Podcast appearances and mentions of lin manuel miranda

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American actor and songwriter

  • 1,760PODCASTS
  • 2,453EPISODES
  • 55mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 26, 2022LATEST
lin manuel miranda

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Best podcasts about lin manuel miranda

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Latest podcast episodes about lin manuel miranda

On Air With Ryan Seacrest
The Encanto with Lin Manuel Miranda

On Air With Ryan Seacrest

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 48:50


The Morning Hack…how often you should reboot your devices to keep them working properly! Another ‘Whoa Baby Wednesday'! The brilliant mind behind Hamilton…In the Heights…Encanto… Tick Tick Boom…and so many more…Lin Manuel Miranda joins us! Paris Hilton is married! And she's on with to talk about it! And can celebrities really have a private life if they want to? Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Slate Daily Feed
ICYMI: We TikTok About Bruno

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 30:34


“We Don't Talk About Bruno,” the hit song from Disney's Encanto, is sitting at No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 this week, and that's all thanks to TikTok. On the show today, Madison and Rachelle talk about the songs from Encanto currently dominating the platform, and why people online seem to love to hate Lin-Manuel Miranda. Podcast production by Daniel Schroeder and Derek John. Correction: This podcast incorrectly stated that TikTok is included in the Billboard Hot 100 chart calculations, misnamed the song “Surface Pressure,” and misstated that it is sung by the oldest daughter (it's sung by the middle daughter). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Beer With Geeks: A Geek Pop Culture Podcast
386: Broadway Nesting Dolls

Beer With Geeks: A Geek Pop Culture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 31:02


Frank and Tim chat about Netflix's Tick, Tick... Boom!, the directorial debut of Lin Manuel Miranda starring Andrew Garfield. Cheers! Beers of the Week Harpoon Dunkin Pumpkin Stella Artois

ICYMI
We TikTok About Bruno

ICYMI

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 30:34


“We Don't Talk About Bruno,” the hit song from Disney's Encanto, is sitting at No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 this week, and that's all thanks to TikTok. On the show today, Madison and Rachelle talk about the songs from Encanto currently dominating the platform, and why people online seem to love to hate Lin-Manuel Miranda. Podcast production by Daniel Schroeder and Derek John. Correction: This podcast incorrectly stated that TikTok is included in the Billboard Hot 100 chart calculations, misnamed the song “Surface Pressure,” and misstated that it is sung by the oldest daughter (it's sung by the middle daughter). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Culture Gabfest
ICYMI: We TikTok About Bruno

Culture Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 30:34


“We Don't Talk About Bruno,” the hit song from Disney's Encanto, is sitting at No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 this week, and that's all thanks to TikTok. On the show today, Madison and Rachelle talk about the songs from Encanto currently dominating the platform, and why people online seem to love to hate Lin-Manuel Miranda. Podcast production by Daniel Schroeder and Derek John. Correction: This podcast incorrectly stated that TikTok is included in the Billboard Hot 100 chart calculations, misnamed the song “Surface Pressure,” and misstated that it is sung by the oldest daughter (it's sung by the middle daughter). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Wait For It Podcast
Netflix & PHIL - Tick, Tick...Boom!

The Wait For It Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 13:14


@PhilTheFilipino is back with his monthly series titled, "Netflix & Phil"! For these episodes, Phil recommends different shows that you'll find on streaming sites like Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime, etc. & for today's episode, Phil recommends a film that was very nearly his movie of the year for The Wait For It Awards. & that film is Tick, Tick...Boom!, starring Andrew Garfield and directed by Lin Manuel Miranda. Synopsis: Based on the autobiographical musical by playwright Jonathan Larson. It's the story of an aspiring composer in New York City who is worried he made the wrong career choice, whilst navigating the pressures of love and friendship.Check out the Wait For It Podcast YouTube Page: The Wait For It Podcast

Pop Shop Podcast
Lin-Manuel Miranda Talks About 'Bruno' & Says His Job on 'Encanto' Was to Prove 'What Music Can Do'

Pop Shop Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 31:52


Lin-Manuel Miranda joins the Billboard Pop Shop Podcast to talk all things “Encanto.” Miranda wrote eight songs for the hit Disney animated film and No. 1 soundtrack, including the top 10 Billboard Hot 100 hits “We Don't Talk About Bruno” and “Surface Pressure.” Miranda chats about working with “Encanto” animators to help tell the film's story, his songwriting process for film, and more. Plus, with the film's “Dos Oruguitas” shortlisted for the Oscar for best original song, Miranda discussed why that song was the right tune to submit to the Academy as a representation of the film. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Culture Pop
Episode 162 - Robin de Jesús, ”Tick, Tick Boom”

Culture Pop

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 39:02


"Tick, Tick Boom" is one of the b best movies of 2021, and Mase & Sue are joined by star Robin de Jesús on this episode of the #CulturePop podcast. He talks about paying tribute to Jonathan Larsen's legacy by adapting his one-man show for the big screen. Also working with director Lin Manuel Miranda on both this movie and the original Broadway production of "In the Heights."

I Don't Wanna Hear It
156 – One and One Are Five: It's My Birthday

I Don't Wanna Hear It

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 95:12


I Don't Wanna Hear It Podcast156 – One and One Are Five: It's My BirthdayThis week we're celebrating our three-year anniversary by doing exactly what we would normally do today. Therefore, the trial separation and divorce are imminent.Check out more of our stuff at I Don't Wanna Hear It and join the Patreon, jabroni. I mean, if you want. Don't be weird about it. Oh, and we publish books now at WND Press because we want to be bankrupted by a dying medium.We now have a Big Cartel where you can buy shirts, pins, mugs, and coffee.Also, you should listen to our 2021 Christmas special: A Black Metal Christmas Carol, as well as Mikey's true crime podcast, Wasteland and Shane's psychology podcast, Why We Do What We Do.Aaannnddd... our good buddy Matt Moment is in a great hardcore band called Contact. Check 'em out!Episode Links:Porch CoffinOffice of Future PlansAdventBack To the Roots Mushroom Growing KitErrorzone by Vein.fmEnter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers) by Wu-Tang ClanJust Can't Hate Enough X2 – Plus Other Hate Songs by Shai HuludSome of our old bands are on Spotify:Absent FriendsWe're Not DeadYears From NowMusical Attribution: Licensed through NEOSounds. License information available upon request.“5 O'Clock Shadow,” “America On the Move,” “Baby You Miss Me,” “Big Fat Gypsy,” “Bubble Up,” “C'est Chaud,” “East River Blues,” “The Gold Rush,” “Gypsy Fiddle Jazz,” “Here Comes That Jazz,” “I Wish I Could Charleston,” “I Told You,” “It Feels Like Love To Me,” “Little Tramp,” “Mornington Crescent,” “No Takeaways.”

Now Try This
Encanto

Now Try This

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 96:34


Episode 44 – This week Nick challenges Marcus to watch Disney's 60th Animated Film Encanto! Will this movie musical's songs penned by Lin-Manuel Miranda make a believer out of Marcus? Can Nick possibly explain how generational trauma works through a children's movie?? Do our boys sell their vision of a shared Disney Universe??? You'll have … Continue reading Encanto →

The Rough Cut
tick, tick...Boom!

The Rough Cut

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 67:07


Editors - Andrew Weisblum ACE and Myron Kerstein ACE tick, tick...Boom! editors Andy Weisblum and Myron Kerstein merged their considerable talents to bring Lin-Manuel Miranda's directorial debut to life....but not at the same time.  While Weisblum began the project, COVID-related delays and a prior commitment to another film meant that Andy would not be able to finish the film.  Fortunately for Miranda, he had to look no further than the cutting room of his film IN THE HEIGHTS.   With that, Myron Kerstein was brought in to lend his storytelling skills to the project and bring "TTB" home. ANDREW WEISBLUM ACE Aside from his rich body of work with Wes Anderson, Andy is also a frequent collaborator with director Darren Aronofsky.  In addition to his Oscar®-nominated work on Aronofsky's BLACK SWAN (2010), Andy also collaborated with him on THE FOUNTAIN (2006), BROKEN ENGLISH (2007), THE WRESTLER (2008), NOAH (2014) and MOTHER! (2017).  The two are currently at work on Aronofsky's next film, THE WHALE. MYRON KERSTEIN ACE Even before re-teaming with Lin-Manuel Miranda for tick, tick...Boom!, Myron Kerstein had plenty of experience to draw from going into their first project together - Miranda's Broadway hit, IN THE HEIGHTS (2021). Kerstein previously worked with IN THE HEIGHTS director John Chu on the film, CRAZY RICH ASIANS (2018).  Myron also had a diverse pool of film and tv projects, including; GARDEN STATE (2004), NICK AND NORAH'S INFINITE PLAYLIST (2008), LITTLE FOCKERS (2010), THE DUKES OF HAZARD (2005), FAME (2009), GIRLS (2015-17) and HOME BEFORE DARK (2020). Editing tick, tick...Boom! In our discussion with tick, tick...Boom! editors Andy Weisblum and Myron Kerstein, we talk about: How to manage the handoff of a project from one editor to another Converting beats to frames when cutting a musical Cutting at director, Lin-Manuel Miranda's house What to do with the post crew when a new editor comes in to replace the first one Editing with The Wu-Tang Clan looking over your shoulder The Credits Get your free 100GB of media transfer at MASV Visit ExtremeMusic for all your production audio needs See what's new in the latest version of Media Composer Listen to editor Andrew Weisblum discuss The French Dispatch Hear Myron Kerstein talk about cutting In the Heights Subscribe to The Rough Cut podcast and never miss an episode Visit The Rough Cut on YouTube

Writers and Company from CBC Radio
Quiara Alegria Hudes on her journey to writing the hit musical In the Heights

Writers and Company from CBC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 62:52


Pulitzer Prize-winner Quiara Alegria Hudes is best known for her collaboration with Lin-Manuel Miranda to create the popular musical and feature film, In the Heights. In her new memoir, My Broken Language, she explores the intersection of identity and language, in relation to home.

