Podcasts about ote

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Best podcasts about ote

Latest podcast episodes about ote

Imagine Sports
39. Week 3 NFL Predictions + Overtime Elite Draft 2022

Imagine Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 23:34


Fellas, we give you a run down on everything that is about to go down in Week 3 of the NFL season. There are a lot of bad games, and a lot of good games, which should make for a wonderful, and extremely unpredictable weekend. We also got into a little basketball, talking about the recent news with Celtics head coach Ime Udoka. Lastly, we talked about the future of basketball and what the OTE aka Overtime Elite is bringing to us. OTE just had a draft, forming some of the best prospects in basketball into three teams. Luke and I break down two of our favorite prospects from the draft.

Tech Sales Insights
E93 Part 3 - Value Selling Starts with Command of Your Messaging with Matt Handler

Tech Sales Insights

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 17:34


This episode of Tech Sales Insights is the last part of our conversation with Matt Handler, President and COO of Coralogix. He discusses value selling and how the different departments must be aligned on what your value is to extract it in every part of your messaging. Matt also discusses retention and compensation. Coralogix boasts the best in class retention at 150% as they compensate salespeople for the right things, consider upsells and cross-sells as new business, and follow it up with attractive accelerators. HIGHLIGHTSProduct, marketing, sales, finance, and HR must know the product's value intimately wellValue selling: Constantly check your messagingRetention: Compensation drives behavior, so incentivize correctly QUOTESAlign your messaging so value selling becomes organic - Matt: "Every conversation that we have, the frontline managers, second line managers, CRO, me, we are speaking the same language of ‘Do you understand what the current situation is? The pain? How do they measure that?' ‘What's the future stake? What is it that they're looking for and how does that apply to their business? How do we do it? How do we do it better? Who have we done it before?' And we run those conversations all the time. And around that, did we need the economic buyer. ‘Do we have a champion? Do we understand the decision process?' All of those things are built-in."Compensate according to where you want to go as a company - Matt: "Incentivizing the right things, we make it fun. We pay well. I don't pay considerably over market for the initial OTE, I hate that. It's a personal thing for me. I want someone who's hungry to work here. We make sure that the quotas are great, that the territories are great. And then, as soon as you get over your quota, we absolutely crush it with accelerators." Find out more about Matt and check out Coralogix's open positions in the links below:LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/matthandler/Website: https://coralogix.com/Send in a voice message to us: https://anchor.fm/salescommunity/message

Game Theory Podcast
2023 NBA Draft Thoughts, Part 1: Scoot vs. Vic Matchup Preview! Mega vs. OTE, Thompson Twins vs. Djurisic Breakdown

Game Theory Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 76:04


The first part of a two-part NBA Draft-centric episode! In this first part, Spins and I chat about the forthcoming Scoot Henderson vs. Victor Wembanyama matchup that has been set for October 4/6 in Las Vegas. What should we be looking for in this game? When was the last time we saw this kind of 1 vs. 2 matchup in the preseason? A deep dive into an incredibly fun NBA Draft matchup. Then, we break down this past week's OTE vs. Mega matchup in Serbia that saw three potential first round picks face off against one another. Amen and Ausar Thompson for OTE vs. Nikola Djurisic for Mega. Who played well? Who showcased some small concerns about their games? What did we take away from what might be the most important scouting game of the season for the Thompson twins? Finally, we take some questions, including answering "Should the Lakers do a Buddy Hield-Myles Turner deal or a Bojan Bogdanovic and Mike Conley deal?" Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

jonathan_foster
Season 5:5 Church: How'd We Get Here?

jonathan_foster

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 43:31


On this episode I took a group of questions I got recently about church and boiled ‘em down to one: How did we get here? There are a handful of different topics to work through in order to answer that question well, but here's a bit of my take filtered as it is through mimetic theory, open and relational theology. So, we'll talk about Omnipotence some, plus the scapegoating mechanism, some evangelicalism and Donald Trump, control, sacrifice, immutability, and a bunch of other super fun topics! -And don't miss my conversation with my friend, Rev. Dr. Letiah Fraser on the subject of the church at https://www.patreon.com/jonathan_foster -Helpful sources and/or things I cite… -Paper on Panentheism and Panexperientialism for Open and Relational Theology https://brill.com/view/book/edcoll/9783957437303/BP000019.xml?language=en -Open and Relational Theology https://www.amazon.com/Open-Relational-Theology-Introduction-Life-Changing/dp/B096WM4PQN/ref=sr_1_1?crid=1UT60AGDLIUDA&keywords=open+and+relational+theology&qid=1660654400&sprefix=open+and+relational+theology%2Caps%2C138&sr=8-1 -R,.T. Mullins Podcast Page: https://www.rtmullins.com/podcast - Kristen Du Maze John Wayne and Jesus, https://kristindumez.com/books/jesus-and-john-wayne/ -Feel free to leave a review, share it with a friend, and don't forget to sign up for my newsletter at jonathanfosteronline.com. -The main music for this season's show is from Velveteen, entitled, “Losing It,” and on this episode there's a tune from OTE called “Riding Lower.” Both of those songs come to us by way of epidemicsound.com. And then a bunch of the samples and other music comes from Landr.com or me.

Slate Daily Feed
Culture Gabfest: Do-Over, Please

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 58:33


This week, Dana and Julia are out but never fear, we've brought on two great guest host to join Steve: slate alumnus and NYT columnist Jamelle Bouie and senior editor at Slate, Sam Adams. First, the panel breaks down the moral quandaries of the socially unhinged HBO hit The Rehearsal. Then, the panel dips a toe into the dark side with the Aubrey Plaza-led film Emily the Criminal. Finally, the panel discusses the article “Why Do Rich People Love Quiet?” by Xochitl Gonzalez for The Atlantic. In Slate Plus, the panel discusses the relationship between race and food, based on the article “What We Talk About When We Talk About ‘White People Food'” by Jenny G. Zhang for Bon Appétit. Email us at culturefest@slate.com. Endorsements Sam: The new New York City Center's “Encore” production of Stephen Sondheim's Into the Woods—now showing at the St. James Theater in New York City. Jamelle: Inspired by his podcast Unclear & Present Danger: the 1992 Bill Duke film Deep Cover starring Laurence Fishburn and Jeff Goldblum, which is a great example of relatively modern neo-noir and a fascinating political artifact of the 1990s. Steve: A previous endorsement update: Steve has finished and approves the 1980 novel The Transit of Venus by Shirley Hazzard. Steve's real endorsement for the week: the album Crest by Swedish hip-hop artist Bladee, especially the songs: “Desire is a Trap” and “Girls Just Want to Have Fun.”   Podcast production by Cameron Drews. Production assistance by Nadira Goffe. Outro music is "What Do You Want From Me" by OTE. Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts, a bonus segment in each episode of the Culture Gabfest, full access to Slate's journalism on Slate.com, and more. Sign up now at slate.com/cultureplus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Culture Gabfest
Culture Gabfest: Do-Over, Please

Culture Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 58:33


This week, Dana and Julia are out but never fear, we've brought on two great guest host to join Steve: slate alumnus and NYT columnist Jamelle Bouie and senior editor at Slate, Sam Adams. First, the panel breaks down the moral quandaries of the socially unhinged HBO hit The Rehearsal. Then, the panel dips a toe into the dark side with the Aubrey Plaza-led film Emily the Criminal. Finally, the panel discusses the article “Why Do Rich People Love Quiet?” by Xochitl Gonzalez for The Atlantic. In Slate Plus, the panel discusses the relationship between race and food, based on the article “What We Talk About When We Talk About ‘White People Food'” by Jenny G. Zhang for Bon Appétit. Email us at culturefest@slate.com. Endorsements Sam: The new New York City Center's “Encore” production of Stephen Sondheim's Into the Woods—now showing at the St. James Theater in New York City. Jamelle: Inspired by his podcast Unclear & Present Danger: the 1992 Bill Duke film Deep Cover starring Laurence Fishburn and Jeff Goldblum, which is a great example of relatively modern neo-noir and a fascinating political artifact of the 1990s. Steve: A previous endorsement update: Steve has finished and approves the 1980 novel The Transit of Venus by Shirley Hazzard. Steve's real endorsement for the week: the album Crest by Swedish hip-hop artist Bladee, especially the songs: “Desire is a Trap” and “Girls Just Want to Have Fun.”   Podcast production by Cameron Drews. Production assistance by Nadira Goffe. Outro music is "What Do You Want From Me" by OTE. Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts, a bonus segment in each episode of the Culture Gabfest, full access to Slate's journalism on Slate.com, and more. Sign up now at slate.com/cultureplus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

SaaSBOOMi
From building a Conversation Intelligence SaaS to getting acquired by Clari with Shruti Kapoor of Wingman

SaaSBOOMi

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 43:46


Sales team is closer to the customer's problems.How do we bring the marketing and product teams closer to customer problems, so that they feel the voice of the customer? Voice of the customer is really valuable. It's very hard to get access to it, and even if you get access to it, it's a pain to gain insights from it, and then scale it up.This is the pain point which led Shruti Kapoor and her co-founders Muralidharan Venkatasubramanian - Head of Product and Srikar Yekollu -  to start Wingman, a conversation intelligence SaaS.Wingman acts as the single source of truth for all types of interactions between sales teams and buyers including emails and calls.It analyzes them and it gives the ability to deep dive into these conversations and provide the larger analytics and intelligence, to improve revenue.Their 1st million revenues came in around 2.5 years, and 2nd million in the next 6 months. They've also been part of Ycombinator and SaaSBOOMi GrowthX. Wingman recently got acquired by Clari. Tune in to this episode to gain insights on right time to get acquired,  nitigrities of valuation from the standpoint of acquisition and fundraising, the AI piece on strengthening revenues, how personal branding for you as a founder helps and more.1:31 - What's Wingman?3:07 -Why Wingman welcomed the early acquisition by Clari - 3 key factors3:22 - Figuring out the valuation 4:32 - Valuation multiples by Private Equity companies7:15 - Valuation multiples during fundraising versus acquisitions10:03 - VC valuation v/s PE valuation12:19 - What does it mean if a VC is giving a 20x valuation multiple?15:43 - The idea of Wingman and how did the founding team come together?21:06 - Using AI to gain sales intelligence from sales calls using Wingman24:55 - Funds raised and investors25:31 - Rationale for high pricing, is it a sales barrier?29:18 - ICP of Wingman30:56 - SaaS pricing insights for Indian market31:31 - Change in org structure after acquisition34:45 - Wingman's go-to market model35:50 - Creating proxies of trust - personal branding as a founder36:40 - How to increase average ticket sizes 39:46 - OTE v/s sales quota

