Podcasts about Royal commission

Formal body created for public inquiry into a defined issue in some Commonwealth monarchies

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Latest podcast episodes about Royal commission

Stuff You Missed in History Class
Hortense and Marie Mancini

Stuff You Missed in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 46:55


Hortense and Marie Mancini tried to make a place for themselves in 17th-century Europe, defying all kinds of conventions along the way. Their lives were full of adventure and daring, but they were also both stuck in abusive marriages.   Research: "Jules Mazarin." Historic World Leaders, edited by Anne Commire, Gale, 1994. Gale In Context: U.S. History, link.gale.com/apps/doc/K1616000407/GPS?u=mlin_n_melpub&sid=bookmark-GPS&xid=68d5e2f8. Accessed 11 Oct. 2022. "When lesbian passions stirred at court." Times [London, England], 7 Feb. 2019, p. 3. Gale In Context: Global Issues, link.gale.com/apps/doc/A572957931/GPS?u=mlin_n_melpub&sid=bookmark-GPS&xid=8ab9535e. Accessed 11 Oct. 2022. Britannica, The Editors of Encyclopaedia. "Mancini sisters". Encyclopedia Britannica, 11 Dec. 2015, https://www.britannica.com/topic/Mancini-sisters. Accessed 12 October 2022. Esslemont, Chloe. “Keeping up with the Mazarinettes.” Art UK. 1/17/2019. https://artuk.org/discover/stories/keeping-up-with-the-mazarinettes Ferguson, Donna. “Restoration influencer: how Charles II's clever mistress set trends ahead of her time." The Guardian.2/28/2021. https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2021/feb/28/restoration-influencer-how-charles-iis-clever-mistress-set-trends-ahead-of-her-time Folger Library. “The Fabulous Mancini Sisters.” 3/13/2012. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5sX30o5FX0Y Folgerpedia. “The Mancini Sisters.” https://folgerpedia.folger.edu/The_Mancini_Sisters:_Mistresses_and_Memoirists Goldsmith, Elizabeth C. “The Kings' Mistresses: The Liberated Lives of Marie Mancini, Princess Colonna, and Her Sister Hortense, Duchess Mazarin.” Public Affairs. 2012. Latour, Therese Louis. “Princesses Ladies And Adventuresses of the Reign of Louis XIV.” London. Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co. 1924. O'Rourke, John. “17th-Century Sisters the Kardashians Might Admire.” BU Today. 8/27/2012. https://www.bu.edu/articles/2012/17th-century-sisters-the-kardashians-might-admire/ Porter, Linda. “Charles II's last mistress.” Historia: Magazine of the Historical Writers' Association. 4/16/2020. https://www.historiamag.com/charles-iis-last-mistress/ Richard, Kristen. “How Italy's ‘Runaway Duchess' Changed How We Drink Champagne.” Wine Enthusiast. 2/11/2022. https://www.winemag.com/2022/02/11/hortense-mancini-runaway-duchess-champagne/ Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts. “The Manuscripts of His Grace the Duke of Rutland: Letters and papers, 1440-1797 (v.3 mainly correspondence of the fourth Duke of Rutland). v.4. Charters, cartularies, &c. Letters and papers, supplementary. Extracts from household accounts.” Jan. 1889. https://play.google.com/store/books/details?id=IgoRAAAAYAAJ&rdid=book-IgoRAAAAYAAJ&rdot=1 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Culture G
Qu'est-ce que la liste rouge de l'UICN ?

Culture G

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 6:14


Il s'agit d'un inventaire mondial sur l'état de conservation global des espèces végétales et animales. Il recense les espèces en voie de disparition, notamment le panda roux, la baleine bleue ou encore le léopard d'Arabie... Dans cet épisode, zoom sur ce dernier animal dont il ne reste que quelques dizaines de représentants sur notre planète

The Signal
Why legal warnings didn't stop Robodebt

The Signal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 12:37


For hundreds of thousands of Australians the former Coalition government's attempts to claw back welfare overpayments became a time of great distress. In some cases people took their own lives.   Now a Royal Commission into the Robodebt scandal has heard the Commonwealth was warned the debt recovery was potentially illegal years before the scheme even began.  Today 7.30 reporter, Paul Farrell on the woman who fought to expose the injustice and how the Royal Commission could reveal wrongdoing at the highest levels. Featured: Paul Farrell, ABC TV's 7.30 reporter

SBS World News Radio
Was the government 'recklessly indifferent' over its 'robodebt' scheme?

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 2:52


The Royal Commission into the botched Centrelink debt recovery scheme has heard the department's own lawyers cast doubt on its legality before it began. The scheme ran from 2015 until November 2019, when the government accepted it was unlawful.

SBS Macedonian - СБС Македонски
Disability Royal Commission focuses on people from migrant backgrounds

SBS Macedonian - СБС Македонски

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 4:01


Кралската комисија за попреченост го насочи своето внимание спрема луѓето од различно културно и јазично потекло. Комисијата испитува како перцепциите за попреченоста во некои заедници може негативно да влијаат на пристапот и поддршката.

SBS World News Radio
Disability Royal Commission focuses on people from migrant backgrounds

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 2:50


The Disability Royal Commission has turned its attention to focus on people from culturally, linguistically and diverse backgrounds. The commission is examining how perceptions of disability within some communities can impact negatively on access and support

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Political commentators Gareth Hughes & Brigitte Morten

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 22:59


Gareth, Brigitte and Kathryn talk about how the Hamilton byelection is an unwelcome litmus test for Labour, the Government's decision to dump its Covid powers and a possible Royal Commission into the Covid response. The economic hangover continues, could National's social investment proposal work and the PM has met with Auckland's new mayor.

RNZ: Morning Report
Former Catholic Bishop under spotlight at inquiry

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 3:06


The former Catholic Bishop of Auckland has come under intense questioning at the Abuse in Care Inquiry over recommending a priest, who had three allegations made against him, for a teaching job. The Catholic Church appeared at the Royal Commission hearing in Auckland yesterday. Bishop Patrick Dunn was responding to complaints made about Tongan priest, Sateki Raass. Andrew McRae reports.

Ben Fordham: Highlights
Calls for royal commission into medical fraud

Ben Fordham: Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 3:39


Medicare specialist Dr Margaret Faux told Ben Fordham all types of doctors are involved in the system-wide scandal.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Economics Explained
White Elephant Stampede w/ Scott Prasser - EP161