Music Notes with Jess
Ep. 119 - 'Encanto' Songs

Music Notes with Jess

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 15:24


Disney's recent animated film Encanto, is embraced globally for its family message, and music. All 8 songs sung in the movie are charting! I storytell it using these songs and report each of its historic Billboard charting. Theme Song: "Dance Track", composed by Jessica Ann CatenaEncanto soundtrack: https://disneymusic.co/encantoEncanto Disney+ link: https://www.disneyplus.com/movies/encanto/33q7DY1rtHQH1. "The Family Madrigal"2. "Waiting On A Miracle"3. "Surface Pressure"4. "We Don't Talk About Bruno"5. "What Else Can I Do?"6. "Dos Oruguitas" / 10. "Two Oruguitas"7. "All of You"9. "Columbia, Mi Encanto"

The Man Cave Chronicles
Olivia Trujillo talks about her role as Alex in her new film 'BORREGO'

The Man Cave Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 11:54


Olivia Trujillo recently joined host Elias in the cave! Olivia Trujillo has quickly made a name for herself in the entertainment industry bringing diverse and dynamic characters to life on screen. Olivia can be seen starring in the independent thriller feature “Borrego,” opposite Lucy Hale and Nicholas Gonzalez. She also lend her voice to “Vivo,” Sony Pictures Animation's first-ever musical adventure featuring all-new original songs from Lin-Manuel Miranda, alongside Zoe Saldana, Michael Rooker, Nicole Byer, and Gloria Estefan. “Vivo” In television, Olivia exploded into our hearts and households with her breakout role in the critically acclaimed, Apple TV+ drama series “For All Mankind” as Aleida Rosales, an immigrant daughter raised by a single father after her mother's passing. Olivia has also made her mark in comedy, appearing on Comedy Central's “Drunk History” in 2019. You can watch this interview on YouTube - https://youtu.be/Uc2O3B-Il48 You can find Oliva on Instagram and Twitter Have a question? Email us  themccpodcast@gmail.com Follow us on Social Media for the latest show updates  www.twitter.com/themccpodcast www.instagram.com/themccpodcast www.facebook.com/themancavechroniclespodcast www.themccpodcast.com         

Now That’s Something Good Podcast

Meet our friend, Bryan Roach. Bryan is an incredibly talented musician, singer, songwriter, creative & friend. In this episode he shares his background story from musicals to a record deal to burnout and a 10 year music writing hiatus. This is a story of how many creatives struggle, those of us with perfectionist tendencies have to learn to let go, and the power of having safe allies with whom we can safely bounce our ideas. What is extraordinary about Bryan's story is the redemptive power of faith. Letting go of control, trusting God, and experiencing spiritual growth led to a restoration of things once thought lost. Sarah and Will played witness to and are champions of a revitalization in Bryan's creative life. That's something good!In November 2021, after a decade away from songwriting and recording, Bryan released a new album called The Matthew 6 Project. We are blessed to be part of his music writing hiatus coming to an end and even more excited to share the beginnings of the Matthew 6 Project. Stay tuned for next episode to hear more about the Matthew 6 Project. It is definitely something good!Discover more about our guests:http://matthew6project.com/All the links: https://linktr.ee/matthew6projectFavorite quotes from the episode:"I play the pong at a pretty high level."“[Winchester - the Shi Tzu] takes all the attention I used to get from my wife.”Sarah is “intimidating and unapproachable.”“The big thing for any new guitar player is learning bar chords.”“Seeing Hamilton without Lin Manuel Miranda is like seeing the Alanis Morissette musical without her in it.”“I've always been surrounded by incredible musicians.”“I could literally talk for hours how amazing [my wife Julie] is.”“An important component for a creative person is to have a peer to bounce something off of.”“Especially as a creator you need a safe place to share something that could potentially could be a bad idea.”“To this day I feel like I was put on this planet to make music.”“Everyone needs a Kim in their life.”Fun questions from the episode:Is a Golden Milk latte really a latte in the absence of espresso?What is your favorite musical?Do you think Bryan looks like Kevin Bacon?Have you ever had a challenge letting go of control?What song impacts your heart and soul in a deeply personal way? Share your thoughts: podcast@sarahgood.comNow That's Something Good Podcast by Sarah Good is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 4.0Show notes may contain affiliate links. This is at no extra cost to you but does help support telling more stories that bring more good. Now that is something good! Thank you for your kind support.

The West Wing Thing
In God We Trust w/Special Guest James Fritz

The West Wing Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 153:49


Comedian James Fritz joins Josh and Dave to talk about God, children, ice cream, and the awesome January 6 celebration, with a special appearance by West Wing superfan Lin-Manuel Miranda.  Plus, an interview with social epidemiologist Justin Feldman about his terrific piece on the Biden administration and Covid, which you can read here:  https://jmfeldman.medium.com/a-year-in-how-has-biden-done-on-pandemic-response-88452c696f2

Sexy Unique Podcast
TEASER: Holes & Moles

Sexy Unique Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 2:36


On this week's bonus episode, Lara and Carey chat about yearly check-ups, brewing, insurrection memorial day, Lin Manuel Miranda and get reader mail concerning chic cruises, fading out of friendships and more! You can hear the full episode on the SUP Patreon. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Operations
#throwback Imperfection is Commitment's Secret Weapon with Karen Borchert

Operations

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 43:02


It's that time of year when everyone is taking stock of what they accomplished (and didn't accomplish) last year, so we decided to bring back one of our earlier episodes all about setting goals.Luckily, self-proclaimed goals nerd Karen Borchert, formerly COO at Flywheel and current COO of ROKA, is here to help. In our conversation, we go deep on the goal-setting framework she used at Flywheel, the special quadrant she built to help you plot all of your goals, and if you stick around until the end, you'll get to hear about how Karen was inspired by Hamilton creator Lin-Manuel Miranda (seriously). Like this episode? Be sure to leave a ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ review and share the pod with your friends! You can connect with Sean on Twitter @Seany_Biz and @DriftPodcasts.

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2749 - Why The Democrats Still Don't Understand "Party Politics" w/ Adam Hilton

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 81:57


Sam hosts Adam Hilton, assistant professor of politics at Mount Holyoke College, to discuss his recent book True Blues: The Contentious Transformation of the Democratic Party, on how the party apparatus of the Democratic Party went from a three-majority monster in the midst of the 20th Century to a hollow shell of an organization. Professor Hilton begins by walking through where political parties came from, looking at them as creatures of political officials seeking to form a structure of internal coalition, while in contentious interaction with the social groups that make up their base, before they help contextualize where the Democratic Party was coming out of the New Deal. Adam and Sam walk through the coalition of Southern conservatives, big city Democratic machines, and Northern liberals that took hold of US politics for three decades after FDR's Presidency, exploring the Confederate-like arrangement that allowed states and localities autonomy over their agendas, and why this both bolstered the unity over those decades, while also ultimately undermining the Democratic association with growing movements for civil rights, with continued coalition with a segregationist south. Next, they dive into the four years from 1968-1972 that saw a complete deconstruction of the Democratic apparatus, starting with the '68 conventions election of Hubert Humphrey – against the public's engagement –  and shifting towards a New Politics ideology of good government reformation amidst a rejection of racial populism. Professor Hilton then dives into how organizations like the Coalition for a Democratic Majority put themself at the center of the party in the wake of George McGovern and New Politic's overwhelming loss to Nixon in '72, effectively working to completely deconstruct the party reformation, leaving behind solely a shell of an organization, largely relying on outside groups for their electoral efforts. Hilton and Sam also explore the major differences between the Democratic and Republican parties at this time, before diving into how we can see the DNC or other organizations work to rebuild the party's structure. Sam also gives some updates on Omicron and Education. And in the Fun Half: Sam reunites with Matt and Brandon as they take on Nate Silver's descent into a whole new realm of fear-mongering, Hannity and Meadows reflect on the true meaning of January 6th, and the crew reflects on their Omicron run-ins. Ron DeSantis debates the politicization of coup d'etats, and Brandon and Matt reflect on the legacy of the 1/6 narratives. Lin Manuel Miranda inspires a conversation on the relationship between talent and corniness, and Nathan from Chicago chats about WWE's exploitative practices. They also chat about the Democrats' desire to respect existential threats, plus, your calls and IMs! Purchase tickets for the live show in Boston on May 15th HERE: https://thewilbur.com/artist/majority-report/ Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com: https://fans.fm/majority/join Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here:  https://madmimi.com/signups/170390/join Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store: https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ Support the St. Vincent Nurses today! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/leftreckoning Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/literaryhangover Check out The Nomiki Show on YouTube. https://www.patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/mattbinder Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/ExpandTheDiscourse Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada. https://www.patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at https://www.twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere. https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere  Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop The Majority Report with Sam Seder - https://majorityreportradio.com/

Sitting Around Talking Movies
A New Leaf - "Cyrano" and "The Lost Daughter," "Tick, Tick, Boom," plust the "Harry Potter" reunion.

