Podcasts about New South Wales

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State of Australia

  • 1,958PODCASTS
  • 5,607EPISODES
  • 26mAVG DURATION
  • 5DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 27, 2021LATEST
New South Wales

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Best podcasts about New South Wales

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Latest podcast episodes about New South Wales

SBS Polish - SBS po polsku
Gladys Berejiklian faces a corruption ICAC enquiry - Gladys Berejiklian odpowiada przed Niezależną Komisją Antykorupcjną ICAC

SBS Polish - SBS po polsku

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 9:42


A corruption inquiry is examining whether the former New South Wales premier Gladys Berejiklian breached public trust by supporting two projects proposed by her then secret boyfriend, the former member for Wagga Wagga, Daryl Maguire who later admitted he sought payment to help broker a deal for a Chinese property developer. - Komisja ICAC bada, czy była premier NSW Gladys Berejiklian naruszyła zaufanie publiczne, popierając dwa projekty promowane przez jej partnera Daryla Maguire. Były poseł z Wagga Wagga podał sie do dymisji w 2018 r. przyznając, że próbował uzyskać wynagrodzenie za pomoc i pośrednictwo w zawarciu umowy z chińskim developerem nieruchomości.

Green & Red: Podcasts for Scrappy Radicals
Oz as a Sub-Imperial Power: Prof Clinton Fernandes on Australia's support of the U.S. Empire (G&R 116)

Green & Red: Podcasts for Scrappy Radicals

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 53:38


In our second discussion with Professor Clinton Fernandes from the University of New South Wales in Canberra, Australia, which is part of the Australian Defence Force Academy, we talked about the new Australian deal to buy subs from the U.S., and the larger role of Australia as a "sub-Imperial" country, not powerful in its own right so much as a supportive nation for American efforts in the Pacific. Outro music is "The Band Played Waltzing Matilda" by the Pogues. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Links// Trade routes or War Games?: Subs and the geopolitics behind the China threat (https://bit.ly/3E92ALE) Aukus: French contractor ‘astonished' at cancellation of Australia submarine deal (https://bit.ly/3CnSJkM) Follow Green and Red// https://linktr.ee/greenandredpodcast Donate to Green and Red Podcast// Become a recurring donor at https://www.patreon.com/greenredpodcast Or make a one time donation here: https://bit.ly/DonateGandR This is a Green and Red Podcast production. Produced by Bob (@bobbuzzanco) and Scott (@sparki1969). “Green and Red Blues" by Moody. Editing by Issac.

SBS Vietnamese - SBS Việt ngữ
Học sinh NSW quay lại trường, Victoria chuẩn bị mở cửa thêm

SBS Vietnamese - SBS Việt ngữ

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 5:29


Học sinh New South Wales đã đi học lại nhưng một số giáo viên của các em vẫn chưa được chủng ngừa COVID-19. Victoria ghi nhận 1.510 ca nhiễm mới với hai phần ba là những người chưa được tiêm chủng. 74,7% người dân Victoria từ 16 tuổi trở lên đã được tiêm chủng đầy đủ.

SBS Vietnamese - SBS Việt ngữ
Hướng dẫn mới vạch ra cách thức các hãng luật có thể cải thiện khác biệt văn hóa

SBS Vietnamese - SBS Việt ngữ

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 9:51


Luật sư đoàn New South Wales vừa đưa ra hướng dẫn mới, trong đó nêu lên một loạt các biện pháp về nơi làm việc hợp pháp, để có thể cải thiện sự đa dạng về văn hóa. Trong khi bảng hướng dẫn hy vọng sẽ giúp cho nghề luật sư trở nên đoàn kết hơn và đại diện cho xã hội nước Úc, thì các luật sư thuộc nguồn gốc khác biệt về văn hóa lại cho rằng, đó chỉ là một phần của giải pháp mà thôi.

Neural Implant podcast - the people behind Brain-Machine Interface revolutions
Francois Ladouceur on a new paradigm for action potential sensing through optics

Neural Implant podcast - the people behind Brain-Machine Interface revolutions

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 28:13


Francois Ladouceur is a University of New South Wales professor teaching and researching integrated optics, silica and diamond-based photonics, optical sensing networks, and photonics-based brain/machine interfaces Top 3 Takeaways:  "it's a liquid crystal-based transducer that can transduce an electrical signal into an optical signal that we can carry the away from the place of measurement" With electrical-based electrodes making the devices smaller increases the impedance degrading the signal which doesn't happen in LCP based electrodes "We have built a chip, which is bidirectional, it can read the action potential and it can stimulate the neuron. Again, entirely passive. It requires no electrical input. It does not dissipate energy." 0:30 "How did you get on this podcast?" 3:00 Is another advantage the lack of heat generated? 5:30 "What are the bio compatible properties of liquid crystal?" 7:00 "What are some advantages of this over other techniques?" 10:15 "How does the multiplexer work?" 15:15 "What would be the minimum width?" 19:00 "You haven't really published too much about this, but you said a big paper is going to be coming out?" 21:30 "It's really just for sensing, you couldn't stimulate with these, right?" 25:00 "When did this technology originally come to your mind?" 27:15 "Is there anything that we didn't talk about that you wanted to mention?"  

Path 11 Podcast
358 Our Spiritual DNA with Carmel Niland

Path 11 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 53:10


Carmel Niland graduated from the Universities of New South Wales and of Illinois and began her career as a teacher in Sydney, Australia, and Ithaca, New York, USA.  She worked for thirty years for the NSW Government leading agencies on gender, racial equality, human rights, child protection, and disability services. She was elected as the Deputy Chancellor at the University of New South Wales. Carmel was honored by the Medal of Australia for her work.  She is married to John and they have two children, and live in Sydney. Her first book, A Darker Magic This Way Comes has received critical acclaim, earning Honourable Mentions at the 2017 Los Angeles, San Francisco and New York Book Festivals. Our Spiritual DNA is a guide to deciphering your spiritual lineage After examining the lives of thousands of individuals across five thousand years, Carmel Niland saw patterns that allowed her to connect each individual to 12 specific Ascended Masters https://www.ourspiritualdna.com/ ------------------------------------ Check out Molly Mandelberg's Wild Hearts Rise Up Oracle Deck & Guidebook ------------------------------------

SBS Italian - SBS in Italiano
A partire dal weekend Melbourne e il resto del Victoria non saranno più separati

SBS Italian - SBS in Italiano

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 9:09


Sia Victoria che New South Wales stanno reintroducendo la possibilità di viaggiare al di fuori delle rispettive capitali, in Victoria da venerdì 29 ottobre e in New South Wales da lunedì 1 novembre.

Anything Ghost Show
Anything Ghost #286 - The 15th Annual 2021 Mega-Macabre Halloween Special - True Stories from Around the World!

Anything Ghost Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 148:34


Heather (Wichita, Kansas) – Roxie the Ghost Deana (Nevada, US) - Angry Ghost On the Porch Christian (Chapa, Texas) - West Texas Shadows Erin (Virginia, US) - Haunted North Virginia Home Nate (US) - Antique Iris Lamp Cat (Mexico) - Art Museum Ghost Olivia (Palm Springs, California) - The Haunted Desert Home Andrea (Virginia, US) - Haunted Virginia House Leigh (Tennessee, US) - Ghosts of the Tennessee Vocational School for Girls Jessica (Maryland, US) - Haunted House in Hyattsville, Maryland Sindy (US) - Voice in My Head Mario (South Texas, US) - Shadow Person Jessica (Adelaide, Australia) – Bruised Nightly by a Ghost Felipe (Jervis Bay, New South Wales, Australia) - The Black Shadow at Dad's Death Suzanne (Stanton, Virginia) - Days Inn New Market Haunting Angela (Philippines) - The Six O'clock Ghost

RNZ: Checkpoint
Australia opens to limited international travel in just over a week

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 3:31


Australia is throwing open its doors to international travel with flights resuming in as soon as 10 days. It comes as Victoria and New South Wales hit 70 and 80 percent double dose levels, ease lockdowns and move towards freedom. Worldwatch's Perlina Lau has the details.