Culture Gabfest
Culture Gabfest: Sandman vs. Predator

Culture Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 63:16 Very Popular


This week, Dana and Julia hold down the fort in Steve's absence while Slate's book critic, Laura Miller, fills in as a third host. First, the panel breaks down the Neil Gaiman adaptation that no one thought would happen, The Sandman. Then, the panel discusses the new installment in the Predator franchise: Prey. Finally, supplemented by Laura's great piece on the author, the panel attempts to answer: Who is Colleen Hoover? In Slate Plus, the panel discusses pairs of notable people that they'd like to see in conversation with one another. Email us at culturefest@slate.com. Endorsements Dana: Pulling a Julia with a food endorsement: Off-Script's Samin-Nosrat-inspired thyme pistachio pesto. Julia: More Summer Strut afterglow: “I Wish That I Could See You Soon” by Herman Dune. Laura: The New Zealand comedy series, Wellington Paranormal, which is a spin-off of the original What We Do in the Shadows film. Specifically: season 4 episode 3, “The Coolening.” Podcast production by Cameron Drews. Production assistance by Nadira Goffe. Outro music is "Forbidden Love" by OTE. Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts, a bonus segment in each episode of the Culture Gabfest, full access to Slate's journalism on Slate.com, and more. Sign up now at slate.com/cultureplus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Slate Daily Feed
Culture Gabfest: Sandman vs. Predator

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 63:16


This week, Dana and Julia hold down the fort in Steve's absence while Slate's book critic, Laura Miller, fills in as a third host. First, the panel breaks down the Neil Gaiman adaptation that no one thought would happen, The Sandman. Then, the panel discusses the new installment in the Predator franchise: Prey. Finally, supplemented by Laura's great piece on the author, the panel attempts to answer: Who is Colleen Hoover? In Slate Plus, the panel discusses pairs of notable people that they'd like to see in conversation with one another. Email us at culturefest@slate.com. Endorsements Dana: Pulling a Julia with a food endorsement: Off-Script's Samin-Nosrat-inspired thyme pistachio pesto. Julia: More Summer Strut afterglow: “I Wish That I Could See You Soon” by Herman Dune. Laura: The New Zealand comedy series, Wellington Paranormal, which is a spin-off of the original What We Do in the Shadows film. Specifically: season 4 episode 3, “The Coolening.” Podcast production by Cameron Drews. Production assistance by Nadira Goffe. Outro music is "Forbidden Love" by OTE. Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts, a bonus segment in each episode of the Culture Gabfest, full access to Slate's journalism on Slate.com, and more. Sign up now at slate.com/cultureplus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

iball Podcast
"Full Transparency"

iball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 52:58


RANKINGS MATTER!! With that being said rankings are dropping Monday 08/22/22 for the iBall with Terry Drake Lottery Rankings. The game is to be sold not to be told, but we're here giving you the game. You're Welcome! This episode holds no punches and we're being COMPLETLY TRANSPARENT! Lock in!

Outside/In
Yardwork: Lawn and Order

Outside/In

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 27:10 Very Popular


Welcome to Yardwork, a summer yard and garden miniseries from Outside/In. We're sharing three stories about our relationships with the land around us: the front yard, the backyard, and down the block. This is part one.Americans love a lawn. Green grass grows everywhere: on baseball fields, in backyards, in front of strip malls. Collectively, we spend billions of dollars every year keeping them fertilized and watered.But lawns cost more than money in Western states like Utah. Despite a severe drought, residents of Utah's towns and cities use more water per capita than any other place in the nation, and a majority of that water goes right into lawns. That's helping fuel an environmental disaster that could wipe out one of America's largest inland seas.In part one of Yardwork, we trace the 600-year history of lawns, explore how they became a symbol of power, wealth, and Whiteness in America, and share tips on how to make a yard more environmentally responsible.Featuring: Malin Curry, Ira Curry, Kelly Kopp, Zach Frankel, Karen Stenehjel SUPPORTOutside/In is made possible with listener support. Click here to become a sustaining member of Outside/In. Subscribe to our FREE newsletter.Follow Outside/In on Instagram or Twitter, or join our private discussion group on Facebook LINKSCheck out Malin Curry's essay on the history of Black Americans and yard work. To read more about how agriculture and outdoor watering is contributing to the disappearance of the Great Salt Lake, take a look at these two studies.  ProPublica published an excellent investigation into why one of the West's driest states often rejects aggressive water conservation efforts. For some great history on lawns, read Paul Robbins' Lawn People and Virginia Scott Jenkins' The Lawn: A History of an American Obsession CREDITSHost: Nate HegyiReported and produced by Nate HegyiEditing by Taylor QuimbyAdditional editing help from Justine Paradis, Felix Poon, Rebecca Lavoie and Jessica Hunt. Rebecca Lavoie is our Executive ProducerSpecial thanks to Sherry Lund, Zach Renstrom, Karry Rathje and Ken Fox. Music for this episode by Walt Adams, Sture Zetterberg, OTE, Headlund, Roy Edwin Williams, El Flaco Collective, Pulsed, Jimmy Wahlsteen, Both Are Infinite, Airae, and Alfie-Jay Winters.Our theme music is by Breakmaster Cylinder.Outside/In is a production of New Hampshire Public Radio

iball Podcast
iBall with Terry Drake Elite Skills Camp Recap Part 1

iball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 36:25


Disclaimer: Sorry for the audio and static in the background. Well, its a wrap on the inaugural iBall with Terry Drake Elite Skills Camp and if I do so myself it was by far the best exposure event this state has to offer for high school players. We had over 60 prospects show up and show out and in this episode DWill The Coach and Coach Chill Will give you part one of many when it comes to breaking down what they saw at camp only as they know how and that's REAL. So lock in as they bring you part 1 recap of the camp.

Hinten links im Kaiser Friedrich
Folge 132: Ralf Schumann und der Wandel in Tenever

Hinten links im Kaiser Friedrich

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 50:43


Ralf Schumann ist Abgeordneter der Linken-Fraktion in der Bremischen Bürgerschaft. Einigen Bremerinnen und Bremern dürfte er allerdings durch eine andere Tätigkeit bekannt sein: Er war Gewoba-Geschäftsbereichsleiter für Osterholz-Tenever. Er war eine der maßgeblichen Personen, die den Um- und Rückbau der Hochhaussiedlung sowie den Wandel zu „OTe“ verantwortet haben. Bei seiner Stippvisite im „Kaiser Friedrich“ plaudert er nicht nur über seine Jugend in Hamburg und den Wandel in Tenever, sondern auch über seine Erfahrungen als Abgeordneter im Landtag und seine Zukunftspläne.

iball Podcast
"Changing The Model"

iball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 69:04


Man its camp week and as confirmations of players, staff, and media continue to roll in we are ready to present the #1 Skills Camp in the state of Alabama. We have been working tirelessly and non stop on making sure this event does exactly what it is designed to for each and every prospect that attends. But, in the mist of all that the crew is back to give you the real on why you should show up to camp and how that ties in to the way the landscape of high school basketball is changing. So lock in as DWill The Coach and Coach Chill Will give you the real deal!

No Pump Fakes
Should the Warriors give Draymond Green a Max Contract?

No Pump Fakes

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 29:33


Is Draymond Green worthy of a 4-year max extension? Should he be rewarded for winning 4 titles with the Warriors, or should his success be credited to Steph Curry? Is he a First-Ballot HOF-er? Plus, is Dame Lillard taking the easy way out by not asking for a trade? Ahmad Smith on Instagram   Theus McBee on Instagram

Surf and Sales
S3E32 - Your level of income will never exceed your level of self-worth, with Elyse Archer

Surf and Sales

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 56:41


Elyse took her annual 6-figure income to 7-figures in 6 weeks, literally.  She shares her growth and is over the hump of the fear.  Getting unstuck from the $150 OTE is more than about the money Sales are not just about the hustle Difference between masculine and feminine energy Feminine is about play, fun, relationships, the journey Masculine energy, the destination, structure, where you are going Leaning into your intuition in your sales process The difference between 6-figure and 7-figure income people

Bikes & Big Ideas
Over The Edge on Trail Building, Travel, & Rampage

Bikes & Big Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 44:07


We sat down with Troy, Paul, Pierce, and Jonah from Over The Edge — our Blister Recommended Shop in Fruita, CO; Hurricane, UT; Todos Santos, Mexico; and Melrose, Australia — to talk about the unique history of OTE; building trails in the early days of mountain biking; the development of mountain bike towns; travel & MTB destinations; servicing bikes at Rampage; and a whole lot more.TOPICS & TIMES:Over The Edge's origin story (4:13)Expansion & the growth of MTB towns (6:12)Trail building (13:25)Paul's involvement & maturation (20:50)The OTE customer (25:30)Service turnarounds & saving trips (30:11)Travel & MTB towns (32:39)The Hurricane shop (35:53)RELATED LINKS:Over The EdgeBecome a Blister MemberBlister LabsThis Week's Gear GiveawayBlister Mountain Bike Buyer's GuideOUR OTHER PODCASTSOff The CouchGEAR:30Blister Podcast See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Slate Daily Feed
Culture Gabfest: Money, Sex, and Space

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 57:59 Very Popular


This week, author, poet, and host of the podcast This Is Good for You, Nichole Perkins, fills in for Julia as the panel begins by digging into Apple TV+'s new series Loot. Then, the panel explores sex and sexuality in the film Good Luck to You, Leo Grande. Finally, the panel is joined by science writer and editor, Jaime Green, to break down the meaning of NASA's new Webb Telescope images—her new book The Possibility of Life title comes out in April. In Slate Plus, the panel discusses their relationship to plot. Email us at culturefest@slate.com. Endorsements Dana: A supplement to the segment on the Webb Telescope: a simple website that takes the images and places them in context to each other for scale. Nichole: The 2012 romance novel A Lady Awakened by Cecilia Grant, which centers a recent widow who needs to provide an heir to keep her wealth. Steve: Kris Kristofferson's song “Help Me Make It Through the Night”: including the covers by John Doe and The Sadies and Sammi Smith. Podcast production by Cameron Drews. Production assistance by Nadira Goffe. Outro music is "What Do You Want From Me" by OTE. Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts, a bonus segment in each episode of the Culture Gabfest, full access to Slate's journalism on Slate.com, and more. Sign up now at slate.com/cultureplus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Culture Gabfest
Culture Gabfest: Money, Sex, and Space

