another squid game or you know another show that just kind of breaks through the site-geist and by the way that's where Netflix is so I'll leave Netflix aside but I'm so struck by is this company shapes the Zeitgeist whether they can cause a run on chess board sales worldwide with the Queens Gambit a year ago where they can cause more people start studying Korean on Duolingo a language app which I actually like is the stock because they can you know they've introduced this show squid games like when a company reaches the Zeitgeist when they when they become almost like a lucky lexicon like they become a verb like I'm gonna google that or you know it's the Uber of this that or that you know that's that's something special and those are usually stocks that have gotten very long runways. Scot: [16:44] Yeah and I'm here in North Carolina and we have all these MBA we have all these universities and I was actually speaking earlier this week at MBA class over at Duke. And you know I have this whole little joke track that I do where I talk about my first company was profitable and I learned I could never raise VC because get the TV season that's a your profit we don't invest in property companies so yeah I often joke that I've been doing it wrong and ever since then I haven't made a dime. And I kind of thought it was those funny because you kind of. The internet sector was kind of early before SAS where and you point this out where there's kind of you know what we learned is there is an investor that loves Revenue growth and in a way that the opposite side of that coin is it can actually hurt you if you start to make profits maybe share with listeners that that you know probably many of them come from traditional businesses where that sounds nonsensical maybe maybe explain kind of what happened there. Mark: [17:41] Well I want to be I want to be on to get nuanced here which is you know I that chapter that says the most important thing out there is revenue revenue revenue you know for tech stocks and growth stock. But of course earnings and free cash flow matter it's that sometimes the public market is a lot longer term focused than people give it credit for Netflix is a great example that also is Amazon. I mean those those businesses had if you look at near-term valuation PE metrics price to free cash flow there's no way you would have bought those stocks. But what I think long-term growth investors realized is there's this you know when these get these assets that can grow their Top Line twenty to thirty percent Plus. From scale for multiple years like that can that creates an enormous amount of value over time and it's so rare I came up with something of a 20% rule you know it's one to two percent of the S&P 500 that can consistently grow at from scale their Top Line 20% which is like five times faster or six times faster than Global GDP growth so it's rare for good reasons but those companies dramatically outperformed the market because they're rare and it's not like growth and scale solve everything but geez they solve a lot of things I've yet to see it's got you know you go way back on this I'm sure you had these comments like Amazon will never turn a profit my first year on the street. [19:04] There's a person who's not one of the most influential investors out there put his finger in my chest. And said you know Amazon will never be profitable and you know I guess he must have been writing he was so smart but he was wrong because he didn't realize just what how powerful Amazon could be as it's scaled over time I mean you generate billions and billions in revenue and you can you can run over a lot of your fixed costs as long as you're not selling dollars for 95 cents you know if you're you know if you're selling them for a dollar and two cents and then you get scale against your fixed cost yeah scale will solve just about anything and I look at what happened with Amazon and I've looked at more much more recently its bring it up to up to date to Uber Uber just printed its first free cash flow quarter ever even though it's Rideshare businesses like down 40% since Pre-K covid levels how the heck did they do that because it took a lot of costs out of the business and then they had this delivery business that really scaled so look earnings matter it's just that when we look at tech stocks and growth stocks you know especially early on is IPOs they rarely go public. As profitable businesses the question you have to answer yourself is can they be profitable long-term are there companies that are already you know similar business models that are already are that's one way or their segments of the business that are already profitable. [20:19] Is there a reason that scale can't drive profitability for the company and the fourth what I call profitability Action question that detail this in a book is yo Are there specific steps steps that the management team can take to bring the product the company to profitability so I've yet to see a company. [20:36] And I'm sure there are some but I've yet to see one that hit the public markets that couldn't scale itself to profitability now some blew up. Well you know that's because they couldn't