Hoop Heads
Peter Lonergan - Director of High Performance Coach Development for Basketball Australia - Episode 545

Hoop Heads

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 82:10


Peter Lonergan is the Director of High Performance Coach Development for Basketball Australia.  Peter is an influential coach educator impacting coaching development around the world. He has been an Australian Opals Assistant Coach, a highly successful State Director of Coaching in Victoria and New South Wales, and an international clinician for FIBA. If you're looking to improve your coaching please consider joining the Hoop Heads Mentorship Program.  We believe that having a mentor is the best way to maximize your potential and become a transformational coach. By matching you up with one of our experienced mentors you'll develop a one on one relationship that will help your coaching, your team, your program, and your mindset.  The Hoop Heads Mentorship Program delivers mentoring services to basketball coaches at all levels through our team of experienced Head Coaches. Find out more at hoopheadspod.com or shoot me an email directly mike@hoopheadspod.com Follow us on social media @hoopheadspod on Twitter and Instagram and be sure to check out the Hoop Heads Podcast Network for more great basketball content. Jot down some notes as you listen to this episode with Peter Lonergan, Director of High Performance Coach Development for Basketball Australia. Website - https://australia.basketball/ (https://australia.basketball/) Email –  peter.lonergan@australia.basketball Twitter - https://twitter.com/lono610 (@lono610) Visit our Sponsors! https://www.drdishbasketball.com/ (Dr. Dish Basketball) Mention the Hoop Heads Podcast when you place your order and get $300 off a brand new state of the art Dr. Dish Shooting Machine! http://www.fastmodelsports.com/ (Fast Model Sports) Use Code SAVE10 to get 10% off the number one play diagramming software for coaches https://gripspritz.net/ (Grip Spritz) Grip Spritz revitalizes and cleans the soles of your basketball shoes to stop you from slipping and sliding on the court! Better Grip, Better Game! Twitter Podcast - https://twitter.com/hoopheadspod (@hoopheadspod) Mike - https://twitter.com/hdstarthoops (@hdstarthoops) Jason - https://twitter.com/jsunkle (@jsunkle) Network - https://twitter.com/HoopHeadsPodNet (@HoopHeadsPodNet) Instagram https://www.instagram.com/hoopheadspod/ (@hoopheadspod) Facebook https://www.facebook.com/hoopheadspod/ (https://www.facebook.com/hoopheadspod/) YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDoVTtvpgwwOVL4QVswqMLQ (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDoVTtvpgwwOVL4QVswqMLQ) Support this podcast

The Smoking Hot Confessions BBQ Podcast
Bringing Gyros to Australia | Rhiannon Peterson | BBQ Spit Rotisseries

The Smoking Hot Confessions BBQ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 52:12


BBQ Spit Rotisseries is a  success story in the world of BBQ businesses, and co-founder Rhiannon Peterson is a driving force behind it. Rhiannon is a highly motivated, hard working entrepreneur and foodie who, starting with just a rotisserie, an idea and a never give up mindset, has built the country's largest independent BBQ store with shops in Melbourne, Victoria and Sydney, New South Wales. Not only do they have their own brand of BBQ smoker and spit rotisserie, Flaming Coals, they also import some of the best grills from the United States by way of SnS Grills and a veritable truck load of the best BBQ rubs and sauces available. And they also work with some of the best competition BBQ teams Australia has to offer. In this full episode of the Smoking Hot Confessions BBQ Podcast, Rhiannon and I get into:• Why a rare steak is her favourite (3:59) Why people are moving from pellet grills to offset smokers (14:42) How BSR came to be (20:52) When the worst possibility occured (23:28) BSR's brand new BBQ studio kitchen (33:45) Rhiannon's best tips for cooking a Greek gyro on a spit rotisserie (41:26) This episode of the Smoking Hot Confessions BBQ Podcast is proudly brought to you by our Podcast Partner, JAGRD Woodfired Smoker Ovens. If you're looking for your next Barbeque, smoker or grill, be sure to check them out. They have a wide range of well-performing units available, and love doing custom work and commercial kit outs as well. Check out: https://jagrdwoodfired.com.au    If you would like to become a Podcast Partner we'd love to hear from you. Send Ben an email at ben@smokinghotconfessions.com and let's get that conversation started! To get your free copy of 'The Beginners Guide to Real BBQ', including some smoked meat recipes, head to: https://smokinghotconfessions.com  

SBS Vietnamese - SBS Việt ngữ
Úc cam kết mục tiêu khí hậu quốc tế, hy sinh các thị trấn khai mỏ quê nhà

SBS Vietnamese - SBS Việt ngữ

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 4:35


Nhiên liệu hóa thạch sẽ là chủ đề chính của hội nghị COP-26 và việc Úc phụ thuộc vào than đá có thể bị xem xét kỹ lưỡng. Nhưng nếu ngành kỹ nghệ than đá bị buộc ngừng hoạt động thì các thị trấn khai mỏ, như Singleton ở vùng Hunter của New South Wales sẽ đi đâu về đâu?

Podiatry Legends Podcast
176 - Trina Goard & Tahlia North New Mums & Business Ownership

Podiatry Legends Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 41:41


Trina Goard from Armidale Podiatry in New South Wales and Tahlia North from Heal Focus Podiatry in South Australia are both new mums. I thought it was essential to share their stories, thoughts and ideas around business ownership and motherhood, especially while it is still very fresh in their minds.  In this episode, we discuss: The preparation needed leading up to stopping work. Sharing the news with your patients and how did they take it? What were you going to do if you could not find another podiatrist? What have you learnt, and what would you do differently? Was there any pressure from family, friends and patients about working? The benefits of belonging to different podiatry groups. The importance of having systems.  Why you need to employ early.  You can connect with Tahlia and Trina via email at tahlia@healfocuspodiatry.com.au and trina.goard@hotmail.com. If you have any questions about this episode, one-on-one business coaching or any of my group coaching programs, please email me at tf@tysonfranklin.com, and we can arrange a quick ZOOM call.  Youtube I record and upload most of my podcast interviews and other educational videos to my Youtube channel, Tyson E Franklin - Podiatry Business Coach. Please SUBSCRIBE, and if you click on the bell icon, you'll be informed whenever a new video is uploaded.  Competitive Advantage If you're looking for a competitive advantage over other podiatrists in your area, please visit my EVENTS PAGE, consider joining the Podiatry Business Owners Club on Facebook. To learn more about the next group coaching program, please visit https://www.tysonfranklin.com/Coaching/REBOOT.

The Faster Than Normal Podcast: ADD | ADHD | Health
Sally Willbanks, Founder of ND Renegade Contemporary Apparel Brand Shines Light on Neurodiversity

