Podcasts about Saskatoon

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Best podcasts about Saskatoon

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Latest podcast episodes about Saskatoon

We LOVE Arabian Horses!
Tex Kam and Murray Popplewell: We Stand on Guard for Thee

We LOVE Arabian Horses!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 29:50


Thank you to Markel for your ongoing support of the We Love Arabian Horses Podcast. Markel is the insurance with horse sense. In this special early release episode, Paul speaks with Tex Kam from the Canadian Arabian Horse Registry and Murray Popplewell of Rae Dawn Arabians, based in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, CA on the Canadian National Arabian Championships. This event was a labor of immense love and support, and through the strength and resilience of the Canadian Arabian Horse community, they, and others, were able to produce a national level horse show in Canada over an incredibly short time period after the third consecutive cancellation of the Canadian National Championship show by the Arabian Horse Association. This interview provides a picture of what that looked like and how the Arabian horse community came together to support our neighbors to the north. The space has been packed, and with prize money and the added historical context of the importance of Canadian National Champions to the breed over the years, this event's future looks bright. Join us to hear about the show being put on in Red Deer, Alberta, Canada and make sure you reach out to Tex to share your thoughts and support at TexMKam@gmail.com. Have a great idea for a guest or topic, or just want to send us your feedback? Send us an e-mail to austin@welovearabianhorses.com! Want to get some WLAH Merch? Totes and wearables are now available at We Love Arabian Horses!

Authors on the Air Global Radio Network
Authors on the Air presents guest host Millie Naylor Hast and author SC Lalli

Authors on the Air Global Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 15:32


Authors on the Air welcomes guest host Millie Naylor Hast and S.C. Lalli to the show. S.C. Lalli is an author of Punjabi and Bengali heritage, who writes romance and women's fiction novels under her full name Sonya Lalli. She studied law in her hometown of Saskatoon, Canada, and at Columbia University in New York. Sonya has worked in law, legal journalism and book publishing. She lives in Vancouver with her husband. Her newest release, Are You Sara?, is a crime thriller. To learn more about Sonya's novels, visit sonyalalli.com, or connect with her on Instagram or Twitter. Millie Naylor Hast writes award-winning action thrillers based on important themes of today. She is a former journalist, city council member, and graduate of the FBI, DEA, and Houston Police Citizens Academies. In her spare time she hikes, cycles, and plans new adventures.

Startupville
Global Biotech Week 2022

Startupville

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 35:48


Global Biotech Week started 19 years ago right here in Canada, and has since gone global, raising awareness for the significant role biotech plays in the world today. To celebrate Global Biotech Week, we've interviewed three leaders in the biotech sector, to learn more about what they do and how we can celebrate between September 26-30. We talked with Mehmet Tulbek of the Saskatchewan Food Industry Development Centre, Heather Deobald with Quantum Genetix and Jackie Robin from Ag-West Bio. The Saskatchewan Food Industry Development Centre is a non-profit organization and leader in providing expertise and resources to assist agri-businesses to create innovative products and value added opportunities in the food industry. Quantum Genetix is an agricultural technology company that harnesses the power of genomics to improve agriculture efficiency. Ag-West Bio is Saskatchewan's bioscience industry association and bioeconomy catalyst. This podcast is brought to you by Innovation Place & Martin Charlton Communications “We have to really put Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, more on the map, and Global Biotech Week is a really great way to do this.” – Mehmet Tulbek, Saskatchewan Food Industry Development Centre

Authors on the Air Global Radio Network
Authors on the Air presents guest host Millie Naylor Hast and author SC Lalli

Authors on the Air Global Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 15:32


Authors on the Air welcomes guest host Millie Naylor Hast and S.C. Lalli to the show. S.C. Lalli is an author of Punjabi and Bengali heritage, who writes romance and women's fiction novels under her full name Sonya Lalli. She studied law in her hometown of Saskatoon, Canada, and at Columbia University in New York. Sonya has worked in law, legal journalism and book publishing. She lives in Vancouver with her husband. Her newest release, Are You Sara?, is a crime thriller. To learn more about Sonya's novels, visit sonyalalli.com, or connect with her on Instagram or Twitter. Millie Naylor Hast writes award-winning action thrillers based on important themes of today. She is a former journalist, city council member, and graduate of the FBI, DEA, and Houston Police Citizens Academies. In her spare time she hikes, cycles, and plans new adventures.

Kids Who Explore Parent Edition
Ep. 87 Less Waste & More Earth Love with Launne Kolla

Kids Who Explore Parent Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 33:23


Raise your hand if you care about our planet! Launne Kolla says she is not perfect, and none of us should expect to be, but trying our best with the knowledge we have can make our earth a little bit greener. Launne graciously does all the hard research for us, to make our gentle footprint a little bit easier to navigate.     Back on episode 64, we met Launne, when we talked all things birding and bird watching. Not only is Launne a Wildlife Biologist for EDI Environmental Dynamics, where she gets to love up on wildlife, she is also on a mission to take care of the earth and teach others how to do the same, with her account Do More Good. Raising two daughters, in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, she is also teaching them to love, respect, and nurture the earth!     Episode 64 on Birding: https://kidswhoexplore.com/podcasts/ep-64-birding-bird-watching-with-launne-kolla/    Garbage Takeaways:  Buy/consume less and use what you have   Vote with your dollar – think about what you purchase before you buy it, as in where it was made, who made it, what it is made from, and how long it will last  Purchase items with less packaging   Corporations need to make a change – support the “good” ones  Shop in bulk   Bring your own produce bags, or don't use produce bags    Recycling Takeaways:  Most of the things you throw in your recycling bin cannot get recycled – don't “wish recycle” – know what can go in there, because wrong items can contaminate the whole bin, or cause harm to the system or workers   Generally, plastics with number 1-7 in the middle of recycle symbol can be recycled   Generally, they only accept items bigger than a deck of cards  Be intentional     Compost Takeaways:  In Calgary, currently, compostable packaging – compostable plates etc., cannot be composted. https://www.calgary.ca/waste/residential/how-composting-works.html[In Seattle they can] Check with your city!  Check if your city has an app  Tips to Compost on your own: Check out Vermicompost – using worms; Mix the browns and the greens – yard waste with food; Sometimes places have a compost drop off, or big gardens or food banks asking for compost  App = Share Waste (can find compost in the area) - https://sharewaste.com    In Canada, there is a single use plastic ban starting in 2022, and will be completed by 2025.    Ep. 31 Reduce, Reuse, Recycle for the Planet with Michelle Dias –   https://kidswhoexplore.com/podcasts/ep-31-reduce-reuse-recycle-for-the-planet-with-michelle-dias/    Sustainable and Eco-Friendly Swaps:  ·      Bring your own coffee mug and water bottle  ·      Use bar shampoos and conditions  ·      Use safety razor  ·      Swap bees wax wraps (or containers), instead of Sarah Wrap  ·      Turn off sprinklers when it's rainy  ·      Unplug “ghost power”  ·      Delete emails! [1 person sending 65 emails is the same as driving a km in your car]  ·      Pick up garbage you see outside  ·      Pay for carbon offsets [Carbon Zero, vetted by WestJet, or Less Emissions, used by Air Canada]  ·      Shop secondhand   ·      Don't return clothes unless you KNOW they are going back on the shelf  ·      Say no to Palm Oil, unless it's “responsible palm oil”    Follow Launne on IG: @do.more.good  Launching blog soon.       Check out KWE's #patch4apurpose to support 1, or all 8, charities: https://kidswhoexplore.com/product/original-explorer-patch4apurpose/  Today's Host: @adriannaadventures & @laurenrodycheberle from @kidswhoexplore Production: @kpmediaproductions. Music: @michaelferraro_music 

Justice with John Carpay
S03E37 Covid Situation in Saskatchewan

Justice with John Carpay

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 60:01


Kevin is joined this week by Saskatchewan-based Justice Centre lawyer Andre Memauri. They discuss the sad news from last week about Carol Pearce, a Saskatoon woman who died in a Shoppers Drug Mart seven minutes after receiving a Covid booster. Andre then gives his perspective on a few of his cases; the Seneca College vaccine mandate challenge, the lawsuit of Dr. Francis Christian, and the case against Saskatchewan's limits on public gatherings during the pandemic.The Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition - Canadian National DivisionIllinois College of Law: Francis BoyleJustice Centre, Dec 17, 2021: NB Government and farmer's market back down on mandating vaccines for grocery shoppingSasktoday, Sep 22, 2022: Sask. woman dies allegedly after COVID booster: Daughter in shockCKOM, Sep 21, 2022: Saskatchewan still recording no deaths related to COVID vaccineJustice Centre, Sep 12, 2022: Court denies students' request to block Seneca's vaccine mandateWestern Gazette, Sep 19, 2022: Western vaccine lawsuit heard before London court, students aim to destroy vax recordsThe Canadian Press via CBC, Mar 2, 2022: Ontario judge rules mother doesn't have to vaccinate her children against COVID-19CTV, Jun 24, 2022: TTC facing nearly $3M in lawsuits filed by former employees over vaccine policiesJustice Centre, Jun 27, 2022: Dr. Francis Christian v. Saskatchewan Health Authority, the College of Medicine, et. al.Justice Centre, Sep 20, 2022: Saskatchewan Court rules government 10-person outdoor protest limit justifiableThe Post Millennial, Jul 22, 2022: Pastor Artur Pawlowski wins appeal against Alberta Health ServicesTheme Music "Carpay Diem" by Dave StevensSupport the show

The Gathering At Broadway: Weekly Teaching Time

It turns out that pulling U-Turns is actually pivotal to living well. This Sunday we are exploring the account of thousands of people who changed their minds about Jesus and what happened as a result. Scripture Passage: Acts 2:22-41Speaker: Brian

Grace Fellowship Saskatoon and Warman Sermons

Colossians 1:15-20 (Saskatoon) The post Supremacy of Jesus appeared first on | Grace Fellowship | Saskatoon Church | Warman Church.

Forest Grove Community Church
Acts 2:1-21 // Kevin Wiens

Forest Grove Community Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 22:35


Kevin Wiens teaches from Acts 2:1-21 as we continue our Acts series.

Grace Fellowship Saskatoon HD Video Sermons

Colossians 1:15-20 (Saskatoon) The post Supremacy of Jesus appeared first on | Grace Fellowship | Saskatoon Church | Warman Church.

Moony Birth Stories
Jennifer S.- Infertility, IVF, Vasa Previa, Scheduled Cesarean Section, NICU, Successful VBAC with Epidural

Moony Birth Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 95:38


Jenn, from Saskatoon, SK shares her two pregnancy and birth stories on this episode of the podcast.  She opens up about her and her husband's struggles with infertility and their journey with IVF.  Once Jenn was pregnant with their first daughter, it was discovered later on that she had a very rare placenta issue and would require a scheduled c-section to ensure that labour would not start on it's own.  She also had gestational diabetes which she was able to manage with an appropriate diet.  After deliver, they were hit with some unexpected issues that required a difficult stay in NICU. Once they were able to take their baby home, postpartum went well and after about 10 months, they decided to start trying for their second baby, again with IVF.  Jenn got pregnant surprisingly quickly this time and was able to go on and have a successful VBAC delivery.Soraya -Be Convinced! Sharing Lifechanging Stories of HopeHost Soraya Coffelt shares lifechanging stories of hope to encourage and motivate you.Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify

Southern Alberta Council on Public Affairs (SACPA)
Red Alert: Our Public Medicare is at Risk! With Chris Gallaway

Southern Alberta Council on Public Affairs (SACPA)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 58:55


A coordinated effort of reactionary columnists, conservative politicians, right-wing think tanks and others are lining up to push the narrative that our public health care is “broken”; they predictably go on to conclude that the only solution is to privatize it. But the truth is our system isn't broken, it's being intentionally dismantled for the benefit of private profits.  There is no doubt that our public health care system is struggling under a series of crises: the ongoing pandemic, a deadly drug poisoning crisis, chronic short staffing and burnout, bed and unit closures, chronic EMS red alerts, the impacts of years of austerity and cuts, and so much more. But rather than respond to this urgent situation with urgent action, our provincial government is using this to justify an aggressive spree of privatization - with recent announcements privatizing surgeries, community labs, ophthalmology, seniors care, home care, food services, and even a scheme to send Alberta surgeons along with their patients to private for-profit facilities out of province.  Their agenda of privatization is clear. It is full steam ahead. And unless Albertans stand up and fight right now, we risk losing our treasured public health care system altogether.   Speaker:     Chris Gallaway, Executive Director Friends of Medicare               Chris Gallaway (he/him) is an experienced community organizer and advocate for public health care. Born and raised on a farm in rural Saskatchewan, he has since spent most of his adult life living on Treaty 6 territory, first in Saskatoon, and for the last decade living here in Edmonton. His past experience includes working for the Alberta Federation of Labour, in three provincial legislative assemblies, and for a variety of non-profit and community organizations. Outside of work Chris is an active volunteer and community member engaged in social justice and the arts.   

Basic Banter.. for Witches

We wanted to share some of the resources of where YOU could get certified in Card Reading.This is just our favorite courses local to Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Bev Lazar -Usui Master, Certified Hypnotherapist (plus SO MUCH MORE) and one half of The Empath SistersFind out more about her courses hereJenn - owner of Wonder & Whimsy Events and Little Wonders - Sask!You can Reach out to her on her IG @littlewonders.sask or by her website here!Find us on Instagram, TikTok and YouTube @basicbanterforwitchesEmail us at basicbanterforwitches@gmail.com

The Gathering At Broadway: Weekly Teaching Time

The outpouring of the gift of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost brought some unexpected new experiences to the first disciples. We explore what this tells us about what God is up to in the world.Scripture passage: Acts 2:1-21aSpeaker: Brian

Cruz Mornings with Stacie & Clayton
Hinterland Who's Who - Leaf Blower Guy

Cruz Mornings with Stacie & Clayton

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 1:52


The Fall season is beautiful in Saskatoon... UNTIL THIS GUY SHOWS UP AT 7:31 IN THE MORNING! #StacieAndClayton #yxe

FUELRADIO.COM
Contemplation with Deb Arndt

FUELRADIO.COM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 49:03


My guest today is Deb Arndt. Deb's background is in education, spending 18 years in the high school classroom. She has served as a Pastor of Spiritual Formation, offered many workshops and retreats, and continues to companion others in spiritual direction. She lives on an acreage outside of Saskatoon, SK with her husband Lavern. They have two adult sons, a lovely daughter-in-law, and a precious granddaughter. Deb enjoys nature, hiking, deep connections with others, belly laughs, reading, good food and drink, and their Bernese Mountain dog Ralph. Many of my guests for this series on contemplation have been partners with Soulstream. Deb is SoulStream's Executive Director. Prior to becoming Executive Director Deb served on SoulStream's Leadership Team from 2011-2017 and has co-facilitated Living from the Heart (a course that we have mentioned many times in this series because of its impact on our guests) for more than 10 years.

The Green Zone - CJME / CKOM
The Green Zone - Hour 1 - WHL Preview w/Saskatoon Blades GM Colin Priestner

The Green Zone - CJME / CKOM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 31:20


The Green Zone with Jamie & Drew

No Nonsense with Pamela Wallin
Escaping the Taliban with Umulbanin Arjmand and David Fraser

No Nonsense with Pamela Wallin

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 47:02


Escaping the clutches of the Taliban at 19, Umulbanin Arjmand, now a Saskatoon high school student and refugee, shares her story from Afghanistan to the Canadian Prairies, while former Major-General David Fraser shares updates on the ongoing crisis.

KeyStone Stock Talk Podcast
Stock Talk Podcast Episode 178

KeyStone Stock Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 51:13


Back from the Big Smoke, the center of the Canadian Universe, Hogtown, the city of many nicknames, or as Brennan, a huge Drake fan refers to it, the six. For most of our listeners who are likely still unaware of what city I am referring to – myself and Aaron just return from Toronto where we spoke to audiences at the MoneyShow – the first time in person for 3 years – we get into our talk and highlights of the event including my take on the folly of macro forecasts. We have a big stock debate for this week as the Killer B's (Brennan & Brett) square off in a no hold's barred battle. In the crosshairs this week is a company founded in Brennan's current stomping grounds, a city previously thought to be made-up, yes, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. The company, Vecima Networks Inc. (VCM:TSX), develops hardware and software solutions for broadband access, content delivery, and telematics. The coinflip chose Brennan for the Bear case, and Brett as the Bull. Aaron will sit in as judge, jury, and executioner. In light of recent interest rate hikes and the continued likelihood of more on the horizon, Aaron takes a brief look at the fixed income market – bonds, GICs and T-bills in a preview of some work he will be presenting at our Fall 2022 upcoming seminars. So, let's get to the show!    

