Podcasts about ERP

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Best podcasts about ERP

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Latest podcast episodes about ERP

All The Hard Things
#91 - Perinatal and Postpartum OCD with Megan Giacomino

All The Hard Things

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 51:15


In this episode, I talk with Megan, a mom of two and a nurse who experienced perinatal and postpartum OCD. We talk about .. - how her symptoms showed up both in the perinatal and in the postpartum period - difficulties associated with OCD including a sense of urgency, how symptoms snowball and get worse, and the intolerance of uncertainty - barriers, red flags, and frustrations about the maternal mental health/medical system For OCD treatment, check out NOCD - head to www.treatmyocd.com and schedule your free 15 minute phone call to get connected with a licensed therapist who specializes in Exposure and Response Prevention. NOCD is a mobile therapy platform and includes video sessions with a therapist, in addition to peer support, ERP tools, and more. This podcast should not be substituted, nor is meant to act as a substitute, for legitimate mental health treatment/a legitimate mental health treatment provider. This podcast and any information in it is solely the reflection of general knowledge and cannot be taken as a personal therapeutic recommendation. To find a therapist near you to work more directly with these issues, head over to IOCDF.org, psychologytoday.com, or nami.org. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jennaoverbaugh/support

CFO Thought Leader
768: How Real-Time Data Is Changing the Performance Conversation | Michael High, CFO, Deep Water Gulf of Mexico, Shell

CFO Thought Leader

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 59:03


Back in 2012, when Michael High was heading up corporate planning across 30 countries for Shell, the energy company's CFO made it known that clemency was no longer “a given” for those Shell business leaders who were in the habit of annually renegotiating their business targets. To that end, Shell's finance leader let it be known that while such renegotiations may have been forgiven for “Year 1” of its latest multiyear plan, renegotiation for “Year 2” targets would be a nonstarter. And perhaps just to make certain that Shell's leaders did not second-guess the finance leader's intentions, he let it be known that the business units could skip the company's corporate planning process in 2013. “I actually think that this was the right insight at the time, but it generated a ton of knock-on consequences over time,” explains High, who commends the finance leader's willingness to take head on what's recognized in business at large as the budgeting process's greatest vulnerability: target renegotiation. Still, the consequences were real. “When we went to turn on the planning system in 2014, most people didn't remember how it worked. There was a series of intricate steps—something like 146 steps and different jobs required to get the IT application to do everything that it was supposed to. And, of course, if you do it only once a year, nobody remembers all the right steps,” comments High, who notes that the circumstances also exposed how talent often factors into corporate planning. “If you think about the FP&A community and the IT community that supports FP&A, you realize that these tend to be high-turnover roles. They tend to be career-developing roles. So, you'd put people in them for maybe 2 to 3 years, typically. Well, by the time we got around to doing business planning in 2014, 80 percent of the organization that either had facilitated the planning process or controlled the IT systems had turned over,” recalls High. Today, High views as a painful lesson the subsequent late nights and weekends required to get Shell's corporate planning process back on track—times when many members of Shell's FP&A team paid a high price. “I was accountable for the process, so it was a leadership failure on my part,” he states.   However, High observes that something more did arise from this consequential episode. Over the next few years, High says, he began to note how a shift was under way within organizations as the regular enhancement of cloud applications began to surpass the functionality improvements of legacy ERP platforms. Meanwhile, when it came to corporate planning, he became focused on how the talent demands of certain IT systems had traditionally put the planning process at a higher risk. According to High, he was determined to “de-risk” technology in planning and eliminate IT complexity. To better evaluate some of the new cloud applications, High began attending different conferences, including the annual gathering of the Association of Financial Professionals (AFP)—where the cloud vendors always highlighted how they were zeroing-in on corporate planning's pain points. This helped High to see how the adroitness with which certain cloud applications can access, correlate, and display company data could once and for all put an end to certain planning rituals such as the renegotiation of targets. Concludes High: “What you have the potential to do today is to really change the nature of the performance conversation and the results discussion. You can go from having a static set of numbers produced outside of the room to a discussion during which you can pull up live data and talk about it and actually seek answers to questions on the spot.” –Jack Sweeney

All The Hard Things
#90 - "How Do I Do Exposures for Intrusive Thoughts?"

All The Hard Things

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 34:24


In this episode, I share my thoughts about a commonly asked question, which is," How do I do exposures for intrusive thoughts?" I talk about why this is an unanswerable question unless we have more information and why. You'll learn .. - why you can't just do exposures for intrusive thoughts, no other information provided - what else you need to know in order to have good exposures - qualities of good exposures - examples For OCD treatment, check out NOCD - head to www.treatmyocd.com and schedule your free 15 minute phone call to get connected with a licensed therapist who specializes in Exposure and Response Prevention. NOCD is a mobile therapy platform and includes video sessions with a therapist, in addition to peer support, ERP tools, and more. This podcast should not be substituted, nor is meant to act as a substitute, for legitimate mental health treatment/a legitimate mental health treatment provider. This podcast and any information in it is solely the reflection of general knowledge and cannot be taken as a personal therapeutic recommendation. To find a therapist near you to work more directly with these issues, head over to IOCDF.org, psychologytoday.com, or nami.org. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jennaoverbaugh/support

Raw Data By P3
The Numbers that Didn't Exist, with Tim Rodman

Raw Data By P3

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 95:12


Tim Rodman revisits his backyard BBQ education in PowerPivot. Not just any BBQ, this one hosted two corporate powerhouses casually chatting analytic software over the grill. After this informal introduction, Tim went on to become yet another Power BI OG. Flash forward to current times where his experience with Acumatica paired with his background in accounting, ERP systems, and Excel makes him uniquely qualified to build better reporting. Imagine a blank slate where insights that never existed before in an organization just seem to manifest. Unexpectedly, in this episode, we learn the true nature of mega drilling machines. From Tim's description of these machines, it's easy to imagine them as metaphorically linked with Power BI: nimble cutting discs making multiple, surgical cuts that cause little bits to fall away creating colossal tunnels underground– small, incremental changes creating a path to actionable insight. Contact Tim and check out his website, AUGForums.com References in this episode: Better Call Saul Bunker Build Independence Day Checkmate TMNT Drill Tim's First PowerPivotPro.com Blog Post on Self Serve BI Adoption Tim's PowerPivotPro.com Blog Post on Data Nirvana Raw Data with Lori Rodriguez Raw Data with Ken Puhls Raw Data with Brad and Kai from Agree Media Hitler Hits A Breaking Point with Tableau