hit the enough scale so that's that's kind of my answer to the question of yes of course earnings and free cash flow matter at the end of the day that's what they're going to be valued on but just watch these companies that they really execute well they can take what looks like really aggressive valuations and overtime those valuations can turn awfully awfully attractive and a lot of times the stock wealth creation goes from point A to point B it doesn't start at point B. Jason: [21:10] Yeah the you know it's you mentioned then the Netflix. Effect on the cultural zygous fun fun stat on Queen's gamut it drove the sale of millions of chessboard and caused hundreds of people to start playing chess. I do one of the things that comes out strongest in in the book to me and that you alluded to upfront is sort of the difference between trading and investing. You know I always have people come up to me and they're like hey you know a lot about these retail companies what's a good investment and I'm like. I have no idea can you can you talk a little bit about sort of what you mean by sort of fundamental investing versus trading. Mark: [21:56] Well I sum it all up in the pithy expression don't play quarters I find playing quarters is almost a Fool's game the number of times I get questions you know what should I buy for the quarter and for little sophisticated institutional investors that could be I've got a position in. [22:15] Amazon or Google or Twitter and you know do I should I be you know heading into the position prior to earnings or you know facing back and adding to it more afterwards okay that's a different setup but if you're just playing a company for that quarter pop the problem is quarterly earnings reactions there's two things that drive them. Fundamentals great get the fundamentals right that it's expectations so the quarter trades are really about expectations you may get the quarter right you may be right that Nvidia or Roblox are going to have super strong quarters because I see how many of my friends kids are all over Roblox you maybe well right on that but you have to know you know what the market is actually expecting and numbers can go Revenue can accelerate but if the bar is higher than that then you're going to see these stocks trade off it happens a lot so I just unless you're unless you're a pro less you're in day in and day out. You know working working these stocks and really have a sense of where the expectations are. I think it's just a Fool's game to play play stocks just four quarters instead you know you want to stick with stocks for the you know you want to find an asset that you think is going to be. [23:29] Materially bigger in two to three years down the road and you think it's high quality based on some of the screens I threw out then stick with that name and don't try to play around the quarters and it's in fact sometimes you can use weakness or strength around the quarter to adjust your position but don't use it too initiator close out a position at the then you fall trap to these expectations game that is very hard to participate in if you're just a regular you know retail investor and you can make just as much money just staying invested in some of these great assets. Jason: [23:59] That is great advice and it's I certainly resonate with the sticking with the Investments I am curious though on the other end of that on the really long Horizon you mentioned you've you've been had a buy on Amazon for like 15 years. Wait. Like are you going to have a buying them for the next 15 years is that how I mean like does there come a point when they achieve their potential and you have to start worrying about them getting on the other side of the Hill. Mark: [24:26] Yeah I think you can I think you can one look for the fundamental towel and so I'm going to I'm going to spin over to another stock I talked about in the book Priceline. Which is actually the single best performing S&P 500 stock for like a 10 year period 2005 to 2015 phenomenal stock travel name everybody knows it William Shatner excetera although they're real secret sauce with what they did in European markets but. But that's a company that you know sustained premium growth like they were growing their bookings in the revenue 40 percent year over year for years and years and years and years and that's what powered that that that stock and when it stopped materially ah performed Market was when the growth rate decelerate it below 20%. [25:10] And so I don't want to you know create a hard and fast rule but I do feel strongly about this twenty percent rule 20 percent you know we're close to it you know don't don't Nick me at 19.8% you know could close to twenty percent is unusual rare growth. [25:23] And the markets usually pay up for that and when you see a company over time either because of Miss execution it happens or Market maturity and their growth rates you know kind of slide below 20% then that's when you reconsider your position that's a simplistic rule as a lot of caveats to that when I see with Amazon here is despite the size of this business I think they're still growing 20% for the next five years so in that if that's the