Sitting Around Talking Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 40:33


A new year is upon us, and if you've made the resolution to keep up with the latest movies this is the podcast for you! First we've got "Cyrano." It stars Peter Dinklage in the title role as a wordsmith, too self-conscious to woo Roxanne himself,so he helps young Christian nab her heart through love letters. And it's a musical! We all saw it so we'll tell you what we think. Then there's Maggie Gyllenhaal's directorial debut "The Lost Daughter" starring Oscar winner Olivia Colman as woman whose beach vacation takes a dark turn when she begins to confront the troubles of her past. Neil Rosen catches up with Guillermo DelToro's "Nightmare Alley" starring Bradley Cooper. Bill McCuddy and Bill Bregoli already saw it and now we get to hear what Neil Thinks. Neil also tells us what he thinks of "Tick, Tick, Boom" which stars Andrew Garfield and is directed by Lin-Manuel Miranda. Bill Bregoli tells us about the "Harry Potter 20th Anniversary: Return to Hogwarts" special in which cast members from all "Harry Potter" films reunite in a retrospective special to celebrate the anniversary of the first film, including interviews and cast conversations. Then we've got "The Times Square Killer." It's a Netflix true crime docuseries which tells how in1970s NYC, the "Torso Killer" preyed on women to fulfill his grotesque fantasies while eluding police. It's quite a way to start the new year - so listen in!

Rack Focus
tick tick... Boom! & In The Heights w/ Alice Brooks A.S.C

Rack Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 54:56


Alice Brooks, ASC is a cinematographer who has photographed award-winning feature films, television shows and commercials and her next feature project is Director Jon M. Chu's adaptation of the hit musical WICKED. Brooks has worked with Chu on several of her last projects. She recently photographed tick tick…BOOM! for Netflix and Imagine Entertainment, directed by Lin-Manuel Miranda and produced by Ron Howard. tick tick...BOOM! It Premiered at AFI Fest on Nov. 10, then debuts in theaters for a limited run before heading to Netflix. Her other recent work includes the 2021 summer release of Miranda's IN THE HEIGHTS for Warner Bros. also directed by Chu. The film's cinematography received widespread critical acclaim. Brooks also lensed HOME BEFORE DARK (pilot and season one) for Apple TV+, Paramount TV and Anonymous Content, produced by Dana Fox, Dara Resnik and Joy Gorman.

It's A Musical! Podcast
It's A Musical! Podcast Ep. 92 - Tick, Tick... BOOM!

It's A Musical! Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 117:52


They're singing Happy New Year, You just wanna lay down and cry! Not just another New Year, it's 2022! We're starting this year with a BOOM! Specifically, Tick, Tick… Boom! Join us as we discuss Lin-Manuel Miranda's directorial debut of Jonathan Larson's autobiographical show - with Andrew Garfield swinging in to lead! Will Danny Come To His Senses and finally get the appeal of a Larson musical? Or will he say No More and need Therapy to understand Why? This is the life, bo-bo, bo-bo-bo! Click on that link, bo-bo, bo-bo-bo!   Music: purple-planet.com

Present Company
More Like This: Lin-Manuel Miranda & Rob Marshall

Present Company

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 30:38


Welcome to the 2nd episode of the Present Company mini-series, More Like This. Today, we're at the School of Visual Arts Theater in New York City, about to hear from Lin-Manuel Miranda on his directorial debut, Tick, Tick...Boom. This conversation will be led by film and theater director, producer, and choreographer Rob Marshall, who has captured our hearts over the years with films such as Annie, Chicago, and Memories of a Geisha.  

Fácil de Complacer
Episodio 83 - The Matrix: Resurrections

Fácil de Complacer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 42:12


¡Feliz año nuevo! Esta semana Rafa, Diego y Thomas dan sus recomendaciones de la semana y analizan la película The Matrix: Resurrections. También cuentan con la participación especial de Óscar Solano como Quico, hablando de Encanto.00:00 Intro00:30 ¿Qué estás viendo? Diego: Encanto, And Just Like That…Thomas: Hawkeye.Rafa: Holidate.16:03 The Matrix: Resurrections (sin spoilers)20:33 The Matrix: Resurrections (full spoilers)40:21 Despedida *Música cortesía de Daemon Hatfield (Good Morning California)*Episodio editado por Rafa y @estebanvargasmixes.

You Know What I Like...?
Episode 68: Vivo

You Know What I Like...?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 37:21


There is a certain charm to being able to sit down with a children's movie, zone out, and have a cheerful lovely time. That's especially true when the film centres around...grief? Get some tissues for this one.This month we're talking about Vivo.Come and listen to us talk about defining characters as either annoying or endearing, the quality of media within media, and sticking monkeys in cages to watch them dance.Follow You Know What I Like...? on Twitter (@YKWILPodcast)Like You Know What I Like...? on FacebookMusic: http://www.purple-planet.comCover Art: Andrew Losq

All Of It
Director Lin-Manuel Miranda On 'Tick, Tick... Boom!'

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 27:28


[REBROADCAST FROM November 18, 2021] Lin-Manuel Miranda has made his directorial debut with the big screen adaptation of Jonathan Larsen's musical "Tick, Tick... Boom!" He joins us to discuss the film, which stars Andrew Garfield as Jon.

Flame ON!
Resurrections Of A Year Gone By

Flame ON!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 105:08


Is that a Pym tech arrow flying by or just a glitch in the Matrix? Don't let the revelations or the resurrections of the past year slow you down as you make your way to the ball drop and the change of the year to 2022! Whether your life has been Encanto-fied or you need a new perspective, it's a whole new year waiting for you today!So this is Christm... wait, no, we're past Christmas and ready for the ball to drop as the boys ring in 2022! The past year has both felt like its flown by AND been the longest three years ever, but that means that there is plenty of pop culture to dish about at our round table. Kicking the episode off is BeeJay's review of the new Disney animated film, Encanto! From its loveable characters (even the ones you don't talk about) to the melodious soundtrack by Lin Manuel Miranda to Alan Tudyk's role as a bird (because of course he's a bird), you'll find out what made this film so enchanting to our boys. From there the conversation turns to the digital when Erik changes his code and dives into The Wachowski's latest installment to The Matrix trilio... wait... there can't be four films in a trilogy... until NOW! The boys dish on The Matrix Resurrections and if it lives up to its predecessors, if it's worth the hype, and if the Catrix might have been a better fit. After that, Pat takes you to the planet Eternia for the Kevin Smith helmed continuation of Masters of the Universe: Revelations. Can a show where (spoiler alert!) He-Man is killed in the first episode live up to the expectations thrust upon it like the Sword of Power? Listen in to find out! After a brief pause for station identification, Bryan rounds out the month in pop culture with a deep dive into the world of Hawk Guy... nope, that can't be right. Oh, it's Hawkeye! Marvel TV is back with close out the year with another stellar outing and the boys are ready to see the resurrections of multiple characters from shows gone by (and maybe a reimagining that we didn't see coming!). To close out the show, the boys chat about their picks for some of the favorite pop culture items of 2021! It's been an amazing year and we thank you for being on this journey with us! Have a safe and happy new year everyone! Sit back and get ready to FLAME ON!Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/flameon. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Gayish Podcast
Gayish: 260 Champagne

Gayish Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 85:41


We cover the creation of champagne (hint: it's not Dom Pérignon), Mike's new favorite god, why champagne is associated with New Year's Eve, bottomless mimosas, champagne songs by mostly straight artists (incl. Taylor Swift, Nick Jonas, Drake, Lin Manuel Miranda, Jessica Hammond, Malia Civetz, Queer Rocket, and Amanda Lepore), the “gay” cava True Colours and their iffy LGBT support, and the champagne of beer. In this episode: News- 1:27 || Main Topic (Champagne)- 14:49 || Gayest & Straightest- 1:13:41 In the bonus Patreon segment, Fucking Dan shoots champagne up his ass. No, for realz. Get bonus audio and video at patreon.com/gayishpodcast.

All Of It
'Freestyle Love Supreme' On Broadway

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 19:02


[REBROADCAST FROM October 21, 2021] "Freestyle Love Supreme" returned with a star-studded Broadway premiere on October 19. We speak to Anthony Veneziale, who co-created the group with Lin Manuel Miranda, along with cast members Andrew Bancroft, Kaila Mullady and Aneesa Folds, about their return to Broadway and the FLS Academy.

RTÉ - Arena Podcast
Film highlights 2021

RTÉ - Arena Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 51:51


Seán Rocks revisits film interviews from the past year on Arena, includng Ruth Negga, Lin-Manuel Miranda, and Sparks, Ron and Russell Mael.

Present Company
Introducing: More Like This

Present Company

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 2:25


Krista gives a sneak peak of More Like This - a mini series that will be coming to Present Company January 3rd. These episodes will bring you exclusive conversations with the directors of three of Netflix's biggest films of 2021 -- The Power of The Dog, Tick, Tick...Boom, and The Lost Daughter. 

