Podcast appearances and mentions of Joan Baez

American singer

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Best podcasts about Joan Baez

Latest podcast episodes about Joan Baez

Total SF
The joyous sounds of Glide Memorial Church

Total SF

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 31:36


Glide Memorial Church musical director Vernon Bush is a dynamic presence leading the Glide Ensemble, using his experience as a preacher's kid and his love for community to lift the diverse group – and the congregation — higher. Total SF hosts Peter Hartlaub and Heather Knight watch and record a Glide Ensemble rehearsal, then join Bush on stage to talk about his upbringing near choirs, the church's history and how he feels about the Tenderloin District making the news. And Bush tries to explain what it's like leading a choir when Joan Baez, Bobby McFerrin or Bono might drop by at any time. Produced by Peter Hartlaub. Music from the Sunset Shipwrecks off their album "Community," Castro Theatre organist David Hegarty and cable car bell-ringing by 8-time champion Byron Cobb. Follow Total SF adventures at www.sfchronicle.com/totalsf  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

I Am Refocused Podcast Show
Tiffany and her new album Shadows

I Am Refocused Podcast Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 6:44


ABOUT TIFFANY AND SHADOWSTiffany is back with the announcement of her first new record since 2018's Piece Of Me. Shadows, due November 25, 2022 via Deko Entertainment, is described as a cathartic comeback LP on which Tiffany bares her soul and invites listeners to walk with her into the light. Today, she shares the record's newest single, "I Like The Rain," of which she says: "'I Like The Rain' is about owning your own dysfunction and the people who benefit from it."Speaking on her forthcoming LP, she continued: "Shadows is about the light and dark of my life, the heartbreak that nobody knows about, when you're trying to be fabulous onstage. My life has never been perfect. But maybe all those things are meant to be. And what helps me more than anything is writing songs."Shadows includes 11 brand new songs, including the new single "I Like The Rain," as well as stand out tracks "My Everything," "Bed of Nails," and a rocking cover of the Rival Sons track "Keep On Swinging." It will be released in multiple formats, including Digital, CD, and Limited-Edition Pink and Black vinyl, with pop-up album artwork created by multidisciplinary British artist Stuart Semple. This is limited to 250 copies and comes with multiple Tiffany photo inserts, making this a one-of-a-kind collectible piece.Stuart states, "It's been really exciting to be able to make some new art with Tiffany. Her music was a big part of my childhood. The new record is amazing and I'm so glad to have been able to come up with a visual way to bring it to life. It feels like the whole project is an artwork in it's own right."The most fascinating artists have both darkness and light. No one understands that duality better than Tiffany. She's the former teen icon with the scars of a lifer. A multi-million-selling phenomenon whose outward success story belies bad romances and bum deals. A genre-blind singer/songwriter who writes starkly personal lyrics that make entire stadiums sing along.As such, when it came to naming her new studio album, one title called out. "Shadows is about the light and dark of my life," says Tiffany. "The heartbreak that nobody knows about, when you're trying to be fabulous onstage. My life has never been perfect. But maybe all those things are meant to be. And what helps me more than anything is writing songs."Tiffany's life can be measured in songs. Anyone with even a casual eye on pop culture will remember her breakout in the late-'80s, sparked by the transatlantic #1 smash, "I Think We're Alone Now."But the fans who have made the journey with her since know that the best stuff came later, as the singer fought her way to the music she burned to record, from 1993's restorative Dreams Never Die, through the pulsing electro bangers of 2005's Dust Off And Dance, right up to 2018's highly acclaimed Pieces Of Me. "It's an album highlighting an artist at the top of their game," wrote Get Ready To Rock of the latter, "producing music from the heart.""It's been a long journey to get back," reflects the singer. "There can be a lot of discouragement, naysayers, and obstacles. But you've got to keep on swinging. You've got to have a lion heart. For Shadows, I found the right people and that made me bold."The songs that Tiffany brought to the Shadows sessions at Rockfield Studios - some rowdy and brittle, others tender and feather-soft - are a candid snapshot of her life as she steps into her fifth decade. But listen a little harder and you'll hear everything that has led her here, for better and worse.Born in Norwalk, California, on October 2nd, 1971 - and carrying a tune from the age of two - Tiffany barely remembers her life before the stage. She was a pageant girl, then a dancer, before, aged nine, she sang at a friend's birthday party and the clocks stopped. "There I was, nine years old, and I sounded like a 30-year-old woman," she recalls. "Not being in the music industry, my parents had no idea how to begin, but we just started there."Even in the Golden State, Tiffany's home life came with storm clouds. "My parents were lovely people, but there were issues with alcohol, a turmoil there," she says. "You'd hear the crying at night, the screaming, the rows, and wonder if you're even going to have a place to stay the next day."Through the chaos, music was her lifeline. In the early-'80s, all over San Diego, from the fairgrounds of Del Mar to the country music circuit, Tiffany was a livewire presence, singing out her heart and soaking up the wisdom of the greats whose orbit she now moved in. "From artists like Jerry Lee Lewis, Little Richard and George Jones, I learnt to live out loud," she reflects. "They woke up and that's who they were. They lived their life through music."All the while, Tiffany was feeding the insatiable muse that is evident on Shadows. "I had an older cousin who was listening to AC/DC, Led Zeppelin, Heart," she reflects. "I'd ask my best friend to buy my records at the music store when I was too embarrassed, because I had Barbra Streisand, Ozzy Osbourne, and James Taylor. I love Joni Mitchell. Joan Baez. Huge Bob Dylan fan. And with artists like Stevie Nicks and Deborah Harry, it wasn't just the music that inspired me, it was their strength. These are women who have made it through the good, the bad and the ugly."The passing decades would see Tiffany suffering her own body blows, from the painful court case in which she fought her parents for control of her career to the relationships that rose and fell in the public eye. "Sometimes," she laughs darkly, "my girlfriends will make a joke and say, 'You just date the same person over and over again...'"But while a lesser artist might retreat to lick their wounds, Tiffany always used her hard-won experience as rocket fuel. Driven by that unmistakable grit-and-honey voice, Shadows feels wrenched from the depths, from the defiant primal-scream rocker "Cried For The Last Time" to the bruised electro ballad "I'll Meet You Anywhere." "On this album, there's a pop base with rock edge," she considers. "There's a definite retro sound on songs like 'Shadows' and 'Lost Inside. 'They have that punky, '80s, Go-Gos, Blondie, Pat Benatar kinda feel with a more modern rock attitude. I want people to sing along."Producer Mark Alberici and the first-call studio band ensured that Shadows roars from the speakers. But perhaps the record's greatest power comes from Tiffany's unflinching lyrics. "'I Like The Rain' is saying that I almost choose the chaos in my life," she says of the riff-driven groove, "while 'You're My Everything' was about having a big row with my boyfriend, but instead of the end of our relationship being ugly, I wanted it to be beautiful." Elsewhere, smoky torch song "Bed Of Nails" was so heartfelt that Tiffany caught the vocal in a single late-night take. "It's quite a dark song and I just purged myself. I walked up to the mic and it was literally one pass, which is what you hear on the record. I'm writing about a relationship where two people aren't getting what they want out of it, yet they've sacrificed a lot to be there. At the time, my boyfriend and I were both divorcing other people. With a lot of these songs, I'm sharing my vulnerability with you."All of our lives come with shadows. But with her latest studio album, Tiffany invites her fans to walk with her into the light. "These last few years, we've all been through a really hard time," she considers. "People have been through divorces, lost jobs, family members, friends. I know I have. You have to carry on, but there's a sadness and loneliness."That's where music comes in," she counters. "It bonds people. For me, it recharges my batteries, getting that validation, seeing those smiles, getting the fans to go on the next journey with me. Who knows where I'm going next? But I'm a lifer. There's no plan B. I think I'm doing my best material now. I know myself more - and I'm singing the best I ever have..."https://linktr.ee/TiffanyTuneshttps://tiffanytunes.com/news

Rock & Roll Attitude
Rock and Roll Attitude 3/5 - Paul McCartney, Stevie Wonder, Joan Baez et Judas Priest se dévoilent en musique

Rock & Roll Attitude

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 3:55


Il n'y a rien de plus humain que de vouloir laisser une trace de son passage sur cette terre ! Raconter sa vie pour partager son expérience, pour montrer l'exemple, la marche à suivre ou à ne pas suivre ! Se raconter, c'est aussi se faire comprendre des autres, faire le point sur son parcours, sur ses actes héroïques ou ses erreurs ! Nos rockeurs ont des vies de dingue, ils ont visité le monde entier, ont rencontré les gens les plus intéressants de la planète, se sont battus comme des lions pour en arriver là. Ça pique notre curiosité, ça c'est excitant, mais cette vie-là ne veut pas dire qu'ils sont plus heureux que vous et moi, bien au contraire comme vous l'entendrez ! En 2013, Paul McCartney creuse dans son passé, il plonge dans ses vieux souvenirs avec " On My Way to Work " (sur le chemin du travail), bien avant le succès, lorsqu'il travaillait pour une société de livraison à Liverpool. Retour en 1967 avec ce titre du très jeune Stevie Wonder : " I Was Made To Love Her'' cosigne avec Lula Mae Hardaway, sa maman, et nous parle de son premier vrai coup de foudre, elle s'appelait Angie. 1975, Joan Baez publie déjà son 16e album " Diamonds and Rust ", la chanteuse et musicienne revient sur son histoire d'amour avec Bob Dylan. Deux ans plus tard, aussi fou que cela puisse paraître, le groupe de Heavy Metal, Judas Priest reprend ce titre, à sa façon, après plusieurs écoutes, le chanteur, Rob Halford, est touché par l'élégance et l'authenticité du morceau. --- Du lundi au vendredi, Fanny Gillard et Laurent Rieppi vous dévoilent l'univers rock, au travers de thèmes comme ceux de l'éducation, des rockers en prison, les objets de la culture rock, les groupes familiaux et leurs déboires, et bien d'autres, chaque matin dans Coffee on the Rocks à 6h30 et rediffusion à 13h30 dans Lunch Around The Clock.

Yesterday Once More
Shades of Night

Yesterday Once More

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 53:44


This week's theme presents songs about different aspects of the night. Legend, Perry Como starts the program with his Italianate ‘Mandolins In The Moon light‘ followed by the great Joan Baez... LEARN MORE The post Shades of Night appeared first on Yesterday Once More.

Bubbles Mushrooms Podcast
Ep041: Go Back to Mother Russia

Bubbles Mushrooms Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 55:40


On this episode of BM, Katie talks about the neighborhood cats again and we revisit Jenn's Poop Corner, again. Edward gets some free leftover drywall from Luke's recent building materials purchase and has not yet found a project for it's use. We all rip a certain local gas station location a new one because they were out of buns for Edward's Cheeseburger Big Bite. Then we play Edwards game invention - Cosmo Roulette. Hear us make fun of articles filled with bad advice and the idiots who wrote them. Would you rather make love to your SO to Miles Davis, Joan Baez or The Eagles? Nat Hentoff picks The Eagles for sure. Listen to Claire Scoville's hot make-up tips for a new generation of women. What food should broads not eat on a first date? Find out here, now! Follow us on Instagram @bubbmush and email the show bubbmush@gmail.com - thanks for listening - tell your dumb friends to listen too!

Humleborg Podcast
112 Sejrstimen - Music Of The Month

Humleborg Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 59:48


Music of the Month! Babylonerne opfandt kalenderen for 4000 år siden men det er romernes julianske og gregorianske kalender der er grundlaget for den nutidige. Året er jordens gang om solen men måneden er månens gang om jorden og de 12 fik naturligvis navne efter romerske guder og kejsere (omend de sidste 4 kun efter nummer i rækkefølgen). Her på vore breddegrader er vi jo meget optagede af kalenderen og månederne, da årstidernes skift har stor betydning for lys og temperatur. Dette tema er en hyldest til månederne sat i musik, og selvom der er skrevet langt flere sange om visse af de 12 har jeg udvalgt to eksempler af hver med: Kate Bush, Prince, Caravan Palace, Joan Baez, Pilot, Annie Lennox, The Waterboys, Bee Gees, Barbara Dickson, Fallout Boy, Taylor Swift, BabyBird, Florence + The Machine, Bob Geldof, Neil Diamond, A-ha, Laleh, Jung og Lars H.U.G. m.fl.

Through the music
Thjrough the Music #156

Through the music

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 58:56


Folk contemporaneo e d'annata con un salto ai Matia Bazar in Italia, american and british folk.

Tent Show Radio
Steve Earle & The Dukes / Episode 22-44

Tent Show Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 59:01


This week on Tent Show Radio, enjoy a high-voltage hour featuring the rough-neck poetics of troubadour Steve Earle and The Dukes.  He has run a lot of roads and run ragged, but the singer-songwriter has never run out of things to say or songs to sing. Over the course of twenty studio albums, Earle has distinguished himself as a master storyteller, and his songs have been recorded by a vast array of artists, including Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings, Joan Baez, Emmylou Harris, the Pretenders, and more. Earle's 1986 debut album, Guitar Town, is now regarded as a classic of the Americana genre, and subsequent releases like The Revolution Starts...Now (2004), Washington Square Serenade (2007), and TOWNES (2009) all of which received Grammy Awards. This episode of Tent Show Radio features recordings from Steve Earle & The Dukes 2021 performance under the Big Top tent.