Your Anxiety Toolkit
Ep. 217 The Benefits of Meditation for Anxiety & OCD

Your Anxiety Toolkit

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 40:39


SUMMARY:  Today we have Windsor Flynn talking about how she realized the benefits of meditation for anxiety and OCD in her recovery. Winsdor brought her lived experience and training to the conversation and addressed how meditation has helped her in many ways, not just with her OCD and mental health. In This Episode: The benefits of meditation for general anxiety The benefits of meditation for OCD The roadblocks to practicing meditation How Mindfulness and mediation help with daily stress (especially through COVID-19) Links To Things I Talk About: Instagram: @windsormeditates Instagram: @Windsor.Flynn Website: www.windsorflynn.com (Windsor is certified to teach the 1 Giant Mind 3 Day Learn Meditation course). ERP School: https://www.cbtschool.com/erp-school-lp Episode Sponsor: This episode of Your Anxiety Toolkit is brought to you by CBTschool.com.  CBTschool.com is a psychoeducation platform that provides courses and other online resources for people with anxiety, OCD, and Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors.  Go to cbtschool.com to learn more. Spread the love! Everyone needs tools for anxiety... If you like Your Anxiety Toolkit Podcast, visit YOUR ANXIETY TOOLKIT PODCAST to subscribe free and you'll never miss an episode. And if you really like Your Anxiety Toolkit, I'd appreciate you telling a friend (maybe even two). EPISODE TRANSCRIPTION This is Your Anxiety Toolkit - Episode 217. You guys, 217. That's a lot of episodes. I'm very excited about that. Today, we have with us the amazing Windsor Flynn. I cannot tell you how incredibly by inspired I am with Windsor. She is very cool and has so much wisdom and so much kindness to share. Today, we have her on to talk about having anxiety and learning the importance of meditation. Now, Windsor speaks specifically about having OCD and how much it has helped her to take up a meditation practice. She goes over the couple of main key points, which is number one, anyone can meditate. And that meditation can be user-friendly for people, even with OCD. And she said, “Especially for people with OCD.” And she actually gives us the amazing gift of a guided meditation at the end, that just helps you bring your attention to the present and learn to drop down into your compassion and your body. And then the third point she makes is that meditation can be integrated into your life, even if you feel like you don't have time, or even if it's really uncomfortable. And she shares some amazing experiences and examples of where she really struggled and how she got through those difficulties. So, I'm going to quickly first do the “I did a hard thing” and then I'm going to let you guys get right into the amazing conversation with Windsor Flynn. So, today's “I did a hard thing” is from Anonymous, and they said: “I wear a dress that has been sitting in my closet for months. I was always scared to show my skin since breaking out in hives over my social anxiety. I felt proud for the first time in a long time.” This is so cool. You guys, I love this so much. They're really talking about showing up imperfect and all, or letting people judge them and going and doing what you want to do anyway. And that is what this podcast is about. It's about living the life that you want, not the life that anxiety wants you to have. And often, anxiety will keep your life very small if you only listen to it and only follow its rules. And so, anonymous is doing this work, walking the walk, not just talking the talk. So, yes, I'm so, so in love with this. Now you guys, you can go over to my private practice website, which is where the podcast lives. It's Kimberley Quinlan - L for License, M for Marriage, F for Family, and T for Therapist – I had to think there – .com. So, KimberleyQuinlan-lmft.com. And then you can click on the podcast and right there is a link for you to submit your “I did a hard thing” and you can be featured on the show. So, go do that, but not right away. First, I want you to listen to this amazing, amazing episode. Kimberley: Welcome. I am so excited for this episode. I have a reason for being so excited, which I'll share with you in a second, but first, I want to introduce to you Windsor Flynn. She is incredible. I have watched you grow over the last what? A year or two years since I've known you. It is so wonderful to have you on, so thank you for coming. Windsor: Yeah. Thank you for inviting me. This is so cool because I've spent a lot of time listening to your podcast and, I don't know, just hoping to be on Monday, but I didn't know for what. So, this is really cool for me. Kimberley: Yeah, this is so cool. So, you're coming on to talk about meditation. And the reason that this is so exciting for me is that is actually what this podcast was originally for – was to bring mindfulness and meditation practice to people who have anxiety. And I did a lot of meditations at the beginning and then I lost my way. So, I feel like you coming here is full circle. We're going back to the roots of the show to talk about mindfulness and meditation. Do you want to share a little bit about your story with mental health and why you landed on this as being your passion project? Windsor: Yeah, sure. So, I started-- I guess my mental health story goes way back, but I'll just start at the beginning when I first came to my OCD diagnosis. I had been experiencing anxiety. Looking back, I will say it was pretty debilitating, but I was sort of just powering through it. I was a new mom. I didn't have a lot of mom friends, the first in my group to have kids. My parents are across the ocean in Hawaii. I'm in California, in San Francisco with my boyfriend who is shocked at being a dad. So, I'm very anxious, but I'm doing all the things. And I had started experiencing intrusive thoughts, which I didn't know were intrusive thoughts. I was just really worried that I was going to become a headline for like moms that murder. I hate moms that kill because I had heard of this story. I'm sure so many people who grew up at the same time as me were really familiar with the Andrea Yates story. I don't need to go full into detail, but she had some mental health issues and she ended up killing her kids. It's a very, very sad story, but I had attached to that because I was just so, so scared that that would happen to me. And I don't know why I was nervous that this would happen to me. But ever since I was little, I just always thought that anything drastic, it would happen to me. I would be there for the end of the world. I would be there to witness a mass murder, or I would be a victim of a serial killer. All these things, I just thought it had to be me. I don't know why. So, of course when I have a baby, I'm thinking, “Oh no, this horrible thing, it's bound to happen to me. I need to pay attention.” So, that's when the hypervigilance started, all of these things that I now have language for, but I wasn't quite sure how to explain, and I also didn't want to explain it to anyone because it sounds unhinged. So, I was doing this alone. I was trying to keep myself very busy. I was doing all the classic compulsory activities that happen when you're trying to avoid intrusive thoughts and avoid this massive discomfort in fear. And eventually, we moved out of the city. So, not only was I mothering by myself-- not really by myself. I had a partner, but he was working a lot just with his schedule. So, he was sleeping most of the day and gone all night. So then we moved across the bay to Alameda and then I just didn't even have friends anymore. So, I was all alone. So, I was thinking, “Wow, if there's ever going to be a time that I'm going to just completely go off, it'll be now.” And then it just snowballed. It spiraled into this thing where I couldn't not be scared and I didn't know what was going to happen. I was convinced that I was going to kill my son for no other reason. Then I just had a feeling that something bad was going to happen. So, I looked up postpartum mood disorders because somehow, I knew those existed. And I was hoping that this had something to do with it. I still had hope that there was an explanation. And I found something that said Postpartum OCD, and anxiety. And of course, I hit every single track mark. It wasn't mild symptoms. I was just, yup. Check, check, check, check, check. And so, I felt a little okay. Not really, right? And I finally saw someone who ended up being-- she said she was a postpartum specialist, which was great. I signed up with her. We talked. She told me I had OCD. It was cool. But she didn't give me any tools. She was doing the root cause stuff, which is probably really helpful in other circumstances, not necessarily for OCD. But she reassured me enough that I was cool with my OCD. I was like, “Well, I'm not going to kill anyone. That's fine. I can go home. I can continue being a mom as long as you're telling me I'm not a murderer.” Just like, “No, you're not a murderer.” I was like, “Great, well, we're done here, I guess.” And I got pregnant again. And of course, I was so scared. I was like, “That's going to happen again. I'm going to have postpartum OCD.” So, I couldn't pause my whole pregnancy, but it was in the name of preparedness. So, I didn't know that I was making my symptoms worse and worse and worse until I had the baby. This time I'm not scared I'm going to kill anyone. I'm just scared that now I think she's the devil, which I did not know how to recognize it. So, finally, I'm experiencing a whole different subset of OCD symptoms. I didn't know, but I just thought, well, it was OCD the first time. I'm just going to check. And luckily, I landed on my therapist. I still see-- even though this was four years ago, I still see her every two weeks. I love her. She's the best. She's given me all the tools I needed to manage my mental health, got me to a place where not only was I totally understanding the disorder, but I felt really comfortable sharing and sharing in a way that I thought would be helpful to other people. So, that's when I started advocating for maternal mental health and OCD, and that's how we know each other, through the internet, social media space. And I guess that was a mouthful, but that was how I landed onto the advocacy part. And eventually, I switched to meditation because I felt like this was a tangible way that I could offer a service that I know to be helpful for the management of mental health. And I know how much resistance there is towards starting this meditation practice because I too went through a number of years where I absolutely said no to this idea of meditation. But once I started, I realized, wow, I don't know why I didn't do this sooner. There's really something to it. And it's very teachable. And I know from firsthand experience how beneficial it is. Kimberley: I love that. I actually don't think I've heard your entire story. So, thank you for sharing that with me and everybody. I didn't realize there were two waves of OCD for you and two different subtypes, which I think is common, for a lot of people. Windsor: Yeah. Kimberley: I love that. So, I think what you're saying, and can you correct me if I'm wrong? So, the first wave was reassurance, what you used to get you through. And then the second you used ERP? Windsor: Yes. Kimberley: Okay, great. And then from there, the third layer of recovery or however you want to say it, was it meditation, or were there other things you did to get to the meditation place? Windsor: Well, I was doing ERP and that really helped with my OCD management. I was able to recognize whenever I had a new obsession, and I feel like I could recognize anyone's new obsession. At this point, I was like, ‘Oh, that's this, that's this. It's tied into this.” So, I had a really great understanding, and that was cool. But I still have two kids, we're still in a pandemic, I still have communication issues with my partner – all these normal things that ERP doesn't necessarily help with. So, it was really just about finding that balance between working on myself and stress management and really getting to be that calm, chill person that I've always wanted to be. Even when I was doing the best with my OCD, I was still not so relaxed because I had a lot of attachments to how I wanted people to perceive me, how my children were behaving, not necessarily in a controlling way, but just really feeling a lot of responsibility over everything. And so, the meditation was just this next step that I was hoping would get me there, because I was feeling a lot of stress, not even related to my OCD, just in general. And I wanted to be able to find something that would help me get through that stress so that I could start really figuring out what it is I wanted to do, just even for fun again, instead of just only feeling this overwhelmed. Kimberley: Yeah. No, I really resonate with that. All I can say for me is, while I had a different story, I had an eating disorder, I was trying to do meditation during that, but the thoughts and everything was just too big for it. And it was hard for me to access actual meditation without it just being an opportunity to ruminate, sitting there, just cycling. So, the main thing I really want to ask you, if you're willing to share, is let's say specifically someone with OCD, what were some of the struggles that you had with meditation? Because I know so many people with OCD are really resistant to it because the thoughts get louder when you sit still and so forth. So, what were some of the things that you had to work through to be able to sit on a cushion? Windsor: Yeah. That's such a great question because I feel like, had I not figured out that I had OCD and then done all this work with ERP to really learn how to acclimate myself to the presence of intrusive thoughts, I don't know that I would've been successful in meditation. Actually, I know that I wasn't because I had tried it before, and it was too hard. So, I really-- even with ERP, once I started the meditation journey, the first few weeks were pretty challenging for me because as someone with OCD, every time I close my eyes and I'm not occupied, or my brain is not occupied, it's like prime time. This is OCD's favorite. It's like the time to shine. It's like, “Okay, here I am. What can we throw out to you today?” And so, knowing that this was a possibility, even when I signed up to learn meditation, I was like, “Okay, I'm going to do this. I'm going to try, I'm going to give college a try.” Then my OCD was like, “No.” You close your eyes, something could happen, like you could have a breakdown or you could make all these realizations that you are a psycho killer. And then you'll just definitely kill everyone. Thank God you tried meditation. Now your true self can come out. And I was like, “Okay, I'm going to just do it anyways. I'm just going to meditate because I have to see, not even in a compulsory way, I have to see if this is true. But I can't-- knowing now what OCD does, I couldn't-- it was almost I took it as a personal challenge. Kimberley: Like an exposure, right? It was like an exposure, like, “Okay, fine. I'm going to-- let's see.” Windsor: I signed up to learn meditation as a true exposure because now I had this fear that if I come to all these realizations, it won't be cool. It will be devastating for everyone around me. So, I was like, “Well, I'm going to try. I'm going to try to meditate.” And do you know what? I cried and panicked the first time. I had to turn off my camera because I did not want the teacher to see. Kimberley: So you did it live. Windsor: I did it live. It was so hard. It was like a total exposure because this was in front of-- I think there were 25 people in the course and everyone was closing their eyes, I'm assuming. But 20 minutes is a long time to meditate. So, I know people were going to be opening their eyes. So, I was live having this fear that I was going to turn into a psycho killer on the camera. So, I was crying because it was hard. But you know what? I'm so glad I did because also ERP showed me that crying is fine. We can cry when we do hard things. I was doing the hard thing and I was proud of myself. I even shared afterwards. We were like, “Who wants to share?” And I was like, “Me.” I cried and I had a panic attack. Kimberley: See. That is so badass in my mind. That is so cool that you did that. You rode that wave. Windsor: Yeah. And it was great because if I didn't do that or purposely put myself into the situation to cry and do this hard thing, I wouldn't have been able to get to the good part of meditation, which I