Saskatoon Open Door Society Podcast Podcamp
2022 Voices of Youth Summit - Mental Health Panel

Saskatoon Open Door Society Podcast Podcamp

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 94:29


Saskatoon Open Door Society's 2022 Voices of Youth Summit panel on Mental Health and Disability. The main topic of the discussion is becoming comfortable with the uncomfortable; to respect different perspectives in order to expand our own views. We discuss the bridging of inclusivity and disability.  Youth facilitators: Miheret, Farheen, Birana, and Suro. Panelists:  Tracey and Shelby work at 'Listen to This', a disabled person led community art organization in Saskatchewan. They are also joined by Barry, who is a member of their community. The Voices of Youth Summit is a youth led project focused on connecting and amplifying the youth perspective on key issues that impact the youth experience in Saskatoon, hoping to connect and empower youth to take action. This project was funded by the government of Canada under the Canada Service Corps as well as the IRCC.

Justice with John Carpay
S03E36 Following the (Political) Science

Justice with John Carpay

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 51:12


We go through a Toronto Star article about a federal government leak (or trial balloon) about possibly ending the Covid mandates and testing at the border. Then we discuss a victory for Canadian workers who were refused EI when they declined the Covid jab. We also take a few moments--with the Bernier et al trial in Saskatchewan as the backdrop--to remind everyone about the summer of 2020 when the powers that be gave some protestors a pass when it came to following the law, while they nailed others with fines and charges.Toronto Star, Sep 16, 2022: Trudeau government considering end to COVID-19 vaccination mandate at border and random testing: sourcesGrand Forks Herald, Sep 10, 2022: Will Canada soon lift its ArriveCan requirement? UND expert says he thinks soJustice Centre, Aug 10, 2022: Canada's Road to BeijingSmall Dead Animals, Sep 16, 2022: Pierre Poilievre Gets ResultsJustice Centre, Aug 24, 2022: Justice Centre brings legal challenge against ArriveCAN and quarantine measuresDanish Health Authority: Vaccination against covid-19The Counter Signal, Sep 14, 2022: Denmark ends COVID jab for people under 50The Counter Signal, Sep 9, 2022: UK ends vaccine for kids under 12SSRN, Sep 12, 2022: COVID-19 Vaccine Boosters for Young Adults: A Risk-Benefit Assessment and Five Ethical Arguments against Mandates at UniversitiesJustice Centre, Sep 12, 2022: Ontario Superior Court upholds Seneca College's mandatory vaccination policyJustice Centre, Sep 16, 2022: Federal tribunal rules in favour of fired employee denied EI for not taking COVID shotsJustice Centre, Sep 12, 2022: Two-week trial underway today in Saskatoon against Maxime Bernier and dozens of other protestors for peaceful protestsCNN, Jun 5, 2020: Over 1,000 health professionals sign a letter saying, Don't shut down protests using coronavirus concerns as an excuseCTV, Jun 12, 2020: 'Let's all work together': Saskatoon mayor urges COVID-19 safety during BLM ralliesTheme Music "Carpay Diem" by Dave StevensSupport the show

City Centre Church Podcasts

Speaker: Derek Melnychuk Sermon: Cast Beyond • Join us this Sunday! 720 20th Street West, Saskatoon, SK https://goo.gl/maps/h1XF5Vi5w64GofEB7  Follow us! FACEBOOK :: https://www.facebook.com/citycentrechurch INSTAGRAM :: https://www.instagram.com/cccyxe Visit our website: https://www.citycentrechurch.ca/ City Centre Church is a multi-generational, multi-ethnic, Jesus-centred and PEOPLE loving church located in the core of Saskatoon. We are passionate about serving God by serving our community.

The Sit Down podcast with Mark and Joel

From Saskatoon, SK, our new friend Fabian Minnema has stories for days. This Dutch-born musician and radio host for Saskatoon's community station CFCR 90.5 talks about festivals, the indie music scene, local radio and so much more. Also, keep a look out for a clip of him on the drums at Doylefest. Fabian Minnema on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fabian.minnema Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fabian_minnema/ Twitter: hthttps://twitter.com/fabianminnema Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNh5BHXQuNm21UFik5WJWUA Mark Poppen and Joel Gaudet on:  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joelvgaudet/  Twitter Joel: https://twitter.com/JoelVGaudet  Twitter Mark: https://twitter.com/MarkPoppen  Instagram Mark: https://www.instagram.com/mark.poppen Funky Moose Records on: Website: https://www.funkymooserecords.ca/  Twitter: https://twitter.com/FunkyMoose_ca  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FunkyMooseRecords  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/funkymooserrecords  Northern Royals EP Presale Bundle: https://www.funkymooserecords.ca/products/northern-royals-northern-royals-ep-180-gram-45rpm-gold-splatter  Inspired Vapor Company: https://www.inspiredvaporcompany.com/ Promo: MOOSE10 Song in the ad: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ypN72NLUCH0 Artist looking for contacts?  Check out muse @: https://muse-canada.ca/ Promo: FUNKYMOOSE2021 Skull Creek Studios: https://skullcreek.ca/ Prehistoric Productions: https://www.prehistoricproductions.com/ The Capitol Music Club: https://www.capitolclubyxe.ca/ The views and opinions of our guests do not represent the views and opinions of Mark, Joel or Funky Moose Records.

Grace Fellowship Saskatoon and Warman Sermons

Colossians 1:9-14 (Saskatoon) The post What to Pray For appeared first on | Grace Fellowship | Saskatoon Church | Warman Church.

Forest Grove Community Church
Unstoppable - Acts 1:1-11 // Reg Toews

Forest Grove Community Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 22:28


Reg Toews teaches from Acts 1:1-11 as we begin our Acts series.

Grace Fellowship Saskatoon HD Video Sermons

Colossians 1:9-14 (Saskatoon) The post What to Pray For appeared first on | Grace Fellowship | Saskatoon Church | Warman Church.

The Night's End Podcast
Project Lazarus

The Night's End Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 24:36


You've been listening to the Night's End podcast which is a production of Dissonance Media.   Charlie Morgan had planned the perfect murder, or had he?   Project Lazarus was written by Tommy Ellis. Tommy has previously been published in Writers' Forum, Horla Horror ezine, The Ankh Quarterly, and is the author of S01E23 Fast Forward on the Night's End podcast as well as Photo Finish, a Night's End exclusive episode. He also has a new middle-grade portal fantasy out as eBook and paperback entitled “The Puddle People.” It is available from Amazon HERE    This episode was narrated by Drew Sebesteny. Drew works best by the light of the moon, spinning dark and delirious tales of horror each and every week as the host of Tales to Terrify podcast – one of longest running horror fiction podcasts. During those loathsome daylight hours, though, he applies his creative forces as a writer, designer and creative director for his little ad agency, Balloonfish. He lives in Saskatoon, Saskatcher wan, Canada with his partner, son and a slowly dwindling menagerie of agéd fur kids. Listen to more of his work at www.talestoterrify.com, or get in touch via social media @DrNebulon – Instagram / Twitter .   Abigail was performed by Erika Ventura. Erika is a mother, narrator, visual artist, and animal husbandry technician. You can check out some of her artwork on Instagram www.instagram.com/efventu or you can visit her artist page at www.facebook.com/BioArtsy   Alexander was performed by Phoenix Fire. For more narrations by PhoenixFire head over to https://www.youtube.com/PhoenixFireNarrations   Jimmy Horrors was performed by James Barnett   This episode was edited and produced by James Barnett   Please support us by leaving a review and a 5 star rating. Or even telling a friend about us.   If you aren't already aware, Night's End has released a horror-themed apparel line called, Stay Horrific. There are horror-themed t-shirts, mugs, dresses, socks, all the good stuff. Go and check it out now. Support the Night's end on Patreon to receive bonus content and merch: www.patreon.com/nightsendpodcast Or support us by purchasing directly from our shop: www.nightsendpodcast.com/shop Donations: www.ko-fi.com/nightsendpodcast   And as always, stay horrific, everyone.

YXE Underground
Season Five - Episode One - Phillip Harder

YXE Underground

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 41:29


Every superhero has an origin story. For hydrologist Phillip Harder, who I consider a water superhero, his origin story traces back to when he first saw a culvert sticking straight up in the air near his farm at the age of seven.Phillip wanted to know why there was fresh water at the bottom of that odd-looking culvert when there was an alkali body of water nearby. To a seven year-old kid growing up on a farm southeast of Saskatoon, this question needed an answer.The answer to this question, and the great story that surrounds it, is in this episode of YXE Underground.Season 5 of YXE Underground begins with Phillip Harder. He is a hydrologist and a Research Associate for the Centre for Hydrology at the University of Saskatchewan. He is also a member of a national team called the Global Water Futures research project. Phillip is helping communities on the prairies, and especially farmers, learn to best use their fresh water resources. He's doing this through careful research, flying expensive drones and engaging with people on social media. I really admire the work Phillip is doing for our communities. I think the issue of fresh water will become more prominent in the years to come here in Saskatoon as we continue to see the impact of climate change and how it impacts the South Saskatchewan River. We rely so much on the South Saskatchewan River here in Saskatoon, but as Phillip points out in the podcast, so do many people in Saskatchewan and Alberta. We are going to need to share this valuable resource and Phillip's research will help guide us in how best to do so. You will also hear from Jay Famiglietti in this episode. Jay is the Executive Director for the Global Institute of Water Security at the University of Saskatchewan and hosts a wonderful podcast called What About Water which is produced here in Saskatoon. Jay does an excellent job of putting Phillip's work into a larger context and discusses the challenges of sharing research with people who are set in their ways when it comes to using water. This was such a fun episode to produce! I spent a very hot August afternoon with Phillip on his family's land just south of Clavet, Saskatchewan, which is about 15 minutes southeast of Saskatoon. He not only took me to the infamous vertical culvert but also to a research site where some of his work is taking place. Phillip is passionate about educating people on issues surrounding fresh water and is gifted at explaining things in clear and understandable ways. I hope you enjoy the Season 5 debut of YXE Underground and I want to thank you for supporting a local, independent podcast! When I started this podcast in September of 2018, I had no idea it would find such a caring and engaged audience, and I sure didn't think I would make it to a fifth season! Thank you so much for your continued support as I really love sharing the stories of people who are making a difference in Saskatoon but are flying under the radar.Cheers…Eric  

Hard Knox Talks
Influencing Substance Use w/guest, Carissa McNaught. Phoenix Fire ep. 25

Hard Knox Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 67:04 Transcription Available


Join us on the Hard Knox Talks platform twice a week for inspiring stories and real talk about all things substance use.This week's guest, Carissa McNaught.Carissa was a street kid at 15 years old. Today she lives a fulfilling as a loving mother of 4 and as a Kambo practitioner right here is Saskatoon, SK.She has had an incredible journey to get to where she is today and we are going to hear about it this week right here,on Phoenix Fire.----------------------Love what we do? Jump over to Hard Knox Talks on Apple Podcasts and give us a review! It would mean the world to us and it'll help our message reach more people 

The Recruitment Flex
Practitioner Series: Mckenzie Hunter

The Recruitment Flex

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 30:15


Talent Acquisition Practitioners Series: McKenzie has built the HR function from being solo to a team of 16 people. The best part, McKenzies' team has great tools and a CEO who understands TA! Living proof the tech sector is hot in Canada. We were blown away by the rocketship that 7shifts is on, growing from 40 employees to 350.  3 things essential for high growth organizations to attract top talent   Passion for the product A product that solves a real world problem Great Leadership Sourcing software developers in Saskatoon, 7shifts has the formula right! How did they successfully win top talent? Building great relationships with your hiring leaders

Forest Grove Community Church
Kick-off Sunday // Reg Toews

Forest Grove Community Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 11:28


Reg Toews teaches on mission/vision/values for our kick-off Sunday.

Pipeline Show Media RSS Feed
The Pipeline Show Sep9 2022

Pipeline Show Media RSS Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 143:22


Coming Down the Pipe... [0:00] - The new intro for Season 18 of The Pipeline Show [1:27] - Guy begins the episode with some quick news and notes before getting to the guest list. [12:23] - We start looking ahead for the WHL's East Division with the Brandon Wheat Kings and head coach Don MacGillivary. [34:30] - The Regina Pats are in the spotlight next with John Paddock, the GM and head coach of the team with the planet's most talented 17-year-old on it. [52:30] - From Regina it's to cross province rival Saskatoon as Blades General Manager Colin Priestner pulls back the curtain on his team. [1:19:23] - The re-branding is complete and now the new-look Moose Jaw Warriors are ready to take flight on what promises to be a big year. Head Coach Mark O'Leary is my guest. [1:38:36] - The Prince Albert Raiders have a new head coach in Jeff Truitt who is on the show this week to preview the coming year for his club. [1:58:37] - The Winnipeg ICE were the top team in the WHL last regular season but can they be even better than that this year or will they take a step back? Mike Sawatzky from the Winnipeg Free Press isn't sold. [2:21:59] - Guy wraps up the episode for the week.

Here & Now
Cree tribal leader speaks on stabbings; Netflix film explores 'worth' of 9/11 victims

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 42:47


It's been a tragic week for Saskatchewan's Cree Nation, following the stabbing spree that killed 10 and injured another 18 on Sunday. Both suspects are deceased. Tribal Chief Mark Arcand is the head of the Saskatoon's Tribal Council, and also a mourner who lost a sister and nephew in the attacks. Arcand joins us. And, the Netflix film "Worth" tells the story of attorney Kenneth Feinberg who administered the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund. The film is based on Feinberg's book "What is Life Worth." We revisit our 2021 conversation with Feinberg and his office administrator, Camille Biros.

Hardcore Haven
Ep. 62 - Lance Wright Controls The Show - (Sept. 12th & 19th, 1995 - ECW TV)

Hardcore Haven

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 133:24


It's time for Luke Pennock & Brendan Flaherty to review episode 125 and 126 of ECW, from September 12th & 19th, 1995. Luke watches the wrong pair of episodes! Quite possibly Cactus Jack's most infamous promo! Old timers facetiming each other and chugging wine! Double dog collars and more swerves than your shopping cart during Sears Days. All this and a heckton more. Support us on Patreon! Only a buck for our THREE WEEK PUSH! https://www.patreon.com/hardcorehaven/ IG & Twitter: @hcorehavenpod Contact us: hardcoreahavenpod@gmail.com Luke on Twitch: http://www.twitch.tv/pukelennock/ Logo by Raymond Biesinger Theme song by RANX

Nuus
Kanadese gemeenskap geruk deur massa-mesaanval

Nuus

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 0:33


Die Kanadese koninklike berede polisie se ondersoek na die massa mes-aanval duur voort. Die laaste voortvlugtige Myles Sanderson is in hegtenis geneem maar het kort daarna aan meswonde beswyk. Sy boer is reeds Maandag dood aangetref. Internasionale media berig dat die klein gemeenskap in Saskatchewan geruk is deur die aanval, die ergste in die land se geskiedenis. Tien mense is dood en 18 beseer. Tydens 'n emosionele nuuskonferensie het die hoof van die Saskatoon-stamraad, Mark Arcand, wie se suster, Bonnie Burns en haar 28-jarige seun Gregory, onder die vermoordes was.

Live from Studio 5 on AMI-audio
Introducing John Loeppky

Live from Studio 5 on AMI-audio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 10:05


We introduce our newest columnist John Loeppky from Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. From the September 7, 2022 episode.

Live from Studio 5 on AMI-audio
Full Show - Episode 628

Live from Studio 5 on AMI-audio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 104:45


Today on NOW with Dave Brown, Kelly Bron Johnson explores the importance of creating a work-life balance for parents during this back-to-school season. Shane Baker shares some tips and techniques to practicing mindfulness and relaxation. Derek describes an upcoming CNIB orientation session about guide dog rights. We introduce our newest columnist John Loeppky from Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. And, Ryan Delehanty chats about the newest episodes of AMI-tv's “Our Community.” This is the September 7, 2022 episode.

UBC News World
Call Saskatoon's Best Furnace Service Company For Routine Maintenance & Repairs

UBC News World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 2:24


If you're looking to repair or service your furnace in preparation for winter, these Saskatoon HVAC professionals offer fast, affordable, and effective services. Call them at +1-306-230-2442 or visit https://proservicemechanical.com/heating/furnace-repair (https://proservicemechanical.com/heating/furnace-repair) to request a free quote now.