Screaming in the Cloud
Breaching the Coding Gates with Anil Dash

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 39:03


About AnilAnil Dash is the CEO of Glitch, the friendly developer community where coders collaborate to create and share millions of web apps. He is a recognized advocate for more ethical tech through his work as an entrepreneur and writer. He serves as a board member for organizations like the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the leading nonprofit defending digital privacy and expression, Data & Society Research Institute, which researches the cutting edge of tech's impact on society, and The Markup, the nonprofit investigative newsroom that pushes for tech accountability. Dash was an advisor to the Obama White House's Office of Digital Strategy, served for a decade on the board of Stack Overflow, the world's largest community for coders, and today advises key startups and non-profits including the Lower East Side Girls Club, Medium, The Human Utility, DonorsChoose and Project Include.As a writer and artist, Dash has been a contributing editor and monthly columnist for Wired, written for publications like The Atlantic and Businessweek, co-created one of the first implementations of the blockchain technology now known as NFTs, had his works exhibited in the New Museum of Contemporary Art, and collaborated with Hamilton creator Lin-Manuel Miranda on one of the most popular Spotify playlists of 2018. Dash has also been a keynote speaker and guest in a broad range of media ranging from the Obama Foundation Summit to SXSW to Desus and Mero's late-night show.Links: Glitch: https://glitch.com Web.dev: https://web.dev Glitch Twitter: https://twitter.com/glitch Anil Dash Twitter: https://twitter.com/anildash TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Today's guest is a little bit off the beaten path from the cloud infrastructure types I generally drag, kicking and screaming, onto the show. If we take a look at the ecosystem and where it's going, it's clear that in the future, not everyone who wants to build a business, or a tool, or even an application is going to necessarily spring fully-formed into the world from the forehead of some God, knowing how to code. And oh, “I'm going to go to a boot camp for four months to learn how to do it first,” is increasingly untenable. I don't know if you would call it low-code or not. But that's how it feels. My guest today is Anil Dash, CEO of Glitch. Anil, thank you for joining me.Anil: Thanks so much for having me.Corey: So, let's get the important stuff out of the way first, since I have a long-standing history of mispronouncing the company Twitch as ‘Twetch,' I should probably do the same thing here. So, what is Gletch? And what does it do?Anil: Glitch is, at its simplest, a tool that lets you build a full-stack app in your web browser in about 30 seconds. And, you know, for your community, your audience, it's also this ability to create and deploy code instantly on a full-stack server with no concern for deploy, or DevOps, or provisioning a container, or any of those sort of concerns. And what it is for the users is, honestly, a community. They're like, “I looked at this app that was on Glitch; I thought it was cool; I could do what we call [remixing 00:02:03].” Which is to kind of fork that app, a running app, make a couple edits, and all of a sudden live at a real URL on the web, my app is running with exactly what I built. And that's something that has been—I think, just captured a lot of people's imagination to now where they've built over 12 or 15 million apps on the platform.Corey: You describe it somewhat differently than I would, and given that I tend to assume that people who create and run successful businesses don't generally tend to do it without thought, I'm not quite, I guess, insufferable enough to figure out, “Oh, well, I thought about this for ten seconds, therefore I've solved a business problem that you have been needling at for years.” But when I look at Glitch, I would describe it as something different than the way that you describe it. I would call it a web-based IDE for low-code applications and whatnot, and you never talk about it that way. Everything I can see there describes it talks about friendly creators, and community tied to it. Why is that?Anil: You're not wrong from the conventional technologist's point of view. I—sufficient vintage; I was coding in Visual Basic back in the '90s and if you squint, you can see that influence on Glitch today. And so I don't reject that description, but part of it is about the audience we're speaking to, which is sort of a next generation of creators. And I think importantly, that's not just age, right, but that could be demographic, that can be just sort of culturally, wherever you're at. And what we look at is who's making the most interesting stuff on the internet and in the industry, and they tend to be grounded in broader culture, whether they're on, you know, Instagram, or TikTok, or, you know, whatever kind of influencer, you want to point at—YouTube.And those folks, they think of themselves as creators first and they think of themselves as participating in the community first and then the tool sort of follow. And I think one of the things that's really striking is, if you look at—we'll take YouTube as an example because everyone's pretty familiar with it—they have a YouTube Creator Studio. And it is a very rich and deep tool. It does more than, you know, you would have had iMovie, or Final Cut Pro doing, you know, 10 or 15 years ago, incredibly advanced stuff. And those [unintelligible 00:04:07] use it every day, but nobody goes to YouTube and says, “This is a cloud-based nonlinear editor for video production, and we target cinematographers.” And if they did, they would actually narrow their audience and they would limit what their impact is on the world.And so similarly, I think we look at that for Glitch where the social object, the central thing that people organize around a Glitch is an app, not code. And that's this really kind of deep and profound idea, which is that everybody can understand an app. Everybody has an idea for an app. You know, even the person who's, “Ah, I'm not technical,” or, “I'm not really into technology,” they're like, “But you know what? If I could make an app, I would make this.”And so we think a lot about that creative impulse. And the funny thing is, that is a common thread between somebody that literally just got on the internet for the first time and somebody who has been doing cloud deploys for as long as there's been a cloud to deploy to, or somebody has been coding for decades. No matter who you are, you have that place that is starting from what's the experience I want to build, the app I want to build? And so I think that's where there's that framing. But it's also been really useful, in that if you're trying to make a better IDE in the cloud and a better text editor, and there are multiple trillion-dollar companies that [laugh] are creating products in that category, I don't think you're going to win. On the other hand, if you say, “This is more fun, and cooler, and has a better design, and feels better,” I think we could absolutely win in a walk away compared to trillion-dollar companies trying to be cool.Corey: I think that this is an area that has a few players in it could definitely stand to benefit by having more there. My big fear is not that AWS is going to launch stuff in your space and drive you out of business; I think that is a somewhat naive approach. I'm more concerned that they're going to try to launch something in your space, give it a dumb name, fail that market and appropriately, not understand who it's for and set the entire idea back five years. That is, in some cases, it seems like their modus operandi for an awful lot of new markets.Anil: Yeah, I mean, that's not an uncommon problem in any category that's sort of community driven. So, you know, back in the day, I worked on building blogging tools at the beginning of this, sort of, social media era, and we worried about that a lot. We had built some of the first early tools, Movable Type, and TypePad, and these were what were used to launch, like, Gawker and Huffington Post and all the, sort of, big early sites. And we had been doing it a couple years—and then at that time, major player—AOL came in, and they launched their own AOL blog service, and we were, you know, quaking in our boots. I remember just being kind of like, pit in your stomach, “Oh, my gosh. This is going to devastate the category.”And as it turns out, people were smart, and they have taste, and they can tell. And the domain that we're in is not one that is about raw computing power or raw resources that you can bring to bear so much as it is about can you get people to connect together, collaborate together, and feel like they're in a place where they want to make something and they want to share it with other people? And I mean, we've never done a single bit of advertising for Glitch. There's never been any paid acquisition. There's never done any of those things. And we go up against, broadly in the space, people that have billboards and they buy out all the ads of the airport and, you know, all the other kind of things we see—Corey: And they do the typical enterprise thing where they spend untold millions in acquiring the real estate to advertise on, and then about 50 cents on the message, from the looks of it. It's, wow, you go to all this trouble and expense to get something in front of me, and after all of that to get my attention, you don't have anything interesting to say?Anil: Right.Corey: [crosstalk 00:07:40] inverse of that.Anil: [crosstalk 00:07:41] it doesn't work.Corey: Yeah. Oh, yeah. It's brand awareness. I love that game. Ugh.Anil: I was a CIO, and not once in my life did I ever make a purchasing decision based on who was sponsoring a golf tournament. It never happened, right? Like, I never made a call on a database platform because of a poster that was up at, you know, San Jose Airport. And so I think that's this thing that developers in particular, have really good BS filters, and you can sort of see through.Corey: What I have heard about the airport advertising space—and I but a humble cloud economist; I don't know if this is necessarily accurate or not—but if you have a company like Accenture, for example, that advertises on airport billboards, they don't even bother to list their website. If you go to their website, it turns out that there's no shopping cart function. I cannot add ‘one consulting' to my cart and make a purchase.Anil: “Ten pounds of consult, please.”Corey: Right? I feel like the primary purpose there might very well be that when someone presents to your board and says, “All right, we've had this conversation with Accenture.” The response is not, “Who?” It's a brand awareness play, on some level. That said, you say you don't do a bunch traditional advertising, but honestly, I feel like you advertise—more successfully—than I do at The Duckbill Group, just by virtue of having a personality running the company, in your case.Now, your platform is for the moment, slightly larger than mine, but that's okay,k I have ambition and a tenuous grasp of reality and I'm absolutely going to get there one of these days. But there is something to be said for someone who has a track record of doing interesting things and saying interesting things, pulling a, “This is what I do and this is how I do it.” It almost becomes a personality-led marketing effort to some degree, doesn't it?Anil: I'm a little mindful of that, right, where I think—so a little bit of context and history: Glitch as a company is actually 20 years old. The product is only a few years old, but we were formerly called Fog Creek Software, co-founded by Joel Spolsky who a lot of folks will know from back in the day as Joel on Software blog, was extremely influential. And that company, under leadership of Joel and his co-founder Michael Pryor spun out Stack Overflow, they spun out Trello. He had created, you know, countless products over the years so, like, their technical and business acumen is off the charts.And you know, I was on the board of Stack Overflow from, really, those first days and until just recently when they sold, and you know, you get this insight into not just how do you build a developer community that is incredibly valuable, but also has a place in the ecosystem that is unique and persists over time. And I think that's something that was very, very instructive. And so when it came in to lead Glitch I, we had already been a company with a, sort of, visible founder. Joel was as well known as a programmer as it got in the world?Corey: Oh, yes.Anil: And my public visibility is different, right? I, you know, I was a working coder for many years, but I don't think that's what people see me on social media has. And so I think, I've been very mindful where, like, I'm thrilled to use the platform I have to amplify what was created on a Glitch. But what I note is it's always, “This person made this thing. This person made this app and it had this impact, and it got these results, or made this difference for them.”And that's such a different thing than—I don't ever talk about, “We added syntax highlighting in the IDE and the editor in the browser.” It's just never it right. And I think there are people that—I love that work. I mean, I love having that conversation with our team, but I think that's sort of the difference is my enthusiasm is, like, people are making stuff and it's cool. And that sort of is my lens on the whole world.You know, somebody makes whatever a great song, a great film, like, these are all things that are exciting. And the Glitch community's creations sort of feel that way. And also, we have other visible people on the team. I think of our sort of Head of Community, Jenn Schiffer, who's a very well known developer and her right. And you know, tons of people have read her writing and seen her talks over the years.And she and I talk about this stuff; I think she sort of feels the same way, which is, she's like, “If I were, you know, being hired by some cloud platform to show the latest primitives that they've deployed behind an API,” she's like, “I'd