The Faster Than Normal Podcast: ADD | ADHD | Health

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 14:46


Sally Willbanks, Founder of ND Renegade, a contemporary apparel brand that shines a light on neurodiversity. She is an award-winning Australian artist who made a career change when she decided to start this clothing brand, with the intention of instilling pride in the neurodivergent population, including her two children.  Sally is the creator of all of ND Renegade's designs. Sally is also a neurodiversity advocate and speaker, presenting at schools in NSW with to educate faculty in ways to help neurodivergent students. Today we learn her story. This is awesome- enjoy! In this episode Peter and Sally Willbanks discuss:     1:47 - Intro and welcome Sally!   2:42 - So what prompted the start of your fashion brand ND Renegade? 3:42 - The concept of starting a company is not foreign to those of us with ADHD. Did this seem natural and usual to you and your children? 5:08 - These are so smart and AWESOME!!! Ref:  Designs at https://www.ndrenegade.com 5:37 - What have your reactions been to the messaging?  7:26 - When and with what were your children diagnosed? 8:00 - What are the conversations you are having with your young children about it all? 8:56 - How are you children involved in the business? 9:92 - What makes an item “sensory friendly” -what goes into making those? 10:15 - Pardon my American-ness, what is “Takiwatanga” and what does it mean? 11:28 - How old is the company now? 11:45 - What do you want people to know about the reasons you've done this and what are your goals? 12:56 - How can people find you? https://www.ndrenegade.com and @ndrenegade on INSTA and @ @NDRneurotribe on Facebook 13:25 - Thank you Sally Willbanks! Guys, as always, we are here for you and we love the responses and the notes that we get from you; so please continue to do that! Tell us who you want to hear on the podcast, anything at all; we'd love to know.  Leave us a review on any of the places you get your podcasts, and if you ever need our help I'm www.petershankman.com and you can reach out anytime via peter@shankman.com or @petershankman on all of the socials. You can also find us at @FasterNormal on all of the socials. It really helps when you drop us a review on iTunes and of course, subscribe to the podcast if you haven't already! As you know, the more reviews we get, the more people we can reach. Help us to show the world that ADHD is a gift, not a curse!  14:00 - Faster Than Normal Podcast info & credits TRANSCRIPT:  — I want to thank you for listening and for subscribing to Faster Than Normal! I also want to tell you that if you're listening to this one, you probably listened to other episodes as well. Because of you all, we are the number one ADHD podcast on the internet!! And if you like us, you can sponsor an episode! Head over to https://rally.io/creator/SHANK/ It is a lot cheaper than you think. You'll reach... about 25k to 30,000 people in an episode and get your name out there, get your brand out there, your company out there, or just say thanks for all the interviews! We've brought you over 230 interviews of CEOs, celebrities, musicians, all kinds of rock stars all around the world from Tony Robbins, Seth Godin, Keith Krach from DocuSign, Danny Meyer, we've had Rachel Cotton, we've had  the band Shinedown, right? Tons and tons of interviews, and we keep bringing in new ones every week so head over to https://rally.io/creator/SHANK/ make it yours, we'd love to have you, thanks so much for listening!  Now to this week's episode, we hope you enjoy it! — What's up guys, Peter Shankman at Faster Than Normal. We've got an extra special 10 minute episode this morning with Sally Willbanks. So most people, when they have ADHD this, you know, at ADHD and. Maybe I'll I'll I'll get some help, but I'll figure out what I'm doing. I'll I'll adjust some things. No. Sally decides to start a renegade contemporary apparel company called ND Renegade because that's what people with ADHD do. So we write books, we start clothing companies, we started other companies it's just who we are. So she's the founder. She's an award winning Australian artist who made a career change, which she decided to start this clothing brand with the intention of instilling pride into the neurodivergent population, including her two children. So there's the creator of all of the ND renegades designs. She's a neurodiversity new university advocate and speaker. She presents at schools in New South Wales with the ability and the desire to educate faculty in ways to help neuro diversion students. I love everything about that. Sally, welcome to Faster Than Normal. Thank you very much. Thank you for having me.  So you decided out of the blue, I mean, it wasn't as much out of the blue, but what made you make that change? You said, okay. I have two children who are neurodivergent; I'm just going to start a fashion.  Yeah. Um, well, I'm a, I'm an artist, I'm a painter and that requires long, long hours in the studio And, uh, I was just not spending too much time with my family and we homeschool and I wanted to show the kids how to run a business, but I needed them to be more involved. So. Um, I put down my brushes cause that's, it's really solitary. It didn't involve them very much. Um, I had the thought of doing a clothing brand that just for neurodivergent people, just to bring pride to themselves And once I had the idea, I couldn't let it go. So I literally wrapped up my show, uh, within a couple of weeks and designed a website, uh, designed the logo, got the name and, uh, we'd sold a first item within a month of me having the idea.  I love it. And, you know, the concept of, um, uh, sort of starting a company, or doing something like that it's not that foreign to people with ADHD because that's what sort of we do. We sit there and we say, okay, I have this idea. And 30 minutes later, you know, we've sketched it out and we have a website up. All right. We don't, we don't do focus groups. We don't do a panel testing. We just sort of go for it. So did you find that it was sort of the same thing? Like, okay, we're just going to go for this and, and, you know, you're teaching your kids sort of, sort of, this is how we do things and it's a faster sort of lifestyle as it were. Yeah. You know, basically if I, if I'd known how big it was going to get. And I, I, I wouldn't have done it like a, like if I'd seen the big picture, I don't know how I would've gotten there, but just taking one step at a time is what made it work. So I just thought, okay, I've got to get a logo, got to get a name, got to get a website, got to start designing. And it just kind of grew. So if I had, if I had seen what it was going to be and all the steps that took, I D I think I would have backed out to be honest. Um, so it was really about. Not thinking too far in advance and breaking it down into small doable steps. And, um, yeah, it just, it just clicked. It just worked. There was nothing else out there with this idea. There's other, there are other clothing lines out there that do, neurodiversity stuff, but it's more like to let people know that there, their kids are autistic but it's nothing about pride. So I wanted to change that.  I love what I'm seeing here on the spectrum and off the hook. Um, these are, these are, these are amazing. I love it. The nerd, my favorite is a neurodiversity, uh, shirt with like 15 different, uh, different types of, um, uh, chords, accessory chords, the Aux cord, the USB cord, the,, this is so smart. I mean, this stuff is, I think that what I, what I like about this is the premise that, that.  You know, we're in a time right now where, you know, 50 years ago, obviously no one talked to well forger about neurodivergency, we didn't talk about anything having to do with mental health. Mental health was a secret. We didn't share it. We didn't talk about it. If you remember, I'm always affected that, that scene in madman where, um, where Don sends Betty to a psychiatrist and, you know, she. The psychiatrist sends him the bills and the updates and the status reports. And doesn't share it with her know, even though she's the one in treatment. It doesn't share it with her. And that's changed the point where today we actually, you know, we, we represent this as pride. I mean, I have my t-shirts, I have countless ADHD t-shirts and, and, and I wear a wristband that says faster than normal and, and all of these things. And, you know, so you're in a, sort of a good place at the right time. Right. Um, we're trying to change that conversation from one of shame to one of pride. And what has been sort of the reaction that, that you've received have, have you had, I'm assuming it's mostly positive. Have there been any negative reactions? Have people told you this is something we shouldn't talk about or how, how, what what's talk about that?  Um, it's actually been really positive reaction. There were a few designs that I had, I've had a few issues with, um, as far as like, like an asby design, um, we've been asked to take that down, but then I got. So many people are asking me to keep it up. So I've got a disclaimer on the website and, um, you know, an educate yourself page as to why some people don't like the term Asperger's. Um, but other than that, it has been overwhelmingly fantastic. I get emails from people thanking me. I get emails from people telling me that they're using their clothing to come out to their family as neurodivergent. Um, it's just been, it's been overwhelmingly positive and it keeps me going. So, I mean, pretty much every other day I'd have something in my inbox. Saying, you know, thank you so much for doing what you're doing. Which is great.  This really is good stuff. And, and I think that, that, so, so when your children were diagnosed with, it goes to the ADHD or? Ok, so my son was diagnosed first as autistic, and then my daughter was diagnosed as ADHD, and then she was diagnosed as autistic and my son has since been diagnosed with ADHD. Um, so it's just that. Yeah, yeah, yeah. I mean, there's,??you know what I mean?  How are old are they? My son is eight and my daughter is 10. Tell us about what you tell them. Tell us about how, I mean, obviously they, they, they understand that there are benefits to this as well. Um, what are the conversations you're having with them? Are they having, you know, do they, they, they ever look at it as, as a, as a, as a curse, as opposed to a gift or how.  Right. Um, my son does, sometimes, he is a tough cookie. He's got anxiety disorder as well. So he gets quite angry a lot and he feels shame, uh, with his anger, but he still tells me he loves his brain because he wouldn't get to do the things that he can do. Like he can spell any word, he's been reading fluently since he was three, he can type like you would not believe on a computer. Um, and my daughter is nothing but positive. She is so stoked to be neurodivergent. She loves being Autistic. She loves being ADHD, and I just hope it stays that way. You know, she seems invincible at the moment and I know she'll have some setbacks, but I just, I love that she's so positive and she's becoming a great role model for other kids in the community as well. Um, How are your children involved in the business? Sure. They both have a couple of designs, believe it or not, on the store. Yeah, it is. I'm really thrilled with it actually. Uh, so I just took the drawings and turned them into t-shirts and they sell really well, which is great. And they actually partake in the giveaway videos that we do. And my son doesn't love being interviewed, so he hasn't yet, but my daughter and I do interviews with her about the different diagnoses and we do Instagram Live's and things like that. So she's really quite involved in the advocating side of things on Instagram.  Um, I'm looking on the website. I see sensory friendly hoodies. Talk about what makes an item sensory friendly? Uh, basically the tag fray and as soft as we could find. So, um, the tag is the big issue. You know, people, people with ADHD and autism have sensory issues and particularly that scratch irritating tag. And even if you cut the tag off, you still have that little nub of, you know, the seem where the tag is. So we've made sure that our clothes, um, uh, tag fray and a soft and comfortable as we could find. So we just did a lot of testing on products and found the best one. So I have a whole slew of my own clothes because they're the most comfortable ones that I own. So I'm always walking around with brand and branded clothing on.  I can tell there's definitely the artist's flare in here because the website is just stunningly beautiful. It's just so, so simple. And so, so clearly designed, um, tell me, uh, you know, this is, I think the American in me, what is “Takiwatanga” and what does it mean? Uh, that is one that we've actually come under a bit of fire with lately. That is, um, it's the Maori word for Autism and it means “in his home, my own space and time”, and it was coined by a man called a PI who basically wrote the, the mental health, like medical dictionary for the Maori language. And, um, I'm actually, I've got Maori ancestry, so my great-grandparents were Maori. Um, And I just think it's a really, really beautiful word. And I, I think that it is a way of looking at Autism that needs to be shared. So I've got that on a t-shirt so that people ask, what does it mean? Um, because the definition is just amazing. I mean, how, how, um, perfect. As it, in, in his, her my own space and time, it kind of encapsulates everything may, that autism is.  Oh, it really does. I love that. Oh, it obviously works. Cause I asked, you know, these are, these are really, really beautiful there. The website is ND renegade.com.  [[https://www.ndrenegade.com ]]And how old is the company now?  It is, it started in January of last year. So what's that about? 20 18, 20 months old, something like that.  Phenomenal. It's great to see. It's great to see that that taking sort of your, your talent and your putting it to such a use like this. Um, what do you want people to know about the reasons you've done this and what do you want people to know about, you know, what you're goals are?  Yeah, well, our goals are to spread neurodiversity pride into every part of the world. So we want people who have these differences to stand tall and know that that people are proud of them and that they don't need to hide because the more these people kind of hide and feel shame and mask their differences, they're going to, they're going to just disappear. Their lives are going to be, you know, spend at home, not, not being in society, not making the changes that they can make because they've got amazing brains. They have fantastic ideas that neurotypical people don't have. Um, the innovation that they can, that they can create in the workspace is incredible. And we need these brains. And if we don't show them that they, that they should feel pride and that they are loved and respected, they won't be using those incredible brains to help our planet. So we just want them to, we want me to know that they should stand tall. Differences are awesome.  I love it. Talking to [Sally] Willbanks NDRenegade is the website.[https://www.ndrenegade.com] I love it. I just signed up for your Instagram. I'm on the whole thing. Um, yes, we'll definitely have you back. Definitely keep in touch. And when you do new, new, um, items, you have dropped your drop notifications and you let people know and everything? Yup. Yup. I do. I usually, uh, run a few test, uh, stories on Instagram first and, you know, make sure people like what I'm doing and give them a couple of options and, uh, yeah, drop em on Instagram.  Very cool. Well, we'll definitely have you back.  Thank you so much for taking the time you thank you for having me.  Of course, you're listening to Faster Than Normal. If you're wondering why my voice is a little lower today. It's cause it's just about four in the morning here. And her being in a, uh, on the other hemisphere, I decided to get up even earlier than normal to get my workout in before or right after we interviewed. So this is me before my workout. If I'm a little calmer now, you know why guys as always you've been listening to Faster Than Normal. We love you for being here and we will see you next week. ADHD is a gift, not a curse. As is all neurodiversity. Stay tuned. See you again soon. — Credits: You've been listening to the Faster Than Normal podcast. We're available on iTunes, Stitcher and Google play and of course at www.FasterThanNormal.com I'm your host, Peter Shankman and you can find me at petershankman.com and @petershankman on all of the socials. If you like what you've heard, why not head over to your favorite podcast platform of choice and leave us a review, come more people who leave positive reviews, the more the podcast has shown, and the more people we can help understand that ADHD is a gift, not a curse. Opening and closing themes were composed and produced by Steven Byrom who also produces this podcast, and the opening introduction was recorded by Bernie Wagenblast. Thank you so much for listening. We'll see you next week. 