case. [25:48] You know the simple rule of thumb is companies that can grow like. They can I like to see stocks that can double in in three years in order to do that you kind of have to do you know 20 to 25 percent earnings growth that's what a Maps out too. And you know you can double a stock in 3 years your handily beating the market in almost all time periods. And so when I see what it'll change my opinion really on Amazon is if I believe that this company is going to go X growth it's going to go you know well below 20 percent Revenue growth I just don't see that in the next couple of years given how much growth they have in retail in NE ws and cloud computing and in some of these really newer areas that I'm really interested in whether they really can crack the code on groceries and they can that's a large opportunity and business supplies Industrial Supplies I think that's a very underappreciated part of Amazon's business so I don't see myself changing my opinion on Amazon although you don't want things that we talked about this earlier that I love to see your founder LED companies that's no longer the case with with Amazon so that's you know at some level I've got slightly less conviction than the in the by case but I'm going to stick with it as long as the numbers prove out right and long as I can see this path that's consistent 20% Revenue. Scot: [26:59] Yeah and this is kind of breaking out of the book thing but since you brought up Amazon it wouldn't be a Jason Scott show if we didn't kind of double click on that what did any thoughts on the Q2 and Q3 earnings feels like they're slowing down a bit and feeling some of the labor and see what we call Supply pain on the show are you are you getting nervous about it or you think it's just a little one of their little kind of investment phases. Mark: [27:23] I called the six billion dollar kitchen sink that's how much lower their guidance was for operating income in the December quarter then then what the street was looking for like she was looking for close to eight billion and they guided to billions six billion dollar kitchen sink and they threw it all in there wage inflation you know you right you drive that route 95 on the east coast and you'll see Amazon Amazon is hiring Billboards up and down the East Coast Seaboard I did it recently so yeah they're aggressively hiring at higher wages that's impacting their margins there still some covid related cost shipping they're just not able to a sufficiently source and bring in product and so they have to bring in product into the the ports that aren't optimized for their distribution Network so just a lot of. [28:14] Positive blowing up now the question you have to ask yourself as an investor is are those are those cost increases elective structural discretionary temporary it's kind of like which of those are they the more that you can make a determination that the cost bikes are temporary the more you stick with the name if you think there's something structurally changed about Amazon okay that's different I don't think there's anything structurally changed about Amazon and certainly not its competitive position and then the last thing what I really like to see. [28:44] Frankly is this company. I mean the level of investment this company is making its distribution Network you know you talked about Facebook earlier they're dumping 10 billion into the metaverse which I think there's a there there but I don't know Amazon is dumping billions and billions into its own Logistics Network like they're doubling down on their core competency you bet I'll stick with that and what they're going to what's going to come out of that is even faster and faster delivery and they're going to prove out this concept what I call shipping elasticity the faster you ship the more that people are going to use you in a more of their of the more of their wallet and per-share you're going to Amazon's going to get so we're going to actually going to Super up one day delivery and then they're going to Super up super same day delivery and I think they'll be able to just grab more and more and offer more and more products to people so I like those kind of investment initiatives so I think a lot of that margin pressure by the way it was really due to these kind of elective investments in the infrastructure they added more distribution capacity the last two years than Walmart has in its history. That's how aggressive Amazon is being an eye you know my guess is that third we're going to see dramatic market share gains from Amazon in the next 12 months so I like those companies that kind of really lean in bendin and the double down on our core competency that's what the Amazon is doing now. Scot: [30:00] Yeah. The Press is making a lot of noise around Shopify versus Amazon and Shopify is kind of amplifying that with they're arming the rebels and everything. Jason Connor makes our I won't say his thing but he's not a believer in that I think it's kind of interesting in there's definitely no love lost between the company's what what's your take on that is that a real battle or is that just kind of genda by to kind of raise awareness for Shopify. Mark: [30:26] You