Culture Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 57:59


This week, author, poet, and host of the podcast This Is Good for You, Nichole Perkins, fills in for Julia as the panel begins by digging into Apple TV+'s new series Loot. Then, the panel explores sex and sexuality in the film Good Luck to You, Leo Grande. Finally, the panel is joined by science writer and editor, Jaime Green, to break down the meaning of NASA's new Webb Telescope images—her new book The Possibility of Life title comes out in April. In Slate Plus, the panel discusses their relationship to plot. Email us at culturefest@slate.com. Endorsements Dana: A supplement to the segment on the Webb Telescope: a simple website that takes the images and places them in context to each other for scale. Nichole: The 2012 romance novel A Lady Awakened by Cecilia Grant, which centers a recent widow who needs to provide an heir to keep her wealth. Steve: Kris Kristofferson's song “Help Me Make It Through the Night”: including the covers by John Doe and The Sadies and Sammi Smith. Podcast production by Cameron Drews. Production assistance by Nadira Goffe. Outro music is "What Do You Want From Me" by OTE. Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts, a bonus segment in each episode of the Culture Gabfest, full access to Slate's journalism on Slate.com, and more. Sign up now at slate.com/cultureplus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Positive Disintegration Podcast
Overexcitability and Openness to Experience

Positive Disintegration Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 53:00


In episode 16, Chris and Emma were joined by Dr. Shelagh Gallagher, for a discussion of overexcitability (OE) and openness to experience (OtE), based on her paper which compares the two frameworks. Shelagh is an independent consultant in gifted education and President-Elect of the National Association for Gifted Children. We discussed the controversy in the field of gifted education about OE and OtE, and the value both frameworks can provide in informing us about the gifted student experience in education. We talked about the impact and difference having multiple OEs can have in a person’s life, and Shelagh shared insights from her research and pointed out directions for future work in gifted populations. Shelagh will be a keynote speaker at the 2022 Dabrowski Congress and will be talking about contemplations on overexcitabilities.Resources mentioned in this episodeOpenness to Experience and Overexcitabilities in a Sample of Highly Gifted Middle School Students by Shelagh GallagherBuilding Bridges: Research on Gifted Children's Personalities from Three Psychological Theories by Shelagh Gallagher24-item Overexcitability QuestionnaireA Comparison of the Concept of Overexcitabilities with Measures of Creativity and School Achievement in Sixth-Grade Students by Shelagh GallagherCreative Personality Characteristics and Dimensions of Mental Functioning in Gifted Adolescents by Shirley SchieverThe 15th International Dabrowski Congress agenda and registrationShelagh’s websiteNAGC This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit positivedisintegration.substack.com

Innovation with Mark Peter Davis
Next Gen Sports Media with Dan Porter of Overtime

Innovation with Mark Peter Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 51:37


On today's episode I chat with Dan Porter, Co-Founder and CEO of Overtime. https://overtime.tv/ (Overtime) is the leading brand for the next generation of sports fans. Dan and his team at Overtime identified that the traditional sports media players were (and still are) heavily invested in the old infrastructure like cable deals. That left an opportunity to create an agile sports media brand that would cater to the younger generation utilizing new technology such as social platforms. What started as an app turned into a community and has now morphed into creating and managing sports leagues. They currently operate two leagues OTE and OT7, one basketball and football. Dan is a startup guru. He's sold a few companies before starting Overtime and teaches entrepreneurship at NYU. If you're interested in media, the business of sports or entrepreneurship this episode will have something for you. Enjoy. Show Links: Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/overtime (@overtime), https://twitter.com/tfadp (@tfadp), http://twitter.com/mpd (@mpd) Guest Links: https://overtime.tv/ (Overtime), https://www.overtimeelite.com/ (OTE) Podcast Links: http://mpd.me (Website), https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCua7T3uyg6IQeSbYyNKT_Iw (YouTube), https://twitter.com/mpd (Twitter), https://www.linkedin.com/company/innovationwithmpd (LinkedIn)

Slate Daily Feed
Culture Gabfest: Elvis, Please Leave the Building

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 60:47 Very Popular


This week, the panel begins by experiencing Baz Luhrmann's new biopic Elvis with Slate's pop critic, author, and media professor, Jack Hamilton. Then, the panel goes on the run with the new FX series The Old Man. Finally, the panel discusses the viral article on cancel culture from New York Magazine's website The Cut, titled “Canceled at 17.” In Slate Plus, the panel divulges what they're actually excited about. Email us at culturefest@slate.com. Endorsements Dana: A movie Dana just reviewed for Slate, Marcel the Shell With Shoes On. Julia: A fortified endorsement of a previous Gabfest segment, Abbott Elementary.  Steve: An essay by Hannah Zeavin for n+1 Magazine titled, “Unfree Associations.” Podcast production by Cameron Drews. Production assistance by Nadira Goffe. Outro music is "Forbidden Love" by OTE. Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts, a bonus segment in each episode of the Culture Gabfest, full access to Slate's journalism on Slate.com, and more. Sign up now at slate.com/cultureplus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Culture Gabfest
Culture Gabfest: Elvis, Please Leave the Building

Culture Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 60:47 Very Popular


This week, the panel begins by experiencing Baz Luhrmann's new biopic Elvis with Slate's pop critic, author, and media professor, Jack Hamilton. Then, the panel goes on the run with the new FX series The Old Man. Finally, the panel discusses the viral article on cancel culture from New York Magazine's website The Cut, titled “Canceled at 17.” In Slate Plus, the panel divulges what they're actually excited about. Email us at culturefest@slate.com. Endorsements Dana: A movie Dana just reviewed for Slate, Marcel the Shell With Shoes On. Julia: A fortified endorsement of a previous Gabfest segment, Abbott Elementary.  Steve: An essay by Hannah Zeavin for n+1 Magazine titled, “Unfree Associations.” Podcast production by Cameron Drews. Production assistance by Nadira Goffe. Outro music is "Forbidden Love" by OTE. Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts, a bonus segment in each episode of the Culture Gabfest, full access to Slate's journalism on Slate.com, and more. Sign up now at slate.com/cultureplus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Thrivecast
Thrivecast 037 x James H. Davis III - Thriving at OTE

Thrivecast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 29:28


For those of you who don't know OTE is a new sports league that takes the world's most talented young basketball players and gives them a better pathway to becoming professional athletes! James heads their performance coaching and helps all of the OTE players develop athletically and physically. He and I talk about part of his life journey from his own athletic career to finding his purpose as a professional.

Päivän mietelause
Ote Judith Schalanskyn teoksesta Kaukaisten saarten atlas

Päivän mietelause

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 3:03


Ote on Judith Schalanskyn kirjasta Kaukaisten saarten atlas, suomentanut Marko Niemi, Poesia 2020. Mietteen on valinnut Nina Naakka, lukijana Joni Timonen.

Päivän mietelause
Ote Judith Schalanskyn kirjasta Kaukaisten saarten atlas

Päivän mietelause

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 3:03


Noin 250 asukkaan Pingelap sijaitsee Tyynellä valtamerellä ja kuuluu Mikronesian saariryhmään. Kymmenen prosenttia pingelapilaisista on kromosomimutaation vuoksi täydellisesti värisokeita. Ote on Judith Schalanskyn kirjasta Kaukaisten saarten atlas, suom. Marko Niemi, Poesia 2020. Mietteen on valinnut Nina Naakka. Lukijana Joni Timonen.

Päivän mietelause
Ote kirjailija Arvid Järnefeltin Heräämiseni-teoksesta

Päivän mietelause

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 3:03


Ote kirjailija Arvid Järnefeltin Heräämiseni-teoksesta vuodelta 1894. Otava 1894 Kuuluttaja Olli Kari.

Päivän mietelause
Ote kirjailija Arvid Järnefeltin Heräämiseni-teoksesta

Päivän mietelause

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 3:03


Ote kirjailija Arvid Järnefeltin Heräämiseni-teoksesta vuodelta 1894. Otava 1894. Kuuluttajana Charlotta Hagfors.

Päivän mietelause
Ote kirjailija Arvid Järnefeltin Heräämiseni-teoksesta

Päivän mietelause

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 3:03


Ote kirjailija Arvid Järnefeltin Heräämiseni-teoksesta vuodelta 1894. Otava 1894. Kuuluttajana Joni Timonen.

Slate Daily Feed
Culture Gabfest: Whose Woods Are These?

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 63:17 Very Popular


This week, the panel begins by discussing the new true crime series Under the Banner of Heaven. Then, the panel time travels with the film Petite Maman. Finally, the panel debates “The Future of Public Parks,” inspired by a New Yorker piece from Alexandra Lange. In Slate Plus, the panel discusses their experiences having their work edited. Email us at culturefest@slate.com. Endorsements Dan: The novel, Howards End by E.M. Forster. Julia: A listener response to her former request of snorkeling's relationship to birdwatching. Steve: A book review in The New Statesman from Scotland's National Poet, Kathleen Jamie, titled “What rocks teach us about the human condition,” which reviews Hugh Raffles' book The Book of Unconformities: Speculations on Lost Time. Podcast production by Cameron Drews. Production assistance by Nadira Goffe. Outro music is "Last Sunday" by OTE. Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts, a bonus segment in each episode of the Culture Gabfest, full access to Slate's journalism on Slate.com, and more. Sign up now at slate.com/cultureplus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Culture Gabfest
Culture Gabfest: Whose Woods Are These?

