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  • 4,584EPISODES
  • 1h 19mAVG DURATION
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  • Jun 23, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Rem

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Latest podcast episodes about Rem

Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning
Brain Fact Friday ”Using Neuroscience to Explain Why Our Dreams Are So Weird, Highly Emotional, and Often Forgotten”

Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 12:49


“As long as we dare to dream and don't get in the way of ourselves, anything is possible—there's truly no end to where our dreams can take us.” Hilary Swank On the episode you will learn: The Neuroscience behind ✔ Why our dreams are so weird, highly emotional and often forgotten. ✔ With a BRAIN STRATEGY you can use to improve your waking life, with your brain and sleep in mind. For returning guests, welcome back, and for those who are new here, I'm Andrea Samadi, author, and educator, with a passion for learning, understanding difficult concepts, and breaking them down so that we can all use and apply the most current research to improve our productivity and results in our schools, sports environments, and modern workplaces. On today's EPISODE #226 and Brain Fact Friday, we are going to dive deeper into the research of Dr. Baland Jalal, who has studied the phenomenon of sleep paralysis and dreams for the past decade, and see what we can learn from our brain, while dreaming. To do this, we are going to review what's happening to the brain during sleep paralysis, and during our REM/dream state to see what we can learn from this understanding. I hope this will open up our level of awareness and help us to understand how our dream world can impact our everyday, waking world. What is Sleep Paralysis? Dr. Jalal and I discussed this terrifying experience in depth on our recent interview, episode #224[i] and most of us can relate to this experience, but wonder what it is, and why it happens, in addition to many other questions I had about dreams themselves. You can see Dr. Jalal's lectures on this topic, where he explains what happens to our brain when we sleep and that we even see things we might say were ghosts. Now that I have heard Dr. Jalal's explanation of what happens to our brains when we are dreaming, I definitely think of my brain now, when analyzing my dreams, with this new awareness. Which brings us to this week's Brain Fact Friday where I want to explore sleep paralysis, why dreams are so weird, and why are they highly emotional, and do this, with our brain in mind. SLEEP PARALYSIS DID YOU KNOW that during REM sleep (when we dream) there's a part of the brain in the brain stem that paralyzes the body to keep us (and our sleeping partner) safe[ii] and another part of our brain (the cortex) that's responsible for our perceptual awareness. Occasionally, we can wake up when we are still in REM sleep, and are perceptually aware, but unable to move as we are paralyzed. This is sleep paralysis, and can feel terrifying, if you have no idea what's going on. I learned from Dr. Jalal that in this state we can also see what we think is a ghost, or which he explains is “an illusion that your brain creates” in the Temporal Parietal Junction (that's close to our Occipital or Visual Lobe) that can project a sense of our self, outside of our body. Have you ever felt or seen something like this and thought it was a ghost? Seeing something like this, paired up with feeling paralyzed can be a terrifying experience as I told him in the interview, and he agreed, with his own sleep paralysis experience. Then, our brain doesn't like the feeling of incompleteness and it will make up a story of what you are seeing. Dr. Jalal explains that in all of the years he has done this work, he has found that our cultural background can influence what we think we are seeing. It took me some time to make the connection, but the ghost I saw, was not far off from an 18th Century Englishman, or even someone wearing the outfits of the guards at Buckingham Palace. I did grow up with a photo of the Queen Elizabeth and Prince Phillip in my house, and this made me think it could have been the reason why my ghost was of British decent when I was actually in a house in Vancouver, Canada. My brain created this image from a past, cultural memory. WHY ARE DREAMS SO WEIRD? DID YOU KNOW that there's a part of our brain called the Dorsolateral PFC[iii] (a region of the frontal lobes associated with executive functions like working memory and attention) (Curtis and D'Esposito, 2003) that put concepts together in a meaningful way in our life—and that during REM sleep, or when we are dreaming, this part of the brain “shuts off”[iv] so we aren't usually aware that we are dreaming? If you have ever thought “that dream felt so real” this is the reason why, and it also explains why everything in our dreams is messed up and backwards. One minute we are on a bus with friends we haven't seen in years, you grab one of your friends' hand, jump off the bus, and go to the movies, and the next minute, you are back in your childhood home, drinking tea. This is one of my bizarre dreams, and I'm sure you can relate with your dreams. Now that I understand Dr. Jalal's explanation of the part of my brain that puts concepts together in a meaningful way, shutting down during REM sleep, I can clearly see why everything in my dream is disjointed and doesn't make much linear sense. WHY ARE DREAMS FILLED WITH STRONG EMOTION, PAST MEMORIES AND PEOPLE? DID YOU KNOW that during the REM state, or while we are dreaming, that “four areas of the brain fire up: the visual spatial regions (that help people to find their way around the world), the motor cortex (creates movement in the body), the hippocampus (our memory center) and amygdala (that processes strong emotions like fear, pleasure or anger)” “Which is why dreams are often filled with movement, strong emotions, past memories, people, experiences and are irrational.” Mathew Walker[v] tells us on his podcast that's all about why we dream. If you can keep a dream log, over time you can see what's going on in your waking hours, and learn from your dreams. Usually our concerns, worries and fears will show up in our dreams in some way, and you can solve them once you are aware of what they are. To conclude this week's Brain Fact Friday, that came from our recent interview with the world's leading expert on sleep paralysis, Dr. Baland Jalal, we took a closer look at the neuroscience of our dream world, explaining why our dreams are so weird, often highly emotional and what we can learn from them. I have four brain tips to make what we have learned about our brain when we sleep, useful in our daily life. UNDERSTANDING SLEEP PARALYSIS: Once we know what sleep paralysis is, that our brain paralyzes our body to keep us safe, then we can understand what might happen if we become perceptually aware during our REM sleep, and stuck between our sleep and wake state. BRAIN TIP FOR THIS FACT: OUR BRAIN DOESN'T LIKE CONFLICT OR INCOMPLETENESS: So figure out what your story is, if you have had a sleep paralysis experience and it's left you feeling unsettled. I explained my British ghost that my brain created as an illusion to tell the story and fill in the blanks of the unknown. What was YOUR sleep paralysis experience, and how can YOU  make sense of it?   WHY ARE DREAMS SO WEIRD AND OFTEN FORGOTTEN: Since we now know the Dorsolateral PFC, the front part of our brain associated with memory, attention and putting things together in a meaningful way in our life, shuts down during REM sleep, we can now understand why dreams are so weird and events that happen are all over the place. If the part of our brain responsible for our memory is turned off, this explains why “95% of our dreams we don't remember” but we might remember the last few minutes, and last stage of our dreams if we are intentional about it. BRAIN TIP FOR THIS FACT: REPEAT TO REMEMBER: (which is John Medina's Brain Rule #5).[vi] If you want to improve this number see if you can remember your dreams when you wake up. Write them down before you do anything else, or they will be forgotten. Sometimes I'm not even awake yet, and I repeat the dream in my head while I'm brushing my teeth, to help me to remember and write it down when I can. Also, it will help if you are intentional about this practice and say “I will remember my dream” before you go to sleep at night. LEARN WHY DREAMS ARE HIGHLY EMOTIONAL: When we know what parts of the brain fire up during REM sleep, especially our amygdala that processes strong emotions, or past memories and experiences, we can now look for messages in our dreams, over time to see what common themes come up. If we can solve the problems that we find in our waking hours, it will help improve the other 1/3 of our life spent in sleep. BRAIN TIP FOR THIS FACT: SLEEP WELL, THINK WELL (John Medina's Brain Rule #7).[vii] Here's the im portance of sleep again. It keeps coming back on this podcast. John Medina writes in his Brain Rules book, that “people vary on how much sleep they need and when they prefer to get it, but the biological need for a nap is universal.” (Medina, Brain Rules)[viii] If there's something bothering you in your waking hours, it will show up in your dreams in some way, and will impact your sleep. To truly sleep well, leading to improved “attention, executive function, working memory, mood, quantitative skills, logical reasoning and even motor dexterity” (Medina) work out your problems, and add a nap to your day to keep your mind operating at its highest levels. While Dr. Jalal does put his neuroscientific mind first with every question I asked him, there were still some questions that he said science couldn't prove, that have a spiritual side. Instead of saying that some things are not possible, he leaves this up to us to keep an open mind, and perhaps in the future, new advancements in science could move us forward so that we could find answers to the spiritual questions of our dreams in a way to benefit our waking life. Until then, I plan to keep on dreaming, and learning as much as I can on this topic to share with you here. I hope you've enjoyed diving deep into sleep paralysis, why our dreams are so weird, and highly emotional with some tips we can all use to take our understanding and awareness to a new level. It really helped me to make sense of my sleep paralysis experience after interviewing Dr. Jalal, and thinking of ways that we can all use what we learned from his research. I do plan to keep an open mind moving forward to see what else I can learn from lucid dreaming, especially as it relates to improving our psychological well-being. See you next week and hope you have sweet dreams this weekend. REFERENCES: [i] Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast EPISODE #224 with Dr. Baland Jalal on “Expanding our Awareness into the Mysteries of the Brain During Sleep” https://andreasamadi.podbean.com/e/harvard-neuroscientist-drbaland-jalalexplainssleepparalysislucid-dreaming-andpremonitionsexpandingour-awareness-into-the-mysteries-ofourbrainduring-sl/ [ii] Sleep Paralysis https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/21974-sleep-paralysis#:~:text=Why%20does%20sleep%20paralysis%20happen,or%20coming%20out%20of%20REM. [iii] Dorsolateral PFC https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/neuroscience/dorsolateral-prefrontal-cortex#:~:text=The%20dorsolateral%20prefrontal%20cortex%20is,Pathways%20in%20Clinical%20Neuropsychiatry%2C%202016 [iv] Neuroscience of Dreams and Sleep Paralysis at Harvard University Published on YouTube Feb. 13, 2020 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7WBL-51kIkc&t=7s [v] Mathew Walker Podcast The Sleep Diplomat https://www.sleepdiplomat.com/podcast [vi] John Medina's Brain Rule #5 Repeat to Remember https://brainrules.net/short-term-memory/#:~:text=Rule%20%235%3A%20Repeat%20to%20remember.&text=Which%20means%2C%20your%20brain%20can,have%20to%20repeat%20to%20remember. [vii] John Medina's Brain Rule #7 Sleep well, think well.

Ask Dr. Dream
The Science of Dreams with Robert Hoss

Ask Dr. Dream

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 46:21


Let's get sciency shall we? For those of us who already know the realm of dreams are valid because we've experienced their transformational value, we need no scientific proof or understanding of what happens in the brain when we dream. But for those of us who like to know the neurology behind the vast and oh-so intricate matrix of our nighttime dreaming mind, this show is for you. Robert Hoss, from the Dream Science foundation, (author of Our Dreaming Mind, and Dreams that Change our Lives) joined the show to help me make sense of what happens in the brain during our REM cycles, vivid dreams and lucid dreams. Find out about the work of DreamScience.org if you are interested in dream studies, research, and dream work. Dream Expert, Best Selling Author, and Spiritual Healer Kelly Sullivan Walden Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sofá Sonoro
Los dos regresos de Patti Smith

Sofá Sonoro

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 58:59


En los años ochenta, Patti Smith se alejó de la música para cuidar a sus dos hijos. En esos años se centró en la escritura, fueron años claves para su formación y para lo que vendría después. En aquella década, Smith solo publicó un disco, Dream of Life, junto a su marido. Tras la inesperada muerte de Fred Smith, Patti se encontró viuda a los 48 años, sin trabajo y con dos adolescentes a su cargo. En aquel momento de dudas apareció Michael Stipe, cantante de REM, que con  una llamada nocturna cambió la carrera de Smith que volvió a los escenarios junto a Bob Dylan y más tarde al estudio con Gone Again, un disco fascinante que marcó su nuevo regreso. Esta semana recordamos esta historia y estas canciones junto a Toni Castarnado y Lucía Taboada.

Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning
Harvard Neuroscientist Dr. Baland Jalal Explains ”Sleep Paralysis, Lucid Dreaming and Premonitions: Expanding our Awareness into the Mysteries of Our Brain During Sleep”

Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 62:34


“Dreams are one of the great mysteries of science. In their bizarre complexity, they can reveal deeper truths about who you are at the most basic level.” Researcher at Harvard University and the World's leading expert on sleep paralysis, Dr. Baland Jalal Watch this interview on YouTube here https://youtu.be/nE15JIqy5rU On the episode you will learn: ✔ Who is Dr. Baland Jalal, and how did he find his way to study neuroscience and sleep, becoming the world's leading expert on sleep paralysis?  ✔ How is Dr. Baland connected to Francis Crick, who discovered the double helix of the DNA structure and Dr. V.S. Ramachandran? ✔ What is sleep paralysis and what happens to the brain while this is occurring? ✔Why is the time just before we go to sleep and the time just before we wake up important for increasing our creativity or gaining insight? ✔ Are premonitions real, and can we access important information from our dreams? ✔Can we actually travel to places we have never been? ✔ What is lucid dreaming and how can we gain insight from what we see in these dreams? ✔Can lucid dreaming be beneficial for our waking hours? ✔What advancements in neuroscience do you think could help us in the future with our dreams? For returning guests, welcome back, and for those who are new here, I'm Andrea Samadi, author, and educator, with a passion for learning, understanding difficult concepts, and breaking them down so that we can all use and apply the most current research to improve our productivity and results in our schools, sports environments, and modern workplaces. On today's EPISODE #224 (that was postponed from April due to our guest's busy travel and work schedule) we are going to go beyond where we've ever gone before on this podcast, and cover some topics that you might have questions about, like I did, and I've found Dr. Baland Jalal[i], from Harvard, the world's leading expert on sleep paralysis, who has published 48 peer reviewed academic papers as well as a book from Cambridge University Press, to answer our questions.   We've covered dreams before, on EPISODE #104[ii], with Sleep Scientist Antonio Zadra and his book When Your Brain Dreams: Exploring the Science and Mystery of Sleep but I left out some parts of the dream world that I thought might be too weird for this podcast, until I heard Dr. Jalal connecting the brain to our dreams, and this changed everything for me. I mentioned on EPISODE #211, that when I first was introduced to Dr. Jalal, his team sent me an email with his Harvard Bio and a write-up about his work on dreams but little did I know that his work would open my mind to places it's never been before, as I began to explore sleep paralysis (something I've experienced—just once which was enough for me, I just had no idea there was a name for it), lucid dreams (that I flat out thought I was crazy for having), and learning how my brain operates while dreaming, which revealed more truths about who I am at the core than I knew before coming across Dr. Jalal's work. I've gone on to study English scientist and professor of neuroscience, Mathew Walker and often tune into his podcast that's all about sleep, the brain and the body[iii] to see how we can all learn more about ways to improve our sleep, which we all know to be one of our top 5 health staples. I did create this podcast to bring credibility to some of the concepts that used to be considered weird, but now, science and FMRI scans show why these practices that 20 years ago were not mainstream, are now commonly used in our schools and work environments.  Before watching Dr. Jalal's lectures, I don't think I would openly talk about the experiences I've had with the dream world, but I thought if I've experienced these things, what if our listeners have also, wherever you are listening to this podcast in the world, and perhaps hearing from Dr. Jalal WHAT these bizarre things called dreams actually are, WHY we have them, and see if they can expand our self-awareness, and open up our world to a new level and even be used in a way to improve our productivity, creativity and results in our waking life. My mentor Bob Proctor was always challenging me to stop looking at life through the key hole, and instead, open up the door and expand my level of awareness. He would say, “Once the mind has been expanded, it will never go back to its original state. Awareness is not something you lose.” (Bob Proctor) When Dr. Jalal and I were working on rescheduling our interview, he asked me how early on a Sunday I would wake up, since he is currently in Europe, and my response to him was that I would wake up at midnight to speak with him about this topic because it's fascinating and I know will help all of us to expand our thinking. Let's meet Dr. Baland Jalal, and see if he can shed some light with what neuroscience can tell us about our dream world. Welcome Dr. Jalal, thank you for coming on the podcast, and helping all of us to expand our thinking about what happens in our dream world—especially knowing that this time takes up 1/3 of our life and that our sleep is such an important health staple. Thanks for being here today…I know you have been busy recording your second TED TALK and that you are in Europe now? I'm hoping you can shed some light for ways we can gain a deeper understanding of ourselves through our dreams, and what neuroscience can tell us about our sleeping brain. Intro Q: I've watched all of your most recent podcasts, and had no idea how much I would learn from them. I really enjoyed your interview on The Ranveer Show[iv] as Ranveer seemed like such an open-minded person. You mention your beginnings on this podcast that I think are important to begin with since there's a lot more to you than we see without listening to your story, so I've got to ask, can you take us back to your humble beginnings, and then how you met your mentor (Dr. V.S. Ramachandran)?[v] Q1:  Until I heard your lectures, I probably wouldn't ever admit to the fact that I had felt sleep paralysis. It's such a weird and scary experience, and you explained it EXACTLY as I felt it over 20 years ago. For those listening, can you explain what sleep paralysis is, why we become paralyzed during REM sleep, and what's happening in our brain to make this happen? Q1B: Why does it feel so scary? I had an experience that if I had not heard you say this, I probably wouldn't be mentioning it at all—but I thought there was a ghost laying on my chest. I could see him (in my head) and he definitely “felt” evil. Did my brain play a trick on me with what I was seeing and feeling or was there really a ghost in this sleep paralysis experience? Q1C) How did you become known as the world's leading expert on sleep paralysis and then I saw the topic of your most recent TED talk you how are you have designed one of the first treatments for sleep paralysis to help people who experience this terrifying phenomenon regularly? Q2: I think it's crazy that most of us have had these experiences, but we would just leave them off the table of our regular conversations with people, since they are just so weird. I actually remember asking a sleep expert years ago why I could “see things” in my head in those moments that I was drifting off to sleep. He wrote down the term “hypnagogia[vi]” and told me to study that.  I can sometimes see people's faces and sometimes what I see foreshadows important events many years later. What can you tell us about the importance of this time before sleep and wake, and how insights can be drawn from what we see so we can trust what we see to be useful? 2B: Sometimes during this time, we can have the sensation of floating above our body.  I know you've talked about this often, and explain what's happening in the brain for this to occur. Can you explain the part of our brain that's responsible for our self-awareness, (Temporal Parietal Lobe) and how we could possibly see another version of ourselves floating above our self? (Sup Parietal Lobe) Q3: Premonitions? Is there any TRUTH to what we are dreaming? Are there messages from our waking hours in our sleeping world? I think there are (after seeing common themes in my dreams from my waking hours) but what do you think? After your research and connecting science to dreaming, why do we have dreams? Are we supposed to learn from them? What part of our brain can help us to interpret our dreams? Q4: What about lucid dreaming. At the time I first wrote these questions (in April) I didn't know there was a name for this. There are times just before I wake up, or times just before I go to sleep, that I can see things. My eyes are closed, (but I can feel them opening and moving around in my head as I'm trying to see this vision in my head) that I think are lucid dreams. Some of these visions have helped me in life with massive life-changing decisions and others I have no idea what I'm supposed to be learning from them. One example I can give you that I have no idea what the purpose of the vision is—there's a hallway, and I can see people walking down the hallway. I know where this hallway is, and who the people are from what they are wearing. I've never been there before, but there's certain things in the hallway, in addition to the people, that tell me where it is.  The last time I saw this hallway, I was able to (for the first time) zoom in on certain parts of the hall, and see photos on the wall, or the light at the end of the hallway, where the people were walking.   I know this hallway is a real place, because I saw a news clip of it, and had this immediate feeling of recognition like “that's the hallway” but the camera in the news clip was shooting from a different angle than what I saw in my dream and I kept thinking…turn around, so I could see the hallway as I saw it in my head. What's happening here? How can see “see” places in our mind where we have never been before? I don't need to ask if it's real because I'm certain it is from what I have seen, but what's the purpose of have a lucid dream? 5: When we are “lucid dreaming” I recently learned from Mathew Walker's research that in this state, our PFC that usually shuts down usually in dreaming, lights up and this explains why we can actually interact with people in our lucid dreams, or gain control of our dream.  I've always just been an observer (like my hallway example I'm standing behind the people) but recently saw that I could zoom in and out of the hallway and see the pictures on the wall--wouldn't it be neat if we could interact with the people we see, or even bring back something to show we really were there, like a pen from someone's desk or something. You mention that you had this experience, and that you put a piece of paper in your pajama pocket. Can you explain what happened to the paper? Do you know how to control lucid dreams so they could be beneficial for us? Q6: If lucid dreaming is real, and I think it is, couldn't we use this skill for improved productivity or creativity in our waking hours? Could athletes use this for mental rehearsal since dreaming of doing something is almost equivalent to actually doing it? What about in the workplace to gain access to ideas or answers to problems? Is there a way to enter lucid dreaming at will vs just randomly happen (which is how it happens for me)? I can't control what I see, it just happens. Q7: How can we “test” ourselves to see if we are dreaming or not so we can develop Lucid dreaming more? Is it like the MATRIX when Neo puts his hand on the wall and it either stops, or goes through?  Can we do this to test if we are dreaming or not? What are you learning from your dream experiences to help yourself and others? Q8: For people to learn more about your work, is the best place to follow you on YouTube where you post your lectures? Thank you very much Dr. Jalal, for coming on the podcast, opening up my awareness BEFORE the interview, and giving us all an understanding of how our brain connects to our dream world. I hope it can help others to not be afraid of what they see during REM sleep, and keep searching for answers to help them in their waking hours, with whatever it is they are working on. It's been such a pleasure to speak with you. FOLLOW DR. JALAL Facebook https://www.facebook.com/balandjalal Instagram https://www.instagram.com/balandjalal/?hl=en YouTube https://www.youtube.com/c/DrBalandJalal   RESOURCES: Sleep Paralysis and the Monsters Inside Your Mind by Baland Jalal July 15, 2020 https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/sleep-paralysis-and-the-monsters-inside-your-mind/       REFERENCES:   [i] Dr. Baland Jalal https://psychology.fas.harvard.edu/people/baland-jalal [ii] Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast EPISODE #104 with Antonio Zadra on “When Brains Dream” https://andreasamadi.podbean.com/e/sleep-scientist-antonio-zadra-on-when-brains-dream-exploring-the-science-and-mystery-of-sleep/ [iii] Mathew Walker's Podcast https://themattwalkerpodcast.buzzsprout.com/ [iv] The Ranveer Show Published on YouTube July 30, 2021 Neuroscientist Explains Scary Secrets of Your Brain https://www.youtube.co/watch?v=vJ_7h-OijAQ&t=24s [v] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/V._S._Ramachandran https://www.ted.com/talks/vs_ramachandran_3_clues_to_understanding_your_brain [vi] What is Hypnagogia, the State Between Wakefulness and Sleep https://www.healthline.com/health/hypnagogia  

The Matt Walker Podcast
#24: Sleep is Bloody Remarkable - Part 2

The Matt Walker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 13:24


Matt is back this week with his recurring series, ‘Sleep is Bloody Remarkable'. Today's episode is all about why we are unique when it comes to sleep. When we compare our sleep to that of all other primates, humans stand out in two ways. First, we spend far less time asleep, and second, and in bloody remarkable

Grass-Roots Wellness
EP 6: Is Your Bedroom Making You Sick? 10 Simple Hacks to Create a Healthy Sleep Oasis.

Grass-Roots Wellness

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 16:06


Is your Bedroom making you sick?  We spend 1/3 of our lives sleeping; this space must provide a non-toxic place for rest and restoration.  Find out if you wake up feeling groggy or less than your best due to your bedding.   10 Simple Steps to start to create that healthy non-toxic bedroom: Swap your pillow for a healthier upgrade.  Organic cotton, wool, and natural latex  Get 100% organic cotton sheets/pillow cases or all cotton but wash them several times in a clean detergent like our abode pods and rinse with vinegar.   Fill your room with house plants. Episode 2 talks about houseplants and how they are so helpful to our indoor air quality.   Wash your sheets weekly with Abode Laundry Pods.  Swap out your mattress for an organic version when your budget allows.  My favorite company is Lifekind. Keep your room cool Use an Essential Oil Diffuser to clean the air and create a calm atmosphere. Remove the TV and screens from your bedroom. Remove the noise.  Use a white noise machine or app that helps remove disruptions. I use the app Noisli. Keep the room cool. Aim for about 65 degrees to get more REM sleep. Organic Education Sleep Safe in a Toxic World was published in 2011 as a second edition to Toxic Bedrooms, first published in 2007. Both books were well-reviewed, and the second edition (with forwarding by Athena Thompson) was an official Green Book Festival selection.   Considered the foremost expert on organic sleep, Walt continues to lecture on his research to ensure the consumer public knows the importance of organic in our lives. Sleep Safe in a Toxic World: Your Guide to Identifying and Removing Hidden Toxins from your Bedroom (available on Amazon)   The best bedding... in my opinion: life kind OMI/Organic Pedic Natura World Organic Series   Wishing you Happy, Healthy Sleeping! Jen https://www.jennaleewellness.com    

De Vastgoedshow
#74 | DIT GEBEURDE EEN DAG VAN TE VOREN?!

De Vastgoedshow

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 24:15


Vandaag is Dinand ter Braak, notaris bij Ter Braak Willems en onderdeel van het REM collectief, aanwezig in de podcast. Samen met Thomas bespreken ze waar de notaris allemaal mee te maken krijgt en meer!

The Rich Dickman Show
Episode 217 - Murder Boners

The Rich Dickman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 99:10


Episode 217 is live and we hate Randy's edit! Or do we? Rem is sorry for being a dick; Cody works Randy's edit button; Randy went to wrestling; Randy plugs in his car; Dale Earnhardt died once and Rem watched; Cody makes chicken parm; Randy had KFC in Kentucky; Rem doesn't know his chicken sandwiches; Rem went to a funeral; making a new friend and dreading it; and more! (There'd be more notes but Randy is bad at taking notes) Get in there and have fun with your favorite podcast friends!

NeverMind the Shitcoins
It's #N2BN (nice to be nice!) a very adventurous pilot

NeverMind the Shitcoins

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 19:09


Hi I'm Ricky ben bob sunderland crypto clem bateman Fitz) and you've stumbled onto the weirdest most funnest thing on youtube you never knew you wanted to watch today! Coming up, we have… REM - man on the moon - a very personal cover A serious moment about mental health in the crypto industry Ben's Joke, Fact and Book of the Day Why Ben only has 1 favorite Crypto EVER for all time (probly anyway!) and now assumes he has a paycheque for life so long as he very very loosely behaves from now on and promises to be nice to EVERYONE (yes Boss!) Lots of segues, outtakes N maybe some other stuff because the man, the myth, the legend, Alexander Filatov has granted this beautiful idiot FULL CREATIVE FREEDOM (as long as I'm nice!!))... yay!!!!! If you're silly or bored enough to hang around, we're gonna have a lot of fun because…. It's Nice to be Nice!!!! (ECHOOOOOOOO!!!!) #entertainment #mentalhealth #n2bn #cryptocurrency #everscale #guitarcovers #listenable --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nevermindtheshitcoins/message

GENILEM Podcast
Christophe Wagnière : Essayer, échouer, recommencer

GENILEM Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 28:21


Pour ce nouvel épisode du podcast « Sans détour » nous nous entretenons avec Christophe Wagnière, ‘capitaine' de 42 Lausanne - une école d'informatique renouvelant les codes de l'apprentissage. L'approche de l'Ecole 42 – un concept innovant d'écoles développé par l'entrepreneur français Xavier Niel – est fondée principalement sur la pratique, l'autonomie et la collaboration. L'objectif ? Remédier à la pénurie de talents dans le numérique tout en répondant aux mutations économiques et technologiques. Il en existe aujourd'hui plusieurs dizaines de campus à travers l'Europe ; celui de Renens est le premier en Suisse. Les établissements sont ouverts à toutes et tous sur sélection mais sans diplôme requis ni limite d'âge, et ce gratuitement grâce au soutien des partenaires. Au-delà de l'informatique, l'école encourage le développement de soft skills valorisés sur le marché du travail : esprit d'équipe, créativité, culture de l'échec, adaptation au changement, etc. Dans cet entretien, Christophe Wagnière raconte la genèse de l'établissement romand et les caractéristiques de ce système d'apprentissage novateur, où la culture du "faire" incite à essayer, échouer et recommencer. Il revient également sur les défis et les enjeux auxquels il est confronté. *** Animé par nos coachs en création d'entreprise, le podcast GENILEM est un rendez-vous pour les personnes passionnées et curieuses d'entrepreneuriat. Avec le soutien de notre parrain Berney Associés.

Ka Adventist World Radio
Ka Rta jong phi

Ka Adventist World Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 29:00


Ka, rta, jong, phi, yn, pynim, slem, kpa, tymmen, khun, sngewsih, pisa, juti, rem, dor, babha, phong, leit kai, kynduh, samla, rkhie, bein, iam, sngewsih, jingieit, por, sngikha, lynti, jain, leit-phai, sopti, dohnud.

Vágatlan Verzió
Vágatlan Verzió #56 - Brazil filmek (Vendégünk: Luca)

Vágatlan Verzió

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 236:56


Sziasztok, Ez itt a Vágatlan Verzió, három hetente jelentkező filmes podcast 56. adása, amiben vendégünk, Luca kalauzolásával látogatunk el a brazil dzsungelek, sivatagok, favelák és nagyvárosok közegébe. Az expedíció során, Luca megbízható szakértelme mellett ejtünk szót a brazil történelemről, társadalomképről és mítoszokról. A brazil filmek végtelenül lesújtó és reménytelen képei mögött azért ott sejlik valamennyi remény lehetősége, és néhány nemzeti hős, néhány megható pillanat kivillanása. Reméljük, hogy a négy brazil film megbeszélésével közelebb juttathatunk Titeket is a brazilság esszenciájához. Tartsatok velünk, és jó szórakozást! Tartalomjegyzék: 0:00 – Bevezetés 26:34 – Isten és Ördög a Nap földjén 1:13:27 – Isten városa 2:29:37 – Senna 3:28:01 – Egy láthatatlan nő élete Alternatív linkek: iTunes - https://itunes.apple.com/hu/podcast/v%C3%A1gatlan-verzi%C3%B3/id1382751778?l=hu&mt=2 Spotify – https://open.spotify.com/show/3OVfiTmsGL8iYljlRWZ8g3 Letöltés – https://hearthis.at/vgatlan-verzi/vv56noiseless/download/?secret=auNS9 Social media: Discord: https://discord.gg/Kq9gDYDnaJ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vagatlanverziopodcast/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/vagatlanverzio/ E-mail: vagatlanverzio.podcast@gmail.com Az adásban elhangozott adatok és információk mellé minden részben linkelni fogunk további olvasnivalókat. A mostani adag: Brazil magyarok podcast https://open.spotify.com/show/3O6q68ZGgC1WNn2FELtRSi Füry Lajos említett könyve: https://moly.hu/konyvek/fury-lajos-eso-a-mato-grosson Brazil szociológiai kötet, a rabszolgaság kérdésköre kapcsán: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casa-Grande_%26_Senzala Brazília és rasszizmus https://time.com/5915902/brazil-racism-quilombos/ Jorge Amado brazil író, aki a Nap vidékéről szóló műveket írt: https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Jorge_Amado Magyar esszé Jorge Amado jelentőségéről: https://1749.hu/fuggo/essze/a-nagy-brazil-meselo-emlekere-jorge-amado-20.html Xuxa videók https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YMegGFNDhZs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KDp6e0_d7g8 Xuxa és a felnőttfilmes per https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5943905/Brazilian-actress-Xuxa-loses-battle-Google-pedophile-film.html Csaknekedkislány - Lődi https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZjeSgDAbXBo Város és város között: https://moly.hu/konyvek/china-mieville-a-varos-es-a-varos-kozott Kulturális forrásaink (minden áthallás jogos, de nem szándékos) : Önkényes Mérvadó, A hét mesterlövésze, Retroschock, Pál Feri, Jordan Peterson Külön köszönet: Tamásnak, az intróban nyújtott hangjáért! https://bogyopeter.tumblr.com/ - Péternek, a csodálatos artworkért! http://eper.elte.hu/ - Az EPER Rádió stúdiójának a felvétel lehetőségéért! Köszi, hogy meghallgattatok! Ádám, Ákos, Alex _________________________________________________________________ podcast, film, kritika, elemzés, kibeszélő, bemutató, brazília, rio de janeiro, senna, forma 1, mítosz, nemzet, esőerdő, brasil, foci, isten városa, kis zé, kiskocka, rakéta, favela

I Think, Therefore I Google

We dream big with this episode, looking to understand why it is that when we fall asleep our minds can take us on the strangest adventures.  What is the science of dreams?  Why do we have them? We look at REM sleep, lucid dreaming, communication with dreamers, Dzido's thoughts on bears flying airplanes and more!MINOR SPOILERS for the following mediaDr Strange In the Multiverse of Madness (2022)Inception (2010)Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind  (2004)Further linksDream theories - Khan Academyhttps://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat/processing-the-environment/sleep-and-consciousness/v/dream-theories-freud-activation-synthnesis-hypothesisHow do blind people dream? - NBC Newshttps://web.archive.org/web/20130124114342/http://bodyodd.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/03/09/10602730-how-do-blind-people-dream?lite