Musiques du monde
#SessionLive de Souad Massi pour la sortie de l'album «Sequana»

Musiques du monde

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 48:30


Souad Massi sort son 10ème album Sequana. Elle interprète 2 titres au Grand studio avec le guitariste Malik Kerrouche. Sequana est le dixième album de Souad Massi, chanteuse, auteure et compositrice d'origine algérienne. Habituellement reconnue pour sa musique folk et chaâbi, sa palette de couleurs sonores s'élargit vers le Sahel, les Caraïbes, le Brésil, parfois le rock. Souad a totalement renouvelé l'équipe qui l'accompagne, ouvrant ainsi un nouveau chapitre à une carrière commencée dans les années 1990 et marqué par un départ de l'Algérie pour la France. Elle s'envole ici à la recherche du soleil de son enfance, « de la lumière et de la douceur », tout en traquant la cruauté qui pousse les dictateurs à couper les mains du poète. Épaulée par Justin Adams (Rachid Taha, Tinariwen, Robert Plant…) à la production, accompagnée ici et là par Piers Faccini ou Naïssam Jalal, Souad Massi creuse son sillon de femme engagée, émancipée, une femme de son temps qui chante ses combats comme jamais. Ce qu'il convient de garder en tout état de cause, c'est le contact avec la nature, parce qu'elle est belle, mais aussi parce qu'elle sait résister, nous dit Souad Massi. Sur la pochette, la voici de face, deux pâquerettes posées sur les yeux, délicatement. « J'avais la sensation d'être fragile, vulnérable, et ne plus avoir cette vision laide et moche de la nature que l'on détruit ». Sous les fleurs, les yeux fermés, « on se reconnecte avec l'essentiel. Paradoxalement, poursuit Souad Massi, c'est une forme de dénonciation ou d'indignation face à ce que nous vivons et ce que notre regard perçoit ». Sequana est un recueil de onze chansons, dont neuf écrites et composées par Souad Massi, qui tentent de saisir le passage du temps et l'essentiel – ce que nous devons préserver et transmettre. « Mon album tourne autour des rapports humains, du mal-être des adolescents d'aujourd'hui, de la perte de repères aux dangers des régimes totalitaires qui poussent les peuples à prendre tous les risques pour quitter leurs pays ». Ici, tout est métaphore et paradoxe, tout est cocon et chrysalide, tout est pulsion, et tout est lien. En écrivant Sequana, Souad s'est penchée par exemple sur les mystères du papillon multicolore Paon-du-jour, dont la larve affectionne les orties piquantes, et qui meurt dès qu'il est privé de liens avec ses congénères. En vertu de cette loi de la transformation, Sequana affiche une diversité de styles musicaux inusitée, distillés avec délicatesse, au fil de l'inspiration, rock, folk, calypso, bossa, reggae, sons d'Orient ou du désert algérien. Suggérée par le producteur anglais Justin Adams, cette palette de couleurs a été validée, puis magnifiée par une Souad aventureuse, qui accueille sur un titre Piers Faccini, ou encore la jeune flûtiste syrienne Naïssam Jalal. Voir le clip officiel de Une Seule Étoile.   Souad Massi appartient à une large et riche famille, celle du folk, dont l'ADN se définit par la guitare, le souci de l'observation et l'intelligence qu'il y a à transmuter les blessures en chansons. Née en 1972 dans le quartier populaire de Bab-el-Oued, Souad Massi a écouté du chaâbi algérois et la chanson kabyle si importante en matière de poésie. Elle a aimé les chansons à texte propres au répertoire français, puis, dit-elle, a appris à comprendre les vies singulières d'artistes populaires, tels Michel Berger ou Dalida. Et puis, elle a adoré la country mélodique de Kenny Rogers, et adoubé les abrasements sociétaux de Bob Dylan ou Joan Baez. Les nouvelles chansons de Souad Massi, chantées en arabe et en français, ont été conçues dans un mode duel, imposé par une dialectique de pandémie : comment rendre son rythme, son harmonie à un monde plongé dans un cotonneux brouillard, où le repli et la solitude tiennent lieu de mot d'ordre. « Le COVID a fait ressortir des angoisses enfouies. L'inconnu m'a toujours fait peur, dit Souad Massi. Tout ce que nous ne maîtrisons pas, les angoisses du soir, l'abandon, la solitude...Pour créer, mettre des mots sur ces troubles profonds, je dois aller chercher les forces vives, le rythme, la pulsion ». Souad Massi se glisse dans la nostalgie teintée de bossa nova sur L'Espoir, un titre conçu avec Michel Françoise. Elle s'empare de la poésie de la langue arabe pour décrire le malaise adolescent – délicate transformation de la chrysalide – à travers le mythe de la déesse Sequana, celle qui selon nos ancêtres les Gaulois, veillait sur les sources d'eau douce. C'est en groupe, en famille, que se travaille la mémoire, cet indispensable atout qui nous permet d'avancer.   Intellectuellement carrée, de formation scientifique (Souad Massi est ingénieure, diplômée de l'École du génie civil), elle s'est frayé un chemin artistique entre les courants musicaux qui habitent Alger dans les années 1990. Passée par le flamenco avec le groupe Triana d'Alger, puis par le heavy metal avec Atakor, Souad Massi a étudié la musique classique occidentale. En ce sens, elle est le pur produit d'une « Alger ville ouverte », longtemps célébrée. Venue à Paris en 1999 pour chanter au Cabaret Sauvage, sa première cassette sous le bras, Souad Massi est remarquée par le label Island-Mercury. Depuis, elle a choisi de vivre en France. « L'Algérie, dit-elle, est inscrite en moi, ce sont des mondes parallèles qui me nourrissent et dans lesquels je puise mes ressources, comme une plante, en réalité ». L'exil, c'est autre chose. L'exil, ce sont « ces gens qui s'agrippent aux avions qui partent de Kaboul lors du retour des Talibans. Pour eux, j'ai écrit Dessine-moi un pays. Mais aussi, parce que je ne peux souscrire aux discours de la peur qui se développent ici, pour créer un pays où l'on serait montré du doigt dès lors qu'on a une couleur différente du blanc ». De ce monde chaotique et brisé, l'espoir n'a pourtant pas été effacé. « Une seule étoile suffit à nous inviter à penser notre propre rapport à l'autre et à aller à l'essentiel » : la vie et la résistance aux forces de destruction.   Titres interprétés - Dessine-moi un pays Live RFI voir le clip de RFI Vidéos - Mirage Feat. Piers Faccini, extrait de l'album Sequana - medley Raoui, Dar djedi (« la maison de mon grand-père »), Tout reste à faire (duo avec Francis Cabrel), Paris (duo Marc Lavoine) - Une seule étoile Live RFI voir le clip de RFI Vidéos.   Line up : Souad Massi, guitare voix, Malik Kerrouche, guitare.   Son : Benoît Letirant & Fabien Mugneret.   ► album Sequana (Backingtrack Productions 2022).   Playlist de Souad Massi - Leonard Cohen « Here it is » - Ella Fitzgerald « One note samba » - Kenny Rogers « Sunshine » - Freddy Mercury « The show must go on ».   Concert 3 février 2023, Salle Pleyel, Paris.

El Salón del Cinéfilo
NAVES MISTERIOSAS (1972), de Douglas Trumbull

El Salón del Cinéfilo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 32:43


Reseña solicitada por la oyente Nikki Fenel de una cinta ecologista de ciencia-ficción protagonizada por Bruce Dern como el encargado de cuidar y proteger las últimas especies botánicas del planeta Tierra… en el espacio, dentro de un gigantesco invernadero en forma de cúpula. Cuando la empresa responsable ordena la destrucción de este tesoro, el protagonista emprende la misión de convertirse en su protector, con la ayuda de algunos simpáticos robots. Dirige Douglas Trumbull, responsable de efectos especiales de ‘2001, una odisea del espacio’ y ‘Blade Runner’, y escribe entre otros Michael Cimino. Atentos a las piezas musicales cantadas por Joan Baez. Este año, la película cumple medio siglo. ENLACES DE INTERÉS https://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/2022/09/sci-fi-classic-silent-running-to-receive-arrow-video-4k-uhd-blu-ray-and-steelbook-release/ https://www.bbc.com/culture/article/20210212-silent-running-the-sci-fi-that-predicted-modern-crises https://gizmodo.com/50-years-later-silent-running-is-more-relevant-than-ev-1848638632 https://www.inverse.com/entertainment/silent-running-50-year-anniversary

疲惫娇娃 CyberPink
013 | 知识和创作不通过X传播 Deconstructing the Muse Myth

疲惫娇娃 CyberPink

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 77:12


这是一期不合时宜和疲惫娇娃的串台节目,也是一场女生宿舍的四人夜谈。2012年,蔡依林就已经在《大艺术家》的歌词里劝女性不要被“缪斯”和“艺术家”的关系蓝本所迷惑、而失去自己的主体性;然而回望这十年里我们自己和身边朋友所经历的苦恼,不得不说蔡依林算是白唱了,但是人文社科的书不能白读。这期节目,我们试着从流行文化的角度拆解“缪斯”和“孤独的艺术家”的迷思,反思我们自己过去在他者和个人经验中感受到的迷失、成长以及成为自己路上的挣扎。我想这种迷惑以及获得成长的灵感一瞬并非个体的私人感受,而是作为女性共有的感受。 This is a special “girls' chat” episode with our friends from 不合时宜. In this episode, we try to deconstruct the myth of the muse and the lone genius in pop culture and reflect on how it affected us. 【Timestamp】 02:35 “说的文艺一点是聊一聊男性艺术家和女性缪斯,说的不文艺一点就是骂骂男人” 08:17 缪斯的三重身份:素材,伴侣,粉丝 11:46 美国民谣皇后 Joan Baez 和 Zelda Fitzgerald 18:28 缪斯这个词总是和“红颜祸水”的印象联系起来 20:45 缪斯对面的“孤独天才“的自信是从哪里来的 31:30 在宏大叙事和认知失调中寻找自己作为女性的声音 43:28 艺术“自毁倾向”的诱惑,和如何夺回自我? 01:03:31 如果性别对调,这一切还成立吗 02:35 All of this is just an excuse to vent about men 08:17 The triple identity of the muse: the subject, the companion, the admirer 11:46 The story of Joan Baez and Zelda Fitzgerald 20:45 The myth of the lone genius and the source of their confidence 31:30 Finding your voice as a woman in the midst of grand narratives and cognitive dissonance 43:28 The temptation of artistic "self-destructive tendencies" 01:03:31 Can we tell the same story if the gender roles are reversed 我们提到的一些文章和作品: Joan Baez — Diamonds and Rust 纪录片《Woman》 阿列克谢耶维奇《The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II》 波伏娃 《第二性》 电影《Almost Famous》 《看不见的女性》- 卡罗琳·克里亚多·佩雷斯 【本期音乐】 片头:小野洋子 - Every Man Has a Woman Who Loves Him 插曲:Joan Baez - Diamonds And Rust 片尾:小野洋子 - Palumbo Of The Brothers Brothers - Yes, I'm A Witch 如果喜欢这期节目并愿意想要给我们买杯咖啡: 海外用户:https://www.patreon.com/cyberpinkfm 海内用户:https://afdian.net/@cyberpinkfm 商务合作邮箱:cyberpinkfm@gmail.com 商务合作微信:CyberPink2022

不合时宜
知识和创作不通过 X 传播

不合时宜

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 76:58


【主播的话】这期节目是我们和《疲惫娇娃》的主播花酱和小杨的一次对谈,也是一场女生宿舍的四人夜谈。2012年,蔡依林就已经在《大艺术家》的歌词里劝女性不要被“缪斯”和“艺术家”的关系蓝本所迷惑、而失去自己的主体性;然而回望这十年里我们自己和身边朋友所经历的苦恼,不得不说蔡依林算是白唱了,但是人文社科的书不能白读。这期节目,我们试着从流行文化的角度拆解“缪斯”和“孤独的艺术家”的迷思,反思我们自己过去在他者和个人经验中感受到的迷失、成长以及成为自己路上的挣扎。我想这种迷惑以及获得成长的灵感一瞬并非个体的私人感受,而是作为女性共有的感受。【主播】若含(微博:_若含)王磬(微博:王磬)【本期剧透】02:35 “说的文艺一点是聊一聊男性艺术家和女性缪斯,说的不文艺一点就是骂骂男人”04:05 这期节目的录制灵感来自于一次令人失眠的深夜对谈08:17 缪斯的三重身份:素材,伴侣,粉丝11:46 美国民谣皇后 Joan Baez 和鲍勃·迪伦的故事18:28 缪斯这个词总是和“红颜祸水”的印象联系起来20:45 缪斯对面的“孤独天才“的自信是从哪里来的31:30 在宏大叙事和认知失调中寻找自己作为女性的声音43:28 艺术“自毁倾向”的诱惑,和如何夺回自我?01:03:31 如果性别对调,这一切还成立吗 【相关延展】Joan Baez — Diamonds and Rust纪录片《Woman》阿列克谢耶维奇《The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II 》波伏娃 《第二性》电影《Almost Famous》《看不见的女性》- 卡罗琳·克里亚多·佩雷斯【本期音乐】片头:小野洋子 - Every Man Has a Woman Who Loves Him插曲:Joan Baez - Diamonds And Rust片尾:小野洋子,Palumbo Of The Brothers Brothers - Yes, I'm A Witch【Logo设计】刘刘(ins: imjanuary)【后期制作】方改则【互动方式】微博@不合时宜TheWeirdo【商务合作】长期开放商务合作,可发送邮件至 [hibuheshiyi@126.com](mailto:hibuheshiyi@126.com) 或者私信官方微博 @不合时宜TheWeirdo

Journal du Rock
Le Journal Du Rock - Stevie Nicks ; Blink-182 ; les Red Hot Chili Peppers ; les Beatles ; AC/DC ; les Guns N'Roses

Journal du Rock

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 4:18


La chanteuse Sevie Nicks s'exprime autour de l'importance de voter pour les élections américaines de mi-mandat dans son poème "Get It Back" face à la désintégration de l'arrêt "Roe v. Wade" qui garantit les droits des Américaines à avorter. Les heureuses retrouvailles de Blink-182 avec le line-up composé de Mark Hoppus, Tom DeLonge et Travis Barker dont voici le tout nouveau single "Edging" sortira ce vendredi 14 octobre et un concert le vendredi 8 septembre 2023 au Sportpaleis d'Anvers. Les Red Hot Chili Peppers ont sorti " Eddie " le 23 septembre, un single en hommage à Eddie Van Halen extrait du futur album ‘'Return Of The Dream Canteen'' et viennent de le proposer en live pour la première fois ce 9 octobre au Austin City Limits à Austin, au Texas. Une nappe décorée de croquis des Beatles avant leur dernier concert officiel à San Francisco a été remise à ses propriétaires plus de 50 ans après avoir été volée, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison et Ringo Starr y ont tous laissé leur empreinte ainsi que la chanteuse folk Joan Baez, va désormais être mis aux enchères. Pour les 50 ans du groupe, le gouvernement australien rend hommage à AC/DC en proposant une collection de pièces de monnaie à leur effigie, et un livre intitulé ‘'The AC/DC AB/CD High-Voltage Alphabet'', produit et designé par Paul McNeil pour les tout-petits. Guns N'Roses vient de sortir une nouvelle vidéo live de " You Could be Mine " de l'album ‘'Appetite For Destruction'', images filmées en 1991 lors d'un concert que le groupe donnait au Ritz Theatre de New York, dans le box de réédition ‘'Use Your Illusion I & II'' . --- Classic 21 vous informe des dernières actualités du rock, en Belgique et partout ailleurs. Le Journal du Rock, chaque jour à 7h30 et 18h30.

For Songs
Episode 51: A Conversation with John McCutcheon

For Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 40:11


You think you've been productive during COVID? Maybe so, but did you write, record, and release three (that's right, THREE!!!) albums in two-plus years? No? Well, my next guest did. In fact, folk singer John McCutcheon's latest album Leap, released in September 2022, is not only his third album since 2020, but his 43rd of his career! John's love of folk music began as a young teenager watching the 1963 March on Washington; after seeing Bob Dylan, Odetta, Joan Baez, and Peter, Paul, and Mary, he was hooked. He's been writing and recording folk music since the mid-1970s, and hasn't looked back. In this episode, we talk about four songs from Leap—The Ride, The Troubles, Sorryland, and Work. We take a deep-dive into his prolific songwriting process, how the material keeps flowing, and how he hopes to stay “useful” as long as possible. Listen in!