be miserable. Like, I don't want to do that in the world.” And I sort of feel the same way. But if you say, “This person who never imagined they would make an app that would have this kind of impact.” And they're going to, I think of just, like, the last couple of weeks, some of the apps we've seen where people are—it could be [unintelligible 00:11:53]. It could be like, “We made a Slack bot that finally gets this reporting into the right channel [laugh] inside our company, but it was easy enough that I could do it myself without asking somebody to create it even though I'm not technically an engineer.” Like, that's incredible.The other extreme, we have people that are PhDs working on machine learning that are like, “At the end of the day, I don't want to be responsible for managing and deploying. [laugh]. I go home, and so the fact that I can do this in create is really great.” I think that energy, I mean, I feel the same way. I still build stuff all the time, and I think that's something where, like, you can't fake that and also, it's bigger than any one person or one public persona or social media profile, or whatever. I think there's this bigger idea. And I mean, to that point, there are millions of developers on Glitch and they've created well over ten million apps. I am not a humble person, but very clearly, that's not me, you know? [laugh].Corey: I have the same challenge to it's, effectively, I have now a 12 employee company and about that again contractors for various specialized functions, and the common perception, I think, is that mostly I do all the stuff that we talk about in public, and the other 11 folks sort of sit around and clap as I do it. Yeah, that is only four of those people's jobs as it turns out. There are more people doing work here. It's challenging, on some level, to get away from the myth of the founder who is the person who has the grand vision and does all the work and sees all these things.Anil: This industry loves the myth of the great man, or the solo legend, or the person in their bedroom is a genius, the lone genius, and it's a lie. It's a lie every time. And I think one of the things that we can do, especially in the work at Glitch, but I think just in my work overall with my whole career is to dismantle that myth. I think that would be incredibly valuable. It just would do a service for everybody.But I mean, that's why Glitch is the way it is. It's a collaboration platform. Our reference points are, you know, we look at Visual Studio and what have you, but we also look at Google Docs. Why is it that people love to just send a link to somebody and say, “Let's edit this thing together and knock out a, you know, a memo together or whatever.” I think that idea we're going to collaborate together, you know, we saw that—like, I think of Figma, which is a tool that I love. You know, I knew Dylan when he was a teenager and watching him build that company has been so inspiring, not least because design was always supposed to be collaborative.And then you think about we're all collaborating together in design every day. We're all collaborating together and writing in Google Docs—or whatever we use—every day. And then coding is still this kind of single-player game. Maybe at best, you throw something over the wall with a pull request, but for the most part, it doesn't feel like you're in there with somebody. Certainly doesn't feel like you're creating together in the same way that when you're jamming on these other creative tools does. And so I think that's what's been liberating for a lot of people is to feel like it's nice to have company when you're making something.Corey: Periodically, I'll talk to people in the AWS ecosystem who for some reason appear to believe that Jeff Barr builds a lot of these services himself then writes blog posts about them. And it's, Amazon does not break out how many of its 1.2 million or so employees work at AWS, but I'm guessing it's more than five people. So yeah, Jeff probably only wrote a dozen of those services himself; the rest are—Anil: That's right. Yeah.Corey: —done by service teams and the rest. It's easy to condense this stuff and I'm as guilty of it as anyone. To my mind, a big company is one that has 200 people in it. That is not apparently something the world agrees with.Anil: Yeah, it's impossible to fathom an organization of hundreds of thousands or a million-plus people, right? Like, our brains just aren't wired to do it. And I think so we reduce things to any given Jeff, whether that's Barr or Bezos, whoever you want to point to.Corey: At one point, I think they had something like more men named Jeff on their board than they did women, which—Anil: Yeah. Mm-hm.Corey: —all right, cool. They've fixed that and now they have a Dave problem.Anil: Yeah [unintelligible 00:15:37] say that my entire career has been trying to weave out of that dynamic, whether it was a Dave, a Mike, or a Jeff. But I think that broader sort of challenge is this—that is related to the idea of there being this lone genius. And I think if we can sort of say, well, creation always happens in community. It always happens influenced by other things. It is always—I mean, this is why we talk about it in Glitch.When you make an app, you don't start from a blank slate, you start from a working app that's already on the platform and you're remix it. And there was a little bit of a ego resistance by some devs years ago when they first encountered that because [unintelligible 00:16:14] like, “No, no, no, I need a blank page, you know, because I have this brilliant idea that nobody's ever thought of before.” And I'm like, “You know, the odds are you'll probably start from something pretty close to something that's built before.” And that enabler of, “There's nothing new under the sun, and you're probably remixing somebody else's thoughts,” I think that sort of changed the tenor of the community. And I think that's something where like, I just see that across the industry.When people are open, collaborative, like even today, a great example is web browsers. The folks making web browsers at Google, Apple, Mozilla are pretty collaborative. They actually do share ideas together. I mean, I get a window into that because they actually all use Glitch to do test cases on different bugs and stuff for them, but you see, one Glitch project will add in folks from Mozilla and folks from Apple and folks from the Chrome team and Google, and they're like working together and you're, like—you kind of let down the pretense of there being this secret genius that's only in this one organization, this one group of people, and you're able to make something great, and the web is greater than all of them. And the proof, you know, for us is that Glitch is not a new idea. Heroku wanted to do what we're doing, you know, a dozen years ago.Corey: Yeah, everyone wants to build Heroku except the company that acquired Heroku, and here we are. And now it's—I was waiting for the next step and it just seemed like it never happened.Anil: But you know when I talked to those folks, they were like, “Well, we didn't have Docker, and we didn't have containerization, and on the client side, we didn't have modern browsers that could do this kind of editing experience, all this kind of thing.” So, they let their editor go by the wayside and became mostly deploy platform. And—but people forget, for the first year or two Heroku had an in-browser editor, and an IDE and, you know, was constrained by the tech at the time. And I think that's something where I'm like, we look at that history, we look at, also, like I said, these browser manufacturers working together were able to get us to a point where we can make something better.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: I do have a question for you about the nuts and bolts behind the scenes of Glitch and how it works. If I want to remix something on Glitch, I click the button, a couple seconds later it's there and ready for me to start kicking the tires on, which tells me a few things. One, it is certainly not using CloudFormation to provision it because I didn't have time to go and grab a quick snack and take a six hour nap. So, it apparently is running on computers somewhere. I have it on good authority that this is not just run by people who are very fast at assembling packets by hand. What does the infrastructure look like?Anil: It's on AWS. Our first year-plus of prototyping while we were sort of in beta and early stages of Glitch was getting that time to remix to be acceptable. We still wish it were faster; I mean, that's always the way but, you know, when we started, it was like, yeah, you did sit there for a minute and watch your cursor spin. I mean, what's happening behind the scenes, we're provisioning a new container, standing up a full stack, bringing over the code from the Git repo on the previous project, like, we're doing a lot of work, lift behind the scenes, and we went through every possible permutation of what could make that experience be good enough. So, when we start talking about prototyping, we're at five-plus, almost six years ago when we started building the early versions of what became Glitch, and at that time, we were fairly far along in maturity with Docker, but there was not a clear answer about the use case that we're building for.So, we experimented with Docker Swarm. We went pretty far down that road; we spent a good bit of time there, it failed in ways that were both painful and slow to fix. So, that was great. I don't recommend that. In fairness, we have a very unusual use case, right? So, Glitch now, if you talk about ten million containers on Glitch, no two of those apps are the same and nobody builds an orchestration infrastructure assuming that every single machine is a unique snowflake.Corey: Yeah, massively multi-tenant is not really a thing that people know.Anil: No. And also from a security posture Glitch—if you look at it as a security expert—it is a platform allowing anonymous users to execute arbitrary code at scale. That's what we do. That's our job. And so [laugh], you know, so your threat model is very different. It's very different.I mean, literally, like, you can go to Glitch and build an app, running a full-stack app, without even logging in. And the reason we enable that is because we see kids in classrooms, they're learning to code for the first time, they want to be able to remix a project and they don't even have an email address. And so that was about enabling something different, right? And then, similarly, you know, we explored Kubernetes—because of course you do; it's the default choice here—and some of the optimizations, again, if you go back several years ago, being able to suspend a project and then quickly sort of rehydrate it off disk into a running app was not a common use case, and so it was not optimized. And so we couldn't offer that experience because what we do with Glitch is, if you haven't used an app in five minutes, and you're not a paid member, who put that app to sleep. And that's just a reasonable—Corey: Uh, “Put the app to sleep,” as in toddler, or, “Put the app to sleep,” as an ill puppy.Anil: [laugh]. Hopefully, the former, but when we were at our worst and scaling the ladder. But that is that thing; it's like we had that moment that everybody does, which is that, “Oh, no. This worked.” That was a really scary moment where we started seeing app creation ramping up, and number of edits that people were making in those apps, you know, ramping up, which meant deploys for us ramping up because we automatically deploy as you edit on Glitch. And so, you know, we had that moment where just—well, as a startup, you always hope things go up into the right, and then they do and then you're not sleeping for a long time. And we've been able to get it back under control.Corey: Like, “Oh, no, I'm not succeeding.” Followed immediately by, “Oh, no, I'm succeeding.” And it's a good problem to have.Anil: Exactly. Right, right, right. The only thing worse than failing is succeeding sometimes, in terms of stress levels. And organizationally, you go through so much; technically, you go through so much. You know, we were very fortunate to have such thoughtful technical staff to navigate these things.But it was not obvious, and it was not a sort of this is what you do off the shelf. And our architecture was very different because people had looked at—like, I look at one of our inspirations was CodePen, which is a great platform and the community love them. And their front end developers are, you know, always showing off, “Here's this cool CSS thing I figured out, and it's there.” But for the most part, they're publishing static content, so architecturally, they look almost more like a content management system than an app-running platform. And so we couldn't learn anything from them about our scaling our architecture.We could learn from them on community, and they've been an inspiration there, but I think that's been very, very different. And then, conversely, if we looked at the Herokus of the world, or all those sort of easy deploy, I think Amazon has half a dozen different, like, “This will be easier,” kind of deploy tools. And we looked at those, and they were code-centric not app-centric. And that led to fundamentally different assumptions in user experience and optimization.And so, you know, we had to chart our own path and I think it was really only the last year or so that we were able to sort of turn the corner and have high degree of confidence about, we know what people build on Glitch and we know how to support and scale it. And that unlocked this, sort of, wave of creativity where there are things that people want to create on the internet but it had become too hard to do so. And the canonical example I think I was—those of us are old enough to remember FTPing up a website—Corey: Oh, yes.Anil: —right—to Geocities, or whatever your shared web host was, we remember how easy that was and how much creativity was enabled by that.Corey: Yes, “How easy it was,” quote-unquote, for those of us who spent years trying to figure out passive versus active versus ‘what is going on?' As far as FTP transfers. And it turns out that we found ways to solve for that, mostly, but it became