Rem and Sam
Steph's Finals Moment and May Music Draft | EP 34

Rem and Sam

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 43:40


Rem opens talking about games 4 and 5 of the NBA Finals and Steph's historic 40-point performance, before bringing on The Champ Quinn to draft May/June music releases. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Wealthy Wellthy Wise
Get Good Sleep w/Todd & Tara Youngblood

Wealthy Wellthy Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 61:48


My guests this week are a Power Couple, and also serial entrepreneurs with a passion for bringing new products to market. With over $300M in revenue creation, current focus is on improving sleep with the Chilisleep and sleep.me platform. Please meet Todd and Tara Youngblood. Let's Chat... Are you an avid nap-taker? Depending on your body type, you might be! If you are, Todd + Tara share that it is best to take a nap after lunch because your chronotype is dropping your core body temperature, which is what is facilitating that.  There are different levels of rest… even different levels of napping! It is important to really examine your schedule and then manage your sleep to get what you need. You need 2 hours of REM sleep and then 2 hours of deep sleep. Be thoughtful with YOUR life!  Ask yourself: what's NOT working? Because then you can gain awareness, clarity, and therefore change. Let's overcome these obstacles! “Overcoming the next obstacle is what successful entrepreneurs do…” – Todd  "Pressure produces results." – Todd Topics Discussed in Episode: Entrepreneurship Raising outside capital Start up Positive impact of delayed gratification Links: Chilisleep Chilisleep Discount Link (WealthyWellthy20 is the code) Instagram LinkedIn

Sudden but Inevitable Rewatch
Death Note - Wager and Decision (Bondage Gurney)

Sudden but Inevitable Rewatch

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 89:09


This week the SBI crew discovers what happens when Rem decides not to like you anymore, and Josh is finally able to decide how he feels about Light! Ricky D of course takes the opportunity to wonder how he feels about Light's little sister. Wait, that came out wrong...but we're wagering that you'll let that decision slide!Subscribe now to Open Pike Night now to be part of the Cap'n's new Star Trek Strange New Worlds podcast!Support your favorite indie podcast in style with an SBI shirt! Follow us on Twitter @SuddenBut! Check out our picks for Shot of the Show on Instagram @suddenbutinevitablepodcast! Or, go to twistmyarm.net/sbi to get everything all in one place. Follow our Facebook page to join us live and be part of the discussion! Watch us on YouTube!

The Jedburgh Podcast
Jumping In with Alpha Elite Performance Founder & Green Beret Travis Wilson (The Jedburgh Podcast Short-Form Series)

The Jedburgh Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 26:33


Fran Racioppi had the chance to Jump In with Alpha Elite Performance Founder Travis Wilson while covering Sandlot Jax and the GORUCK Games. Alpha Elite Performance is a supplement company dedicated to the Special Operations Truth #2: quality is more important than quantity.Travis and Fran catch up on their time in 10th Special Forces Group, Travis shares his motivation to start Alpha Elite Performance, and how his new sleep aid is making an impact across the supplement industry. They also talk about the lessons learned from his nine deployments, the importance of integrity and being honest, raw and flawed; and how a canopy collapse during a night training jump changed his life. Learn more on The Jedburgh Podcast Website and check out our video YouTube versions of all episodes here.Highlights:-Travis shares the vision behind Alpha Elite Performance and how he started the company based on quality over quantity. (4:47)-GBNT Sleep is the latest release in the line of Alpha Elite Performance products and is helping people get the REM sleep they need. (5:49)-ODA Supergreens detoxes the body. (7:36)-Travis entered the military to follow in his parents footsteps, serving first as a medic in the Army before being selected for Special Forces. (8:28)-Travis describes how the integrity and character he learned in the military are applied to his entrepreneurial efforts. (11:35)-Fran asks Travis to share what he has learned from his parachuting accident which resulted in 13 surgeries and a new take on life. (13:10)-Travis describes what it means to be honest, raw and flawed; and how at 47 he is still learning. (17:21)-Fran & Travis reminisce about being on the same base in Iraq, FOB Paliwoda, during 2005-2006 and the type of combat operations they conducted there. (20:41)-Rally & Recover is the newest oral rehydration supplement by Alpha Elite Performance. (23:45)-Travis reveals the upcoming event trailer that is about to launch. (25:17)Quotes:-”It's not my first time in the back of an FLA with another man.” (3:47)-”There has to be a problem and we come up with that solution” (5:45)-”I wanted to be in the Air Force. I wanted to be a PJ like my Dad.” (8:38)-“I just always wanted to be more than what I was. (10:17)-”Your reputation precedes you and integrity goes along with that.” (12:36)-”They said it sounded like two rocks slapping together when I hit the ground.” (14:08)-”I haven't grown, but I've just decided to keep moving.” (17:05)-“I think that we're all flawed. I haven't been perfect.” (17:30)-”I'm 47 years old…I'm still learning from the things I messed up in life.” (18:05)-”If you didn't get hit on the way down, you were getting hit on the way out.” (23:03)This episode is brought to you by Jersey Mike's, 18A Fitness, Analytix Solutions, Jaguar Land Rover of Fairfield and The Readiness Collective.

Whole 'Nuther Thing
Episode 685: Whole 'Nuther Thing June 12, 2022

Whole 'Nuther Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 118:37


"I am from the Sunday school,  I sing soprano in the upstairs choir You are a holy man, on the FM radio,  I sat up all the night and watched thee To see who in the world you might be" No mystery who I might be just great tuneage from 3 -5 PM on  the Sunday Edition of Whole 'Nuther Thing. Joining us this  afternoon are Barenaked Ladies, Tears For Fears, REM, David Bowie,    The Motels, Lou Reed, The Beach Boys, Donovan, The Left Banke,  Beatles, Kenny Rankin, Lovin' Spoonful, Police, Rolling Stones, Tears  For Fears,  Crosby Stills & Nash, The Kinks, Bee Gees, Tom Petty &    The Heartbreakers, Van Morrison and Joni Mitchell...Please go online at 885fm.org and Subscribe, Renew a Subscription or just contribute what you can to keep this wonderful station alive and Whole 'Nuther Thing on Sundays from 3-5 PM each Sunday.

The Rich Dickman Show
Episode 216 - Podcast Friend Search 2022

The Rich Dickman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 102:31


Episode 216 drops and with that is The Great TRDS Podcast Friend Search of 2022! Randy has poked the boys into going out and making new friends! Cody has an attack of ricotta cheese; What is the reverse of QAnon?; Spaghetti wants attention; Rem had a death in the family; Randy gets Cody's confused; Are you PRIDE enough?; What is Ball Toner?; TWYD returns; Why You Should Never Trust Anyone On The Internet; The Library of Babel; Rem's internet is shit; What is me?; and more!

The Matt Walker Podcast
#23: Dreams – Part 6

The Matt Walker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 16:09


In this episode, Matt goes deeper into his exploration of  lucid dreaming. He tells us all about studies demonstrating that lucid dreamers can wake from dream sleep on command, demonstrating control over intention in their dreams, and even bring themselves to orgasm in dream sleep!Matt tells us about two leading methods for developing the skill of lucid dreaming. The first is Mnemonic Induction of Lucid Dreams, which involves the creation of a conscious, deliberate intention to remember that one is dreaming. For example, repeating a certain phrase each night before sleep. The second is the Reality Testing Method. This involves consistently examining one's environment and testing to differentiate between which of the two worlds, waking or dreaming, it is. The idea is to ingrain these tests in your waking life, so that they will flow over into your dreams, thereby triggering lucidity if you are dreaming.But how does the brain become lucid during dreaming? It's been discovered that when lucid dreaming starts, the prefrontal cortex fires up into activity! This seems to be a defining quality of the lucid dreaming state, different to classical REM sleep dreaming where this rational control region of the prefrontal cortex re-engages, thereby letting you gain volitional control over what you dream.Matt finally poses this hypothesis: between 80 to 90 percent of the populace are not lucid dreamers. If gaining dream control was so beneficial, surely more of us would do it. However, Matt counters his own argument: as we have not stopped evolving, it's possible that lucid dreamers represent the next iteration of hominid evolution in their ability to control their dreams, and potentially harness their preferred creative problem-solving ability! #mindblown!Please note that Matt is not a medical doctor, and none of the content in this podcast should be considered medical advice in any way, shape, or form, nor prescriptive in any way.The good people at InsideTracker are one of the sponsors of this week's episode, and they are generously offering a special 25% off any one of their programs for anyone who uses the above link during the time window of this episode. InsideTracker is a personalized biometric platform that analyzes your blood and your DNA to better understand what's happening inside of you and offers suggestions regarding things that you can do to better try and adjust some of those numbers, optimize them, and, as a result, optimize you.Also sponsoring this week are those fine people at Athletic Greens, and they are generously offering 3 benefits for anyone who uses the above link for their first order: 1) a discount on your order; 2) a one-year free supply of vitamin D; 3) five free travel packs. Athletic Greens is a nutrition drink that combines a full complement of antioxidants, minerals and biotics, together with essential vitamins. Matt's been using it for several years now, first because he's serious about his health, and second, because Matt did his research on the science and ingredients in Athletic Greens and thinks scientific data that can be taken as ground truth.So, make your way over to InsideTracker and Athletic Greens to take advantage of these incredible deals. And, as always, if you have thoughts or feedback you'd like to share, please reach out to Matt on Instagram.

The Rich Dickman Show
Episode 215 - ImPRESSive

The Rich Dickman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2022 95:36


Episode 215 is LIVE but we're not live. We're far away…but that's okay! Randy is flexing his EP muscles, running the board and doing…press? Yes! Randy does on location interviews! Cody and Randy recap their trips; YouTube sleep music; INSA; The first dick pic; Rem calls Kristen; YouTube shorts; Randy got new toys and shows off; the grocery store robot; getting your money back; and more! Check this one out!

Ochenta Cuentos
El fuego no solo quema

Ochenta Cuentos

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 13:13


Elena vive en una cabaña a las afueras de la ciudad. Tiene un objetivo: escribir sus memorias antes de que todas las mujeres de su familia (ella incluida) desaparezcan. Ava, su gata, es su única compañía; la única que entiende su poder.Esta historia de ficción nos llega desde Ciudad de México. ****Si quieres leer transcripciones en español y en inglés de nuestros episodios, entra a https://ochentastudio.com/ochenta-cuentos.Síguenos en nuestras redes sociales para estar al día con nuestras actualizaciones:IG: @ochentapodcastsTikTok: @studioochentaTwitter: @ochentapodcasts ****CRÉDITOS:Escrito por: María Remírez (Ciudad de México, 1994) es psicóloga, escritora y assistant show runner. Ha colaborado como guionista con conocimientos en psicología para Netflix, Sonoro Media y Studio Ochenta.VOZ EN ESPAÑOL:ELENA: María RemírezMÚSICA Y DISEÑO SONORO: Jeremías JuárezPRESENTADO POR: Maru Lombardo See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Ochenta Cuentos
Fire Not Only Burns

Ochenta Cuentos

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 11:28


Elena is alone in a cabin in the woods. She intends to write her memoirs before all of the women in her family (including her) disappear. Her cat, Ava, knows her secret.This fiction story comes to us from Ciudad de México.****Check out transcripts in Spanish and English over at https://ochentastudio.com/ochenta-cuentos.Follow us on our social media for updates:IG: @ochentapodcastsTikTok: @studioochentaTwitter: @ochentapodcasts ******CREDITS:WRITTEN AND PRODUCED BY: María Remírez. María is a scriptwriter and psychologist based in Ciudad de México. She has worked for Netflix, Studio Ochenta and Sonoro Media.VOICES IN ENGLISH:Elena: Maru LombardoMUSIC AND SOUND DESIGN: Jeremías JuárezHOSTED BY: Maru Lombardo See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

White Coat Wellness
Breaking Down the Value of Sleep with Dr. Fariha Abbasi-Feinberg

White Coat Wellness

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 33:11


It is something we need to survive, but the more we try to obtain it, the more it can evade us: sleep. Looking at the clock throughout the night, scrolling on smart phones until our eyes shut, or sleeping with televisions on, many Americans do not create ideal, sleep-conducive settings for themselves, which can cause harm.  In this episode of the Prosperous Doc®, our host Shane Tenny, CFP® welcomes Dr. Fariha Abbasi-Feinberg, one of the foremost experts on sleep and the Medical Director of Sleep Medicine for Millennium Physician Group, to discuss how sleep impacts health, memory, and how COVID has impacted an entire country's sleep habits. Dr. Abbasi-Feinberg breaks down sleep's impact on the lymphatic system, metabolism, cognitive abilities, and more. She even discusses the benefits and harms of taking naps.   

U kulatého stolu
Jan Skryja: Sen ve snu je možný. Při lucidním snění můžete stavět celá města

U kulatého stolu

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 85:15


Hlasovat pro nás v anketě Podcast roku můžete zde: https://www.podcastroku.cz/

OldGuyTalksToMe
126. Actively Keeping Track Of Your Physiology

OldGuyTalksToMe

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 49:39


Check out Biostrap and learn more about them at: www.thestandard.academy/biostrap Are you actively tracking your physiology? If not, why? Today we have with us Kevin Longoria of Biostrap, who is an expert in the field of Clinical Physiology and biometric data science and we are talking about this incredible device, the BioStrap.   As Chief Science Officer at Biostrap, Kevin has led the development and validation of novel physiological biometrics utilizing raw photoplethysmography (PPG) data, the Baseline-Adjusted Early Warning System to predict respiratory illness including SARS-CoV-2, implemented clinical remote physiologic monitoring workflows in various healthcare environments and patient populations, and contributed to large-scale clinical trials with pharmaceutical and government organizations including the National Institute of Minority Health & Health Disparities. Kevin has significant leadership experience leading a team of healthcare professionals, researchers, and data scientists, and is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the National Academy of Sports Medicine, the world's largest sports medicine certification organization.   We talk about the device and how it can help you live a better life. You'll also get a sneek peak into my personal data collected on the Biostrap and we did find some interesting things there.   Kevin also told us how the Biostrap can be an integral part of your life and keep you in check with your physicians as well. We also discussed the importance of sleep and how the Biostrap records REM and deep sleep and what we can learn from the data it collects.   All this and a lot more in the episode.   Abut Biostrap: Biostrap is pioneering the industry of medical-grade biosensors, lossless data processing techniques, and AI/ML to provide custom digital health solutions for healthcare & government organizations, clinical research and telehealth/telemedicine industries. Biostrap captures clinical-grade, continuous, ultra high-fidelity raw signals for analysis in a cloud-based Pulse Engine™. Built with convenience, efficiency, and security in mind, Biostrap translates complex biometric signals into customized insights, dashboards, and mobile applications to meet client needs. API & Bluetooth SDK Integration Options available. Biostrap's widely adopted and proven technologies create disruptive competitive advantages in the health data market developing a revolutionary new PPG data paradigm Biostrap has the largest Raw PPG Database in the world Biostrap is pioneering the fact that PPG data is becoming the new Genomic Data   Biostrap Labs - the contract research division of Biostrap: on a mission to improve consumer decision-making by providing clinical validation in an unregulated wellness market. — An efficient and cost-effective resource for progressive brands seeking market testing, differentiation, and product validation. Biostrap Labs is willing to perform a clinical study with any company with products or services that impact human health and/or performance through non-invasive and real-world data collection.   A bit about me (Dr. Orest Komarnyckyj): Dr. Orest Komarnyckyj enjoyed a prestigious career as a periodontal regenerative surgeon moving to a new passion in June 2018. He retired after a 33-year career to pursue new passions. At 69 Dr. Orest has taken on a new role as an Interviewer, Podcaster and government-certified Old Guy. He streams from his new home in Las Vegas, NV. He lives with his wife of 29 years, Oksana. His status as an empty-nesters with two out of college-employed children has left him with time and energy to share decades of successes, failures, and wisdom.   Go to www.thestandard.academy/getmagazine to become one of the first to get my digital magazine for free that'll help you create a kick-ass life.   Timestamps for the episode:   00:00 - Precap 00:52 - Intro 02:04 - Guest introduction 04:20 - What's the most important thing you've done today? 04:55 - What is ppg? 05:50 - Why is it important to measure this data? 07:05 - What are important things that biostrap measures? 09:40 - What constitutes the term deep sleep? how do you look at that? 11:00 - Difference between REM and deep sleep 11:35 - Other things biostrap measures 13:50 - How can you measure an improvement in elasticity, and how quickly is the improvement seen? 15:05 - Healthy relation between arterial age and chronological age? 18:10 - Diets 19:35 - Commercial 20:08 - Commercial ends 20:45 - What the light sensors are and what they do? 22:40 - False positives in testings 24:50 - Interaction between the physician, the biostrap, and the patient 27:30 - What makes your device so special than other medical grade devices out there? 28:20 - My data and report 35:30 - Let's talk about sleep 40:40 - What are the opportunities for someone to work with your company? 45:10 - Closing thoughts 48:44 - Outro  

Six Sheets Under
There's A Ghost In My Sheets

Six Sheets Under

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 42:00


Warning! We do use the R word a few times. I feel comfortable not editing it out because this topic cannot be researched without it coming to the forefront. As always, we laugh at the absurd, not the real implications. I have a nice chat with Jodie from Po' Boys podcast about the implications of ghost sex, what it must be like for real spiritual sensitives, and why REM sleep is truly a villain. Have fun staring into a mirror after this episode. Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spectrophilia https://www.cosmopolitan.com/sex-love/a29416065/ghost-sex-what-is-spectrophilia/ https://www.huffpost.com/entry/kesha-sex-with-ghost_n_1919320 https://dreamstudies.org/the-ecstasy-of-lucy-liu-erotic-encounters-in-hypnagogia/ https://dreamstudies.org/succubus-and-supernatural-assault/ https://nypost.com/2018/10/30/woman-who-had-sex-with-20-ghosts-is-now-engaged-to-a-spirit/ https://www.mic.com/articles/126513/ghost-sex-is-a-thing-and-its-not-as-weird-or-creepy-as-you-think https://www.webmd.com/sex/what-is-spiritual-sex https://psmag.com/social-justice/a-brief-investigation-into-human-ghost-intercourse-spectrophilia-81973 Find Jodie at https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/po-boys-podcast/id1215644886 and also on twitter @poboypod Also get a discount on biobidet.com promo code "poboys" for 10% off, because bathrooms can be spookier.