Economics Explained

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 53:56


Various projects worldwide have been labeled White Elephants. These projects include the Gold Coast desalination plant and the Berlin Brandenburg Airport, among many others. What exactly is a White Elephant? How can we identify them and how can we stop them from happening in the future? In this episode, Scott Prasser joins show host Gene Tunny to talk about White Elephants. Scott is a former academic and ministerial adviser, and is one of the editors of the new book from Connor Court titled White Elephant Stampede: Case Studies in Policy and Project Management Failures. Please get in touch with any questions, comments and suggestions by emailing us at contact@economicsexplored.com or sending a voice message via https://www.speakpipe.com/economicsexplored. About this episode's guest: Scott PrasserScott has worked in senior policy and advisory roles in Australian state and federal government public service. From 2013 to 2019 he was Senior Adviser to three federal cabinet ministers covering portfolios of education and training, and regional health, sport and decentralisation. In addition, Scott has held academic positions at five universities across four states and territories, the last at professorial level. Scott gained his undergraduate and master's degrees from University of Queensland, and his doctorate from Griffith University. Scott's most recent publication with Helen Tracey was Royal Commissions and Public Inquiries: Practice and Potential (2014); and Audit Commissions: Reviewing the Reviewers (2013). Scott's substack newsletter: https://policyinsights.substack.com/Links relevant to the conversationThe new book from Connor Court White Elephant Stampede: Case Studies in Policy and Project Management Failures:https://www.connorcourtpublishing.com.au/White-Elephant-Stampede-Case-Studies-in-Policy-and-Project-Management-Failures_p_510.htmlCriteria for identifying White Elephant projects:https://drive.google.com/file/d/1qcrWWc39VRZ8ATNO2CRmWRe8KbUxUcki/view?usp=sharingRegarding the cost of the Gold Coast desalination plant, see:https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/national/queensland/tugun-desal-plant-back-online-permanently-from-2020-seqwater-20150901-gjcioa.htmlThe Brisbane Times article reports:“The controversial $1.2 billion  Tugun plant was closed in 2009 after a string of complaints including rusting pipelines  and mothballed from fulltime water production in 2010.Normally it provides only three megalitres per day to Southeast Queensland's water grid and costs between $12 million and $15 million a year to operate.”Time Out article on fixing up the acoustics in the concert hall of the Sydney Opera House:https://www.timeout.com/sydney/news/the-new-and-improved-concert-hall-of-the-sydney-opera-house-has-finally-been-unveiled-071422CreditsThanks to Josh Crotts for mixing the episode and to the show's sponsor, Gene's consultancy business www.adepteconomics.com.au. Please consider signing up to receive our email updates and to access our e-book Top Ten Insights from Economics at www.economicsexplored.com. Economics Explored is available via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcast, and other podcasting platforms.

RNZ: Morning Report
Gloriavale leader appears at Abuse in Care Inquiry

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 6:46


One of Gloriavale's leaders, Howard Temple, has admitted to the Abuse in Care inquiry that victims would be asked to forgive their abuser, sometimes in front of the whole congregation. The 82-year-old appeared before the Royal Commission via audio visual link yesterday. Temple also admitted some victims might not have spoken up about abuse through fear. Despite the admissions, recent leavers of Gloriavale aren't convinced the community will change for the better. One of them is Rosanna Overcomer, a member of the Gloriavale Leavers' Support Trust. She spoke to Kim Hill.

RNZ: Morning Report
Gloriavale to appear at Abuse in Care Inquiry

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 3:23


The Gloriavale Christian Community will appear for the first time at the Abuse in Care Inquiry when it resumes in Auckland today. It's the last public hearing for the Royal Commission, which started its work in 2019. Andrew McRae reports.

New Books in French Studies
F. R. Scott's Journal of the Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism

New Books in French Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 38:53


Greg Marchildon interviews Graham Fraser who edited F. R. Scott's journal that he kept while he was a member of the Royal Commission on Bilinguiism and Biculturalism–the famous Bi and Bi Commission. The book is entitled The Fate of Canada: F. R. Scott's Journal of the Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism, 1963-1971 (McGill-Queen's UP, 2021). The journal sheds considerable light on the intellectual journey of the Commission and the content of its interim and final reports. Graham Fraser is a former journalist who served as Canada's sixth Commissioner of Official Languages between 2006 and 2016. He was also a writer who has published in both official languages of Canada. An officer of the Order of Canada, he is currently associated with the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Ottawa. This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt. This interview was produced with the support of The Champlain Society. The mission of The Champlain Society is to increase public awareness of, and accessibility to, Canada's rich store of historical records. Gregory P. Marchildon is the Ontario Research Chair in Health Policy and System Design with the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/french-studies

New Books in History
F. R. Scott's Journal of the Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 38:53


Greg Marchildon interviews Graham Fraser who edited F. R. Scott's journal that he kept while he was a member of the Royal Commission on Bilinguiism and Biculturalism–the famous Bi and Bi Commission. The book is entitled The Fate of Canada: F. R. Scott's Journal of the Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism, 1963-1971 (McGill-Queen's UP, 2021). The journal sheds considerable light on the intellectual journey of the Commission and the content of its interim and final reports. Graham Fraser is a former journalist who served as Canada's sixth Commissioner of Official Languages between 2006 and 2016. He was also a writer who has published in both official languages of Canada. An officer of the Order of Canada, he is currently associated with the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Ottawa. This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt. This interview was produced with the support of The Champlain Society. The mission of The Champlain Society is to increase public awareness of, and accessibility to, Canada's rich store of historical records. Gregory P. Marchildon is the Ontario Research Chair in Health Policy and System Design with the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
F. R. Scott's Journal of the Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 38:53


Greg Marchildon interviews Graham Fraser who edited F. R. Scott's journal that he kept while he was a member of the Royal Commission on Bilinguiism and Biculturalism–the famous Bi and Bi Commission. The book is entitled The Fate of Canada: F. R. Scott's Journal of the Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism, 1963-1971 (McGill-Queen's UP, 2021). The journal sheds considerable light on the intellectual journey of the Commission and the content of its interim and final reports. Graham Fraser is a former journalist who served as Canada's sixth Commissioner of Official Languages between 2006 and 2016. He was also a writer who has published in both official languages of Canada. An officer of the Order of Canada, he is currently associated with the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Ottawa. This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt. This interview was produced with the support of The Champlain Society. The mission of The Champlain Society is to increase public awareness of, and accessibility to, Canada's rich store of historical records. Gregory P. Marchildon is the Ontario Research Chair in Health Policy and System Design with the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Dietitian Connection Podcast
Community malnutrition: what can we do?

Dietitian Connection Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 42:22


There's been an extraordinary focus recently on food and nutrition within the age care setting because of the Royal Commission, which is incredible. We do know, however, that the vast majority of older adults live in the community, and they face many of the same risk factors for malnutrition as hospital patients: health conditions, cognitive and physical decline, appetite changes, food insecurity and social isolation. So, what can we do? Tune into this podcast with dietitian Susan Bloomfield-Stone to find out! In the episode, Susan also shares her top tips for dietitians working with this client group. For the shownotes: https://dietitianconnection.com/podcasts/community-malnutrition-what-can-we-do/  This podcast is not, and is not intended to be, medical advice, which should be tailored to your individual circumstances. This podcast is for your information only, and we advise that you exercise your own judgment before deciding to use the information provided. Professional medical advice should be obtained before taking action.  Please see here for terms and conditions.

Serious Danger
44: Yes We Cannabis

Serious Danger

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 75:09


Bob “Robin Hood” Katter is stealing from the policy-rich (Greens) to give to the policy-poor. 420 blaze it! Tom and straight-edge Emerald look at the new Greens moves to legalise marijuana in Australia (9:31), and what is standing in the way? Then two stories of messy drama this week (37:00) - Mehreen Faruqi pushing back against racist attacks from Pauline Hanson, and Lidia Thorpe accused of abusive outbursts. Finally, a call to action (1:11:57). Full video version of this episode available on https://www.youtube.com/c/SeriousDangerAU  Subscribe on Patreon to support the show and check out all our bonus Patreon eps with guests like Tom Tanuki and Jon Kudelka, and deep dives into topics like Aussie political sketch comedy, internal Greens party shenanigans, and whether a Greens government would lead to the apocalypse. https://www.patreon.com/SeriousDangerAU  Call to action - Tasmania is going to the polls in local elections over the next few weeks! Check out the Greens candidates and events here:  https://greens.org.au/tas/council-candidates https://greens.org.au/events/tas Greens legalise it campaign: https://greens.org.au/campaigns/legalise-it  Qld: Contact the Premier and ask her to protect the Lake Eyre Basin rivers and Channel Country floodplains by banning unconventional gas in the area: https://www.westernriversalliance.org.au/channel_country_risk  Make a submission on the Royal Commission into Robodebt:  https://robodebt.royalcommission.gov.au/  Produced by Michael Griffin Follow us on Twitter, Instagram, TikTok and Patreon @SeriousDangerAU seriousdangerpod.comSupport the show: http://patreon.com/seriousdangerauSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

SBS Dinka - SBS Dinka
Robodebt royal commission begins probing unlawful debt recovery scheme

SBS Dinka - SBS Dinka

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 9:36


Kany ke Robodebt acenë ke akutë lööŋ man ye cɔl Royal Commission kuɔ̈ɔ̈tic ke ye biääk ben thïïc në ka cë röth wuɔc në ruɔ̈n wäär cë lɔ tueŋ. Në runë 2015 keke cïï akuma ee Akuma Pɛ̈dërɔl caal cë man adɛ̈ ke kɔc juïc ye cam në wëu ke Centrelink cë nɔŋ känŋ në biäk ë wëu cie kaken. Acïï akuma bë them cë man adɛ̈ ke bë kɔc kɔ̈ɔ̈ny ku yekenë acenë kɔc cën kë cïï wuɔ̈ɔ̈c bë lɔ riɛ̈th.