Radio München
#friedensnoten 12 - Joan Baez präsentiert von Ulrike Guerot

Radio München

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 11:03


Friedensnoten – Ulrike Guerot, präsentiert „Where have all the flowers gone“ von Joan Baez. Ulrike Guerot ist Politikwissenschaftlerin und Publizistin. Seit 2021 hat sie die Professur für Europapolitik an der Universität Bonn inne. Ihr wichtigstes Projekt ist wohl die Entwicklung von Konzepten zur Zukunft des europäischen Integrationsprozesses. Sabrina Khalil hat ihren Text gelesen. Danach haben wir nachgesehen, was die 81-jährige Joan Baez tut: Joan Baez widmet sich heute dem Malen. Auf ihrer Website heißt es: "Als eine berühmte Aktivistin für Frieden und Gewaltlosigkeit hätte sich Joan Baez niemals träumen lassen, ein Porträt eines Kriegshelden zu malen". Ihr Gemälde des Ukrainischen Präsidenten Wolodymyr Selenskyj wird seit März 2022 zum Verkauf geboten, der Erlös geht an die Hilfsorganisation International Medical Corps. Es zeigt, um den ukrainischen Führer die blauen und gelben Farben der ukrainischen Flagge, ein Sonnenblumenstrauß und ein Paar Weißstörche am Himmel, beides offizielle Symbole der ukrainischen Nation. Der Name des Präsidenten steht in kyrillischer Schrift darunter. „Wenn ich Selenskyj heute in der Hitze des grausamen Kampfes treffen würde, den er geerbt hat, hätte ich, obwohl ich zutiefst traurig über die organisierte Gewalt bin, keinen Rat, kein Urteil, nur einen demütigen Gruß an seinen monumentalen Mut.“ wird Baez noch einmal zitiert. Friedensnoten ist eine medienübergreifende Friedensinitiative von Markus Klöckner und Jens Fischer Rodrian.

The Nicole Sandler Show
20220923 Nicole Sandler Show - Music, Memories & Writing Songs that Matter with Dar Williams

The Nicole Sandler Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 85:47


After a hectic week with non-stop breaking news, I think we all deserve a break from the politics. So after a brief recap of the latest news, we'll officially begin the weekend with something special. A singer/songwriter who I truly admire has a new book out, "How to Write a Song that Matters". I first met Dar Williams some 27 years ago. Her first album, "The Honesty Room" includes a song that listeners of the LA station where I worked truly connected with called "When I Was a Boy." We started playing it on KSCA fm 101.9 ...and the rest, as they say, is history. I've remained a fan through the years, but never had the opportunity to re-connect with Dar, until now. Her brand new book is out, called "How to Write a Song that Matters." She knows how to do that, and now shares that skill with the public in songwriting retreats, workshops and now, with this book. We have a lot of catching up to do, and I'm excited that listeners are along for the ride today. When the interview we recorded earlier this week ends, perhaps I could be persuaded to run into overtime and share the show we talk about during the interview. It was a morning show remote broadcast from Starbucks in Encino, CA, where she and Joan Baez (who were touring together) graced us with an amazing performance... Happy Music Friday!

Arts Interview with Nancy Kranzberg
317. Chris Pieman and Laurel Wacyk from The Sheldon

Arts Interview with Nancy Kranzberg

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 11:25


Chris Pieman, Director of Advancement for The Sheldon, and Laurel Wacyk, Director of Education, stopped by to talk with Nancy about the happenings at the Sheldon, and the various educational programs. The Sheldon hosts over 350 events each year. Artists like Dave Brubeck, Diana Krall, José Carreras, Herbie Hancock, Joan Baez, Willie Nelson, Lyle Lovett, B.B. King, Mavis Staples, Wynton Marsalis, Judy Collins and Renée Fleming have all performed on their stage. And over 300 exhibits have shown in the Sheldon's galleries since 1998. They also present a wide range of educational programs for schools serving over 30,000 St. Louis-area students each year, and they host hundreds of weddings, community events and other celebrations in their event spaces.        

Arroe Collins
Renee Fleming From Cities That Sing In IMAX

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 9:52


Renée Fleming is one of the most acclaimed singers of our time, performing on the stages of the world's greatest opera houses and concert halls. Honored with four Grammy® awards and the US National Medal of Arts, Renée has sung for momentous occasions from the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony to the Diamond Jubilee Concert for Queen Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace. A ground-breaking distinction came in 2008 when Renée became the first woman in the 125-year history of the Metropolitan Opera to solo headline an opening night gala. In 2014, she brought her voice to a vast new audience as the only classical artist ever to sing The Star-Spangled Banner at the Super Bowl. Known for bringing new audiences to classical music and opera, Renée has starred in and hosted an array of television and radio broadcasts. She has sung with great artists ranging from Andrea Bocelli and Luciano Pavarotti to Elton John, Sting, Paul Simon, Josh Groban and Joan Baez. Renée's voice is featured on the soundtracks of Best Picture Oscar winners The Shape of Water and Lord of the Rings. She has recorded everything from complete operas and song recitals to indie rock and jazz.

Arroe Collins
Renee Fleming From Cities That Sing In IMAX

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 9:52


Renée Fleming is one of the most acclaimed singers of our time, performing on the stages of the world's greatest opera houses and concert halls. Honored with four Grammy® awards and the US National Medal of Arts, Renée has sung for momentous occasions from the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony to the Diamond Jubilee Concert for Queen Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace. A ground-breaking distinction came in 2008 when Renée became the first woman in the 125-year history of the Metropolitan Opera to solo headline an opening night gala. In 2014, she brought her voice to a vast new audience as the only classical artist ever to sing The Star-Spangled Banner at the Super Bowl. Known for bringing new audiences to classical music and opera, Renée has starred in and hosted an array of television and radio broadcasts. She has sung with great artists ranging from Andrea Bocelli and Luciano Pavarotti to Elton John, Sting, Paul Simon, Josh Groban and Joan Baez. Renée's voice is featured on the soundtracks of Best Picture Oscar winners The Shape of Water and Lord of the Rings. She has recorded everything from complete operas and song recitals to indie rock and jazz.

Deadline: White House
“We knew what we were looking at”

Deadline: White House

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 84:56 Very Popular


Nicolle Wallace discusses President Biden condemning acts of hate and violence in the U.S. Plus, former Trump chief of staff Mark Meadows is complying with a subpoena from the DOJ's January 6th probe, the former president warns of ‘big problems' if the DOJ indicts him, Florida's governor uses migrants as political pawns, the DOJ awaits a ruling from a judge on the Mar-a-Lago documents investigation, a new book reveals John Kelly consulted a book warning that Trump was psychologically unfit while he served as chief of staff, and new atrocities revealed in Ukraine as Russians flee. Joined by: Mike Memoli, Jason Johnson, Aisha Mills, Carol Leonnig, Neal Katyal, Rep. Jim Himes, John Brennan, Harry Litman, Basil Smikle, Miles Taylor, Dr. Irwin Redlener, and Joan Baez 

Pinkie The Pig Podcast
0742 Pinkie The Pig Podcast/ Tuesday's Tune * Pinkie Sings *Diamonds & Rust

Pinkie The Pig Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 5:51


Pinkie Sings Joan Baez " Diamonds & Rust

Songs & Stories
Talking Story with Jon Woodhouse

Songs & Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 21:07


This is a podcast interview with music journalist and author Jon Woodhouse talking about his new book Music Legends on Maui: Conversations with Icons of Rock, Country, Jazz, Blues, Hawaiian, Soul & Reggae in Paradise. The book features more than 80 interviews compiled over 40 years. It presents intriguing profiles of many icons, from Willie Nelson, Prince, and Paul Simon to B.B. King, Herbie Hancock, and Joan Baez, with unique insights into their creative and spiritual paths. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/bigislandmusicmagazine/message

Staring at the World with BoDeans’ Kurt Neumann
Season TWO with legendary David Paich of ToTo

Staring at the World with BoDeans’ Kurt Neumann

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 49:34


We sit down to launch season 2 of Staring at the World Podcast, with legendary guest David Paich of ToTo. We discuss his incredible career and solo album Forgotten Toys. Boz Scaggs. Mötley Crüe. Steely Dan. Bryan Adams. George Martin. Michael Jackson. Quincy Jones. P!NK. Aretha Franklin. Miles Davis. The Doobie Brothers. Stevie Nicks. Dolly Parton. Jessie J. Cher. Rod Stewart. Tina Turner. Michael McDonald. Joan Baez. Ray Charles. Elton John. Barbra Streisand... and countless others. If you've listened to music in the last 50 years, including any of the iconic artists above, you were hearing David Paich. Music is the soundtrack of our lives, and David is one of its architects. He initially embraced music by his father—jazz icon, musician, and arranger Marty Paich. “I met Jimmy Webb when I was 10 years old, when my father was working with him,” he recalls. "My dad nudged me towards songwriting because I had the ability to write poetry. Somehow, my father saw my lyrical potential. I followed in Jimmy's footsteps until Elton John's first record came out in 1970. That really cemented my musical path. I continued to soak up all the great songs from then on.” Together, Paich and his father notably co-wrote “Light The Way” for Ironside, winning an EMMY® Award for “Best Song or Theme” back in 1974. With Boz Scaggs, he co-wrote the songs "Miss Sun", "Lido Shuffle", and Grammy Award-Winning "Lowdown" from the multi-platinum album Silk Degrees. Around that same time, Paich and childhood friend, iconic studio drummer Jeff Porcaro wiggled their way onto two Steely Dan albums, which helped form some of their musical direction. Paich and David Foster co-wrote “Got To Be Real” with Cheryl Lynn, catapulting her to disco stardom. All of these accolades solidified him as one of the go-to studio musicians for music's A-list. Paich decided it was time for him and Jeff to form their own band, which you now know as Toto. With his TOTO bandmates, David arranged and performed songs on Michael Jackson's legendary albums, Thriller and Bad. “One of my greatest memories is collaborating with Michael Jackson, on the bestselling album of all time, Thriller, Helping arrange the Jackson/Paul McCartney duet, “The Girl is Mine”, is still a musical highlight in my career.” Over the past several years, David, along with TOTO has had a major renaissance in popularity like few bands at this point in their career and now have a multi-generational global fan base. In fact, “Africa” has amassed over 1 billion streams worldwide and is one of the most covered and sampled songs in music history, including by Jay-Z, Pitbull, Ellie Goulding, and Weezer. As a six-time Grammy® Award Winner, Paich has contributed to over 2,000 albums, shaping the sound of popular music as a songwriter, performer, producer, arranger, vocalist and primary composer of the seminal band TOTO. With TOTO, Paich has released 17 albums, sold over 40 million records and garnered over 3 billion streams worldwide. Paich wrote or co-wrote TOTO's biggest hits, "Hold the Line", "Rosanna" and “Africa”. A very special thank you to our sponsor BeBOLD Bars, all natural energy bars from the founder of Stacy's Pita Chips. Check them out at http://www.BeBOLDbars.com and use code BOLD for 20% off your order

The String
Kenny Greenberg plus Bros. Landreth

The String

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 58:59


Episode 215: Since moving to Nashville at age 21 in 1978, Kenny Greenberg has built a reputation as a guitarist who could bring rock and roll punch and jangle to commercial country records as well as a standout behind the glass. Besides his seminal work with Allison Moorer, Kenny has produced albums by the Mavericks, Josh Turner, Joan Baez, Toby Keith and just recently Hayes Carll. And his studio resume is extensive and diverse, including work with Etta James, Chris Knight, Lee Ann Womack, Amy Grant, Jon Randall, Bob Seeger, and his wife of many years, Ashley Cleveland. Now he's released the first solo album in his career. Also in the hour, the Bros. Landreth from Canada about their new record and the song they wrote that Bonnie Raitt just released, with Kenny Greenberg playing guitar. 

Power Your Life
Stefan Haves: The Power of HA! Connecting Through the Heart of Humor

Power Your Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 42:00


Stefan Haves is an accomplished entrepreneur, international bestselling author and an award-winning theatre and cirque director. He collaborated with clowns Bill Irwin and David Shiner on the Tony Award-winning Broadway show Fool Moon before being poached by CIRQUE DU SOLEIL as a comic act designer, casting partner and master teacher. For 40+ years, he's coached and directed thousands of world-class performers globally including Joan Baez, Doug Jones, and Val Kilmer. Most recently, Stefan crafted the Playland Experience in Las Vegas for Katy Perry's New Year's Event. Two of his amazing goals are to reinforce the curative nature of laughter and shatter the stigma of clowns.

Analog Smile
Analog Smile - David Poe

Analog Smile

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 23:29


On this episode of Analog Smile, Sherry speaks with David Poe. His highly-anticipated new album Everyone's Got A Camera arrives September 23rd, 2022 on ECR Music Group. Its powerful third single, “Analog” is out now. More sonically adventurous than his previous album, Poe's latest begins and ends with straightforward songs for a world in reckoning. This third single follows on a wave of critical and commercial success for the artist. Rolling Stone writes, “David Poe gives the singer-songwriter genre a much-needed jolt.” Poe has toured the world with Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, Tori Amos, The Jayhawks, and Glenn Tilbrook of Squeeze. A composer fellow of the Sundance Institute, his work features in numerous film, TV, dance and theater projects, official selections of the Sundance Film Festival, and commercials for humanitarian projects like the Malala Fund and the You Mean The World Foundation. His songs have been performed by a wide array of artists, including Curtis Stigers, Oh Land, Ana Moura, C.C. White, Thomas Dybdahl and the cast of ABC's Nashville, and recorded by producers including T-Bone Burnett, Larry Klein, Buddy Miller, and Dave Sitek. He has also produced recordings for other artists, including Regina Spektor and Kraig Jarret Johnson. Shadowland, a collaboration with contemporary dance company Pilobolus, toured for a decade and was performed on five continents, for Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, and was released as a feature film. In an era of pop music that tends to either turn away from big concerns or focus on small ones, David Poe's Everyone's Got A Camera feels both new and old, as surprising as it is inevitable: a musical treatise for an age in flux that is as daring as it is profound. From 1960s-tinged rock & roll to quasi-trap, with nods to the jazz-inflected folk and acoustic music for which he is best known, Poe's new songs take on the handoff between this century and the last, surveillance culture and the ongoing battle between fact and opinion with a plain-spoken philosopher's wit. Transplanted from the American Midwest to New York City, David Poe served as the sound engineer at CBGB's 313 Gallery before signing with Sony/Epic. He currently lives in Los Angeles. Sherry and David chat about his new single “Analog”, his forthcoming album ‘Everyone's Got A Camera', and much more! Check out davidpoe.com for more information.