The Joe and Smith Podcast: Read the Book of Mormon with us

Neither Smith nor Joe has seen The Last Temptation of Christ (1988). Joe talks about some of the obsession with sex in the church, and how marriage was looked at like checking a box. Smith talks about some of the overt racism in the early church and refers listeners back to the CES letter for better info (see link below). Joe asserts that BY was a bad enough guy that the university should be renamed. Smith reads a quote from Mark Twain that the BOM is “chloroform in print”. Smith brings up a Michael Crichton quote about the crazy-looking tabernacle.  The guys wish they could not feel bad about anything. Smith notes that the “choice” in the BOM so far is to either be disobedient and die, or to be obedient and rich. Joe makes sure to bring up that REM's Murmur album was named Rolling Stone's Best Album of 1983. Joe pitches the idea of changing the name of the podcast to Everything is Fetch. The guys express their dislike of the use of that word as a swear. Lamen has an awkward conversation with the Lord.  The angel has an awkward conversation with L&L about making Nephi a leader over them. Joe points out that this gives an argument to people who want to claim some moral authority over reason in the name of some unseen righteous authority. Smith points out that God may just be on mute and he doesn't realize it. Joe recommends S12E17 of Southpark which gives a pretty accurate depiction of the translation of the BOM. Smith reminds us that the temple ceremony used to contain penalties for breaking promises, like medieval penalties.  Section of CES letter about ban on black men to have the priesthood https://read.cesletter.org/prophets/#blacks-ban Mark Twain on the Mormons https://twain.lib.virginia.edu/roughingit/map/rimormon6.html The Dollop 132 - THE BONE WARS https://allthingscomedy.com/podcasts/132---the-bone-wars Wikipedia page for REM's Murmur album https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murmur_(album)   Stephen Paul Taylor Everybody knows shit's fucked https://youtu.be/xJ7JseIxgX4?t=57  Wikipedia page for Southpark episode “All about Mormons” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_About_Mormons  Mormon stories Podcast. 005: MASONRY AND MORMONISM, AN INTERVIEW WITH GREG KEARNEY  https://mormonstories.org/podcast/mormon-stories-podcast-005-masonry-and-mormonism-and-interview-with-greg-kearney/  Music Provided by Eric VanAusdal with permission from the artist.  The Book of Mormon is publicly available at churchofjesuschrist.org Cesletter.org Mormonstories.org Email us at joeandsmithpod@gmail.com

Teach4Endurance
Cosmic Harmony

Teach4Endurance

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2022 4:33


Ahh . . . where to start with "Cosmic Harmony." Well, its intro and exit have a very Seattle feel; but then out of nowhere, you'll hear some REM inspiration . . . and then when you think you have it all figured out, off we go to church with the angelic voices and harmonies. It's a cosmic ride!

The Rich Dickman Show
Episode 214 - We're Live!

The Rich Dickman Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2022 106:29


We're Live! And in Person! Episode 214 emanates from the fabulous Hilton Garden Inn in Wallingford, CT, as Rem and Randy join Cody in his hotel room to broadcast together, for the first time ever, together and in person! (Since we were all so excited, there's some audio issues - not terrible, but they exist and we apologize) Listen in as Cody and Randy detail the struggles it took to get there; Ritual Bestowing Of The Gifts; going out to dinner; Visiting Massachusetts; Ali G; Randy went to get a pizza; Cody loves the laws in CT; Women's clothing sizes; and so much more fun. This was an amazing experience and we had an absolute blast recording and being able to bring this to you!

El sótano
El sótano - Di Versiones (XXII) - 27/05/22

El sótano

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 60:30


Nuevo episodio de la serie Diversiones. Recordamos grandes canciones del pop y el rocknroll del siglo XX a manos de bandas y artistas de generaciones posteriores. Playlist; (sintonía) LOS TIKI PHANTOMS “Ni tu ni nadie” (Alaska y Dinarama) SOUTHERN CULTURE ON THE SKIDS “Funnel of love” (Wanda Jackson) MIKE NESS “Big iron” (Marty Robbins) JESSE DAYTON “Whole lotta Rosie” (ACDC) AC/DC “Baby please don’t go” (Big Joe Williams) DUCKS DELUXE “Here comes the night” (Lulu) DEE JAY “Gloria” (Them) THE SHAKE SPEARS “Summertime” (Helen Jepson) THE VINDICTIVES “What a wonderful world” (Louis Armstrong) THE TOY DOLLS “No particular place to go” (Chuck Berry) THE PROCLAIMERS “Whole wide world” (Wreckless Erik) DOWN BY LAW “(I’m gonna be) 500 miles” (The Proclaimers) MITCH EASTER “Shiny happy people” (REM) PRIMAL SCREAM “Gimme some truth” (John Lennon) LOU REED “This magic moment” (The Drifters) TED LEO “Heroes” (David Bowie) Escuchar audio

How'd It Happen Podcast
Oura Ring (#277)

How'd It Happen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 9:53


In this fun little solo episode, I talk to you about my sleep tool called "Oura Ring."  It actually does a lot more than analyze how well someone sleeps, but that's my number one favorite feature of the ring.  It keeps track of your total sleep, your time in bed, your sleep efficiency (your REM, deep and light sleep), it keeps your heart rate, keeps track of movement and restfulness. This new technology was smart enough to alert me that I had COVID before I actually had any symptoms.  Maybe having this kind of information could be helpful to you, would maybe "gamify" you as it gamified me! It might have a positive impact on your life! Connect with Mike:Website: https://mikemalatesta.com/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mikemalatesta/ 

Totalcar Égéstér: Podcast autókról
Felniktől a medencébe vizelésig

Totalcar Égéstér: Podcast autókról

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 88:00


Meg kell-e enni a hódot, vagy mehet fabetét az autóba? Karotta meg tudja-e indokolni BÁRMILYEN felni megvásárlását? Remélem, nem lep meg senkit, hogy igen.

All Heart with Paul Cardall
How to Get Better Sleep

All Heart with Paul Cardall

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 28:50


Millions of people have trouble getting enough sleep and are looking for solutions. Dove award winning pianist and All Heart podcast host Paul Cardall, who's experienced insomnia as a result of past medical challenges, explains the process of sleep and how music is helping people achieve the REM stage. That final and most important stage of fulfilling a deep sleep happens less and less as we age. Paul talks about his SLEEP project featuring 3 songs he composed during the pandemic to help him enjoy better sleep. He's making this personal tool available to fans so they can wake up refreshed and in a good mood.  This is the 42nd episode of All Heart with Paul Cardall.LISTEN TO SLEEP Why should you listen to this music before going to bed? Music can aid sleep by helping you feel relaxed and at ease. With streaming apps and portable speakers, it's easier than ever to take advantage of the power of music wherever you go. Given music's accessibility and potential sleep benefits, it might be a good time to try adding it to your nightly routine. We've known for years that music has the ability to enhance our moods and help us relax. This is because music affects different areas of the brain, and stimulates feel-good chemicals. SLEEP is created with certain frequencies that are known to trigger the sleep process in the brain, while relaxing the body. All Heart by Paul Cardall is sponsored by The Broken MiracleWatch on Youtube ABOUT PAUL CARDALLSteinway & Sons has endorsed him as one of the world's finest pianists. Dove Award-winning musician, composer, and producer,  His music is frequently categorized as Classical, Christian and New Age. With 11 No. 1 Billboard albums, 30 million monthly listeners and 3 million subscribed fans on social media. Paul s music has been streamed on platforms worldwide 3 billion times, which makes him one of the most listened to artists of our time.Paul was born with essentially half a heart and before his first day was finished, surgeons had cut into his infant body to save his life. He would spend virtually all of his life in and out of hospitals and recovering from surgeries. He received a heart transplant in 2009. Living with congenital heart disease has helped Paul understand the trauma imposed, particularly on a young person and their families. Paul has made it his life's mission to create and share piano music that is healing both physically and emotionally.Two of the many projects Paul's involved with include partnering with the The Ryan Seacrest Foundation to donate keyboards to children's hospitals nationwide. Paul and his wife, Kristina, who is from Cleveland, Ohio and a former Wall-street Analyst, established scholarships for students affected by medical bills associated with congenital heart disease because he believes in getting an education regardless of terminal diagnosis. Paul served as an executive board member of the Saving tiny Hearts Society, which seeds grass roots money for federal grant research in the field of congenital heart disease. In 2011, Utah State Board of Regents awarded Paul Cardall with an honorary doctorate.Paul has collaborated with Grammy winning artists CeCe Winans and Rachel Yamagata. He released a soundtrack album with a handful of artists for the The Broken Miracle, the No. 1 best-selling Amazon novel by J.D. Netto inspired by Paul's life living with only half a heart. Collaborations include songs and performances with David Archuleta, Tyler Glenn (Neon Trees), Ty Herndon, Thompson Square, Matt Hammitt and many others. In 1999, Paul founded Stone Angel Music, a record label, whose catalogue consists of Billboard charting albums by cellist Steven Sharp Nelson, guitarist Ryan Tilby, pianist Jason Lyle Black and David Tolk, Ryan Stewart, and various artist projects with a handful of former American Idol contests like Ashley Hess, Jordon Moyes, and Kenzie Hall. In 2018, Anthem Entertainment Group, one of today's most powerful publishers, acquired Paul's catalogue along with the albums he produced for Stone Angel Music, in one of the biggest instrumental acquisitions of the music industry's history. Anthem also owns music made popular by Tim McGraw, Justin Timberlake, Beyonce, Keith Urban, Jason Aldean, the Canadian trio Rush, and countless others.American Songwriter Magazine invited Cardall is also the host of a successful podcast, All Heart with Paul Cardall, and a YouTube series All Heart Adventures, featuring Cardall in various "bucket list" scenarios--living his life to the fullest, with gratitude and appreciation.Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PaulCardallMusicTwitter: https://twitter.com/paulcardallInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/paulcardall/

Healthy Sleep Revolution
Sleep. Breathe. Dream.

Healthy Sleep Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 5:50


Dreams are one of the most fascinating and mystifying aspects of sleep. Despite considerable research that worked to unravel both the neuroscience and psychology of dreams, there is much that remains unknown about both sleep and dreams. Even the most fundamental question of “Why do we dream at all?” is still subject to significant debate. In this episode, join me as we dive further on dreams, REM sleep, and quality sleep.     Key Takeaways: - What are dreams? - What is REM sleep?  - How are dreams related to quality sleep?      If you know someone who is not getting quality sleep, is tired all day long, snores or has issues with their CPAP, get their sleep evaluated by a professional.     Dr. Meghna Dassani is passionate about promoting healthy sleep through dental practices. In following the ADA's 2017 guideline on sleep apnea screening and treatment, she has helped many children and adults improve their sleep, their breathing, and their lives. Her books and seminars help parents and practitioners understand the essential roles of the tongue, palate, and jaw in promoting healthy sleep.     Learn more about Dr. Meghna Dassani Website: www.meghnadassani.com; www.dassanidentistry.com Facebook: Meghna Dassani; Dassani Dentistry Instagram: @healthysleeprevolution; @dassanidentistry LinkedIn: Meghna Dassani Get a copy of Airway is Life: www.airwayislife.com

The Matt Walker Podcast
#22: Dreams - Part 5

The Matt Walker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 13:41


In part five of his series on dreams, Matt discusses what lucid dreaming is and how it was scientifically proven to be real.We define lucid dreaming as the moment when an individual becomes aware they are dreaming. Historically, the concept of lucid dreaming was considered a scientific scam. First, to claim that people can gain conscious control over a normally unconscious process injects a heavy dose of ludicrous into the already preposterous experience we call dreaming. Second, how could any scientist objectively prove a subjective claim, especially when the individual is asleep when they do it?Well, several years ago, an experiment removed all such doubt. Lucid dreamers were placed inside an MRI scanner and instructed to alternately clench their hands. The researchers took snapshots of their brains as they were doing this, allowing them to define the precise  areas controlling each individual's left and right hand. In the second part, the participants again underwent an MRI scan, this time, allowed to enter REM sleep.Once the subjects became lucid, they signaled their awareness with a specific set of eye movements so researchers could take MRI pictures of brain activity. They then gave another set of eye signals to demonstrate that, in the dream, they were now alternating between clenching their hands.Each time the dreamers indicated that they were clenching a hand, the scientists were able to take down timestamps. Of course, the participants weren't physically moving their hands, but amazingly, the results of the MRI scans proved that they weren't lying; the same regions of the brain that were active during the physical movements lit up when the lucid dreamers clenched in dreams. With these results, the scientists had gained objective proof that lucid dreamers can not only control when they are dreaming but can also control what it is they dream.Please note that Matt is not a medical doctor, and none of the content in this podcast should be considered medical advice in any way, shape, or form, nor prescriptive in any way.One of the sponsors of the episode today is our good friends at the athletic clothing company, Vuori. They have a special deal for you all where you can get 20% off your purchase when you visit vuori.com/mattwalker. Vuori produces high quality clothing, and they offset their carbon footprint 100%, both of which, of course, mean a great deal to me. So, if you like athletic clothing, and you wish to help the planet out, then check them out at vuori.com/mattwalker. Another sponsor of today's podcast is the biochemical electrolyte drink company LMNT, and they are very kindly offering eight free sample packs when you purchase any one of their orders at drinklmnt.com/mattwalker. LMNT is an electrolyte sports drink that I can fully get behind - it's created from the basis of science, and it has no sugar, no coloring, and no artificial ingredients – all qualities important to maintaining your blood biochemical balance. So, if you want to give LMNT a try, just head on over to drinklmnt.com/mattwalker and get your eight free samples with your first purchase.As always, if you have thoughts or feedback you'd like to share, please reach out to Matt on Instagram.

The Rich Dickman Show
Episode 213 - Smells Flammable

The Rich Dickman Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 112:29


Episode 213 is live and we are very, truly, deeply, absolutely sorry. In the course of doing business, sometimes an idea is acted upon that shouldn't have been and this is that idea. It's a “shots” episode and, well…yeah.    Randy's friend John joins the show to offer a very unique perspective on things. Matty from Australia pops in as well. John gives the scoop on what to expect when meeting Randy; Circumcision and Why It's Amazing; Rem seeks advice on how to quit gambling; Randy promo's upcoming TRDS events; and then the liquor gets the best of us. Good luck to those of you attempting to make it to the end. Let us know if you did!