RNZ: Morning Report
Covid-19: Modeller on what case numbers could be on the way

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 4:02


A Covid-19 modeller says daily numbers could top out at around 150,200 cases a day by the middle of November, but New Zealand is also risking a New South Wales-style blowout. The country hit a new record of daily Covid-19 cases on Tuesday, 94 with more than half unlinked, sparking fears the contact tracing system could soon go under. Professor Michael Plank from Te Pūnaha Matatini told Morning Report contact tracing could help keep things under control. "If we can keep everything sort of as it is at the moment, and everything keeps working, it could be that the cases will flatten out at maybe 150, 200 a day by mid-November, as our vaccination program ramps up and the vaccines gradually put the brakes on the virus. "But one of the dangers at the moment is if the contact tracing system really struggles to keep up with the number of cases that it's being asked to deal with the cases could really accelerate, and if that happens, we could see a much higher number of cases." Prof Plank said with hindsight Auckland may have left alert level 4 too early, but staying any longer would only have bought more time. "It may well not have eliminated the outbreak, and so we may have ended up in a very similar situation to what we are now. It might have bought us a week, but it probably wouldn't have completely eliminated." He also didn't back the National Party's plan to end lockdowns when vaccinations reached between 85 and 90 percent or on December 1. "I don't think it's a very good idea to put fixed dates on things, I think we need to be responsive to what's happening in terms of the outbreak, and we need to be guided by the number of people that we've got vaccinated, and the epidemiology of the outbreak and the number of cases that load on the healthcare system, those sorts of things. "They will change over time, so we need to be able to respond to that."

Green & Red: Podcasts for Scrappy Radicals
A Very Secretive Democracy: Prof. Clinton Fernandes on Australia's Role in Pinochet's Coup in Chile (G&R 115)

Green & Red: Podcasts for Scrappy Radicals

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 45:56


We talked with Clinton Fernandes, professor at University of New South Wales in Canberra, Australia, which is part of the Australian Defence Force Academy, about his role in getting documents showing Australia's role in the 9/11/73 coup in Chile to depose Salvador Allende. He talked about the background to the coup, Australia's role in supporting American policies, and his efforts to get the documents showing those links. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Links// Challenge to declassify documents on Australia's involvement in Pinochet coup continues in secret (https://bit.ly/3pd0SVq) Guardian: Declassified documents show Australia assisted CIA in coup against Chile's Salvador Allende (https://bit.ly/3lOWcTg) Follow Green and Red// https://linktr.ee/greenandredpodcast Donate to Green and Red Podcast// Become a recurring donor at https://www.patreon.com/greenredpodcast Or make a one time donation here: https://bit.ly/DonateGandR This is a Green and Red Podcast production. Produced by Bob (@bobbuzzanco) and Scott (@sparki1969). “Green and Red Blues" by Moody. Editing by Isaac.

SBS World News Radio
Queensland's borders to reopen as southern Tasmania exits lockdown

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 5:31


Victoria has reported 1,903 new locally acquired COVID-19 cases and seven deaths, as it prepares for an early exit from its lockdown. And thousands of children have gone back to school in New South Wales.

RNZ: Checkpoint
Queensland to reopen as state nears 80 percent vaccinated

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 1:53


Christmas is back on in Queensland with the Premier announcing once the state reaches 80 percent double vaccinated, the border will reopen to fully-vaccinated arrivals, who will be able to do home quarantine. Meanwhile, New South Wales is enjoying more freedoms today. Worldwatch's Perlina Lau has the details.

SBS Italian - SBS in Italiano
Il futuro dell'Australia, tra COVID-19 ed emissioni zero

SBS Italian - SBS in Italiano

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 8:32


Victoria e New South Wales allentano questa settimana le restrizioni in vigore per proteggere la popolazione dal COVID-19. In altri stati preoccupa il tasso di vaccinazione che non cresce in modo abbastanza veloce.

RNZ: Morning Report
Covid-19: New South Wales residents enjoy new freedoms

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 3:21


New South Wales residents will face fewer Covid-19 restrictions from today, as the state hits a significant milestone. It's become the first in Australia to have 80 percent of its eligible population fully vaccinated against the virus. ABC correspondent Lara Hyams spoke to Susie Ferguson.

The John Batchelor Show
1768: New South Wales reopens for business and festivity in hours; & What is to be done? Jeremy Zakis, New South Wales, Australia.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 9:59


Photo: A 630 lb gold specimen from Hill End, New South Wales, unearthed in 1872 @Batchelorshow New South Wales reopens for business and festivity in hours; & What is to be done? Jeremy Zakis, New South Wales, Australia. https://www.broadsheet.com.au/sydney/city-file/article/just-new-south-wales-has-hit-80-cent-fully-vaccinated

SBS World News Radio
New South Wales reaches 80 per cent double dose vaccination target

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 6:30


Restrictions will further ease on Monday in New South Wales after the state reached its 80 per cent target.

The John Batchelor Show
1766: New South Wales aims to emerge with digital certificates. Scott Mayman @CBSNews. Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 12:06


Photo: One form of digital certificate. . CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow New South Wales aims to emerge with digital certificates. Scott Mayman @CBSNews. Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. https://www.zdnet.com/article/new-south-wales-and-victoria-commence-trial-of-covid-19-digital-certificates-on-check-in-apps/

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast
NSW plans to welcome international tourists next month, PM says not yet

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 10:41


New South Wales has vowed to become the first state to reopen to the world from November but the Prime Minister says tourists won't be allowed yet.

RNZ: Checkpoint
NSW to reopen border for visitors, but PM says otherwise

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 3:14


New South Wales' new Premier says the state will soon do away with hotel quarantine. From the November 1, fully vaccinated travellers will be allowed in without having to isolate in a hotel or at home, Dominic Perrottet revealed on Friday.  But a few hours later at the Australian Prime Minister's media conference, Scott Morrison poured water on the plan, saying only Australian citizens, residents and their immediate families will be able to enter New South Wales without quarantining.  Worldwatch's Perlina Lau reports.