have a quick point of view on that Scott. Scot: [30:29] I think Shopify becomes a Marketplace adjacent thinks that's crazy Jason what do you what I'll let you state your own opinion. Jason: [30:38] Yeah I mean I think Shopify is a phenomenal company and a good executor so I'm not throwing rocks at Shopify. They're to me they're not a competitor to Amazon they don't acquire customers they have no traffic there there. Piece of infrastructure and a great valuable piece of infrastructure but a piece of infrastructure. Doesn't draw any customers in so I call these people that are like oh man they're like Amazon they have all this aggregated gmv and they could sell ads to it and they can you know recruit more sellers because they have this this audience and all these things will they don't have any of those things they don't have a single b2c marketer. In their company and I would argue that's that's been one of Amazon's Court competencies is they've they use the flywheel to build this this huge audience that they get to sell all the. Their goods and services to so I just I don't think. They compete in any in any meaningful way and I think if Shopify were to try to become a true b2c company like Amazon. It would just be a phenomenal pivot it would be you know. Can't you know obviously they have the resources to fund trying for it but I'm not sure that's the best move for them. Mark: [31:57] Yeah I don't so I Do cover Shopify I've been really impressed with them I don't know them as well as I know Amazon but I've been super impressed. With them and terms of the product development and they are just providing more and more services to small Merchants so I think there's an are now bigger than eBay in terms of GM vo but I can never there's not enough disclosure to figure out so where's that GM D coming because I think some of that probably does come through eBay so a little bit of double counting that goes on in there but it's really impressive what they've pulled together whether they can actually aggregate demand in a way that Amazon has I think that's I think that's unlikely I think that's a very hard thing to do it's possible they do have a shop app I just, yeah I guess that's the action question we often ask ourselves do you think you're going to use the shop app to shop. [32:45] I don't think so I don't think people are going to do that but you know if they can get enough people to do that boy they will have really they will have some really circled it that you know because they got the infrastructure okay they're talking about building out fulfillment and doing fulfillment for people and spending a billion dollars on it sorry my friends you're gonna have to spend a heck of a lot more than a billion if you if you really want to you know compete. Because the bar is getting higher it's not getting lower it's getting higher in terms of funeral the speed of delivery eBay learn this the hard way and so shockfights Memphis spend a lot more than that so anyway there's a lot of wonderful things about Shopify and I don't know whether if you listening to slammed on by if you think they can build up an aggregate an audience I don't think they can so does it make doesn't make it a slam dunk by it's it's you know it's a deep three point shot put it that way. And you're not Steph Curry. Jason: [33:41] I think we're going back to the basketball references in the book. Yeah it you know I tend to agree I'm not I don't think the shop app you know has attracted an audience that uses it for shopping yet it's a shipping trapping tracking app at the moment. But the it is funny like there are lots of companies that facilitate huge amounts of gmv so I think of like. Excuse me and Akamai is a. Is a CDN that's that used by almost every retailer to help help sell stuff right and so if you said well what's the CD the gmv of Akamai well it's bigger than Amazons. Um but that doesn't mean that Akamai can compete with Amazon so yeah I don't know. [34:28] I do want to go back to Amazon earnings just briefly because I you know I think a lot of the Slowdown is kind of a covid blip and I don't know if you ever think of it this way but. They're there their times in history when. It feels like the external factors aren't a big influence and and you know some companies perform really well and other companies struggle so you know there could be a year when you see Home Depot doing really well and lows struggling and you say. There's something special about Home Depot that I might be interested in investing in at the moment it feels like the external environment for retail is having a. [35:07] Sort of a consistent effect on everyone right and so you look at the industry average is you look at all of them is on Spears and they all have sort of the same shape of deceleration. That Amazon has so it's to me it's hard to attribute that to some. Some fundamental flaw in Amazon but there is one thing I noticed this quarter that it was interesting and I wanted to get your opinion about because I know as an investor you like seeing companies that have pricing power. And you know of course Amazon famously raise the price of prime a while back and seems like that was