Culture Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 63:17


This week, the panel begins by discussing the new true crime series Under the Banner of Heaven. Then, the panel time travels with the film Petite Maman. Finally, the panel debates “The Future of Public Parks,” inspired by a New Yorker piece from Alexandra Lange. In Slate Plus, the panel discusses their experiences having their work edited. Email us at culturefest@slate.com. Endorsements Dan: The novel, Howards End by E.M. Forster. Julia: A listener response to her former request of snorkeling's relationship to birdwatching. Steve: A book review in The New Statesman from Scotland's National Poet, Kathleen Jamie, titled “What rocks teach us about the human condition,” which reviews Hugh Raffles' book The Book of Unconformities: Speculations on Lost Time. Podcast production by Cameron Drews. Production assistance by Nadira Goffe. Outro music is "Last Sunday" by OTE. Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts, a bonus segment in each episode of the Culture Gabfest, full access to Slate's journalism on Slate.com, and more. Sign up now at slate.com/cultureplus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

I AM D1
Overtime Elite… The Truth! Now You Know With Shea Dawson

I AM D1

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 38:41


Last year the social media & grassroots basketball giant Overtime, sent shockwaves through the basketball world when they announced a new start-up…Overtime Elite.  Overtime Elite put together a new program consisting of Corporate executives & current and former NBA players. OTE would pay high school basketball players as much as a half-million dollars (that's right) to leave their high school and come to Overtime Elite to prepare to elevate their game to play in the professional ranks. This would mean they would skip getting a college education to focus on their career. & there's more...   In this episode Coach Chris will sit down with Shea Dawson (a star in her own right) from Overtime to learn the truth about  Overtime Elite (OTE) and share why this new model may be the one that changes the game for ever!!! This episode is a must for every basketball player, parent & coach!  So lace up & let's get it!!! Follow Coach Chris on Instagram & Twitter. Email us at contact@iamd1thebook.com Follow I AM D-1 on Instagram Follow Tidal League on Instagram  

The Big Big East Show Podcast
Over-Under Take Over! #25

The Big Big East Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 37:45


We have a very special guest on the Big Big East Show today! Joining Chris we have Overtime Team Elite head coach Dave Leitao! Dave tells of his amazing time coaching at Depaul and his hand in the rich basketball history at UCONN. If you ever wanted to hear about the behind the scenes ate OTE, THIS IS YOUR EPISODE! Tune in NOW!Follow Dave!Twitter: https://mobile.twitter.com/coachdleitaoFollow Chris!Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cwalkersports/Twitter: https://twitter.com/cwalkersports Follow Big Big EastInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/bigeastshow/-When you think of college basketball, what comes to mind first? If it's The Big East Conference, then you're right. Basketball lives in New York City — from the Bronx to Brooklyn to Madison Square Garden, you can't look anywhere without seeing a basketball fan who loves the sport more than anything. If you love the game, you'll love hearing about it from former player, coach, and now CBS Sports analyst, Chris Walker. Tune in weekly with Chris as he breaks down games, chats with friends, and talks the love of the game.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

High Tech Freedom
Should I Stay or Should I Go?

High Tech Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 9:26


Highlights As sales people, we can be optimistic creatures. We have to recognize that if we want something, we will create the justification and easily sell ourselves. That's what we do! Maybe take out a sheet of paper, do the old Ben Franklin method. The money. Because we are in sales, we become programmed to look at the money. The risk is to simply look at the one-year OTE and base it on that. Try looking more long term and add in a few additional variables. What are your 5-year objectives? Is it a certain income, a particular role? Does a move to this company get you there faster? Will you be happier on the journey? Now, the worst time to be decide this 5-year objective is when you are looking at the new opportunity. As sales people, we are really good at selling ourselves and creating the justification. You should have this 5-year goal or objective clearly scripted out. Acquisition – How would you feel if the new company was acquired within the first couple of years? If you are pursuing a smaller company, that is part of their exit plan so it's important to think about the role as part of a larger unknown organization. Download our free eBook on “Passively Investing in Real Estate” by going to www.hightechfreedom.com   Subscribe to our newsletter for sales and real estate investing tips by going to www.hightechfreedom.com   Host Contact Information - Chris Freeman LinkedIn - http://linkedin.com/in/chrisfreeman Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/chris.freeman.9461  

Screaming in the Cloud
Building a Healthier Sales Environment with Ashleigh Early