The Play Podcast
The Play Podcast - 035 - Our Country's Good by Timberlake Wertenbaker

The Play Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 62:44


Episode 035: Our Country's Good by Timberlake Wertenbaker Host: Douglas Schatz Guest: Matt Beresford The Play Podcast is a podcast dedicated to exploring the greatest new and classic plays. In each episode we choose a single play to talk about in depth with our expert guest. We discuss the play's origins, its themes, characters, structure and impact. For us the play is the thing. It is 1789 and a group of convicts in the newly-founded colony of Botany Bay in Australia are assembled to put on a production of George Farquhar's Restoration Comedy The Recruiting Officer. The true story of this unlikely theatrical enterprise is the subject of Timberlake Wertenbaker's award-winning play, Our Country's Good, which premiered at the Royal Court Theatre in 1988 almost exactly 200 years after the events it portrays. The play is a vivid portrait of the volatile new settlement in New South Wales, which raises timeless questions about what makes for a country's good: the exercise of justice, the iniquities of class, the value of education and culture, and particularly of the redemptive power of theatre itself. It made complete logical sense to follow our last episode on The Recruiting Officer with this wonderful play, and even more sense to invite Director Matt Beresford back to talk us through it.

The Conversation Weekly
Explaining the 2021 Nobel Prizes: how touch works, a better way to make medicine and the fiction of Abdulrazak Gurnah

The Conversation Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 44:06


Six prize announcements later, 12 men and one woman from 11 countries are now settling down to their new lives as Nobel laureates. In this episode, we delve into the scientific discoveries around touch and organic catalysts awarded the 2021 prizes in medicine and chemistry. And we talk to a friend and collaborator of Abdulrazak Gurnah, the Tanzanian writer awarded the Nobel prize for literature.Featuring Kate Poole, associate professor in physiology, at the University of New South Wales in Australia, David Nagib, associate professor of chemistry at the Ohio State University and Susheila Nasta, emeritus professor of modern and contemporary literatures at Queen Mary University of London.Plus, Ina Skosana, health editor at The Conversation in Johannesburg, recommends some recent analysis on a huge breakthrough for the African continent: the approval of a malaria vaccine. (At 41m30)The Conversation Weekly is produced by Mend Mariwany and Gemma Ware, with sound design by Eloise Stevens. Our theme music is by Neeta Sarl. You can sign up to The Conversation's free daily email here. Full credits for this episode available here.Further readingMy PhD supervisor just won the Nobel prize in physics – here's how his research on complex systems changed science, by Paolo Barucca, UCLNobel Peace Prize for journalists serves as reminder that freedom of the press is under threat from strongmen and social media, by Kathy Kiely, University of Missouri-ColumbiaNobel winner David Card proves immigrants don't reduce the wages of native-born workers, by Arvind Magesan, University of CalgaryBreakthrough malaria vaccine offers to reinvigorate the fight against the disease, by Eunice Anyango Owino, University of NairobiMalaria vaccine is a major leap forward: but innovation mustn't stop here, by Jaishree Raman and Shüné Oliver, National Institute for Communicable Diseases See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

SBS World News Radio
What is 'Green Hydrogen'?

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 3:42


Andrew Forrest has announced ambitious investments in green hydrogen, partnering with the New South Wales and Queenlands Governments.

SBS Swahili - SBS Swahili
Je! utaendelea kufanyia kazi nyumbani au utarudi ofisini jimboni NSW?

SBS Swahili - SBS Swahili

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 8:59


Wiki hii wakaaji wa New South Wales ambao wame pata chanjo zote za Uviko-19, walipata fursa zakujumuika pamoja na jamaa namarafiki kwa mara ya kwanza baada ya zaidi ya siku 100 za vizuizi vyakudhibiti usambaaji wa Uviko-19.

SBS Italian - SBS in Italiano
Elezioni Comites 2021 in Victoria e New South Wales

SBS Italian - SBS in Italiano

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 24:21


Al via in tutto il mondo la campagna elettorale per l'elezione dei COMITES, Comitati degli Italiani all'estero. In questo primo dibattito abbiamo parlato con alcuni candidati australiani.

The Howie Carr Radio Network
Morning Minute - 10.13.21

The Howie Carr Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 1:21


Now in Australia, their health officials are suggesting the masks could become a mainstay. listen to New South Wales' chief health official Dr. Kerry chant.

SBS Korean - SBS 한국어 프로그램
NSW 주정부 석탄에서 수소로...30억 달러 계획 공개

SBS Korean - SBS 한국어 프로그램

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 1:41


뉴사우스웨일스 주정부가 주 수소산업을 확장하기 위한 30억 달러 규모 전략을 공개했다.

SBS Vietnamese - SBS Việt ngữ
New South Wales sẽ cán mốc 80% hai liều vaccine vào Chủ Nhật này

SBS Vietnamese - SBS Việt ngữ

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 10:10


Thủ hiến Dominic Perrottet nói tiểu bang có thể chuyển bang sang giai đoạn hai của việc mở cửa sớm hơn dự định. Trong khi đó Lãnh thổ phía Bắc yêu cầu những người làm những công việc có tiếp xúc với công chúng phải tiêm vaccine để tiếp tục đi làm. Còn tại VIC hôm nay có1.572 ca nhiễm mới 13 tử vong với 91% trong số 705 ca nhập viện không tiêm chủng đầy đủ.

SBS Macedonian - СБС Македонски
Australia's first dose vaccine administration is rising - Бројот на вакцинирани со прва доза во Австралија се зголемува

SBS Macedonian - СБС Македонски

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 9:35


As fully vaccinated residents in New South Wales venture out of their homes, Victoria becomes the only state in the country counting new COVID-19 cases in the thousands. First dose vaccine administration is rising around the country, which gives health officials hopes Australia will soon bring the pandemic under control. - Додека целосно вакцинирани жители во Нов Јужен Велс излегуваат од своите домови, Викторија станува единствената држава во земјата, која брои илјадници нови случаи на KОВИД-19. Степенот на вакцинација со прва доза се зголемува низ целата земја, што им дава надеж на здравствените власти дека Австралија наскоро ќе ја стави пандемијата под контрола.

Locales Unknown
Exploring Sydney, Australia with Jevon Saba

Locales Unknown

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 62:25


In this episode Jevon takes us to the land down under that is distinctly a continent onto itself. We traverse the country from the Torres Strait to the Whitsundays, New South Wales, Victoria and the Barossa. Sydney is also a focal point in our discussion, as we highlight its multiculturalism, food scene and world class beaches/harbor. We round out the episode with activities for every season and customizable itineraries for individuals seeking a novel experience. 

The Leighton Smith Podcast
Leighton Smith Podcast Episode 132 - October 13th 2021

The Leighton Smith Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 90:58


On this week's podcast:In early 2020, nearly every government in the world, in a multitude of ways, increased its direct control of people's lives. "The Great Covid Panic” examines how the madness started, what kept it going and how it might end. Guesting is co-author Professor Gigi Foster from the School of Economics at the University of New South Wales. It's a lengthy expose.Finally, to the Mailroom, and a further submission from a former National MP who addresses political leadership in a brilliant manner.File your comments and complaints at Leighton@newstalkzb.co.nzHaven't listened to a podcast before? Check out our simple how-to guide.Listen here on iHeartRadioLeighton Smith's podcast also available on iTunes:To subscribe via iTunes click here

SBS Japanese - SBSの日本語放送
Australia's first dose vaccine administration is rising - ワクチン接種の伸びで当局はパンデミックからの脱出に期待

SBS Japanese - SBSの日本語放送

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 9:05


As fully vaccinated residents in New South Wales venture out of their homes, Victoria becomes the only state in the country counting new COVID-19 cases in the thousands. First dose vaccine administration is rising around the country, which gives health officials hopes Australia will soon bring the pandemic under control. - ワクチン接種を完了したニューサウスウエルズの住民が外出の冒険に乗り出す一方、ビクトリアはCOVID-19の新たな感染ケース数が1,000件台を続けている国内で唯一の州となっています。全国でワクチンの一回目の接種が増え続けており、それがヘルス当局にオーストラリアは間もなくこのパンデミックを抑えられるという希望を与えています。

Inside Outside
Ep. 268 - Kevin Leland, Founder of Halo and Matt Muller, Dir. of Applied Innovation at Baxter on Open Innovation & Global Connections