something a bit different and a bit weird. But here we are.Anil: Yeah, there was definitely an adjustment period, but at some point, if you'd made an HTML page in notepad on your computer, and you could, you know, hurl it at a server somewhere, it would kind of run. And when you realize, you look at the coding boot camps, or even just to, like, teach kids to code efforts, and they're like, “Day three. Now, you've gotten VS Code and GitHub configured. We can start to make something.” And you're like, “The whole magic of this thing getting it to light up. You put it in your web browser, you're like, ‘That's me. I made this.'” you know, north star for us was almost, like, you go from zero to hello world in a minute. That's huge.Corey: I started participating one of those boot camps a while back to help. Like, the first thing I changed about the curriculum was, “Yeah, we're not spending time teaching people how to use VI in, at that point, the 2010s.” It was, that was a fun bit of hazing for those of us who were becoming Unix admins and knew that wherever we'd go, we'd find VI on a server, but here in the real world, there are better options for that.Anil: This is rank cruelty.Corey: Yeah, I mean, I still use it because 20 years of muscle memory doesn't go away overnight, but I don't inflict that on others.Anil: Yeah. Well, we saw the contrast. Like, we worked with, there's a group called Mouse here in New York City that creates the computer science curriculum for the public schools in the City of New York. And there's a million kids in public school in New York City, right, and they all go through at least some of this CS education. [unintelligible 00:24:49] saw a lot of work, a lot of folks in the tech community here did. It was fantastic.And yet they were still doing this sort of very conceptual, theoretical. Here's how a professional developer would set up their environment. Quote-unquote, “Professional.” And I'm like, you know what really sparks kids' interests? If you tell them, “You can make a page and it'll be live and you can send it to your friend. And you can do it right now.”And once you've sparked that creative impulse, you can't stop them from doing the rest. And I think what was wild was kids followed down that path. Some of the more advanced kids got to high school and realized they want to experiment with, like, AI and ML, right? And they started playing with TensorFlow. And, you know, there's collaboration features in Glitch where you can do real-time editing and a code with this. And they went in the forum and they were asking questions, that kind of stuff. And the people answering their questions were the TensorFlow team at Google. [laugh]. Right?Corey: I remember those days back when everything seemed smaller and more compact, [unintelligible 00:25:42] but almost felt like a balkanization of community—Anil: Yeah.Corey: —where now it's oh, have you joined that Slack team, and I'm looking at this and my machine is screaming for more RAM. It's, like, well, it has 128 gigs in it. Shouldn't that be enough? Not for Slack.Anil: Not for chat. No, no, no. Chat is demanding.Corey: Oh, yeah, that and Chrome are basically trying to out-ram each other. But if you remember the days of volunteering as network staff on Freenode when you could basically gather everyone for a given project in the entire stack on the same IRC network. And that doesn't happen anymore.Anil: And there's something magic about that, right? It's like now the conversations are closed off in a Slack or Discord or what have you, but to have a sort of open forum where people can talk about this stuff, what's wild about that is, for a beginner, a teenage creator who's learning this stuff, the idea that the people who made the AI, I can talk to, they're alive still, you know what I mean? Like, yeah, they're not even that old. But [laugh]. They think of this is something that's been carved in stone for 100 years.And so it's so inspiring to them. And then conversely, talking to the TensorFlow team, they made these JavaScript examples, like, tensorflow.js was so accessible, you know? And they're like, “This is the most heartwarming thing. Like, we think about all these enterprise use cases or whatever. But like, kids wanting to make stuff, like recognize their friends' photo, and all the vision stuff they're doing around [unintelligible 00:26:54] out there,” like, “We didn't know this is why we do it until we saw this is why we do it.”And that part about connecting the creative impulse from both, like, the most experienced, advanced coders at the most august tech companies that exist, as well as the most rank beginners in public schools, who might not even have a computer at home, saying that's there—if you put those two things together, and both of those are saying, “I'm a coder; I'm able to create; I can make something on the internet, and I can share it with somebody and be inspired by it,” like, that is… that's as good as it gets.Corey: There's something magic in being able to reach out to people who built this stuff. And honestly—you shouldn't feel this way, but you do—when I was talking to the folks who wrote the things I was working on, it really inspires you to ask better questions. Like when I'm talking to Dr. Venema, the author of Postfix and I'm trying to figure out how this thing works, well, I know for a fact that I will not be smarter than he is at basically anything in that entire universe, and maybe most beyond that, as well, however, I still want to ask a question in such a way that doesn't make me sound like a colossal dumbass. So, it really inspires you—Anil: It motivates you.Corey: Oh, yeah. It inspires you to raise your question bar up a bit, of, “I am trying to do x. I expect y to happen. Instead, z is happening as opposed to what I find the documentation that”—oh, as I read the documentation, discover exactly what I messed up, and then I delete the whole email. It's amazing how many of those things you never send because when constructing a question the right way, you can help yourself.Anil: Rubber ducking against your heroes.Corey: Exactly.Anil: I mean, early in my career, I'd gone through sort of licensing mishap on a project that later became open-source, and sort of stepped it in and as you do, and unprompted, I got an advice email from Dan Bricklin, who invented the spreadsheet, he invented VisiCalc, and he had advice and he was right. And it was… it was unreal. I was like, this guy's one of my heroes. I grew up reading about his work, and not only is he, like, a living, breathing person, he's somebody that can have the kindness to reach out and say, “Yeah, you know, have you tried this? This might work.”And it's, this isn't, like, a guy who made an app. This is the guy who made the app for which the phrase killer app was invented, right? And, you know, we've since become friends and I think a lot of his inspiration and his work. And I think it's one of the things it's like, again, if you tell somebody starting out, the people who invented the fundamental tools of the digital era, are still active, still building stuff, still have advice to share, and you can connect with them, it feels like a cheat code. It feels like a superpower, right? It feels like this impossible thing.And I think about like, even for me, the early days of the web, view source, which is still buried in our browser somewhere. And you can see the code that makes the page, it felt like getting away with something. “You mean, I can just look under the hood and see how they made this page and then I can do it too?” I think we forget how radical that is—[unintelligible 00:29:48] radical open-source in general is—and you see it when, like, you talk to young creators. I think—you know, I mean, Glitch obviously is used every day by, like, people at Microsoft and Google and the New York Timesor whatever, like, you know, the most down-the-road, enterprise developers, but I think a lot about the new creators and the people who are learning, and what they tell me a lot is the, like, “Oh, so I made this app, but what do I have to do to put it on the internet?”I'm like, “It already is.” Like, as soon as you create it, that URL was live, it all works. And their, like, “But isn't there, like, an app store I have to ask? Isn't there somebody I have to get permission to publish this from? Doesn't somebody have to approve it?”And you realize they've grown up with whether it was the app stores on their phones, or the cartridges in their Nintendo or, you know, whatever it was, they had always had this constraint on technology. It wasn't something you make; it's something that is given to you, you know, handed down from on high. And I think that's the part that animates me and the whole team, the community, is this idea of, like, I geek out about our infrastructure. I love that we're doing deploys constantly, so fast, all the time, and I love that we've taken the complexity away, but the end of the day, the reason why we do it, is you can have somebody just sort of saying, I didn't realize there was a place I could just make something put it in front of, maybe, millions of people all over the world and I don't have to ask anybody permission and my idea can matter as much as the thing that's made by the trillion-dollar company.Corey: It's really neat to see, I guess, the sense of spirit and soul that arises from a smaller, more, shall we say, soulful company. No disparagement meant toward my friends at AWS and other places. It's just, there's something that you lose when you get to a certain point of scale. Like, I don't ever have to have a meeting internally and discuss things, like, “Well, does this thing that we're toying with doing violate antitrust law?” That is never been on my roadmap of things I have to even give the slightest crap about.Anil: Right, right? You know, “What does the investor relations person at a retirement fund think about the feature that we shipped?” Is not a question that we have to answer. There's this joy in also having community that sort of has come along with us, right? So, we talk a lot internally about, like, how do we make sure Glitch stays weird? And, you know, the community sort of supports that.Like, there's no reason logically that our logo should be the emoji of two fish. But that kind of stuff of just, like, it just is. We don't question it anymore. I think that we're very lucky. But also that we are part of an ecosystem. I also am very grateful where, like… yeah, that folks at Google use Glitch as part of their daily work when they're explaining a new feature in Chrome.Like, if you go to web.dev and their dev portal teaches devs how to code, all the embedded examples go to these Glitch apps that are running, showing running code is incredible. When we see the Stripe team building examples of, like, “Do you want to use this new payment API that we made? Well, we have a Glitch for you.” And literally every day, they ship one that sort of goes and says, “Well, if you just want to use this new Stripe feature, you just remix this thing and it's instantly running on Glitch.”I mean, those things are incredible. So like, I'm very grateful that the biggest companies and most influential companies in the industry have embraced it. So, I don't—yeah, I don't disparage them at all, but I think that ability to connect to the person who'd be like, “I just want to do payments. I've never heard of Stripe.”Corey: Oh yeah.Anil: And we have this every day. They come into Glitch, and they're just like, I just wanted to take credit cards. I didn't know there's a tool to do that.Corey: “I was going to build it myself,” and everyone shrieks, “No, no. Don't do that. My God.” Yeah. Use one of their competitors, fine,k but building it yourself is something a lunatic would do.Anil: Exactly. Right, right. And I think we forget that there's only so much attention people can pay, there's only so much knowledge they have.Corey: Everything we say is new to someone. That's why I always go back to assuming no one's ever heard of me, and explain the basics of what I do and how I do it, periodically. It's, no one has done all the mandatory reading. Who knew?Anil: And it's such a healthy exercise to, right, because I think we always have that kind of beginner's mindset about what Glitch is. And in fairness, I understand why. Like, there have been very experienced developers that have said, “Well, Glitch looks too colorful. It looks like a toy.” And that we made a very intentional choice at masking—like, we're doing the work under the hood.And you can drop down into a terminal and you can do—you can run whatever build script you want. You can do all that stuff on Glitch, but that's not what we put up front and I think that's this philosophy about the role of the technology versus the people in the ecosystem.Corey: I want to thank you for taking so much time out of your day to, I guess, explain what Glitch is and how you view it. If people want to learn more about it, about your opinions, et cetera. Where can they find you?Anil: Sure. glitch.com is easiest place, and hopefully that's a something you can go and a minute later, you'll have a new app that you built that you want to share. And, you know, we're pretty active on all social media, you know, Twitter especially with Glitch: @glitch. I'm on as @anildash.And one of the things I love is I get to talk to folks like you and learn from the community, and as often as not, that's where most of the inspiration comes from is just sort of being out in all the various channels, talking to people. It's wild to be 20-plus years into this and still never get tired of that.Corey: It's why I love this podcast. Every time I talk to someone, I learn something new. It's hard to remain too ignorant after you have enough people who've shared wisdom with you as long as you can retain it.Anil: That's right.Corey: Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me.Anil: So, glad to be here.Corey: Anil Dash, CEO of Gletch—or Glitch as he insists on calling it. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment telling me how your small team at AWS is going to crush Glitch into the dirt just as soon as they find a name that's dumb enough for the service.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