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 43:22


About AshleighAshleigh Early is a passionate advocate for sales people and through her consulting, coaching, and The Other Side of Sales, she is devoted to making B2B sales culture more inclusive so anyone can thrive. Over the past ten years Ashleigh has led, built, re-built, and consulted for 2 unicorns, 3 acquisitions, 1 abject failure and every step in between.  She is also the Head of Sales at the Duckbill Group! You can find Ashleigh on Twitter @AshleighatWork and more about the Other Side of Sales at Othersideofsales.comLinks: Twitter: https://twitter.com/ashleighatwork LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ashleighearly TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Couchbase Capella Database-as-a-Service is flexible, full-featured and fully managed with built in access via key-value, SQL, and full-text search. Flexible JSON documents aligned to your applications and workloads. Build faster with blazing fast in-memory performance and automated replication and scaling while reducing cost. Capella has the best price performance of any fully managed document database. Visit couchbase.com/screaminginthecloud to try Capella today for free and be up and running in three minutes with no credit card required. Couchbase Capella: make your data sing.Corey: Today's episode is brought to you in part by our friends at MinIO the high-performance Kubernetes native object store that's built for the multi-cloud, creating a consistent data storage layer for your public cloud instances, your private cloud instances, and even your edge instances, depending upon what the heck you're defining those as, which depends probably on where you work. It's getting that unified is one of the greatest challenges facing developers and architects today. It requires S3 compatibility, enterprise-grade security and resiliency, the speed to run any workload, and the footprint to run anywhere, and that's exactly what MinIO offers. With superb read speeds in excess of 360 gigs and 100 megabyte binary that doesn't eat all the data you've gotten on the system, it's exactly what you've been looking for. Check it out today at min.io/download, and see for yourself. That's min.io/download, and be sure to tell them that I sent you.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. My guest today does something that I, sort of, dabbled around the fringes of once upon a time, but then realized I wasn't particularly good at it and got the hell out of it and went screaming into clouds instead. Ashleigh Early is the Head of Sales here at The Duckbill Group. Ashleigh, thank you for joining me.Ashleigh: Thanks for coming on and running, screaming from my chosen profession [laugh]. You're definitely not the only one.Corey: Well, let's be clear here; there are two ways that can go because sure, I used to dabble around in sales when I was, basically, trying to figure how to not starve to death. But I also used to run things; it's basically a smart team. I was managing people and realized I was bad at that, too. So, really, that's, sort of, an open-ended direction. We can go either side and…But, let's go with sales. That seems like a more interesting way for this to play out. So, you've been here for—what is it now—it feels like ages, but my awareness for the passing of time in the middle of a global panini is relatively not great.Ashleigh: Yeah. I think we're at day—what is it—1,053 of March 2020? So, time is irrelevant; it's a construct; I don't know. But, technically, by the Gregorian Calendar, I think I'm at six months.Corey: It's very odd to me, at least the way that I contextualized doing this. Back when I started what became The Duckbill Group, I was an independent consultant. It was, more or less, working people I knew through my network who had a very specific, very expensive problem: The AWS bill is too high. And I figured, this is genius. It is the easiest possible sale in the world and one of the only scenarios where I can provably demonstrate ROI to a point where, “Bring me in; you will inherently save money.”And all of that is true, but one of things I learned very quickly was that, even with the easiest sale of, “Hi. I'd like to sell you this bag of money,” there is no such thing as an easy enterprise sale. There is nuance to it. There is a lot of difficulty to it. And I was left with the, I guess, driving question—after my first few months of playing this game—of, “How on earth does anyone make money in this space?”The reason I persisted was, basically, a bunch of people did favors for me, but they didn't owe me at all. It was, “Oh, great. I'll give them the price quote.” And they're, like, “Oh, yeah.” So cool, they turned around and quoted that to their boss at triple the rate because, “Don't slit your own throat on this.” They were right. And not for nothing, it turns out when you're selling advice, charging more for it makes it likelier to succeed as a project.But, I had no idea what I was doing. And, like most engineers on Twitter, I look at something I don't understand deeply myself, and figure, “Oh. Well, it's not engineering, therefore, it's easy.” Yeah, it turns out that running a business is humbling across a whole bunch of different axes.Ashleigh: I wouldn't even say, it's not running a business; it's working with humans. Working with humans is humbling. If you're working with a machine or even something as simple as, like, you know, you're making a product. It's follow a recipe; it's okay. Follow the instructions. I do A, then B, then C, then D, unless you don't enjoy using the instructions because you don't enjoy using instructions. But you still follow a set general process; you build a thing that comes out correctly.The moment that process is, talk to this person, and then Person A, then Person B, then Person C, then Person D, then Back to Person A, then Person D, and then finally to Person E, everything goes to heck in a handbasket. That's what really makes it interesting. And for those of us who are of a certain disposition, we find that fascinating and enthralling. If you're of another disposition, that's hell on earth [laugh]. So, it's a very—yeah, it's a very interesting thing.Corey: Back when I was independent, and people tried to sell me things—and yeah, sometimes it worked. It was always interesting going through various intake funnels and the rest. And, like, “Well, what role do you hold in the organization? Do you influence the decision? Do you make the decision? How many people need to be involved in the rest?”And I was looking around going, “How many people do you think fit in my home office here? Let's be serious.” I mean, there are times I escalated to the Chihuahua because she's unpleasant and annoying and basically, sometimes so are people. But that's a separate topic for later. But it became a very different story back as the organizational distance between the people that needed to sign off on a sale increased.Ashleigh: Mm-hm. Absolutely. And you might have felt me squirm when you described those questions because one of my biggest pet peeves is when people take sales terminology and directly use that with clients. Just like if you're an engineer and you're describing what you do, you're not going to go home and explain to your dad in technical jargon what exactly; you're going to tell him broad strokes. And if they're interested, go deeper and deeper; technical, more technical.I hate when salespeople use sales jargon, like, “What's your role in the organization? Are you the decision-maker?” Don't—mmm. There are better ways to deal with that. So, that's just a sign of poor training. It's not the sales rep's fault; it's his company's fault—their company's fault. But that's a different thing.It's fascinating to me, kind of, watching this—what you said spoke of two things there. One is poor training, and two, of a lack of awareness of the situation and a lack of just doing a little bit of pre-work. Like, you do five seconds of research on Corey Quinn, you can realize that the company is ten to 15 people tops. So, it makes sense to ask a question around, “Hey, do you need anyone else to sign off before we can move forward with this project?”That tells me if I need to get someone for technical, for budget, for whatever, but asking if you're a decision-maker, or if you're influencing, or if you're doing initial research, like, that's using sales terminology, not actually getting to the root of the problem and immediately making it very clear, you didn't do any actual research in advance, which is not—in modern selling—not okay.Corey: My business partner, Mike, has a CEO job title, and he'll get a whole bunch of cold outreach constantly all day, every day. I conducted a two-week experiment where in front of my Chief Cloud Economist job title, I put ‘CTO/' just to see what would happen, and sure enough, I started getting outreach left, right, up, down, and sideways. Not just for things that a CTO figure might theoretically wind up needing to buy, but also, job opportunities for a skill set that I haven't dusted off in a decade.So, okay. Once people can have something that hits their filters when you're searching for very specific titles, then you wind up getting a lot more outreach. But if you create a job title that no one sensible would ever pick for themselves, suddenly a lot of that tends to go by the wayside. It shined a light on how frustratingly dreary a lot of the sales prospecting work really can be from—Ashleigh: Oh, yeah.Corey: —just from the side of someone who gets it. Now, I'm not exaggerating when I say that I did work in sales once upon a time. Not great at it, but one of the first white-collar-style jobs that I had was telemarketing, of all things. And I was spectacular at it because I was fortunate enough to be working on a co-branded affinity credit card that was great, and I had the opportunity to position it as a benefit of an existing membership or something else people already had. I was consistently top-ten out of 400 people on a shift, and it was great.But it was also something that was very time-limited, and if you're having an off day, everything winds up crumbling. And, eventually, I drifted off and started doing different things. But I've never forgotten those days. And that's why it just grinds my gears both to see crappy sales stuff happening, and two, watching people on Twitter—particularly—taking various sales-prospect outreach for a drag. And it's—Ashleigh: Oh, God. Yeah.Corey: —you know, not everyone is swimming in the ocean of privilege that some of the rest of us are. And understand that you're just making yourself look like a jerk when you're talking to someone who is relatively early-career and didn't happen to google you deeply enough before sending you an email that you find insulting. That bugs me a fair bit.Ashleigh: And I think part of that is just a lack of humanity and understanding. Like, there's—I mean, I get it; I'm the first person to be jumping on Twitter and [unintelligible 00:08:41] when something goes down, or something's not working, and saying, you know—I'm the first one to get angry and start complaining. Don't get me wrong. However, what I think a lot of people—it's really easy to dehumanize something you don't see very often, or you're not involved in directly. And I find it real interesting you mentioned you worked in, you know, doing telemarketing.I lasted literally two weeks in telemarketing. I full-on rage-quit. It was a college job. I worked in my college donations center. I lasted two weeks, and I fully walked out on a shift. I was, like, “Screw this; I'm never doing anything like that ever again. I hate this.”But what I hated about it was I hated the lack of connection. I was, like, I'm not just going to read some scripts and get yelled at for having too much banter. Like, I'm getting money; what do you care? I'm getting more money than other people. Maybe they're not making as many calls, but I'm getting just as much, so why do you care how I do this?But what really gets me is you have to remember—and I think a lot of people don't understand how, kind of, most large, modern sales organizations work. And just really quickly giving you a very, very generic explanation, the way a lot of organizations work is they employ something called SDRs or Sales Development Reps. That title can be permeated in a million different ways. There's ADRs, MDRs, BDRs, whatever. But basically, it's their job to do nothing but scour the internet using, sometimes, actual, like, scripts.Sometimes they use LinkedIn; sometimes they have—they purchase databases. So, for example, like, you might change your title on LinkedIn, but it's not changing in the database. Just trust me Corey, they have you flagged as a CTO. Sorry. What [crosstalk 00:10:16].Corey: My personal favorite is when I get cold outreach asking me on the phone call about whether we have any needs for whatever it is they happen to be selling at—and then they name a company that I left in 2012. I don't know how often that database has been sold and resold and sold onwards, yet again. And it's just, I work in tech. What do you think the odds are that I'm still in the same job I was ten years ago? And I get that it happens, but at some point, it just becomes almost laughable.Ashleigh: Yeah. If you work in a company—that when in doubt—I tell every sales, kind of, every company team that I work with—do not use those vendors. Ninety percent of them are not very good; they're using old databases; they don't update. You're better off paying for a database that is subscription-based because then, literally, you've got an SLA on data quality, and you can flag and get things fixed. The number one sales-data provider, I happen to know for a fact, I actually earned, I think, almost $10,000 in donations to a charity in—what was this—this was 2015 because I went through and did a scrub of are RCRM versus I think, LinkedIn or something else, and I flagged everything that wasn't accurate and sent it back to them.And they happened to have a promotion where for every—where you could do a flag that wasn't accurate because they were no longer at the company. They would donate a buck to charity, and I think I sent them, like, 10,000 or something. [unintelligible 00:11:36] I was like, “None of these are accurate.” And they're, like, you know? And they sent me this great email, like, “Thank you for telling us; we really appreciate it.”I didn't even know they were doing this promotion. They thought I'd be saving up for it. And I was, like, “No, I just happened to run this analysis and thought you'd want to know.” So, subscriptions—Corey: You know, it turns out computers are really fast at things.Ashleigh: Yeah, and I was very proud I figured out how to run a script. I was, like, “Yay. Look at me; I wrote a macro.” This was very exciting for—the first—God, the first five or so years of my sales career, I've consistently called myself a dumb salesperson because I was working in really super-technical products. I worked for Arista Networks, FireEye, Bromium, you know, PernixData. I was working in some pretty reasonably hard tech, and I'd always, kind of, introduced myself, I definitely talked about my technical aptitude because I have a degree in political science and opera. These are not technical fields, and yet here I am every day, talking about, you know, tech [crosstalk 00:12:25].Corey: Well, if the election doesn't pan out the way you want, why don't you sing about it? Why not? You can tie all these things together.Ashleigh: You can. And, honestly, there have several points—I've done a whole other shows on, like, how those two, seemingly, completely disparate things have actually been some of the greatest gifts to my career. And most notably, I think, is the fact that I have my degree in political science as a Bachelor of Science, which means I have a BS in BS, which is incredibly relevant to my career in a lot of different ways.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of “Hello, World” demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking, databases, observability, management, and security. And—let me be clear here—it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself, all while gaining the networking, load balancing, and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build. With Always Free, you can do things like run small-scale applications or do proof-of-concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free? This is actually free, no asterisk. Start now. Visit snark.cloud/oci-free that's snark.cloud/oci-free.Ashleigh: Yeah, so wrapping up, kind of, how modern-skills organizations work, most companies' employees can be called BDRs, and they're typically people who have less than five years of sales experience. They, rightly or wrongly, tend to be people in their early-20s who have very little training. Most people get SDRs on phones within a week, which means—Corey: These are the people that are doing the cold outreach?Ashleigh: —they've gotten maybe five or six hours of product training. Hmm? Sorry.Corey: These are the people who are doing the cold outreach?Ashleigh: These are the people who are doing the cold outreach. So, their whole job is just to get appointments for account execs. Account execs make it—again; tons of different names, but these are the closers. They'll run you through the sales cycle. They typically have between five and thirty years of experience.But they're the ones depending on how big your company is. [unintelligible 00:13:35] the bigger your company, typically the more experience your sales rep's going to have in terms of managing most separate deal cycles. But what ends up happening is you end up with this SDR organization—this is where I've spent most of my career is helping people build healthy sales-development organizations. In terms of this churn-and-burn culture where you've got people coming in and basically flaming out because they go on Twitter or—heaven forbid—Reddit and get sales advice from these loud-mouthed, terrible people, who are telling them to do things that didn't work ten years ago, but they then go try it; they send it out, and then their prospects suddenly blasting them on Twitter.It's not that rep's fault that they got no training in the first place, they got no support, they just had to figure it out because that's the culture. It's the company's fault. And a lot of times, people don't—there was a big push against this last year, I think, within the sales community against other sales leaders doing it, but now, it's starting to spread out. Like, I have no problem dragging someone for a really terrible email. Anonymize the company; anonymize the email. And, if you want to give feedback, give it to them directly. And you can also say, “I'm going to post this, but it's not coming back to you.” And tell them, like—Corey: Whenever I get outreach from—Ashleigh: “Get out of that terrible company.”Corey: Yeah. Whenever I get outreach from AWS for a sales motion or for recruiting or whatnot. I always anonymize the heck out of the rep. It's funny to me because it's, “Don't you know who I am?” It is humorous, on some level. And it's clear that is a numbers game, and they're trying to do a bunch of different things, but a cursory google of my name would show it. It's just amusing.I want to be clear that whenever I do that, I don't think the rep has done anything wrong. They're doing exactly what they should. I just find it very funny that, “Wait, me? Work at an AWS? The bookstore?” It seems like it would be a—yeah. Yeah, the juxtaposition is just hilarious to me. They've done nothing wrong, and that's okay. It's a hard racket.I remember—at least they have the benefit over my first enterprise sales job where I was selling tape drives into the AS/400 market, competing against IBM on price. That was in the days of “No one ever gets fired for buying IBMs.” So, yeah. The place you want to save money on is definitely the backup system that's going to save all of your systems. I made one sale in my time there—and apparently set a company record because it wasn't specifically aimed at the AS/400—and I did the math on that and realized, “Huh, I'd have to do two of these a month in order to beat the draw against commission structure that they had.”So, I said, “To hell with this,” and I quit. The CEO was very much a sales pro, and, “Well, you need to figure out whether you're a salesperson or not.” Even back then, I had an attitude problem, but it was, “Yeah, I think that—oh, I know that I am. It's just a question is am I going to be a salesperson here?” And the answer is, “No.” It [laugh]—Ashleigh: Yeah.Corey: It's a two-way street.Ashleigh: It is. And I say this all the time to people who—I work with a lot of salespeople now who are, like, “I don't think sales is for me. I don't know, I need [unintelligible 00:16:24]. The past three companies didn't work.” The answer isn't, “Is sales for you?”The answer is, “Are you selling the right thing at the right place?” And one of the things we've learned from the ‘Great Recession' and the ‘Great Reshuffling' in everything is there's no reason to stay at a terrible company, and there's no reason to stay at a company where you're not really passionate and understand what you're selling. I joked about, you know, I talked down about myself for the first bit of my career. Doesn't mean I didn't—like, I might not understand exactly how heuristics work, but I understand what heuristics are. Just don't ask me to design any of them.You know, like, you have to understand and you have to be really excited about it. And that's what modern sales is. And so, yes, you're going to get a ton of the outreach because that's how people—it still works. That's why we all still get Nigerian prince emails. Somebody, somewhere, still clicks those things, sadly. And that gets me really angry.Corey: It's a pure numbers game.Ashleigh: Exactly. Ninety percent if enterprise B2B sales is not that anymore. Even the companies that are using BDRs—which is most of them—are now moving to what's called ‘account-based selling'. We're using hyper-personalized messaging. You're probably noticing videos are popping up more.I'm a huge fan of video. I think it's a great way to force personalization. It's, like, “Hi. Corey, I see you. I'm talking to you. I've done my research. I know what you're doing at The Duckbill Group and here's how I think we can help. If that's not the case, no worries. Let me know; I'll leave you alone.” That's what selling should be.Corey: I have yet to receive one of those, but I'm sure it'll happen now that I've mentioned that and put that out into the universe.Ashleigh: Probably.Corey: What always drove me nuts—and maybe this is unfair—but when I'm trying to use a product, probably something SaaS-based—and I see this a lot—where, first, if you aren't letting me self-serve and get off with the free tier and just start testing something, well, that's already a ding against you because usually I'm figuring this out at 2 o'clock in the morning when I can't sleep, and I want to work on something. I don't want to wait for a sales cycle, and I have to slow things down. Cool. But at some point, for sophisticated customers, you absolutely need to have a sales conversation. But, okay, great. Usually, I encounter this more with lead magnets or other things designed to get my contact info.But what drives me up a wall, when they start demanding information that is very clearly trying to classify me in their sales funnel, on some level. I'll give you my name, my company, and my work email address—although I would think that from my work email address, you could probably figure out where I work and the rest—but then there are other questions. How big is your company? What is your functional role within the company? And where are you geographically?Well, that's an interesting question. Why does that matter in 2022? Well, very often leads get circulated