wildly successful this quarter. They've raised the price for grocery delivery there now charging ten dollar delivery fees even for Prime members. And then this week we saw that they made a pretty substantial increase to the cost of f ba which is you know the fundamental service used by almost all marketplace hours and they they just raise the price of that by like five percent and I'm curious do you look at that as a good sign that hey. They have pricing power and they're doing so well that they can command those prices or to me it's a potential warning sign because I feel like Amazon is so. Zealous an advocate of the flywheel in the flywheel is all about driving costs down to get scale up I just was surprised to see some of these like price increases in in you know. Especially grocery which isn't super mature yet. Mark: [36:33] Well I'm not sure really of the answer to your question Jason it's a it's a it's a really good thoughtful question on the on the groceries I think they raised it because the unit economics were just not working for them in terms of grocery delivery that's that's my guess they also you know yet to have that get to really crack the code on the grocery business and so I sort of see that as they tried it and it just can't right size the economics of they got to charge more for it so I read that kind of negatively what did the raising fees to sellers. But my guess is it's a mixture of things but it's largely driven that my guess is that this largely driven off of Just Rising. [37:17] You know Rising infrastructure costs have been rising shipping costs I mean Rising the two costs that they called out specifically on the earnings call my recall is correct is our steel costs because of all of that dish construction they're doing with their fulfillment centers and trucking services and so my guess is that they've they're doing is not necessarily the right size the economics is I think the economics are working but because they want to try to keep their unit economics relatively intact. And that's sort of the way I think they thought about the raising the price of prime it wasn't they did it because they could. It's they did because they sort of had to like the costs are rising it's just that what I found interesting in terms of pricing power is van acceleration in in Prime ads you know post that price increase like that and so does Netflix to me Netflix is essentially raise fees use the fees to you know generate more Revenue by more content is like a flywheel that they've worked with their make the service more bringing more users allows them to get a little bit raised money just a little bit more so it's not so much raising fees to extract excess profits it's raising fees to further accelerate growth and the value proposition is strong enough that they can do that and not lose customers that's that's that that there's this is subtle nuance and maybe it's too salty but but I think it's an important it's important difference it's not it's no it's raising pricing not to raise margins it's raising pricing to fuel growth. [38:46] And when you so either way it's good I happen to think you you want to the the better one is the latter one is a more impressive the latter one is more impressive because you're raising pricing just to Goose your margins you know you just put a Target on your back. Scot: [39:03] Reading the book made me nostalgic and maybe we'll do a little bit of a lightning round but one of the companies you wrote about that I kind of forgot about and those interesting was Zulily I remember when they came on the scene and we were all like. They were all blown away by how fast they could just get product up right they had this thing where they could. They could have most of those kids so they'd get like all these little kid models in there and throw some clothes on them take a picture and then like changed outfit take another so they could do something like you know thousand different products an hour or something. What's your recollection on Zulily. Mark: [39:40] She really is that was one of my calls that didn't work and. So I and I learned some lessons from that I think to me the lesson I drew a to do with value proposition they had wonderful cohort disclosure in their S1 when they went public I mean it was truly impressive. And you know the they also raise kind of an analytical question because the first it's not too dissimilar to stitch fix today the first three or four million customers were extremely happy the question is. Were there another three to four million customers that could be extremely happy and the problem that Zulily faced is that it customer value proposition had one major flaw which is that you couldn't return product if you didn't like it they didn't they didn't accept returns oh I'm sorry there were two problems and there was no Speedy Delivery you know you could get stuff in seven days and 20 days. That was good for the first day of the first three to four million customers who are fine with that you break into the mainstream and you mean I can't return something if I don't like it you mean I gotta wait how many days until I get something like that ended up. [40:45] And it was