El sótano
El Sótano - Di Versiones (XXI) - 20/05/22

El sótano

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 58:04


Cocinamos una nueva entrega de grandes clásicos del pop y el rock del siglo XX en forma de versiones. Playlist; (sintonía) LOS STRAITJACKETS “My heart will go on” (Celine Dion) BART MENDOZA “Sunny” (Bobby Hebb) STIV BATORS “It’s cold outside” (The Choir) DAN SARKA and THE SOMETIMES WHY “Starry eyes” (The Records) HUW GOWER “Do anything you wanna do” (Eddie and the Hot Rods) EDDIE and THE HOT RODS “Time won’t let me” (The Outsiders) RAMONES “Somebody to love” (Jefferson Airplane) THE CURE “Hello I love you” (The Doors) ALPHA BOY SCHOOL “Boy’s don’t cry” (The Cure) HUGH CORNWELL “For what it’s worth” (Buffalo Springfield) LOCKSLEY “It’s no use” (The Byrds) TY SEGALL “Isolation” (John Lennon) ROBYN HITCHCOCK “Let me roll in” (Paul McCartney & Wings) REM “First we take Manhattan” (Leonard Cohen) Escuchar audio

Yoga with Melissa
Non Sleep Deep Rest for Beginners (NSDR) | Yoga with Melissa 621

Yoga with Melissa

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022


Non Sleep Deep Rest for Beginners In this non sleep deep rest I will gently guide you through a body scan to help you relax, reduce stress and fall asleep more easily. Non-sleep deep rest, or yoga nidra, is the kind of rest you get when your body is in a relaxed state, but your mind is still awake. NSDR involves slowing down your brain wave frequency, similar to what happens during sleep, only that in this case you're awake. Non sleep deep rest is a very easy guided meditation that you do lying down. It will take you into deep non-REM delta wave sleep while you are completely awake and aware. It is deep awareness, stillness, rest and relaxation that you can do at any time of day or night. Think of it like a relaxing body scan. Non sleep deep rest is recommended by Stanford neuroscientist and researcher Dr. Andrew Huberman. According to Dr. Huberman, non sleep deep rest can put the body in a restorative state, similar to sleep. I feel grateful to have been listening to Dr. Huberman's podcast for several years and to have heard him lecture here at University of Victoria here in Victoria BC.