New Books in History
Andrew Roberts, "The Last King of America: The Misunderstood Reign of George III" (Viking, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 36:16


Most Americans dismiss George III as a buffoon--a heartless and terrible monarch with few, if any, redeeming qualities. The best-known modern interpretation of him is Jonathan Groff's preening, spitting, and pompous take in Lin-Manuel Miranda's mauvais ton, Broadway show. But this deeply unflattering and ahistorical characterization is rooted in the prejudiced and brilliantly persuasive opinions of eighteenth-century revolutionaries like Thomas Paine and Thomas Jefferson, who needed to make the king appear evil in order to achieve their own political aims. After combing through hundreds of thousands of pages of never-before-published correspondence, award-winning master historian Andrew Roberts has uncovered the truth: George III was in fact a wise, humane, and even enlightened monarch who was beset by talented enemies, debilitating mental illness, incompetent ministers, and disastrous luck.  In The Last King of America: The Misunderstood Reign of George III (Viking, 2021), Roberts paints a deft and nuanced portrait of the much-maligned monarch and outlines his accomplishments, which have been almost universally forgotten. Two hundred and forty-five years after the end of George III's American rule, it is time for Americans to look back on their last king with greater understanding: to see him as he was and to come to terms with the last time they were ruled by a monarch. A truly splendid book, for both the academic and the lay educated reader. The perfect holiday book for someone who loves the historical art. Charles Coutinho Ph. D. of the Royal Historical Society, received his doctorate from New York University. His area of specialization is 19th and 20th-century European, American diplomatic and political history. He has written for Chatham House's International Affairs, the Institute of Historical Research's Reviews in History and the University of Rouen's online periodical Cercles. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Andrew Roberts, "The Last King of America: The Misunderstood Reign of George III" (Viking, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 36:16


Most Americans dismiss George III as a buffoon--a heartless and terrible monarch with few, if any, redeeming qualities. The best-known modern interpretation of him is Jonathan Groff's preening, spitting, and pompous take in Lin-Manuel Miranda's mauvais ton, Broadway show. But this deeply unflattering and ahistorical characterization is rooted in the prejudiced and brilliantly persuasive opinions of eighteenth-century revolutionaries like Thomas Paine and Thomas Jefferson, who needed to make the king appear evil in order to achieve their own political aims. After combing through hundreds of thousands of pages of never-before-published correspondence, award-winning master historian Andrew Roberts has uncovered the truth: George III was in fact a wise, humane, and even enlightened monarch who was beset by talented enemies, debilitating mental illness, incompetent ministers, and disastrous luck.  In The Last King of America: The Misunderstood Reign of George III (Viking, 2021), Roberts paints a deft and nuanced portrait of the much-maligned monarch and outlines his accomplishments, which have been almost universally forgotten. Two hundred and forty-five years after the end of George III's American rule, it is time for Americans to look back on their last king with greater understanding: to see him as he was and to come to terms with the last time they were ruled by a monarch. A truly splendid book, for both the academic and the lay educated reader. The perfect holiday book for someone who loves the historical art. Charles Coutinho Ph. D. of the Royal Historical Society, received his doctorate from New York University. His area of specialization is 19th and 20th-century European, American diplomatic and political history. He has written for Chatham House's International Affairs, the Institute of Historical Research's Reviews in History and the University of Rouen's online periodical Cercles. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in American Studies
Andrew Roberts, "The Last King of America: The Misunderstood Reign of George III" (Viking, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 36:16


Most Americans dismiss George III as a buffoon--a heartless and terrible monarch with few, if any, redeeming qualities. The best-known modern interpretation of him is Jonathan Groff's preening, spitting, and pompous take in Lin-Manuel Miranda's mauvais ton, Broadway show. But this deeply unflattering and ahistorical characterization is rooted in the prejudiced and brilliantly persuasive opinions of eighteenth-century revolutionaries like Thomas Paine and Thomas Jefferson, who needed to make the king appear evil in order to achieve their own political aims. After combing through hundreds of thousands of pages of never-before-published correspondence, award-winning master historian Andrew Roberts has uncovered the truth: George III was in fact a wise, humane, and even enlightened monarch who was beset by talented enemies, debilitating mental illness, incompetent ministers, and disastrous luck.  In The Last King of America: The Misunderstood Reign of George III (Viking, 2021), Roberts paints a deft and nuanced portrait of the much-maligned monarch and outlines his accomplishments, which have been almost universally forgotten. Two hundred and forty-five years after the end of George III's American rule, it is time for Americans to look back on their last king with greater understanding: to see him as he was and to come to terms with the last time they were ruled by a monarch. A truly splendid book, for both the academic and the lay educated reader. The perfect holiday book for someone who loves the historical art. Charles Coutinho Ph. D. of the Royal Historical Society, received his doctorate from New York University. His area of specialization is 19th and 20th-century European, American diplomatic and political history. He has written for Chatham House's International Affairs, the Institute of Historical Research's Reviews in History and the University of Rouen's online periodical Cercles. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in Biography
Andrew Roberts, "The Last King of America: The Misunderstood Reign of George III" (Viking, 2021)

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 36:16


Most Americans dismiss George III as a buffoon--a heartless and terrible monarch with few, if any, redeeming qualities. The best-known modern interpretation of him is Jonathan Groff's preening, spitting, and pompous take in Lin-Manuel Miranda's mauvais ton, Broadway show. But this deeply unflattering and ahistorical characterization is rooted in the prejudiced and brilliantly persuasive opinions of eighteenth-century revolutionaries like Thomas Paine and Thomas Jefferson, who needed to make the king appear evil in order to achieve their own political aims. After combing through hundreds of thousands of pages of never-before-published correspondence, award-winning master historian Andrew Roberts has uncovered the truth: George III was in fact a wise, humane, and even enlightened monarch who was beset by talented enemies, debilitating mental illness, incompetent ministers, and disastrous luck.  In The Last King of America: The Misunderstood Reign of George III (Viking, 2021), Roberts paints a deft and nuanced portrait of the much-maligned monarch and outlines his accomplishments, which have been almost universally forgotten. Two hundred and forty-five years after the end of George III's American rule, it is time for Americans to look back on their last king with greater understanding: to see him as he was and to come to terms with the last time they were ruled by a monarch. A truly splendid book, for both the academic and the lay educated reader. The perfect holiday book for someone who loves the historical art. Charles Coutinho Ph. D. of the Royal Historical Society, received his doctorate from New York University. His area of specialization is 19th and 20th-century European, American diplomatic and political history. He has written for Chatham House's International Affairs, the Institute of Historical Research's Reviews in History and the University of Rouen's online periodical Cercles. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

PopCultX
El Año Pasado (AKA The Continued Dominance of Lin-Manuel Miranda)

PopCultX

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 52:08


Welcome to Episode 38 and congrats! We made it! The end of 2021!   In this episode, "El Año Pasado (AKA The Continued Dominance of Lin-Manuel Miranda)" we talk about Encanto, Venom 2, Spider-Man: No Way Home, Hawkeye, And Just Like That.   More importantly we discuss what we are looking forward to in 2022 or as Gabe would say Two Thousand Twenty-Two. We also reflect on what pop culture and our very own podcast has taught us this past year!  Thanks for being apart of our journey and we look forward to bringing you many more exciting episodes in the New Year! Cheers! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/popcultx/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/popcultx/support

Richard Skipper Celebrates
Richard Skipper Celebrates On Broadway with Oren Jacoby (12/27/2021)