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்
Robodebt royal commission hearings start in Brisbane - Centrelink Robodebt கடன் வசூலிப்பு திட்டம் மீதான விசாரணை ஆரம்பம்

SBS Tamil - SBS தமிழ்

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 6:45


Australian news bulletin for Tuesday 27 Sep 2022. Read by Renuka - SBS தமிழ் ஒலிபரப்பின் இன்றைய (செவ்வாய்க்கிழமை 27/09/2022) ஆஸ்திரேலியா குறித்த செய்திகள். வாசித்தவர் றேனுகா

SBS World News Radio
Robodebt royal commission begins probing unlawful debt recovery scheme

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 3:33


The Royal Commission into the former federal government's 'robodebt' scheme has begun sitting in Brisbane.

The Critical Banter Podcast
Cancelling Adam Levine (with Tom Witcombe)

The Critical Banter Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 71:26


After last week's top tier episode with all four of the boys, we bet you thought there was no way to top it. But we have done it - we have absolutely done it. Comedian and friend of the show Tom Witcombe joins us again for this week's episode, replacing wannabe comedian and anti-hero of the podcast Sen. Before we answer your questions with Tom, Rohit recaps the week by recounting his near-death experience involving wine, bikes and magpies - a tale so tall it should singlehandedly inspire a Royal Commission into the rules and regulations of the biking industry. We have a new game this week "Kushinator" - surprisingly inspired by the game that saved us from the bores of high school Akinator. In this game, there will be a person, place or thing that the boys will have to guess within 20 questions. As per usual, the tempers flare as the boys challenge and critique each other's contentious questions & answers - leaving us to wonder if the boys are really friends at all. Finally, saving the best until last, Tom Witcombe joins us for the fan favourite segment "#AskTCB". After we get some interesting updates from Tom on what he's been up to and what exciting things he has coming up, we delve into the questions you have sent in. We discuss all things cancelable - from primary schools to Adam Levine to carrying out mass genocide. Remember, you guys sent in these questions - not us. Also this week: Helmets, Kevin Spacey, Apu Nahasapeemapetilon, City2Surf and death row. Segments this week: The Logue: Tired of reaching around each other (at least on the podcast), the boys have instead decided to reach around the week's news stories, events and viral trends. Kushinator: The boys have 20 questions to guess the mystery person, place or thing. #AskTCB: We answer the questions you have sent in! If you want your questions answered on the next #AskTCB, send us your questions in the comments below or on Instagram! ______________________________________________ SPONSORS

A Rational Fear
Secretive Australia — Festival Of Dangerous Ideas — Kate McClymont, Damien Cave, Amber Schultz, David McBride, Dan Ilic & Lewis Hobba

A Rational Fear

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 55:36


Roy and HG - Bludging on the Blindside
Football's Tax Free Status

Roy and HG - Bludging on the Blindside

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 33:10


At half past the 11th hour on AFL Grand Final eve, Roy & HG examine the tax free status of all sporting codes, especially AFL and NRL. Is this because sport in this country is like a religion? Or V'Landy's and the Murderer squeezing the last ounce of juice out of sports that are dying in the bush. Royal Commission me thinks.

Boundless Possible
336. Weekends with Walshy - No Royal Commission

Boundless Possible

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 95:11


Each week we speak with Chris Walsh, Editor of the NT Independent online newspaper, about some of the stories making news in the Territory. This week's stories are:  Calls grow for federal inquiry into NT Police  NT cop in professional standards facing assault charge, also witness at coronial inquest  Opinion: The last refuge of police comradery has been shattered forever  Police arrest, charge another man in connection to fatal Outback Wrangler helicopter crash  Tiwi islanders celebrate court win over Barossa gas project, while Santos warns government about future investment  Origin Energy to exit Beetaloo Basin, selling gas exploration interests  ‘He read his job description': Gaming Minister backflips on pokies, suspends applications for 60 Alice Springs machines  Fannie Bay vote dodgers hit with 1,542 infringement notices by Electoral Commission --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/territorystory/message

Sky News - Outsiders
Outsiders, Sunday 18 September

Sky News - Outsiders

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 101:35


One Nation on the urgency of a Royal Commission into the abuse of power during Covid. The Queen's greatest achievement: cultivating mass popularity without ever resorting to stoking populism. Plus, hear from The Babylon Bee's Joel Berry.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Mike Hosking Breakfast
Mike's Minute: Time to get on with a Covid inquiry

The Mike Hosking Breakfast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 2:09


It is moderately encouraging we have two mutterings from the Government this week so far on the potential for a Covid inquiry. Grant Robertson told us Monday on this show it was closer, and the Prime Minister is taking advice on what it should look like. The reluctance to this point is fairly obvious. It's going to be ugly, and they know it. Government's call inquiries for a couple of reasons. One, to get the subject off the front page. Two, to get a result they need or want. They do that by appointing the right people, so they can fairly confidently tell what's going to happen. When you get the report, if you don't like it, you review it, and release recommendations on a Friday after everyone is at the pub. If it tells you what you want, you stand at the pulpit of truth with a trumpet and enact everything. The irony here is no one has called more inquiries and launched more working groups than this lot. Given that, just what advice is it they are seeking? Is there anyone left that isn't already involved in one? I note also the Australians are well underway with their review into the Reserve Bank. That's another little look this Government isn't really interested in. Once again because they know full well it's going to be ugly. But, as the Australians well understand and clearly, we don't want to, these are large and live issues that continue to affect each and every one of us each and every day, and they will do for years. There are gargantuan questions around the performance of both the Reserve Bank and the Government in Covid. Lives have been up ended, learning has been interrupted, the surgery back log is a mile long, and economies have been dented severely. If that isn't worth looking into, what is? The Australian Reserve Bank Governor, Phillip Lowe, has already said he won't quit, and indeed offered a level of defence for his actions, or lack of them. That's his right. The same way I assume Adrian Orr, and indeed our government, surely have an argument for doing things the way they did. But these past couple of years, these 900 plus days are something most of us have never seen before and we pray never will again. Was there a better and different way? You will never know until you dig and put a blowtorch on those who took our lives in their hands and asked us to trust them. If that isn't worth a Royal Commission, nothing is.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Come Out Wherever You Are with Sean Szeps
Yvonne Sillett was forced out of the army for being a lesbian