love. I like to talk about the good part of meditation. But having OCD makes starting the hardest part. Kimberley: Yeah. What is the good part of meditation for you? Because I think that no one wants to do hard things unless they know there's some kind of reward at the end. Everyone's going to be different, but for you, what is the why? Why would you do such a thing? Windsor: Well, because I learned this thing, right? That was so valuable. Someone told me, we don't gauge the benefits of meditation for how we feel when our eyes are closed. We're more interested in what happens while our eyes are open. How is it impacting? And I noticed almost right away that when tensions were high, when I usually would be the first to participate-- because I'm really affected by the way other people's moods are. I feel responsible or I have to change it. I became dysregulated really easily. I noticed almost right away that when other people were feeling their feelings around me, I was able to observe them instead of participate in that, which was really cool. And it was just so much nicer to be able to be supportive instead of become one of those people who also needed support in that moment. And I also noticed right away that I had a higher tolerance for loud noises and just disruptions, because I'm pretty sensitive to lots of different noises at once. It gets me pretty anxious and agitated. So, having kids at home all day isn't ideal for that. And so, the meditation really helped me a lot with that. I was able to recover more quickly from periods of dysregulation. Maybe I would become dysregulated, but I could calm down quicker. And so, I really loved that. And I noticed that as before where I would be like, I need wine at 4:30 or whatever time it was. Once I started meditating for a few weeks, then wine just became something that tasted good that I liked in the afternoons. I didn't need it. Sometimes I would be like, “Wow, we're having dinner. Oh my God, kids, I didn't even have wine.” And they were like, “Wow, you're right.” And so, I would pour myself a glass just because I like it. Kimberley: Right. Not because you needed it to get through the afternoon. Windsor: Yeah. And so, I really liked all those changes. And it just is really restful, which I wasn't expecting. The practice itself, the one that I practice, it's twice a day. And I find that doing those two meditations really gives me more energy because I'm not a coffee person. So, yeah, I just feel like what started as a thing that I wanted to feel more rested and less stress, it has actually become a tool that I can use to help maintain a busier lifestyle, which as much as I don't love for everyone, I can't avoid it. Anyway. Kimberley: That is so cool. I mean, how amazing that this practice came to you. So, you are talking about this specific meditation practice that you use and the benefits. Do you want to share a little about what specifically you use? I'm sure some people here have heard from me of self-compassion meditations and mindfulness meditations, but do you want to share specifically what practices you are interested in practicing? Windsor: Yeah. So, the practice that I find the most success and enjoyment out of is a silent meditation, which actually was the most intimidating for me, but I love it. It's the one giant mind being technique. It's called a being technique because, I guess the focus of the meditation is to connect with your being, which I guess if you say it without sounding too woo-hoo or anything like that, we're just connecting to your true self apart from all the thoughts and the ideas and all the conditioning we have. Just getting back to you, which is something that I really wanted, especially after having two kids and being confused in the state of life that's not really developed yet. So, I love that part. And since I didn't have to focus on anything like someone else's voice, or trying to follow a guided meditation, sometimes I feel that takes more energy because I still have to pay attention to something. A silent meditation allowed me to really find that rest and allowed my brain to just slow down. Kimberley: Yeah. I too. I mean, I love guided meditations for people who are starting off and need some instructions. But I find the silent meditation once I got the hang of it, I could practice it in a minute between clients. I could just sit for-- I could quickly go into that and then come out. Or if I'm presenting and I'm listening to someone, I could just drop down into that. So, I really love the idea of this as well because it's something you can practice in small pieces.  Not so formally, but drop into just connecting down out of your head into your body kind of thing. Okay, so the biggest question I'm guessing people have is, are you “successful” with your meditations daily? What does it look like day-to-day? Are there ups and downs? How is it for you? Windsor: Yeah. This is something that comes up a lot when people ask, because we know that, yes, all meditation is helpful. But we also know that to get the most benefit out of meditation, it's best to have a regular practice. And this could mean meditating once a day, or with this particular technique, meditating twice a day. And it sounds a lot. And I would love to say I meditate twice a day every day, no matter what. But I have OCD, so I allow myself to be a little bit more flexible. I don't really love rigidity when it comes to things like that because I have a tendency to really grab onto them. So, I do allow myself to skip it sometimes, either for reasons like I forget, or the day just gets ahead of me. As important as meditation is, there's a lot of things that trumpet, like do my kids need something? Do I have to pick someone up? Is everyone being fed? There's all these things that are also really important. So, I do try to meditate twice a day. Most days I do. Sometimes I don't. But that's okay because I did what I had to do to keep everything going. Kimberley: What about during your meditation? Windsor: What, excuse me? Kimberley: What about during your meditation? Is that an up and a down process? Do you have “good days” and “bad days” with it or is it pretty consistent for you now? Windsor: Well, I don't like to talk about the meditations as being good or bad. Some are really gratifying and some are less gratifying, because even the less gratifying meditations are really good for you. You're still going to benefit from them, even though it wasn't necessarily easy or didn't feel good. But that's just like a lot of things. Meditation can be categorized as something like that, like maybe brushing your teeth or exercising. Maybe you don't love it all the time, but you do it because it's good for your body and it helps you reach certain goals. And sometimes it's really hard for me to get to a good juicy place, and that's okay. I've just started to not expect a certain experience when I go into the meditation. And that makes everything a lot easier because then I'm not letting myself down or I'm not feeling disappointed or I'm not crushing a goal. I don't go into the meditation feeling like I'm going to feel so relaxed and cool. I just say, “Oh, I'm going to close my eyes and we'll just see what happens during this session.” Kimberley: And that's why I love what you're saying because it's so in line with recovery, like dropping the expectations, dropping just the good feelings, dropping goals, having these big goals all the time. I think that's-- sometimes I have found, what happens in your meditation is like a metaphor for life, right? Like, okay, today is a busy brain day. There's going to be days like that. And I think that it's a great way to just practice the tools in a small setting that you would be practicing in the day anyway. Windsor: Exactly. That's why I love it for people with OCD too because let's say you commit to doing it 20 minutes a day or 20 minutes twice a day. During that 20 minutes, you know that any thoughts can come up, any feelings can come up, and you're just going to let them be there. And this is excellent practice for when you're going about your daily life and you have no control ever over what comes into your mind or what happens. But since you've been practicing this in your meditations, those responses to accept and let go become more automatic. So, not only are you having great meditation experiences or anything, but in your life, you can use those same tools. It's not just adding another thing. It all works together. The meditation is so helpful in every aspect. Kimberley: Right. It's like we go to the gym to strengthen our muscles and we meditate to strengthen our brain muscles, right? Windsor: Yeah. Kimberley: Yeah. I love that. So, one thing I didn't ask you ahead of time, but I'm wondering, would you be interested in leading us through a couple of minute meditation to get us experiencing that? Windsor: Yeah. And you know what? I was thinking of like, maybe I should think of something to say in case she asks it, but I don't think she will. So, yeah, we can just do a short-- what I do sometimes when I don't do the whole 20 minutes is I just do a short mini one, like a minute or two. Kimberley: Would you lead us? Windsor: Yeah. Okay. So, for everyone listening and for Kimberley, I just want to show you a little bit about what it looks like to connect to your being and to practice a silent meditation, just for a short little grounding experience in the middle of a busy day or before a meeting, anytime you need to. So, what I like to do before I meditate is to just get into a comfortable spot. You don't necessarily have to be on a fancy cushion. You just have to have your lower back supported. And go ahead and close your eyes. And what I like to do before I start any meditation is take a few deep belly breaths. So, we'll just breathe into our noses right now. Feel your belly. Feel your chest... And release through the mouth. One more deep breath into the nose... into your belly... and release. And one more deep breath into the nose. Feel your belly... and release. So, now you just want to let your breath settle into its own natural rhythm. This isn't a breathing meditation. We're not going to focus on our breath. And you can scan your body for any tension that you might be holding. A commonplace is in your neck and your shoulders. Make sure you drop your shoulders, can wiggle your jaw a little bit, and just let all of that tension go. So, when we're meditating, we don't want to put a focus on any thoughts that might come into our mind. But when they do come in, we just want to acknowledge them and recognize that this is a normal part of meditation. We never want to resist any thoughts or feelings that we might have. These are all important. And just continue following your natural breath. And has any thoughts come into your mind, just remember that we don't have to engage with them. It's okay to just witness them and let them pass through you. Maybe you might notice a sound outside or a body sensation. That's okay. Just be a witness to that too. Now you can take another deep breath into the nose... Into your belly... and breathe out. And you can start to bring your awareness back to your body and see how it feels to be where you are. You can start to bring your awareness back into the space. And slowly, when you're ready, you can open your eyes. Kimberley: Oh, what a treat. Windsor: And that's a little meditation, but I was really feeling it for a second. Kimberley: Yeah. I just kept smiling because it was such a treat. What a treat that I get to have my own little meditation instructor in the middle of a podcast. It's my favorite. What a gift. Thank you so much. Windsor: You're welcome. Kimberley: Yeah. Thank you. I think I love-- I just want to highlight a couple of things you said, which is, for those who have anxiety, meditation is not the absence of thoughts and feelings, right? You highlighted that and that was so helpful, just to acknowledge that thoughts and feelings will happen, sensations will happen, but we just become an observer to them, which I think again, not only helps us with meditation, but it helps us with response prevention, during our exposures. It helps us during panic. Such a great tool. So, I'm so grateful for you sharing that. Windsor: Cool. Well, thanks for letting me. I love to talk about it when I have the chance. Kimberley: Yeah. Okay. So, I want to ask one final question, which is, what do you really want people to know? If there's something we've missed today or if you want to drive home the main point, what is your main message that you're wanting people to take away from today's podcast? Windsor: I guess what I really want people to know about meditation is that you don't have to be a certain type of person to do this. You don't need to be a specific personality type or have certain interests to make meditation work for you. You can just be yourself and come as you are and treat this practice as a gift that you're giving yourself, that you deserve to take part in because it offers such deep rest and relaxation. That meditation can be a part of a modern, busy lifestyle. You don't have to be common Zen all the time to do it. I think that meditation is for everybody. Kimberley: I love that. I always remember, I think I could be killing this here, but the Dalai Lama says, and this always gets me laughing because he always says, if you don't have time for meditation, you are the one who needs to meditate the most. Windsor: Yeah. I love that one. Kimberley: I killed the way that he said it, but for me, so often I'm like, “Oh, I don't have time. Oh, I didn't get time today.” And he really keeps nagging me in my mind in terms of knowing the more busy you are, the more you may want to prioritize this. Of course, like you said, that happens and priorities happen. But for me, that was the main message I had to keep reminding myself when it came to meditation. So, I loved that. Windsor: Yeah. Kimberley: Well, thank you so much. This is just delightful. Really it is. It has brought such joy to me today because like I said, it feels full circle to be coming back and talking more about meditation and doing more of that here. Where can people get a hold of you and hear about your work? Windsor: So, I have my Instagram, @windsor.flynn, and that's my OCD one. I talk a little bit about meditation on there, but I know that not everyone is necessarily ready for that. So, I do have my other Instagram, @windsormeditates. And that's when I focus a little bit more on the meditation. And if you're interested in taking any of my group courses or private meditation sessions, you can just go to my website, windsorflynn.com. All very easy, just search my name on the internet, and then you'll find some links for those. Kimberley: And we'll have all the links in the show notes as well. So, if people are listening on, they should be able to connect to that. So, amazing. I'm so-- pardon? Windsor: I was just going to say thank you so much for having me. I'm a big fan of yours and I love the work that you're doing and I feel so honored that I get to be on your podcast. Kimberley: No, I feel likewise. I love what you're doing. There's so many things I wish I could focus on. And I love when somebody like you will come along and they focus on that one thing. It just makes me really happy because I just love when people are finding little areas, particularly in the OCD and mental health space where it's like, we need these sources. So, I'm so happy that you're doing that work. Thank you. Windsor: Cool. Thank you so much. Kimberley: My pleasure. And like I said, go follow Windsor. She's amazing, and I'm just honored to have you here. Windsor: Thank you. ----- Okay. So, before we finish up, thank you so much for being here and staying till the end. Before we finish, I want to share a review of the week. This one is from Cynthia Saffel and she said: “I'm so excited to share these podcasts with my clients.” She gave it a five-star review and said, “I first was introduced to Kimberley's clear and compassionate teaching style when I took the ERP school course for therapists.” For those of you who don't know, we have a CEU approved course called ERP School, where you can learn how to treat OCD using ERP. And she went on to say, “In the past 3 weeks since taking the course I recommended both the course and podcasts to my clients.” Thank you so much, Cynthia, for your review. And for everyone who leaves a review, it is the best gift you can give me in return for these free resources. So, if you have the time, please do go over and leave a review and have a wonderful day. It is a beautiful day to do hard things. Have a wonderful day, everybody.