very hard being the survey you really had to go with gut instinct on that to realize in advance that they were going to hit a wall in their growth. Geez when you saw what happened to their growth rate when they went public it was Triple digits six quarters later they were doing 10 percent Revenue growth they hit the wall because the value proposition. Wasn't strong enough and then they end up going going private that to me was kind of a lesson which is you know the. [41:10] Growth was impressive but that value proposition if it's not if they hadn't they didn't have it nailed down and you knew from the beginning I knew from the beginning what the two Falls were I just I didn't know when it would hit them and hit them earlier than I thought so you know it gives us another reason to really focus on how compelling do you think this value proposition is how many you know will that can the can a customer base double given the existing value prop. And that's one of the big lessons if I spin it a little bit I mean that's to me is and Scott you look through this entire history like you know the first decade of the internet the king of online retail wasn't Amazon it was eBay and they had like six times seven times the market cap of Amazon that's completely changed and why is it change and I think in part it's because of the value prop I mean Amazon just beat him on price selection and convenience year in and year out and that really mattered but a more recent example in my book. [42:02] In literally and figuratively is doordash and GrubHub and that's example many people will will know but grub have that great business model wonderful investor Centric business model High margins and doordash had this you know generating tons of losses but they had the better value prop because they had more restaurants selection and the end of the day that they want and they were able to scale up and generate serve reasonable profits over time that was the case where my quick tag line is you know customer-centric companies. Beat investor Centric companies most of the time in market cap and market share Amazon versus eBay, GrubHub versus doordash those two examples really drilled that less than to me. Jason: [42:48] Yeah I've been fighting those companies because you know there. They're like increasingly overlapping with a lot of my Commerce clients and like you know a big. A big sort of disruption and commerce right now is all these ultra-fast delivery services and you know it seems pretty clear that doordash and Uber are both gonna want to play directly in that space so it seems like some of those those sectors are on a collision course to chase that Tam. Mark: [43:15] I think you're right Jason I also think Amazon I mean you're talking about logistics like that's Amazon's competency so whether you need to. Whether you're going to vertically integrate and do that or whether you going to do that virtually you know Foo you know a gig economy Network. I don't know which which is going to work better long-term but yeah and you know it's going to raise the bar and make it more and more expensive for anybody to operate in that in that segment I have a bias that Amazon in the end wins that but it's big enough of a market it's so early stage that you can have multiple winners for the next five years I don't know that you can have multiple winners for the next 10 years. Jason: [43:56] Yeah there was a funny question in the Amazon earnings call someone asked about ultra-fast delivery in the CFO kind of I thought brilliantly threw some shade on it he's like. He said something to the effect of we like where we are and ultrafast like we have one hour delivery on about 178,000 skews right now and we're you know we're going to continue to scale that and I don't know how many people follow this but all of the competitors in this space are are desperately trying to figure out how to do one hour delivery for like 7000 skus. So so like they're you know they definitely are gonna be able to leverage the infrastructure there and I'm sure they're making some big investments in that space too. Another area that's that's been kind of interesting lately and I know you've been following this little bit is obviously there are all these privacy changes and the depreciation of the third-party cookies and especially the IDF a you know mobile privacy changes. That Apple has instituted and that obviously had a pretty pronounced impact on the value of some companies like Snap recently A View you have a opinion there is that. Is that a blip or is that a systemic change. Mark: [45:08] I think it's a big pothole in the road. But it's not there but the but the it's a big pothole in the road but it's not a bridge that it's not a collapsed bridge that get that mountain out. Yeah so poor that hey yes. Yes it is yeah that's it that's pretty I mean that's a big pothole that idea Fay allowed Facebook to offer amazing attribution to millions and millions and millions of businesses and now that's gone and and and to their credit to Facebook's credit they warned about it for a year two snaps discredit they didn't warn about it ever and so that's why their stock went off you know 22 decline 