Come Out Wherever You Are with Sean Szeps

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 47:28


Imagine you're a young girl dreaming of serving in the Australian Army. Then, it becomes your reality. You have your dream job now. And a few years into your service, you fall in love with one of your colleagues. Harmless, really. Except... it's the 1970's. And that colleague is another woman. This was the reality for Yvonne Sillett who served in the Corps of Signals in the Australian Army for 10 years before she was forced out due to her sexuality. On today's episode, Yvonne talks with Sean about keeping her sexuality a secret, the day she learned she would have to leave the army and her current advocacy work which brought her to testify at the Royal Commission into Defence and Veteran Suicide. Her mission? Get an apology from the Albanese government. Yvonne is the President of the Discharged LGBTI Veterans' Association. Find out more: https://dlvainfo.com/about/ Learn more about Yvonne's story at the 'Defending with Pride' exhibition at the Shrine of Remembrance in Melbourne: https://www.shrine.org.au/defending-pride  Yvonne was interviewed for the book 'Pride in Defence' https://www.mup.com.au/books/pride-in-defence-paperback-softback  Follow us on Instagram: @comeoutwhereveryouare Email us: comeouttous@gmail.com If this episode brought up any feelings for you or you want more information, these resources may help you: Open Arms provides free 24-hour counselling for veterans and their families. Their number is 1800 011 046 QLife: Call 1800 184 527 for a free phone service every day from 3pm – midnight. Visit their website www.qlife.org.au for a free webchat Minus18: Australia's LGBTQIA+ charity. Follow them on social @minus18youth or visit their website on www.minus18.org.au for resources, events and training for your school or workplace Lifeline: Call 13 11 14 for 24-hour crisis supportSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Friendlyjordies Podcast
EVERYONE GETS A ROYAL COMMISSION : Friendly Jordies Podcast

Friendlyjordies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 85:14


SBS Filipino - SBS Filipino
Royal commission to investigate 'Robodebt' - Royal Commission iimbestigahan ang 'Robodebt'

SBS Filipino - SBS Filipino

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 5:53


Prime Minister Anthony Albanese has announced a Royal Commission into the previous government's so-called 'Robodebt' scheme, fulfilling an election promise. - Bilang pagtupad sa pangako noong halalan, inanunsyo ni Punong Ministro Anthony Albanese ang Royal Commission para sa tinaguriang “Robodebt” scheme ng nakaraang administrasyon.

SBS Vietnamese - SBS Việt ngữ
Inquiry into harrowing experiences of Australians with a disability - Ủy ban Điều tra Độc lập xem xét vấn đề bạc đãi người khuyết tật

SBS Vietnamese - SBS Việt ngữ

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 3:09


The Royal Commission into abuse and neglect of people with a disability has heard accounts of physical and sexual violence for people living in temporary accommodation. - Cuộc điều tra cho biết người khuyết tật sống tại những nơi ở tạm chịu đựng những bạo lực thể chất và tình dục, đối mặt với nguy cơ vô gia cư do thiếu nhà ở giá cả phải chăng dành cho họ.

SBS World News Radio
Inquiry into harrowing experiences of Australians with a disability

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 2:53


The Royal Commission into abuse and neglect of people with a disability has heard accounts of physical and sexual violence for people living in temporary accommodation.

SBS Indonesian - SBS Bahasa Indonesia
Royal commission to investigate 'Robodebt' - Komisi Royal akan Selidiki 'Robodebt'

SBS Indonesian - SBS Bahasa Indonesia

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 6:01


Prime Minister Anthony Albanese has announced a Royal Commission into the previous government's so-called 'Robodebt' scheme, fulfilling an election promise. - Memenuhi janji Pemilunya, Perdana Menteri Anthony Albanese telah mengumumkan adanya Komisi Royal untuk menyelidiki apa yang disebut dengan skema 'Robodebt' dari pemerintah sebelumnya.

RNZ: Dateline Pacific
Abuse in Care Royal Commission wraps up agency examinations

RNZ: Dateline Pacific

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 7:14


Abuse in Care Royal Commission of Inquiry wraps up its examination of NZ govt agencies.

RNZ: Checkpoint
Public Service Commissioner Peter Hughes apologises at inquiry

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 1:35


Public Service Commissioner Peter Hughes has apologised to state care abuse survivors at the Royal Commission of Inquiry into Abuse in Care this afternoon. Hughes was also chief executive of the Ministry of Social Development for ten years up until 2011. He says, when he was in charge of the Ministry, it let down survivors Keith Wiffin, Paul White and Earl White in particular. The Commissioner says staff lost sight of the human beings at the center of the claims - and caused them further harm. Peter Hughes says he is committed to leading change across all public services. In particular, he says Oranga Tamariki needs to listen harder to what in children in care, want.

SBS Russian - SBS на русском языке
Royal commission to investigate 'Robodebt' - Королевская комиссия проведет расследование системы 'Robodebt'

SBS Russian - SBS на русском языке

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 6:10


Prime Minister Anthony Albanese has announced a Royal Commission into the previous government's so-called 'Robodebt' scheme, fulfilling an election promise. The automated debt recovery program saw hundreds of thousands of welfare recipients wrongly pursued by Centrelink for debts they did not owe. - Премьер-министр Энтони Альбанезе объявил о создании Королевской комиссии по расследованию работы системы предыдущего правительства "Robodebt", выполнив тем самым свое предвыборное обещание. В рамках автоматизированной программы взыскания долгов Centrelink ошибочно преследовал сотни тысяч получателей социальных пособий за долги, которых у них не было.

SBS Macedonian - СБС Македонски
Royal commission to investigate 'Robodebt' - Кралската комисија ќе го испита „Рободебт“ (Robodebt)

SBS Macedonian - СБС Македонски

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 6:25


Prime Minister Anthony Albanese has announced a Royal Commission into the previous government's so-called 'Robodebt' scheme, fulfilling an election promise. The automated debt recovery program saw hundreds of thousands of welfare recipients wrongly pursued by Centrelink for debts they did not owe. - Премиерот Ентони Албанези најави Кралска комисија во таканаречената шема „Рободебт“ (Robodebt) на претходната влада, исполнувајќи го изборното ветување. Автоматизираната програма за наплата на долг придонесе стотици илјади корисници на социјална помош Centrelink погрешно да ги гони за долгови што не ги должат.

The Quicky
Evening Headlines: Royal Commission To Examine Robodebt Scheme

The Quicky

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 3:54


Welcome to The Quicky, getting you up to speed daily.  The Quicky drops an episode every morning with a deep dive and the news headlines, and we'll be bringing you the afternoon news as well. Every weekday Emma Gillespie will be in your ears telling you the headlines you need to know, to make your commute home that little easier. And yes, Claire Murphy will still be getting you up to speed each morning.  CREDITS  Host: Emma Gillespie Audio Producer: Thom Lion Executive Producer: Talissa Bazaz  Subscribe to MamamiaBecome a Mamamia subscriber: https://www.mamamia.com.au/subscribeSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

SBS World News Radio
Royal commission to investigate 'Robodebt'

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 3:57


The automated debt recovery program saw hundreds of thousands of welfare recipients wrongly pursued by Centrelink for debts they did not owe.