The Clean Energy Show
Don't Charge Your Electric Vehicles and Definitely Don't Charge Your E-Bikes

The Clean Energy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 57:07


The U.K. Conservatives have elected a new PM, Lizz Truss, who doesn't like to look at solar panels. Battery fires get E-Bikes banned in New York City public housing. California pays poorer people not to own cars. General Motors offers to buy out Buick dealers who don't want to get with the electric future. A word for all the awefull people who fear a green future. California suffers its worst drought in twelve hundred years and you can't put gas in a gas car without electricity. Also this week: Pipeline patrol planes Russia cuts off the gas yet again American Top 40 used to get sent to radio stations on vinyl LPs says Brian Germany offers cheap train passes to offset high energy prices France is looking to cut energy use by 10% which means lowering the thermostat to 19 degrees/66 F. Ethanol plants can give off terrible pollution that is harmful. Tesla Canadian factory rumors. All about Metathesiophobia from a Chevy Bolt owner Feedback on our light pollution episode from May End-of-life batteries from electric vehicles are not likely to be the primary source of recyclable material until the mid-2030s, according to Benchmark Mineral Intelligence Trump goes on nonsensical rant about electric cars: 'We need to rid of them' Four years of Boston Consulting Group's US electric vehicle sales forecasts, compiled by RecurrentAuto show how bad EV adoption predictions are.  Electric school buses in Massachusetts provided energy back to the grid for more than 80 hours this summer, helping to reinforce the grid during some of the hottest summer days when electricity was most in demand. 10 of 13 ‘Flagship' CCS Projects Failed to Deliver, IEEFA Analysis Concludes. Thanks for listening to our show! Consider rating The Clean Energy Show on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you listen to our show. Follow us on TikTok! Check out our YouTube Channel! Follow us on Twitter! Your hosts: James Whittingham https://twitter.com/jewhittingham Brian Stockton: https://twitter.com/brianstockton Email us at cleanenergyshow@gmail.com Leave us an online voicemail at http://speakpipe.com/cleanenergyshow Tell your friends about us on social media! Transcript of this episode  (done by A.I.) News anchor: The United Kingdom Conservative Party announced Monday that Liz Trust was selected as its new leader. Lizz Truss: It's an honor to be elected as leader of the Conservative and Unionist Party. And I think one of the most depressing when you're driving through England is seeing fields that should be full of crops or livestock, full of solar panels. Various people: You got to be kidding me. You got to be kidding me. You're kidding me. You're kidding me. You're kidding me, right? Are you kidding me? Are you kidding me? Are you kidding me? Are you kidding me? Are you kidding me? Are you kidding me? Yeah. Nope. Hell, no. Brian: Hello, and welcome to episode 130 of the Clean Energy Show. I'm Brian Stockton, James: And that must be I'm James Whittingham, and this week, British conservatives have indeed elected their new PM, and she doesn't like the site of solar panels. Oh, Boris. Who would have thought I'd ever miss your puffy ass? And you know, that thing on your head? In a shocking announcement, General Motors offers to buy out any Buick dealers that don't want to sell electric vehicles. It's shocking because I had no idea Buick still existed. I learned a new word that describes everyone you hate on Twitter. And it's not donkey knobbler. Nobler California suffers an unprecedented heat wave and the worst drought in 1200 years. Worst of all, it's become unfashionable to say, but it's a dry heat. All that and more on this edition of the Clean Energy Show. Also on this edition of I hope you're not wearing white, because it's after Labor Day. Brian, the pipeline plane that flies over my house is flying lower than expected. Much lower. Californians are asked not to charge their electric cars. Russia has a clog in their oil pipes again. And a wildfire warning in Alberta reminds people you can't run a gas pump without electricity. First of all, how's your back this week? Yeah, definitely better. I am walking without a cane for the first time. You literally walk with a cane. I was really walking with a cane. You were literally a hobbled old man for a while. Absolutely. But yeah, I think I'm doing okay. Although I will have to probably switch my seating position halfway through the show. All right. As we record this, our whole province of Saskatchewan in Canada is in international news. And I thought it would be weird if we didn't talk about that. Yeah, we've been having all kinds of emergency alerts on our phones night and day of a terrible tragedy that has taken place on the First Nation and around and for a while, the mass killer has been believed to be hiding in the city that we live in. If you listen to the show and you hear us talking about it while you've heard it in the news, and here we are. We're both here. Brian safe and his farm shelter. Our thoughts go to all the victims. And, yeah, it's not too often we make international news, and sometimes it's for good reasons and sometimes not so good. Let's hope for a good outcome and better things in the future. Yeah. So speaking of our hometown, it came up on a podcast this week. So remember when I retired, I said my retirement project was going to be making my own shoelaces? Yeah. So I learned that from a TV show called Going Deep with David Reese, one of the greatest TV shows of all time. I absolutely loved it. It covered things like how to tie your shoes. Fantastic show, right? Anyway, David Reese and John Kimball have a podcast called Election Profit Makers, and it's a humorous podcast about political commentary, American politics. But they go off on a lot of tangents on the show, which is why I like it. And they started talking recently about the old American Top 40 show with Casey Cases. And so I decided to write them a letter. And they read my letter on the show this week, which was a lot of fun for me. And it mentions our hometown, and we have a clip. Clip of another podcast: Brian writes in: Dear Kidmitas and Long John Silver. As a teenager in the early 1980s, my first real job was as the overnight DJ on CK CK, the Top 40 radio station in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. In addition to overnights, I would often operate the American Top 40 show on Saturday afternoons, and it would come in on four vinyl LPs every week. Incredibles per side. I can't believe they used to do the radio shows on records. Yes. Now he says, I managed to keep a souvenir from my time at this station, and that's the complete vinyl set of the 1983 Top 100 Countdown from American Top 40. And he attached pictures along with a picture of the skyline for Regina, Saskatchewan. It's pretty sweet. I'm telling you. Canada, pretty much every city in Canada has a great skyline. James: That one guy sounds like me. And going off on tangent sounds like us. Brian: Yeah, there's a very similar dynamic on the show there, I would say. And perhaps I'm the straight man, you're the funny man. But, yeah, they like to talk about skylines. That's one of the tangents, the aesthetic qualities of city skylines. And so they appreciated the skyline of our city. And, yeah, in their opinion, most Canadian cities have a fantastic looking skyline. And I don't know, I would have to kind of agree. Yeah, sure. They're not bad. I remember somebody from going through town once, I told the story in the show before. I was going to a newspaper conference, a student newspaper conference in Winnipeg. And he went through Johnny, he said, hey, your town looks brand new, because he just drove by to look at the skyline. And it's all glassy towers. At least it was 30 years ago when I was in university. And apparently wherever they were from didn't have that. And the other nice thing about our skyline, it rises out of a completely flat prairie. It's very unusual to have a city built on a completely flat thing. But then the other part of the call so, yeah, it makes me sound super old to be relating this story, but I used to operate the American Top 40 show. It came in on records. They would make a record every week, four LPs. And that's how we would play the show on the radio. That is amazing. In the mail, I guess. I don't remember, but so I have the complete Top 100 countdown from 1983. It was usually meant to be played, like, on New Year's Eve. You start at 04:00 p.m.. The show wraps up at midnight top 100 hits of the year. So next year it'll be the 40th anniversary of this 19 8100. So I've always been ready to have like a New Year's Eve party or something where we play the 1983 Top 100 countdown. But I don't know. Then I'd have to stay up till midnight, which I don't think I would. Oh, that's tough for you. That's tough for you. You'd need an injection of some sort. Yeah. So huge. Thanks to David and John and the election profit makers show. That was a lot of fun. And you can go on ebay and discogs and you can find them for sale. You can buy them. Sometimes I think the one I've got is probably worth a couple of something. Was it like the Casey case I'm talking was on vinyl too? Oh, yeah, everything. So you didn't have to do anything. I would have to insert the commercial break so he would say, and coming up next, right after this and then you'd have to pause the turntable, play the commercials and then start the turntable back up again. Have you ever paused a turntable while it was playing someplace? And I went, don't remember doing that. No. But we used to play songs on carts. They were sort of like eight tracks. That's how all the songs were played on the station. So sometimes there's a few songs that have pauses in them. Like the music stops for a second. So sometimes for fun, we would pause the pause for a little extra. You dirty bastards. On late night radio, screwing is a lot of fun. You rebel. That's funny and weird. So that's our broadcasting heritage here at the Clean Energy Show. Well, that is so weird. Like, you've never mentioned that to me before. That's such a weird thing. I wonder if it was just practical because they could stamp them out at the time. Like nowadays they could stamp a CD, I suppose. Yeah. There were enough stations to play the show. There must have been a lot they would have had to make. Yeah, like 1000 or 2000, maybe, who knows? Well, I was driving into my North Regina subdivision, I guess, made in the late 70s so it's still at the edge of the city. And I saw a plane flying over the subdivision here. From a different perspective, it was the pipeline plane, from a different perspective, wasn't flying over here. I thought the damn thing was landing like it was so low. So I was kind of curious. And I used a flight Tracker 24 software online than in my app to track it sometimes to see where it's going. And it says Calibrated 2100ft, but I thought that was 2100ft because that's where the air ambulance, helicopters fly. It's not, though. It's not above terrain. It's above sea level. And we're 1900ft above sea level. So that sucker is 200ft above the ground. Yeah. And this is the plane. I've got a toy drone, Brian, that almost goes that high. And if I hacked it, it would like it's a very serious subject, but it's not out of the question that anybody could be flying a drone at a couple of hundred feet and run into this airplane, which, by the way, inspects the pipeline for leaks. Yeah. So I did some research on pipeline inspection planes. They call them pipeline patrol pilots. And apparently in the old days, not that long ago, they would fly 50 to 100ft off the ground. Now, I'm sure they wouldn't do that over a city because there would be cell towers and things like that. And by the way, a cell tower is probably that high in some cases, so that's interesting. But somebody died in Edmonton in 2013 doing it because they were taking pictures. Their job is to take photographs and fly the damn plane by themselves. Wow. Well, I remember I made a film one time where we rented a helicopter and we filmed some stuff from a helicopter. And my recollection back then was a thousand feet was as low as the helicopter was allowed to go over the city when we were flying over the city to take some shots. So the pipeline planes must have their own special kind of regulation. It gives us PTSD here, it sounds like World War II because they sound like they're flying right over your head. Incoming. Always yell incoming when it comes to my family, just as a joke. Nobody gets it, but I am using myself. And that's how it goes. That's all that matters. Yeah, this plane just does the pipeline through the small city we live in of 200,000 people or so. Just does that stretch. So it takes off and lands in about less than 15 minutes and it's done its whole work. Wow. The other day, though, I tracked it and it took off and did it twice, and then it took off down the pipeline, which also splits our bedroom community of Emerald Parkwite City diagonally. Just splits it in half. You're on the wrong side of the pipeline. I know, but, well, it's still fun. And there's lots of golfers out there. And I heard on the radio that they're going to stop poisoning the little bastards. They can be annoying, the Richardson ground squirrel, which we have here in abundance, and they will reproduce. They will come into my yard and eat my strawberries and assert themselves and get cocky. I've spent lots of time staring at them and they chirp. They make this high pitched chirp and it's just really irritating after hours. It's kind of bad, like having a really nasty crow around or something. By the way, the crows disappeared. I mentioned that. We started the summer, lost the crows, they're gone. I don't know who shot them or ate them or whatever. So they're gone? Yes, they're moving on. CBC had a new story that perhaps my ears up on California. I guess the government down there asked them to not charge your EVs. Try not to use too much electricity in those key hours. And the key hours are between 04:00 p.m. And 09:00 p.m.. Even electric cars, supposedly a long term solution to fossil fuel usage, are part of this problem. Owners of Tesla's and other Ecars are being asked not to charge their vehicles during that five hour period, prompting some to ask questions about an eventual complete conversion to electric cars. Severn. Vormstein is with the University of California. There's no way we could keep up right now if we suddenly went to 100% clean cars. What do you think of that? Yeah, well, it's annoying because of course we can't immediately switch to 100% electric cars. It's a gradual thing, but there's certainly a number of factors being stacked on top of one another that is turning this into a much more difficult year for energy grids than I think we ever expected. So with California, it's this massive heat wave. They're well over 100 degrees Fahrenheit in California and the worst drought in 1200 years. Did you see that? No. This is the worst drought in 1200 years in the western United States. Well, it's been a weird pattern. And I heard somebody say that it was El Ninja. The ocean current was sticking around for a second and possibly third winter. Wow. And that has done weird things. And one of the things is bunched up the systems in North America. So we got this big ridge going way up to Alaska, and that gets hot. And we get hot here in central western Canada. And yesterday was the hottest day on record for Regina for this day. Yeah, it was the second hottest day of the summer. The hottest day of the summer was also in September, where it got to 36 deg. It's crazy. I mean, that's never happened before, ever. I've lived here almost all my life, and I was at a weather geek when I was a kid. I paid attention to these things and yeah, it's weird. So I heat my pool with solar panels, like thermal solar panels, and it's the first time I've ever been in the pool in September without a gas heater in my pool. And it's weird because it doesn't work as well as it does in June. The sun goes down early, and it goes behind trees, my neighbors trees. So the pool itself gets shaded. And it's unpleasant to be in there when you're not in the sun. So it takes a longer time to heat up anyway. It's just weird. Yeah. And of course, the other thing that's happening with a massive drought and this is not just California, but places in Europe is happening, too, is the hydroelectric cannot run at full capacity because they just don't have the water behind the dams that they normally do. So the Hoover Dam, lake Mead. There was another mob body found the other day in Lake Mead. So Lake Mead is the reservoir for the Hoover Dam. Produces lots of hydroelectric power, but it's down to something like 30% of its maximum level now. And so they can't generate as much electricity as normal. And, yeah, they're finding bodies now. The water is so low, they're finding bodies in there that have been there for decades. And the rivers are low in Germany, so you can't transport coal. And the water is too hot to cool some of the nuclear plants in, I believe, France. And now, this isn't a hundred years from now, this isn't 50 years from now. All this weird stuff is happening now. Posing problems for non solar and wind. I would say yes. And the only thing I would mention here is I think we talked about it, but there's a Tesla virtual Power plant pilot project going on in California. So they've run it three times now, and they're probably running it again today. So today is expected to be perhaps the biggest peak of this energy crisis in California. They may have to go to blackouts today in California as we record this because they may not be able to produce enough energy. But anyway, it's not enough to save the grid. But these virtual power plants in California can output up to 50 MW, which is a promising start. Imagine eventually when every home has a backup battery that would be enough to kind of stabilize these problems with the grid. But I thought that was super encouraging. And when called upon, they can all shoot power to the grid at up to 50 MW, apparently. And 50 MW is five times the peak capacity of the solar plant that I visited in Saskatchewan. What are the first ones that came on? The only ones that they're allowing now is 10 MW. So 10 is five times what that is. And that just further illustrates how puny that solar farm from SAS power is. Yeah. So they're expecting rolling blackouts is expected to be 115 deg today in Sacramento. That's 46 Celsius. That would be a record. And people are going to turn on the air conditioners. They're telling people not to charge their electric cars, especially during peak hours. I don't think people do because in California there's like peak energy demand, right? Yeah. I was posting this on Twitter. If you have an EV, you can get a special plan on the grid. There the utility and they'll charge you less overnight. So if you have an EV plan, you pay, I don't know, it's a third or something like that of what the demand is during the day, in the early evening, and then you can charge all you want from eleven on or something. Yeah, and that's a good example of how we are going to adapt and we're not going to switch to 100% electric cars overnight. But that's one of the strategies going forward as we slowly transition to electric. And I should say I think it's like $0.25 overnight. So that's almost twice what we're paying. I guess ours are creeping up too, but twenty five cents per kilowatt hour per kilowatt hour. That's still kind of pricey. It's not like the $0.03 that some places are talking about charging EV owners to charge overnight. But that is one way your neighbors will say, well, the grid can't handle it because they write it out a meme on Facebook, that's BS. If we charged overnight, we have the capacity to meet what the peak demand is and it falls off overnight. And there's lots of buffer there between what overnight use is and what the peak is that you could charge in some grids right now. You could just charge all the electric. If everybody had an electric car, you could charge them all and it'd be fine because they're only charging for a couple of hours too, like at most usually. Yeah. And it's an example of how these grids just need to plan and manage. And just the extreme weather that we're having this year is kind of revealing, maybe, who has done the best planning and who has not. I mean, the governor could have easily said don't cook supper in your oven or don't do a load of laundry. But they went after electric cars and said don't charge them. And very few people are charging them anyway. What they need to do is say turn up your thermostat by a degree or two and just take it easy because the peak we don't want to rolling black. And do your thing if you can, if you want to, and then the industry can help with that as well. They can slow down their shifts at factories or whatever, but yeah, so we'll see what happens if there are in fact, I guess there are 5000 MW short of its power supply, peak demand, that's forecasted by the computers. And that will hit at 05:30 P.m. Pacific, which is a couple of hours after we're recording this. Yeah, we'll see how that goes. Russia has again stopped supplying gas to Germany through the pipeline that we've been talking about over the past few weeks on the show. So again, Russia has said, no more gas for you. Germany, they were trying to build up gas reserves in Germany. And Germany has said finally, that they are still planning to close those three nuclear power plants that are scheduled to close by the end of the year. They're going to go ahead with it, but the kind of compromise is they're going to keep two of them on standby, whatever that means. I guess if they completely mothballed everything, they couldn't start it up again. But they're going to not completely mothball everything and have two of the three on standby until April so that they possibly could be restarted if they need to. There's a remarkable thing that you talked about last week. If you missed last week's show, you might want to go listen to that because there's a lot of stipulations going on with those plants that they have to fix or not fix. And it's a challenge. Yeah. No, I often think about Mad Max. The Mad Max movies, which I love. And it's all based around gasoline because it's the wasteland in Australia and gasoline is the precious resource after society has collapsed. But if we were to have this Mad Max future now, it'd really be solar panels and batteries would be the precious resource. And it's a much, much simpler thing than having to make gasoline and store gasoline or process it or whatever you have to do. And the same thing with nuclear power plants. Like, a nuclear power plant is not going to be much use in a post apocalyptic world because it's too complicated to run. And yeah, so I did enjoy that segment on last week's show. It's not as simple as just deciding to keep a plant open or close it. Nuclear power plants have so many rules and regulations and laws, they would literally have to change the laws in Germany to keep those power plants open. And hats off to the employees of the nuclear power plants in the Ukraine, which are essentially prisoners of the Russians and who have decided, because speaking of not being used in an apocalypse, well, you have to have the expertise there, and they're basically forcing them to be there. It's just a horrible situation. And Brian, speaking of emergency alerts, we've gotten a whole bunch of alerts, but Alberta has some emergency alerts that I'm going to make fun of or at least make light of because Jasper National Park in Alberta straddling the Alberta BC border. It is arguably one of our national park's best areas. It's amazing. So beautiful and less touristy than bank because it's a bit more out of the way. It is experiencing, unfortunately, a wildfire due to the heat wave that we've been talking about. And it was started by lightning. But here's what the CBC news story said about it said before Jasper lost power Sunday evening, the Alberta Emergency Alert System advised residents to prepare for a possible power outage in the town of Jasper, including advising people to fill up their vehicles fuel tank as gas stations rely on electricity. And people come to us and say what do you do with the power comes out? They come up with those parking lots with their EVs and they say what do you do if the power goes out? As if they run out of extension cords. The fact is you charge them and you have hundreds of kilometers of range if the power goes out. And then you drive like you would. And if the gas station has no power, if you had no power, you could drive to where there is power and charge it up if you needed to. Yeah. And Jasper has always had kind of an isolated electricity system because it's in kind of a remote place and I think there's only kind of one power line going in and out. So they have frequent blackouts in Jasper. So perhaps the residents are used to this. But I remember being in Jasper a few years ago and the power was out. It was out for hours. But where did we go? We went to the one restaurant or there was a couple that had generators like this happens frequently enough that this restaurant had a big enough generator to keep themselves running. Well, it's wilderness. It's mountain wilderness. You have power lines that are hard to get to. You have to helicopter people in there. That's a perfect place for a battery backup system when they become available. Yeah, and I think they are working on that. They're running generators to do the well, I think the power is out right now. So if anybody in Jasper is listening to us. Hello. Yeah. So General Motors is going to offer buyouts to their Buick dealers. So this is very similar to a story we had last year where they were offering buyouts to Cadillac dealers. So these are sub brands within General Motors. When they offered it to Cadillac dealers, about 320 out of the 880 retailers accepted the offer. And apparently the buyouts for the Cadillac dealers was in the range of $300,000 to a million dollars a payout to get them to stop selling Buicks or stop selling Cadillacs. And this is because General Motors realizes they have too many dealerships. They cannot go forward with this many dealerships in an electric vehicle future. So this is a sign of the times and good on General Motors for planning for the future like that and we'll see how it goes. So there's about 2000 Buick dealers and they're all going to be offered this deal and some of them will have to go away. And of course switching to an EV dealership is going to be perhaps an expensive proposition. There'd be money involved and so I think this is a buyout, really, for the kind of the smaller dealerships that don't think that they can make enough money off of EVs. As we've discussed many times, they don't need oil changes, they need much less maintenance. It's for those dealerships that just think they don't want to make the effort or spend the money to go to EVs because they don't think it's going to be worth it. My elderly neighbors will be disappointed because they bought a Buick recently. Oh, really? That's what I said to myself. Oh. I didn't know Buicks existed anymore. Yes. I don't know why they don't just shut out the brand. Because the average age of the buyers got to be in their seventy s. Seventy s? How about one hundred eighty s? One hundred. I'm thinking old people who are living in the don't want to buy a Cadillac or a Buick. But you know, the Cadillac lyric is pretty. It checks all the checkboxes. It takes off a lot of things, fast charging range. But