Digital genial – Digitalisierung kompakt verpackt
my proALPHA – Was kann das neue Kundenportal?

Digital genial – Digitalisierung kompakt verpackt

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 14:20


Das neue Kundenportal „my proALPHA“ hat seine Tore bereits für unsere Kunden geöffnet. Egal wann, egal wo – unsere Kunden haben nun jederzeit Zugriff auf umfangreiche Online-Services und wichtige Funktionen. In dieser Episode sprechen wir darüber, was das neue Portal alles kann, welche Mehrwerte es bietet und wie der Entstehungsprozess mithilfe unserer Pilotkunden ausgesehen hat.

Social Capital
Manufacturing Mavens #2: Digital Transformation In The Manufacturing Industry

Social Capital

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 31:52


Manufacturing Mavens Episode 2: Digital Transformation In The Manufacturing Industry   Today's episode is Part 2 of our 3-part Manufacturing Mavens - a BROADcast Mini Series. I've got 2 guest hosts with me for this mini-series! Kristina (Kris) Harrington and Erin Courtenay. Part 2 is going to be Guest Hosted by Kris Harrington. Kris is the President and COO for GenAlpha Technologies. During her time with OEMs in the mining industry, Kris and the other founders of GenAlpha saw a need to find a better way for B2B manufacturers to do business. This led to the development of Equip, an eCommerce, eCatalog, and Analytics solution for manufacturers and distributors who want to grow their business online. Take it away, Kris!    Kris: Thanks, Lori! Happy to be here. Let's start this show with a quick introduction to our hosts.   Erin Courtenay is VP of Digital Services at Earthling Interactive. Erin loves watching programmers work their magic, opening up the possibilities of the internet to small and medium businesses with powerful websites and custom software. Calling herself a “digital empathy practitioner”, Erin is determined to help clients move thoughtfully and compassionately into their digital future.   Lori Highby is a podcast host, speaker, educator, and founder of Keystone Click, a strategic digital marketing agency. Using her vast multi-industry knowledge - gained from experience and education, She can see the potential of greatness within the already established good of a business. Through strategic actionable moves, she has worked with Fortune 500 companies such as ABB and Syngenta to micro-business owners, to achieve their marketing goals. Lori carries her energy and drives into her professional engagements in order to empower and educate other fellow life-long learners.   Thank you, mavens, it is such a pleasure to be here with you both today. As a former leader in a global manufacturing organization responsible for growing equipment and aftermarket sales, and now a leader of a digital eCommerce company, I am often reminded how much things have changed in just the past twenty years. I mean, I can remember when I was so excited to get a Blackberry phone (remember those?) so that when I was traveling to remote mining areas and arrived at my hotel, I wouldn't have to hook up my laptop to the dial-up hotel internet connection just to check my emails to make sure I didn't miss anything important before going in to visit my customer the next day. It was so much faster to check them from my Blackberry, and for me, this was roughly 2007.   Fast forward to today, now if a manufacturer were to roll out an eCommerce solution like Equip, if I were still that same sales leader visiting my customer, I would be able to stand next to their machine in the pit and pull up full product bills of materials, identify the products from a 3D interactive drawing, add them to a shopping cart and send them a quotation all from a smartphone or tablet. The customer experience opportunities are incredibly different today for those manufacturers who are ready to make the leap into digital self-service. And this is just one example of the type of digital services available. This takes us to today's topic - Manufacturing and Digital Transformation where we're going to talk about manufacturers and their journey toward digital transformation.   Let's get into it. To set the stage, Erin and Lori, I would like to hear how each of you define digital transformation for the manufacturing industry?   Erin: One thing it always goes back to his business goals. Your business goals should define your approach to digital transformation. In manufacturing, I see a couple of things that define digital transformation. The first is digital transformation as cultural transformation. So opening the business culture to digital tools, be in sales, operations production is a cultural change. And so the digital transformation has an impact on everyone, and how they identify as part of the organization. The next component of digital transformation is maintenance or growth strategy for your business. So tools like eCommerce, ERP, automation are becoming sort of the oxygen of all businesses, and manufacturing is no different. So to breathe, to grow, it can't be ignored, digital transformation is going to be foundational.   Lori: I resonate with everything you said, and especially the cultural component because regardless of any transformation that you are incorporating into your business, you've got to get everyone on board and it's sometimes very challenging to do that if this is the way we've always been doing it for the last 40 years and you're trying to teach an old dog new tricks. I like to compare it to what manufacturing has been doing already with regards to automation, robotics, and creating efficiencies in their business, I think it's no different when you're looking at other segments of the business such as marketing, sales, and the communications and that relationship and that nurturing and it's just taking that transformation or that evolution of what's happening, and applying it to different segments of the business. You mentioned ERP systems, which are taking all elements of your business and combining them into one extremely useful digital tool and resource. But the critical component of that is the adoption of getting all components together and then getting all of the business on board with how to use that component. If you're looking at marketing automation, you need the sales and the marketing team working together on the same page and it's all about maximizing the relationships. COVID taught us real quickly that you can have relationships that aren't in person shaking hands, and that you can still nurture and create new connections.   Kris: I know there have been numerous articles written about this, but I am curious, based on each of your experiences, what do you think are the three most important reasons why manufacturers need to be prioritizing digital transformation?   Lori: It's hard to pick only three. I'll start with something that carries over from the last question, which is that efficiencies are there. Just like in the machines and the equipment at the plants, there are efficiencies in leveraging the digital tools and resources out there. We're all in that marketing and sales side of things, but we really focus on maximizing and shortening that lifecycle and making it easier to have those conversations with your clients or your potential clients. The second one, I would say is this next generation, the current generation is online. That's where your next client is hanging out. They're not going to answer the phone, they're not always going to show up at a trade show because I think trade shows are more of that nurturing opportunity. Using SEO making sure your websites getting found online, leveraging social media to tell your brand story, and creating efficiencies around that is going to help you to continue to find that next client. The third thing that I think is the most important actually out of all these three, is what your customers are expecting. They're expecting to have a conversation on your website using a chat feature, they're expecting to log in to place an order online and just repeat that order and not have to have a conversation or get an instant quote, or whatever it is. If your customers are expecting this, you have to make this transformation.   Erin: My response to three reasons that digital transformation is more of a big picture kind of thought. First is attracting and retaining a workforce. Younger generations, like Lori, pointed out, expect and anticipate a digital forward work environment. If you can't provide that, that's not going to be appealing to younger people. We all have heard about how workforce attraction and retention is a big issue in manufacturing so digital transformation, not only for the functional parts but going back to that cultural idea, demonstrating that your digital forward as a company or as an organization. Next is modernization. I mean, we don't leave our baskets anymore. We're not horse-drawn carriages, we're digital so it's time to get there. Then the last one, I think this is not spoken about enough is pleasure and freedom. I just was in a webinar the other day which talked about the future and technology and what it can do for us. If we can lean more heavily on digital tools to do sort of the mundane things for us, it can open up all these possibilities of creativity, of moving ahead, of offering us time to do the things that we really love and care about, and value. If we're going to get there, that means we all have to participate and contribute to digital transformation, not just wait for it to happen, because then that's something that's happening to us, not something that's happening with us.   Kris: The world is a bit of a crazy place right now, what do you think are some of the biggest challenges manufacturers are facing today that may be preventing them from moving forward with their digital journey?   Erin: This is where I may get a little controversial. I think one of the biggest challenges is rigid industry leadership that is not helping lead us into the next era with digital transformation. I see people like Matt Goose and Eddie Saunders doing much of the heavy lifting. These are folks that are getting young kids excited about manufacturing by meeting them where they are and they are doing that heavy lifting. I'd like to see more of that from industry leadership. So it's a little bit of a prescription and also a diagnosis mixed in together.   Lori: Erin, I just have to say that I love your perspective. My answer is from a bit different perspective in that I think part of the challenge is that to some extent, it's cluttered. There's a lot of information coming from a lot of different directions and you don't know where to start. I think there's also this fear of the unknown because it can be a big investment. I know that these manufacturing organizations, when they invest in a new piece of machinery, they have so much confidence that it's going to produce a certain volume of new business for them, and they can get so much work done. But when they're making this investment into this unknown territory, where they don't have their historical references for themselves to have confidence on how it's going to improve their business, they're really just trusting kind of someone else's opinions, but there are opinions on all different spectrums and there are all different ways to tackle this. So I think that's where there's a lot of hesitation and reservation to move forward.   Kris: If you could offer one piece of advice on how digital can help solve the challenges preventing companies from moving forward, what would it be?   Lori: To solve the problem based on how I answered the last question, I would say manufacturers need to start having the conversations with those that are doing it right now and start asking some intelligent questions to build their confidence and really just get that conversation going, which is what we're doing right now. They have to have true curiosity into this topic in order to have any movement going forward and helping them solve some of these bigger issues where digital can do so much and solve so many problems. Yeah, it is a time and financial investment on the front end, but the long end return significantly outweighs any current hurdles that someone may be having right now. So my very simple answer is to start talking about it and start asking questions.   Erin: A challenge that keeps folks from moving forward and I think I'm going to name that challenge as thinking that you're locked in a rigid mindset. Whether that's before you get started with the technology, or you might even be mid-technology and so that brings to mind this example of somebody that we worked with. They had a transportation management system platform that they were using and it just kept not being the right solution for them. Over and over again, they were running into roadblocks and barriers and they asked us how we could help them. We suggested to them that they should make their own because it could fit their needs and might even save them money. They decided to try it and not only did they save money, but they also ended up making six figures from that platform, because they were able to then sort of rent it out to some other folks as well. So just knowing that one of the great things about digital transformation is flexibility is the ability to name your own solution. It can be daunting, I totally get it, but if you keep that in mind, that you should ask for what you want, you should know what you want and ask for it and not be let alone by the no's, that will help you really move forward.   Kris: What services do each of you offer that support the manufacturing industry?   Erin: At Earthling Interactive, we do take that consultative approach. Yes, can seem off-putting at first, but what that allows us to do is though, is we are adept at starting where you are, where our clients are. For example, so many manufacturing websites are, frankly terrible, and they're out of date. But you can actually accomplish a lot with just a website refresh, and not just because of how it looks, but it can function and be a very powerful tool for you and your business. We can start there, let's just get you a new website. But we're also great at modifications and fixes. For example, if you're running a technology that's falling short of your expectations, like that example that I mentioned before with the TMS system, or let's say you've got a time tracking system that isn't conforming to your business model, we can help it get there, we can help do those tweaks in those modifications so that you have a tool that really works with your business, and helps you accomplish your goals.   Lori: At Keystone Click, we brand ourselves as a strategic digital marketing agency. What we're doing is really focusing on our clients' customers. So you the manufacturer, you're trying to get new customers, and we get inside the head of your customer and really figure out what is that customer journey? What is the pain that they initially have? How are they searching for that pain? Because people don't know what the solution is the right way they know what the challenge is that they're facing. Then how do we position you and tell your brand story in the digital space so that you are positioned as the expert to solve the problem that they have? We do that by conducting research on your customer and then building a full strategic plan that's focused on helping you achieve your business goals. Then we support the implementation and we do websites as well. We manage your social paid initiatives, and really anything under that digital umbrella with your business end goal in mind. What about you, Kris?   Kris: I think the best way to describe what the Gen Alpha team does is really equip manufacturers and distributors with the tools, services, and advice that they need to sell their products online. So we come with real-world experience, the founding members of Gen Alpha all worked in manufacturing and we truly believe that there was an easier way of doing business with a manufacturer. So we've been in the shoes of our customers, trying to satisfy their customers and grow business at the same time. We believe that in coordination with our clients. We keep building upon our already solid foundation of helping them to keep delivering better solutions year after year. So we truly love working with the manufacturing industry and we want these people to be relevant and successful in the future. I think what I would say about all of us and all of our companies is that we do care so much. If you were to work with any one of us, you're going to have a trusted relationship where we're going, to be honest with you about your business, how we believe we can help you, we're going to offer you alternative solutions, but the true intention around everything we're doing is for the greater good.    Thank you for listening to part 2 of our 3-part series. If you've enjoyed what you heard, definitely chime in for part 3, and if you didn't get a chance to listen to Part 1 - you'll want to take a listen as we dove into Social Selling. In Part 3 we will be talking about co-opetition vs competition. Reach out to Lori if you're interested more about strategic digital marketing, reach out to Kris if you want to learn more about manufacturing eCommerce solutions, and reach out to Erin if you're interested in learning more about manufacturing consulting services.   Head to keystoneclick.com/mavens to learn more about your hosts and their exclusive offerings available for Mavens listeners!

Distribution Talk
Profitability, expansion, and beneficial ownership with an ESOP in the hose and fittings industry with Mike Mortensen

Distribution Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 40:36


Looking for a way to enhance company culture and boost revenue? Mike Mortensen, president and CEO of Alaska Rubber Group based in Anchorage, AK, has a proven solution: an employee stock ownership plan. Jason chats with Mike about his entry-level start in distribution, his company's rapidly expanding physical and digital presence, and why owners of privately-held organizations should look to an ESOP when considering growth or exit strategies. For many independent distributors, the thought of turning company ownership over to employees is as intriguing as it is intimidating.  But ESOP options are endless; owners can choose the most suitable structure for their organization and their legacy. For Alaska Rubber, that meant pursuing a “beneficial ownership” model. “The trust owns the company, owns the inventory, the assets and everything like that. And as an employee and a participant in the plan, we own the right to the rise or fall of the share price.”  To say that the ESOP has panned out for Alaska Rubber is an understatement. While the model wasn't an easy option for the company's original selling party to buy into, the long-term benefits outweighed those initial doubts.  Besides increased revenue, transitioning to an ESOP has provided the company with advantages in areas of recruitment, acquisition, and innovation. The company recently completed a massive website upgrade, for example and while on-site cash sales remains top tier, Mike says the fully integrated B2B e-commerce platform has captured business well beyond the counter. Mike also credits forward-thinking tech companies like data partner Proton AI with Alaska Rubber's success despite online pressure from behemoth pick-and-ship competitors. Mike's good fortune in the distribution industry is one he's paying forward. He views his participation in both NAHAD (The Association for Hose & Accessories Distribution) and IDCO (Industrial Distributors Co-op) as a way to contribute to the industry's future.  MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE DT082: Benj Cohen of Proton AI on Leveraging Sales Data with AI Designed for the Distribution Industry Proton AI NAHAD - The Association for Hose & Accessories Distribution IDCO - Industrial Distributors Co-op CONNECT WITH MIKE MORTENSEN Alaska Rubber Group LinkedIn CONNECT WITH JASON LinkedIn *** For full show notes and services visit: http://www.distributionteam.com Distribution Talk is produced by The Distribution Team, a consulting services firm dedicated to helping wholesale distribution clients remove barriers to profitability, generate wealth and achieve personal goals.    This episode was edited & mixed by The Creative Impostor Studios.  Special thanks to our sponsor for this episode: INxSQL Distribution Software, integrated distribution ERP software designed for the wholesale and distribution industry.