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 21:12


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Kevin Leland, CEO and Founder of Halo and Matt Muller, Director of Applied Innovation at Baxter. The three of us talk about the changing world of open innovation and what it takes to connect and collaborate, to solve big industry problems. Let's get started. Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help new innovators navigate what's next. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat into what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started. Interview Transcript with Kevin Leland, CEO and Founder of Halo and Matt Muller, Director of Applied Innovation at BaxterBrian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger. And as always, we have another amazing set of guests. Today, we have Kevin Leland, who is the CEO and Founder of Halo. And Matt Muller, who is the Director of Applied Innovation at Baxter. Welcome. Kevin Leland: Thank you. Brian Ardinger: Hey, I'm excited to have you both on the show to talk about a topic that's near and dear to a lot of folks out there. That's the topic of open innovation and how to corporates and startups and new ideas get started in this whole world of collaborative innovation. Kevin you're the CEO and founder of Halo. What is Halo? And how did you get started in this open innovation space? Kevin Leland: Halo is a marketplace and network where companies connect directly with scientists and startups for research collaborations. It's about as simple to post RFP or a partnering opportunity on Halo as it is to post a job on LinkedIn. And then once it's posted scientists submit their research proposals. We went live in January. Matt and the team of Baxter was our very first customer. So, the earliest of early adopters and they were a really fantastic partner.I came across the idea of Halo and got into open innovation really kind of by accident. The original concept for Halo was crowd funding for medical research. So, a little bit different, but we would work with technology transfer offices at universities to identify promising technology that just needed a little bit of funding to get to the next level.And through that experience, I learned that scientists needed more than just funding. They needed the expertise and the resources of industry. Meanwhile, I was learning how industry was actively trying to partner with these scientists and these early-stage startups, because they realized that they were less good at the early-stage discovery process of research. And so to me, it seemed like an obvious marketplace solution. And so that's where the impetus of the business came and how we started. Brian Ardinger: Let's turn it over to you Matt. From the other side of the table, from a corporation, trying to understand and facilitate and accelerate innovation efforts. What is open innovation mean to you and how did Halo come to play a part in that?Matt Muller: As you mentioned earlier, I'm Director of Applied Innovation here at Baxter and I am in our Renal Care Business. And so that's the business at Baxter that's focused on treating end stage kidney disease. And that's one of Baxter's largest businesses. As a company, we have over $12 billion in sales annually, and dialysis in the renal care businesses, is our largest business unit.And it is an area that we've struggled with innovation. And particularly what we excel at, at Baxter is we excel at treating kidney disease in the home. So, this is a particular therapy called peritoneal dialysis. Patients are able to do it in their home while they sleep. And one of the big challenges that we have today with peritoneal dialysis is that patients need dialysis solution. They use about 12, 15 liters of this sterile medical solution every night to do their therapy. And today the way we do that and the way we've done it ever since this therapy has been around since early seventies is we literally deliver that solution in bags, by trucks. We make it in big plants in the United States and trucks drive all across the country and they deliver it to patients in their home.And as a company, we, for a long time have said, we really need to change this business model. It's not sustainable for us. It requires our patients store a lot of water in their home or the solution rather in their home. And they have to essentially dedicate a whole room of their houses to storage of their supplies.So, we have, for the longest time said, we want to change how this is done. And we want to be able to use the patient's own water in their home. And instead of delivering all these bags of solutions deliver concentrates much like if you go on, you buy a soft drink at the movie theater, it comes from a concentrated box of syrup that is, you add water to it and you have your soft drink. And so that's our vision. And we've struggled for many years of how to bring innovation into the marketplace for making that pure water that we need in the home. We have a lot of very bright scientists at Baxter. The problem is that as Kevin mentioned before, our scientists are really good at solving particular problems in particular getting products to market. Where we've been struggling is that the science has not or at least we haven't been aware of the science that could really allow us to break this barrier and make the leap to be able to make this pure solution medical grade solution in the home. And that's why we've reached out to Kevin and his platform as a way to do that is to go out to a really broad community of researchers to bring new ideas into the company, to help us figure out new ways to approach the problem.Brian Ardinger: The history of open innovation is long. And there's a lot of things that have been tried in the past. Did Baxter try other methods in the past? Or how did you go about trying to determine what things we should innovate internally and try to solve that way versus when and where we go outside for solutions? Matt Muller: I would say as a company, we probably hadn't been as involved specifically in the university and in the startups space. So, a lot of times as a company, we have a lot of people that come to us with ideas and looking for funding. Most of the time, it's a very common proposition that they give you. They need a certain amount of funding, and in three years, they'll have a product. Three years is like the magic number. And the reality is that it's frequently the claims and the charity are very oversold, and we haven't been really successful in that type of space. And so, we've been really looking at different ways to engage a larger community. The other element of it too, is sometimes when you talk open innovation, we're limited by our existing network of people. And so that is the employees and who they work with. Maybe it's the fact we're in Northern Illinois, we're close to Northwestern University and people here have relationships with professors at Northwestern.So, we develop those relationships and the open innovation opportunities through those connections. We've been looking into how do we expand that? Reach a broader audience and get a global connection, so to speak and open to new ideas. Brian Ardinger: And that's a great segue. Kevin, you've worked with companies also besides Baxter out there and that. What are some of the typical mistakes or challenges that you see corporations making when trying to get started in an open innovation.Kevin Leland: First of all get started is kind of the big challenge, because there's still some resistance to open innovation, and even the term open can be scary to some companies because it implies, or it can be interpreted as we're letting all of our competitors know what our strategic interests are. And so, I'm even hesitant sometime about using the word open. I mean, we're really about facilitating partnerships between companies and researchers who have mutually shared interests and can work together to solve problems. Some of the approaches in the past to me just seemed really inefficient, like traveling around the world and going to conferences and hoping you hear somebody speak or get a referral from someone or just call up the universities. Or just more likely to just work with Harvard, Yale, and Princeton are just example of select universities as if there couldn't possibly be great research coming out anywhere else.And so that was part of the problem that I was trying to solve with Halo in terms of democratizing access to companies like Baxter for all scientists, regardless of where they are in the world, or what institution, where they reside and making the process a lot easier for both the scientists and for the company.Because one of the reasons that companies don't pass a wider net is because it's a lot of tedious administrative work in terms of emailing and downloading attachments and PDFs. So, the platform is designed to streamline that entire process so they can cast a wider net. The Ewing Marion Kauffman FoundationSponsor Voice: The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation is a private, nonpartisan foundation based in Kansas City, Missouri, that seeks to build inclusive prosperity through a prepared workforce and entrepreneur-focused economic development. The Foundation uses its $3 billion in assets to change conditions, address root causes, and break down systemic barriers so that all people – regardless of race, gender, or geography – have the opportunity to achieve economic stability, mobility, and prosperity. For more  information, visit www.kauffman.org and connect with us at www.twitter.com/kauffmanfdn and www.facebook.com/kauffmanfdn.Brian Ardinger: Are there types of businesses or types of challenges that seem to work better when tackled in this open format or open environment? Kevin Leland: We're focused on scientific innovation. So the other key difference is that all of our community are PhDs or part of funded startups. So it's not a challenge site where just anybody can submit an idea. So that's one of the key differences. Brian Ardinger: Are the types of businesses or types of challenges that seem to work better in this type of environment.Kevin Leland: In the case of Halo, we seen everything from very specific requirements that were similar to what Baxter was looking for where they lay out the actual technical requirements of what they're looking for. And then on the other side of the spectrum, we have what Bayer has done, which is a very open-ended call for proposals around the area of sustainable agriculture. And so, the platform is flexible enough that it works for either approach. The key difference, I mean, it really depends on the goal of the company. So in the case of Baxter, a