Richard Skipper Celebrates

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 66:00


For Video Edition, Please Click and Subscribe Here: https://youtu.be/S-6IjfeeFsI Dear Richard, It was so much fun being on your show. Thank you for your wonderful questions, an engaging conversation, and your illuminating take on the film, ON BROADWAY! I can tell you have a deep love and understanding for live theater and appreciate you highlighting for your viewers, at this crucial moment in history, how much we all need to support the arts --especially live performance. Oren Jacoby,  www.storyville.org ON BROADWAY An all-star cast tells the inside story of the Broadway theater, and how it came back from the brink thanks to innovative work, a new attention to inclusion and a sometimes uneasy balance of art and commerce. Key players--Helen Mirren, Christine Baranski, August Wilson, James Corden, Alec Baldwin, John Lithgow, Viola Davis, Hugh Jackman and Ian McKellen--take us behind the scenes of Broadway's most groundbreaking shows, from A Chorus Line to Hamilton. The film includes performances by Lin Manuel Miranda, Patti Lupone, Bernadette Peters, James Earl Jones and Mandy Patinkin. This 85-minute documentary is a hurly burly ride through Times Square, once again the main street of American show business. Oren Jacoby is an Oscar-nominated filmmaker, writer and founder of Storyville Films. His film On Broadway will be released in 2020. He has produced and directed over 30 films including: Sister Rose's Passion, Best Documentary Short Film at the Tribeca Film Festival and nominated for an Academy Award; Shadowman premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival and was runner up for the audience award. https://www.docnyc.net/film/on-broadway/

BroadwayRadio
BroadwayRadio Special, December 28, 2021: “tick, tick…BOOM!” Review

BroadwayRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 32:49


In a special episode of BroadwayRadio, Ashley and Grace discuss the Netflix adaptation of Jonathan Larson's “tick, tick…BOOM!,” directed by Lin-Manuel Miranda and starring Andrew Garfield, Alexandra Shipp, Robin de Jesus, Vanessa Hudgens, Joshua Henry, and more. Any and all feedback is appreciated: Ashley Steves ashley@broadwayradio.com | @NoThisIsAshleyGrace Aki grace@broadwayradio.com read more The post BroadwayRadio Special, December 28, 2021: “tick, tick…BOOM!” Review appeared first on BroadwayRadio.

42e Rue
Hommage à Jane Powell ; Lin-Manuel Miranda parle de « Tick Tick… Boom »

42e Rue

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 58:19


durée : 00:58:19 - Jane Powell, la copine d'à côté de la comédie musicale hollywoodienne - par : Laurent Valière - Jane Powell fut l'une des enfants stars de la MGM. Dès 15 ans, elle est embauchée et sera cantonnée à des rôles de gentille petite adolescente. Seule exception : Mariage Royal avec Fred Astaire. Elle a disparu en septembre dernier. - réalisé par : Gilles Blanchard

Reel Perspective
Episode 66: tick, tick... BOOM!

Reel Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 106:32


This week, Missy and MJ are joined by Jordan Fulmer for a lengthy discussion about Lin-Manuel Miranda's directorial debut starring Andrew Garfield, tick, tick... BOOM!

Dermot & Dave
Dermot & Dave's Best Of Big Guests Podcast

Dermot & Dave

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 230:28


What do Ed Sheeran, Coldplay, Michael Bublé, Gary Barlow, the cast of James Bond, Ryan Reynolds and John Cena all have in common? [audio mp3="https://media.radiocms.net/uploads/2021/12/22133010/DermotandDave_BestOfBigGuest_2212.mp3"][/audio] They're all besties with Dermot and Dave, obvs. Despite lockdowns, restrictions and general upset, it's been a busy year for lots of people in the biz of show, and we've been so lucky to get to chat to some brilliant stars over the course of the year. The ‘Dermot and Dave Best Of Big Guests Podcast'  goes on a pleasant post-Christmas Dinner stroll throughout just some of the big celebs who popped by to say hi this year. Aside from our pals like Coldplay, Ed and Gary. You'll hear from the cast of the latest Bond movie, Keanu Reeves and the gang from The Matrix, and everyone from Jennifer Hudson to Lin Manuel Miranda, Kit Harrington to Spiderman himself, Tom Holland. So, grab those headphones, and get stuck in! You can catch all the biggest names by clicking play above!

In the Spotlight
A Very Merry Christmas Special

In the Spotlight

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 49:36


Episode Segments:3:10 – Favorite Things32:38 – How Do You Solve a Problem Like Maria?40:19 – Someone Tell The StoryMusic Credits:"Overture" from Dear World (Original Broadway Cast Recording)  | Music by Jerry Herman | Performed by Dear World Orchestra & Donald Pippin"We Need A Little Christmas" from Mame  (Original Broadway Cast Recording) | Music & Lyrics by Jerry Herman | Performed by Angela Lansbury, Frankie Michaels, Jane Connell, Sab Shimono, & Donald Pippin"My Favorite Things" from The Sound of Music (Original Soundtrack Recording) | Music by Richard Rodgers, Lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II | Performed by Julie Andrews"Maria" from The Sound of Music (Original Soundtrack Recording)  | Music by Richard Rodgers, Lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II | Performed by Evadne Baker, Anna Lee, Portia Nelson, Marni Nixon"The Ballad of Booth" from Assassins (Original Off-Broadway Cast Recording) | Music & Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim | Performed by Patrick Cassidy, Marcus Olson, & Victor Garber

The Theatre Podcast with Alan Seales
Ep178 - Robin de Jesús: tick... tick... Boom!, In the Heights, La Cage aux Folles, The Boys in the Band

The Theatre Podcast with Alan Seales

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 51:59


Robin de Jesús is an actor and singer who has received Tony Award nominations for his roles in In the Heights, La Cage aux Folles, and The Boys in the Band. He made his Broadway debut in Rent in 2005, and has also appeared as Boq in Wicked on Broadway. His film and TV credits include his breakout role in the independent film Camp, as well as appearances in Hair Brained, How to Make It in America, and Law & Order: SVU. Robin can now be seen starring alongside Andrew Garfield as Michael in the musical drama tick, tick… BOOM!, directed by Lin-Manuel Miranda, and available on Netflix.  Robin takes us behind the scenes of working with Andrew Garfield, from their first reading, to the table work where they realized the weight and importance of Michael and Jonathan's relationship as a catalyst for the second half of the movie. He opens up about his Puerto Rican heritage, and talks about the full circle moment of starring in tick, tick… BOOM, having made his Broadway debut in Rent years ago. Robin also speaks about representation, taking care of his mental health, and why he would love his career to showcase range, in a predominantly gay career.  In this episode, we talk about:  How simple, human, and in the moment Jonathan Larson's work is Laying the foundation for Rent in tick, tick… BOOM!  Why and how he's trying to be a “disruptor”  A fortuitous visit to his grandmother in Puerto Rico when he was 2  The audition process for tick, tick… BOOM! Connect with Robin: Watch tick... tick... Boom! on Neflix IG: @robinofjesus Twitter: @robinofjesus Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Thank you to our friends Jukebox The Ghost for our intro and outro music. You can find them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @jukeboxtheghost or via the web via jukeboxtheghost.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Master of One Network
PCR 444- Particularly Urban, Wearable Tech, Trails of Tucana Holiday Edition & Succession

Master of One Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 85:39


Andrew12 Days of Christmas Drawings: https://www.instagram.com/p/CXaHbR1M2zq/Land + World Stickers: https://www.landandworld.com/Succession, Season 3 Finale: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt7660850/?ref_=nv_sr_srsgLaurenTick, Tick... Boom!: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt8721424/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0SCUM!: https://www.instagram.com/geistronzineteam/ https://geistronzineteam.gumroad.com/l/scumzineHobbit Pins: https://www.etsy.com/shop/NotCoolCoThe Drawing Board: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIlr7mCBsH-m7Vo5iTqNAlQDungeons & Designers Special Christmas Adventure: https://www.youtube.com/c/mof1podcast/featuredSamsung 'Rollable' Smartwatch: https://phandroid.com/2021/12/10/samsung-has-some-wild-ideas-for-a-future-smartwatch/PatrickTMNT Dreamex: https://www.bigbadtoystore.com/Product/VariationDetails/50026Dam Toys, Soldiers: http://www.damtoys.com/Trails of Tucana, Holiday Edition: https://www.aportagames.com/lesson/trails-of-tucana/

Fresh Air
Remembering Sondheim (Part III)

Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 46:53


On the final day of our tribute to Stephen Sondheim, we'll hear from people who worked with him, including James Lapine, who wrote the books for three Sondheim musicals: 'Sunday in the Park with George,' 'Into the Woods' and 'Passion'; music director Paul Gemignani, and Stephen Colbert and Lin-Manuel Miranda who each performed in Sondheim musicals.

Pop Culture Happy Hour
Tick Tick Boom

Pop Culture Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 19:23


The Netflix movie tick, tick...BOOM! is the story of composer Jonathan Larson and the musical he wrote a few years before he wrote Rent. The film marks the directorial debut of Lin-Manuel Miranda, and stars Andrew Garfield as Jonathan. It's set in 1990 and takes place over a few days leading up to Jonathan's 30th birthday.

Pop Culture Happy Hour

Encanto is the latest animated Disney musical that tells the story of the Madrigal family, whose members are tucked away in the mountains of Colombia. The film is stuffed with characters who wield magical powers and perform lavish musical numbers written by Lin-Manuel Miranda. But for all its magical realism, it's also a fairly simple story about a family whose bonds need healing.

Pop Culture Happy Hour
Remembering Stephen Sondheim

Pop Culture Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 20:58


Stephen Sondheim, the most influential composer in modern Broadway history, died on Friday at the age of 91. He wrote music and lyrics for Sweeney Todd, Into The Woods, Sunday In The Park With George, Company, and more. Sondheim won eight Tony Awards, eight Grammy Awards, a Pulitzer Prize for Drama, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom. And along the way, he made work so beloved that it's been produced again and again around the world, and influenced other Broadway composers like Lin Manuel-Miranda and Jonathan Larson.