The Breakout Growth Podcast
Rocketship Jumping: Jon Chang Explains his Move from $45B Klarna to New Early-Stage Startup

The Breakout Growth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 60:26


In this week’s episode of The Breakout Growth Podcast, hosts Sean Ellis and Ethan Garr speak with Jon Chang who recently took on the Head of Growth role at Nate. Nate is a new service that allows consumers to buy products from any e-commerce site with just one click. You may remember Jon from his first appearance on the podcast when he was a growth lead at Klarna, a rocketship Fintech company now valued at more than $45 Billion. His experience and approach offer valuable insights for leaders at fast-growing companies struggling to hire the right people to build on strong growth rates as well as individual growth and marketing professionals who are looking to find their next great opportunities. This week’s episode is sponsored by Rise with SAP. Why did Jon leave this nearly 6000 person rocketship for a fast-growing, but relatively small 70 person startup? Well, when we saw Jon had shared a LinkedIn Post, by another former guest, Mayur Gupta (formerly Marketing/Growth lead at of Freshly and Spotify and now at Gannett Publications), it gave us a great starting point to answer that and other questions: https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6883531385433321472/ Mayur encourages every marketer to get startup experience at some point in their journey, and suggests that the earlier the better. Jon agrees, and as a self-described builder, he explains not just why this matters, but also how it informs his approach for hiring and leading growth. Jon is obsessed with building teams and driving organizational efficiencies, but his approach is anything but clinical. From his thoughts on mentoring to his focus on soft skills, this discussion is really about a people-driven mindset to powering growth. Please remember to check out this week’s sponsor, RISE with SAP S/4Hana Cloud. If you have ambitious goals, SAP is the technology partner you need to scale and drive innovation. Instead of relying on stitched together solutions to manage business finances, operations, and customer relations, leverage the flexibility of SAP’s cloud-based ERP solution to gain the insights that will help drive your breakout growth success. We discussed: * Moving from Klarna to Nate (03:35) * Why startups need jack-of-all-trades personalities to be successful (06:20) * Auditing the experience before you apply for a job (13:15) * Challenges of measuring your impact in large organizations (20:30) * Jon’s approach to building his new team (28:45)

Strap on your Boots!
Episode 90: How to take your startup to $1 million with Sam Gupta

Strap on your Boots!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 17:09


In today's episode I talk to Sam Gupta who has been an Enterprise resource planning (ERP) thought leader in the digital transformation space for nearly two decades. During this time he has been part of large transformation initiatives for fortune-500 corporations but now spends his time consulting with SMEs as a Principal Consultant/CEO at ElevatIQ. In this episode you'll learn how to identify the right marketing strategy for your business type, whether it is consulting, product based, or another business. Sam talks about how to tap into your existing channels and relationships to gain marketshare. Finally he gives us 3 tips on how to earn at least $1,000 a month.

deutsche-startups.de-Podcast
Insider #119: Gorillas - Flink - Alasco - Lendis - SoSafe - Plantura - Operations1 - Hypatos

deutsche-startups.de-Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 53:31


Die Themen: Gorillas, Flink, Arive, Biorena, Alasco, Lendis, SoSafe, Plantura, LunarX, Operations1, Hypatos, Kubermatic +++ Quick Commerce-Update: Gorillas, Flink #EXKLUSIV +++ Balderton investiert erneut in Arive #ANALYSE +++ Picus investiert in Biorena #EXKLUSIV +++ Insight und Lightrock investieren 40 Millionen in Alasco #EXKLUSIV +++ Keen investiert 25 Millionen in Lendis #EXKLUSIV +++ Highland investiert 50 Millionen in SoSafe #EXKLUSIV +++ Vorwerk investiert in Plantura #EXKLUSIV +++ 468 Capital investiert in LunarX #EXKLUSIV +++ 468 Capital legt zweiten SPAC auf #EXKLUSIV +++ 468 Capital: Zweiter Fonds liegt bei 350 Millionen #EXKLUSIV +++ OpenOcean investiert 10 Millionen in Operations1 #EXKLUSIV +++ DN Capital & Framework Ventures investieren in Hypatos #EXKLUSIV +++ btov Partners investiert in Kubermatic #EXKLUSIV Unser Sponsor Die heutige Ausgabe wird präsentiert vom YoY extended Supply Chain Planning System! Der Klimawandel, das Lieferkettengesetz, Non-Financial CSR ESG Reporting oder kollabierende Lieferketten während der Pandemie! Unternehmen sehen sich zunehmend mit Herausforderungen konfrontiert, die außerhalb der eigenen Unternehmensgrenzen stattfinden und die sich nur entlang der Lieferkette lösen lassen. In der Integration all dieser Aufgaben in einer zentralen Softwarelösung liegt der Schlüssel! Das wissen CIOs spätestens seitdem es ERP Systeme gibt. Und was das ERP seit Jahrzehnten für die kritischen internen Unternehmensabläufe ist, ist das YoY eSCP für das Management der erweiterten Lieferkette. So digitalisieren wir Lieferketten für unsere Kunden und machen sie ganzheitlich nachverfolgbar, transparent und wertebasiert - Ende zu Ende! Lieferketten brauchen Partner-Eco-Systeme. Ihr habt passende Lösungen, Technologien oder Expertise? Oder Ihr sucht strategische Partnerschaften? Wir haben die Kundenprojekte und die Basistechnologie! Interesse? Dann meldet Euch unter deutsche-startups@yoy.cool! Weitere Infos unter www.yoy.cool. Vor dem Mikro Alexander Hüsing, deutsche-startups.de - www.linkedin.com/in/alexander-huesing/ & www.twitter.com/azrael74 Sven Schmidt, Maschinensucher - www.linkedin.com/in/sven-schmidt-maschinensucher/ Hintergrund Der deutsche-startups.de-Podcast besteht aus den Formaten #Insider, #Interview, #StartupRadar und #Startup101. Mehr unter: www.deutsche-startups.de/tag/Podcast/. Anregungen bitte an podcast@deutsche-startups.de. Unseren anonymen Briefkasten findet ihr hier: www.deutsche-startups.de/stille-post/

The OCD Stories
Dr Sam Greenblatt: Cancel culture (OCD), & the overutilisation of porn to cope with OCD (#311)

The OCD Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 60:58


In episode 311 I chat with Dr Sam Greenblatt. Sam is a licensed clinical psychologist. We discuss his own OCD setback and the learnings he got from it, we discuss the fear of being cancelled, cancel culture more generally, how the worry of cancel culture started with the ‘me too' movement, how some people's OCD has latched on to this, using exposure and response prevention therapy (ERP) for this worry, we discuss the importance of focusing on the uncertainty not the themes, we then discuss pornography over utilisation to cope with OCD, and much more. Hope it helps.   Show notes: https://theocdstories.com/episode/dr-sam-greenblatt-311 The podcast is made possible by NOCD. NOCD offers affordable, effective, convenient therapy available in the US and outside the US. To find out more about NOCD, their therapy plans and if they currently take your insurance head over to https://go.treatmyocd.com/theocdstories

GROW B2B FASTER
Ep 48 - Markus Rupprecht - 1 KPI to rule them all

GROW B2B FASTER

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 69:10


In today's GROW B2B FASTER episode, our host Sammy, Managing Partner and founder of SAWOO, catches up with Markus Rupprecht, CEO at Traxpay.That's in it for you:1. Which KPIs are most crucial to look at, to incentivize your team as well as work towards one goal2. How to win clients with direct sales3. Why social media plays such a huge role in big whale hunting4. Why you should share more of your knowledge and not hold backAbout MarkusMarkus is an entrepreneur with a broad overview of the European and US banking market. His focus is on payments and trade finance. As a generalist his main skill is to get things going and then drive them forward. He brings experience in a major European bank's credit department to the table, followed by experience in payments software and consultancy companies. Now he is the CEO of Traxpay.About TraxpayTraxpay is a pioneer in B2B Dynamic Payments. As a company they uniquely connect banking, transaction data, and B2B commerce together to provide the utmost in visibility and control for B2B buyers and suppliers. Traxpay has developed a method of very lean ERP integration which enables suppliers to get all refinancing solutions out of one hand, buyers to leverage their excess cash, and banks to stay relevant at the center of the client relationship. About the host SammySammy is Managing Partner and founder of SAWOO.  SAWOO helps companies with Social Marketing and Lead Generation to leverage the power of LinkedIn in a sustainable way. No spam, no bots but building real Human 2 Human connections between you and your B2B buyers. Shownotes MarkusFind Markus on LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/markusrupprecht/#)Markus' company Traxpay (https://www.traxpay.com/)

Leaders In Payments
Itamar Jobani, CEO of Payem | Episode 135

Leaders In Payments

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 29:52


What does an Israeli native with three degrees in Fine Arts and a professional career as a New York sculptor have to do with payments? Believe it or not, quite a bit! Payem CEO Itamar Jobani is my guest on this week's podcast and his story of a professional career that spans from sculptural artistry to the medical field and eventually to payments is truly fascinating.For those of you who may not know, Payem is a spend-management platform that helps mid-market organizations with their finance operations via a streamlined integration into their ERP software. They serve as a one-stop shop for finance teams to internally manage employee T&E, expense reimbursement, credit purchasing and more. Itamar talks about his well-rounded journey into the payments space and where he sees our industry going in the next 2-3 years – including all the dots that need to be connected before some of the usual suspects like blockchain and cryptocurrency have the opportunity to dominate the ecosystem. 

That Triathlon Show
Power profiling, critical power, and U23 cycling research with Peter Leo | EP#319

That Triathlon Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 76:45


Peter Leo is an applied exercise physiologist and high performance coach from Austria. Peter has done extensive research in profiling performance and physiological characteristics of U23 cyclists which we discuss in this interview. We also discuss power profiling and using Critical Power.   IN THIS EPISODE YOU'LL LEARN ABOUT: -Best practices for power profiling (e.g. formal testing vs. raw training data) and methodological considerations -What is Critical Power, and why use that as a main physiological marker over others (such as MLSS and FTP) -Power changes in U23 cyclists across a season -How training characteristics (e.g. training intensity distribution as well as added load from racing) impacted the change in power profile across the season -Practical takeaways from these studies - what can we learn when thinking about how we go about our own training and racing across an entire season?     SHOWNOTES: https://scientifictriathlon.com/tts319/   SCIENTIFIC TRIATHLON AND THAT TRIATHLON SHOW WEBPAGE: www.scientifictriathlon.com/podcast/   SPONSORS: ROKA - Exceptional quality triathlon wetsuits, trisuits, swimskins, goggles, performance sunglasses as well as prescription eyeglasses and sunglasses.  Online vision test for prescription updates and home try-on options available for eyeglasses. Ships from  the US, UK and EU. Trusted by world-leading athletes such as  Lucy Charles-Barclay, Javier Gómez Noya, Flora Duffy, Morgan Pearson, Summer Rappaport and others in triathlon, cycling, speed skating, and many more. Visit roka.com/tts for 20% off your order.   ZEN8 - The ZEN8 Indoor Swim Trainer is a tool for time-crunched triathletes looking to improve swim specific strength and technique. The swim trainer is a perfect complement to your training in the pool. On days when you don't have time to go to the pool, you can now do a short but effective home-based workout on the trainer. It is inflatable, so doesn't take up much space, and best of all, it is very affordable. Get 20% off your order at zen8swimtrainer.com/tts.   LINKS AND RESOURCES: Peter's Twitter and Research Gate  Longitudinal physiological and performance characteristics of U23 elite cyclists - Peter's PhD thesis Power profiling and the power-duration relationship in cycling: a narrative review - Leo et al. 2021 Power Profiling in U23 Professional Cyclists During a Competitive Season- Leo et al. 2021 Training Characteristics and Power Profile of Professional U23 Cyclists throughout a Competitive Season - Leo et al. 2020 Power Profiling, Workload Characteristics, and Race Performance of U23 and Professional Cyclists During the Multistage Race Tour of the Alps - Leo et al. 2021 Climbing Performance in U23 and Professional Cyclists during a Multi-stage Race - Leo et al. 2021 All-Out Physiology - Youtube-channel by Dr. Mark Burnley Exercise intensity domains and phase transitions: the power-duration relationship - blog post by Dr. Mark Burnley Tools and calculators by PhD candidate Felipe Mattioni Previous guests on That Triathlon Show mentioned in this episode (may not be an exhaustive list): Mark Burnley, Andy Jones, Philip Skiba, James Spragg, Teun van Erp, Robert Lamberts, John Hawley, Louise Burke, Dan Lorang   RATE AND REVIEW: If you enjoy the show, please help me out by subscribing, rating and reviewing: www.scientifictriathlon.com/rate/   CONTACT: Want to send feedback, questions or just chat? Email me at mikael@scientifictriathlon.com or connect on Instagram, Facebook, or Twitter.