maybe I'll end up with just one of those one of these days. Some more news from Germany. So over the summer, they introduced this really interesting deal for cheap rail in Germany. And they did this because of the high fuel prices in Germany. This is really part of the whole strategy energy crisis in Europe. Fuel is just too expensive. And of course, also the more people drive, the more it contributes to greenhouse gasses. So over the three months of the summer, germany offered for $9, which is about €9 a month, a train ticket to go anywhere in Germany. And this has worked really well. It has saved about one 8 million tons of CO2 from the atmosphere. And yes, people took advantage of this. It makes a lot of sense. And of course, it's not necessarily as possible where we live in the isolated prairies, but when you have a proper rail system, like they do in pretty much all the countries in Europe, why not offer incentives and get people to use it? And it benefits everyone. I wonder if that will spread through Europe just because there's a big crunch coming on energy and maybe that idea will spread and that will also maybe change some people's habits. Yeah, I hope so. And of course, it's also just a bit of a help because gasoline is just so expensive. So it's a way to help out your population and give them a break on the high fuel prices. This is a clean energy show with Brian Stockton and James Whittingham. Brian. The UK finally has a new Prime Minister to replace Mr. Boris Johnson. Right. So, Liz Truss, I haven't seen a picture. What's her hair like? It's more organized, I would say. Definitely more organized. Okay, that's a good sign. It doesn't seem to have a life of its own. It seems fine as every other person in England has normal hair. But not Boris. Yeah, so she's weird. She doesn't like the sight of solar panels. And I think one of the most depressing sights when you're driving through England is seeing fields that should be full of crops or livestock, full of solar panels. The hell is wrong with her? She started as a Social Democrat and she was an anti nuclear activist when she was young, but at some point at university, a switch went off and she became hard. Right. And she's vowed to be a very Conservative Conservative because that's what she campaigned on. I always think it's fantastic when I see a field of solar panels, but also Agravoltaics, which you talk about frequently. You can have both. You can have crops and solar panels. You can have sheep grazing, you can have goats grazing. It's a win win. It's sad that she's insane. It's sad that she's dumb about this, as many people in her party are, but, you know, there's only 14% of Brits are against the net zero plan for us. Johnson 14% of people are against sunny days. That's unheard of. Like, there's a very strong support for clean energy in that zero. Yeah. So that's a weird stand for her to she's making it a sort of culture war, using the climate as a culture war thing. She doubled down on her comments during the leadership campaign that farmers feel shouldn't be full of solar panels, and several Conservative MPs have raised it. And solar farms in the UK currently account for 0.8% of total land use. That's very little land use right now under the government's net zero plan. Solar farms. This is getting rid of climate change, right? Addressing climate change, Paris Accord targets and all that over the next 30 years would be .6% of all land use. About half of 1% of land use would be solar in the UK. And that's not accounting for efficiency improvements as we move forward. We'll need less panels, and maybe there'll be different ways to deploy them. Yeah, it's a strange thing to plant a flag on. Anyway, Brian, I just want to add one thing. Solar energy. UK says that this amount of land use will be less than the amount of land currently used for golf courses. That is the .6% of UK land. And saving the freaking planet is less than golf courses. No. And golf courses are kind of notoriously bad for the environment because they take up so much space for the enjoyment of so few people and they take so many resources to water and maintain those lawns that apologize to golfers. Let's take all the golf courses in the world and just put solar panels on them. That would be great. All right, so, staying in Europe again, European energy crisis. France is looking to cut their energy use by about 10% this year. So, again, energy crunch. France is having problems with their nuclear plants. They aren't able to share as much energy back and forth with other countries like Germany who's having their problems. So coming into the winter, they have said that they want to cut energy use by about 10%. So in the winter, this is going to mean setting your thermostat in your house at about 19 Celsius or 66 Fahrenheit, which is a genuine sacrifice. I would not want to do that. We've been very spoiled of just being able to kind of set the temperature. So 19 would be freezing for me. Yeah. Where am I? I'm around 21, I think. Winter has been so far behind us and yet so close to tennis. But that's up. It's up. When I first moved to this house, I was a 20 degree man. Brian. Yes. Now that I'm old, I'm not making energy anymore in my body. I'm just getting old. I'm supposed to eat less. That's why the seniors menu 55 plus is cheaper at Denny's, because I'm supposed to eat less. Yeah, I don't feel like you feel like you do the same thing I did when I was 20. There's going to be a lot of sweaters sold in France. That's all I got to say about that. Yeah, get into the sweater business and Brian from the Nebraska examiner and I know you have subscription, Brian. Do you have a subscription to that one? No, but next time I'm on the PressReader app, I will look for the Nebraska shout out to the Nebraska examiner staff. A southwest Iowa ethanol plant has been ordered to pay $10,000 fine for its repeated air emissions of excessive cancer causing compounds in the last five years. I live near an oil refinery, heavy oil operator refinery. And I complained about the smell and I told you that there's an author and a team of journalists looking at that over four years and they're looking to go to ethanol and stuff like that and biofuel fuel for planes and stuff like that. They're trying to diversify and there's even canola crushing plants going up around it. But this proves to me the reason why I mentioned it is that even these plants can have horrible emissions like formaldehyde. This plant was spewing out formaldehyde and other byproducts of its fermentation process that are known to have adverse health risk like cancer. So actual harm to the environment and public health may have occurred since this order from the Iowa Department of Natural Resources and due to the amount of pollutants that were and are being admitted. So, yeah, it's just something to keep in mind when you think that, oh, good, your refinery is going bio. It can be bad for you as well if you live near one. Yeah, no, I've never been a fan of the bio fuels. It's a stop gap that we probably don't need. Okay. So rumors are heating up about a possible Tesla factory here in Canada. Public companies have to disclose their lobbying efforts. So Electric and others have reported on this. Apparently Tesla is looking at Quebec and Ontario for some type of factory. I mean, it could be a car factory, could be a battery factory, could be both, who knows? What's your bet? Where's your bet going right now? I'm thinking it will be a car factory, and I'm thinking Quebec. There is a long history of not only automobile production in Ontario and Quebec, but also mining a lot of the minerals. And of course, Tesla is trying to local source as many of the minerals and metals and stuff needed for electric cars for the batteries. So, yeah, best case scenario, a battery and car plant. And I'm leaning towards Quebec, but that's really just a guess. I'm leaning towards not being a normal car plant. Like not XYZ three, not a full blown thing. No, it could be batteries or it could be something weird like cyber trucks and semis. That's my guess. Yes. Because they both take up a lot of batteries. So maybe they'll just make the batteries for those two things and I don't know, they'll be able to transport them to the east coast because that's kind of one of the challenges of the Texas plant, is having to transport all that stuff to the other half of the country and the eastern half. Yeah, and like I say, there's a huge history of doing this. Like all the major car brands have factories or have had factories in Ontario and Quebec, in Canada. So clearly there's a decent reason to do it. If others have done it, then probably it'd be a work for Tesla. And on the Great Lakes, that's a port. That's access to a port. So if you wanted to ship to Europe, that's another option. Yeah, it's not just the eastern part of North America is a shorter shipping route to Europe where a lot of these things are going to be bought over the next little while. So, once again, I know I mentioned this a lot, but I was on the Chevy Bolt user group that is largely the United States. There's so many people there compared to Canada. That is a post every couple of minutes and it eats up my Facebook feed, but I always find it interesting. Brian there's a guy named Randy Moffatt, which is interesting because I went to high school with the person with that name and the fear of change. This is something that he pointed out in a Facebook post talking about all the hate that EV owners were getting. And so he came into this and he said, the fear of change has a word, it's called oh God. Meta the SEO phobia. No. You do. Finland pronunciations. Why can't you do this? No, I think you did it slowly, but you did it above. So it is the fear of change. And I hadn't heard of this one before. Have you heard of that? One. I've heard lots of phobias. Yeah, this is basically what's going on in the world. If you were looking at Facebook hate and people uncomfortable with DVS. So why do they give a crap? I mean, you could say, well, they're forced to in 2035 or in California and other places, but that's not really a pressing issue right now. It's not here before us. Why do people hate on EV so much? And it is a fear that people are going through, a fear of change. And the fear of change is evolutionary in humans. Our internal predispositions teach us to resist change, mainly to always feel in control. So these people are feeling out of control on these people who like to feel in control the most in our comfort zone. Yeah. And of course, it isn't just a hatred of EVs. It's just a reaction to people are scared about getting off fossil fuels, which seems like a weird thing to us because it's a whole new dawn of a fantastic new day. It's nothing but good news getting off fossil fuels. But yeah, people are just scared about change. And you see it a lot in Alberta, our neighboring oil province, where people are just absolutely dead set on sticking with what they know, which is oil and gas. Here's a quip from YouTube. We are all afraid of the uncertainty that comes with change. We would rather things be not so great then go through the risk and process of change. This specific phobia can reduce one's will to live. So this is pretty extreme. Wow. The phobes who have this often feel like they have no control over their lives on the cost and changes. She tends to live in the past and may also be depressed. So there you go. Therefore, you make them unwilling to move. So Randy says on this Facebook post, I became interested in computers in the early 1970s and learned a program so that's very early, like, very few people were doing it back then. I was always on the cutting edge of technology. The amount of hate was palatable with people accusing me of being a Satanist. Randy S from the States, where there's lots of, you know, Baptists and religion and stuff, people said they would never own one. This is a computer. Okay, yeah. So we are going through this again. He says. However, now the government is issuing mandates for this transition to EV is making the fear even worse. When I got my first EV almost nine years ago, I had neighbors calling me crazy. My next door neighbor said he would never own one. Last weekend he told me he just ordered his third. So be patient, be nonconfrontational, just set a quiet example and someday, just like computers, they will figure it out. And I thought that was a great post. I wanted to share with their listeners. This happens all the time. Like, I follow photography and cameras and stuff. And there's a move now from optical viewfinders to electronic viewfinders and cameras, and it's progressed enough that people have accepted it. But two or three years ago, you had people just hatred for electronic viewfinders on cameras. Like, people just hated the idea of it, and one by one, they're all moving to it. It happened too quickly for them to comprehend. I don't know. As soon as I found out about it, I thought it was fantastic, and I couldn't wait to switch. So, yeah, this is definitely a mindset. Conservatives versus progressive. I had one on a point and shoot camera 15 long time ago, a lot of years ago in the digital camera age. Didn't care for it, of course. They weren't focused. You couldn't do anything. I'm sure they're getting a lot better, and I've not actually used one myself. It was very clear to me early on it was the way of the future. But, yeah, people just take much longer, generally speaking, to catch on. All right, let's stick it to the mail bag. The user feedback this week comes from Doug in Colorado, who wrote about our May 2 show. Doug, you're behind. You put a lot of catching up to do. Take some time off work if you have to. Binge listen our show. So he says to us, thank you for highlighting the problem of light trespass from harsh, glaring Led street light fixtures. And he says an excellent resource is the International Dark Sky Association. They have everything people need to know about light pollution, including model lighting ordinance. And also, thanks for coming to Ups. Replacement gasoline, mail delivery, van, contract debacle. Hoping canada learns from the United States. US is making big mistakes and hopefully pushes Canada to do much better. Yeah, so I vaguely remember talking about Led lighting back in May. That was a long time ago. Led lighting, I think what we said at the time, it's a fantastic opportunity to upgrade things and make it better and reduce light pollution. But since Led lights are still kind of new technology, a lot of the designs aren't great. Cities don't quite know how to implement them yet. And yeah, a lot of the times they're just too harsh. But, yeah, my pet peeve is the brightness. We have the ability now to put them on timers and control the brightness. So street lights could come on at full power, kind of in the dusk times, and then you could eventually back those off at three in the morning, just turn all the street lights down. And if you've ever been out in the middle of the night, you don't need a whole lot of light to see once your eyes are adjusted. I'm surrounded by a ridiculous amount of light pollution. I'm thankful that they changed the street lights in our neighborhood here to Led that have a slight warmth to them, and they're less bright than the previous, I would say overall they disperse them better, and they even that out, and that's fine. However, my neighbor across the street, across the boulevard, he's the person with the police stickers all over his house, he's scared of getting killed. And he's got this bright white LEDs just glaring on his property like a landing strip for an airport. And then across the Pipeline Field, which is, I don't know, 50 meters across, 50 yards across, there's another guy who has a giant white light in his backyard, and it shines, and I can see the gophers and anything going around in the night. And then there's a school there as well, which is further away from me, but they have this anti never do well lighting to keep people from doing things there, because people do do things. But it's blindingly bright, and it shines in my drapes, and it's a long ways away, and it's light pollution. And all these lights that I speak of are not on the spectrum of warmth. So they're the bluer side, and they bounce, and those are the wavelengths that bounce up into the sky the most. And I think I talked about this on the show, but I've got a street light just right outside of my house. And a couple of years ago, the ball went out, and it was the greatest, because I don't want that giant street lamp shining in my windows at night. It was so great. I was very disappointed when they should have rented a bucket truck and went up there and put some tape over it just a little put in a low wattage bulb. And also yesterday I was coming home from Home Depot and I saw two pickup or two trucks with Amazon delivery vehicles on them, like there was four Amazon Delivery Prime trucks, the kinds that look like the EVs that they're coming out in the States. So, of course, I went and checked them out and saw the giant tailpipes on them. Was very disappointed. But they looked those four transit vans converted, and they should look they should be EVs, and they're not. We don't have those around here. We have a third party delivery service, don't we, in Virginia? No, it hasn't been great for electric sort of trans advance around here. Yeah, but there was one place remember last week we talked about a place in Saskatoon? They got one for delivering at a bakery, and it's just and they're saving money, handover it's free. They said there's paying for the payments to save money. They save for the payments for the new vehicle. So how great is that? And of course, we'd love to hear from you. So right now, get out your pen. Get out your typewriter. Cleanenergyshow@gmail.com. Write us with an angry letter. Tell us when we're wrong. Tell us when you agree or disagree with us. We're on Twitter. We're on TikTok Clean Energy Pond as our handle. And don't forget to check out our YouTube channel for all kinds of things going on. We got two YouTube channels. I dare you to find the second one that has the audio on the podcast. Probably can't do it. Leave us a voicemail@speakpipe.com cleanenergyshow. You know, it's been ages since anybody left us a voicemail at SpeakPipe, so be fantastic if somebody did that. Yes, we'll mention your name and your birthday. So mention your birthday. We'll mention your birthday. Here we go. Brian. The Clean Energy Show Lightning Round, where we breeze through the headlines and end the show on a fast pace. End of life batteries from electric vehicles are not likely to be the primary source of recyclable material until the mid 2030, according to Benchmark Mineral Intelligence. Yeah, I think we talked about that last week of the week before that. It's going to be a very slow ramp up because electric vehicle batteries are just lasting way longer than people thought. Our friend Donald Trump has gone on a nonsense, cynical rant about electric cars the other day at a rally. He says we need to get rid of them. The story was on electric and we have a clip, but I'm not going to play the man, okay? I said to myself, how can we cover this and not hear his stupid freaking voice? You already said his name. Which gives me I'm sorry. I like how Steven Colbert does it. They have Twitter. People come up with nicknames, which always makes for him every. But this is very similar to the British PM with the rant about solar panels is kind of the same thing. This is trying to make it into a culture war type of issue. Well, speaking of Britain, I had a computer read his text in a posh British accent. So here it is. A friend of mine wanted to do something for the environment. He went out and bought an electric car and he made a certain trip, I won't say from where, kentucky. And he is a good person. He wants to do what's well, and now he understands, hey, not so good. He bought an electric car and he made the trip often from Kentucky to Washington. And he made it. He would drive down, put the car away and drive back. He was getting like 38 miles per gallon. It took me more time to charge in the damn car than I could spend in a drive in. It took me two and half times. My name is Donald J. Trump, and I'm an idiot. A complete and total idiot. Please enjoy listening to the Clean Energy Show. Hopefully Brian isn't drunk this week. Okay, well, that was a bit added on at the end there, but you get the idea. It makes no sense at all. Yeah, and we all know electric cars work great for road trips. They do. And the author of that electric piece, Freslinber, pointed out that he went from New Orleans up to Quebec, didn't have to stop for more than 30 minutes and he had to dine anyway. I had to eat something and go to the bathroom and stretch his leg. Yeah, it wasn't an inconvenience at all for him and his Tesla. Yeah. With the caveat that the Tesla charging network is definitely the best and the third party charger is maybe not as good and you might still have some issues there. Have you heard of Boston Consulting Group before? Often it is quoted in the news on different things. It is a major consulting group. So four years. This is four years of Boston Consulting groups. US. Electric vehicle sales forecasts. This is something that Wall Street relies on, consulting groups like this. And this is an evolution of how their forecasts have changed. We talked about this type of thing on the show, that people are always revising their forecast and we could have told them differently. So in 2018, they said 21% of sales will be EVs in 2030. This is the United States. Two years later, they said, Oops, 26. Year after that, 42. That's a big jump. And then this year, they're now saying 53%, which is a lot more common. And even that is like, we doubt that. We think it's going to be more than that. Things are going to tip. This is an S Curve adoption, and we're at the steep part of the S Curve. This is going to go up way faster than people think. Just think back to when smartphones were first introduced and everyone's like, that's kind of a weird thing. And then you blink and a couple of years later, everybody had a smartphone. And that's how fast it goes. You're looking at the chart now on our script. Look at where it levels off. It levels off between 55 and 75%. Yeah, they're still kind of doing it wrong. They're still underestimate. Curves of adoption don't level off until around 90%. Like color TVs, cell phones, stuff like that, when the last 10% is the hard to get. Yeah. And I will say, like, manufacturing cars, electric cars, is a lot more difficult, probably, than manufacturing something like a smartphone. So it maybe won't go as quickly as the smartphone, but it is going to go fast. From carbon tracker. Just over 30 solar installations are being carried out every week in Britain, and that is up from 1000 a week just two years ago. So it's tripled the home. That's a lot. The home solar installations have tripled in two years. That's crazy time for CS. Fast fact hawaii produces more renewable energy than all of Canada. Were you sitting down for that? Oh, yes. Your posture is excellent this week, by the way. I'm happy to see your back is better. Yeah, I haven't had to change position, but yeah, we reported a couple of weeks ago they got their last shipment of coal for their last coal fired electricity plant. And that plant did close down just the other day. So that's great. So, yeah, the regulatory consequences are clear. If utilities fail to meet their renewable targets, they are forced to pay penalties, which must be covered by company, the shareholders, and rather than the taxpayers. And that's the way it should be. That should be the lesson for everybody. The shareholders should have to cover it, not the ratepayers. Electric school busses in Massachusetts provided energy back to the grid for more than 8 hours this summer. That is a lot of hours of emergency heat wave protection from buses that weren't doing anything because they are electric. They were sitting around all summer. And this is a great use case in the United States where they have less severe winters, but summer heat waves need that grid backup. And those electric buses which are just starting to trickle in, really, for schools, are there and useful. So that's awesome. Fantastic. Ten of 13 flagship CCS that is carbon capture and Sequestration Rhine SEQUEST projects failed to deliver, according to IEFA analysis, and that's 50% of goals haven't even been reached. And that's what our boundary dam they mentioned. The boundary dam is the first thing they mentioned right here in this catch one. Yeah, we had one of the first carbon capture on a coal plant, and they have captured some carbon, but nowhere near what they thought they were. Mars Technica ebike battery fires are pushing New York City towards a ban in public housing. That is, public housing is banning ebikes. This is quite disturbing, but so is the reason why so poorly made cells, tough work and lack of space, I guess, in these places, are causing deadly rise of fires. A deadly rise of fires in the New York City. That was a lot. I mean, laptops can do that, too. Ebike battery is made up of dozens of individual AA sized batteries wired together and managed by a battery management system. And you were talking last week how you were told that you have to unplug. You can't just keep charging us. Maybe that's the reason. Yes. My ebike doesn't have a battery management system, so you're not supposed to leave it plugged in. But yeah, I could see where this could turn out to be a huge problem. By the way, my partner shops at Shoppers Druckmart, and they had an ebike in there for $250 for the weekend, but it was just this tiny little thing that didn't have pedals, it just had spikes to put your feet on. Yes. Anyway, that's interesting. Sometimes those things are mismanaged. The charging is mismanaged, the faulty, they are damaged, they're waterlogged. But a five year old was killed in a fire, and it's very tragic. And just be careful. If you have an ebike battery, don't read the manual and be aware that you're not supposed to leave it. In many cases, you're not supposed to leave them charging indefinitely, but they're not inherently dangerous either. But anything that is a battery that charges I mean my charge and lead to acid battery in my house for my RV. So you got to be careful. Washington Post amid a bonanza of measures passed to cut the state's carbon emissions in California as fast as possible, the legislature in California approved $1,000 refundable tax credit to poor Californians who don't own vehicles. So it's paying people not to own vehicles if you are poorish. I might even qualify. It will head to the desk of Newton soon and he's going to sign it. He's expected to sign it. The bill offers the tax credit to single filers earning up to $40,000 in joint filers up to $60,000 who live without personal cars. And you can get it whether you make a lot of tax money or not. And you can just get that $1,000 regardless. Yeah, that sounds great. And maybe that's something we'll start to see other places. I've heard the concept before, but this is the first time I've seen it getting passed. Another CS fast Fact from Nat bullard from Bloomberg New Energy Finance. There are 148,026 convenience stores in the United States. OK, 148,000.   What he's saying is look out. Change is coming. And Brian, that is our time for this week. It's been fun as always. Glad you're feeling better. We'd like to hear from you. Remember, contact us at cleanenergyshow@gmail.com and all the rest of the places. And if you're new to the show, remember to subscribe to get our podcast cast every week, and we'll see you next time. See you next week.