Parliament - Live Stream and Question Time
Oral Questions for Thursday 25 August 2022

Parliament - Live Stream and Question Time

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 51:34


Questions to Ministers CHRIS BAILLIE to the Minister of Police: Does he agree with the Prime Minister's statement, made on Tuesday, that "Police do keep a tally of ram raids in different regions"; if so, how many ram raids have been recorded over the past three months? NICOLA WILLIS to the Minister of Finance: Did he receive any advice from Treasury about potential for increased inflationary pressures from Government spending decisions made in Budget 2022; if so, on what occasions, if any, did he choose to spend more on initiatives than Treasury advised? BARBARA EDMONDS to the Minister of Finance: What recent reports has he seen on the New Zealand economy? Hon PAUL GOLDSMITH to the Minister of Justice: Does she stand by all her statements and actions? ANNA LORCK to the Minister of Forestry: What recent announcements has he made about transforming the forestry and wood processing sector? ERICA STANFORD to the Minister of Immigration: How many nurses have applied for the Accredited Employer Work Visa, and how many of those nurses applied from offshore? WILLOW-JEAN PRIME to the Minister of Research, Science and Innovation: What recent announcements has she made regarding the Research and Development Tax Incentive? RICARDO MENÉNDEZ MARCH to the Minister for Social Development and Employment: Does she stand by the application of sanctions to people who receive the jobseeker-health condition and disability benefit for "failing to prepare for work"; if so, what is the purpose of these sanctions? ANAHILA KANONGATA'A-SUISUIKI to the Minister for Pacific Peoples: What recent work has the Government done to grow Pacific employment? SIMON WATTS to the Minister of Local Government: Does she agree with Central Hawke's Bay Mayor Alex Walker, who described her Three Waters reform process as "unempowering for our communities", and does she believe communities have been adequately consulted in her proposed Three Waters reforms? KAREN CHHOUR to the Minister for Children: Does he have confidence in this Government's ability to protect and support vulnerable children, and what lessons, if any, have been learnt from the Royal Commission of Inquiry into Abuse in Care to date? IBRAHIM OMER to the Minister for Disarmament and Arms Control: What outcomes does he want to be achieved when the Review Conference of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons concludes this week?

RNZ: Checkpoint
Nearly half of Māori rangatahi in state care have gone to prison

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 3:24


A third of children who were placed in state care have ended up serving a prison sentence. For Māori, it's nearly half. The data comes from research tabled before the Royal Commission into Abuse in Care today. Māori news reporter Jamie Tahana has more.

Squiz Today
Thursday, 25 August - A whistleblower on Twitter; A Royal Commission into Robodebt; Daniel Ricciardo and McLaren part ways; And wine you shouldn't drink..

Squiz Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 10:14


The Squiz is your shortcut to the news. More details and links to further reading for all of today's news can be found in The Squiz Today email. Click here to get it in your inbox each weekday morning.Other things we do:Politics Today - a weekday newsletter getting you across the latest in politics, both here and abroad.Sport Today - a sports news podcast designed to keep you ahead of the game. Or sign up to the newsletter hereSquiz Shortcuts - a weekly explainer on big news topicsSquiz Kids - a news podcast for curious kids. Age appropriate news without the nasties! PS. Are you a teacher? Jump into your 30 day free trial of Squiz Kids For Schools - curriculum-aligned, differentiated resources based on The Squiz Kids podcast.

RNZ: Checkpoint
Oranga Tamariki challenged on existing abuse in care

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 3:41


Oranga Tamariki has been challenged on whether abuse in state care facilities really is historic. Senior officials from the children's ministry were again before the Royal Commission into Abuse in Care today. They were asked about abuse in state care facilities, and whether it was systemic. Jamie Tahana is at the hearings in Auckland.

Life on the Line
Panel - Veteran Suicide

Life on the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 75:45


Alex Lloyd hosts a panel on the veteran suicide crisis, with Wes ‘H' Hennessey and Renee Wilson. Life on the Line tracks down Australian military veterans and records their stories. On 11 August 2022, the Interim Report of the Royal Commission into Defence and Veteran Suicide was submitted to the Governor-General, and then to Parliament. While this podcast sees itself as a veterans storytelling platform first and foremost, topics as exceptional as this are an ongoing part of the stories of veterans and families around the country. As a nation, we've lost more veterans to suicide than we did to combat in the Afghanistan and Iraq wars. This Royal Commission was something tirelessly campaigned for by veterans and families, so this interim report is an important measure of whether it's achieving what so many wanted it to. To discuss the interim report, host Alex Lloyd welcomed back two previous guests. Wes ‘H' Hennessey is veteran of the 2nd Commando Regiment, a deeply experienced and well-decorated soldier after many combat deployments to Afghanistan. Renee Wilson is the CEO of Australian War Widows NSW, an ambassador for the Commando Welfare Trust, and is a staunch advocate for veterans and their families. She is also the wife of veteran Gary Wilson, who was significantly injured in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan. You can listen to this episode in your usual podcast app, or watch our Zoom recording on YouTube.  Episodes referenced at the end of the podcast include: Panel - Returning Home Panel - The Vietnam War Panel - Life After Service #54 'H' Vol I-III (Season 3) Panel - Australian Infantry Against the Odds Panel - Modern Veterans #54 'H' Vol IV-V (Season 4) The Partners - Renee Wilson Christmas on the Line Vol III #107 Brett Wood Life After Service: Gary & Renee Wilson Christmas on the Line Vol IV To see photos related to today's interview, visit our website - www.lifeonthelinepodcast.com - or follow us on social media: @lifeonthelinepodcast on Facebook and Instagram, @LOTLpod on Twitter and 'Thistle Productions' on LinkedIn.

RNZ: Checkpoint
Oranga Tamariki admits multiple failings at abuse commission

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 3:04


Oranga Tamariki has admitted multiple failings today at the Royal Commission of Inquiry into Abuse in Care. The ministry for children says the state did not stop abuse and did not meet the basic needs of youth, between 1950 and 1999. Sam Olley reports.

RNZ: Checkpoint
Abuse in care: Children let down by police - Andrew Coster

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 3:48


The Police Commissioner says many children have been let down by police responses to abuse in state care. It was the police force's turn to front the Royal Commission on Abuse in Care today, to explain their role in a state care system that saw thousands of children abused and neglected. Jamie Tahana is following the hearing.

RNZ: Morning Report
Agency failures allowed thousands of children in care to be abused, Crown officials concede

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 3:10


Crown officials have conceded that failures by multiple agencies allowed thousands of children in its care to be abused over decades. Monday was the first day of a two-week hearing before the Royal Commission into Abuse in Care, examining the actions of Crown agencies. Jamie Tahana is following the hearing.

RNZ: Checkpoint
Gang members encouraged to share with Abuse Commission

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 3:30


The Mongrel Mob was born out of state-run institutions for teens in the 1960s, the very institutions that are under the spotlight for mistreating children in their care. In recent years the Royal Commission of Inquiry into Abuse in Care has probed these state and faith-based set-ups. But there's a sense gang members have been reluctant to engage, something the Waikato chapter of the Mongrel Mob is out to change. Jimmy Ellingham has the story.

Squiz Today
Friday, 12 August - An interim report from the Royal Commission into Defence and Veteran Suicide; Disney overtakes Netflix; The taste of dreams; and getting on board the Coastal Grandmother trend...

Squiz Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 10:28


The Squiz is your shortcut to the news. More details and links to further reading for all of today's news can be found in The Squiz Today email. Sign up (it's free!) - www.thesquiz.com.au.LINKS: Friday Lites - Mushroom and leek pastries, plus coastal grandmother fashion... Subscribe to The Squiz Today newsletter for more details on all the stories covered in the podcast, plus a whole lot more. You can read today's edition here.Other things we do:Politics Today - a weekday newsletter getting you across the latest in politics, both here and abroad.Sport Today - a sports news podcast designed to keep you ahead of the game. Or sign up to the newsletter here.Squiz Shortcuts - a weekly explainer on big news topicsSquiz Kids - a news podcast for curious kids. Age appropriate news without the nasties!