out to people based upon geography. And I get it, but it also frustrates me, just because I don't want to have to deal with classifying and sorting myself out for what is going to be a very brief conversation [laugh] with a salesperson. Because if the product works, great, I'm going to buy. If it doesn't work, I'm going to get frustrated and not want to hear from you forever.Which gets to my big question for you—and please don't take the question as anything other than the joking spirit in which it's intended—but why are so many salespeople profoundly annoying?Ashleigh: I would—uh, hmm.Corey: Sales processes is probably the better way to frame it because—Ashleigh: I was going to say, “Yeah, it's not the people; it's the process.” So—Corey: —it's not the individual's fault, as we've talked about it.Ashleigh: —yeah, I was going to say, I was, like, “Okay, I think it's less the people; more of the processes.” And processes that will make [crosstalk 00:19:37]—Corey: Yeah. It expresses itself as the same person showing up again and again. But that is not—Ashleigh: Totally.Corey: —their fault. That is the process by which they are being measured at as a part of their job. And it's unfair to blame them for that. But the expression is, “This person's annoying the hell out of me, what gives?”Ashleigh: “Oh, my gosh. Why does she keep [unintelligible 00:19:51] my inbox? Leave me alone. Just let me freaking test it.” I said, “I needed two weeks. Just let me have the two weeks to freaking test the thing. I will get back to you.” [unintelligible 00:19:58] yeah, no, I know.And even since moving into leadership several years ago, same thing. I'm like, “Okay, no.” I've gotten to the point where I've had several conversations with salespeople. I'm like, “I know the game. I know what you're trying to do. I respect it. Leave me alone. I promise I will get back to you, just lea”—I have literally said this to people. And the weird thing is most salespeople respect that. We really respect the transparency on that.Now, the trick is what you're talking about with lead capture and stuff like this, again, it comes down to company's design and it comes down to companies who value the buyer experience and customer journey, and companies who don't. And this, I think, is actually more driven by—in my humble opinion—our slightly over-reliance on venture capital, which is all about for a gathering of as much data as possible, figuring out how to monetize it, and move from there. In their mind, personal experience and emotion doesn't really factor into that equation very much, so you end up with these buyer journeys that are less about the buyer and more about getting them from click to purchase as efficiently as possible in terms of company resources, which includes salespeople time. So, as to why you have to fill out all those things, that just to me reeks of a company that maybe doesn't really understand the client experience and probably is going to have a pretty, mmm, support program as well, which means the product had better be really freaking good for me to buy it.Corey: To be clear, at The Duckbill Group, we do not have a two-in-the-morning click here and get you onboarded. Turns out that we have yet to really see the value in building a shopping cart system, where you can buy, “One consulting please,” and call it good. We're not quite at the level of productizing our offering yet and having conversations is a necessary part of what we do. But that also aligns with our customer expectation where there is not a general expectation in this industry that you can buy a full-on bespoke consulting engagement without talking to a human being. That, honestly, if someone trying to sell someone such a thing, I would be terrified.Ashleigh: Yeah, run screaming. Good Lord. No, exactly. And that's one of the reasons I love working with this team and I love this problem is because this isn't a quick, you know, download, install, and save, you know, save ten percent on your AWS bill by installing Duckbill Group. It ain't that simple. If it were that simple, like, AWS wouldn't have the market cap it does.So, that's one of the things I love. I love really meaty problems that don't have clean answers, and specifically have answers that look slightly different for everybody. I love those sort of problems. I've done the highly prioritized stuff: Click here, buy, get it on the free tier, and then it's all about up-sale, cross-sale as needed. Been there, done that; that's fun, and that's a whole different bucket of challenges, but what we're dealing with every single day on the consulting's of The Duckbill Group is far more nuanced and far more exciting because we're also seeing some truly incredible architecture designs. Like, companies who are really on the bleeding edge of what they're doing. And it's just really fun—Corey: Cost and architecture are the same thing in the Cloud.Ashleigh: —[crosstalk 00:22:59] that little—Corey: It's a blast to see it.Ashleigh: It's so much fun. It's, it's, it's… the world's best jigsaw puzzle because it covers, like, every single continent and all these different nuances, and you got to think about a ‘ephemerality,' which is my new favorite word. So…Corey: It's fun because you are building a sales team here, which opens up a few interesting avenues for me. For one, I don't have to manage and yell at individual salespeople in the same way. For example, we talk about it being a process and not a person thing. We're launching some outbound sales work and basically, having the person to talk to about that process—namely you—means that I don't need to be hovering over people's shoulders the way I felt that I once did, as far as what are we sending people? These passive-aggressive drip campaigns of, “Clearly, you don't mind lighting money on fire. If that changes, please let me know.”It's email eight in a sequence. It's no. This stuff has an implicit ‘Love, Mike and Corey' at the bottom of everything that comes out of this company, and it represents us on some respect. And let's be clear, we have a savvy, sophisticated, and more-attractive-than-the-average audience listening to all of these shows. And they'll eat me alive if we start doing stuff like that—Ashleigh: Oh, yeah.Corey: —not to mention that I find it not particularly respectful of their time and who they are. It doesn't work, so we have to be very conscious of that. The fact that I never had to explain that concept in any depth to you made bringing you in one of the easiest decisions we've ever made.Ashleigh: Well, I think it helped—I think in one of my interviews I went off on the ‘alligator email,' which is this infamous email we've all gotten, which is basically, like, you know, “Hi. I haven't heard from you yet, so I want to know which one of these three scenarios has happened to you. One, you're not interested in my product but didn't have the balls to email me and say that you're not interested. Two, you're no longer in this position, in which case, you're not going to read this email anyway. Or three, you're being chased by an alligator, and I should call animal control because you need help.” This email was—Corey: He, he, he, hilarious.Ashleigh: Ugh. And there's variations of it. And I've seen variations of it that are very well done and are on brand and work with the company. I've seen variations that could be legitimately, I think, great humor. And that's great.Humor in emails and humor in sales is fantastic. I have to shout out my friend, Jon Selig up in Canada, who actually, literally, does workshops on how sales teams can integrate humor into their prospecting. It's freaking brilliant. But—Corey: Near and dear to my heart.Ashleigh: —if you're not actually trained in that stuff, don't do it. Don't do the alligator email. But I think I went off on that during one of our interviews just because I was just sick of seeing these things. And what kills me, again, it comes back to the beginning, is people who have no training, no experience coming in—I mean, it really kills me, too, because there's a real concerted effort in the sales community to get more diverse people into sales to, kind of, kill the sales bro just by washing them out, basically. And so, we're recruiting hard with veterans, with black and other racial minority groups, LGBTQ communities, all sorts of things, and indigenous peoples.And so, we're bringing people that also are maybe a little bit more mature, a little bit older, have families they're supporting, and we're throwing them in a role with no support and very little training. And then they wash out, and we wonder why. It's, like, well, maybe because you didn't—it's, like, when I explain this to other people who aren't in sales, like, “Really, imagine coming in to being hired for a coding job, being told you're going to be trained on, you know, Ruby on Rails or C# or whatever it is we're currently using”—my reference is probably super outdated—but then, being given a book, and that's it. And told, “Learn it. And by the way, your first project is due in a month.” That's what we're doing in sales—Corey: For a lot of folks, that's how we learned in the engineering spaces, but let's be clear, the people who do well in that, generally have tailwinds of privilege at their back. They don't have headwinds of, “You suck at this.” It was, you're-born-on-third-you-didn't-hit-a-triple school-of-thought. It's—Ashleigh: Yeah.Corey: —the idea of building an onboarding pipeline, of making this stuff more accessible to people earlier on is incredibly important. One of my, I guess, awakening moments as we were building this company was it turns out that if you manage salespeople as if they were engineers, it doesn't go super well. Whereas, if you manage engineers like they're salespeople, they quit—rage quit—cry, and call you out as being an abusive manager.One of the best descriptions I ever heard from an advisor was that salespeople are sharks. But that's not intended to be unkind. It is simply a facet of their nature. They enjoy the hunt; they enjoy chasing things down, and they like playing games. Whereas, as soon as you start playing games with your engineers on how much money they're going to make this week, that turns out to be a very negative thing. It's a different mindset. It's about motivating people as whatever befits what it is that they want to be doing.Ashleigh: It is. And the other thing is it's a cultural conditioning. So, it's really interesting to say, you know, “People,” you know, “Playing games.” We do enjoy—there's definitely some enjoyment of the competition; there's the thrill of the hunt, absolutely, but at the same time, you want your salespeople to quit? Screw with their money.You screw with their money; we will bail so fast it'll make your head spin. So, it's like, people think, “Oh, we love this.” No, it's really more—think of it as we are gamblers.Corey: Yeah. To be clear when I say, “Playing games with money,” I'm talking about the idea of, “Sell to a company in this profile this quarter, and we'll throw a $5,000 bonus your way,” or something like that. It is if the business wants to see something, great, make it worth the sales team's while to pursue it, or don't be surprised when no one really cares that much about those things—Ashleigh: Exactly.Corey: It's all upside. It is not about, “He, he. And if you don't sell to this weird thing that I can't really describe effectively to you, we're going to cut your bet—” Yeah, that goes over like a lead balloon. As it should. My belief is that compensation should always go up, not down.Ashleigh: Yeah. No, it should. Aside from that, here's a fun stat—I believe this came out of Forrester, it might've been out of [Topel 00:28:54]; I apologize, I don't remember exactly who said this, but a recent study found that less than 68 percent of sales reps make their quota every month. So, imagine that where if you're—we have this thing called OTE, which is On Target Earnings. So, if you have this number you're supposed to take home every month, only 68 percent of sales reps actually do that every month.So, that means we live with this number as our target, but we're living and budgeting anywhere from 30 to 50 percent below that. And then hoping and doing the work that goes in there. That's what we've been conditioned to accept, and that's why you end up with sales reps that use terms like ‘shark' and are aggressive and are in your face and can get—[unintelligible 00:29:30]—Corey: I didn't realize it was pejorative.Ashleigh: I know. No. But here's the thing too, but somebody called it ‘commission breath,' which I love. It's, like, you can smell commission breath coming off us when we're desperate. You totally can. It's because of this antiquated way of building commissions.And this is something that I—this was really obvious to me, and apparently, I was a little bit ahead of the curve. When I started designing comp plans, everyone told me, “You want to design a comp plan? Tie it to what you want them to do very specifically.” So, if you want them to move a pen, design a comp plan that they get a buck when they put the pen from the heel of your hand to the tips of your fingers. Then they get a buck. And then they can do that repeatedly. That's literally how I was taught design comp plans.In my head, that meant that I need to design it in such a way that it's doable for my team because I don't want my team worrying about how they're going to put food on the table while they're talking to a client because they're going get commission breath and it'll piss off the client. That's not a good client experience; that's not going to lead to good performance. Apparently—Corey: Yeah. My concern as a business owner has nothing to do with salespeople making too much money. In fact, I am never happier than I am than paying out commissions. The concern, then, therefore has to become the, “Okay, great. How do I keep the salespeople from being inadvertently incentivized to sell something for $10 that costs me $12 to fulfill?”It's a question of what behaviors do you incentivize that align what they're motivated by with what the company needs. And very often getting that wrong—which happens from time to time—is not viewed as a learning experience that it should be. But instead, “They're just out to screw us.” And I've seen so many company owners get so annoyed whenever their salespeople outperform. But what did you expect? That is the positive outcome. As opposed to what? The underperforming sales rep that can't close a deal? Please.Ashleigh: Well, no. And let's think about this too, especially if it's tied to commission and you're paying out commission. It's, like, okay, commission is always some, sort of, percentage—depending on a lot of things—but some sort of percent of what they're bringing in. If you design a comp plan that has you paying out more in commission than the sales that were earned to bring it in, that's on you; you screwed up. And you need to either be honest and say, “I screwed up; I can't pay this,” and know that you're going to lose some sales reps, but you won't lose as many as if you just refuse to pay it.But, honestly, and I'm not even kidding, I know people. I've worked at a company that I happen to know did this. That literally fired people because they didn't have the money to pay out the commission. And because they fired them before the commission was due to be paid out, then that person no longer had a legal claim to it. That's common. So, the commission goes both ways.Corey: To be clear, we've never done that, but I also would say that if we had, that's a screaming red flag for our consultancy, given the nature of what it is that we do here. It turns out that when we're building out comp plans, we model out various scenarios. Like, what is the worst way that this could wind up unfolding? And, okay, some of our early drafts it's, yeah, it turns out that we would not be able to pay salaries because we wound up giving all of that in commission to people with uncapped upside. Okay, great.But we're also not going to cap people's commissions because that winds up being a freaking problem, so how do we wind up motivating in a way that continues to grow and continues to incentivize the behaviors we want? And it turns out it's super complicated which why we brought you in. It's easier.Ashleigh: Yeah, it's a pain. But the other side of this too, I think, is there is another force at play here, which is finance. A lot of traditional finance modeling is built around that 50 to 70 percent of people hit commission. So, if all of the sudden, you design a comp plan such of a way that a hundred percent of the team is hitting commission, finance loses their shit. So, you have to make sure that when you're designing these things, one of the things I learned, I learned the hard way—this is how I learned that not everyone does it this way—I built my first comp plan; my team's hitting it.My team's overperforming, not a ton, but we're doing really well. All of the sudden, I'm getting called to Finance and getting raked over the coals. And they're like, “What did you do?” I'm like, “What do you mean what did I do? I designed a comp plan; we're hitting goal. Why are you mad?” “Well, we only had this much budgeted for commission.”And I was, like, “That's not my fault.” “Well, that's what historic performance was.” “Okay, well that's not what we're going to do going forward. We're going to do this.” And they're like, “Oh, well, you need to notify us if you're going to change it like that.” And I was, like, “Wait a minute. You modeled so that my team would not hit OTE?” “Yes.” “That's how you've always done this?” “Yes.” “Okay. Well, that's not what we're going to do going forward, and if that's a problem, I'll go find a door.” Because, no.Especially when we're talking about people who are living in extremely expensive areas. I spent most of my career living and working in San Francisco, managing teams of people who made less than six figures. And that's rough when you're paying two grand in rent every month. And 60 percent of your pay is commission. Like, no. You need to know that money's coming.So, I talk about modern sales a lot because that's what I'm trying to use because there's Glengarry Glen Ross, kind of, Wolf of Wall Street school, which is not how anyone behaves anymore, and if you're in an environment that's like that or treats your salespeople like that? Please leave. And then you've got modern sales, which is all about, “Okay, let's figure out how we can set up our salespeople to be the best people they can be to give our clients the best experience they can.” That's where you get top performance out of, and that's where you never run into the terrible emails with the alligators, and the, “Clearly you like lighting piles of money on fire.” That's where you don't get emails to Corey Quinn asking him if he's interested in coming to work for AWS, the book company.It's by incentivizing the people and creating good humans where they can really thrive as salespeople and as people in general. The rest comes with time. But, it's this whole, new way of looking at things. And it's big, and it's scary, and it costs more upfront, but you get more on the back end every single time.Corey: Not that you care about this an awful lot, but you have your own podcast that talks about this, The Other Side of Sales. What inspired you to decide, not just to build sales teams through a different lens, but also to, “You know what? I'm going to go out and talk into microphones through the internet from time to time.” Which, let's be clear, it takes a little bit of a certain warped perspective. I say this myself, having done this far too often.Ashleigh: Yeah. No, it's a fun little origin story. So, I'm a huge Star Trek geek; obsessive. And I was listening to a Star Trek podcast run by a couple of guys who are a little bit embarrassed to run a Star Trek podcast, called The Greatest Generation. Definitely not safe for work, but a really good podcast if you're into Star Trek at all.And they always do, kind of, letters at the end of the shows. And one of the letters at the end of the show one day was, “Hey, I was really inspired by you guys and I started my own podcast on this random thing that I am super excited about.” And I'm literally driving in the car with my husband, and I'm, like, “Huh. I don't know why I'm not listening to sales podcasts. I listen to enough of these other random ones.” Jumped online, pulled up a list of sales podcasts, and I think I went through three or four articles of, like, every sales podcast that was big. And this was, like, January of 2019.Corey: “By Broseph McBrowerson, but Everyone Calls Him ‘Browie.'” Yeah.Ashleigh: Literally, there was, Conversations with Women in Sales with the late, great—with the amazing Lori Richardson, who's now with it, but she took over for a mentor of mine who passed in 2020, sadly. But there was that, and then there was one other that was hosted by a husband-and-wife team. And that was it out of, like, 30 podcasts. And [laugh] so it was this moment of, like, epiphany of, like, “I can start my own podcast,” and, “Oh, I probably need to,” because, literally, no one looks or sounds like someone who I would actually want to hang out with ever, or do business with, in a lot of cases. And that's really changed. I'm so grateful.But really, what it came down to was I didn't feel there was a podcast for me. There wasn't a podcast I could listen to about sales that could help me, that I felt like I identified with. So, I was, like, “All right, fine. I'll start my own.” I called up a friend, and she was, literally, going through the same thing at the same time, so we said, “Screw it. We'll do our own.”We went full Bender from Futurama. We're like, “Just screw it; we'll have our own podcast… with liquor… and heels… and honest conversations that happens to us every day,” and random stuff. It's a lot of fun. And we've gone through a few iterations and it's been a long journey. We're about to hit our hundredth episode, which is really exciting.But yeah, we're—The Other Side of Sales is on a mission to make B2B sales culture truly inclusive so everyone can thrive, so, our conversations are all interviews with amazing sales pros who are trying to do amazing things and who are 90—I think are over 90 percent—are from a minority background, which is really exciting to, kind of, try and shift that conversation from Broseph McBrowerson. Our original tagline was the ‘anti-sales bro' podcast, but we thought that was a little too antagonistic. So…Corey: Yeah, being a little too antagonistic is, generally, my failure mode, so I hear you on that. I really want to thank you for taking so much time out of your day to speak with me. Because—well, not that I should thank you. It's one of those, I should really turn around and say, “Wait a minute. Why aren't you selling things? Why are you still talking to me?” But no—Ashleigh: No, I'm waiting for you to say, “Back to work.”Corey: Do appreciate your—exactly. I think that's a different podcast. Thank you so much for your time. If people want to learn more, where's the best place to find you?Ashleigh: Well, definitely please go check out duckbillgroup.com. We would love to talk to with you about anything to do with your AWS bill. Got a ton of resources on there around how to get that managed and sorted.If you're interested in connecting with me you can always hit me up at—I'm on Twitter @ashleighatwork, which is another deep-cut Star Trek reference, or you can hit me up at LinkedIn. Just search Ashleigh Early. My name is spelled a little weird because I'm a little weird. It's A-S-H-L-E-I-G-H, and then Early, like ‘early in the morning.'Corey: And links to all of that will wind up in the [show notes 00:39:11]. Thanks so much for your time. It's appreciated.Ashleigh: This has been fun; we'll do it again soon.AndIf your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Luka Nation Network
633. Overtime Sam Joins Luka Nation