The OCD Stories
Story: Sam (#310)

The OCD Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 43:23


In episode 310 I chat with Sam who has kindly agreed to share her story with us.  We discuss her story, a sexual assault that came before the OCD, worrying about getting an STI, pedophile themed OCD (pOCD), her compulsions, doing exposure and response prevention therapy (ERP), medication and self stigma, what else helps her, where she's at now, and much more. Hope it helps.   Show notes: https://theocdstories.com/episode/story-sam-310 The podcast is made possible by NOCD. NOCD offers affordable, effective, convenient therapy available in the US and outside the US. To find out more about NOCD, their therapy plans and if they currently take your insurance head over to https://go.treatmyocd.com/theocdstories

Empowered Relationship Podcast: Your Relationship Resource And Guide
ERP 300: How to Set Your Relationship up for Success

Empowered Relationship Podcast: Your Relationship Resource And Guide

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 43:52


To commemorate the 300th episode of the Empowered Relationship Podcast here's a special episode for you all! Since the premiere episode in 2015, our goal has been to help people feel more prepared and, as a result, set their relationships up for success by encouraging them to invest in the strength of their connection rather than second-guessing their partner choice. Learn how couples can shift into safer, more positive, and more connected patterns of relating as she discusses key findings out of a landmark relationship science study that was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, which was first-authored by Samantha Joel. Check out the transcript of this episode on Dr. Jessica Higgin's website. In this episode 08:08 What constitutes a successful relationship, and why do some relationships thrive more than others? 16:06 Top relationship characteristics that most accurately predict a person's happiness. 30:00 Five personal attributes that can help predict a person's happiness. Mentioned A landmark study shows what makes a successful relationship Machine learning uncovers the most robust self-report predictors of relationship quality across 43 longitudinal couples studies Dr. Susan Johnson's website Gottman Institute Julie Gottman's wikipedia page Samantha Joel's citations on Google Scholar Podcast Rocket's website ERP 297: How to Enhance Emotional Intimacy in Your Relationship – An Interview with Amber Dalsin ERP 274: How Increasing Relationship Love & Health Can Impact Borderline Personality Disorder – An Interview with Gabrielle Usatynski ERP 169: What to Do When Depression Takes Hold in Your Relationship, with Dr. Susan Heitler ERP 166: How Perfectionism And Depression Affect You And Your Relationship – with Dr. Margaret Rutherford ERP 015: Do You Have a “Unity” or “Journey” Mindset In Relationship? Connect with Dr. Jessica Higgins Facebook: facebook.com/EmpoweredRelationship  Instagram: instagram.com/drjessicahiggins  Podcast: drjessicahiggins.com/podcasts/ Pinterest: pinterest.com/EmpowerRelation  LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/drjessicahiggins  Twitter: @DrJessHiggins  Website: drjessicahiggins.com   Email: jessica@drjessicahiggins.com If you have a topic you would like me to discuss, please contact me by clicking on the “Ask Dr. Jessica Higgins” button here.  Thank you so much for your interest in improving your relationship.  Also, I would so appreciate your honest rating and review. Please leave a review by clicking here.  Thank you!   *With Amazon Affiliate Links, I may earn a few cents from Amazon, if you purchase the book from this link.

All The Hard Things
#89 - Why "Just Pay More Attention" is Bad Advice for OCD Recovery

All The Hard Things

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 22:00


In this episode, I talk about some poor advice I saw on social media, encouraging people to "just pay more attention" when they ritualize the first time so that they don't have to do it a second time. I talk about.. - why this is bad advice for people who have OCD - how this advice is substituting one ritual for another - how this can snowball into more rituals in the future - what to do instead For OCD treatment, check out NOCD - head to www.treatmyocd.com and schedule your free 15 minute phone call to get connected with a licensed therapist who specializes in Exposure and Response Prevention. NOCD is a mobile therapy platform and includes video sessions with a therapist, in addition to peer support, ERP tools, and more. This podcast should not be substituted, nor is meant to act as a substitute, for legitimate mental health treatment/a legitimate mental health treatment provider. This podcast and any information in it is solely the reflection of general knowledge and cannot be taken as a personal therapeutic recommendation. To find a therapist near you to work more directly with these issues, head over to IOCDF.org, psychologytoday.com, or nami.org. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jennaoverbaugh/support

FearCast
Can I have more than one obsession, and what if I orgasm during ERP?

FearCast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 20:23


Originally published on December 24, 2021, however it did not post correctly. Here it is now. To close out 2021, I'm answering two quick questions from listeners. The first question is about whether someone can have more than one obsession. Spoiler, yes you can. The next question is about whether… Continue reading The post Can I have more than one obsession, and what if I orgasm during ERP? appeared first on FearCast Podcast.

The Breakout Growth Podcast
Flapper's CEO Describes Wild Ride Driving Growth in Developing Countries

The Breakout Growth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 46:57


This week's episode of the Breakout Growth Podcast is brought to you by Rise with SAP and includes some incredible stories! Paul Malicki is the founder and CEO of Flapper, Brazil’s first on-demand private aviation marketplace, and his journey has been anything but boring. Hold onto your hats, as he tells Ethan and Sean about a negotiation he had in the Philippines where the other party placed a grenade and a gun on the desk and asked whether Paul was still not willing to budge from his proposed 70/30 revenue split? That story stems from his days launching Easy Taxi in developing countries, but the excitement has continued, as Paul moved from building a terrestrial taxi service to now building a taxi service of sorts for the skies. Paul’s vision is to turn private aviation into a mainstream travel option. From creating a marketplace where travelers can book empty seats on private jets and helicopters to offering on-demand charters, Flapper is blazing its own trail to breakout growth success. In 2019 the business grew 251%, and even with the challenges of the global pandemic, Paul and his team still were able to realize ~100% year over year gains in 2020. Driving growth through the tumult required a quick pivot to leverage the skyrocketing demand for cargo and ambulance flights, but a scrappy, growth hacker’s mindset helped to keep the business on track through these difficult times. Flappers ascent has been anything but easy. Aviation has traditionally been a tough industry in which to win, and Paul explains that it took 228 meetings to raise seed money for the business, and another 530 meetings to fund his Series A. But, he explains his determination very simply: “I was already here, I liked what I was doing, and it was a sexy business.” So sit back and enjoy one of our most fun and entertaining conversations of the year. We still get into the gritty details of team structure, growth engine, and all the other important elements of growth you expect from the podcast, but through Paul’s experience taking on challenges in developing, and not always friendly environments, we view growth from a unique and exciting vantage point. Before you jump in learn more about RISE with SAP S/4Hana Cloud here. If you have ambitious goals, SAP is the technology partner you need to scale and drive innovation. Instead of relying on stitched together solutions to manage business finances, operations, and customer relations, leverage the flexibility of SAP’s cloud-based ERP solution to gain the insights that will help drive your breakout growth success. Fasten your seatbelt for this one! We discussed: * A vision to change the way we travel (4:56) * Why private aviation can be affordable (6:53) * Learnings from the not-so-easy world of Easy Taxi (8:34)

My Climate Journey
Ep. 189: Kentaro Kawamori, Co-Founder & CEO of Persefoni

My Climate Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 54:21


Today's guest is Kentaro Kawamori, Co-Founder & CEO of Persefoni.Persefoni is the leading Climate Management & Accounting Platform (CMAP). The company's Software-as-a-Service solutions enable enterprises and financial institutions to meet stakeholder and regulatory climate disclosure requirements with the highest degrees of trust, transparency, and ease. As the ERP of Carbon, the Persefoni platform provides users a single source of carbon truth across their organization, enabling them to manage their carbon transactions and inventory with the same rigor and confidence as their financial transactions. Before founding Persefoni, Kentaro was the youngest Chief Digital Officer ever at a Fortune 500 company. As Chief Digital Officer, Kentaro led the digital operations and CIO It strategy function for Chesapeake Energy. His career has focused on the software space. It includes time spent as a Cloud strategy consultant at Accenture, a Venture Partner at Rice Investment Group, and a board member at Umbrage, a digital product studio. In 2020, Forbes named Kentaro on its 30 Under 30 list. He also holds an MBA from Arizona State University.In this episode, Kentaro explains Persefoni's unique solution, what led him to build a carbon accounting company, and when he first became engaged in the climate space. We talk about the existing carbon accounting landscape, the role offsets play in the clean future, and the accuracy of carbon accounting. We cover many topics in this episode, and Kentaro is a fantastic guest.Enjoy the show!You can find me on twitter @jjacobs22 or @mcjpod and email at info@myclimatejourney.co, where I encourage you to share your feedback on episodes and suggestions for future topics or guests.Episode recorded December 17th, 2021For more information about Persefoni, visit: https://persefoni.com/For more information about this episode, visit: https://myclimatejourney.co/episodes/kentaro-kawamori

BTC Cast
Dr. Consulta, Alpargatas, McDonalds | Vale, Embraer, CVC e Itapemirim | BTC Journal 23/12/21

BTC Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 61:43


Analise notícias de negócios como os instrutores da Business Training Company: https://bit.ly/3nMGJURPainel semanal de notícias de negócios e empresas, comentadas e analisadas pela Business Training Company!Temas comentados:- Vale vende ativo em Moatize e sai de carvão- CVC reacomoda clientes da Itapemirim após suspensão das operações- Eve, da Embraer, e americana Zanite acertam fusão de US$ 2,9 bi- Conta Azul compra Swipe e quer fazer do ERP o novo internet banking- Oracle compra Cerner por US$ 28,3 bi- McDonald's raciona batata frita no Japão por gargalo no fornecimento / McDonald's vende startup de cupons e promoções para Mastercard- Alpargatas pagou caro pela Rothy's?- Em busca do “oceano azul”, dr.consulta mergulha em plano de saúdeSe você gostou, INSCREVA-SE em nosso canal e curta o nosso vídeo! ----------------------------------------------------Siga a Business Training Company nas redes sociais!Facebook: https://bit.ly/face-btcInstagram: https://bit.ly/insta-btcLinkedIn: https://bit.ly/linkedin-btc----------------------------------------------------Confira nosso site: www.btcompany.com.br

Distribution Talk
Revisiting Lisa Fiore on technology-driven innovation in the legacy landscape industry

Distribution Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 36:08


During this holiday season, we are taking the opportunity to re-release some of the most popular episodes of Distribution Talk. The August 2020 interview with Lisa Fiore, co-founder and CEO of Landscape Hub, broke all download records for the show. People were intrigued with her ability to apply this digital marketplace to the highly fragmented legacy industry of landscapes. Since the interview, Landscape Hub has grown dramatically and they're continuing to add more robust search features for the end user. From a fingernails in the dirt family business to technology-driven service provider, this is a really cool innovation story.  Enjoy! *** Lisa Fiore left the family business behind to transform an industry. Jason and Lisa discuss the challenges that have shaped her management style and the tech she's created to revolutionize a stodgy wholesale vertical. “Their version of the story is that I grabbed the business and took it from them. My version is they gave it to me,” Lisa laughs, recalling the series of events that ultimately lead to her taking over the family's century-old landscape supply business in 2010 - at the height of the Great Recession.  Throughout that crisis, Lisa maintained an honest dialogue with her staff and her family about the painful adjustments to come. Fostering that level transparency taught her a great deal about the value of vulnerability, an attribute that has prepared her for the current pandemic. “We all have deep scars from the recession and I guarantee you we're all gonna have deep scars of living through this…[but] it's informed my instincts.”  Challenges should beget meaningful change. That's a takeaway Lisa has run with throughout her career. After shoring up the family business, she left the company to realize her dream: the creation of an online marketplace connecting buyers and quality suppliers across the country.  But optimizing a fragmented ecosystem is not an easy task - or a quick one.  Imagine an industry in which the established common names for products change from region to region, where orders are often taken via pencil and pad. That's what Landscape Hub is up against. Three years in, however, Lisa is as enthusiastic about her tech as she was the first time she pitched it to venture capitalists. “This is the future of the industry and I have to be a part of it and I have to see this thing through.”  Under her guidance, Lisa and her team will no doubt do just that. An entrepreneur at heart, she's happiest laying the foundation for future innovations. “We are doing something that is genuinely going to change this industry. We don't know necessarily what role we'll play in terms of the finished product, but I guarantee you, what we're doing today will make a difference.” *** Distribution Talk is produced by The Distribution Team, a consulting services firm dedicated to helping wholesale distribution clients remove barriers to profitability, generate wealth and achieve personal goals.    This episode was edited & mixed by The Creative Impostor Studios.  http://www.distributionteam.com Special thanks to our sponsor for this episode: INxSQL Distribution Software, integrated distribution ERP software designed for the wholesale and distribution industry.