'The Mo Show' Podcast
Houssam Abiad 63 | The Mo Show | Planning for Cities, Love for Makkah, Celebrating Identity

'The Mo Show' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022


Although born in Australia, at the age of 3, his parents moved back to war-torn Lebanon where Houssam grew up. At the age of 18 he moved back to Australia with his family where he spent his adult life. He graduated with a double degree in Health Sciences & Biomedical Engineering and first found success as an entrepreneur in business before switching to politics. In 2010, he was elected to the City of Adelaide and is the first Muslim to hold a Deputy Lord Mayoral Office in Australia. In 2019, the Royal Commission for Makkah City & Holy Sites recruited him, and he relocated to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia 9 weeks before the pandemic. Houssam discusses his life as an Australian Muslim, childhood recollections from Lebanon, his preconceived notions of Saudi Arabia, and the privilege of serving Makkah.حسام الأبيض، هو مختص في إدارة المدينة ومن كبار رجال الأعمال و كذلك رئيس قسم الابتكارات على الرغم من كونه ولد في أستراليا، إلا أنه في سن الثالثة عاد مع والديه إلى لبنان التي مزقتها الحرب وهناك نشأ حسام. أما في 18 من عمره، عاد مع أسرته إلى أستراليا حيث أمضى هناك بقية حياته البالغة. ثم تخرج بشهادة مزدوجة في العلوم الصحية والهندسة الطبية الحيوية وحقق النجاح لأول مرة كرائد أعمال في مجال الأعمال التجارية قبل تحوله إلى مجال السياسة في عام 2010، انتخب لعضوية مدينة أديلايد وهو أول مسلم يعمل بمنصب نائب مكتب عمدة البلدية في أستراليا. وفي عام 2019، عينته الهيئة الملكية لمدينة مكة المكرمة والمشاعر المقدسة، وانتقل إلى المملكة العربية السعودية قبل 9 أسابيع من تفشي الوباء. يتحدث حسام عن حياته كمسلم أسترالي، وذكريات طفولته من لبنان ومفاهيمه المسبقة عن المملكة العربية السعودية، وامتياز خدمته لمكة المكرمة.Houssam Abiad Instagram https://bit.ly/3BIfB0N Twitter https://bit.ly/3SGvFGq Linkedin https://bit.ly/3oX5EVp The Mo Show Podcast Youtube https://bit.ly/3nDwsZv Apple Podcast https://apple.co/3J9ScX4 Spotify https://spoti.fi/33dzsC2 Google Podcast https://bit.ly/3ebB7xN Anghami https://bit.ly/3mRo1uy Website https://bit.ly/3H2DhMM Instagram https://bit.ly/2KAwq5v Twitter https://bit.ly/3KanEnJ Email info@themopodcast.com This episode is presented by Caffeine Lab Website https://bit.ly/3bonoWh Instagram https://bit.ly/3b7uNta Credits Ahmed Hussein | Brand Manager Ryan Ismail | Show Manager Mubashir Shoukat | EditorKatie Janner | Sound Editor Chaima Boudchar | Translator Edgar Ydel | Sound Engineer Christian Rufo | Sound Engineer