奇想驿 by 产品沉思录
零售的哲学:当我在便利店打工时,我在学什么

奇想驿 by 产品沉思录

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 35:47


这是一个新的尝试,避免让自己成为一个「心灵修炼」的主播,毕竟还是做产品的。故事其实横跨了六年,前半截是在便利店打工时候的小故事。后半截是六年后重看铃木敏文的书籍,所受到的启发。所谓的创造新事物,并不是创造了什么,而是从现有世界存在的众多事物中发现某些东西,在此基础上尝试将这些事物与创造联系起来。我曾在 2016 年于 7-Eleven 见习三周(日记上、日记下),因为彼时试图在线下开设实体店,但苦于没有经验,就去报名门店经理见习。对于那时试图改造一切的互联网人来说,这次经历不但打开了视野,接触到了许多从未接触到的概念,也让我对传统行业充满了敬畏之心。虽然不属于一个行业,但是对于做产品启发颇多,因为都是面向大众消费者提供服务的,包括但不限于以下方面: 对于用户需求的洞察和消费趋势的把握,在铃木敏文的书中有大量具体的洞察,其精准性和预见性,远超许多互联网人。而对于消费趋势的把握,则能很早的预见到消费者购买的不再是商品,而是事件。 对于创造性解决问题的思考和能力,如何生产高标准的自有商品,如何为了能在店内存取款而设立银行。 对于供应链及店铺细致的管理能力,密集开店战略的原因,从多供应商一日单配,变成一日多配。以及如何发挥店铺人员的能动性,让其在没有太多经验的情况下,可以进行单品管理,提高销售额。下面的案例也是基于上述的经验思考的实践。 在经营丁香医生的时候,应用便利店内「价格带」管理来重新改造医生的定价指导体系。 在进行医生运营时,参考便利的许多 SOP 标准制定的方法以及培训体系,提高医生的服务意识和质量。6 年以后,再看铃木文敏的书籍和资料,依旧对当下的创业有颇多的启发。但由于其书籍资料重复度较高,每本书自有其结构,所以在此结合自己的经验和对互联网产品设计的启发,重新整理如下,不断迭代。观点摘录 「为顾客着想」和「站在客户立场」是完全不同的概念,前者还是站在卖方立场,脱离了消费者的普通生活; 顾客购买的对象是产品的价值,而不是价格。 现代消费者并非在消费产品本身,而是由自己重视的事情引发了消费行为。 越是美味的东西,顾客越愿意购买,但美味的东西,也是容易生腻的东西。 如果没有实现目标的条件,就自己去思考实现目标的方法。如果不具备必要条件,那么就去改变条件本身。 不要依附于公司,因为人如果依附于某一事物,就会丧失真正的力量。关于铃木敏文铃木敏文 1932 年出生,是日本著名企业家,曾担任日本 7&I 控股公司、伊藤洋华堂、日本 7-Eleven 等公司的代表取缔役会长与 CEO,也担任日本中央大学理事长。 其一直以「外行人」自居,却深谙统计学和消费者心理学,在 40 岁的年龄以及总部不看好的情况下,自行筹资一半和 15 名同僚成立了日本 7-Eleven ,并创造了单品管理这个独特的经营方法。Shownotes: 00:01:30 想去打工,但是遭到歧视(大龄 + 高学历) 00:05:26 培训中一些有趣的故事 00:07:32 拉排面,这个排面是什么 00:11:09 真去店里打工时,那些意想不到的启发 00:15:15 为何要研究铃木敏文?对设计产品有何启发? 00:17:40 第一个启发:何谓真正以顾客视角出发 00:20:44 第二个启发:如何了解顾客的心理 00:25:00 第三个启发:不变的立场与可变的素材 00:28:47 第四个启发:避免站在 A 的延长线上思考 00:31:10 人一旦依附某物,就会丧失真正的力量相关资料 去「产品沉思录」查看 《产品人的 100 本非必读书》音乐 Here's To You by Joan Baez

Monkey Off My Backlog
Ep. 109 - Rockumentaries and Concert Films! Amy, Awesome; I F*****' Shot That, No Direction Home

Monkey Off My Backlog

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 63:16


That's right...Sam hosted this episode! We're talking rockumentaries and concert films. Because 'The Song Remains the Same' was so terrible. This week, we're talking about films centered on Amy Winehouse, the Beastie Boys, and Bob Dylan. 3:00 - Amy 23:50 - Awesome; I F*****' Shot That 41:00 - No Direction Home

Tous les cinémas du monde
Émission spéciale Ennio Morricone

Tous les cinémas du monde

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 48:30


Ses collaborateurs l'appelaient avec déférence Maestro ! C'est même ainsi que l'on fait désormais référence à ce grand nom de la musique de films, ce grand nom de la musique tout court du XXème siècle. On l'appelle donc Maestro, ou même tout simplement par son prénom : Ennio. Ennio, c'est d'ailleurs le titre du nouveau film de Giuseppe Tornatore, le réalisateur italien de Cinema Paradiso a suivi pendant cinq ans l'immense Ennio Morricone, de 2015 à sa mort en juillet 2020. Et il a rencontré d'illustres admirateurs de Bruce Springsteen à Joan Baez en passant par Quentin Tarantino, Clint Eastwood, John Williams ou Dario Argento. Ce documentaire de plus de 2 heures trente est actuellement en salles.   Pour parler d'Ennio Morricone, l'homme aux 253 bandes originales (Il était une fois dans l'Ouest ; Mission ; Le clan des Siciliens ; Le bon, La brute et le truand…), nous recevons le chroniqueur musical et compositeur Alex Jaffray, et Stéphane Lerouge qui dirige la collection « Écoutez le cinéma ! » chez Universal et a édité deux coffrets Ennio Morricone, soit 32 CD, un travail colossal comprenant des livrets avec des entretiens inédits, notamment l'ultime interview d'Ennio Morricone.

Science at the Movies
Silent Running

Science at the Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 84:25


This week, we take a look at the 1972 classic, Silent Running, where a very serious Bruce Dern plays an annoying vegan who commits eco-terrorism but can't live with the guilt of his actions. Tell us we're wrong? With a teeny budget of ONE MILLION DOLLARS, this movie has it all: Joan Baez crooning as Bruce Dern eats a melon, bilateral amputees playing loveable drones (never done before or since) and most importantly, microwave button pushers which definitely became a thing and definitely do not date this movie. .Trees need light, Freeman Lowell!.Links:Silent Running by Mark Kermode (reference for use of bilateral amputees)Silent Spring by Rachel CarsonWhen Prophecy Fails by Festinger, L., Riecken, H. W., & Schachter, S. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Song by Song
Baby Gonna Leave Me, Real Gone, Tom Waits [327]

Song by Song

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 22:49


High energy blues number - check. Harsh beat-boxing rhythmic tone - check. Mumbled lyrics and anti-poetic phrasing - check. David, Sam and Martin find all the required elements, but discuss whether it all comes together in this week's song. Note: we mention Mark Rylance this episode; between recording and release, his brother Jonathan was killed - sympathies from all of us for this loss. website: songbysongpodcast.com twitter: @songbysongpod e-mail: songbysongpodcast@gmail.com Music extracts used for illustrative/review purposes include: Baby Gonna Leave Me, Real Gone (remastered), Tom Waits (2004/2017) Babe I'm Gonna Leave You, In Concert, Joan Baez (1962) Baby Gonna Leave Me, Real Gone (original), Tom Waits (2004) We think your Song by Song experience will be enhanced by hearing, in full, the songs featured in the show, which you can get hold of from your favourite record shop or online platform. Please support artists by buying their music, or using services which guarantee artists a revenue - listen responsibly.

Jamie Roxx's Pop Roxx Talk Radio Show
Ada Marques (Indie-Folk, Singer-Songwriter)

Jamie Roxx's Pop Roxx Talk Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 76:00


Pop Art Painter Jamie Roxx (www.JamieRoxx.us) welcomes Ada Marques (Indie-Folk, Singer-Songwriter) to the Show!    (Click to go there) ● IG: @adatheband ● TK: @adatheband As an only child, Ada Marques admits that she lives in her own head sometimes. She has also always had a level of intimacy with songwriting that is unique and different from most people. At times, her relationship with music felt as vital to her as other people's connection to their best friend. Music made her feel alive and loved, and she couldn't get enough of it. Each night, while her aunt was away at work, Marques would sneak into her bedroom and spend hours sampling and studying each of the albums in her CD collection, connecting emotionally with each artist she discovered including Joni Mitchell, Joan Baez, and Stevie Nicks. “The way they would write their stories so plainly and bluntly yet gracefully inspired me,” she admits, noting their influence on her own style of songwriting. Uncovering Taylor Swift's debut album, Marques realized for the first time that songs don't just happen; they're created by musicians. Instantly, she was inspired to try to unlock her own abilities as a storyteller. ● Media Inquiries: Joshua Hammond Publicist TREND: PR | Branding | Social Media www.TrendPR.com

Natural MD Radio
What We Must Do NOW to Save Reproductive Freedom with Kathryn Kolbert & Julie Kay

Natural MD Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 73:07 Very Popular


The new medicine for women is here—I'm back with a new season full of taboo-busting conversations about all things women's health. As a woman in her wisdom years, I'm bringing together the four decades of work I've done as a midwife, herbalist, and MD, to share tools, knowledge, ideas, and insights with you all.     Today's episode could not have come at a more pressing time in history with the recent decision by the Supreme Court to overturn Roe v. Wade. I am joined by Kathryn Kolbert and Julie Kay, the authors of Controlling Women: What We Must Do NOW to Save Reproductive Freedom, for a critical conversation surrounding reproductive rights, abortion activism, and the American judicial system. Kolbert and Kay have together dedicated decades of their careers to litigating, lobbying, and plotting for the expansion of abortion rights. In the words of Joan Baez, "Action is the antidote to despair."    We discuss:    Why abortion became a potent and polarized political issue  How the overturning of Roe affects maternal care and decisional autonomy  The significant physical and emotional risks associated with lack of access to abortions   How you can become active in making change at a personal and local level      Thank you so much for taking the time to tune in to your body, yourself, and this podcast! Please share the love by sending this to someone in your life who could benefit from the kinds of things we talk about in this space. Make sure to follow me on Instagram @dr.avivaromm and go to avivaromm.com to join the conversation. Purchase a copy of Controlling Women: What We Must Do NOW to Save Reproductive Freedom here. 

Women Awakening with Cynthia James
Cynthia with Martha Reich - Singer Songwriter, Certified Music

Women Awakening with Cynthia James

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 25:50


An award winning Santa Fe-based singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist, Martha Reich has performed around the world and shared stages with Melissa Crabtree, Consuelo Luz, Gregg Braden, Reverend Horton Heat and others, as well as opening for Kate Macleod and performing at the Sundance Film Festival. Originally from New England, she received an B. F. A. in illustration from Parsons School of Design and Philadelphia College of Art, but music called and she relocated to Santa Fe in 1999 where she has since released five CDs including the award winning album entitled BRAVE BIRD.Her 2018 release, BRAVE BIRD, was described as “stunning and heartbreaking” by Americana Highways and earned her a Gold Medal for Female Vocalist in the 2018 Global Music Awards, as well as the LA Critics Award for Best Folk Artist. Often compared to Joni Mitchell and Joan Baez, Reich is deeplyinspired by nature and her unique style features an honesty and vulnerability that evokes “a sound almost woven out of the earth.” She is often joined on stage and on recordings by longtime collaborator, cellist Michael Kott, who “presents the cello as a portrayal of infinite compassion”.Reich was awarded three Indie Music Channel Awards in 2020, the 2019 New Mexico Music Award for Best Singer-Songwriter Song FADE AWAY, and 2 Clouzine International Music Awards, for Best Indie Album BRAVE BIRD, and Best Acoustic Folk Song for THE LETTERS. She previously won Global Music Awards in 2017 and 2016, The Southwest Independent Music Award in 2015 and a 2014 New Mexico Music Award for Best Folk Song.Martha is also a Certified Music Practitioner, playing for Hospital patients, those in Hospice and people living with Alzheimer's and Cancer.Her music can be heard on PANDORA Radio as well as national and international radio stations.It is available via iTunes, Spotify, AppleMusic, BandCamp and her website: www.marthareich.comMartha Reich - Singer Songwriter, Certified MusicPractitioner and Licensed Massage TherapistWebsite: www.marthareich.comEmail: marthareichmusic@gmail.com

Talkin' the Talk with The Great Southern Brainfart
Episode 87: Anne K. O'Neill (Serpentent)

Talkin' the Talk with The Great Southern Brainfart

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 51:04


Anne K. O'Neill (Serpentent) emerged from the void and delivered one of the most disturbingly, dark, yet beautiful collection of music that I have heard in a long time.  Based out of Seattle, WA, Anne is a multi-instrumentalist, artist, and musician who's influences range from Kate Bush to the legendary dark folk sounds of Buffy Sainte Marie and Joan Baez.  Under the Serpentent umbrella, Anne has released Ancient Tomes I: The Mother of Light which is the first of a three part concept album.   It was so exciting to have the opportunity to speak with Anne since it seems pretty rare these days that I get to speak to a brand new emerging artist that I don't know a whole lot about.  It was so interesting to talk to her about her influences, the concept behind the Ancient Tomes trilogy, and how it's just not bad to love the dark.  

Café del sur
Café del sur - Diamantes y óxido - 12/06/22

Café del sur

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 58:51


Historias de amores y de despedidas, de ayer y de hoy, firmadas por Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen, Joan Baez y Patti Smith. Escuchar audio

Uncorked with Funny Wine Girl
Summer Fun'n, Had Me A Blast!