ON Point with Alex Pierson
Manhunt Underway For Suspect Involved In Saskatchewan Stabbings

ON Point with Alex Pierson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 23:20


Over the weekend, 10 people lost their lives, and 19 more were injured following a series of stabbings carried out by two alleged suspects. The search for Damien Sanderson, 31, and Myles Sanderson, 30, began early Sunday morning following multiple reports of stabbings on the James Smith Cree Nation (about 200 kilometres northeast of Saskatoon). While police have identified Damien Sanderson as deceased at this moment, Myles Sanderson is still at large, and has a lengthy criminal record. To tell us about the experiences and complexities of this, Alex speaks to Melissa Mbarki of Treaty 4. Melissa also has family on the reserve at the heart of these horrific attacks. Alex also speaks with Jim Van Allen, A threat and Risk Assessment Consultant with Investigative Solutions Network Inc. and Former Manager of the OPP Criminal Profiling Unit.

Daily News Brief by TRT World
September 5, 2022

Daily News Brief by TRT World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 2:21


*) Ukraine retakes 'certain heights' from Russia Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy says that his forces have marked progress in a counteroffensive against Russia that began last week. He thanked his forces for retaking two settlements in the south, a third in the eastern Donetsk region, as well as additional territory – what he called “certain heights” – in the Lysychansk-Siversk region, also in the east. He did not say precisely where the territories were and provided no timeline except to say that he had received "good reports" at a meeting on Sunday from his military commanders. *) Chile resoundingly rejects new progressive constitution Chileans have resoundingly rejected a new constitution to replace a charter imposed by the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet 41 years ago. The 61.9 percent rejection vote, compared to the 38.1 percent for approval dealt a stinging setback to President Gabriel Boric, who argued the document would have ushered in a progressive era. Despite initially backing change, many voters say the wording of the document would have moved the nation too far to the left. *) ​​Flood-hit Pakistan breaches lake to avert overflow Pakistani authorities have deliberately breached the country's largest freshwater lake in the southeastern Sindh province. The operation at Manchar Lake has displaced up to 100 thousand people, but officials say it was necessary to prevent heavily-populated towns from flooding. Pakistan has been hit with record rainfall this monsoon season. Nearly 1,300 people have been killed, including scores of children. *) Canada mass stabbings kill, wound many A series of stabbings in two communities in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan has left at least 10 people dead and 15 wounded. Police are looking for two suspects. The police said that Sunday's stabbings took place in multiple locations on the James Smith Cree Nation and in the village of Weldon, northeast of Saskatoon. Police have issued photos of the men considered armed and dangerous, urging residents to move with caution and to not approach the 'suspicious persons'. And finally… *) Ukrainian firefighters rescue kitten from burning building Ukrainian firefighters in the city of Kharkiv have helped a small, furry survivor over the weekend. The rescuers, wearing full firefighting gear, battled raging flames and smoke to pull a gray-and-white kitten from among the rubble of a hotel-restaurant complex, which was hit by a rocket. Video showed the firefighters petting and cuddling the feline as they carried it to safety.

Forest Grove Community Church
Psalm 51 // Kevin Wiens

Forest Grove Community Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 31:22


Kevin Wiens teaches from Psalm 51 as we continue our Psalms series.

The Morning Edition from CBC Radio Saskatchewan (Highlights)

The children's advocate says she will do a "full investigation" into private schools in Saskatchewan that get public money. We check in with our political panel on that and a date for Saskatoon's byelection with our political panel.