Luka Nation Network

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 46:31


Topps Chrome Basketball is back and Overtime Sam is here to review the product and open a pack! We talk about OTE- throw up a few “O's” and discuss the new release that is already sold out on Topps.com! Enjoy and thanks for listening

The Digiday Podcast
Why Overtime's Elite basketball league is using social audience interest to find a live TV rights buyer

The Digiday Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 43:58


One year ago, Overtime announced it was creating its own basketball league made up of 16- to 18-year- old players — a demographic representative of the sports' publishers' audience. Called the Overtime Elite League (or OTE), the social media-first sports publisher used some of the $80 million raised last year in its series C to build a basketball arena, boarding school and dorm facility in Atlanta, and recruit 27 high school-aged athletes, all of whom are paid six-figure salaries, to get the league off the ground. As the three-team league wraps its first official season, Overtime's co-founder and president Zack Weiner came on the Digiday Podcast to talk about the advertiser-based business model his team has created around the Elite League. The ultimate goal for making the league profitable, however, is to sell the live game rights to a network or streaming platform, which is the money maker for professional leagues, like the NFL, NBA and MLB. Currently, OTE's games are not broadcast to Overtime's audience, but Weiner said the off-the-court video series and game highlight reels are working to introduce viewers to these players and generate excitement around the league, which will hopefully get a buyer to purchase the live rights for a sizable sum.