All The Hard Things
#88 - What Does NOT Work For OCD Treatment - Part III

All The Hard Things

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 42:02


In this episode, I talk about therapies, techniques, and interventions that could be harmful or detrimental to OCD treatment. I discuss... - mistakes therapists make - common pitfalls in ERP for OCD (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22924159/) - harmful engagement responses (https://windsorflynn.com/blogs/news/an-interview-with-lisa-levine-psyd) For OCD treatment, check out NOCD - head to www.treatmyocd.com and schedule your free 15 minute phone call to get connected with a licensed therapist who specializes in Exposure and Response Prevention. NOCD is a mobile therapy platform and includes video sessions with a therapist, in addition to peer support, ERP tools, and more. This podcast should not be substituted, nor is meant to act as a substitute, for legitimate mental health treatment/a legitimate mental health treatment provider. This podcast and any information in it is solely the reflection of general knowledge and cannot be taken as a personal therapeutic recommendation. To find a therapist near you to work more directly with these issues, head over to IOCDF.org, psychologytoday.com, or nami.org. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jennaoverbaugh/support

Business Central Manufacturing Show
Production orders, jobs, and assembly orders: why, when, and how to use them

Business Central Manufacturing Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 35:56


I met with Ken Sebahar, who is the President of Solution Systems, Inc., a Microsoft Gold-Certified Partner near Chicago, Illinois. Ken and his colleague Michael host the great podcast “A Shot of Business Central and a Beer” in which they provide listeners with news and updates related to Business Central in an entertaining manner. Of course, with a podcast like this, beer was the ideal hook for our conversation. At the beginning of our conversation, you can learn which of us enjoys an advent calendar with German beer. If you listen until the episode's end, you also hear who loves drinking a hot wine punch at a Christmas market. Well, after and before chatting about drinks, we flew full circle on Business Central production orders, jobs, and assembly orders.Once we had the beer advent calendar thing clarified, we started to differentiate typical manufacturing companies. Ken used two key criteria. I would call one criterion the "degree of process repeatability and predictability". Dimensions of this criterium are item structure, BOM, routings, operations, scrap percentages, etc. The second criterion to look at is both the billing and the cost recognition process. The combination of those criteria helps you to figure out if a manufacturer tends to qualify either for the Business Central manufacturing module or for the Business Central jobs module.  However, oftentimes the decision between the jobs and the manufacturing module is not an either/or decision. Instead, Ken favors combining both functionalities for those manufactures with individual, project-type deliveries that base on standardized, but proprietary items. Combining jobs and manufacturing enables customers to benefit from all WIP billing, costing, and revenue recognition advantages that the job module brings. Likewise, customers can add all required items as job planning lines to the bespoke job - independent if those items get purchased or manufactured. The integrated Business Central planning engine sees the demand from the job planning lines and creates suggestions in the planning worksheet. That way, customers can create production orders. When they complete them, they can output the items into inventory. Then, these items can be used by the job journal to consume those manufactured items. Thus, the cost for making those items get associated with the project.However, customers that build bespoke items do not necessarily need to work with production orders. Ken not only points out to assembly orders. He also positions them as "manufacturing light" and precisely describes the sweat spot for assembly orders as follows:Very simple manufacturing processVery predictable amount of time that it takes to produce each unitVery little scrap, and no variance in the amount of scrapSmooth operationSo ultimately, Ken recommends that manufacturers with a project-type of delivery look a jobs and either production orders or assembly orders. He is also very clear about the fact that manufacturing allows taking into account much more parameters for both planning and scheduling.Interestingly enough, this brings us to the Business Central function called capacity constrained resources. Ken shows a very pragmatic approach to when and how to use this function. However, other than many other folks I spoke about it before, he manages to discover and justify a place for that function.This pragmatism truly inspired me, and we kept going for more pragmatic scenarios of using and implementing Business Central jobs, manufacturing, and assembly. Ken coined the phrase "crawl, then walk, the run" and agrees that we currently observe a paradigm shift in implementing EPR projects.

Automotive Insiders Presented By OESA
Technology Impacts on Automotive Bottom Line with SAP and Infosys

Automotive Insiders Presented By OESA

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 60:00


Automotive Insiders is presented by OESA, the Original Equipment Suppliers Association. Industry experts discuss Automotive hot topics to keep the Automotive Supplier Community up to date on the fast-changing mobility landscape. From post-pandemic manufacturing restart planning and worker safety measures, to legal issues and supply chain disruptions, Automotive Insiders is your source of timely and relevant content. Host Bonnie D. Graham welcomes Tom Madonna, Industry Executive Advisor for Automotive at SAP, and Nat Krishnan, Head of SAP Sales and Engagements for Manufacturing at Infosys. Tom Madonna and Nat Krishnan discuss how technology is helping automotive companies adopt and launch new business models faster, streamline costs and increase revenues. Customers' wants and needs are driving companies to change how and how fast they provide new products and innovations. Nat shares examples including Ford's Mobility subscription billing and Volvo's car-as-a-service. As technology maturity (EV, ADAS, AV) drives market cap, evaluation, and other business decisions, older brick-and-mortar companies are being pushed to change. Nat notes that this maturity enables EV startups to adopt best-in-class business capability faster and cheaper than ever, in as little as 1–2 years for Lordstown, Fisker and Rivian. Companies are demanding “skin in the game” from technology services suppliers, including outcome-based commercial models and ERP-as-a-service. Listen on-demand to the full conversation with Tom Madonna and Nat Krishnan. More info: https://OESA.org

Digital Stratosphere: Digital Transformation, ERP, HCM, and CRM Implementation Best Practices
Top Emerging Business Technologies [Best Tech Alternatives for Your Digital Strategy]

Digital Stratosphere: Digital Transformation, ERP, HCM, and CRM Implementation Best Practices

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 15:38


When considering potential business technologies for your organization there are a lot of options to choose from beyond your traditional ERP, HCM, CRM, and other traditional options. A plethora of technologies such as supply chain management, business process mining, open-source, custom apps, and a variety of other tools are also available. This variety of options can make the process of defining your digital strategy and roadmap difficult and overwhelming. In this episode, I cover the top business technologies you should be considering as you define your digital strategy for the future. These are technologies that should be considered as part of your longer-term digital transformation strategy and roadmap for the 2020s.   DOWNLOAD THE 2021 DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION REPORT: https://www.thirdstage-consulting.com/ TOP 10 ERP SYSTEMS RANKING: https://www.thirdstage-consulting.com/top-10-erp-systems-2022-top-software-vendors/ TOP 10 ERP SYSTEMS FOR SMALL BUSINESSES: https://www.thirdstage-consulting.com/top-erp-systems-for-small-businesses/ TOP 10 CRM SYSTEMS: https://www.thirdstage-consulting.com/top-10-crm-systems-for-digital-transformations/ GUIDE TO ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE MANAGEMENT: https://www.thirdstage-consulting.com/organizational-change-management/ DOWNLOAD 20 LESSONS FROM 1,000 ERP IMPLEMENTATIONS: http://resource.thirdstage-consulting.com/lessons-from-1000-erp-implementations-ebook FOLLOW THIRD STAGE ON LINKEDIN: https://www.linkedin.com/company/third-stage-consulting-group FOLLOW THIRD STAGE ON INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/thirdstageconsulting/ LISTEN AND SUBSCRIBE TO OUR WEEKLY PODCAST: https://stratosphere.podbean.com CONTACT US TO BRAINSTORM IDEAS FOR YOUR DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION: info@thirdstage-consulting.com.  

The OCD Stories
Story: Angel Brown (#308)

The OCD Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 52:56


In episode 308 I chat with Angel Brown who has kindly agreed to share her story with us.  We discuss her story, harm intrusive thoughts, panic attacks, health anxiety, her compulsions, fear of going crazy, doing exposure and response prevention (ERP), helping her family understand how to support her, words of hope, and much more. Hope it helps.  Show notes: https://theocdstories.com/episode/story-angel-308 The podcast is made possible by NOCD. NOCD offers affordable, effective, convenient therapy available in the US and outside the US. To find out more about NOCD, their therapy plans and if they currently take your insurance head over to https://go.treatmyocd.com/theocdstories