Midnight Train Podcast
The F'n Electric Chair

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 92:13


www.patreon.com/accidentaldads  An American-developed method of execution known as the "electric chair" involves strapping the condemned individual to a specially constructed wooden chair and electrocuting them using electrodes attached to their head and leg. Alfred P. Southwick, a dentist from Buffalo, New York, proposed this form of execution in 1881. It was developed during the 1880s as a purportedly merciful substitute for hanging, and it was first used in 1890. This technique of execution has been utilized for many years in the Philippines and the United States. Death was first thought to arise from brain injury, but research in 1899 revealed that ventricular fibrillation and ultimately cardiac arrest are the main causes of death.   Despite the fact that the electric chair has long been associated with the death sentence in the United States, lethal injection, which is generally regarded as a more compassionate mode of execution, has replaced the electric chair as the preferred method of execution. Except in Tennessee and South Carolina, where it may be used without the prisoner's consent if the medications for lethal injection are not available, electrocution is only still permitted as a second option that may be selected over lethal injection at the request of the prisoner in some states. In the states of Alabama and Florida, where lethal injection is an alternate technique, electrocution is an optional method of execution as of 2021. Inmates who are condemned to death for crimes committed before March 31, 1998 and who elect electrocution as their method of execution no longer have access to the electric chair; instead, they are put to death by lethal injection, as are those who do not pick electrocution. In the event that a judge rules that lethal injection is unlawful, electrocution is also permitted in Kentucky. If alternative methods of execution are later determined to be unlawful in the state where the execution is taking place, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Oklahoma have permitted the use of the electric chair as a backup method. On February 8, 2008, the Nebraska Supreme Court ruled that the state's constitution prohibits "cruel and unusual punishment," which included electric chair execution. As a result, Nebraska, the only state that continued to use electrocution as the exclusive form of death, stopped carrying out these kinds of executions.   Newspaper stories about how the high voltages used to power arc lighting, a type of brilliant outdoor street lighting that required high voltages in the range of 3000-6000 volts, were published one after another in the late 1870s and early 1880s. It was a strange new phenomenon that appeared to instantly strike a victim dead without leaving a mark. On August 7, 1881, one of these mishaps in Buffalo, New York, resulted in the invention of the electric chair. George Lemuel Smith, a drunk dock worker, managed to get back inside the Brush Electric Company arc lighting power house that evening and touch the brush and ground of a large electric dynamo in search of the excitement of a tingling feeling he had felt while holding the guard rail. He died instantaneously. The coroner who looked into the matter brought it up before a Buffalo-area scientific group that year. Alfred P. Southwick, a dentist with a technical background who was also in attendance at the talk, believed the strange event may have some practical use.   Southwick participated in a series of studies that involved electrocuting hundreds of stray dogs alongside doctor George E. Fell and the director of the Buffalo ASPCA. They conducted tests using the dog both in and out of the water, and they experimented with the electrode kind and location until they developed a consistent procedure for electrocuting animals. After publishing his theories in scholarly publications in 1882 and 1883, Southwick went on to argue for the employment of this technique as a more compassionate alternative to hanging in capital cases in the early 1880s. His work gained widespread attention. In an effort to create a system that might be scaled up to operate on people, he developed calculations based on the dog experimentation. Early on in his plans, he used a modified dental chair to confine the condemned; this chair would later come to be known as the electric chair.   There was growing opposition to hangings in particular and the death penalty in general following a string of botched executions in the United States. A three-person death penalty commission was established in 1886 by newly elected New York State Governor David B. Hill to look into more humane ways of carrying out executions. The commission was chaired by the human rights activist and reformer Elbridge Thomas Gerry and included Southwick and lawyer and politician Matthew Hale from New York. There was growing opposition to hangings in particular and the death penalty in general following a string of botched executions in the United States. A three-person death penalty commission was established in 1886 by newly elected New York State Governor David B. Hill to look into more humane ways of carrying out executions. The commission was chaired by the human rights activist and reformer Elbridge Thomas Gerry and included Southwick and lawyer and politician Matthew Hale from New York. They also went to George Fell's dog electrocutions, who had collaborated with Southwick on early 1880s tests. Fell continued his research by electrocuting sedated, vivisected dogs in an effort to understand how electricity killed a victim. The Commission suggested execution in 1888 utilizing Southwick's electric chair concept, with the convicted person's head and feet hooked to metal wires. With three electric chairs put up at the jails in Auburn, Clinton, and Sing Sing, they further suggested that the state execute prisoners rather than the individual counties. These ideas were incorporated into a measure that was approved by the legislature, signed by Governor Hill on June 4, 1888, and was scheduled to take effect on January 1, 1889.   The New York Medico-Legal Society, an unofficial organization made up of physicians and lawyers, was tasked with assessing these criteria because the bill itself did not specify the kind or quantity of electricity that should be utilized. Since tests up to that point had been conducted on animals smaller than a human (dogs), some committee members weren't sure that the lethality of alternating current (AC) had been conclusively proven. In September 1888, a committee was formed and recommended 3000 volts, but the type of electricity, direct current (DC) or alternating current (AC), wasn't determined.   At this point, the state's efforts to develop the electric chair were mixed up with the conflict between Thomas Edison's direct current power system and George Westinghouse's alternating current-based system, which came to be known as the "war of the currents." Since 1886, the two businesses had been engaged in commercial competition. In 1888, a sequence of circumstances led to an all-out media war between the two. Frederick Peterson, a neurologist who served as the committee's chair, hired Harold P. Brown to serve as a consultant. After numerous people died as a result of the careless installation of pole-mounted AC arc lighting lines in New York City in the early months of 1888, Brown embarked on his own war against alternating current. Peterson had assisted Brown when he publicly electrocuted dogs with AC in July 1888 at Columbia College in an effort to demonstrate that AC was more lethal than DC.  Thomas Edison's West Orange laboratory offered technical support for these experiments, and an unofficial alliance between Edison Electric and Brown developed. On December 5, 1888, Brown set up an experiment back at West Orange as Thomas Edison, members of the press, and members of the Medico-Legal Society, including Elbridge Gerry, the head of the death sentence panel, watched. Brown conducted all of his experiments on animals larger than humans using alternating current, including four calves and a lame horse, which were all operated under 750 volts of AC.  The Medico-Legal Society advocated using 1000–1500 volts of alternating electricity for executions based on these findings, and newspapers emphasized that the voltage used was just half that of the power lines that run over the streets of American cities. Westinghouse denounced these experiments as biased self-serving demonstrations intended to constitute an outright attack on alternating current, and he charged Brown of working for Edison. Members of the Medico-Legal Society, including electrotherapy specialist Alphonse David Rockwell, Carlos Frederick MacDonald, and Columbia College professor Louis H. Laudy, were tasked with determining the specifics of electrode placement at the request of death sentence panel chairman Gerry. They resorted to Brown once more for the technical support. Treasurer Francis S. Hastings, who appeared to be one of the key figures at the company trying to portray Westinghouse as a peddler of death dealing AC current, tried to acquire a Westinghouse AC generator for the test but discovered that none could be acquired. Brown requested that Edison Electric Light supply the equipment for the tests. They ultimately used Edison's West Orange facility for the animal testing they carried out in the middle of March 1889. Austin E. Lathrop, the superintendent of prisons, petitioned Brown to create the chair, but Brown declined.  Dr. George Fell created the final designs for a straightforward oak chair, deviating from the suggestions of the Medico-Legal Society by moving the electrodes to the head and the center of the back.  Brown did accept the responsibility of locating the generators required to run the chair. With the aid of Edison and Westinghouse's main AC competitor, the Thomson-Houston Electric Company, he was able to covertly purchase three Westinghouse AC generators that were being retired, ensuring that Westinghouse's equipment would be connected to the first execution. Edwin F. Davis, the first "state electrician" (executioner) for the State of New York, constructed the electric chair.   Joseph Chapleau, who had been sentenced to life in prison after being found guilty of killing his neighbor with a sled stake, became the first victim of New York's new electrocution legislation. William Kemmler, who had been found guilty of killing his wife with a hatchet, was the next prisoner on the death row. Kemmler filed an appeal on his behalf with the New York Court of Appeals, arguing that the use of electricity as a manner of execution amounted to "cruel and unusual punishment" that was in violation of both the federal and state constitutions of the United States. Kemmler's petition for a writ of habeas corpus was rejected by the court on December 30, 1889, according to a long decision by Judge Dwight:  “We have no doubt that if the Legislature of this State should undertake to proscribe for any offense against its laws the punishment of burning at the stake, breaking at the wheel, etc., it would be the duty of the courts to pronounce upon such an attempt the condemnation of the Constitution. The question now to be answered is whether the legislative act here is subject to the same condemnation. Certainly, it is not so on its face, for, although the mode of death described is conceded to be unusual, there is no common knowledge or consent that it is cruel; it is a question of fact whether an electric current of sufficient intensity and skillfully applied will produce death without unnecessary suffering.”   On August 6, 1890, Kemmler was put to death in Auburn Prison in New York; Edwin F. Davis served as the "state electrician." Kemmler was rendered unconscious after being exposed to 1,000 volts of AC electricity for the first 17 seconds, but his heart and respiration were left unaffected. Edward Charles Spitzka and Carlos F. MacDonald, the attending doctors, stepped forward to examine Kemmler. Spitzka allegedly said, "Have the current turned on again, quick, no delay," after making sure Kemmler was still alive. But the generator required some time to recharge. A 2,000 volt AC shock was administered to Kemmler on the second attempt. The skin's blood vessels burst, bled, and caught fire in the vicinity of the electrodes. It took roughly eight minutes to complete the execution. A reporter who witnessed the execution reported that it was "an horrible scene, considerably worse than hanging," and George Westinghouse subsequently said, "They would have done better using an ax."   