lot of our other customers like Pepsi or Reckitt, they're looking for a very specific solution, to a challenge that they have. Whereas a company like Bayer kind of doesn't know what they don't know, and they're just kind of want to see what's out there.And then from a management perspective, when you do have a very open-ended call, you get a lot more proposals and the more specific requirements the fewer you are going to get. So, it kind of depends on, on what your ultimate strategy is. Brian Ardinger: That's a great way to segue it back to Matt. I'm assuming that your work with Halo is not the only type of innovation initiative that's going on at Baxter. Can you talk a little bit about some of the other innovation efforts that are going on there and how does your work with Halo fit in with those?Matt Muller: As a company, really, a lot of our innovation framework is built into our core business objectives. The way we're structured as a company we're in business units. So, as I said, I work in renal care, so everything, we start with our business and understanding what does that business strategy. Where do we want to play as a company? And then what are the key problems that we want to solve?And I mentioned up front one of the key problems right now that we want to solve, is we want to figure out how to be a more sustainable business and get away from shipping water across the globe. So that's a key strategic initiative for our business. So, then what we define at that point, what are the key elements or the problems that we need to solve in meeting that strategic initiative. One is how do we purify water in the home? And then we figure out what are the ways, you know, based on those specific problems we find we have, what are the best ways to solve that problem?So, in some cases, we're at a point where we need more ideas. Whereas a company, we stagnated and we tried these pathways are not fruitful. We're kind of keep banging our head against the wall. Let's really go out there and see what's out there. And that was an example of what we did with Halo. We also have our own internal engineering organization. We're a global company. So, there are specific things that we may do from an innovation project where we would work on it internally because we feel like we have the internal expertise. Or a lot of times what we will do is we'll look for external partnerships and that may be in the form of through various engineering consulting companies and product development consulting companies that we may partner with because they may have very specific experiences in a space that we're interested in, or maybe an adjacent space.And that's another big element is we get siloed and focused in medical. But there are a lot of adjacent areas where technologies are being developed and, you know, maybe it's the petroleum or refining industry, or maybe it's, you know, some other area of medical that we just don't play in. And we can bring in these consultant firms that just have much broader exposure. And so that's also an element that we look at. So it's really a mix between this open concept like what we do with Halo, engineering consulting and partnerships, and then internal. Brian Ardinger: You know the world is changing so fast and everything is happening so rapidly that it's tough to keep up. Even if you're an expert in your particular industry, like you said, even understanding what's going on in cross industries and that. Kevin, can you talk a little bit about the types of industries that you serve and why a platform like this can give advantage to corporate?Kevin Leland: Yeah, absolutely. I thought it was interesting when Matt was talking about getting inspiration from other industries like oil and gas or petroleum, because that's really what the platform is designed for. Researchers don't necessarily think in terms of what the commercial application is. They think of what their expertise is. And by collecting all this data on what their focus area is and then on the flip side, what companies are interested in, we can more programmatically find connections that in potential partners where otherwise, it would really have no idea that there might be a fruitful opportunity there. In general, we've been focused like broadly on the area of sustainability, which can include anything from sustainable agriculture, like Bayer to sustainable packaging or work with PepsiCo and then water treatment, which is what we did with Matt and his team.So that's a really broad category. We do have a few other opportunities are kind of outside that scope. But we are also looking at doing more in the medicine and pharmaceutical areas as well. Brian Ardinger: Matt, can you talk a little bit about the early days of finding an innovation effort like this? What were some of the challenges or pitfalls or things you had to do to get buy in and then go and actually execute on this particular challenge? Matt Muller: It's hard to sometimes in a large company get traction. And so, you need a champion. And Kevin's known that cause we've actually worked together to help to get that traction within Baxter. I think it helped as we got started because Kevin had some prior connections with some core people at Baxter, which helped to get some initiative.But I think the biggest challenge is getting started and showing the value and gaining the buy-in to get something like this funded internally in a large company. I think a lot of people have an opinion of large companies have endless resources. And can do anything they want. But the reality is everything's looked at very closely.You're constantly getting distracted with the new crisis or the new area of focus. And people are constantly changing roles and companies. So, you need that champion internally. You need to then be able to get that own internal opportunity to influence. To get the approval, to fund something like this.But then secondly, you need the success stories to come out of it, because if you don't have that initial success, chances are that then you're not going to get that momentum and people aren't going to believe in following through with it. And that was key to our relationship here is getting really some initial successes that we could point to. And then things have kind of evolved from there. Brian Ardinger: And that's a great point. I think a lot of companies are naturally more fearful because failing in an existing business model is not a good thing, but yet to innovate, you know, that there are some things that are probably not going to work and that. Open innovation almost gives you some opportunity to try and test and experiment a little bit outside of your core realm.Gives you a little bit more ground cover sometimes to have different types of conversations than you would have, just if it was only internal and working from that perspective. Kevin, what else are you seeing when it comes to the benefits of companies reaching outside of their four walls to create their innovation initiatives? Kevin Leland: The biggest benefit and maybe Matt can speak to this is they're identifying partners that they would have never known about otherwise. So Matt was able to identify a team in Australia. UNSW Sydney. And I don't think Baxter has anyone on the ground there, and probably wouldn't have found that otherwise. And then the secondary benefit is it's almost like a market analysis tool or market intelligence tool because the companies are learning about new technologies and trends and different pockets of innovation around the world that they really didn't have visibility into previously.Brian Ardinger: What are you guys most excited about moving forward?Kevin Leland: I'm really excited to see this working. So, you know, I did a ton of customer discovery before launching Halo. I had dozens of interviews with innovation executives on one side and scientists on the other side. But you never really know until you actually go into the wild and introduce a platform to the users to see if it's going to work. And we've done 20 plus RFPs now since Baxter. We work to put 12 Fortune 500 companies, every one of them has resulted in signed agreements. And, you know, obviously it takes time to see these products into the marketplace, but that's the next thing I'm excited about is when Baxter introduces a new home dialysis device, where patients can make the dialysis solution from their kitchen and don't have to have 900 pounds of solution sitting in their bedroom.Brian Ardinger: Matt, what are you excited about? Matt Muller: Well, I like your vision of the future there, Kevin, first of all. Beyond that, you know, and obviously helping us accelerate, getting the innovative products to market. The other thing that I've really enjoyed is being able to make these broader connections that we never would have before. Kevin used the example of we're connected now with the University of New South Wales on a really interesting research project.But the other thing that this connected us with is a whole network of experts on an NSF Foundation called New, which is very well aligned with some of our core business and research interests that we never would have had before. You know, if we hadn't been involved with this initiative. And so, it's those types of things that also really get me excited because it really helps us.You know, at the end of the day we're scientists. We're engineers. We all like collaborating with other scientists and engineers to solve problems. And this is just exciting because it broadens that network for us even more. For More InformationBrian Ardinger: Matt and Kevin, thank you for collaborating here at Inside Outside Innovation and sharing some of the insights on what's working in this new changing landscape that we're in. So, I appreciate you both being on. If people want to find out more about yourselves or the companies and that that you work at, what's the best way to do. Kevin Leland: For me, they can connect with me on LinkedIn. Just search Kevin Leland should be one of the top three, I think, or go to Halo. Science Matt Muller: And similarly, you can connect with me on LinkedIn. I'm Matthew Muller, Director of Applied Innovation, Baxter Healthcare. We also have a company bio description on Kevin's platform. Halo. We also have put out two new challenge statements with respect to some of the key technical challenges that we have in our space. So, you know, go to Kevin's platform and check those out as well, please.Brian Ardinger: Well, Matthew, Kevin, thank you again for being on Inside Outside Innovation. I look forward to continuing the conversation and thank you very much.Kevin Leland: Thanks Brian.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  