Down the Wormhole
Healing Part 1: The Return of the Maggots

Down the Wormhole

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 61:18


Episode 105 Maggots! Bloodletting! Graverobbers! Decapitated ducks! Cornflakes! This episode has it all! Join us on this wild ride through the history of Western Medicine as we look at the breakthroughs, setbacks, prejudices, and methodology behind it.    Support this podcast on Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/DowntheWormholepodcast   More information at https://www.downthewormhole.com/   produced by Zack Jackson music by Zack Jackson and Barton Willis    Transcript  This transcript was automatically generated by www.otter.ai, and as such contains errors (especially when multiple people are talking). As the AI learns our voices, the transcripts will improve. We hope it is helpful even with the errors.   Zack Jackson 00:04 You are listening to the down the wormhole podcast exploring the strange and fascinating relationship between science and religion. This week our hosts are   Kendra Holt-Moore 00:14 Kendra Holt-Moore, assistant professor of religion at Bethany College, and my most recent ailment was a concussion from a snowboarding fall,   Zack Jackson 00:28 Zack Jackson, UCC pasture and Reading, Pennsylvania, and my most recent ailment was COVID.   Rachael Jackson 00:36 Rachel Jackson, Rabbi Agoudas, Israel congregation Hendersonville, North Carolina, my most recent ailment is real, pretty bland, but irritating nonetheless. It's just a headache. But it was one of those headaches that I couldn't get rid of a headache for no reason. And I felt like oh my god, I'm just old, I now just get headaches.   Ian Binns 01:01 And Ben's Associate Professor of elementary science education at UNC Charlotte. And my most recent ailment is arthritis in my right hand, where this part is where the thumb comes down and connects to the wrist. It is definitely confirmed no longer early onset arthritis. So yeah, that was fun.   01:26 Why did you why did you ask her this question?   Ian Binns 01:29 For two reasons. One, because we just passed your birthday, Rachel. So celebration.   Rachael Jackson 01:38 Your old everything hurts. Just adding the parenthetical aside, Everybody Hurts from REM is an amazing song from 1992. And it's younger than   Ian Binns 01:50 I am interested. No, yeah, no, that was out before? No. When were you born again, Kendra. 1991. See, so   01:58 nothing hurt, then. I was fresh.   Ian Binns 02:05 The second reason that we're asking this question is because we're starting our new mini series, our next mini series on healing. So for today, I'm gonna give a just a very quick crash course, in kind of the history of healing from a science perspective. And I will let our listeners know that my background and understanding this is definitely more than the western science. So please, if anyone hears this and says, hey, you've left out some cultures, historical cultures that I do apologize for that. But as I said, this is gonna be very brief. So we could do several episodes just on the history of medicine. But so anyway, so I kind of wanted to just give some general, interesting things that have occurred over time. And then we wanted us to be able to get into a conversation about, like medical treatments, for different ailments, as well. But some of our understanding of the history of medicine goes all the way back to prehistoric times. And this is where I think it will come into play throughout our series as well, of how different cultures used to attribute different types of magic or religion to ailments, you know, maybe it was something to do with evil spirits or something like that. But you know, supernatural origin versus more of a natural origin of reason for different ailments. But one of the things that we know from the discovery of different prehistoric skulls is that they would actually drill a hole into the skull of the victim, because they believe that that the speculation is and then we actually see this occurred in more recent human history that it would release the disease. And so that was one thanks, you mean patient? Did I sit victim, you get saved. Because you know, if   Zack Jackson 03:54 you're going to your show, and your hands   Ian Binns 03:56 are gonna drill during prehistoric times, and you're gonna knock a hole into the person's skull, they may end up being the victim. Right? So, so yeah, there you go. And then now we were going to jump ahead to ancient Egypt, when we start actually seeing some evidence of written evidence of different types of treatments and medicine. One examples from the what was called the Smith Papyrus, written in 1600 BCE, right around there. But it was actually we believe it was a copy of a text from much earlier, so roughly 3000 BCE, but in that particular Papyrus, that's now I think, in New York. It contained 48 case studies. There was no theory for anything, but it was an observation and kind of a recording of what it is that they knew. So the case studies were all written, same way, the title, the examination, so what they're observing, and then the diagnosis, and then the treatment, and then they will have a glossary for terms. But again, they were still be speculation about what role Old Evil forces or spirits play in the cause of diseases. And then we're gonna jump ahead more to ancient Greece. And this is where many people may have heard of Hippocrates, of Coase Brahm, circa BCE, or for 20 BC, he was one of the first people who kind of focused on natural explanations trying to move away from supernatural explanations. And he was one of the people who came up with the idea of the four humors, which those are blood, yellow bile, black bile, and phlegm. And if you are healthy, that means the four humors are in balance, if you were not healthy, that means something was off, one of the humors was off. And so this is where we start getting the idea of bloodletting. So for example, if someone had a fever, it was due to an abundance of blood. And so they would do bloodletting as a way to cure the fever. But still, at this time, and again, I'm skipping over a lot of people. They learned different things with anatomy, but they were only allowed to dissect animals, because at the time, it was illegal to dissect humans. At which time, still 420 BCE. So this is still the BCE era, ancient,   Zack Jackson 06:13 ancient really, that sounds more like a Christian hang up than agree. Yeah. Well, and actually to   Ian Binns 06:17 this, and trying to prepare for today's episode, I did see in some of the more ancient eastern cultures of like Hinduism, and from the early early stages of that, that they were also not allowed to cut into the human body and dissect human bodies either. So this is not just in that area. But yeah, you're right, because, Zack, as you just said, that we see that all the way up into the 1500s that they weren't supposed to be dissecting humans in in Europe, for example, but they did not necessarily figure out the reason or the causes of the different parts of the body that they were removing from the body. So when it came to anatomy, who the Egyptians from my from my understanding, or my off on that, which I find that's   Zack Jackson 07:01 fine, it depends. The the Ebers papyrus and again, all these papyrus papyrus papyrus Pappa Ria, I don't know if the plural is. The Papyrus is they are named after the the hippopotami Yes, sorry. They're all happy to discover they're all named there. No, not the Discover. They're named after the white guys who bought it at auction and then brought it back to their country. So, you know, all of Egyptian treasures are in Europe or America somewhere instead of where they belong. But anyway,   Ian Binns 07:35 yeah, the Smith Paul Bader is probably wasn't named for a guy named Smith all that back then.   Zack Jackson 07:40 Right now Pharaoh Smith. No, that's not really an Egyptian name. But the Ebers papyrus was in 1550 BCE, and it had a really detailed explanation of the heart and the entire circulatory system. It was a bit wrong in some of the ways in that they thought that the the heart pumps all fluids. So that includes urine and semen as well as as blood, but they understood the purpose of of the blood going through the muscles and the veins and the arteries and all of that they actually also had some psychiatric conditions that were tied up in conditions of the heart. And they mentioned like dementia and depression, which were problems of the heart because they would dissect people after they died and look at the quality of their ventricles and all of that. So they didn't know what the brain was. They thought that was garbage. But the heart was the center of   Ian Binns 08:37 all thank you for correcting me, Zack, I forgot about that Papyrus. Papyrus? popularized by Bob Yes, go ahead, Rachel.   Zack Jackson 08:46 Papyrus hippopotami   Rachael Jackson 08:47 I was just going to add that because things are because things are so ancient, we tend to forget that there was we say Egyptian. We're looking at 1000s and 1000s of years when we say Ancient Egypt, so 1500 BCE is kind of the middle right? Middle late kingdom, right? This is the these are the new kingdoms. Were this is not, these are not the ones that built those giant pyramids. That's 1000 years earlier that they did that. So I think when we when we talk about that we should do a little bit of justice and say, hey, it would sort of be like saying, hey, all Englanders life for all time, right? Well, that's just been 2000 years like it's at some point. So just to add to that piece and same thing with the the Greek piece or the ancient Greek has been around for a very long time. That's that's the history not the   Zack Jackson 09:45 speaking of the history piece to in about in the 1200s or so BCE, there was this mysterious Bronze Age collapse in which these massive societies, the ancient Egyptians, the Mycenaeans, all the the the Hittite They just they just collapsed. And we're not entirely sure why possibly the sea peoples possibly climate change, possibly a million other things, aliens, if you watch the History Channel, but all of these amazing societies, the Minoans, another one, they all just disappeared. And so you see later Greek society and later Egyptian society, then trying to make sense of the fact that there are these ancient ruins that are massive, and they just assume that ancient heroes built them, which is where a lot of the mythology comes from. But so like this sort of understanding of anatomy and health was probably somewhat lost in going into the period that now you're talking about where people aren't allowed to dissect. So we see them now because we found the papyrus, but they may not have had them   Ian Binns 10:46 as well. So Zach, you mentioned, you know, of that massive loss of civilization around that timeframe? And you mentioned your seafaring people to a man, are you talking about Atlantis there, buddy?   Zack Jackson 11:01 I am actually the Minoans. We're probably the source of the Atlantean myth as far as   Ian Binns 11:07 because wasn't Plato, one of the first ones to talk about it. Plato was the first one to write right about that we have documentation.   Zack Jackson 11:14 It's an Egyptian story that Plato heard and wrote about that there's this island nation that was super advanced in technology and in society, and then they angered Poseidon, right, and then they were wiped out by the sea for their iniquities. And so that lines up really nicely with the Minoan people who were on Crete, who at the time, I mean, we're talking 1500 BCE. Further back had like three storey buildings with hot and cold running water, and indoor plumbing. They had amazing art and architecture. They were they they were doing things that 1000s of years later, people hadn't discovered. And then they were just they were hit by this massive tsunami after the oh, what's that, that place in Greece that everyone goes on vacation with the beautiful blue waters of Santorini the volcano there exploded and caused caused dust it caused tsunamis and basically wiped out their society and in the Mycenaeans conquered them, and then the Bronze Age collapse. So we forgot all about them for 1000s of years, but they were probably the inspiration of Atlantis. It's not aliens, sorry. It's probably just Minoans. It's a bummer. Yeah, well, this has been Zach ruins mythology for you.   Kendra Holt-Moore 12:31 A new segment? I love that. Yeah, exactly.   Ian Binns 12:33 You could just splice this out and move it to the end. So let's get back to because I think while we're doing this to it's interesting, you all I am going to be focusing mostly on how we start to see more of a focus on natural phenomena, natural explanations and a scientific approach to medicine, that you still do see, you know, and like Apocrypha as being one of the individuals again from 420 BCE, trying to move away from Supernatural that even with the work of Hippocrates, that it did not drive out, like the rivals, you know, long that more traditional forms of healing up to that point, those those are traditional forms of healing belief and practice that those still existed. So it's not like when his work and and his contemporaries, you know, and then actually, there's speculation that Hippocrates was multiple people. It was not one. And so, just because of that, though, it did not drive out this the more traditional ways of belief and practices all say, so then I'm going to jump ahead roughly 500 years to Rome, and Galen. So Galen was a individuals from 129, to circa 200 CE. And he really started getting into this notion of we need to rely on the world of our senses. And but he still accepted the idea of the four humors that was originally proposed by Hippocrates. He recognized the arteries contain blood and not merely air, he also showed how the heart sets blood in motion, but he did not have an idea about the whole notion of circulation, blood circulation, but he was he did start figuring out that, you know, the heart did move things at least a little bit. We definitely see evidence with control experimentation with Galen key focus on on anatomy, but again, at the timeframe, dissection of humans was illegal. And so his work was focusing on animals, their section of animals, and it's his work. That actually kind of stayed when you think about Western culture and Western medicine, kind of was the prevailing view of how things were done until the 1500s. was actually the reason why I remember that so much is with that part, because his work was occurring rather right around the time of Ptolemy, when he talked about astronomy, and that stayed around for roughly the same Not a time till you know, Copernicus work. So it was kind of all those things started happening right around the same time. So now again, you know, my apologies for leaving out multiple cultures that I want to jump ahead again now to Medieval and Renaissance Europe. And so as I said galas, views kind of held strong until roughly the 1500s. And this is when we see Andreas alias, emerge. And yes, there were others before him, but he was one of the first ones to really get into dissection of humans. I think he had he was a person who had students who were grave robbers, because it was still illegal at the time. But he realized that we needed for anatomy, we needed a better understanding and body so he would have his students would become grave robbers and steal the bodies, and then they would do special dissections, you know, for like a show. I mean, there were many, many people watching, but they would have lookouts to make sure that they weren't doing anything, they wouldn't get caught.   Zack Jackson 15:58 Do you put them back? I don't know that after you're done? No.   16:02 I would hope so. Yeah,   Ian Binns 16:03 you think so?   Rachael Jackson 16:04 I would think so. Not just think so.   Ian Binns 16:08 Yeah. Then apparently he was a very skilled Dissector. And he felt like you know, it was they had to move away from Galen and his views. And don't forget, you know, I said, you know, we're jumping time. This was 1400 years later. So Galen, his views held strong for a long time. But he did a lot of dissection of humans. And his scientific observations and methods, with these facilities show that Galen can no longer be regarded as the final authority. And so that's when we start to see and again, this is also aligned with the time of the Renaissance. That's when we start seeing movement away from more ancient understandings when it comes to science, to medicine, for example, he believed in the importance of empirical knowledge, independent observation and experimentation. So this alias is really into those types of things. I don't know if he was ever caught. I have to look into that one. Yeah,   Zack Jackson 17:04 well, now he Oh, yeah. You blew his cover, man.   Ian Binns 17:07 Sorry, sorry, everybody. But what's interesting is even when that was occurring, we were also still seeing some people who were holding on to the idea that, you know, while experimentation is important that we still need to Paracelsus was one of them. I think I'm saying that correct. He presents the idea that humans are the ultimate ends of God's creation. So the ultimate form he held on is something called a chemical philosophy, which is a Christian philosophy. But it was not very widely accepted at the time, because as I've already said, this is the time of the Renaissance. So we're trying to move away from those types of explanations. And so he was still around, but he was trying to blend the two, between experimentation, but also to hold into the importance of God and humans kind of being the ultimate form. And then the next person I want to talk about before we start really going into different types of ailments stuff, just because of, as I said, the history as William Harvey, he was 15, seven 816 57. So he advanced medicine even further, because of careful observation, experimentation, he really focused on collecting more evidence. And this is when we really start to see what we now think of as experimentations. So, you know, control experimentation manipulate in nature, so he can see something that normally would not be seen, he came up with the theory of the circulation of blood of blood. So we started trying to have a better understanding how blood circulated throughout the body. And again, you know, he still was someone who did believe in the impact of a designer, but he really focused on the more natural explanations.   Zack Jackson 18:46 It's interesting that you say that he he discovered the circulation of the blood when we just said that 3000 years earlier, the Egyptians knew about the circuit. Oh, you're right.   Ian Binns 18:56 Yeah. Yeah, and plumbing, and plumbing,   19:02 plumbing, our own and in the world, but it   Ian Binns 19:05 is fascinating historical texts still hold us like William Harvey is one of the people who really did that.   Zack Jackson 19:11 Well, God forbid, they credited an African for exactly discovering yessing.   Ian Binns 19:17 And so just because of, you know, because I really want us to get into conversations around like different types of treatments we see throughout history for different ailments. You know, this was the time of the Renaissance. When you start moving past that. I mean, you as we've seen, we've discussed throughout on this show, in the past about the history of science and how scientific advancements just took off during this timeframe. Incredibly fast, right. And it was the same for medical medical advancements, too. And so we continue to see lots of different changes over time to the point where we are to our today, but what I really want to focus on unless someone wants to talk more about other history is getting into these treatments that we see throughout history. If we can   Zack Jackson 19:59 Yeah, That's absolutely yeah, you're chomping at the bit over there. You want to talk about about some some trees.   Ian Binns 20:05 So because one of my hat, like asthma, so asthma used to be treated, it was treated by smoking.   Zack Jackson 20:16 Oh, yes, smoking pipe of   Ian Binns 20:19 tobacco or cigar has the power of relieving a fit of asthma, especially in those not accustomed to it,   Zack Jackson 20:26 which I thought was really amazing custom to tobacco.   Ian Binns 20:29 That was this. That was the argument being presented is amazing. Yeah. There's an when when ish was this it was more like the 1800s.   20:39 Oh, recent.   Zack Jackson 20:40 Yeah. Well, counterpoint. No, that is not don't don't smoke, if you have so please   Ian Binns 20:47 understand that these are old, not accurate. There's a another thing with the whole idea of smoking. Yeah. For Your Health. This is. Back in the late 19th, early 20th century, I found a site talks about these different types of treatments out there smoking, for your health, asthma cigarettes. Yeah. So and they were this is an advertisement, not recommended for children under six. That was nice. But they were actually called asthma cigarettes. And they effectively treat asthma hay fever, foul breath, all diseases of throat, head colds, canker sores, bronchial irritations. So yeah, so that was a good thing.   Zack Jackson 21:30 Well, so when you're talking 19th, and 20th century, and these are like some crazy, wacky solutions for things like when they would give cocaine to children for their cough, and all of that. That's not entirely like saying that the ancient Romans used electric eels to cure hemorrhoids. Which, which is real? Well, when we're in the 19th and 20th centuries, a lot of these are the companies understood the awful things that their, their their products did to people, but they made marketing false advertisements to sell these addictive things to people. You know, the Bayer Corporation knew all about the addictive qualities of cocaine and still pushed it as a as a simple pain reliever, because they could get people addicted to it. And like those sorts of predatory capitalism has existed for the past couple of 100 years with with pharmaceuticals, and we are paying that price now with the opioid epidemic. So when the smoking industry in the 1800s, they didn't understand that it gave cancer, obviously, but they knew it wasn't good. Yeah, no, those advertisements are intentionally misleading, because there was no oversight.   Ian Binns 22:49 Well, and earlier, I referred to bloodletting. And, you know, was talking about, you know, ancient, ancient Greece, you know, and for 400 BCE, bloodletting did not just end then, bloodletting was something that was continued for a very long time, for centuries. And   Rachael Jackson 23:06 right, and I believe, and I have not fact check this. So someone else has please correct me or collaborate, whichever it might be. I said, No, we're doing stuff about presidents. And a little factoid that I heard was that George Washington got a fever, just like you're saying in and at that time. It's George Washington, early, early 19th century, and he got a fever. And so they decided to do bloodletting. And they did bloodletting twice on him. So much, so that he died. Oh, good. I have not, I have not double checked that fact. But I also haven't seen anything to contradict it. So yeah, take that with a grain of salt as it may. But that was, it was all the way up until George Washington is when they were really still using this as a technique to cure people from things like fevers, which are very, very dangerous, but unless you have something to just take down the fever, you're either gonna live it or you're like, or you're not.   Zack Jackson 24:12 Yeah, the Constitution Center. Constitution. center.org says that that process of bloodletting probably let about 40% of his blood supply, right. So you can't really make it through a sickness with 40% of your blood supply.   Rachael Jackson 24:28 Right. So imagine I mean, think about when you donate blood do the three of you donate blood any on a regular or at all ever works. I   Ian Binns 24:37 grew up in Europe. Right? Yeah, Mad Cow Disease just because people don't know.   Rachael Jackson 24:43 Yeah. Yeah. Zack, do you ever   Zack Jackson 24:48 know I don't I don't I mostly have issues with needles. Yeah, exactly. What me not to   Rachael Jackson 24:53 Yeah, don't do that. better for everybody that you don't go to the hospital for donating blood.   Kendra Holt-Moore 24:58 Drive was can So I think because of a COVID related thing, but I would like to, but I haven't.   Rachael Jackson 25:06 Yeah, yeah, it's one of those like really simple, really useful things that if a person is healthy and no guilt, no judgment. For anyone that does or doesn't, you can do it every 56 days, and they take about a leader. And generally speaking, people, adults have five to six leaders. And they say, Okay, you're gonna feel queasy, don't do any weightlifting, don't do anything strenuous for a minimum of 24 hours. Like, you've got to just take it real easy, and you have to be healthy when you donate, because your body needs every blood cell that it has when it's healthy, or when it's sick. And when it's healthy. Yeah, we've got an extra 20%. So let's give it away. But if you take more than that, you're not going to survive very well. And then if you take more than that, and you're sick, your body has no ability to fight off the diseases, right? We talk about blood cells all the time, and the white blood cell counts and red blood cells. And how do we think we were just talking about the circulation system? Right, the circulatory? How do you think all of those good anti me when your immune system actually gets to these infections through your bloodstream? And if you don't have a good flowing bloodstream? Right, if this is August, after a rough summer, it's not happening.   Zack Jackson 26:29 So I know that in modern medicine, they still do use leeches, there are medical legions, and they're usually used to drain excess blood or like, you know, pooling of blood and hematoma hematomas. Is that the thing? Because it's, it's sanitary. And it's easier. And if people are willing to have a leech on him for a while, then it's great. But like, historically, bloodletting has been around for very   Ian Binns 26:56 long, 1000s and 1000s. Like,   Zack Jackson 27:00 it must have worked at least a little bit, or else they wouldn't have kept doing it. Right.   Rachael Jackson 27:06 But don't you think correlation and causation comes into play here. But people get people get better, regardless of what we tried to do them. And so just because someone got better doesn't mean that what we did to them made them better? Well, so   Zack Jackson 27:23 like, there's an old remedy, in which if you got bit by a snake, you would take a duck and put its butt on the wound, and then cut its head off. And then while the bite is on the wound, and the thought was that it would suck out the poison,   Ian Binns 27:37 the dung Would Suck out the poison.   Zack Jackson 27:40 Yes, yes. Yes. Everyone knows this wanted   Ian Binns 27:42 to make that claim. I'm quite excited about that.   