Following its adoption by Ohio (1897), Massachusetts (1900), New Jersey (1906), and Virginia (1908), the electric chair quickly replaced hanging as the most often used form of execution in the country. Death by electrocution was either legal or actively used to kill offenders in 26 US States, the District of Columbia, the Federal government, and the US Military. Until the middle of the 1980s, when lethal injection became the method of choice for carrying out legal executions, the electric chair remained the most popular execution technique.    It appears that other nations have thought about employing the technique, occasionally for unique motives. From 1926 to 1987, the electric chair was also used in the Philippines. In May 1972, Jaime Jose, Basilio Pineda, and Edgardo Aquino were killed there in a well-known triple execution for the 1967 kidnapping and gang rape of the young actress Maggie de la Riva. Lethal injection was used instead of the electric chair when executions resumed in the Philippines after a break in 1976.   Some accounts claim that Ethiopia tried to use the electric chair as a means of capital punishment. According to legend, the emperor Menelik II purchased three electric chairs in 1896 at the urging of a missionary, but was unable to put them to use since his country did not have a stable source of electricity at the time. Menelik II is rumored to have used the third electric chair as a throne, while the other two chairs were either utilized as garden furniture or gifted to guests.   During the Royal Commission on Capital Punishment, the results of which were released in 1953, the United Kingdom explored lethal injection in addition to lethal injection, the electric chair, the gas chamber, the guillotine, and gunshot as alternatives to hanging. The Commission came to the conclusion that hanging was preferable to the electric chair in no specific way. In the UK, the death penalty was abolished for the majority of offenses in 1965.   In 1894, serial killer Lizzie Halliday was given a death sentence via electric chair; however, after a medical committee deemed her crazy, governor Roswell P. Flower reduced her death sentence to life in a mental hospital. Maria Barbella, a second woman who received a death sentence in 1895, was exonerated the following year. On March 20, 1899, Martha M. Place at Sing Sing Prison became the first female to be put to death by electric chair for the murder of her stepdaughter Ida Place, who was 17 years old.   Ruth Snyder, a housewife, was put to death in the electric chair at Sing Sing on the evening of January 12, 1928, for the murder of her husband in March of that year. Tom Howard, a news photographer, sneaked a camera into the execution chamber and captured her in the electric chair as the current was put on for a front-page story in the New York Daily News the next morning. It continues to be among the most well-known instances in photojournalism.   On July 13, 1928, a record was set at the Kentucky State Penitentiary in Eddyville, Kentucky, when seven men were put to death in the electric chair one after the other.   George Stinney, an African-American boy, was electrocuted at the Central Correctional Institution in Columbia, South Carolina, on June 16, 1944, making him the youngest person ever to be put to death by the electric chair. In 2014, a circuit court judge annulled his sentence and reversed his conviction on the grounds that Stinney had not received a fair trial. The judge found that Stinney's legal representation fell short of his constitutional rights as guaranteed by the Sixth Amendment.   Following the Gregg v. Georgia ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1976, John Spenkelink was the first person to be electrocuted on May 25, 1979. He was the first person to be put to death in this way in the United States since 1966.   Lynda Lyon Block was the last person to be put to death in the electric chair without having the option of a different execution technique on May 10, 2002 in Alabama.   On the day of the execution, the condemned prisoner's legs and head are both shaved. The condemned prisoner is led to the chair and placed there before having their arms and legs firmly restrained with leather belts to prevent movement or struggle. The prisoner's legs are shaved, and electrodes are fastened to them. A hat covering his head is made of a sponge soaked in saltwater or brine. To avoid presenting a gory scene to the onlookers, the prisoner may wear a hood or be blinded.   The execution starts when the prisoner is told the order of death and given the chance to say one last thing. Alternating current is delivered through a person's body in several cycles (changes in voltage and length) to fatally harm their internal organs. The initial, stronger electric shock (between 2000 and 2,500 volts) is meant to induce instantaneous unconsciousness, ventricular fibrillation, and eventually cardiac arrest. The goal of the second, weaker shock (500–1,500 volts) is to fatally harm the essential organs.   A medical professional examines the prisoner for signs of life once the cycles are finished. If none are found, the medical professional notes the moment of death and waits for the body to cool before removing it to prepare for an autopsy. The doctor alerts the warden if the prisoner shows signs of life, and the warden would often order another round of electric current or (rarely) postpone the execution (see Willie Francis).   The reliability of the first electrical shock to consistently cause rapid unconsciousness, as proponents of the electric chair sometimes say, is disputed by opponents. According to witness accounts, electrocutions gone wrong (see Willie Francis and Allen Lee Davis) and results of post-mortem investigations, the electric chair is frequently unpleasant during executions.   The electric chair has drawn criticism since in a few cases the victims were only put to death after receiving many electric shocks. As a result, the practice was called into question as being "cruel and unusual punishment." In an effort to allay these worries, Nebraska implemented a new electrocution procedure in 2004 that required the delivery of a 15-second application of electricity at 2,450 volts, followed by a 15-minute wait period during which a representative checked for signs of life. The current Nebraska protocol, which calls for a 20-second application of current at 2,450 volts, was introduced in April 2007 in response to further concerns voiced about the 2004 procedure.   Before the 2004 protocol revision, a first application of current at 2,450 volts for eight seconds, a one-second interval, and then a 22-second application at 480 volts were given. The cycle was performed three more times after a 20-second rest.   Willie Francis tried to escape the electric chair in 1946 and reportedly screamed, "Take it off! Let me Breathe!" when the current was turned on. It turned out that an inebriated jail officer and convict had illegally set up the portable electric chair. In a case titled Louisiana ex rel. Francis v. Resweber, attorneys for the convicted person contended that, although not dying, Francis had indeed been put to death. Francis was put back in the electric chair and killed in 1947 after the argument was rejected on the grounds that re-execution did not violate the double jeopardy provision of the Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution.   Allen Lee Davis, who had been found guilty of murder, was put to death in Florida on July 8, 1999, using the "Old Sparky" electric chair. Pictures of Davis' injured face were taken and afterwards uploaded to the Internet. According to the results of the study, Davis had started bleeding before the electricity was turned on, and the chair had performed as planned. According to Florida's Supreme Court, the electric chair is not "cruel and unusual punishment." When flames sprang from Pedro Medina's skull during his execution in Florida in 1997, it stirred much debate. Medina's brain and brain stem were damaged by the initial electrical surge, which caused him to pass away quickly, according to an autopsy. A court determined that "unintentional human error" rather than any flaws in the "apparatus, equipment, and electrical circuitry" of Florida's electric chair was to blame for the occurrence.   The Louisiana legislature modified the manner of death in 1940; as of June 1, 1941, electrocution was the only option left. At first, Louisiana's electric chair was moved from parish to parish to carry out executions since it lacked a permanent location. Typically, the electrocution would take place in the jail or courtroom of the parish where the condemned prisoner had been found guilty. The first person to be executed with an electric chair in Louisiana was Eugene Johnson, a black man who was found guilty of stealing and killing Steven Bench, a white farmer who resided close to Albany. Johnson was killed at the Livingston Parish Jail on September 11, 1941.    To house all executions in Louisiana, it was decided to construct an execution chamber in the Louisiana State Penitentiary in 1957. Elmo Patrick Sonnier, the prisoner who served as the inspiration for the movie Dead Man Walking, and Willie Francis were notable executions on the chair (the only inmate to survive the electric chair; he was ultimately executed after the first attempt failed). Lethal injection was chosen by the State of Louisiana as the only execution technique in 1991 as a result of new law. Andrew Lee Jones was the last person put to death aboard "Gruesome Gertie" on July 22, 1991. Eighty-seven executions took place using "Gruesome Gertie" during the course of its fifty-year lifespan. The Louisiana Prison Museum presently houses it.  Death row convicts referred to the electric chair in Louisiana as " Gruesome Gertie."  It is also well-known for being the first electric chair execution to fail, when Willie Francis was put to death. As mentioned earlier.   The electric chair used in New Jersey's state prisons, known as Old Smokey, is displayed in the New Jersey State Police Museum. Richard Hauptmann, the person responsible for the Lindbergh kidnapping, was the chair's most well-known victim. The electric chair in Tennessee and Pennsylvania both went by this moniker.   Alabama in the United States has an electric chair called Yellow Mama. From 1927 through 2002, executions were held there.   The chair was first put at Kilby State Prison in Montgomery, Alabama, where it was given the moniker "Yellow Mama" after being sprayed with highway-line paint from the nearby State Highway Department lab. The chair was created by a British prisoner in 1927, the same year that Horace DeVauhan was executed for the first time.   Lynda Lyon Block, who was executed in 2002, was the final person to be executed in Yellow Mama. Since then, the chair has been kept at the Holman Correctional Facility in an attic above the execution room.   Since the introduction of lethal injection in 1979, which is now the standard procedure in all U.S. counties that permit capital punishment, the usage of the electric chair has decreased.   Only the American states of Alabama, Florida, South Carolina, Kentucky, and Tennessee still allow the use of the electric chair as a method of execution as of 2021. The laws of Arkansas and Oklahoma allow for its application in the event that lethal injection is ever ruled to be unlawful. It or lethal injection are the only options available to inmates in the other states. Only prisoners convicted in Kentucky prior to a specific date may choose to be executed by electric chair. In the event that a judge rules that lethal injection is unlawful, electrocution is also permitted in Kentucky.   Tennessee was one of the states that offered convicts the option of the electric chair or a lethal injection; nevertheless, the state approved a statute enabling the use of the electric chair in the event that lethal injection medicines were unavailable or rendered inadmissible in May 2014.   The Nebraska Supreme Court ruled on February 15, 2008, that the Nebraska Constitution forbids "cruel and unusual punishment," which includes death by electrocution.   Before Furman v. Georgia, Oklahoma witnessed the last legal electrocution in the US. This occurred in 1966. The electric chair was used relatively regularly in post-Gregg v. Georgia executions throughout the 1980s, but as lethal injection became more popular in the 1990s, its use in the United States steadily decreased. The most recent US electrocution, that of Nicholas Todd Sutton,  who was responsible for murdering two acquaintances and his own grandmother in North Carolina and Tennessee from August to December 1979, took place in Tennessee in February 2020. A handful of states still give the death penalty option to the convicted, allowing them to choose between lethal injection and electrocution. https://www.listal.com/movies/electric%2bchair