Uncorked with Funny Wine Girl

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 45:57


What are some of your favorite childhood memories from summertime? Do they include trips to your local drive-in theater? Fishing at the lake? Playing games at church picnics or county fairs? This week on Uncorked with Funny Wine Girl, I am sans guest. I'm sharing some of my memories from summertime and offering ideas of ways you can unplug and have fun in Northeast PA. If you like drive-in theaters, you'll want to tune in for at least the first half of this episode. And fun drinking game alert: drink wine every time I say the word "cool." Lol. And "um" will get you a pretty good buzz too :) Resources to find fun things to do in Northeast PA: https://www.visitnepa.org/ https://www.discovernepa.com/ https://www.dcnr.pa.gov/Pages/default.aspx https://lancasteronline.com/news/local/27-places-to-see-a-drive-in-movie-in-pennsylvania/article_888522be-1d2f-11e6-bbe9-efd22dcca512.html Notes/corrections to things I said in this episode: It takes only about 90 minutes to get to Bethel Woods and it's NOT 81 North (oy, I was talking out my butt this week and I had not even been drinking wine). Forest Therapy®” is a research-based practice supporting the healing of individuals through the immersion in forests. The name taken from the Japanese art of “Shinrin-yoku”which translates to “Forest Bathing”. And it was Joni Mitchell who sang "Big Yellow Taxi" (they paved paradise put up a parking lot), not Joan Baez. Be sure to follow Funny Wine Girl Jeannine on Instagram and Facebook and please share some of your summertime memories and/or ideas of things to do in NEPA in the summer! Remember to subscribe and share and as always, I appreciate you from the bottom of my heart and the bottom of my wine glass! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Cindy Paulos Show
Jon Woodhouse, Music Legends on Maui

Cindy Paulos Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 39:05


It's Out! There is no one in Hawai‘i who knows more about the music scene, and the artists themselves than Jon Woodhouse.” - Pat Simmons, The Doobie Brothers. “We've all been waiting for this book.” “At last a written document that honors the music that has taken place on this island represented with grace and passion.” - Mick Fleetwood, Fleetwood Mac. “Jon, who I've known as a friend here for so many years always had great insight into not only the local talent, but more than often a full knowledge of all the incredibly varied world stage acts that have graced these islands.” “Jon's love and deep understanding of music, the variety of people who make it, and the island of Maui are why this book is completely unique.” - Ben Verdery, Professor of Guitar, Yale School of Music. Compiling more than 80 interviews conducted over four decades, Music Legends on Maui presents intriguing profiles of many icons, from Willie Nelson, Prince, and Paul Simon, to B.B. King, Herbie Hancock, and Joan Baez, with unique insights into their creative and spiritual paths. Here are innovative trailblazers, prophets, revolutionaries, and influential artists who have shaped the course of music into the 21st century, many referencing how the Hawaiian islands impacted them https://www.amazon.com/Music-Legends-Maui-Conversations-Hawaiian-ebook/dp/B0B2V1BVVJ/ref=sr_1_1?crid=2AFDRUCZREO20&keywords=jon+woodhouse+music+legends+on+maui&qid=1654653054&sprefix=jon+woodhouse+music+legends+on+maui%2Caps%2C156&sr=8-1

The Smerconish Podcast
Joan Baez Called Me A Moron

The Smerconish Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 13:18


Michael tells the story of a voicemail he received. Original air date 7 June 2022.

Pillole di Italiano
Oggigiorno - Genitori

Pillole di Italiano

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 7:59


Anniversary pill celebrating the Global Day of Parents. - Credits : “Your Intro” by Audionautix (http://audionautix.com/) courtesy of Creative Commons (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) - Joan Baez's “Un mondo d'amore” by Migliacci/Zambrini/Romitelli (1967)

The Politics of Disability
BONUS EPISODE: Disability is Indeed Political - Part 1

The Politics of Disability

Play Episode Play 20 sec Highlight Listen Later May 31, 2022 31:03 Transcription Available


Content warning: Mentions of children's deathIn part 1 of this very special bonus episode, Mary speaks with friend, former colleague at Neighborhood Access, and fellow advocate Dom Kelly.Dom Kelly is currently the Georgia Fundraising Director and the Director of Disability Engagement & Accessibility for Stacey Abrams' campaign for Governor of Georgia.Previously, he was Senior Fundraising Manager at Fair Fight Action, the voting rights organization founded by Stacey Abrams, where he also created and led the organization's Disability Council composed of prominent disability advocates and policy experts from across the country. Dom is one of a set of triplets with Cerebral Palsy and has been a disability advocate since he was four years old. Starting when he was a young teenager, Dom and his brothers toured around the world with their rock band, touring and collaborating with artists like Indigo Girls, Joan Baez, The Bangles, and more and releasing 6 records over 15+ years.He is now retired from music, but with a decade of experience in digital and editorial strategy, he has devoted his life to progressive politics, policy, and advocacy. He received a Master of Science in Nonprofit Leadership degree from the University of Pennsylvania's School of Social Policy and Practice where he also received the Excellence in Social Impact award.Additionally, he holds a bachelor's degree in music production, a master's degree in journalism, an executive certificate in social impact strategy, and a graduate certificate in interdisciplinary disability studies. Dom currently lives in Atlanta, Georgia with his wife Catie, their dog Vivi, and their cat Pippi Longstocking.Mary and Dom discuss the lack of research in adults with Cerebral Palsy, voter suppression, particularly pertaining to disabled voters,  and the myth surrounding those with intellectual disabilities when it comes to voting.

Labor History Today
The Memorial Day Massacre

Labor History Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2022 52:42


(Originally released May 27, 2018) Labor historians Joe McCartin, Ben Blake and Julie Greene remember the 1937 Memorial Day Massacre, when police opened fire on striking steelworkers at Republic Steel in South Chicago, killing ten and wounding more than 160. Patrick Dixon interviews Tom Sito on the 1941 strike by animators against Walt Disney. Sito, a well-known American animator (Who Framed Roger Rabbit, The Lion King, Shrek and many more), animation historian and teacher, is the author of “Drawing the Line: The Untold Story of the Animation Unions from Bosko to Bart Simpson.” And in this week's Labor History Object of the Week we take a look at a United Farm Worker banner commemorating the 1965 strike against grape growers in California. The banner is part of the exhibit “For Liberty, Justice, And Equality: Unions Making History In America” at the George Meany Labor Archives at the University of Maryland College Park campus. Plus we've got music by Joe Glazer, the Eureka's, Willie Sordill and Joan Baez. Union City Radio's Chris Garlock hosts. Joe McCartin is professor of history at Georgetown University and Executive Director of the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor. Julie Greene is a historian of United States labor, immigration, and empire; she teaches at the University of Maryland. She is the author of The Canal Builders: Making America's Empire at the Panama Canal (Penguin Press, 2009). Benjamin Blake works at the University of Maryland, where he's a labor archivist at the George Meany Labor Archives. Chris Garlock, Union Cities Coordinator for the Metro Washington AFL-CIO, hosts Union City Radio on WPFW 89.3FM. Questions, comments or suggestions welcome, and to find out how you can be a part of Labor History Today, email us at LaborHistoryToday@gmail.com Labor History Today is produced by Union City Radio and the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor. Engineered by Chris Garlock. Labor history sources include Today in Labor History, from Union Communication Services unionist.com/ This week's music: Memorial Day Massacre - Joe Glazer 2006 Smithsonian Folkways Recordings / 1975 Collector Records Union Thru and Thru -- the Eureka's Rob Mitchell and Ken Walther (c) Walther Music Talking U.F.W. · Willie Sordill What Now People?, Vol. 2 ℗ 2004 Smithsonian Folkways Recordings / 1977 Paredon Records No nos moveran - JOAN BAEZ

Working Drummer
367 - Jim Brock: Developing Your Own Voice with Percussion, Recording in the Pre-Digital Era

Working Drummer

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 83:30


    Jim Brock has proven to be an innovator in the world of drums and percussion. Within his forty five year career he has appeared on literally hundreds of recordings with artists such as Joe Walsh, Joan Baez, Kathy Mattea, Joe Cocker, Janis Ian, River Phoenix, and James McMurtry. With five solo recordings and a DVD entitled The Nature Of Drumming, Jim Has traveled the world extensively with performances on The Tonight Show, A Prairie Home Companion, Good Morning America, MTV, and multiple appearances on The View, just to name a few. Among these include a concert at the White House for President Clinton in 2000. In 2007, Jim was asked to compose the music for the documentary "The Spirit of Sacajawea". For this work he is the recipient of the prestigious Telly award, and was nominated for an Emmy award in the category of Composer/Arranger. In this episode, Jim talks about:    Learning to develop his own voice with percussion    When and when not to use traditional patterns and feels    Recording with Joe Walsh    Recording in the pre-digital era    Living and working in Charlotte NC    The recording scene in Charlotte    The rhythm of life itself    Recording with Steve Gadd, Alex Acuna, Mel Lewis and others

Hell & High Water with John Heilemann
Bob Crawford

Hell & High Water with John Heilemann

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 92:23 Very Popular


John Heilemann talks with Bob Crawford, bassist for The Avett Brothers and creator of Concerts of Change: The Soundtrack of Human Rights, a new audio docu-series on SiriusXM. Through conversations with artists including U2's Bono, Bob Geldof, and Joan Baez, historian Douglas Brinkley, and civil rights icon Andrew Young, Crawford explores the surge in humanitarian and political activism by musicians -- particularly focused on Africa -- in the seventies and eighties. Heilemann and Crawford discuss the rise of star-studded benefit shows from George Harrison's Concert for Bangladesh to Live Aid; the genesis and behind-the-scenes stories of the chart-topping charity singles "Do They Know It's Christmas?" and "We Are The World"; the singular influence of Geldof in launching Band Aid and Live Aid; the role played by Steven Van Zandt's "Sun City" in ending apartheid in South Africa; and how Bono institutionalized his activist impulses to help combat poverty and AIDS in Africa. They also reflect on Crawford's career with The Avett Brothers, and how his daughter Hallie's battle with cancer changed him and his band. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Encyclopedia Womannica
Prodigies: Joan Baez

Encyclopedia Womannica

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 6:32


Joan Baez (1941-present) is regarded as the Queen of Folk Music, captivating audiences for 60 years with her warbling soprano voice. She used her music as a tool to advocate for social justice and nonviolence.History classes can get a bad rap, and sometimes for good reason. When we were students, we couldn't help wondering... where were all the ladies at? Why were so many incredible stories missing from the typical curriculum? Enter, Womanica. On this Wonder Media Network podcast we explore the lives of inspiring women in history you may not know about, but definitely should.Every weekday, listeners explore the trials, tragedies, and triumphs of groundbreaking women throughout history who have dramatically shaped the world around us. In each 5 minute episode, we'll dive into the story behind one woman listeners may or may not know–but definitely should. These diverse women from across space and time are grouped into easily accessible and engaging monthly themes like Educators, Villains, Indigenous Storytellers, Activists, and many more.  Womanica is hosted by WMN co-founder and award-winning journalist Jenny Kaplan. The bite-sized episodes pack painstakingly researched content into fun, entertaining, and addictive daily adventures. Womanica was created by Liz Kaplan and Jenny Kaplan, executive produced by Jenny Kaplan, and produced by Liz Smith, Grace Lynch, Maddy Foley, Brittany Martinez, Edie Allard, Lindsey Kratochwill, Adesuwa Agbonile, Carmen Borca-Carrillo, Taylor Williamson, and Ale Tejeda. Special thanks to Shira Atkins.Original theme music composed by Miles Moran.We are offering free ad space on Wonder Media Network shows to organizations working towards social justice. For more information, please email Jenny at pod@wondermedianetwork.com.Follow Wonder Media Network:WebsiteInstagramTwitterTo take the Womanica listener survey, please visit: https://wondermedianetwork.com/survey 

Hard Rain & Slow Trains: Bob Dylan & Fellow Travelers
4/28/2022: "May Your Song Always Be Sung": Blowin' in the Wind

Hard Rain & Slow Trains: Bob Dylan & Fellow Travelers

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 84:22


This episode continues our monthly series featuring a single Dylan song and marks the 60th anniversary of the composition of "Blowin' in the Wind" in April of 1962. You'll hear studio and live performances of “Blowin' in the Wind” by Dylan and fellow travelers and a special medley of 28 different versions of the song. The weekly news segment “20 Pounds of Headlines” tells you about a new recording project for Dylan done in partnership with T-Bone Burnett and announces the new director of the Bob Dylan Center in Tulsa. In "Who Did It Better?" we ask you to tell us which version of "Blowin' in the Wind" is better: Bob Dylan in Budokan on March 1, 1978 or Bob Dylan at Earl's Court in London on June 27, 1981? Go to our Twitter page @RainTrains to vote!

What the Riff?!?
1977 - December: Jackson Browne “Running On Empty”

What the Riff?!?

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 41:46


Running on Empty was the fifth album by Jackson Browne.  The album revolves around the theme of life on the road, and it is a live album, but with a couple of twists.  First, none of these tracks had previously appeared on a Jackson Browne studio album.  Second, while some of the songs were recorded on stage during concerts, others were recorded backstage, or in hotel rooms, or on the tour bus.  This gives the album more of a concept feel than would be present for a typical "live" album.Browne got his start as a songwriter as a teenager, and joined the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band shortly after high school.  His early songs were recorded by the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Nico, Steve Noonan, Gregg Allman, Joan Baez, Linda Ronstadt, The Eagles, The Byrds, and others.  He was a backing musician for Nico in 1967 and wrote three of the songs on her debut album, He co-wrote "Take It Easy," the first hit by the Eagles.This album is considered one of the most accessible albums Browne created, and is his most successful album.  It reached number 3 on the Billboard Pop Albums chart in 1978, and stayed on the charts for 65 weeks.  It was nominated for Album of the Year in 1979.  The title track would become a staple of classic rock. Running on EmptyThe title track and first single from the album was recorded in concert at Merriweather Post Pavilion in Columbia, Maryland.  It hit number 11 on the Billboard Hot 100.  The song was inspired by Browne's driving to the studio to make "The Pretender."  It was only a few blocks from his house to the studio, and Browne wouldn't bother to fill up, so he was always literally running on empty.Nothing But TimeThis track is about the boredom of life on the road.  It was written and recorded on the tour bus, a Continental Silver Eagle.  You can hear the bus's engine running in the background, downshifting and accelerating during the bridge.  Browne and Howard Burke (his tour manager) wrote this one.  Russ Kunkel is on percussion, playing snare, hi-hat, and "cardboard box with foot pedal."The Load OutThis is a well-known track about the folks that put the show together and the fans that come to hear the concert.  "We've got to drive all night and do the show in Chicago - or Detroit, I don't know.  We do so many shows in a row, and these towns all look the same."  It portrays a decidedly unglamorous picture of touring life, with the one exception of the time on the stage.StayAlmost always played in series on rock stations with “The Load Out,” this cover of Maurice Williams and the Zodiac's song from 1960 replaces concerns about mom and dad letting the girl stay out with concerns that the roadies, producers, and union letting the band play one more song. ENTERTAINMENT TRACK:Night Fever by the Bee Gees (from the motion picture "Saturday Night Fever")The movie that would make John Travolta a household name and disco the music genre of choice across the nation was released in December 1977. STAFF PICKS:Mind Bender by StillwaterWayne leads off with a band whose name was used for a rock band in the movie "Almost Famous."  This vocoder-laced southern rock piece with a shuffle beat hit the Billboard Hot 100 at number 46.  The song is about a talking guitar called "Mindbender.:  Stillwater is from Warner Robins, Georgia, and plays an annual show in Macon at Christmas time.She's Not There by SantanaRob brings us a cover of the Zombie's hit from the 60's.  While the Zombie's version made it to number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100, Carlos Santana gives it a Latin fusion twist that would hit number 27 on the charts.  Greg Walker is the vocalist on this single, with Santana of course on guitar.Help Is On Its Way by the Little River BandBrian's staff pick is from the Australian band known for their harmonies and easy groove.  This is the lead single from their third album, Diamantina Cocktail.  The song has a positive feel, and peaked at number 14 on the Billboard Hot 100.Baby Come Back by PlayerBruce's staff pick was written by band members Peter Beckett (lead vocals and guitar) and J.C. Crowley (piano and backing vocals)  after two of the band members had broken up with their girl friends.  This is off their self-titled debut album.  The band would be less successful when they moved from a soul oriented sound to a more rock-oriented sound on their future albums. INSTRUMENTAL TRACK:The Dialogue from the motion picture "Close Encounters of the Third Kind"The distinctive 5-note jingle marked the start of a conversation with aliens in this science fiction movie that debuted in December 1977. 

eTown
eTown's Best of 2008 - PART ONE

eTown

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 59:15


We're continuing our journey through the past 30 seasons of eTown; this week, we're listening back to some stellar moments from the 2008 show archives. We'll hear some great tunes from Koko Taylor, Joan Baez, and more! Plus, we'll hear a few interviews from 2008, including host Nick Forster's chat with Irma Thomas from the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver.