Zack Jackson 27:47 Like that. That didn't stick. Yeah. But like draining people have their a painful procedure that is gross, and makes me feel queasy thinking about that stuck around for 1000s of years where like, is there any kind of medical benefit? Like even in obviously not in Washington's case, like if you have an infection, don't get rid of your blood? But like, what that stimulates SIBO antibodies to then like go to the wound, or like adrenaline to help boost the system? What? Are any of you familiar with any positives of blood lead? I   Kendra Holt-Moore 28:28 not? I'm not answering this question to like, describe physiological processes, but the placebo effect is extremely powerful. Like in just the study of medicine, like contemporary researchers, there are some who have done a lot of really interesting work on placebo effects. And obviously, like, we don't have the same kind of data to, like, you know, like double, double blind study results of placebo effects for like, ancient practices, ancient cultures, but I think, you know, cross culturally, all human societies, we all do things that, you know, as Rachel said, we can't really like tie a causation thread between those practices and healing in a definitive way, but a lot of what we do, we do for like cultural or, you know, comfort reasons. And even that is like different than placebo, which, in a lot of cases, like the placebo effect does actually change. Like it does lead to physiological changes. And it's kind of like weird and mysterious, but I think that I think that's not something to take for granted or under appreciate. Because, you know, I think even like early psychological studies showing, you know, if you're in a situation shift where you're around like comforting, familiar people and a comforting, familiar environment, you just fare better. Like even if we're not talking about injury, you fare better in terms of your, like mental health, mental well being, which translates to sometimes like physical well being. And that, you know, those are, those are things that are, I think, often considered, like, non essential pieces of the healing process. But, but yet, we we all, you know, like there are studies to show that people care about a doctor's bedside manner. People care about having, you know, chaplains come into hospital settings to, to support people and that that, that does facilitate something real in terms of healing. But it's it's just not, there's not like a clear, like, hard scientific way of describing that necessarily, but I that it's not to say that it's like not important also.   Rachael Jackson 31:04 Yeah, I would, I would add that, you know, you were just talking to Kendra about hospitals. But also previous to that you were saying, in places where people are surrounded and around things that they're comfortable with, the best healing happens when you're not in a hospital. Right. Hospital is no place for a sick person. I mean, and I mean, that my dad, my dad, was now a doctor said that, to me, it's like, that makes perfect sense. Because to really, unless you're really sick, and you can't be at home, being at home is your best chance of getting better. And I'm using that word intentionally, right, getting closer to a cure and your sense of normal, faster than being in a hospital, and that hospitals are there for the very, very sick people who cannot be at home for whatever reason. So it's one of those other reasons like stay away from a hospital. Also, they just have a lot of germs still stay away from a hospital. Unless, again, you have no other alternative. And so, you know, to answer Zach's question there too, I think the idea of Zack, you were kind of recoiling from the achiness of leeches. And I wonder, are the bloodletting perspective? I wonder if part of the causation and the correlation might be, you're now treating a person differently. You're giving them advantages. Maybe you're giving them more soup, maybe you're giving them more fluids? Maybe you're treating them differently, because Oh, it's so serious that we have to call a doctor in or whoever, whatever their title was, whoever was giving the leeches, the priests perhaps, right, that now they're so different that their everydayness is being being treated differently. You give them the extra blanket, you give them the soup, you take them outside, like whatever it is, that that's really what's happening. And so yes, the leeches are helping but only as a secondary issue.   Zack Jackson 33:08 That reminds me of the correlation causation argument around the increased health of religious people. We've heard that those numbers thrown around a lot that people who regularly are connected to religious communities are healthier live longer than people that don't. Right. Yeah. And the argument from the religious perspective is that well, faithful people have God, and God heals you. And prayer works. And so prayer prayer for people are healthy people. When the opposite argument is then yeah, the opposite argument is that, well, you're connected to a religious community, you've got people that care for you, you've got people that come by There's comfort, there's there's connection, there's soup delivered to your door every day. And those intangibles are what caused the the health and the healing. Yeah,   Kendra Holt-Moore 33:58 and the direction of the correlation is not always clear, if you're looking at like study results. So if you're healthy and able bodied, to like get to your church, or synagogue or whatever, then you can, you can do that. But you were already healthy from the starting point. Whereas if you're like chronically ill and unable to get out of bed, then maybe you don't go to a religious service, because you're not able to but the starting point, the kind of direction of behavior was influenced by the status of your health rather than, like the status of your religiosity. And that that whole like body of literature is like, really, really vast. And it is really interesting, but it's a good, good examples to bring up when we're talking about correlation.   Ian Binns 34:48 Yeah. But Zack, you asked earlier about, you know, why did bloodletting last for so long? I mean, there is, you know, I just started remembering that there are certain Um, chronic diseases, blood diseases that people will have, or blood cancers that will have where it will produce too much either iron and their blood or too much red blood cells. And the way they do that, the way that one of the treatments for that is a phlebotomy and so, which is the removal of amount, a specific amount of blood, it's more than just going in and doing a donation, for example. And so I and that is done for medical purposes, like my dad used to have to do that, because of a blood disease that he had. And so, I saw I started very quickly looking at what is the difference between bloodletting and phlebotomy? And some of this is just saying that bloodletting was a therapeutic practice that started in antiquity, but that there still flub a lot. Phlebotomy is another way of saying bloodletting   35:57 is, when you go rolled, it's phlebotomist. Correct? It's the person that takes   Ian Binns 36:01 control now than it used to be. Right. Yeah.   36:03 Or at least, we think it's   Ian Binns 36:07 yes.   Zack Jackson 36:08 Yeah. So one of the things I wanted, so I want to be cautious about to when we talk about old, older treatments, you know, the cutting off the duck's head and how ridiculous it is, or the how they used to use urine to whiten their teeth. You know, stuff, stuff like that, where we can easily look back at those folksy unintelligent people and say, My goodness, aren't we so intelligent? Today, we have science and science has given us all the answers. And those of you who might be listening at home or have people in your lives, who you've talked to about sorts of things, well, then, you know, get kind of, rightly upset at the sort of hubris of that, that there's there's medicine, and then there's alternative medicine, and alternative medicine is based just on placebo and fantasies and dreams. And real medicine is based on science and truth. And I think Modern medicine is wonderful. And it has given us so much more trust in the process and understanding the why of things work. But that a lot of what we have in modern medicine is based on traditional medicine. You know, the ancient Ancient Egyptians knew that if you had pain, or inflammation or fever that you could chew on birch bark, and it would reduce those things. And it wasn't until much later that that's how we got aspirin now, or I think of penicillin just comes from what mold. And how many of like indigenous cultures will watch the way that nature interacts with itself. And then we'll gain lessons from that, you know, watching what this animal eats when they eat it. And then using that and applying that and finding that those things work. And only much, much, much, much later do we discover the scientific rationale for it. And we're seeing sort of a resurgence in the past couple of decades of people taking indigenous medicines seriously and looking for like the whys of why these things have stuck around for so long. And lots of times discovering that there is there is wisdom behind these traditions. And the whole colonial Western mindset of it's our way, or it's just fantasy is not all that helpful.   Rachael Jackson 38:36 Thank you for that perspective, I think we do need to, you know, recognize our own bias. And also recognize, you know, as we're sort of talking about the with the tobacco industry, that there's a lot of push with marketing, and there's a lot of issues in those ways that we're all very susceptible to that came out of this trusting of the scientific process. And just because it's old, doesn't mean it is old and unscientific doesn't mean that it's not also helpful. Right. So putting that caveat also,   Zack Jackson 39:10 sometimes they are awful. Do the old things, you know, like we if you have syphilis at home, do not inject mercury into your urethra, because that does not work. Right, despite the fact that Blackbeard did it. And   39:27 well, and I think too, are there other are there other? Oh, sorry. Yeah. Well,   Ian Binns 39:31 just real quick, you know, you talk about this, and I think this will be, you know, what you're just discussing, Zach, you know, and wanting to be respectful. And one of the people I hope to get on the show sometime is David distinto, who wrote the book, how God works. And in this particular book, I mean, he is talking in some situations about healing, you know, and says early on, I'm not finished yet but you know, it's says I realized that the surprise of my colleagues and I felt when we saw evidence of religions benefits was a sign of our hubris. Born of a common notion among scientists, all of religion was superstition, and therefore could have little practical benefit is that learned and as this book shows, spiritual leaders often understood in ways that we can now scientifically confirm how to help people live better lives. And so that he is someone I really, you know, reach out to him see if we can get him on the show, because I think that's some interesting research he's done to show. You know, what is it we're learning now? And how it's applicable to helping others but another one I wanted to bring up was the notion of maggot therapy.   40:44 Oh, yes, yeah. Which I've done a little bit   Ian Binns 40:47 here, but if you know more, please, but   Zack Jackson 40:51 which I now say it Rachel hates bugs.   40:57 I do leeches all day long. But maggots.   Zack Jackson 40:59 I got this don't talk about   Ian Binns 41:01 this great book called strange science, wonderful. All these cool things in here, but one of them is pages on maggot therapy. And it says it sounds like something from a horror film fat cream colored maggots eating their way through infected sores and wounds. It's not its medicine. Rachel, says Rachel right there. Since it's so sad since ancient times, doctors have used Magus to prevent wounds from getting infected, and the 1940s Antibiotics replace maggots. But bacteria adapted and started to become resistant to antibiotics. And now we get the return of the maggots. Maggots work by secreting digestive enzymes that feed on dead tissue. Those enzymes also killed bacteria and a wound and speed up healing. Doctors are placed between 203 100 maggots on a wound then cover it maggots and all with mesh beneath the mesh the maggots feed for 48 to 72 hours. When they're done, the doctors remove them. wounds that haven't healed for months even years often respond quickly to maggot medicine. And I really am hopeful this is a video clip we need to share of the wonderful reactions we're seeing from both Rachel and Kendra   Rachael Jackson 42:25 I'm just gonna be real public about this. If I'm ever in a situation where I'd not have a wound that heals and the only thing that could cure me is Maga therapy. Just put me out of my misery. Just don't   Zack Jackson 42:38 just go to   Rachael Jackson 42:42 the blog, the blog and I'm like, kill the maggots like don't even just all amputate or that's I respect people that go through that so much. I'm not one of them. I think that never having that issue.   Kendra Holt-Moore 42:54 You can put the maggots on me but then also punch me in the face and knock me out.   43:02 Alright, so I'll be dead and Kendra will be unconscious. Yeah. And South could be loving every minute.   Zack Jackson 43:09 As well of bugs. Sorry. Yeah.   43:11 All right, Ian, where are you? Where do you fall on this this highly nutritious   Zack Jackson 43:14 to after they're done? Yeah, he's just you can just kill them and dry them and then eat them and then you get all your personal flesh. Then you get the nutrients back. Well should you   43:28 cook in your body,   Zack Jackson 43:34 because they know either way you deal with with insects. You take the insects you suffocate them in a box of carbon dioxide so you don't squish them or anything. Then you take them out and you dehydrate them and then you crush them into a powder and add that into your food. That's the best   Ian Binns 43:50 way to by any chance interview all seasons we're talking about maggots.   Zack Jackson 43:55 Can we continue for the rest of the episode? Rachel?   Ian Binns 44:00 Yes, that's another video clip needs to be shared of Rachel doing the gagging reflex each time I talk about maggots. She's like well   Kendra Holt-Moore 44:09 I feel bad for Rachel.   44:11 Like I don't I'm not queasy, but now I guess I   Ian Binns 44:15 will. So let's let's get into another discussion. Then. Kellogg's cornflakes. Now I'd found a very   Kendra Holt-Moore 44:21 good transition away from dear listener.   Zack Jackson 44:27 Now that's a segue   Ian Binns 44:28 dear listener. So when I mentioned Kellogg's cornflakes prior to recording, both Rachael and Kendra have perked up and seemed to know more information about this than I did. And so I will only share the very little bit of information I have but please reach and Kindle Kendra jump in and tell us what you know about the Kellogg's cornflakes but from what I have read is that Jay is Kellogg one of the people who developed Kellogg's cornflakes he was a medical doctor and health activist and he created the cornflakes. He was one of the people who created any hope that they would prevent sexual urges or more specifically to inhibit the urge to masturbate. And so Rachel, Kendra, you reacted earlier what what did you know? Because this took me by complete surprise because it didn't work. So   Kendra Holt-Moore 45:14 I was gonna say, Rachel, you go because I have to go it's like noon. I don't really have that much to add, either. I just I know that that is a statement.   Ian Binns 45:26 Do we not want to then talk about the very last one about hysteria before Kendra leaves?   Rachael Jackson 45:29 We can keep talking about it. I think she's she's got it. Yeah, I   Kendra Holt-Moore 45:32 mean, I'm gonna say Good. Might have to, like 30 seconds thing   Ian Binns 45:35 for anyone to tell us about hysteria. Kendra. Wow.   Zack Jackson 45:36 Don't eat cornflakes. Just stick with Cheerios. Cheerios make you horny. So you know that's   Ian Binns 45:44 the science apparently   Kendra Holt-Moore 45:45 bowl of cereal if you feel nothing.   Zack Jackson 45:50 Just cereal? If you want to feel nothing at all.   Kendra Holt-Moore 45:55 Land bland, bland cereal for a bland, bland sex life. That's Sorry. All right, see you later.   46:06 Cool. J cereal.   Zack Jackson 46:09 So what kind of what kind of like sexy breakfast? Was he trying to?   Ian Binns 46:13 I don't know. Rachel, can you help us out?   Rachael Jackson 46:16 So I think I'm in the same same boat of it was a factoid that I very much knew and held on to. But beyond that, I don't have a whole lot of information. I mean, the idea is, you know, everyone has breakfast. And so to prevent those urges in the morning, which and also just let's just clarify something here. When they say masturbation, they really mean men. Yeah, I'm sorry. Nobody, nobody. Yeah. Right. And so basically throughout time, and this was a religious issue. And so it wasn't a doctor issue. It was a religious issue of male masturbation is against God, going all the way back to some genesis of Don't spill your seed and, and Leviticus and stuff like that. But it's bad idea to spill your seed and that got translated into don't masturbate. And so as a religious idea, and if you look at men, generally speaking, I think we were talking about this maybe a couple of weeks ago to in the morning, men generally have more of how to say this, erect penises based on what was going on in the evenings, and the dreams and their inability to regulate their own erections. And so if that's the first thing you do in the morning to stop that have cold, dry cereal. Well, something that's bland,   Zack Jackson 47:56 and I will, let's also say, Kellogg, as a human, Mr. Kellogg himself was a bit of an anti sex fanatic, that the man was married, and still never had sex, and wrote books about how he and his wife never had sex. And they lived in separate bedrooms, and they adopted their children. And that sex pollutes the body. And it's the worst thing in the world. And so, like, this guy was afraid of his body, right? And again, not want anyone else's body. Yeah, he   Rachael Jackson 48:28 did this in a religious context. He didn't do it just because he was asexual and thought everyone else shouldn't be too. Yeah, I'm not a sexual anti-sex. So   Ian Binns 48:37 I will say this. And so I did look it up. And so and, you know, this is now I'm getting this from Snopes. And you know, there could be good or bad things getting things. So but according to snopes.com, so the claim, what is the you know, the Kellogg's cornflakes were originally created an effort to discourage American consumers from masturbating. And as you said, Rachel, it's male, actually, so it should say that the rating is mostly false. And so what this they're saying what is true is that the creation of cornflakes was part of JH Kellogg's broader advocacy for a plain bland diet without referring to cornflakes in particular, Kellogg elsewhere recommended a plain bland diet as one of several methods to discourage masturbation. So can I guess that was a people just put that together?   Zack Jackson 49:34 Can I just read a little quote from one of his books, please do other way. So he talks about onanism, which Rachel alluded to is a story of Odin from where we're in Scripture, are we? That is that is where he's supposed to consummate this.   49:55 So this is the story of this is in Genesis in Judah Genesis. Yeah. This is   Zack Jackson 50:01 and where he's supposed to impregnate his brother's widow, and then spills the seed on the ground because   Rachael Jackson 50:08 he doesn't want to because he wants the child to be his own and not be his brother's his dead brother's wife's son, and therefore all the dead brother's property goes to him and he doesn't then have a son. So instead of doing that, they just like,   Zack Jackson 50:26 so then God knocks him out. Right, so, so he talks about onanism. So when he talks about onanism, he's talking about masturbation. He says neither plague nor war nor smallpox have produced results so disastrous to humanity as the pernicious habit of onanism. Such a victim dies literally by his own hand. Yeah, such a victim dies literally by his own answer. You must have been so happy with that line. Can you imagine him writing that out? And he's like, Oh, this is a killer. This is good. This is good. This is good. He dies by his own hand. Oh, I gotta show this to someone.   Rachael Jackson 51:04 Yeah. Also, let's just add to who this person was. He spent 30 years of his life dedicated to promoting eugenics.   Ian Binns 51:15 Yes, he did. So near the end of his life,   Rachael Jackson 51:18 whether or not there was the direct cornflakes is for masturbation, it was promoted by a person who was anti sexual and pro eugenic to donate. You know, that's the history   Zack Jackson 51:33 of cornflakes. Yeah. Meanwhile, recent research has found that for most people, sex is actually super healthy. For a person's like continued health and well, being mentally, physically, emotionally, releases all kinds of amazing hormones and good things into your body. And like a lot of religions throughout history have have have recognized that have seen, like Judaism, spiritual ecstasy, like orgasm is like spiritual ecstasy. That's like the moment of connection to the divine. This breaking forth between the natural and the the supernatural. And this thin place and spirituality have, like, celebrated that. And I think we're coming back around to that. That's a good thing. Right? Oh, Christianity is still lagging far, far, far behind. Thank you some combination of Plato and Augustine, but we're getting there. You know,   Rachael Jackson 52:37 maybe it's kind of like Plumbing. Right? They had an ancient Egypt, and then it took like, one or 2000 years to come back. Yeah.   Zack Jackson 52:48 Yeah. Yeah. So   Rachael Jackson 52:49 you know, your plumbing. Yeah. Not quite, not quite that way. But no, my Jewish comment, my Jewish comment was that Judaism sees, and by Judaism, big broad stroke brush using right here, normative ancient orthodoxy style, Judaism saw sex only within a marital heterosexual concept. But inside those boundaries, yay, more of it. Also, it's a double mitzvah, it's a doubly good thing to do on Shabbat, the day that we're supposed to be the highest connected to God. And this was one of the ways to be even more connected to the Divine was through sex with your spouse. And I was thinking, as you're talking about Kellogg to how they didn't have sex, even though they were married. One of the things in an ancient Catawba marriage document, given it to the wife was written that if the husband doesn't fulfill his side of the contract, because, well, he doesn't or he's dead, then she gets XY and Z things, you know, 50 chickens, a sheep or whatever. Depends on what she's worth old widows and or excuse me, old, divorcees are worth nothing. But beyond that. One of the stipulations in there is how often they have to have sex, how often the husband must provide sex to his wife, not the other way around. And it listed how frequent so a day trader was like, once a week at a minimum, right, but a merchant, every three to say they had a donkey driver that was once a month and then a camel driver was once every three months because they recognize that if your camel driver, you're you're gone for a very long time, so don't punish them. And then they had like, and then because these are scholars writing this and I don't know what their problem was, they just want to have sex with each other instead of their wives. They said, Oh, like every seven years. Is all your seven years. Yeah, like it was ridiculous, how often or how not often they had To have sex so that they could go to the go to their rabbi's house and study with him for years on end, and then just come back once every few years have sex with the wife and then go again. So yeah, so having, like having sex in the religious concept again, and that very narrow first understanding of sis heterosexual marriages, has kind of made sex positive in Judea. Yeah. Yeah.   Ian Binns 55:30 So I know because you know, we are approaching the hour. But I do want to at least because, you know, we talked about before recording. And it's a chance for me to get all my giggles out around this idea of hysteria. Your giggles out most of my giggles. But this was something that I do remember hearing about, you know, at one point about female hysteria. And there's different articles that I have found that talk about, you know, because even there were films about it, or there was a film about it, and play. And so the idea was that, and thankfully, I'm gonna keep fumbling this. But Rachel introduced us to a really cool person, I want to do a shout out for sigh babe on Facebook. does some really interesting stuff. I'm really excited about Reading more about her. But what's interesting is that the argument is, is that hold on, let me pull my thing up, and just be easier. It was believed or this is the argument that in the Victorian era, doctors treated women diagnosed with hysteria, which is no longer a diagnosis, by the way, by genital stimulation to induce an orgasm. This hysteria was supposed to be a buildup of fluid in the woman's womb. And doctors assumed that since men and Jackie lated, and felt better that it stood to reason this would work for when women. Apparently, you know, there was multiple, you know, ideas of what was it that the different symptoms that people would have, obviously, if they were experiencing hysteria, and so this was the way to go was this manual massage. But a text came out in 1999. From and I believe that toss are doing more research for this this episode. A historian wrote this book that came out in 1989. And in that she argued that this was the reason why the vibrator was invented, was to make it so that it was easier for the doctors having to treat women for hysteria. I'm just saying that Oh, nice. But you know. So, yeah, and found out that that actually is not accurate. A more recent paper from last couple years has come out showing that this is actually inaccurate, that there is no evidence whatsoever suggests that women are treated for hysteria, by doctors bringing them to orgasm in their offices. So, or that this was the reason why vibrators were invented. But again, a medical treatment. That was something that took off based on one historians perspective, and or book, and then others kind of pushed back on it was fascinating. And we can share these in show notes or something. But in Reading about this particular ailment, and this suppose a treatment Amad. Yes. And suppose the treatment, there was interesting to read about how this particular historian of technology kind of has backpedal a little bit. And so well, no, I didn't mean I meant it more as a hypothesis, not a yes, this is the way it was. But then, you know, when you actually look at the writing shows, that's not actually how it was presented in the text itself. But it still took off, right? Because it was, I mean, when you think about it, this sounds kind of funny. And so it took off, people listen to it and   Rachael Jackson 59:13 right, because also, you know, God forbid, somebody creates something for women's pleasure, simply for women's pleasure,   Ian Binns 59:21 right? And that's actually there's no reason at the very beginning. It's a disturbing insight, implying that vibrators succeeded not because they advance you know, pleasure, but because they saved labor for male physicians.   Rachael Jackson 59:35 Right? So again, yeah, simply for women that has nothing to do with the man right gets co opted into a story of oh, those poor men, just poor, poor doctors, or in a really awful way of the abuse, the potential abuse of Doc Just taking advantage of their women patience, and showing that it's okay. None of this is ever okay.   Ian Binns 1:00:11 But even there, I mean, you can easily go online and find   1:00:17 trying to find their, you know, articles   Ian Binns 1:00:18 to support that this will that it was used for this as as recent 2019. Right. Yeah.   Rachael Jackson 1:00:28 So no, no your sources correct. And use some good thinking. And if you're going to Google things, feel free to use private browsing. Yes.   Zack Jackson 1:00:39 And if your interest the scientific method, you know, and you're feeling a little hysterical, just want to try it out. See if it works for you. That's in your hypothesis. Thank you. Science is just messing around and taking notes right so.   1:01:04 Wash your hands first.   Ian Binns 1:01:05 And after. Okay, that's all I got.   Zack Jackson 1:01:13 Thank you, doctor. Doctor, doctor.  