iball Podcast
"Mission(s) Completed"

iball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 54:21


2021-2022 High School basketball season is in the books and with the ups and downs the season ended with a bang! DWill The Coach and Coach Chill Will run through it all in this episode only as they know how. Jump in and roll with the fellas of the iball Podcast.

iball Podcast
"Credential Me, Please!"

iball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2022 28:37


DWill The Coach and Coach Chill Will give y'all a bonus this week getting you ready the Regional Finals and also letting you some of the struggles they face even though they are the #1 Podcast in the State of Alabama for all things High School Basketball. But they don't sweat it and since this episode has been recorded they FINALLY got right through the AHSAA.

iball Podcast
"We Come In Peace!"

iball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 57:14


Oh Boy! DWill The Coach and Coach Chill Will are back in studio together and mannnn you can hear the layoff in their voice because they keep it REAL REAL in this episode. They hold no punches in talking about all things high school basketball in the State of Alabama and they want all to know "They Come in Peace" lol! Tap in because this episode is FIRE!

iball Podcast
Preference and Opinion

iball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 32:46


DWill The Coach goes in solo for this bonus episode to shout out everyone for the support of the 2022 iball Lottery Rankings. He also dives a little into S3 E11 dropping at its regular time of every Monday at Noon titled "Exposure and Recognition". But this bouns he gives shout outs but he also drops game on what rankings are and mean....matter of fact just go listen its worth it!!!

iball Podcast
Competence and Competition

iball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 58:28


The full crew is back in the building for another Hot Episode of the iball Podcast. DWill The Coach and Coach Chill Will tear down another episode to pieces as they keep it real as they always do. This time there talking competent refs and competition between players going head to head. Strap up and take a ride with the fellas of the iball Podcast.

Subject to Change with Jordan McCabe and Overtime Tom
Bryce Griggs: Making Money & Hanging W/ James Harden & Meek Mill

Subject to Change with Jordan McCabe and Overtime Tom

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 37:14


We got another FIRE episode for ya'll today. The man…the myth… the crazy baller… our FAM, Bryce Griggs is here. Bryce if one of OTE's hottest players and we got the chance to steal him off the court so we can get the inside scoop. Our conversation goes in a lot of different directions, from his unreal 3-pointer that sent his team into overtime against Vertical Academy, how James Harden is his mentor, and how Meek Mill and Lil Baby were at his birthday party. Tom obviously jumped in and invited himself to Griggs' next birthday (we'll see how that turns out). We also chopped it up about favorite rappers, best hoopers, and what it's like for Griggs playing against one of his best friends, Mikey Williams. Ya'll DO NOT want to miss this episode! Sit back, relax, and tune in. Oh, and we also have a surprise guest at the end of the episode. Much love from your hosts, Jordan McCabe and Overtime Tom- we got another dope guest coming soon!

iball Podcast
OTE!!

iball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 63:37


DWill The Coach and Coach Chill Will are back this week with a new episode and they are talking about their weekend in ATL at the OTE Arena for the OTE League weekend of games. So Take a ride as they recap the weekend and prelude to part 2 of this episode.

iball Podcast
Ain't No Gap Bro!

iball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 53:51


DWill The Coach and Coach Chill Will talk 1st week standouts of the High School Basketball Season and also take a dive into the Gap between a Low, Mid, or High Major prospect.

Tipping The Scales
Mikal Bridges

Tipping The Scales

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 44:42


Shea is back hot off OTE opening weekend and just in time to welcome Tyneeha's son, Western Conference Champion with the Phoenix Suns, Mikal Bridges. More than an insight into his basketball journey, Mikal reflects with the ladies on the behind-the-scenes story of how he grew up and what situations off the court shaped him into the player he is today. Mikal discusses how he mentally prepared to play ball at Villanova, only to be red shirted, and how that year formed him. The laughs, the tears, those who inspired him through grace, and those who motivated him through struggle; We hear about his championship seasons at Villanova, the blessing that was being traded to the Suns on Draft Night, having a career high game during the NBA Finals and the feeling that came with signing a 4-year $90 million rookie extension. This episode is full of basketball, no doubt, but more importantly it is a testament to a mother's love, to the power of positivity and to the meaning of a balanced and fulfilled life. Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/tippingthescalespodcast/  

Ancient Afterlives
9. Part 2. Dead Sea Scrolls in the Modern Era: Provenance and Forgery - Ingrid Breilid Gimse

Ancient Afterlives

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 36:52


This week is the second of a two-part interview with Ingrid Breilid Gimse, hosted by Katherine Gwyther and Michael DeVries. Ingrid is a theologian doing her PhD at the University of Agder in Norway. She is a research fellow in the research project "The Lying Pen of Scribes: Manuscript Forgeries, Digital Imaging, and Critical Provenance Research." Her PhD project concerns the publication history of the official publication series of the Dead Sea Scrolls: Discoveries in the Judaean Desert (DJD). The Lying Pen project is on Facebook (https://facebook.com/lyingpen) and has a formal web site (https://lyingpen.uia.no) and a more informal blog (https://lyingpen.com). Ingrid's twitter handle is @IngridBreilidG. Ingrid's article (Gimse, I. B. [2020]. The Post-2002 Fragments' Dependency on Modern Editions of the Hebrew Bible. Revue de Qumran, 32[1]: 115, 57-77) can be found here: https://uia.brage.unit.no/uia-xmlui/handle/11250/2784067 Bibliography: Dennis Mizzi and Jodi Magness, "Provenance vs. Authenticity: An Archaeological Perspective on the Post-2002 'Dead Sea Scrolls-Like' Fragments," Dead Sea Discoveries 26.2 (2019):135-169 DOI:10.1163/15685179-12341503. Kipp Davis, Ira Rabin, Ines Feldman, Myriam Krutzsch, Hasia Rimon, Årstein Justnes, Torleif Elgvin, and Michael Langlois, "Nine Dubious 'Dead Sea Scrolls' Fragments from the Twenty-First Century," Dead Sea Discoveries 24 (2017): 189–228. Kipp Davis, "Caves of Dispute: Patterns of Correspondence and Suspicion in the Post-2002 'Dead Sea Scrolls' Fragments*," Dead Sea Discoveries 24 (2017): 229–270. Eibert C. J. Tigchelaar, "A Provisional List of Unprovenanced, Twenty-First Century, Dead Sea Scrolls-like Fragments," Dead Sea Discoveries 24 (2017): 173–188. Stephen A. Reed, "What is a Fragment?," The Journal of Jewish Studies 45 (1994): 123–125. Stephen A. Reed, "Find-Sites of the Dead Sea Scrolls," Dead Sea Discoveries 14.2 (2007): 199–221. Gerrie Snyman, “The African and Western Hermeneutics Debate: Mimesis, The Book of Esther, and Textuality,” OTE 25 (2012): 657–684. Thanks for listening!

iball Podcast
Death of High School Basketball? Part 2

iball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 58:18


The last one was so hot we had to run it back....That's right Part 2 of our "Death of High School Basketball" conversation is back in this episode and when I say we go deep i mean like Steph curry from the logo deep deep. So lock in your seat belts gather your thoughts because we are looking to hear from you on what we say.

Ancient Afterlives
9. Part 1. Dead Sea Scrolls in the Modern Era: Provenance and Forgery - Ingrid Breilid Gimse

Ancient Afterlives

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 44:07


This week is the first of a two-part interview with Ingrid Breilid Gimse, hosted by Katherine Gwyther and Michael DeVries. Ingrid is a theologian doing her PhD at the University of Agder in Norway. She is a research fellow in the research project "The Lying Pen of Scribes: Manuscript Forgeries, Digital Imaging, and Critical Provenance Research." Her PhD project concerns the publication history of the official publication series of the Dead Sea Scrolls: Discoveries in the Judaean Desert (DJD). The Lying Pen project is on Facebook (https://facebook.com/lyingpen) and has a formal web site (https://lyingpen.uia.no) and a more informal blog (https://lyingpen.com). Ingrid's twitter handle is @IngridBreilidG. Ingrid's article (Gimse, I. B. [2020]. The Post-2002 Fragments' Dependency on Modern Editions of the Hebrew Bible. Revue de Qumran, 32[1]: 115, 57-77) can be found here: https://uia.brage.unit.no/uia-xmlui/handle/11250/2784067 Bibliography: Dennis Mizzi and Jodi Magness, "Provenance vs. Authenticity: An Archaeological Perspective on the Post-2002 'Dead Sea Scrolls-Like' Fragments," Dead Sea Discoveries 26.2 (2019):135-169 DOI:10.1163/15685179-12341503. Kipp Davis, Ira Rabin, Ines Feldman, Myriam Krutzsch, Hasia Rimon, Årstein Justnes, Torleif Elgvin, and Michael Langlois, "Nine Dubious 'Dead Sea Scrolls' Fragments from the Twenty-First Century," Dead Sea Discoveries 24 (2017): 189–228. Kipp Davis, "Caves of Dispute: Patterns of Correspondence and Suspicion in the Post-2002 'Dead Sea Scrolls' Fragments*," Dead Sea Discoveries 24 (2017): 229–270. Eibert C. J. Tigchelaar, "A Provisional List of Unprovenanced, Twenty-First Century, Dead Sea Scrolls-like Fragments," Dead Sea Discoveries 24 (2017): 173–188. Stephen A. Reed, "What is a Fragment?," The Journal of Jewish Studies 45 (1994): 123–125. Stephen A. Reed, "Find-Sites of the Dead Sea Scrolls," Dead Sea Discoveries 14.2 (2007): 199–221. Gerrie Snyman, “The African and Western Hermeneutics Debate: Mimesis, The Book of Esther, and Textuality,” OTE 25 (2012): 657–684. Thanks for listening!

Exposure & Expansion Podcast
Ep 13 Accountability

Exposure & Expansion Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 92:06


In this ep, the crew discusses relationship curfews & hanging out boundaries while in a relationship, JD vz Diddy, Has Drizzy reached MJ status?, accountability, & more! Timeline: 0:00 vibes | 1:45 check-in | 15:14 androids on FT | 16:50 curfews in relationships | 26:15 accountability | 39:26 guess call | JD vz Diddy? 43:37 | 51:30 Karen civil | 55:10 drake bigger than michael Jackson | 1:00:20 Haitians at tx border | 1:05:58 NBA talk | 1:11:58 OTE basketball | 1:16:35 college & nfl sports picks | outro 1:29:10 Intro song "Melvin" by G Perico | outro song " Love Don't Live Here Anymore" by Rose Royce