The Seen and the Unseen - hosted by Amit Varma
Ep 269: The Life and Times of Nirupama Rao

The Seen and the Unseen - hosted by Amit Varma

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 250:02


A lifetime in diplomacy gave Nirupama Rao an inside view of the making of the first draft of history. She joins Amit Varma in episode 269 of The Seen and the Unseen to share her life lessons -- and what still keeps her buzzing every day. Also check out: 1. Nirupama Rao on Twitter, Substack, Instagram and her own website. 2. The Fractured Himalaya -- Nirupama Rao. 3. A Life in Diplomacy -- Nirupama Rao's talk at Claremont McKenna College. 4. Selected episodes of The Seen and the Unseen on China: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. 5. Selected episode of The Seen and the Unseen on Foreign Policy: 1, 2. 6. Amitava Kumar Finds the Breath of Life -- Episode 265 of The Seen and the Unseen. 7. Sara Rai Inhales Literature -- Episode 255 of The Seen and the Unseen. 8. The Life and Times of Mrinal Pande -- Episode 263 of The Seen and the Unseen. 9. The Glass Cliff. 10. Philip Tetlock on the Art of Forecasting -- Episode 31 of Brave New World (hosted by Vasant Dhar). 11. The Confidence Gap — Katty Kay and Claire Shipman. 12. Democracy in Pakistan — Episode 79 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Pranay Kotasthane & Hamsini Hariharan.) 13. The Business of Winning Elections -- Episode 247 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Shivam Shankar Singh). 14. Nehru: The Debates that Defined India — Tripurdaman Singh and Adeel Hussain. 15. Nehru's Debates -- Episode 262 of The Seen and the Unseen (with Tripurdaman Singh & Adeel Hussain.) 16. Talking South Asia: Can Identity Be Crafted Through the Medium of Music? -- A conversation between Nirupama Rao and Ali Sethi. 17. The Tirukkural -- Tiruvalluvar. 18. Collected Poems -- AK Ramanujan. 19. I Never Dreamed You'd Leave In Summer -- Joan Baez. 20. Joan Baez, Maria Callas, Renée Fleming and Marian Anderson on Spotify. 21. The Collected Tintin. 22. Ekla Chalo Re. 23. A Meditation on Form -- Amit Varma. 24. The Life and Times of Abhinandan Sekhri -- Episode 254 of The Seen and the Unseen. 25. In Praise of Shadows -- Junichiro Tanizaki. 26. Some Prefer Nettles -- Junichiro Tanizaki. 27. The Book of Tea -- Kakuzo Okakura. 28. MS Subbulakshmi on Spotify. 29. The Country without a Post Office -- Agha Shahid Ali. 30. The Lark Ascending -- Vaughan Williams. 31. Norma -- Vincenzo Bellini. 32. Casta Diva -- Maria Callas. 33. Connais-Tu Le Pays -- Ambroise Thomas. This episode is sponsored by CTQ Compounds. Check out The Daily Reader and FutureStack. Use the code UNSEEN for Rs 2500 off. Check out Amit's online course, The Art of Clear Writing. And subscribe to The India Uncut Newsletter. It's free!

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 143: “Summer in the City” by the Lovin’ Spoonful