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate
The Secret To Increase Your Rate Of Return By 10x Or More Through Collateral Optimization!

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 18:59


Do you want to bulletproof your wealth?   Today's guest is Tom Laune. As a music industry professional who lost part of his hearing due to an accident, he realized that if he didn't have some form of long-term disability insurance, he would have been in a lot of trouble. He created the Bulletproof Wealth Strategy to help others protect their income and grow their wealth. Key to his strategy is saving your capital in a place where there is compounding growth.   Tom solves the problem of low returns and increased taxes when storing money in a traditional bank. By creating a line of credit using specially designed whole life insurance, they help real estate investors across the country. The cash value of the policy is guaranteed to grow, creditor-protected, and tax-advantaged. Real estate investors love that there are zero loan origination fees or required interest payments!     [00:01 - 05:40] Learning About Long-Term Disability Policy Losing his hearing after 29 years as an audio engineer Why it is uncommon for people to have a standalone disability policy Helping other people be aware of this coverage   [05:41 - 11:12] The Bulletproof Wealth Strategy Tom on the best place to save your money: collaterals Everything can be collateralized Bulletproof wealth plan vs home equity line of credit Convertible term insurance and whole life insurance   [11:13 - 17:45] Optimizing Collateralization Alternative to a savings account but with a better rate of return Using insurance money to fund your real estate investing A capital with uninterrupted compounding growth plus an actual asset It's not a get-rich-quick scheme   [17:46 - 18:59] Closing Segment Reach out to Tom!  Links Below Final Words Tweetable Quotes   “I have searched high and low trying to find the most tax-advantaged, and the best place to store long-term capital that allows you to collateralize it. One of the big things I talk about is collateral.” - Tom Laune “Creating like a line of credit inside of a specially designed life insurance policy, that is what I teach people, I think it's the safest place to store long-term capital because you have compound growth.” - Tom Laune -----------------------------------------------------------------------------   Connect with Tom! Follow him on LinkedIn. Visit their website and schedule a call with Tom to know more about The Bulletproof Wealth Strategy.   Connect with me:   I love helping others place money outside of traditional investments that both diversify a strategy and provide solid predictable returns.     Facebook   LinkedIn   Like, subscribe, and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or whatever platform you listen on.  Thank you for tuning in!   Email me → sam@brickeninvestmentgroup.com Want to read the full show notes of the episode? Check it out below:   Tom Laune  00:00 The best way to do that is to protect yourself with what's called convertible term insurance which I'm telling you nobody understands how that works either. It's a really misunderstood product. And there's huge advantages to it.    Intro  00:19 Welcome to the How to Scale Commercial Real Estate Show. Whether you are an active or passive investor, we'll teach you how to scale your real estate investing business into something big.     Sam Wilson  00:27 Tom Laune created the Bulletproof Wealth Strategy to help others protect their income and grow their wealth. The secret to his strategy is teaching people to use money like banks do to earn much higher rates of return than the average investor. Tom, welcome to the show.   Tom Laune  00:42 Thank you, Sam. I really appreciate it. I'm so glad to be on your show. And I'm looking forward to spending some time with you today.   Sam Wilson  00:48 Absolutely. Three questions I ask every guest who comes on the show in 90 seconds or less? Can you tell me where did you start? Where are you now? And how did you get there?   Tom Laune  00:55 Okay, I started in the music industry. And I was a professional recording engineer and mix engineer who started to lose hearing in one ear after 29 years. And I realized that if I hadn't had some protection on my ability to earn a living through some special type of insurance, I would have been in huge trouble. So I got this really great long-term disability policy that I had enforced for over 20 years, and then transitioned and went back to school and got three financial designations. And now I'm teaching people, especially real estate investors, how to make their wealth as bulletproof as possible. So I've created a strategy called the Bulletproof Wealth Strategy.   Sam Wilson  01:43 That is really unfortunate. You were in the music industry for 29 years?   Tom Laune  01:48 Yes, sir. Yeah, I worked with like Bruce Springsteen and REM and Amy Grant and a bunch of, you know, The Fabulous Thunderbirds, a bunch of great artists. But of course, I used my hearing that whole time to do it. And if I didn't have the protection that somebody put in place for me, I would have been really in trouble. So that's what I decided to do is to help other people learn the same strategies that I had was fortunate enough to be able to learn.   Sam Wilson  02:17 Outside of a long-term disability policy, what was the other protection that you had in place?   Tom Laune  02:23 So that when I was doing this, for me, personally, that was the main thing that I had, then. And that is a part of my strategy. Now, I will tell you this, very few people have that I'm telling you right now out of 1000 people, there might be 15, that have a long-term standalone disability policy, unless it's been given to him free from work, which those aren't interesting. The work ones are okay, they cover about 60% of your income, but it is taxable. So that's not the main thing that I do now. But it is a part of my strategy for sure.   Sam Wilson  02:57 Yeah, that's really interesting. I mean, I'm not one of your 15 and 1000. I mean, it's so uncommon, you hear so few people talk about it.   Tom Laune  03:04 It's very uncommon. The reason it's so uncommon is because it's not a lucrative thing for advisors to talk about it. It's very difficult to get somebody covered, oftentimes, their coverage is reduced. And the thing does not really pay. You know, it's just not advantageous financially for people to talk about it for the most part, but because I was helped so much by it, I'm willing to, you know, help people get it because I know, super important for me to have.   Sam Wilson  03:34 What do you think is not a profit center for insurance companies? And so that's why...   Tom Laune  03:41 They're dropping like, there's a huge amount of liability on that type of coverage. Because if somebody goes on claim, they can be on claim for 40 years, right? And the payout is tax-free. It's just unbelievable, the advantages that you have with that, and that's why they're very, very picky about who they let have it.   Sam Wilson  04:04 Yeah, that sounds really challenging, I guess, on that side of things, you know, if they're really picky about who they actually give insurance to how can you go out to the masses and say, Hey, here's a product of things you'd have.   Tom Laune  04:18 So yeah, I can go out to the masses and say that because there are people that can get it, and I was one of them that could get it. You know, I can't guarantee I can get it for everybody, but I can sure try. You know, that's all I can tell you is that most people don't aren't even aware that they need it.   Sam Wilson  04:35 Right. No, it certainly not. I mean, your ability to earn if you become severely impacted. And I think this even falls in the Dave Ramsey camp. And, you know, everybody's got their own opinion on Dave Ramsey, but I think even Dave Ramsey said, you know, have a sound financial plan. This needs to be part of it.   Tom Laune  04:51 100% I mean, this is one of the things that Dave and I agree on, and we don't agree on much. But this is definitely one of them. I mean, I don't have any problem with Dave, he lives is right near where I live. I used to go to church with him. It's just that his speaking to a certain audience and that certain audience is very, very middle class, you know, scenario. And I'm most my mostly my client base is real estate investors, and I'm a real estate investor. And that's who I speak to primarily.   Sam Wilson  05:20 Right? Yeah. Again, like you said, there's a certain segment of our society that needs to hear what Dave Ramsey has to say. And they need to totally, and they need to implement it without questioning get it done. Yeah, exactly. Another segment where it's like, well, we can take that and and kind of mix in a little bit, a few other ideas in here, because this isn't going to work for everybody. So write that in. We're not here to discuss Dave, we're here to discuss what the bulletproof wealth plan looks like. Can you tell us what are some other components to it?   Tom Laune  05:47 Absolutely, well, the main thing I do is help people figure out where is the best place to save money, right, because traditional banks have one advantage, and that is liquidity. That means if you put $100,000 into a traditional bank, the only advantage you have is that you can pull that $100,000 out the next day, if you need it for something, right. That's basically it. Other than that, you're losing money to inflation by leaving money in a bank number one. And number two, there is no other advantage to it, because the money that you earn in a bank is piddly diddly, almost nothing. And it's taxable at your ordinary income rates. So the interest that they pay on traditional savings accounts is terrible. So I have searched high and low trying to find the most tax-advantaged, and the best place to store long-term capital that allows you to collateralize it, one of the big things I talk about is collateral. And I know your audience probably understands collateral, but that's really just having an asset the bank can use to pledge to be able to borrow against it. Really, that's what collateral is and everything can be collateralized to one degree or another so you can collateralize stocks and bonds, you can collateralize diamonds and, you know precious metals, you can collateralize cryptocurrency, you can collateralize real estate. But those all have a lower collateral capacity in terms of how much you can collateralize them versus what I do, which is creating like a line of credit inside of a specially designed life insurance policy. That is what I teach people, I think it's the safest place to store long-term capital because you have compound growth, that means the money is growing year over year on in a compounding way. And you're able to collateralize it at 90 to 100% depending on the account value. And you're able to have all of these other amazing benefits like asset protection, it works very similar to what I teach people to a home equity line of credit, the big difference between a home equity line credit and a bulletproof wealth plan is that on a home equity line of credit, when you take a loan against it, it dings your credit score, your FICO score, it's reported on your debt to income ratio, when you take a loan from the place where I have my clients storing capital, it does not. And of course, a home equity line of credit does not pay a dividend. So it's another huge differentiator is that you've got to be looking at where are you saving capital so that you can take advantage of deals when they come along.   Sam Wilson  08:35 Right. Yeah, that's a very, very interesting point. So you've got you've hit on two key parts of this, one is the long term disability. The second one is the whole life insurance, upset whole life, there's probably some nuance there that I'm getting completely wrong, you can clarify.   Tom Laune  08:50 That's fine. The whole life is the traditional the thing Dave Ramsey has, right, is that you can design whole life to be terrible, or you can design it to be great. And he only talks about the terrible kind, you know, so going back to that it's frustrating is that he's only getting a tiny little sliver of the picture out to the world. And basically everybody thinks it's awful. Well, you can design it just right here. I'm here to tell you, you can design it to be phenomenal to pay very low commissions and to have a lot of cash value. You just have to work with somebody who understands how to do this. And that's what I specialize in. So that's the second component of the three components of the bulletproof wealth strategy.    Sam Wilson  09:34 What's number three?   Tom Laune  09:35 So number three is that there is an option strategy that I employ. And it is a special type of long is a special type of term life insurance that allows you to convert later to a whole life policy. Because everybody asks me, hey, what happens if I start saving $25,000 a year now but then two years from now I want to start saving 75,000 Because I've got a big raise, or I have a financial windfall. And the best way to do that is to protect yourself with what's called convertible term insurance, which I'm telling you, nobody understands how that works, either. It's a really misunderstood product. And there's huge advantages to it.   Sam Wilson  10:20 What are… would you ever put someone in a whole life and a convertible term at the same time?   Tom Laune  10:27 I do that all the time. So they start with a whole life to hold whatever amount of money that they want to initially put into it. And then they have a convertible policy that allows them to convert to another whole life policy later, when they're ready. So it is very, very frequent that I do too. In fact, I usually set somebody up with three things I long term disability policy, a term convertible policy and a whole life policy. That way, they can have all the optionality and they can move money into these things as they're ready. And I always look out for making sure that their maximum insurable interest is protected, and that their wealth as bulletproof as humanly possible.   Sam Wilson  11:12 How much of a, what you're gonna call it, a properly structured whole life policy is insurance for you in your eyes, and how much of it is actually just more of an investment vehicle with some really cool benefits?   Tom Laune  11:28 Okay, so zero of it is an investment vehicle, none. And what it is, is that there's a huge percentage of it, that's a savings vehicle. So it's like an alternative to a savings account, but you're getting a much better rate of return than a savings account. So I'll give you some numbers on a $130,000 deposit, which I have a lot of people, that's just kind of a magic number, because you can create a line of credit for usually depending on your health and your age around 100,000. So if you put in 130, you can get a loan for around 100, after 30 days, so it's not tied up for a long time, you know, a large amount of your capital is able to come back to you to then put into an investment. The difference is, is that you're not actually putting your own money in, now you're doing this collateralization, where you're using the insurance companies money to find your real estate investing, does that make sense?   Sam Wilson  12:29 Sort of if I put 130 in bucket, and I can get it out?   Tom Laune  12:35 Yep, so you're down 30. But now all of a sudden, you also have about 3 million or so in life insurance. And then every year you put more money in, the amount of money you have available grows relative to the amount you put in until around year eight, you have more money available in your life insurance than you've put in all for the previous seven years. And then it keeps compounding to where by the time you're ready to retire, you have saved double what you put in, and you've been able to make your investments as well. So if you put in a million, you might have 2 million in your cash value. That's just an example over your lifetime, I'm talking. And then you would be able to use that 2 million to put into your real estate investments. And as long as you're earning more on your real estate investments than you're paying the insurance company, you're employing arbitrage to be able to pay down that balance quicker. And the whole thing works out in an unbelievably advantageous way. It's just it's incredible.   Sam Wilson  13:41 Yeah, I kind of you know, it was not the sharpest pencil in the drawer. So I'm trying to run the numbers here and I go, Gosh, why not just take the 130 Grand, put it in a real syndication have your money doubled in five years, and now I got 260 grand I can go and do something else with?   Tom Laune  13:58 Right. So in this case, you would be taking 130, taking 100 out and putting it into a real estate investment. But this is the thing is that the 100 continues to work for you and earn dividends and grow. And your money is also in the real estate investment. So at the end of the day, you're going to have this huge pool of capital that you've been building for your whole life with uninterrupted compound growth. And you're going to have the real estate investment as well. And your wealth is protected because what happens if two years into this plan, you get hit by a truck. Now all of a sudden your family is going to have millions of dollars that they otherwise wouldn't have had. So you have this layer of protection as well. And depending on what state you live in, you have asset protection that is incredible as well. So you have creditor and creditor protection up to 100% for most of the states I work in California does not have it But Texas, Florida, a lot of the big states do have 100% creditor, creditor protection. Where are you based out of again?   Sam Wilson  15:08 I'm right here with you, man. I'm just down the road Memphis.   Tom Laune  15:12 No way, okay, that's amazing. So Tennessee 100%.   Sam Wilson  15:16 Yeah, I know the 931. It's my wife's from so.  Absolutely. That's really so if I understand this, right, the 100,000 that you pull out, is still treated as if it never left your policy?   Tom Laune  15:30 Or because you're not pulling your own money out. You're doing a collateralization. Right. So you aren't...   Sam Wilson  15:36 That policy or that insurance company? Some form of interest?    Tom Laune  15:41 Yep. It's 4% currently. So if you were putting $100,000 into a real estate investment, earning 8%, that would be $8,000. Right? Your cost of capital would be $4,000. Right? So you're just paying the interest. So rather than making, let's just say, a percent total return, now, you're only investing 4000? Because your 100,000 is still earning money for you. Right, right. And so you're actually converting an 8% return into 100% return by thinking and acting like a bank does. You remember, when a bank lends money, they're not lending their own money, they're lending their depositors money out, right? That's exactly what I'm teaching people. And I'm telling you, it sounds a little bit difficult to uncover right at first. But once you start digging into this, it is a mind-blower. What actually happens as these things mature, and they get into them a little bit. It's not a get-rich-quick scheme. It's more like a get wealthy, slow scheme.   Sam Wilson  16:47 Yes. And I know plenty of very savvy people that use this strategy. I think the key here, and I've talked to I don't know, probably three other people on this show before, you know, maybe obviously, you guys all do very different things. But one of these components is the same. And this is it. Yeah. But the thing that I think is the key here is that it takes until about I think you said year eight, here are my notes. Yeah, you're right. Yeah, is when your the money you've put in and the available money to borrow is the same.   Tom Laune  17:16 Yep, it's very close, though. year four, usually your year on year cash is the same meaning if you put in, let's just call it $50,000, you have 50, mew $1,000 to be able to borrow against so you can get a collateralized loan for the same amount you deposited, which believe me that is the magic here when you're not down at all in liquidity or even and then it starts compounding from there, you know, so it really is amazing.   Sam Wilson  17:46 Tom, thank you for taking the time to come on today. This is a blast. If our listeners want to get in touch with you learn more about the strategies. And again, you know, even just talking I know disability insurance probably isn't the most thrilling Yes, we'll talk about but these are important components of a financial strategy, what's the best way to reach out to you and learn more about you?   Tom Laune  18:05 So I've got free educational videos that is really breaks this all down at bulletproofwealth.info, bulletproofwealth.I-N-F-O. Just go put your name and email address in, watch some of these great videos that I've produced. And then if you want to do something, just click the schedule a call with Tom and I'll be happy to go through and show you what you can do.   Sam Wilson  18:29 Thank you for your time today. I certainly appreciate it.   Tom Laune  18:31 You're welcome. It's great to be here. Thank you, Sam.   Sam Wilson  18:34 Hey, thanks for listening to the How to Scale Commercial Real Estate Podcast. If you can do me a favor and subscribe and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, whatever platform it is you use to listen, if you can do that for us, that would be a fantastic help to the show. It helps us both attract new listeners as well as rank higher on those directories so appreciate you listening. Thanks so much and hope to catch you on the next episode.

Infectious Groove Podcast
Battle Of The Bulge: 1984 vs 1991

Infectious Groove Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 52:06


DISCLAIMER: Before diving headfirst into this episode, it is recommended that you go back and listen to the episodes that we dedicated solely to 1984 and 1991. But hey, if you want to be confused, and listen to this episode first, by all means, you do you. After reading the title of this episode, you might be thinking "hey I thought this was a music podcast", and you are correct, it most certainly is. Truth be told music in the mid-80s/early 90s was on fire, and there is no denying that. You could even go as far as to say that music was BULGING with talent and hits. See what I did there? Yes, that's right, Slash's favorite skinny jeans weren't the only thing with a big ol' bulge back in the day. With so much talent packed into just a few short years in the music industry, it was suggested by our listeners that we do a little comparison between the two, to see who we thought should come out on top. The lists of albums that came out during these two time periods is something truly to be wreckoned with, and the fact that we had to choose one over the other made us (Russ and Kyle) quite sad. Michelle didn't seem to care all that much, and as you'll come to find out, she has her a tribe of her own out there somewhere, so it is what it is. So what do you guys think? Which bulge was better? You might just come to realize that bigger isn't necesarily what you should be concerend with, and that longevity could very well be the key to it all. Come take another ride down the greatest musical rabbit hole out there, and see if you can come away with a clear cut winner. it's season 6, episode 2 of your favorite record store employee's, tattoo artist's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.

The Rich Dickman Show
Episode 212 - Rem Does Sara's VR

The Rich Dickman Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 101:42


Sara Star returns to discuss her trip to Exxxotica in Chicago! Rem asks the hard hitting questions and previews a clip of Sara Star's new Virtual Reality video! We also discuss the "interesting" visitors a porn convention attracts. Pepsi Nitro; Rem and Randy pitch sci-fi ideas to Cody; Rem went to Raw; Ben & Jerry's ruined ice cream; A discussion on circumcision; Some stupid ducks fell into a storm drain; How much gambling is too much gambling?; The VR market and the Metaverse kinda sucks; and more! Be sure to check out Sara Star!

Sleep and Relax ASMR
Dr. Crinkles Second Consultation (ASMR)

Sleep and Relax ASMR