The Clean Energy Show
Green Hydrogen Doubts and Invisible Offshore Wind Turbines

The Clean Energy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 67:18


James visits his first solar farm in Saskatchewan: a single axis bifacial 13mW site near Weyburn. A closer look at Green Hydrogen and Canada's new agreements with Germany to produce it. Brian finally finds an air-source heatpump installer in his home town.  What's faster than a Lamborghini and a Ferrari? A Kia. No joke. Anti-lock brakes are coming to electric bicycles. Dodge has wrecked the idea that electric vehicles will be quiet because the Dodge Charger EV will make noise. A lot of noise. A V8 amount of noise. Will Germany balk at shutting down all of its nuclear power by the end of the year? How far does a wind turbine have to be away from shore before it's not an eye sore: Wind Turbine Visibility and Visual Impact Threshold Distances in Western Landscapes Study link (pdf) Thanks for listening to our show! Consider rating The Clean Energy Show on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you listen to our show. Follow us on TikTok! Check out our YouTube Channel! Follow us on Twitter! Your hosts: James Whittingham https://twitter.com/jewhittingham Brian Stockton: https://twitter.com/brianstockton Email us at cleanenergyshow@gmail.com Leave us an online voicemail at http://speakpipe.com/cleanenergyshow Tell your friends about us on social media! ==transcript== Hello, and welcome to episode 129 of the clean Energy show. I'm Brian Stockton. I'm James Whittingham. This week, I take a closer look at green hydrogen. Apparently, there is a whole, whole rainbow of hydrogen, Brian. Gray, blue, purple, turquoise I'm not even kidding. And even black and white hydrogen. And that's when you watch old footage of the Hindenburg exploding. What's faster than a Lamborghini and a Ferrari? Aka. That's right, Akia. In other news, up is down, black is white, and James is a handsome son of a bitch. You're damn straight. Plus, we asked, and sure enough, there is a study on how far out offshore wind turbines have to be before you can really see them. It's roughly the same distance that France keeps the United Kingdom away. Antilon brakes are coming to electric bicycles. That's right. The nanny state wants you to stop flying over your front handlebars, all in the name of safety. All that and more on this edition of the clean energy show. And also this week, Brian, I visit my first utility solar farm and Dodge. Dodge? Yes. They're making an EV, and they've wrecked the idea that electric vehicles will be quiet, and I'm quite angry about that. And will Germany block it, shutting down all of its nuclear power by the end of the year? I hope you're doing well. You were off last week due to back injury. Yeah, I never thought it would be bad enough that I couldn't record a podcast, but I did contemplate, like, lying flat on my back and somehow getting a microphone. But that would have been so much work to set up. If I had a servant to kind of set all that up for me, I could have done it. Yeah. In the meantime, it's now manageable, I guess, and hopefully it doesn't happen again. It will. It keeps happening. I mean, is this the worst it's ever been? Yeah, I would say so, but I don't know. I feel like I've got a handle on the right stretching that I need to do, so hopefully it's okay. Well, glad to hear, because all the preparation I had for last year, I've forgotten it now. I had a lot ready to go with that. Seemed like distant memories. Now it's only a week ago. Wow. My opening jokes. I wrote those last week. Last week. I thought they seemed dated. Yeah, that news is a little bit stale, but I thought they were both worth talking about. So right after I guess it was Friday, I went to a utility solar farm in Waburn that is an hour and a half south of us. Now, my son and I just he was feeling I basically said, we can't do the vacation he wanted to do. So I said, hey, let's just go on a little road trip. And then I thought, well, maybe I should go look at that solar farm an hour and a half south because it's the direction we haven't gone very often and found it fairly easily. It's not far from the small city of, what, 10,000 people or something like that. And it is the first one that I've seen in our own jurisdiction here ever because they just started putting them online. It puts out up to 10 MW into the system. It's rated at 13, though. So basically in the summer when it goes over ten, they waste whatever is over ten. The grid can't handle it. It's near a substation. What struck me disappointingly, though, was how small it was. Okay, this is run by this is a partnership between, I think, two First Nations, a solar company from Halifax, Nova Scotia, the east coast of Canada that we actually get some information from because I have some questions on the previous show and they're very helpful. But I was struck at how small it was. I haven't seen a lot of solar farms in my day. I've been through California and Arizona, and I probably haven't seen them all down there, but I saw a few, and what I saw were old and big. And this struck me as 2005 ish like it just seemed like, give it the times, man. Yeah, you're late to get on the grid, but what do you need to prove? What about solar? I mean, I've had solar for how many years have you had it? Five or six years now? Yeah, five or six years. We know it works and we're hooked up to the same utility. Why can't you just, I don't know, triple the size of it? But isn't that also encouraging? Because it kind of looks small, but you're still getting 10. Seems pretty good. It's not, though, compared to the size of what they're building now, including in our neighboring province of Alberta, they're building things many times that in one fell swoop. Well, first of all, when I got there, I heard this noise and I thought, oh, solar panels make noise. And I looked up and it was a guy in a riding lawn mower. At first I thought the panels weren't working. So let me describe what this is. This is a single access solar farm. So if you're new to what that is, I'm going to describe it in simple terms. Imagine a rod going from south to north, hoisted up above the ground by about, let's say six or seven, 8ft up. And then the panels are placed elongated on there along that tube, and they rotate to the east in the morning when the sun comes up in the east. And at noon, they're flat. But I was there at 04:00 in the afternoon and they were flat. So I think they made them flat for the guy who was mowing, because there was a few off in the distance that were where they should have been, which is facing west. So they will track the sun from east to west and get more power in the morning than they otherwise would. Ultimately, normally, a fixed panel faces south at the best angle to get the most sun year round over the course of a year. Well, these follow it. So the pattern of that, if you look at the chart that I have there, you know how our charts are. They're kind of a bell curve. Is that fair to say? Yeah. Shaped like a bell? Yes. This one is kind of like a flattened bell, so instead of gradually going up, it shoots up fairly quickly and then it's flat throughout the most of the day up around where our peak is and then comes back down again. So I don't see how it can get as much sun midday as a panel that's fixed and facing an optional direction. Maybe that peak should be a bit lower on that chart that I'm showing you. But that's basically the idea that you put this money into tracking equipment and extra hardware and it will give you more sun throughout the day from the same panels because it will track. And then also, Brian, of course, these are bifacial, so they will pick up sun off the ground, so they're spaced out so that there is some unshadowed ground to pick up. But also when they announced this, they said there was going to be goats and or sheep grazing there, so it could be multi use. But that hasn't happened yet. Maybe eventually it was a bit underwhelming. I was hoping for something bigger. Basically, they're making another one near the landfill in Regina here, and I drove by that on the way home to see what's up with that. It's going they're actually marked out where everything's going to go and they're going to have a battery installation project there. It's just that Brian, we're the sunniest place in Canada. Come on, man, we could do better than this. Plus, we've got like half of our grid is coal powered. We could do better, it seems like. Oh, we don't trust this, we're scared of this. Maybe we need to build a big places near the coal plants, which would work out fairly well because that's part of our sunniest belt is down where the coal plants are. Ironically, that would be cool. Yeah. Well, maybe that's how all the coal ended up there was from all the sunshine. Well, I remember you had a story about coal plants shutting down in the United States and they were putting solar around because the grid ties were already there. Yeah, no, it totally, absolutely makes sense. And yeah, like, of course, on my own house, I've got solar. You've got solar. But I am trying to electrify everything in my house, so I'm quickly finding out that I should have installed maybe three times as many solar panels when I initially did my project. How could you do that? No, there's not much room left, but it is what it is. But I did finally talk to somebody who was willing and HVAC installer, willing to put in an air source heat pump to heat my house. How did you find this person? Just googling and making an inquiry on the web. Okay, where did you make the inquiry to the person you Googled? Yeah, the company. Okay, well, that's cool. Yeah. And I think I had maybe contacted them a few months ago and they never got back to me or everybody's super busy in the trade. But I finally did hear from them and yes, they do air source heat pumps in our ridiculously frigid cold climate. I was just worried I would not ever find somebody who just wasn't even willing to take out a natural gas furnace. But anyway, so it is possible it is being done around here. They also do geothermal, but they don't typically recommend that for urban properties, they prefer to do geothermal. For rural properties, where you have more space, you can do a horizontal pipe rather than if it's in the city, you've got to do a vertical, and those aren't quite as good and very expensive. So this is still expensive in our source heat pump, but it's going to be a lot less than geothermal. And I think this is definitely the way of the future, even around here. So I think I'm probably going to do it. My son was asking me about this because I was telling them and he was saying, why is Brian spending so much money to be first to have a zero footprint? And I said, I don't know. I've just been thinking about it for years and years. As soon as I went solar, my thought was, okay, excellent, I've got the solar. Now how do I get rid of my furnace? It just seemed like the logical next step. It's just you're spending a lot of money on these things and you're not getting the payback for it, you're doing it, and you're not really saving the planet, you're just lowering your own footprint, which is admirable, of course, to everyone listening to the show. Yeah. The catch here is, of course, like 30% of our grid is coal fired. So I think in terms of my carbon footprint, I'll probably end up kind of it'll be a bit of a wash, but of course, eventually the grid here will clean up. And the other thing is, we do have grants available for this in Canada. It's not as generous as the ones recently announced in the US with the biden. What was that called again? Inflation Reduction Act. That's correct, yes. I did the first step, which is apply for the Canada Greener Homes grant. You fill out a thing on the web, so they're going to do an evaluation of my home, and then you get up to five grand for green type renovations, and there's a little bit of a provincial tax rebate, so I might get a couple of grand back there. Yeah, it's expensive. But again, the other impetus was we don't have air conditioning here and so I just didn't want to put in normal air conditioning and then 510 years ago from now have to rip it up because everyone's going to have to get rid of their natural gas in five or ten years. So it's definitely going to cost more than just putting in air conditioning, but it gets rid of my natural gas. So yeah, we'll see how it goes. Will it get rid of your natural gas? Will you use resistive heating as a backup? Yeah, this unit has resistive heater backup which is not efficient. And not cheap to run no, once it hits -20 the heat pump has difficulty so the resistance heat backs up. Right now my natural gas bill is $110 a month, equalized throughout the year, so I should be able to get that to zero. So it probably will still end up costing more than that. It will be probably more than an extra $100. Are we talking water heating here too? Yeah, so the unit that they showed me, it's a Nordic heat pump. It doesn't heat your hot water, but apparently it preheats it. So this is a function of this particular one that they're selling to me. It does like 30% to 50% of your hot water needs, so it sort of preheats your hot water and then you need a regular hot water heater to kind of finish it off. But the idea like I have a natural gas water heater too, so switch that out to a heat pump water heater hopefully. Okay, well, it's tricky where we live because it does get down to -40 it can you have to plan for the worst case scenarios. Yeah, and certainly minus twenty s and thirty s celsius and minus forty fahrenheit celsius is possible. Yeah, but this was super encouraging to find that this is actually being done around here, that we are still going to be the last probably to get off natural gas because this is not going to be cheap and there is a subsidy, but it's still going to be kind of expensive. But yeah, this is totally possible and hopefully I can prove that and report back well, I do expect subsidies to come down in Canada too, eventually because this is planned and we are heavily influenced by what the state does with policy. Sometimes that hurts us and sometimes it helps us. But also heat pumps are generally put into highly insulated houses. It's like an electric car. When you make an electric car, it can do as much as maybe you want it to with the battery size. So you make the cars lighter. You use carbon fiber, you use aluminum, and in the case of a house, you make it the most energy efficient you can. So are you taking any steps there? Yeah, well, we have over the years like we've upgraded the windows. And we have spray foam, a bunch of my bomb shelters spray foam here. As I mentioned last week, it's also patty in case there is a bomb. Nice and soft. And we're doing our part of our roof this year as well. So I was reporting we've got leaks in our roof, so we're going to spray foam that over the next several months so the house will be much better insulated than when we bought it. And then the only thing left to go would be, like, the bedrooms and the living room could still use some extra insulation. So we probably will do that next. But having our vaulted ceiling properly installated will actually help a lot. Oh, Brian, I want to say a shout out to Matthew Pointer, who pulled up beside me and his Tesla yesterday, and much to my daughter's amusement, had a conversation with me between cars. She's never seen that before. I said, Girl, in the old days, people used to stop and talk. Strangers would talk. But he's one of the people in the local EV community, and he had roof racks on his Tesla. I asked him, Why are the roof racks on? And he says, Because I might use them for skiing. And of course, it's not skiing season, water skiing season. I guess it just leaves them on and they're cool roof racks. The Tesla roof racks, they look slick, but he says they're also pretty easy to take off and don't affect his range, to go out of range in his car. Another thing I wanted to mention is that I saw a commercial because we downloaded this app called Fubo for soccer, because that's where the English Premier League soccer is on this year. They're always changing rights. Now it's a different app, by the way. It's better than The Zone, which it was last time, but more expensive. And they have weird ads on these things, okay. Because it's new and they don't know who to sell ads to. So I saw lots of ads for North Dakota repeated over and over again. Okay? Apparently, North Dakota is a cool place with one tall building, which I believe we stayed in when we went to the Faracle Film Festival there. I'm not North Dakota. I love it. There's many aspects of North Dakota I love. And I just saw an ad for lab grown diamonds, and we just talked about that on the show not long ago, and now I'm seeing ads for it. It's commercialized, but I'm wondering now that it's real, if you were a person who I don't like diamond. I don't give a crap about diamonds. I'm not married. I don't believe in that stuff. I'm not an old romantic person. But if you were with a lab grown diamond, be a cop out compared to a real diamond for people. I'm asking you to speculate here, but do you think that there'd be any difference or would you even tell the person you're giving it to? Hey, it was growing a lab hunting from a Big Mac that was rotting in the corner. Is it the kind of thing where a guy could put on one of those loops in a diamond shop and look at it and go, oh, this is lab grown, this is crap? That's a good question. And if you are a listener, we have a lot of smart people listening to the show email as Cleanenergy Show at a@gmail.com that's a question I'd love to know the answer to. That's a very interesting question. Yeah, because I think it's something like cubic zirconia. That's another one where the professionals can tell the difference between a cubic zirconia and a diamond. But you and I probably not. So they'll have less value if they're easier to make. The question is because Canada's North relies on diamond mining, it's a big industrial economic impact up there. Will it be affected? I don't know. However, of course, lab grown diamonds have less environmental impact, which is why we're talking about them in the first place. Another thing I saw when I was searching for cars, trying to buy one, as I was on the Hyundai Canada website and I noticed something new there. They said, try an EV before you buy an EV, so you can book a multi day test drive with an EV. I think it's a great idea. And they're using the service, what's it called? Turtle, which I guess is in some Canadian cities now, I think Vancouver and Toronto, perhaps we can't do it everywhere. But that would be one where you could manually just go rent one at Turtle in the States, people have done that and just had one for a few days to see how they like it, because it's hard. I'd like to drive one and see what they're like, really. But Hyundai also, they're having a hard time keeping up with demand. So do they really need a program like this to sell EVs? Because they tend to sell out pretty quickly. I think I saw somebody on Facebook had an EV six, and where we live are they out already? I didn't know they were coming. They caught me by surprise. Yeah, there's at least one around. So they're starting to trickle out. The question is, how many will they make? Because I'm hoping the demand is there. The reviews are still flowing in for the iconic Five. And we talked last time about Mike having one, a friend of mine, and he really loves it. No. And we have an update coming up as well on the EB Six. But also I wanted to mention I saw Arivian in the wild. Aribian R one T electric pickup truck. I didn't know that any had made it up here, anywhere near here, but it was just outside of Moosejaw, my favorite town. Moose Jaw on the Trans Canada. The number one that goes coast to coast, east to west. Yeah, and that's interesting because other people have spotted them previously in the summer. I wonder if somebody's test driving one back and forth or what's going on with that. I don't know, but hopefully the charging situation is okay for them since they were on the Trans Canada. As we've said many times, the Don Tesla charging situation isn't great. Also, I thought I'd mentioned, because I am looking as a Chevy Bolt EV, that there was a fellow on the Chevy bolt form that had 200,000 miles on his 2020 bolt, and that's 322,000. These were mostly highway miles because he has a really long commute. I don't know why. Maybe he's a drug dealer, who could say? But he's charged to do a run runner, he charges you 100% every day and using it all plus one or two fast charges per day for a very long commute. And by my calculations on what he showed off the dash, it may have lost 15% of its range, which isn't bad. I mean, this is no, you don't expect any car to last 322,000 km or 200,000 miles. And the fact that this isn't just handed off to some teenager to use for local driving at that point, which is how I see EVs going when they lose their range. But it's still a pretty good range and he's still using it for that purpose. He's having to fast charge it maybe a bit more often, especially in the wintertime, he says, when it gets cold. I don't know what his definition of cold is. And also a shout out to Nestor's Bakery up in Saskatoon, our sister city here in the province, that has an electric transit van, a Ford Transit van electric, which is I didn't think we see any of those around either. There's a picture of it on Facebook, and they say they save enough in gas by switching discs to make the van payment. I believe it's free and good for the environment, good for your business brand. They're not even factoring in maintenance. So that, Brian, as we know, as we say all the time, is what's going to really move things along when people start to realize because money speaks, money talks, and when money starts making a difference. Let's get into some updates from past shows. Finland's new nuclear plant has had to cut power to zero from a failed turbine. Yeah, we've mentioned this nuclear plant before because it was finally coming online. And I think I initially reported on this because it was a good news story, because we seem to be sort of bashing nuclear a lot lately because it's so expensive and there's all these delays and cost overruns and it's literally taking decades to get these things up. But since this one in Finland was coming online, I thought, okay, we better report on this. But yeah, power dropped to zero on Monday, so they're still in trial operations. It's not in full blown operation. And they had a turbine fail, sort of killed the whole thing. Nothing dangerous, nothing exploded or melted down or anything. But this reactor was supposed to start production in 2009. That's how long it's taken. And it's going to be apparently a few months more because it's not working right now. Brian, when things are 13 years overdue, money gets spent in that time. So it's not just time, it's money. Yeah. And it's a 1.6 gigawatt reactor that's going to be the fifth reactor in Finland and its biggest reactor, and this is expected to produce 14% of the country's electricity. You put up a solar farm, can put it up in a few months, and it will work. Yeah. And you and I aren't nuclear scientists. Well, no, technically. So that will influence our decision around these things. But solar, wind and batteries are so damn simple. Why don't we move to that and we'll talk about that a bit more when we get to Germany later on? And I know I bring him up, but my boy says, dad, you know what the world's biggest greenhouse gas is? Do you know the answer to this? That's right there in the script. So of course you do. Like the biggest admirer the biggest greenhouse gas that is there in the atmosphere is water vapor. Okay. And you know what? Hydrogen emits water vapor. Is this going to be a problem? Well, I heard about it on a podcast, a good podcast. Was it ours? And it wasn't ours. It was actual people who it was really an in the weeds podcast with experts in the field, talking to other only experts who are working in the industry listen to it. And they said that more study needs to be done because it hasn't been studied. So if you're looking at airliners flying around and emitting water vapor, is that a good thing? Maybe people have some comments and you know how to get a hold of US clean energy show@gmail.com. But I just wanted to throw that out there because he was giving me a hard time about that. And now something for some extremely disappointing news. We tried to focus on the good news. Here's some disappointing news. The Dodge Charger, that is the muscle car that you hear driving down your street at night, eleven at night, waking you up because some teenager has got to feel better about himself. So he bought a Dodge Charger, a muscle car, as they call them. They still exist. They were a big thing in the know. You had a Pinto and called it a muscle car. Was it a Pinto or something? No, I had a grand. Grand. It's even worse, I think. I think I had a Pinto like a week before it broke. Literally. I'm not even kidding. Yeah, so they're making an EV, and they're going to make them all EVs, but they have noise, pretend noise. Brian in fact, the whole back is this pretend exhaust was essentially a dispersion speaker for V eight engine noise. And this is what it sounds like. Yeah, I'm going to boo that guy off the road. The first person to buy one of those, because you'll have the option of turning the stupid thing off. And then you go to a muffler shop. Muffler shops will now be like an audio visual place where they'll put in a bigger amp to make the car louder. Yeah. You know what? That's probably a really good business to get into. There you go, kids. If you're just still in high school, there's a business opportunity for you, and that is just depressing. We don't want cars to make noise because if you get beat by a Porsche, the Porsche doesn't make any noise. What are you emulating? You're emulating a slow car. Good for you. I know. People keep telling me on the street, I like the sound of the smell of fumes. Well, you're going to die early and good luck to you. I don't know. Brian and Elon Musk news this week, and I hesitate to even mention his name anymore. He says, Population collapse due to low birth rates is a much bigger risk to civilization than global warming. I'll repeat that population collapse due to low birth rates is much bigger risk to civilization than global warming. This is a guy who's trying to save global warming by advancing, speeding up the electrification of transportation, which he has successfully done, I would argue. I've known this. We've all known this. We all knew that we would solve hunger and the world would become more equitable and we would educate people would get access to education. We'd stop having 20 babies, right. The birth rate would go down to what it is in, say, Quebec is like 2.0 per person, and that is a declining birth rate. So you bring in people from other countries, eventually everyone's going to catch up. We're all going to have a middle class and maybe not make so many babies. I mean, it's not like we're all going to go to make babies. Brian that's my argument. We're not going to go out and say, oh, I got to save the planet and make 20 kids like he is and name them weird. Yeah. No, there was another quote of his in the news this week, too, where he said we got to keep drilling for oil and gas. But that's just kind of an obvious statement. But anything he says tends to make the news. So yeah, I don't know if it's as big a problem as he says, but I don't know. It's a slow moving train wreck. We'll hopefully have time to figure that out. Well, the economies work on expansion, like our right wing government here in this prairie province. Farming agricultural centric and oil centric brings in immigrants so that the population can expand because nobody wants. To live here. Our population is expanding, our economy is moving because we need to build houses, we need to build more restaurants, we need to build more clothing stores and expand roads and construction and all that. Yeah, we need an equilibrium where maybe we have stable population. But this is something that rethink X, Tony Siba at all have talked about. They're starting to talk about deep things like this, like the world in the future, guaranteed incomes might be necessary. We have to rethink how people will make money when AI takes over a lot of jobs and so forth. So yeah, it's a big question and I don't think a lot of people are actually thinking about that because sometimes these things sneak up on you. Sometimes they can come faster than ever. Back to Kia, we were talking about the EV six not long ago. So they've got a GT version coming out. This is the all electric Kia EV six. The GT version is going to be even faster. And I just like the headline here. We'll beat a Ferrari and a Lamborghini in a race. This is from the electric website.   