25 percent whereas Facebook stock even the numbers came in weaker than expected you know kind of fell off to the 3% and by the way then is traded up above where it was at earnings time so what I mean very intrigued by is I think it will be a son of that idea of a. [46:12] You know child of idea say I like I think there's so much at stake here both from the advertising platforms like Facebook you know and Google's to some extent a little bit and Snapchat but also for you know the millions of marketers out there who you don't you were able to thank thanks to Facebook use of people's privacy data you know from right or wrong I mean that's what that's what they they did I mean this help Merchants really know which of their campaigns worked and allow them to you know run creative and that creative could be automatically you know a be tested abcdefgh like 8 times 8 different ways in which ever those creatives work best. You could actually beat successful one of them then you can just pivot all of the dollars behind that one campaign you know campaign h for campaign be your campaign e.e. and that's just a wonderful way to help these small businesses you know really succeed and that's been taken away now you know there's I think there's first a little bit of shock shoot I can't get the attribution I had I'm going to pull a my marketing dollars but marketers got a market. [47:13] And I think you're going to see those dollars come back and my guess is that Facebook and other companies are going to find some way to do. Better targeting they may not quite get to idea that a type of levels but they were going to be able to do some sort of audience targeting they also have a lot of first-party data but they'll be able to do it in a way that doesn't that you know respect people's privacy and yeah you'll see those dollars come back so that's why I referred to as a pothole I it's a big pothole it's but it's not that it's not a bridge that just collapsed you know you're going to be you can they can they got stuck in that pothole more than anybody else but you know the cranes there whatever they're getting a tow trucks they're they're getting out of it they got to do some nobody work they'll fix the car and it'll be back on the road in part because they've got the talent to do it but in part because there are millions of small businesses that are given to going to give them the incentive to do it because they'll get those marketing dollars back once they figure out some of the idea that a. Jason: [48:09] Yeah I always like to remind people that are like The Skys Falling on the advertising industry that you know. It wasn't very long ago that we had much worse targeting than than we have in digital even with idea of a I mean targeting used to be deciding which publication you were going to print your ad in. And they still got a lot of money in the advertising industry so like I kind of suspect that that marketers are going to figure out you know the best ways to invest their money even if it maybe isn't quite as. As real-time as people got used to for a short while. Mark: [48:42] I think you're right Jason. Scot: [48:45] So Mark you in the book you recap kind of this awesome 25-year career and you know one of the things I've learned is if you're in the game of making predictions you know that it's kind of humbling but then you kind of slowly but surely get better at it right you never get to kind of you know a hundred percent but over time you get better and like like for example you learned the lesson of. The companies that are customer focused to do better than investor focused think founder based in that kind of as you as you take those backward 25-year learnings and project them forward what are some of the things that you get excited about looking out the next five or ten years. Mark: [49:23] Well in terms of Trends even the next year or two I think whoever solves. Marketing attribution is going to be worth a lot more in two years than they are today just because there's so many businesses so many marketers that will pay for that. So I you know so that's that's kind of a debt that whoever whoever fills in the pothole that's going to be a very valuable company it's going to be a lot more valuable to years and it is today my guess is that there's gonna be Facebook so I'm interested in that then there's thing this thing called The Medic verse which I don't know this is just virtual reality just renamed do a Google Trends search on metaverse just watch that just spiked up in the last love so you know you kudos to the person who came up with that idea may be excited maybe Jason or Scott maybe was you I. Jason: [50:09] It's just a rebranded second life. Mark: [50:12] Okay and. But but you know the fact that it was two things that kind of struck me there's some pretty big companies throwing a lot of big money at metaverse you know Facebook Microsoft there's a bunch of others and then there's this Roblox generation people young people who are perfectly comfortable living in the meta verse in virtual reality and. [50:38] You know participating in concerts safely and you know and shopping and communicating and entertaining and learning. [50:49] And