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 7, 2022


Episode 143 of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “Summer in the City'”, and at the short but productive career of the Lovin' Spoonful.  Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "The Sun Ain't Gonna Shine Any More" by the Walker Brothers and the strange career of Scott Walker. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources As usual, all the songs excerpted in the podcast can be heard in full at Mixcloud. This box set contains all four studio albums by the Lovin' Spoonful, plus the one album by "The Lovin' Spoonful featuring Joe Butler", while this CD contains their two film soundtracks (mostly inessential instrumental filler, apart from "Darling Be Home Soon") Information about harmonicas and harmonicists comes from Harmonicas, Harps, and Heavy Breathers by Kim Field. There are only three books about the Lovin' Spoonful, but all are worth reading. Do You Believe in Magic? by Simon Wordsworth is a good biography of the band, while his The Magic's in the Music is a scrapbook of press cuttings and reminiscences. Meanwhile Steve Boone's Hotter Than a Match Head: My Life on the Run with the Lovin' Spoonful has rather more discussion of the actual music than is normal in a musician's autobiography. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Let's talk about the harmonica for a while. The harmonica is an instrument that has not shown up a huge amount in the podcast, but which was used in a fair bit of the music we've covered. We've heard it for example on records by Bo Diddley: [Excerpt: Bo Diddley, "I'm a Man"] and by Bob Dylan: [Excerpt: Bob Dylan, "Blowin' in the Wind"] and the Rolling Stones: [Excerpt: The Rolling Stones, "Little Red Rooster"] In most folk and blues contexts, the harmonicas used are what is known as a diatonic harmonica, and these are what most people think of when they think of harmonicas at all. Diatonic harmonicas have the notes of a single key in them, and if you want to play a note in another key, you have to do interesting tricks with the shape of your mouth to bend the note. There's another type of harmonica, though, the chromatic harmonica. We've heard that a time or two as well, like on "Love Me Do" by the Beatles: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love Me Do"] Chromatic harmonicas have sixteen holes, rather than the diatonic harmonica's ten, and they also have a slide which you can press to raise the note by a semitone, meaning you can play far more notes than on a diatonic harmonica -- but they're also physically harder to play, requiring a different kind of breathing to pull off playing one successfully. They're so different that John Lennon would distinguish between the two instruments -- he'd describe a chromatic harmonica as a harmonica, but a diatonic harmonica he would call a harp, like blues musicians often did: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love These Goon Shows"] While the chromatic harmonica isn't a particularly popular instrument in rock music, it is one that has had some success in other fields. There have been some jazz and light-orchestral musicians who have become famous playing the instrument, like the jazz musician Max Geldray, who played in those Goon Shows the Beatles loved so much: [Excerpt: Max Geldray, "C-Jam Blues"] And in the middle of the twentieth century there were a few musicians who succeeded in making the harmonica into an instrument that was actually respected in serious classical music. By far the most famous of these was Larry Adler, who became almost synonymous with the instrument in the popular consciousness, and who reworked many famous pieces of music for the instrument: [Excerpt: Larry Adler, "Rhapsody in Blue"] But while Adler was the most famous classical harmonicist of his generation, he was not generally considered the best by other musicians. That was, rather, a man named John Sebastian. Sebastian, who chose to take his middle name as a surname partly to Anglicise his name but also, it seems, at least in part as tribute to Johann Sebastian Bach (which incidentally now makes it really, really difficult to search for copies of his masterwork "John Sebastian Plays Bach", as Internet searches uniformly think you're searching just for the composer...) started out like almost all harmonica players as an amateur playing popular music. But he quickly got very, very, good, and by his teens he was already teaching other children, including at a summer camp run by Albert Hoxie, a musician and entrepreneur who was basically single-handedly responsible for the boom in harmonica sales in the 1920s and 1930s, by starting up youth harmonica orchestras -- dozens or even hundreds of kids, all playing harmonica together, in a semi-militaristic youth organisation something like the scouts, but with harmonicas instead of woggles and knots. Hoxie's group and the various organisations copying it led to there being over a hundred and fifty harmonica orchestras in Chicago alone, and in LA in the twenties and thirties a total of more than a hundred thousand children passed through harmonica orchestras inspired by Hoxie. Hoxie's youth orchestras were largely responsible for the popularity of the harmonica as a cheap instrument for young people, and thus for its later popularity in the folk and blues worlds. That was only boosted in the Second World War by the American Federation of Musicians recording ban, which we talked about in the early episodes of the podcast -- harmonicas had never been thought of as a serious instrument, and so most professional harmonica players were not members of the AFM, but were considered variety performers and were part of the American Guild of Variety Artists, along with singers, ukulele players, and musical saw players. Of course, the war did also create a problem, because the best harmonicas were made in Germany by the Hohner company, but soon a lot of American companies started making cheap harmonicas to fill the gap in the market. There's a reason the cliche of the GI in a war film playing a harmonica in the trenches exists, and it's largely because of Hoxie. And Hoxie was based in Philadelphia, where John Sebastian lived as a kid, and he mentored the young player, who soon became a semi-professional performer. Sebastian's father was a rich banker, and discouraged him from becoming a full-time musician -- the plan was that after university, Sebastian would become a diplomat. But as part of his preparation for that role, he was sent to spend a couple of years studying at the universities of Rome and Florence, learning about Italian culture. On the boat back, though, he started talking to two other passengers, who turned out to be the legendary Broadway songwriting team Rodgers and Hart, the writers of such classic songs as "Blue Moon" and "My Funny Valentine": [Excerpt: Ella Fitzgerald, "My Funny Valentine"] Sebastian talked to his new friends, and told them that he was feeling torn between being a musician and being in the foreign service like his father wanted. They both told him that in their experience some people were just born to be artists, and that those people would never actually find happiness doing anything else. He took their advice, and decided he was going to become a full-time harmonica player. He started out playing in nightclubs, initially playing jazz and swing, but only while he built up a repertoire of classical music. He would rehearse with a pianist for three hours every day, and would spend the rest of his time finding classical works, especially baroque ones, and adapting them for the harmonica. As he later said “I discovered sonatas by Telemann, Veracini, Bach, Handel, Vivaldi, Hasse, Marcello, Purcell, and many others, which were written to be played on violin, flute, oboe, musette, even bagpipes... The composer seemed to be challenging each instrument to create the embellishments and ornaments to suit its particular voice. . . . I set about choosing works from this treasure trove that would best speak through my instrument.” Soon his nightclub repertoire was made up entirely of these classical pieces, and he was making records like John Sebastian Plays Bach: [Excerpt: John Sebastian, "Flute Sonata in B Minor BWV1030 (J.S. Bach)"] And while Sebastian was largely a lover of baroque music above all other forms, he realised that he would have to persuade new composers to write new pieces for the instrument should he ever hope for it to have any kind of reputation as a concert instrument, so he persuaded contemporary composers to write pieces like George Kleinsinger's "Street Corner Concerto", which Sebastian premiered with the New York Philharmonic: [Excerpt: John Sebastian, "Street Corner Concerto"] He became the first harmonica player to play an entirely classical repertoire, and regarded as the greatest player of his instrument in the world. The oboe player Jay S Harrison once wrote of seeing him perform "to accomplish with success a program of Mr. Sebastian's scope is nothing short of wizardry. . . . He has vast technical facility, a bulging range of colors, and his intentions are ever musical and sophisticated. In his hands the harmonica is no toy, no simple gadget for the dispensing of homespun tunes. Each single number of the evening was whittled, rounded, polished, and poised. . . . Mr. Sebastian's playing is uncanny." Sebastian came from a rich background, and he managed to earn enough as a classical musician to live the lifestyle of a rich artistic Bohemian. During the forties and fifties he lived in Greenwich Village with his family -- apart from a four-year period living in Rome from 1951 to 55 -- and Eleanor Roosevelt was a neighbour, while Vivian Vance, who played Ethel Mertz on I Love Lucy, was the godmother of his eldest son. But while Sebastian's playing was entirely classical, he was interested in a wider variety of music. When he would tour Europe, he would often return having learned European folk songs, and while he was living in Greenwich Village he would often be visited by people like Burl Ives, Woody Guthrie, and other folk singers living in the area. And that early influence rubbed off on Sebastian's son, John Benson Sebastian, although young John gave up trying to learn the harmonica the first time he tried, because he didn't want to be following too closely in his father's footsteps. Sebastian junior did, though, take up the guitar, inspired by the first wave rock and rollers he was listening to on Alan Freed's show, and he would later play the harmonica, though the diatonic harmonica rather than the chromatic. In case you haven't already figured it out, John Benson Sebastian, rather than his father, is a principal focus of this episode, and so to avoid confusion, from this point on, when I refer to "John Sebastian" or "Sebastian" without any qualifiers, I'm referring to the younger man. When I refer to "John Sebastian Sr" I'm talking about the father. But it was John Sebastian Sr's connections, in particular to the Bohemian folk and blues scenes, which gave his more famous son his first connection to that world of his own, when Sebastian Sr appeared in a TV show, in November 1960, put together by Robert Herridge, a TV writer and producer who was most famous for his drama series but who had also put together documentaries on both classical music and jazz, including the classic performance documentary The Sound of Jazz. Herridge's show featured both Sebastian Sr and the country-blues player Lightnin' Hopkins: [Excerpt: Lightnin' Hopkins, "Blues in the Bottle"] Hopkins was one of many country-blues players whose career was having a second wind after his discovery by the folk music scene. He'd been recording for fourteen years, putting out hundreds of records, but had barely performed outside Houston until 1959, when the folkies had picked up on his work, and in October 1960 he had been invited to play Carnegie Hall, performing with Pete Seeger and Joan Baez. Young John Sebastian had come along with his dad to see the TV show be recorded, and had an almost Damascene conversion -- he'd already heard Hopkins' recordings, but had never seen anything like his live performances. He was at that time attending a private boarding school, Blair Academy, and his roommate at the school also had his own apartment, where Sebastian would sometimes stay. Soon Lightnin' Hopkins was staying there as well, as somewhere he could live rent-free while he was in New York. Sebastian started following Hopkins around and learning everything he could, being allowed by the older man to carry his guitar and buy him gin, though the two never became close. But eventually, Hopkins would occasionally allow Sebastian to play with him when he played at people's houses, which he did on occasion. Sebastian became someone that Hopkins trusted enough that when he was performing on a bill with someone else whose accompanist wasn't able to make the gig and Sebastian put himself forward, Hopkins agreed that Sebastian would be a suitable accompanist for the evening. The singer he accompanied that evening was a performer named Valentine Pringle, who was a protege of Harry Belafonte, and who had a similar kind of sound to Paul Robeson. Sebastian soon became Pringle's regular accompanist, and played on his first album, I Hear America Singing, which was also the first record on which the great trumpet player Hugh Masakela played. Sadly, Paul Robeson style vocals were so out of fashion by that point that that album has never, as far as I can tell, been issued in a digital format, and hasn't even been uploaded to YouTube.  But this excerpt from a later recording by Pringle should give you some idea of the kind of thing he was doing: [Excerpt: Valentine Pringle, "Go 'Way From My Window"] After these experiences, Sebastian started regularly going to shows at Greenwich Village folk clubs, encouraged by his parents -- he had an advantage over his peers because he'd grown up in the area and had artistic parents, and so he was able to have a great deal of freedom that other people in their teens weren't. In particular, he would always look out for any performances by the great country blues performer Mississippi John Hurt. Hurt had made a few recordings for Okeh records in 1928, including an early version of "Stagger Lee", titled "Stack O'Lee": [Excerpt: Mississippi John Hurt, "Stack O'Lee Blues"] But those records had been unsuccessful, and he'd carried on working on a farm. and not performed other than in his tiny home town of Avalon, Mississippi, for decades. But then in 1952, a couple of his tracks had been included on the Harry Smith Anthology, and as a result he'd come to the attention of the folk and blues scholar community. They'd tried tracking him down, but been unable to until in the early sixties one of them had discovered a track on one of Hurt's records, "Avalon Blues", and in 1963, thirty-five years after he'd recorded six flop singles, Mississippi John Hurt became a minor star, playing the Newport Folk Festival and appearing on the Tonight Show. By this time, Sebastian was a fairly well-known figure in Greenwich Village, and he had become quite a virtuoso on the harmonica himself, and would walk around the city wearing a holster-belt containing harmonicas in a variety of different keys. Sebastian became a huge fan of Hurt, and would go and see him perform whenever Hurt was in New York. He soon found himself first jamming backstage with Hurt, and then performing with him on stage for the last two weeks of a residency. He was particularly impressed with what he called Hurt's positive attitude in his music -- something that Sebastian would emulate in his own songwriting. Sebastian was soon invited to join a jug band, called the Even Dozen Jug Band. Jug band music was a style of music that first became popular in the 1920s, and had many of the same musical elements as the music later known as skiffle. It was played on a mixture of standard musical instruments -- usually portable, "folky" ones like guitar and harmonica -- and improvised homemade instruments, like the spoons, the washboard, and comb and paper. The reason they're called jug bands is because they would involve someone blowing into a jug to make a noise that sounded a bit like a horn -- much like the coffee pot groups we talked about way back in episode six. The music was often hokum music, and incorporated elements of what we'd now call blues, vaudeville, and country music, though at the time those genres were nothing like as distinct as they're considered today: [Excerpt: Cincinnati Jug Band, "Newport Blues"] The Even Dozen Jug Band actually ended up having thirteen members, and it had a rather remarkable lineup. The leader was Stefan Grossman, later regarded as one of the greatest fingerpicking guitarists in America, and someone who will be coming up in other contexts in future episodes I'm sure, and they also featured David Grisman, a mandolin player who would later play with the Grateful Dead among many others;  Steve Katz, who would go on to be a founder member of Blood, Sweat and Tears and produce records for Lou Reed; Maria D'Amato, who under her married name Maria Muldaur would go on to have a huge hit with "Midnight at the Oasis"; and Joshua Rifkin, who would later go on to become one of the most important scholars of Bach's music of the latter half of the twentieth century, but who is best known for his recordings of Scott Joplin's piano rags, which more or less single-handedly revived Joplin's music from obscurity and created the ragtime revival of the 1970s: [Excerpt: Joshua Rifkin, "Maple Leaf Rag"] Unfortunately, despite the many talents involved, a band as big as that was uneconomical to keep together, and the Even Dozen Jug Band only played four shows together -- though those four shows were, as Muldaur later remembered, "Carnegie Hall twice, the Hootenanny television show and some church". The group did, though, make an album for Elektra records, produced by Paul Rothchild. Indeed, it was Rothchild who was the impetus for the group forming -- he wanted to produce a record of a jug band, and had told Grossman that if he got one together, he'd record it: [Excerpt: The Even Dozen Jug Band, "On the Road Again"] On that album, Sebastian wasn't actually credited as John Sebastian -- because he was playing harmonica on the album, and his father was such a famous harmonica player, he thought it better if he was credited by his middle name, so he was John Benson for this one album. The Even Dozen Jug Band split up after only a few months, with most of the band more interested in returning to university than becoming professional musicians, but Sebastian remained in touch with Rothchild, as they both shared an interest in the drug culture, and Rothchild started using him on sessions for other artists on Elektra, which was rapidly becoming one of the biggest labels for the nascent counterculture. The first record the two worked together on after the Even Dozen Jug Band was sparked by a casual conversation. Vince Martin and Fred Neil saw Sebastian walking down the street wearing his harmonica holster, and were intrigued and asked him if he played. Soon he and his friend Felix Pappalardi were accompanying Martin and Neil on stage, and the two of them were recording as the duo's accompanists: [Excerpt: Vince Martin and Fred Neil, "Tear Down the Walls"] We've mentioned Neil before, but if you don't remember him, he was one of the people around whom the whole Greenwich Village scene formed -- he was the MC and organiser of bills for many of the folk shows of the time, but he's now best known for writing the songs "Everybody's Talkin'", recorded famously by Harry Nilsson, and "The Dolphins", recorded by Tim Buckley. On the Martin and Neil album, Tear Down The Walls, as well as playing harmonica, Sebastian acted essentially as uncredited co-producer with Rothchild, but Martin and Neil soon stopped recording for Elektra. But in the meantime, Sebastian had met the most important musical collaborator he would ever have, and this is the start of something that will become a minor trend in the next few years, of important musical collaborations happening because of people being introduced by Cass Elliot. Cass Elliot had been a singer in a folk group called the Big 3 -- not the same group as the Merseybeat group -- with Tim Rose, and the man who would be her first husband, Jim Hendricks (not the more famous guitarist of a similar name): [Excerpt: Cass Elliot and the Big 3, "The Banjo Song"] The Big 3 had split up when Elliot and Hendricks had got married, and the two married members had been looking around for other musicians to perform with, when coincidentally another group they knew also split up. The Halifax Three were a Canadian group who had originally started out as The Colonials, with a lineup of Denny Doherty, Pat LaCroix and Richard Byrne. Byrne didn't turn up for a gig, and a homeless guitar player, Zal Yanovsky, who would hang around the club the group were playing at, stepped in. Doherty and LaCroix, much to Yanovsky's objections, insisted he bathe and have a haircut, but soon the newly-renamed Halifax Three were playing Carnegie Hall and recording for Epic Records: [Excerpt: The Halifax Three, "When I First Came to This Island"] But then a plane they were in crash-landed, and the group took that as a sign that they should split up. So they did, and Doherty and Yanovsky continued as a duo, until they hooked up with Hendricks and Elliot and formed a new group, the Mugwumps. A name which may be familiar if you recognise one of the hits of a group that Doherty and Elliot were in later: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "Creeque Alley"] But we're skipping ahead a bit there. Cass Elliot was one of those few people in the music industry about whom it is impossible to find anyone with a bad word to say, and she was friendly with basically everyone, and particularly good at matching people up with each other. And on February the 7th 1964, she invited John Sebastian over to watch the Beatles' first performance on the Ed Sullivan Show. Like everyone in America, he was captivated by the performance: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Want to Hold Your Hand (live on the Ed Sullivan Show)"] But Yanovsky was also there, and the two played guitar together for a bit, before retreating to opposite sides of the room. And then Elliot spent several hours as a go-between, going to each man and telling him how much the other loved and admired his playing and wanted to play more with him. Sebastian joined the Mugwumps for a while, becoming one of the two main instrumentalists with Yanovsky, as the group pivoted from performing folk music to performing Beatles-inspired rock. But the group's management team, Bob Cavallo and Roy Silver, who weren't particularly musical people, and whose main client was the comedian Bill Cosby, got annoyed at Sebastian, because he and Yanovsky were getting on *too* well musically -- they were trading blues licks on stage, rather than sticking to the rather pedestrian arrangements that the group was meant to be performing -- and so Silver fired Sebastian fired from the group. When the Mugwumps recorded their one album, Sebastian had to sit in the control room while his former bandmates recorded with session musicians, who he thought were nowhere near up to his standard: [Excerpt: The Mugwumps, "Searchin'"] By the time that album was released, the Mugwumps had already split up. Sebastian had continued working as a session musician for Elektra, including playing on the album The Blues Project, which featured white Greenwich Village folk musicians like Eric Von Schmidt, Dave Van Ronk, and Spider John Koerner playing their versions of old blues records, including this track by Geoff Muldaur, which features Sebastian on harmonica and "Bob Landy" on piano -- a fairly blatant pseudonym: [Excerpt: Geoff Muldaur, "Downtown Blues"] Sebastian also played rhythm guitar and harmonica on the demos that became a big part of Tim Hardin's first album -- and his fourth, when the record company released the remaining demos. Sebastian doesn't appear to be on the orchestrated ballads that made Hardin's name -- songs like "Reason to Believe" and "Misty Roses" -- but he is on much of the more blues-oriented material, which while it's not anything like as powerful as Hardin's greatest songs, made up a large part of his repertoire: [Excerpt: Tim Hardin, "Ain't Gonna Do Without"] Erik Jacobsen, the producer of Hardin's records, was impressed enough by Sebastian that he got Sebastian to record lead vocals, for a studio group consisting of Sebastian, Felix Pappalardi, Jerry Yester and Henry Diltz of the Modern Folk Quartet, and a bass singer whose name nobody could later remember. The group, under the name "Pooh and the Heffalumps", recorded two Beach Boys knockoffs, "Lady Godiva" and "Rooty Toot", the latter written by Sebastian, though he would later be embarrassed by it and claim it was by his cousin: [Excerpt: Pooh and the Heffalumps, "Rooty Toot"] After that, Jacobsen became convinced that Sebastian should