SBS Spanish - SBS en español
12 de octubre de 1492: ¿Cómo interpretar la colonización de América desde la mirada contemporánea?

SBS Spanish - SBS en español

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 23:34


A más de 500 años del 12 de octubre de 1492, la llegada de Colón no deja de causar controversia, dolor e incomodidad. SBS Spanish conversa con el Dr Jordi Vidal Robert, experto en la economía histórica de la Universidad de Sydney, y con el Dr Carlos Eduardo Morreo, politólogo y ejecutivo del Instituto de Estudios poscoloniales en Melbourne, sobre cómo las nociones de la conquista y la colonización han cambiado en el tiempo.

SBS World News Radio
Australia's first dose vaccine administration is rising

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 6:49


As fully vaccinated residents in New South Wales venture out of their homes, Victoria becomes the only state in the country counting new COVID-19 cases in the thousands.

Free Talk Live
Free Talk Live 2021-10-11

Free Talk Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 121:30


Southwest Airlines Strike :: Biden's vaccine mandate just a press release? :: Woke Superman Comes Out :: It's "Freedom Day" in New South Wales! :: Apostrophe Catastrophe :: Australia Censorship :: Inflation and Employee Shortages :: Show: 2021-10-11 Ian, Aria, Bonnie

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast
S4 E50: Australia: Lockdowns and Location Apps | John Anderson

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 82:01


This episode was recorded on September 9th. Dr. Jordan Peterson and John Anderson exchange ideas about the freedom of conscience, policies, and mandatory vaccines. Dr. Jordan shares his experience with policies while Anderson shares tips on conducting proper debates while commenting on the governmental debates. See how Australia connects to their discussion and how social media came into play. John Anderson is a sixth-generation farmer and grazier from New South Wales, who spent 19 years in the Australian Parliament. After serving in politics, Anderson launched a web-based interview program, Conversations with John Anderson, featuring interviews with public intellectuals. He continues to serve the interests of Australia's rural and regional communities. Find more John Anderson on his website https://johnanderson.net.au/ Check out his YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnAndersonConversations Check out his Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/johnandersonao Follow him on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnAndersonAO/ ———————————— Shownotes ———————————— ● [00:00] Dr. Peterson introduces this week's guest, John Anderson. ● [03:32] "The problem with fighting fire with fire is that you end up burning." Dr. Peterson ● [03:54] What's happening in Australia and the west? ● [04:26] John's tips for proper debates. ● [06:17] How Anderson views Australia's regime. ● [06:40] China's imposed threat on Australia. ● [09:09] John quoting Henry Kissinger on freedom. ● [09:47] The legality of mandatory vaccines in western culture and the blitz story during WWII in Britain. ● [11:48] Anderson's analogy of democracy. ● [14:31] Dr. Peterson's advice on policies. ● [16:05] The lockdowns in Australia. ● [22:07] Dr. Peterson's perspective towards proper political force on vaccinations. ● [21:26] The cost of safety. ● [25:29] John's opinion on debates. ● [26:56] Breaking down trust in the government. ● [31:53] How governmental debates should be conducted. ● [37:21] Freedom of Conscious. ● [43:10] The best rationale for mandatory vaccines. ● [53:01] Lockdowns and the dangers of mandating medical procedures. ● [59:46] The power of social media and John's thoughts on moving forward. ● [01:02:19] Social media and John's podcast. ● [01:06:47] Anderson's thoughts on freedom and governments. ● [01:10:15] Australian politicians' understanding of social media. __________ Visit www.jordanbpeterson.com to view more information about Jordan, his books, lectures, social media, blog posts, and more. Jordan B. Peterson is a professor of psychology at the University of Toronto, a clinical psychologist, and the author of the multi-million copy bestseller 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos, #1 for nonfiction in 2018 in the US, Canada, the UK, Australia, New Zealand, Sweden, the Netherlands, Brazil and Norway, and slated for translation into 50 languages. Dr. Peterson has appeared on many popular podcasts and shows, including the Joe Rogan Experience, The Rubin Report, H3H3, and many more. Dr. Peterson's own podcast has focused mainly on his lecture series, covering a great deal of psychology and historical content. Jordan is expanding his current podcast from lectures to interviews with influential people around the world. We hope you enjoy this episode and more to come from Dr. Peterson in the future. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers
626: Digging into the Fossil Record to Understand our Planet's Past and Aid Present Conservation Efforts - Dr. Michael Archer

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 63:01


Dr. Michael Archer is a Professor of Paleobiology in the School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of New South Wales in Australia. Mike is a paleontologist who is fascinated with understanding the continuity of life over billions of years. He spends his free time watching Sci-Fi movies, including classics like Jurassic Park (one of his all-time favorites). Mike received his undergraduate education from Princeton University in Geology and Biology. He was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to study in Australia and remained there to earn his PhD in Zoology from the University of Western Australia. Mike has since worked at the Western Australian, Queensland, and Australian Museums, and he joined the faculty at the University of New South Wales in 1978. Mike has received many awards and honors, including being named one of the Top 100 Most Influential People in Sydney in 2008, receipt of the Riversleigh Society Medal, the TH Huxley Award from the Australian Museum, and the Australian Centennial Medal from the Federal Government of Australia. He is a Member of the Australia Institute of Biology, as well as a Fellow of the Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales, the World Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Australian College of Educators, The Australian Academy of Science, the Royal Society of New South Wales, and Australia 21. In this interview, Mike tells us more about his journey through life and science.

SBS Samoan - SBS Samoan
Talafou a le SBS Aso Sa 10 Oketopa.

SBS Samoan - SBS Samoan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 9:46


Tatala a taeao Vavao i New South Wales. To'a 1,000 tagata faatagaina i le malae tutu'u o Flemington mo le maimoaina o le Melbourne Cup.

World Business Report
Sydney reopens after 106 days in lockdown

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 22:56


New South Wales' largest city emerges from a lockdown lasting more than three months - we hear about the impact on the economy from Sarah Hunter at BIS Oxford Economics in Sydney. Patrick Edmond of avation consultants Altair Advisory looks back on 75 years of Alitalia as the Italian flagship airline makes its last flight this week. Fabian Bolin of War on Cancer tells us about the organisation's new app which helps track clinical trials available to cancer patients, and independent economist Michael Hughes discusses inflation and rising food prices. This edition is presented by Russell Padmore and produced by Russell Newlove. (Image: A person walks in front of the Sydney Opera House Credit:EPA)

Glitter Hour
Back to School

Glitter Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 9:39


After 4 months away from the classroom, kids in New South Wales are finally returning to the classroom. Mia is a mix of emotions about being back in school and her soon-to-be very busy schedule of after school activities. Listen as she talks us through her feelings and how she plans to handle it all. 

The John Batchelor Show
1753: ""Save Australia!" in the streets of New York City. Jeremy Zakis, New South Wales.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 16:49


Photo: Australian protests against continuing lockdowns. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow ""Save Australia!" in the streets of New York City. Jeremy Zakis, New South Wales. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/transcript-of-robert-s-mueller-iiis-testimony-before-the-house-intelligence-committee/2019/07/24/f424acf0-ad97-11e9-a0c9-6d2d7818f3da_story.html

The David Knight Show
Tue 5Oct21 Parents Who Redress Grievances Declared Enemies of the State, FBI Will Investigate

The David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 181:39


TOPICS by TIMECODE2:00 Should Facebook & other major corporations be given a seat at the UN? Are they the handmaids or the controllers of government? The “Deep State” is the Surveillance State, Facebook and social media are its Frankenstein creation23:11 The bizarre things that happened with Facebook going down — and the reactions. A harbinger of an apocalypse or a new dawn?38:40 GREAT NEWS for nurses losing their jobs due to vaccine mandates40:10 Listener letters: Facing termination but determined and trusting God, an employer who's supporting employee's informed consent and taking steps to circumvent Biden's mandate46:52 In 2003, New South Wales, Australia — the government threatened people with massive fines for the FRAUDULENT CLAIMS THAT MASKS WORKED, citing research that even N95 masks are USELESS AFTER 20 MINUTES57:35 Efforts to block dishonorable discharge for military who refuse the vaccine from both GOP Senators and even the House. Biden opposes. Will there be practical limitations that prevent court martial?1:07:10 Trump's FDA head (now at Pfizer) tells Americans they will sacrifice their individual rights to the collective good as Fauci is lecturing Canadians with the same message1:15:27 Israeli study shows hospital with 96% fully vaxed staff STILL got sick and transmitted to fully vaxed patients (5 died). Two unvaxed patients had mild symptoms only.1:18:33 Health care worker takes jab to keep job, gets paralyzed — NO medical care or rehab and no “vaccine passport” to live her life w/o 2nd jab1:22:44 Project Veritas — 3 Pfizer scientists admit on hidden camera that natural immunity is far better than their vaccine1:31:22 After association of School Board bureaucrats demanded FBI investigate parents who speak out, Attorney General Garland declares them “domestic terrorists”. Are you ready to take your child out and SHUT DOWN these schools, these seminaries for Marx & Satan?2:04:20 INTERVIEW: From Shot to Clot & Merck's Copycat Patent. Dr. Joel Hirschhorn, MD PhD (author of "Pandemic Blunder”) on the mechanism of vaccine-induced blood clots, the intimidation and purging of medical dissent, and Merck has pivots to an expensive therapeutic2:52:59 Schumer's 4D Chess. Dems now furious about the secret deal and the lies. And jailed Marine Lt Col Schiller, still be held w/o trial, wants NOTHING to do with the partisan division — so the Trump cult attacksFind out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-showOr you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail: David Knight POB 1323 Elgin, TX 78621

The John Batchelor Show
1733: Unusual, sudden, mayhap unprecedented tornado in New South Wales; also, the admired premier resigns in a rush of scandal over Wagga Wagga; also, cricket returns! Jeremy Zakis, New South wales, Australia.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 11:32


Photo:  Wagga Wagga Fire Station (C. 1903) on Morrow Street in 1912. @Batchelorshow Unusual, sudden, mayhap unprecedented tornado in New South Wales; also, the admired premier resigns in a rush of scandal over Wagga Wagga; also, cricket returns! Jeremy Zakis, New South wales, Australia. https://news.yahoo.com/rare-tornado-rips-part-australias-004816811.html https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/world/2021/10/new-south-wales-premier-gladys-berejiklian-expecting-to-resign.html https://www.espn.com/cricket/story/_/id/32310428/sheffield-shield-victoria-new-south-wales-prepare-quarantine-get-their-season-going