learning through the metaverse and so you know we knows 8 18 year olds you know get out into the real world you know they're going to be perfectly comfortable in the meadow verse maybe not the way you know not the way that we will naturally be but you know though they'll help us figure it out and so so I'm really intrigued by the metaverse I think it is going to take 5 to 10 years because that to really develop and I'm trying to trying to figure it out who the big winners are but but I'm very intrigued by that. [51:18] Yeah I'm also got one of those oculist you know I've gotten two different versions Generations the it's the iterations of the Oculus Rift and you know i-i've always it's kind of like when I first saw the Kindle you know the first Kindle I ever got was pretty darn kludgy but you know I just love the idea that you could just download any book on the your kludgy device will you know whenever you whenever you were in a Wi-Fi area and and I and you and you just saw how that device got better and better each iteration and so I just think about that with these with these virtual reality headsets I mean they're clumpy their clunky their kludgy it's kind of embarrassing to be have a picture of you taking them but you know just you can imagine already know how much they've improved over the last couple of years and just think ahead is it possible the next five to seven years it's going to be just it's going to be like putting on a pair of sunglasses I think that's what we should be thinking about if you can easily put on a pair of sunglasses and and enter the metaverse and have you know share a virtual you know in presence experience that sounds but that sounds odd or not but you can do that, I think a lot of people will do that and you know the education the work applications around that so I'm very intrigued by that. Jason: [52:28] So you're saying that that could be chewy.com to Google Glasses pets.com. Mark: [52:36] Yes yes I love that yes I hadn't thought about that way yeah and by the way I've got my Google Glass here you know I'm. Got that I got that early version I got the Amazon Fire Phone you know but just be the the early failures sometimes see these I mean they're kind of in the right direction I don't know exactly what there's a there's a backstory to Google Glass that we only partially know but anyway they have the concept is there and and you know the big iterations that these products do get better and as they get better easier cheaper lighter cooler you know like Main Street cooler not Silicon Valley cooler then then markets can appear. Scot: [53:17] I think that's something the three of us have in common I think the three of us are probably the only people that ordered and probably still own an Amazon Fire Phone. Jeff Ellis. Mark: [53:29] And I've Got My Socks.com puppet to it's in my office I put the hits I got it as a warning. Scot: [53:31] I have one of those too yeah we all I guess we all have one of those too. Jason: [53:36] That that puppet ended up being the most valuable asset from pets.com sidenote like I don't know if you followed it but there was there was there was a whole intellectual property fight with Triumph the comedy dog and all that stuff yeah. Unattended value unintended value creation. Scot: [53:53] Mark were you you know we've used up about an hour of your time we really appreciate you coming on the show to tell us about the book when's it come out where can people find it do you do you want them to order from that Seattle bookstore that we've been chatting about. Mark: [54:09] So yeah and thanks Scott Jason I've always enjoyed listening to your show I did tell you it beginning I your analysis recently all birds and Warby Parker I took the heart because I initiated Warby Parker as an analyst but I after after I've seen what your thoughts were on it. So thanks for having me on the show and to talk about the book nothing but Net 10 Timeless stock-picking lessons from one of wall Street's top Tech analyst I just like to nothing but net on a big Hoops fan. And my kids are hoops and that's been my email pack lines there's a lot of meaning for me in that that title it is available wherever fine literature is sold it is available on Amazon it's the it's a top bestseller now and in the business category so I've been I've been just it was just a it was a labor of love for me and throw like a chance to talk with both of you about it because you've lived through the sister just as much as I have and it's fascinating the lessons we can draw from. Jason: [55:01] Well Mark is been entirely our privilege and it's a great sign that you know just halfway through your career you had enough material for an amazing book so I can't wait to read the the sequel after the next half. Mark: [55:13] All right I will talk with will do it again in 25 years. Jason: [55:18] I'm booking it right now. Scot: [55:20] Bring our sock puppet are and pets.com puppets in our Amazon Fire Phone. Mark: [55:24] That's. Jason: [55:25] Yeah everyone else will be living in the metaverse at that point in no one's going to get it but it's cool. But Mark really appreciated your time and until next time happy commercing!