form a group to exploit his potential as a lead singer and songwriter. By this point, the Mugwumps had split up, and their management team had also split, with Silver taking Bill Cosby and Cavallo taking the Mugwumps, and so Sebastian was able to work with Yanovsky, and the putative group could be managed by Cavallo. But Sebastian and Yanovsky needed a rhythm section. And Erik Jacobsen knew a band that might know some people. Jacobsen was a fan of a Beatles soundalike group called the Sellouts, who were playing Greenwich Village and who were co-managed by Herb Cohen, the manager of the Modern Folk Quartet (who, as we heard a couple of episodes ago, would soon go on to be the manager of the Mothers of Invention). The Sellouts were ultra-professional by the standards  of rock groups of the time -- they even had a tape echo machine that they used on stage to give them a unique sound -- and they had cut a couple of tracks with Jacobsen producing, though I've not been able to track down copies of them. Their leader Skip Boone, had started out playing guitar in a band called the Blue Suedes, and had played in 1958 on a record by their lead singer Arthur Osborne: [Excerpt: Arthur Osborne, "Hey Ruby"] Skip Boone's brother Steve in his autobiography says that that was produced by Chet Atkins for RCA, but it was actually released on Brunswick records. In the early sixties, Skip Boone joined a band called the Kingsmen -- not the same one as the band that recorded "Louie Louie" -- playing lead guitar with his brother Steve on rhythm, a singer called Sonny Bottari, a saxophone player named King Charles, bass player Clay Sonier, and drummer Joe Butler. Sometimes Butler would get up front and sing, and then another drummer, Jan Buchner, would sit in in his place. Soon Steve Boone would replace Bonier as the bass player, but the Kingsmen had no success, and split up. From the ashes of the Kingsmen had formed the Sellouts, Skip Boone, Jerry Angus, Marshall O'Connell, and Joe Butler, who had switched from playing "Peppermint Twist" to playing "I Want to Hold Your Hand" in February 1964. Meanwhile Steve Boone went on a trip to Europe before starting at university in New York, where he hooked up again with Butler, and it was Butler who introduced him to Sebastian and Yanovsky. Sebastian and Yanovsky had been going to see the Sellouts at the behest of Jacobsen, and they'd been asking if they knew anyone else who could play that kind of material. Skip Boone had mentioned his little brother, and as soon as they met him, even before they first played together, they knew from his appearance that he would be the right bass player for them. So now they had at least the basis for a band. They hadn't played together, but Erik Jacobsen was an experienced record producer and Cavallo an experienced manager. They just needed to do some rehearsals and get a drummer, and a record contract was more or less guaranteed. Boone suggested Jan Buchner, the backup drummer from the Kingsmen, and he joined them for rehearsals. It was during these early rehearsals that Boone got to play on his first real record, other than some unreleased demos the Kingsmen had made. John Sebastian got a call from that "Bob Landy" we mentioned earlier, asking if he'd play bass on a session. Boone tagged along, because he was a fan, and when Sebastian couldn't get the parts down for some songs, he suggested that Boone, as an actual bass player, take over: [Excerpt: Bob Dylan, "Maggie's Farm"] But the new group needed a name, of course. It was John Sebastian who came up with the name they eventually chose, The Lovin' Spoonful, though Boone was a bit hesitant about it at first, worrying that it might be a reference to heroin -- Boone was from a very conservative, military, background, and knew little of drug culture and didn't at that time make much of a distinction between cannabis and heroin, though he'd started using the former -- but Sebastian was insistent. The phrase actually referred to coffee -- the name came from "Coffee Blues" by Sebastian's old idol Mississippi John Hurt – or at least Hurt always *said* it was about coffee, though in live performance he apparently made it clear that it was about cunnilingus: [Excerpt: Mississippi John Hurt, "Coffee Blues"] Their first show, at the Night Owl Club, was recorded, and there was even an attempt to release it as a CD in the 1990s, but it was left unreleased and as far as I can tell wasn't even leaked. There have been several explanations for this, but perhaps the most accurate one is just the comment from the manager of the club, who came up to the group after their two sets and told them “Hey, I don't know how to break this to you, but you guys suck.” There were apparently three different problems. They were underrehearsed -- which could be fixed with rehearsal -- they were playing too loud and hurting the patrons' ears -- which could be fixed by turning down the amps -- and their drummer didn't look right, was six years older than the rest of the group, and was playing in an out-of-date fifties style that wasn't suitable for the music they were playing. That was solved by sacking Buchner. By this point Joe Butler had left the Sellouts, and while Herb Cohen was interested in managing him as a singer, he was willing to join this new group at least for the moment. By now the group were all more-or-less permanent residents at the Albert Hotel, which was more or less a doss-house where underemployed musicians would stay, and which had its own rehearsal rooms. As well as the Spoonful, Cass Elliot and Denny Doherty lived there, as did the Paul Butterfield Blues Band. Joe Butler quickly fit into the group, and soon they were recording what became their first single, produced by Jacobsen, an original of Sebastian's called "Do You Believe in Magic?", with Sebastian on autoharp and vocals, Yanovsky on lead guitar and backing vocals, Boone on bass, Butler on drums, and Jerry Yester adding piano and backing vocals: [Excerpt: The Lovin' Spoonful, "Do You Believe in Magic?"] For a long time, the group couldn't get a deal -- the record companies all liked the song, but said that unless the group were English they couldn't sell them at the moment. Then Phil Spector walked into the Night Owl Cafe, where the new lineup of the group had become popular, and tried to sign them up. But they turned him down -- they wanted Erik Jacobsen to produce them; they were a team. Spector's interest caused other labels to be interested, and the group very nearly signed to Elektra. But again, signing to Elektra would have meant being produced by Rothchild, and also Elektra were an album label who didn't at that time have any hit single acts, and the group knew they had hit single potential. They did record a few tracks for Elektra to stick on a blues compilation, but they knew that Elektra wouldn't be their real home. Eventually the group signed with Charley Koppelman and Don Rubin, who had started out as songwriters themselves, working for Don Kirshner. When Kirshner's organisation had been sold to Columbia, Koppelman and Rubin had gone along and ended up working for Columbia as executives. They'd then worked for Morris Levy at Roulette Records, before forming their own publishing and record company. Rather than put out records themselves, they had a deal to license records to Kama Sutra Records, who in turn had a distribution deal with MGM Records. Koppelman and Rubin were willing to take the group and their manager and producer as a package deal, and they released the group's demo of "Do You Believe In Magic?" unchanged as their first single: [Excerpt: The Lovin' Spoonful, "Do You Believe in Magic?"] The single reached the top ten, and the group were soon in the studio cutting their first album, also titled Do You Believe In Magic? The album was a mix of songs that were part of the standard Greenwich Village folkie repertoire -- songs like Mississippi John Hurt's "Blues in the Bottle" and Fred Neil's "The Other Side of This Life" -- and a couple more originals. The group's second single was the first song that Steve Boone had co-written. It was inspired by a date he'd gone on with the photographer Nurit Wilde, who sadly for him didn't go on a second date, and who would later be the mother of Mike Nesmith's son Jason, but who he was very impressed by. He thought of her when he came up with the line "you didn't have to be so nice, I would have liked you anyway", and he and Sebastian finished up a song that became another top ten hit for the group: [Excerpt: (The Good Time Music of) The Lovin' Spoonful, "You Didn't Have to Be So Nice"] Shortly after that song was recorded, but before it was released, the group were called into Columbia TV with an intriguing proposition. Bert Schneider and Bob Rafelson, two young TV producers, were looking at producing a TV show inspired by A Hard Day's Night, and were looking for a band to perform in it. Would the Lovin' Spoonful be up for it? They were interested at first, but Boone and Sebastian weren't sure they wanted to be actors, and also it would involve the group changing its name. They'd already made a name for themselves as the Lovin' Spoonful, did they really want to be the Monkees instead? They passed on the idea. Instead, they went on a tour of the deep South as the support act to the Supremes, a pairing that they didn't feel made much sense, but which did at least allow them to watch the Supremes and the Funk Brothers every night. Sebastian was inspired by the straight four-on-the-floor beat of the Holland-Dozier-Holland repertoire, and came up with his own variation on it, though as this was the Lovin' Spoonful the end result didn't sound very Motown at all: [Excerpt: The Lovin' Spoonful, "Daydream"] It was only after the track was recorded that Yanovsky pointed out to Sebastian that he'd unconsciously copied part of the melody of the old standard "Got a Date With an Angel": [Excerpt: Al Bowlly, "Got a Date With an Angel"] "Daydream" became the group's third top ten hit in a row, but it caused some problems for the group. The first was Kama Sutra's advertising campaign for the record, which had the words "Lovin' Spoonful Daydream", with the initials emphasised. While the group were drug users, they weren't particularly interested in being promoted for that rather than their music, and had strong words with the label. The other problem came with the Beach Boys. The group were supporting the Beach Boys on a tour in spring of 1966, when "Daydream" came out and became a hit, and they got on with all the band members except Mike Love, who they definitely did not get on with. Almost fifty years later, in his autobiography, Steve Boone would have nothing bad to say about the Wilson brothers, but calls Love "an obnoxious, boorish braggart", a "marginally talented hack" and worse, so it's safe to say that Love wasn't his favourite person in the world. Unfortunately, when "Daydream" hit the top ten, one of the promoters of the tour decided to bill the Lovin' Spoonful above the Beach Boys, and this upset Love, who understandably thought that his group, who were much better known and had much more hits, should be the headliners. If this had been any of the other Beach Boys, there would have been no problem, but because it was Love, who the Lovin' Spoonful despised, they decided that they were going to fight for top billing, and the managers had to get involved. Eventually it was agreed that the two groups would alternate the top spot on the bill for the rest of the tour. "Daydream" eventually reached number two on the charts (and number one on Cashbox) and also became the group's first hit in the UK, reaching number two here as well, and leading to the group playing a short UK tour. During that tour, they had a similar argument over billing with Mick Jagger as they'd had with Mike Love, this time over who was headlining on an appearance on Top of the Pops, and the group came to the same assessment of Jagger as they had of Love. The performance went OK, though, despite them being so stoned on hash given them by the wealthy socialite Tara Browne that Sebastian had to be woken up seconds before he started playing. They also played the Marquee Club -- Boone notes in his autobiography that he wasn't impressed by the club when he went to see it the day before their date there, because some nobody named David Bowie was playing there. But in the audience that day were George Harrison, John Lennon, Eric Clapton, Steve Winwood, Spencer Davis, and Brian Jones, most of whom partied with the group afterwards. The Lovin' Spoonful made a big impression on Lennon in particular, who put "Daydream" and "Do You Believe in Magic" in his jukebox at home, and who soon took to wearing glasses in the same round, wiry, style as the ones that Sebastian wore. They also influenced Paul McCartney, who wasn't at that gig, but who soon wrote this, inspired by "Daydream": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Good Day Sunshine"] Unfortunately, this was more or less the high point of the group's career. Shortly after that brief UK tour, Zal Yanovsky and Steve Boone went to a party where they were given some cannabis -- and they were almost immediately stopped by the police, subjected to an illegal search of their vehicle, and arrested. They would probably have been able to get away with this -- after all, it was an illegal search, even though of course the police didn't admit to that -- were it not for the fact that Yanovsky was a Canadian citizen, and he could be deported and barred from ever re-entering the US just for being arrested. This was the first major drug bust of a rock and roll group, and there was no precedent for the group, their managers, their label or their lawyers to deal with this. And so they agreed to something they would regret for the rest of their lives. In return for being let off, Boone and Yanovsky agreed to take an undercover police officer to a party and introduce him to some of their friends as someone they knew in the record business, so he would be able to arrest one of the bigger dealers. This was, of course, something they knew was a despicable thing to do, throwing friends under the bus to save themselves, but they were young men and under a lot of pressure, and they hoped that it wouldn't actually lead to any arrests. And for almost a year, there were no serious consequences, although both Boone and Yanovsky were shaken up by the event, and Yanovsky's behaviour, which had always been erratic, became much, much worse. But for the moment, the group remained very successful. After "Daydream", an album track from their first album, "Did You Ever Have to Make Up Your Mind?" had been released as a stopgap single, and that went to number two as well. And right before the arrest, the group had been working on what would be an even bigger hit. The initial idea for "Summer in the City" actually came from John Sebastian's fourteen-year-old brother Mark, who'd written a bossa nova song called "It's a Different World". The song was, by all accounts, the kind of thing that a fourteen-year-old boy writes, but part of it had potential, and John Sebastian took that part -- giving his brother full credit -- and turned it into the chorus of a new song: [Excerpt: The Lovin' Spoonful, "Summer in the City"] To this, Sebastian added a new verse, inspired by a riff the session player Artie Schroeck had been playing while the group recorded their songs for the Woody Allen film What's Up Tiger Lily, creating a tenser, darker, verse to go with his younger brother's chorus: [Excerpt: The Lovin' Spoonful, "Summer in the City"] In the studio, Steve Boone came up with the instrumental arrangement, which started with drums, organ, electric piano, and guitar, and then proceeded to bass, autoharp, guitar, and percussion overdubs. The drum sound on the record was particularly powerful thanks to the engineer Roy Halee, who worked on most of Simon & Garfunkel's records. Halee put a mic at the top of a stairwell, a giant loudspeaker at the bottom, and used the stairwell as an echo chamber for the drum part. He would later use a similar technique on Simon and Garfunkel's "The Boxer". The track still needed another section though, and Boone suggested an instrumental part, which led to him getting an equal songwriting credit with the Sebastian brothers. His instrumental piano break was inspired by Gershwin, and the group topped it off with overdubbed city noises: [Excerpt: The Lovin' Spoonful, "Summer in the City"] The track went to number one, becoming the group's only number one record, and it was the last track on what is by far their best album, Hums of the Lovin' Spoonful. That album produced two more top ten hits for the group, "Nashville Cats", a tribute to Nashville session players (though John Sebastian seems to have thought that Sun Records was a Nashville, rather than a Memphis, label), and the rather lovely "Rain on the Roof": [Excerpt: The Lovin' Spoonful, "Rain on the Roof"] But that song caused friction with the group, because it was written about Sebastian's relationship with his wife who the other members of the band despised. They also felt that the songs he was writing about their relationship were giving the group a wimpy image, and wanted to make more rockers like "Summer in the City" -- some of them had been receiving homophobic abuse for making such soft-sounding music. The group were also starting to resent Sebastian for other reasons. In a recent contract renegotiation, a "key member" clause had been put into the group's record contract, which stated that Sebastian, as far as the label was concerned, was the only important member of the group. While that didn't affect decision-making in the group, it did let the group know that if the other members did anything to upset Sebastian, he was able to take his ball away with him, and even just that potential affected the way the group thought about each other. All these factors came into play with a song called "Darling Be Home Soon", which was a soft ballad that Sebastian had written about his wife, and which was written for another film soundtrack -- this time for a film by a new director named Francis Ford Coppola. When the other band members came in to play on the soundtrack, including that track, they found that rather than being allowed to improvise and come up with their own parts as they had previously, they had to play pre-written parts to fit with the orchestration. Yanovsky in particular was annoyed by the simple part he had to play, and when the group appeared on the Ed Sullivan show to promote the record, he mugged, danced erratically, and mimed along mocking the lyrics as Sebastian sang. The song -- one of Sebastian's very best -- made a perfectly respectable number fifteen, but it was the group's first record not to make the top ten: [Excerpt: The Lovin' Spoonful, "Darling Be Home Soon"] And then to make matters worse, the news got out that someone had been arrested as a result of Boone and Yanovsky's efforts to get themselves out of trouble the year before. This was greeted with horror by the counterculture, and soon mimeographed newsletters and articles in the underground papers were calling the group part of the establishment, and calling for a general boycott of the group -- if you bought their records, attended their concerts, or had sex with any of the band members, you were a traitor. Yanovsky and Boone had both been in a bad way mentally since the bust, but Yanovsky was far worse, and was making trouble for the other members in all sorts of ways. The group decided to fire Yanovsky, and brought in Jerry Yester to replace him, giving him a severance package that ironically meant that he ended up seeing more money from the group's records than the rest of them, as their records were later bought up by a variety of shell companies that passed through the hands of Morris Levy among others, and so from the late sixties through the early nineties the group never got any royalties. For a while, this seemed to benefit everyone. Yanovsky had money, and his friendship with the group members was repaired. He released a solo single, arranged by Jack Nitzsche, which just missed the top one hundred: [Excerpt: Zal Yanovsky, "Just as Long as You're Here"] That song was written by the Bonner and Gordon songwriting team who were also writing hits for the Turtles at this time, and who were signed to Koppelman and Rubin's company. The extent to which Yanovsky's friendship with his ex-bandmates was repaired by his firing was shown by the fact that Jerry Yester, his replacement in the group, co-produced his one solo album, Alive and Well in Argentina, an odd mixture of comedy tracks, psychedelia, and tributes to the country music he loved. His instrumental version of Floyd Cramer's "Last Date" is fairly listenable -- Cramer's piano playing was a big influence on Yanovsky's guitar -- but his version of George Jones' "From Brown to Blue" makes it very clear that Zal Yanovsky was no George Jones: [Excerpt: Zal Yanovsky, "From Brown to Blue"] Yanovsky then quit music, and went into the restaurant business. The Lovin' Spoonful, meanwhile, made one further album, but the damage had been done. Everything Playing is actually a solid album, though not as good as the album before, and it produced three top forty hits, but the highest-charting was "Six O'Clock", which only made number eighteen, and the album itself made a pitiful one hundred and eighteen on the charts. The song on the album that in retrospect has had the most impact was the rather lovely "Younger Generation", which Sebastian later sang at Woodstock: [Excerpt: John Sebastian, "Younger Generation (Live at Woodstock)"] But at Woodstock he performed that alone, because by then he'd quit the group. Boone, Butler, and Yester decided to continue, with Butler singing lead, and recorded a single, "Never Going Back", produced by Yester's old bandmate from the Modern Folk Quartet Chip Douglas, who had since become a successful producer for the Monkees and the Turtles, and written by John Stewart of the Kingston Trio, who had written "Daydream Believer" for the Monkees, but the record only made number seventy-eight on the charts: [Excerpt: The Lovin' Spoonful featuring Joe Butler, "Never Going Back"] That was followed by an album by "The Lovin' Spoonful Featuring Joe Butler", Revelation: Revolution 69, a solo album by Butler in all but name -- Boone claims not to have played on it, and Butler is the only one featured on the cover, which shows a naked Butler being chased by a naked woman with a lion in front of them covering the naughty bits. The biggest hit other than "Never Going Back" from the album was "Me About You", a Bonner and Gordon song which only made number ninety-one: [Excerpt: The Lovin' Spoonful Featuring Joe Butler, "Me About You"] John Sebastian went on to have a moderately successful solo career -- as well as his appearance at Woodstock, he released several solo albums, guested on harmonica on records by the Doors, Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young and others, and had a solo number one hit in 1976 with "Welcome Back", the theme song from the TV show Welcome Back, Kotter: [Excerpt: John Sebastian, "Welcome Back"] Sebastian continues to perform, though he's had throat problems for several decades that mean he can't sing many of the songs he's best known for. The original members of the Lovin' Spoonful reunited for two performances -- an appearance in Paul Simon's film One Trick Pony in 1980, and a rather disastrous induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2000. Zal Yanovsky died of a heart attack in 2002. The remaining band members remained friendly, and Boone, Butler, and Yester reunited as the Lovin' Spoonful in 1991, initially with Yester's brother Jim, who had played in The Association, latterly with other members. One of those other members in the 1990s was Yester's daughter Lena, who became Boone's fourth wife (and is as far as I can discover still married to him). Yester, Boone, and Butler continued touring together as the Lovin' Spoonful until 2017, when Jerry Yester was arrested on thirty counts of child pornography possession, and was immediately sacked from the group. The other two carried on, and the three surviving original members reunited on stage for a performance at one of the Wild Honey Orchestra's benefit concerts in LA in 2020, though that was just a one-off performance, not a full-blown reunion. It was also the last Lovin' Spoonful performance to date, as that was in February 2020, but Steve Boone has performed with John Sebastian's most recent project, John Sebastian's Jug Band Village, a tribute to the Greenwich Village folk scene the group originally formed in, and the two played together most recently in December 2021. The three surviving original members of the group all seem to be content with their legacy, doing work they enjoy, and basically friendly, which is more than can be said for most of their contemporaries, and which is perhaps appropriate for a band whose main songwriter had been inspired, more than anything else, to make music with a positive attitude.