So yeah, this is faster than a Ferrari Roma, faster than a Lamborghini Hurricane or an Evo spider. And this is a reasonably priced I don't think they've announced the price yet, but this will be available to customers later this year. Will this be something similar to your little sports car that you had? Your, what is it? The Hyundai Veloster? Yeah, I would still call it a hatchback, but it's probably called a crossover. It's the same as the EV six crossover that we've talked about before, which is a nice little car, but the lostr was sold as a sporty vehicle for those that live prices or perhaps young people. Yes, this is definitely more of a sporty version, but it's got the same body shape. It's basically the same car. Yeah, I don't know. And no word on the range either. The range on these is just kind of okay, I think. And you'll probably lose a bit of range with the extra fast version. But I don't know, I just think that's super fun. A Kia that goes that fast. The mythical Tesla Roadster version two, which has been promised forever since the cyber truck. Or that's not the cyber truck. The semi would go, what, 2.9 without the rocket? Pass. No, be under 2 seconds because the plat is already under 2 seconds. Also be like 1.9. Yeah, maybe even quicker. They're talking about putting a SpaceX rocket. It's going to have to shoot like adhesive down on the roadway so that it can not spin its tires at that speed. Yes, that's always an issue. Wow. Tire manufacturers are going to have to keep up. At first they were making low rolling resistance, fuel efficient tires vs. Now they have to make them so they can hug the road and not turn into dust just when you accelerate. Brian, something I'm very interested in that is the wind turbine visibility. I asked this question on our last show, and I said, does anybody out there know, is there a study? And sure enough, there is. The US. Government, of all people, studied this very thing, and they did studies with get this professional lookers. I don't know who these people are or what it takes to become one, but I commend you for having that on your business card because that is impressive. So the concern here is that if we put a bunch of offshore wind turbines off the coast, it's going to be unsightly and people will be upset. An ocean view is a beautiful thing. Now you've got your ships out there, and in a lot of places you have warships, I noticed, like down in San Diego, and not only were there warships, there were helicopters doing drills right off the beach. In fact, there was one that hovered, I swear, for an hour and a half it's probably Tom Cruise just shooting. It could have been Tom Cruise. What am I thinking? It was Tom Cruise. Of course it was Tom Cruise. Anyway, we talked recently about the Great Lakes because there was a study that said the Great Lakes can do well. There's some that are deeper than others. The smaller ones could do a significant power. But the Great Lakes hold enough potential for wind energy to power the entire United States. And that's interesting because they're close to population centers, close to grid tieins. Well, these professional lookers came up with they have different categories, lettered categories, de and so forth. And you've got your giant wind turbines, which are basically the ones that the extra large ones. So they have ratings for that. They have ratings for small, medium, and large. They've rated them because you can see them in the distance where you can barely notice them, or you can see them right in front of you and say, oh, that's ugly, and see the whole thing spinning. Or you can barely notice them, or you cannot see them at all. These are the different categories. So category D was clearly visible, with moderate impact becoming less distinct. E was less distinct, size is reduced. Then you get down to negligible or no impact anyway. So negligible or no impact at all for a small offshore wind turbine is 20 km or 12.4 miles. Okay? Now, your biggest turbine, your extra large ones, is up to 40 km or 25 miles. So that's the answer. And it's easy because there's always environmental impacts and things like that. You don't want to have people disrupted. Like Ted Kennedy Jr. He was against wind farms off his coast, which are just now finally got approved this week. Yeah, that's how far it goes back, because he's no longer with us for a long time, somewhere in the middle. The low impact of movement is noticeable in good light, but not normally. And so that's about 10 for a small one and 22 to 27 km, or 13.7 miles for the biggest ones. Yeah, there is a way that's not that far, because on the east coast of North America, there is a large ocean shelf that makes oil drilling and this sort of thing really practical that hasn't been exploited yet. So there's great potential there. And we were talking about Japan recently, which only has a 25 kilometer shelf, but floating wind turbines could go further than that if you wanted to. So, yeah, I'll put this chart in the show notes and you can have a look at it yourself. And again, it was the US. Department of Energy. So the biggest turbines, again, suggest about 40 km away and smaller ones 20 km if you don't want to have any negligible visual impact. And getting back to what I was just talking about from Clean Techa, the Cape Cod Offshore Wind Project, america's first, believe it or not, is finally, officially moving ahead after years of opposition. The Vineyard Wind One is described as the nation's first commercial scale offshore wind farm. The project will utilize 60 213 megawatt heliodx wind turbines. Those are the big mothers, the big ones, the biggest ones there are. They're talking about slightly bigger ones now, but those are huge. I think the wind sweep is like two football fields. It's just massive. And they're also going to have an offshore substation out there and that power will be transferred to shore via 220 volts cables. This is the thing that the locals were concerned about. They weren't concerned any longer about the offshore visibility, they were more concerned about the cables. They had to go through town. So what they did is they made a deal with the town and said that they're going to it's called Covels Beach, and they're going to dig up the roads and put the cable under the roads. And while those roads are dug up, they're going to fix the infrastructure of sewers and whatnot, and storm drains, and that's going to save them money. So the 800 megawatt project that is approaching a nuclear reactor in output is located 15 miles off the coast, so it's fairly close. And these are the big ones, so you will see them and they will generate electricity for more than 40,000 homes and businesses in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and create 3600 full time equivalent job hours. That's not jobs, that's job hours. And, of course, what we like to talk about, it's going to save customers of electricity $1.4 billion over the first 20 years of operation. So clean energy, people, saves the planet and saves your wallet, because energy I saw a study that said people's electricity bills, even by 2030, will be reduced by $9 a month or something like that. So, yeah, it's happening. And by the time we get to our climate goals, hopefully at 2040 to 2050, electricity is going to be given away a lot of times. Fantastic. OK, another story here from Electric. They're reporting on Bosch, the Electric motor and appliance company. They've come up with antilock brakes for electric brakes, which is something I never thought of, never thought was even maybe necessary, but I just liked this story because it's a good example of the progress that we could make once we start taking these kinds of things seriously, like electric bikes. So, yeah, we've had anti lock brakes in cars for years. I didn't like them at first because it seemed like kind of unnecessarily complicated and I was worried it was just going to be one of those things that breaks on your car, like quit working doesn't mean brakes. Yeah, I don't know, they've been great. Antelope brakes are great where we live in the winter because you can stomp on the brakes and not slide around on the ice. You can still keep steering your car when you just lock up the wheels in your car. You can't steer, you just have to slide around like an idiot. But antilock brakes give you a little bit more control, so it only makes sense to do this on bicycles as well. So these were shown off at Eurobike 2022, an exhibition recently in Europe, and Electric took these for a ride and it looks fantastic. Have you ever locked up your front brakes on a bike and flown over the handlebars? I don't even want to talk about it. That's how bad it is. We were talking before the show about the evolution of home videos and the cameras. Well, that little flip camera, guess how it got broken going over your hand on my handlebars down a hill. It was a mountain biking course and it did go down quicker than I thought and there was just I could have paralyzed myself. I basically did a somersault as a much lighter man, but it was not pleasant. And this was only about eight years ago, seven years ago, yes, it was scary and whole body feels like it got hit by a truck and then you start to shake it off. Is anything broken? So the answer to your query, yes. One time in my twenty s, I went over my front handlebars. It's no fun, but yeah, Antelope breaks will absolutely be fantastic. So hopefully that starts to become and they mentioned here in the article that it's great for things like cargo bikes. So electric cargo bikes are going to be a huge thing in cities for doing deliveries and stuff, and that's a particular case where you can get a lot of momentum with kind of a heavy cargo bike and you don't want to be locking up those wheels in any way. So, yeah, this is a nice step forward. I'd be curious to try them. And, you know, I remember when I used to go to the bicycle shops a lot, that they used to go away to the bike shows this time of year. This is the exact time of year when the bike conventions are on and all your greasy bike mechanics from the local shops go out and on vacation. Duke God knows what in Las Vegas. Ebikes. Not e, motorcycles. Not electric motorcycles. But bikes are going over highway speeds now because occasionally you will see them with that spec with a new bike announcement on electric or somewhere. And I'm thinking, okay, that's not good. But it's all about control, right? So if you do have any lock brakes, then that may change the equation. I mean, I'm scared going at my peak of my ebikes, 25 miles an hour type of thing. So I don't know. Brian we've got many press releases and I got one that I was kind of interested in doing the interview on, and that is because last week the Chancellor of Germany was coming to our country to make various announcements and agreements. And on his last day on Tuesday, he went out to the east coast of Newfoundland and Labrador and was making an announcement about green hydrogen. And one of the countries in Canada that is trying to do green hydrogen out there got a hold of me and wanted me to interview the CEO. Now, our schedule is never hooked up, but I started doing research into it and I started to get ill feelings about the whole thing about A, green hydrogen and how is this viable and B, like, are these companies just sort of jumping on the government teeth at the time when they're desperate to fight climate change? And is this legitimate? I'm starting to feel like I was just getting bad vibes about the whole thing. So I did some research into green hydrogen and I came to the conclusion that the first thing that we should use green hydrogen for is not Germany's. Electricity needs to get off Russian fuels, fossil fuels, but to use it for what it's used for now. And it's used in oil refinery, refinery, refinery oil refinery. Ammonia production and methanol production as well as steel production. And I think maybe some cement production is possible as well. So ammonia is used in fertilizers. So if we can get off the ungreen hydrogen now, that makes emissions. When you make that hydrogen, that's where we should first apply. This 4% of hydrogen in the world is currently green. That's not very much. And there's a great expense to how they do it. What they do with green hydrogen is use process called electrolysis, where you put basically two high electric probes in water and you split the water's atoms and separate the hydrogen from it. That's very energy intense. And those electrolysis machines are very expensive now and they're trying to get them down in price like wind and solar. But there's some debate as to how that's even possible. So they're talking about shipping it to Germany. And in order to do that, because hydrogen is not like gasoline, you have to cool it down and make it solid, okay. Because it just takes up so much volume. So you have to make it really cold. Now you can make Ammonium cold, but not as cold, and do that. You don't have to make it as cold. You can turn it back into hydrogen again on the other side. But the person we were going to talk to, he bought this brownfield oil storage facility in Nova Scotia, and he plans on putting up wind turbines, 100 or so wind turbines to power the place phase one and offshore for phase two. And he's put $100 million of his own money into it because he's a rich guy with lots of investments from prior times and he has expertise in setting something like this up. But, yeah, I mean, it's 160 wind turbines on Charlotte the locals aren't thrilled about. And they started getting that shoved down their throats really quickly. They haven't had time. And that's all these things take time. But he's got this brownfield oil storage place, which apparently is great. And there's a deep shipping channel there. I think it's like 27 meters or something. So you can get ships in and out to ship it. And that's all you that's a big step forward for this particular company. But there are, critics say, 24 separate government agencies right now that have to provide the stamp for this to go forward. For something like this, that's a lot. And that means years and years and years. Yeah. Well, back to that issue of Complication. It's so much more complicated than solar, wind and battery. And that's my thought. It's complicated as expensive. And in Alberta, they streamlined oil exploration and development so that you go to one agency and they take care of everything. We're going to have to do something like that if things like hydrogen are going to be sped up, because that's a problem with solar. Like Australia took away the green tape, or the red tape rather, and replaced green tape and makes it cheaper and faster. Faster means cheaper because you don't have to sit around and all that. It's just a better process. So it expanded really rapidly once they did that. So there's also blue hydrogen, which they're making next door in Alberta and the oil rich profits of Alberta. But they say they're going to capture that carbon that's from natural gas. So you have to capture the emissions from that. And that's not practical. Yeah, so green hydrogen is made with clean electricity, so it should be 100% emissions free. Blue hydrogen is made from fossil fuels, but you can capture the carbon and then make it kind of clean. And there's lots of hydrogen projects going on in the world, lots of them and this will be maybe one of the first in North America. But the thing is, it's just going to take so much time. I don't doubt there's going to be an appetite for a market for it. Okay. There's going to be an insatiable market to buy green hydrogen, just like there's an insatiable market to buy green energy. Amazon wants to have green energy. They put up a million solar farms or whatever, like dozens, and counter do them, I don't know. And they'll just do that and Microsoft, et cetera, et cetera. Well, that's happening. And people will want green hydrogen as well. And green steel made from green hydrogen. So we'll see. Yeah, Germany seems to be definitely on the forefront of this hydrogen. And there was a story, this was from CNN that the very first hydrogen powered train line has now started running full time in Germany. So they've got 14 hydrogen powered trains. These are fuel cell hydrogen vehicles, so emissions free. And as long as the hydrogen is made in an emissions free way, then this is an emissions free system. I don't know, it doesn't say how the hydrogen is made. I'd be surprised if it's fully green hydrogen. But yeah, this is a thing that is actually working now. And they still have some diesel trains that they plan to replace, but this project has started. They have about a 1000 kilometer range on these hydrogen trains. So they can run basically do their route all day without refilling. But they just have refilling stations at either end of the line. And yes, this is the thing that's now working well in California. California has like, I don't know, maybe 34 hydrogen refilling stations for cars. There's like six in maybe Vermont or somewhere for Bernie's friends, but they're all in California. Half of them aren't working. It's very expensive to fill your car, very expensive. They're hoping to get the cost of these electrolyzers down where they could fuel a vehicle and be cost competitive with fossil fuels. And they won't even need blue hydrogen, but you need to be able to commit to that. Then there needs to be just the difficulty of refueling and transporting is just such a major thing to do. Yeah, it's almost like you need your green hydrogen plant right next to where the storage is, like for this train line. If they could actually make the green hydrogen at both ends of the rail line, but it's just probably not practical to do that everywhere. We're going to potentially need this hydrogen. The question my partner asked when they were watching the news story on TV is why doesn't Germany make their own dammarine hydrogen? Well, I looked into that and they do have a coastline, they do have places to put wind, but they claim it's just not enough coastline as other people. Nova Scotia is very windy. They don't have good solar resources. And Newfoundland and Labrador also have good very good wind resources. And ironically, I'm looking at the solar chart for Newfoundland. You know, where the best solar potential is for Newfoundland, it's way better, the most extreme north as you go. So it's actually just a weather thing. I think there's just a lot of clouds in the south, less cloud. You're getting really close to the Arctic up there in Labrador. And then this is better solar resources than there is down south. Okay, so there was a fantastic article this week from Power magazine written by Sony Patel, and I just wanted to talk about this because it's really a follow up to a lot of these things that we're talking about, the complications, these different types of power. So we've been talking about Germany. They have been trying to phase out their nuclear power plants. This is really part of a political platform. People in Germany don't really want their nuclear power anymore. So they have so far shut down three of the six nuclear power plants that they have had in Germany. So just last year, nuclear was supplying about 12% of the electricity needs in Germany. That's now down to 6%, which is these three nuclear power plants remaining. But of course, as we know, Europe, and Germany in particular, is in a bit of an energy crisis this year because they've been relying on fossil fuel imports from Russia. And those are now in doubt. And nobody really wants to talk to Russia anymore. We don't want their stinky oil and gas. So there's been a lot of talk about, well, should they delay the closing of these last three nuclear plants in Germany? And it's like, on the surface, well, that seems like a great idea. This is a carbon free form of electricity. Just keep them running a little bit longer, another year or two, then maybe they can find a different plan instead of relying on this Russian oil and gas. But this article was so great because it really went through the complications in doing that. That sounds like a simple thing, just keep the plants running for another year or two. But I'll go through some of the legal and regulatory hurdles that was mentioned in this article, because, of course, solar, wind and batteries, something like that, it's fairly simple. Like, you and I could literally build a solar wind and battery power plant. Basically, like, you have one in your camper, you put out the solar panel, you charge it in a battery, boom. It's pretty simple. But nuclear can be extremely dangerous. So over the years, we've created all of these laws and regulations. So the first hurdle, the reactors cannot be operated beyond 2022. December under Germany's Atomic Energy Act and prolonging their operation will require an amendment to the law. They would literally have to change the law, which they can do to keep these plants running beyond 2022. There would also be an environmental impact assessment that would have to be done. And this would have to abide by a European Court agreement as well. There has to be a comprehensive risk and benefit assessment by Germany's legislature that would balance assessments. This was created after the Fukushima accident in 2011. Regulations got more severe, so there's a bit more here in terms of regulations. The reactors would need to address safety and security requirements because they're slated for shutdown in December 20. So they're already three years past. They were given a sort of a special exemption. So continuing beyond that, they're already 13 years past the last major kind of safety inspections. Continued operation would only make sense if the safety review were significantly reduced in scope and the test depth or extensive retrofitting might be kind of simplified. You'd have to basically change all of these safety rules and kind of let everything slide for a couple of more years. They are also running out of fuel. So the fuel elements in the plant have been largely used up. They have enough fuel for only about 80 days of extended operation past that December 2022 shutdown point. Procuring new fuel is a lengthy process that could take between 18 and 24 months. If you did a super accelerated version, maybe twelve to 15 months. So the fuel is a huge problem. There would also have to be testing of this new fuel. Like, you don't just come up with nuclear fuel. It's an extremely difficult process, making sure there's enough staff so they could have staffing issues if they continue beyond this date. I imagine a lot of the staff have already made other plans to go onto other jobs. So there would have to be extensive human resources coordinated and people trained. It's just a long nightmare of things. There's the financial consideration. So again, doing all of this stuff to extend it beyond its normal date. This is going to cost even more money than it has been costing. This is going to be expensive electricity if they keep it running. Now, there is, of course, a nuclear business and technology association called ChemD. They disagree with some of these conclusions that in their view, basically it's worth it. This is a massive crisis facing Europe and Germany, this massive energy shortage. So they think that all of these extra measures that would be needed are probably worth it, but I'm not so sure. And the fact that they're down to only 6% of the German electricity generation with these last three plants, hopefully they can come up with another 6% somewhere. Russia could just go home and get out of Ukraine and be nice. Yeah, and hopefully punished somehow. But it's phenomenal. I understand they are going to try and keep three running, right? They're going to do their best. Yeah. There's been sort of conflicting reports. They had said, no, we're not going to extend them. But now it sounds like they're considering it, and I guess we'll see. Well, Brian, we're going way over on the show this week, but I want to mention, coming up in the show is a lightning round where we'll have a skim of the rest of the week's headlines. Real quick, let's dip into some of our feedback from the web. We have a DoorDash driver, says he bought a Chevy Bolt EV. That's a slightly larger version of the Bolt with the crossover styling. Took the Evo DoorDashing this evening. This is a person who works as a DoorDash delivery person. It's a great car for food delivery. The first order of the day pays for all of the fuel I need. And again, and I can sit in the AC listening to music between orders without worrying about overheating. And this is the person who was down in the States, and it's perfect DoorDash car. We hear that a lot. Yeah. And of course, one of my pet peeves we've mentioned on the show is you'll often see people around here sitting in normal weather with the engine running, and I always am confused by that. It's like, do they really need the AC running? It's not that hot out, et cetera, et cetera, wasting all that fuel. But I was in my gas powered car the other day just with the engine off and listening to the radio, and after about a minute, a warning comes up on the screen saying, oh, you shouldn't be running your AV system without the engine running, because you're going to run your battery down. So maybe that's why everyone's running their cars. Well, they don't have to, because the little no, it's telling me it's life experience. And I can't believe you've never had this experience. You've never run your battery down and been stranded from that very thing. It takes a long time. Mr. Stockton, with his good quality batteries, not so much. He stretches the life of his battery because he's poor. Well, I've run into that before when I was a kid, and I've learned my lesson, and I think a lot of people have, and that's why they don't turn it off. You know, what I'm hearing a lot of now is people like pickup trucks automatically shutting off the engine that stop lights. But really, how much is that saving you? It's a minute or two of idling here and there. It's a little bit it's something that should have been implemented 20 years ago, and that might have made a difference, but it's a little too long because the engine literally has to start just like you're turning the key over. It seems like it's wearing air on it a lot. You need a more robust starter, but I think at the end, it does save a bit of fuel. All right, I have a question here on Twitter from alternative frequency that's his handle. He has a trucker who says the trucker in the United States says we are one of his five favorite podcasts. I thought they listened to Fantastic. And some of the others are Dr. Volts, which is a paid podcast on substance. And inside EVs, of course, is a popular one. Undecided Matt Farrell, which has been off of his YouTube channel. I use Matt Farrell's undecided for information. He is not a professional, but he does research well and has good videos. So, question for all of us, and we are the only ones that go back to them because we're good and decent people. Brian, even with your back, it says home batteries seem to cost roughly $1,000 per kilowatt hour. But the F 150 Lightning pickup truck has 93 kilowatt hours for about $40,000. And the Silverado announced Silverado EV will be 200 kilowatt hours for about 40 kwh. And I don't think either of those are actually 40K, by the way. They're already under prices like Tesla inflation, yes, but that's the whole cost of the vehicle. Or just the cost of the battery. That's the starting price. The supposed starting price. I mean, this is for the fleet version of those vehicles. But the question is, is home storage price too high? And are EV trucks price too low? Is it not about the capacity? I think that's a complicated question with a complicated answer with multifaceted. I'll add one before you do. Tesla, for example, wants to sell their vehicles. That's their primary motivation is to keep their company going by selling vehicles. So they'll put their batteries into the vehicles and they'll overprice the battery storage so that everybody's not buying it. I'm sure the battery storage could be cheaper for Tesla, maybe half as much. And we'd all buy got a waiting list for everything. We use all their batteries, and that would kill their business. That's one reason. Do you have other reasons? Not really, but I think it's a little bit of both. I mean, the home batteries have seemed awfully expensive to me. Also quite possible that Ford is losing money on these trucks and that Chevy is going to lose money on these trucks. We don't know for sure. Well, I'm not really sure if you have any thoughts cleanenergyshow@gmail.com or on Twitter. On Facebook. We're not on Facebook. It took us off Facebook. We're on TikTok, of course, and you to check us out. We have SpeakPipe. Comcleenergyshow to leave us a voicemail message, and we'd love to hear from you anything you have to say on this or any other subject. Brian it is time for, of course, the Lightning Round. The Lightning Round is where we skimmed through a few more headlines, really quick to end the show, and it's one of our favorite shows. It was a new segment almost two years ago, almost celebrating the two year anniversary of the Lightning Round. And believe me, there will be cake this year. I hope tesla says autopilot is preventing 40 crashes per day from wrong pedal error driving. And when this came out, somebody had crashed their car into a building. No, they crashed it into a wedding on the west coast of Canada and killed two people. And you occasionally see the elderly doing this in front of a store. I was teaching my daughter how to drive, and she wanted to use her left foot for the brake. And I said, no, there's a reason for that. And this is the reason. You stick to the right foot and you go back and forth. So the use of the auto pilot sensor to mitigate torque when it's sure the car is sure that the input was a mistake. Yeah, well, it's like saving 40 crashes a day means this is a really common, a way more common problem than I might have thought it is. Because if it's just 40 a day in Tesla, imagine the entire fleet of cars. But I think when we first talked about this a couple of years ago in the podcast I mentioned, I think it was called the Audi 5000. So way back in the late 70s or the early 80s, audi had a huge PR problem in North America because of sudden unintended acceleration. And it was believed that these Audi cars were faulty and they would just suddenly accelerate into a building, they would accelerate into traffic, et cetera, et cetera. And it was eventually determined it was just driver error. But there was, I think, like a 60 Minutes report on it that suddenly scared everybody off of buying an Audi. So this is apparently a very common problem, people pressing the wrong pen. And there was also something just about Priuses that killed their popularity, that was a big dent on them because toilet was such a reliable vehicle. It turned out it was just a format sticking on the driver pedal formats now so they can't move. I've had problems with my floor mats and different cars, too. Yeah, it took them forever to figure it out, too. To absolutely figure it out. A small Vermont utility which uses Tesla power walls from customers, speaking of this very thing, in a virtual grid backup system. So there's 4000 Tesla power walls hooked up in people's homes to the grid, and they found out that the first thoughts on this is that it's saving them a lot of money. In fact, $1.5 million in one week this summer. Now, I don't know what how you save one? I don't understand the nuances of grid. I mean, you have to fire up a plant. Maybe you lose some hardware during the situation that you wouldn't have otherwise lost. But they're sure that they've saved 3 million since in 2021 and just 1.5 million in the heatwave this summer. So, yeah, again, there's another virtual power plant project happening in Japan right now. There's a big one happening in California also with Tesla powerwalls. They could all be networked. Yeah. I think eventually it won't really be so much about saving money necessarily, it's just kind of stabilizing the grid. But stabilizing apparently saves money. I don't understand why, but it is. Yes. Oh Brian. It's time for a clean energy show. Fast fact pakistan is responsible for 1% of global emissions, yet it is the 6th most climate vulnerable country in the world, proving that the climate change impacts affect poor countries disproportionately. Yeah. And of course there's been massive flooding in Pakistan this last week or so. Absolutely devastating. Kind of what was normally once in a hundred year kind of situation is now sadly much more frequent. Speaking of which, new scientists says that the heatwave in China this summer is the most severe ever recorded in the world. People in large parts of China have been experienced two months of extreme heat and that's been 40 degrees and terrible things. The worst one in history, Brian. But we have to go. We'll see you again next week for another edition of the clean energy show. See you next week.

Liberty Dispatch
Episode 144 - The Gaystapo Have Colonized Canada

Liberty Dispatch

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 69:01


Liberty Dispatch ~ August 30, 2022 In this episode of the Liberty Dispatch, the Trudeau Regime flies its freak flag, Western students, faculty, and alumni push back against vax and mask mandates, and doctors push jabs on those who were injured by them. Tune in as hosts Matthew Hallick and Andrew DeBartolo unpack these stories.   Weekend Review: 1. Western University students organize vaccine mandate protest: https://tnc.news/2022/08/28/lawton-western-prally; 2. The Ontario Science Table will be disbanded: https://globalnews.ca/news/9087175/ontario-covid-19-science-table-being-dissolved;   [Story 1] - Trudeau Regime to Invest $100 Million into First-ever 2SLGBTQI+ Action Plan: https://globalnews.ca/news/9090604/canada-1st-2slgbtqi-action-plan; https://pm.gc.ca/en/news/news-releases/2022/08/28/prime-minister-launches-canadas-first-federal-2slgbtqi-action-plan; Canadians 18-34 more likely to identify as trans and non-binary: https://thepostmillennial.com/canadians-ages-15-34-more-likely-to-identify-as-trans-or-non-binary?utm_source=deployer&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter&utm_term=4127 The Pride Awards: https://publicservicepride.ca/psp-awards   [Story 2] - Vaccine injured in Saskatoon told to get a second shot: https://www.westernstandard.news/news/nearly-300-covid-vaccine-injured-people-told-to-get-second-shot-in-sask/article_51d58140-24b8-11ed-b100-5ba44addca03.html?utm_source=westernstandard.news&utm_campaign=%2Fnewsletter%2Foptimize%2Fdaily-headlines%2F%3F-dc%3D1661515217&utm_medium=email&utm_content=read%20more.   WATCH THIS EPISODE  ON RUMBLE HERE: https://rumble.com/v1hyxlv-the-gaystapo-have-colonized-canada.html;    Sick of Mainstream Media Lies? Help Support Independent Media! DONATE TO LCC TODAY!: https://libertycoalitioncanada.com/donate/  Please Support us in bringing you real, truthful reporting and analysis from a Christian perspective. SUBSCRIBE TO OUR SHOWS/CHANNELS: LIBERTY DISPATCH PODCAST: https://libertydispatch.podbean.com; https://rumble.com/c/c-1687093;  OPEN MIKE WITH MICHAEL THIESSEN: https://openmikewithmichaelthiessen.podbean.com; https://rumble.com/c/c-1412501;  THE LIBERTY LOUNGE WITH TIM TYSOE: https://rumble.com/c/c-1639185    STAY UP-TO-DATE ON ALL THINGS LCC: Gab: https://gab.com/libertycoalitioncanada Telegram: https://t.me/libertycoalitioncanadanews Instagram: https://instagram.com/libertycoalitioncanada Facebook: https://facebook.com/LibertyCoalitionCanada Twitter: @LibertyCCanada - https://twitter.com/LibertyCCanada Rumble: https://rumble.com/user/LibertyCoalitionCanada YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLb1yNIeJ-2bSuHRW4oftRQ Please LIKE, SUBSCRIBE, RATE & REVIEW and SHARE it with others!

Yara's Crop Nutrition podcast
What's Happening on our Incubator Farm in Saskatchewan, Canada?

Yara's Crop Nutrition podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 22:21


Crop Manager Delaine Mandziak, gives us an update on the activities on one of our four North America Incubator Farms.  Listen to our introduction to this farm on our initial episode about this Farm. Delaine talks about the devestating drought conditions they have endured throughout Western Canada and they unexpected learnings from this.  She also updates us on the 2022 observational data and the importance of a complete nutrition program during these challenging times. The Saskatoon incubator farm is 80-acres of row crops that feature Western Canada's cropping system including canola, wheat, barley, peas, lentils, etc. To find out more about the Saskatoon field click HERE Yara has created these incubator farms in North America with collaborative efforts with customers, partners, and various technology providers, Yara plans to utilize these farms to study and advance insights into all aspects of the cropping system. To find out more about the incubator farms click HERE.

CrossPolitic Studios
The Gaystapo Have Colonized Canada [Liberty Dispatch]

CrossPolitic Studios

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 69:01


Liberty Dispatch ~ August 30, 2022 In this episode of the Liberty Dispatch, the Trudeau Regime flies its freak flag, Western students, faculty, and alumni push back against vax and mask mandates, and doctors push jabs on those who were injured by them. Tune in as hosts Matthew Hallick and Andrew DeBartolo unpack these stories. Weekend Review: 1. Western University students organize vaccine mandate protest: https://tnc.news/2022/08/28/lawton-western-prally; 2. The Ontario Science Table will be disbanded: https://globalnews.ca/news/9087175/ontario-covid-19-science-table-being-dissolved; [Story 1] - Trudeau Regime to Invest $100 Million into First-ever 2SLGBTQI+ Action Plan: https://globalnews.ca/news/9090604/canada-1st-2slgbtqi-action-plan; https://pm.gc.ca/en/news/news-releases/2022/08/28/prime-minister-launches-canadas-first-federal-2slgbtqi-action-plan; Canadians 18-34 more likely to identify as trans and non-binary: https://thepostmillennial.com/canadians-ages-15-34-more-likely-to-identify-as-trans-or-non-binary?utm_source=deployer&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter&utm_term=4127 The Pride Awards: https://publicservicepride.ca/psp-awards [Story 2] - Vaccine injured in Saskatoon told to get a second shot: https://www.westernstandard.news/news/nearly-300-covid-vaccine-injured-people-told-to-get-second-shot-in-sask/article_51d58140-24b8-11ed-b100-5ba44addca03.html?utm_source=westernstandard.news&utm_campaign=%2Fnewsletter%2Foptimize%2Fdaily-headlines%2F%3F-dc%3D1661515217&utm_medium=email&utm_content=read%20more. WATCH THIS EPISODE ON RUMBLE HERE: https://rumble.com/v1hyxlv-the-gaystapo-have-colonized-canada.html; AND THE FLF NETWORK HERE: https://subspla.sh/d2xw9bg Sick of Mainstream Media Lies? Help Support Independent Media! DONATE TO LCC TODAY!: https://libertycoalitioncanada.com/donate/ Please Support us in bringing you real, truthful reporting and analysis from a Christian perspective. SUBSCRIBE TO OUR SHOWS/CHANNELS:LIBERTY DISPATCH PODCAST: https://libertydispatch.podbean.com; https://rumble.com/c/c-1687093; OPEN MIKE WITH MICHAEL THIESSEN: https://openmikewithmichaelthiessen.podbean.com; https://rumble.com/c/c-1412501; THE LIBERTY LOUNGE WITH TIM TYSOE: https://rumble.com/c/c-1639185 STAY UP-TO-DATE ON ALL THINGS LCC: Gab: https://gab.com/libertycoalitioncanada Telegram: https://t.me/libertycoalitioncanadanews Instagram: https://instagram.com/libertycoalitioncanada Facebook: https://facebook.com/LibertyCoalitionCanada Twitter: @LibertyCCanada - https://twitter.com/LibertyCCanada Rumble: https://rumble.com/user/LibertyCoalitionCanada YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLb1yNIeJ-2bSuHRW4oftRQ Please LIKE, SUBSCRIBE, RATE & REVIEW and SHARE it with others!