Your Anxiety Toolkit
215 Setting Boundaries with Loved Ones

Your Anxiety Toolkit

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 23:35


In This Episode: How to identify what your role is in a relationship How to manage a mental illness and set boundaries How boundaries are needed when you are in recovery How to set boundaries with a loved one during the holiday season. Links To Things I Talk About: ERP School: https://www.cbtschool.com/erp-school-lp Episode Sponsor: This episode of Your Anxiety Toolkit is brought to you by CBTschool.com.  CBTschool.com is a psychoeducation platform that provides courses and other online resources for people with anxiety, OCD, and Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors.  Go to cbtschool.com to learn more. Spread the love! Everyone needs tools for anxiety... If you like Your Anxiety Toolkit Podcast, visit YOUR ANXIETY TOOLKIT PODCAST to subscribe free and you'll never miss an episode. And if you really like Your Anxiety Toolkit, I'd appreciate you telling a friend (maybe even two). EPISODE TRANSCRIPTION This is Your Anxiety Toolkit - Episode 215. Welcome back, everybody. It is the final episode of Your Anxiety Toolkit for the year 2021. I will not be putting out a podcast next week because it falls right on the holidays, and I really wanted to make sure I give you all time to be with your family instead of listening to my voice. If you are in the holiday season and you want to listen to my voice, there are so many, in fact, there are 214 episodes. You can go back and listen to. I just want to be with my family, and I want you to be with the people you love. Speaking of people you love, today we're talking about setting boundaries with loved ones or managing our relationship during the holidays. However, I did a whole episode about this last week. You can go back. It's episode 214, where we talk about holiday anxiety. We did discuss some of this there as well. So, you can go back and listen there. But for right now, I want us to talk about managing relationships, specifically during the holidays, but this episode can be applied to any old day of the week. Now, before we get started, we always do the “I did a hard thing.” This one is from Rachel. We do an “I did a hard thing” to motivate you, to remind you that there are more people out there going through what you're going through. You're not alone. Rachel shared with us today: “I have somatic OCD.” For those of you who don't know what that means, it means that you have OCD about specific sensations that show up in your body. You sometimes feel like you can't stop noticing them or you're afraid you will never stop noticing them. Sometimes you're afraid that the feeling will never go away and it can feel really disorienting. So, Rachel says: “I have somatic OCD, and I always need to distract myself not to notice them. I've been able to drive without the radio or calling anyone and it feels so good.” Rachel, this is so good. You're doing what we talk about in ERP School. ERP School is our online course that teaches how to expose ourselves to fears, specifically obsessions for people with OCD, health anxiety, and these types of OCD, like somatic OCD, on how to practice facing our fear. In this case, it was her driving, that without using safety behavior or compulsions. So, in this case, the compulsion would be to have the radio on or calling someone to distract her on her somatic obsession or her sensation. So, Rachel, amazing job, you're doing the work. You're doing the exposure and the response prevention. One thing I want to mention to everybody, if you have OCD or an anxiety disorder, is we must do both. We must face our fears and not do the safety behaviors to reduce or remove that discomfort that we feel when we face our fear. So, you've explained this perfectly. Congratulations. I am so proud of you. Love getting the “I did a hard thing's” from you guys. And so, just so thrilled to get that message from you. All right, let's go over to the episode. It's the holidays. You're anticipating the gifts and the food and the time and the travel and all the things, but what's worse than that is anticipation of the interactions that you're going to have with certain family members. Now, if you're listening to this and it's not the holidays, it's the same. You're anticipating going to work, but you're dreading the interactions. You're dreading how messy things get. You're going to school, and you're dreading how messy things get with the people you have in your life – your students, your classmates, your teacher, your friends, whoever it may be. I want you to think about your responsibilities. And I talk a lot with my patients and clients about responsibility because it's a really important part of recovery. When we think about the holidays, we think about a certain event that's coming up. I'll often explain to my patients that really all you need to do is you need to focus on your lane. So, I've talked about this before on the podcast, but I want you to imagine you're driving on the highway, you're in your car, and the only thing you're responsible for is to not run into other people in their lane and to stay in your lane and to go at a pace that's right for you and a speed that's right for you and in a car that's right for you. Now, that metaphor is exactly how you're going to get through the holidays or get through this event that you've got coming up. Your job is to take responsibility for you and your lane. Now, sometimes people in the lane next to us come on over into our lane and they want to tell us how to act, and they want to tell us what to do, and they want to impose on you their beliefs. Now, our job is to remind them and set boundaries that that's not your lane, that's their lane. And their job is to stay in their lane. And our job is to stay in our lane. Now, in addition, we have to be careful that we are not popping on over into their lane and telling them how they should be, and telling them how they should act, and trying to take responsibility for their feelings, and trying to prevent them from judging you because that's their lane. We talked about this in the last episode. Go back and listen to that. But that's not your job either. It's not your job to get their approval because that's their responsibility. How they feel is their responsibility. We can't control that. And so, first, before we even talk about setting boundaries, we have to be really clear on what's in your lane. So, an example for me is, as I go into the holidays, I am going to be really aware of what is my responsibility, how do I want to show up? And then it's my responsibility to show up in my lane doing so. But it's also important to catch when I'm-- often we do this. It's like, “Well, I'm going to do X, Y, and Z because I really want A, B and C to like me.” But that's your lane. It's not your responsibility. It's not your job to get them to approve of you because we don't have any control of that. And as we talked about last week, their judgment of us is their responsibility. It's a reflection of them. It's not a reflection of us. So, we have to be really careful of really getting clear on how we want to show up and only trying to control us, because we can't control our family members. They're going to do what they do. They're going to act out. They're going to be up in your lane. From there, we can set a boundary to protect ourselves from them coming into your lane. So, when we set boundaries, we usually set boundaries when somebody is imposing their stuff onto us. Imagine if someone came into your house and walked in with their shoes on and put dirt all over the carpet, you might say, “Excuse me, please would you take your shoes off?” There's like a boundary violation. If they come into my house and they start smoking cigarettes, no disrespect or judgment on people who do smoke cigarettes, but I'm going to say, “I'm really sorry, we actually don't smoke in this house. Can you please put your cigarette out and go out to the back?” And so, that would be me setting a boundary. Now, a lot of you brought in and you asked questions about this. Last week we addressed a lot of the questions. So, an example, somebody said, “How can I communicate with my family about my OCD and keep my boundaries?” So, what you might do is first ask yourself. If I was going to communicate about my OCD or my anxiety or my depression or my eating disorder or whatever you may have, panic, is ask yourself, are you communicating with it so that they change the way they act because that's their lane? The only reason we would need to communicate about our stuff is so that we can set a boundary. Let's say a really big one that I have had to practice is when family members comment about weight. I had a couple of family members in my childhood who every Christmas would, “Have Merry Christmas, Kimberley, your weight is blank. You're up a bit. You're down a bit. You're bigger, you're smaller, whatever.” And it was so incredibly painful and so incredibly unhealthy for me. And so, the boundary here would be to say, “I would really prefer that you don't comment on my way. And if you do, I'm going to remove myself from this interaction.” So, that's a boundary and it's respectful and it's compassionate, and I'm not doing it to harm them or discipline them or pay them back. I'm doing it because it's a boundary violation, and it's in my lane. When I'm in my lane, I want to have a really positive idea about my food and my body. If a family member is telling you how you should act, you might say to them, “Thank you so much for your thoughts. I am going to choose to do it this way. And I would really appreciate if you didn't comment.  if you're unable to hold that boundary, I'm going to have to leave,” or you can say whatever you want. You can just set the limit. Sometimes you don't even need to tell them your boundary. You might just keep it to yourself. Like, “Oh, if they're going--” if a family member says, “I'm so OCD about stuffing,” or whatever they say, “I'm so OCD about my cooking,” you might just not even need to express the boundary with them. You might gently just get yourself up and walk away. That's a boundary. Sometimes we don't have to verbally express boundaries because we can just remove ourselves from the situation and stay in our lane. Somebody said, “How to say no to things?” So, you've decided you don't want to do something. We talked about this last week in Episode 214. You've decided you don't want to do something. And so, you say to them, “I'm going to bring baked goods. I'm not going to bake them myself. I will buy them at the bakery. No, I'm not going to hand bake them.” Or you might say, “No, I'm not going to go to that Christmas party,” or “No, I am not going to buy gifts this year.” Okay? Now, that's you holding your own boundary. Then your job, and again, this is why I shared about the lanes, is your job is to let them have their feelings about it. They're allowed to have their feelings. They're even allowed to act out. If they act out and they say something unkind, you may set a boundary with them. But we can't hold everybody to our standards. Some people are going to act out. They may not have the skills you have. They may be triggered. They may have expectations of you. And that's okay. They're allowed to have expectations, but it doesn't mean you have to do it. You may choose to follow their expectations. We talked about that again last week. But that's your decision. You have to be responsible for you and saying yes to what matters to you and saying no to what doesn't matter to you. Any time you notice resent, show up, that's usually because you violated your own boundary. You did something you didn't want to do and you should have said no to. It's okay. I'm going to keep saying this to you guys. It's okay to disappoint people. We will disappoint them. It's either they get disappointed, or you do the thing they want you to do, and then you're disappointed. And you have to choose. It's your responsibility to choose. And we do this responsibility work compassionately. I speak a lot in my book, The Self-Compassion Workbook for OCD, about compassionate responsibility. That's saying: “I am responsible for me,” but not in a disciplinarian, like you're responsible for yourself, you're alone, you're on your own kind of way. It's a compassionate act of, “Yes, I get to take responsibility for myself. I get to take care of myself. I get to say no, I get to say yes. I get to make those choices and I'll do them kindly.” Somebody asked a question about managing irritability. This is a great one, because our family members and our friends and our loved ones and the people at our Christmas party or our Hanukkah party, our Kwanzaa, they may irritate us. Yeah, it's okay to feel irritated by our family members. My husband and I always-- we learned this maybe five years ago. We get caught up in it. I'll be like, “Why are you acting that way?” And he'll say gently to me, “Kimberley, I'm allowed to feel this way.” And I'm like, “Oh crap, you're right. I keep forgetting that you're allowed to feel what you want to feel.” Or he'll be upset and he'll be like, “What's wrong? Why are you being this way?” And I'll be like, “I'm allowed to feel this way.” And he's like, “Oh crap, you're right.” You're allowed to be irritable. You're not allowed to be unkind. I mean, you are, but you have responsibility, There's consequences. But ideally, let yourself be irritable. Be compassionate with your irritability. Like say, “Yeah, it makes complete sense that I'm irritable. This is hard. It makes complete sense that I'm annoyed. They've said something that annoyed me.” Again, they're allowed to say annoying things. We get to remove ourselves if it doesn't feel right or we get to express ourselves.” That really hurt my feelings. That made me upset.” This is why you're allowed to share. Let's see. Someone said dealing with a toxic parent. Well, it depends. My answer to that is it depends on whether you're a minor or an adult. If you're a minor, it's hard to remove yourself from a toxic parent. They are your guardian. You're legally under their care. But you can remove yourself from them physically in terms of going to another room. You can try and share with them. “That was really painful for me to hear that. If you do that again, I'm going to leave the room.” Or you get to make your own boundaries. They may be physical boundaries where you leave. They may be emotional boundaries where you don't go to them and you don't share with them if they can't hold space for you compassionately and respectfully. If you're an adult, you can choose to set as many boundaries as hard or as strong, as light as you need. Some people set boundaries with their family members. Like, “You can't come here without announcing yourself. You must let us know first. You can't say those things about me or I'm going to leave.” Or you may, again, you don't even have to say them out loud. If they're really toxic, you may say to them, “I'm not going to see you anymore if you keep acting like this towards me and my family. I can no longer put myself through that.” You get permission. We don't get to choose our family, but you don't have to see them either if they're really unhealthy for you. You may want to get some therapy around it and have the help of a clinician to help you navigate what's a right boundary for you. Everybody's different. Someone said, “I get really bad depression during the holidays and people have expectations for me to be happy.” Well, that's their lane. You don't have to act or be any way. Be kind, be compassionate, but do the best you can. It's your lane. You got to just do the best you can with what you have. So, again, I think that's a really big part of this, is really take care of you because that's your job. One thing actually, before we finish up, let me mention, it's no one else's job to make us feel better either. I know a lot of this today is going to feel like a lot of hard truths, but I promise you, there is so much liberation that comes from this. It's a hard pill to swallow, but it's still a really, really good pill. It's a good pill. It's a helpful pill. And so, it's not other people's job to make us joyful on Christmas either. That's our job. I'll tell you a story, when I was really a young adult, I think it was quite shocking to me that when you're a kid, everyone throws you a big party. And when you're an adult, it's not as big of a deal. And I used to get really offended that people didn't throw me a massive party until I was like, “Wait, it's really not their job.” And so, I started doing it for myself, and I have no shame about it. If I know I want to feel special on my birthday, I always organize something really special for myself. For the last three years, except for the year of COVID, I always rent-- you guys, probably know this. I rent an RV and I invite my three best girlfriends and I have a party for myself, and I'm not ashamed about it. I'm happy to celebrate myself. A If you are feeling like other people's job is to bring you joy on Christmas, I would say, no, bring yourself joy. Buy yourself a gift. Make your special meal you want to have. Treat yourself and shower yourself with the joy that you want to feel. That's a huge liberation, a huge freedom. Such a gift. Okay. So, that's it. That's how you set boundaries. You get to set them. It's your lane. You get to decide. But other people are allowed to have their feelings about it. And that's okay. That doesn't mean you're bad. They can even tell you you're bad, and that doesn't mean you're bad. They can say, “I don't like you,” and you don't think you're doing the right thing and they get to have their opinion, it doesn't make it a fact. This is hard work. I am not going to lie, I am still working on this. I'm still learning from this. I still have to practice it every single day. So, be gentle and remind yourself, this is a journey. This is not a destination that you're like, “Yay, I'm great with boundaries.” It will be something you'll have to keep practicing. But the holidays are the perfect time to practice them. It's so important. My loves, you probably have lots of questions about this. Do go over to social media. I'll leave links in the bio. If you want to send me questions, I do a live Q and A every second and fourth Monday of the month at 12 o'clock Pacific Standard Time. So, I'm happy to answer your questions there. Have a beautiful day. Happy 2021. I will be seeing you in 2022, holy macaroni, but I can't wait. I'm actually really pumped about Your Anxiety Toolkit next year. I'm going to put a ton more effort into it. That's where I want my attention to be next year. So, sending you love. Have a wonderful day, and I'll talk to you soon. Oh no, wait. Before we finish up, what was I thinking? It is time for the review of the week. This is from IsaacRThorne, and they said: “Love this show and I look forward to it every Friday.” Sorry, Isaac, I nearly missed you here. “No matter what you struggle with, there's more than one episode where your mouth will drop open, your eyes will grow wide, and you'll shout: “That's totally me!” Isaac, this is the best review ever. It just brings me so much joy. “Your mouth will drop open, your eyes will grow wide, and you'll shout, “That's totally me!” So, I hope this episode was that for you. Thank you so much for your wonderful review. Please, if you don't want to give me any gift of the world, it would be to leave me a review on the iTunes app. Thank you so much for your reviews. They bring me joy, but they also help us reach more people. So, thank you, thank you, thank you so much. We are going to give a free pair of Beats headphones to one lucky reviewer when we hit a thousand reviews. We're on our way. Please go and leave a review. It would be the best, best, best gift you could give me. Have a wonderful day, everybody. And now I officially say, have a wonderful day and I will see you in the New Year.

Tech Pro Unicorn Podcast
Gary Melling - CEO AI Inc. - Talking ERP Technology - Metaverse 3D Avatars

Tech Pro Unicorn Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 54:05


Gary is President and CEO of Acquired Insights Inc. A strategic Management Consulting and Systems Aggregation firm focusing on delivering applied Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning, Predictive Analytics, Cyber Security, Humanoid Robotics, Chatbot and 3D Avatar business solutions resulting in immediate, measurable, and scalable value for our clients through better, real-time business decision support. Michael and Gary discuss the Metaverse and the upcoming 3D avatars we will all have.  What relevance do these have for companies? Gary reminds us about some security vulnerabilities that come with new technologies.Michael and Gary discuss the latest in ERP technologies and topics such as Predictive Analytics, Unstructured Data and Cloud are broken down into digestible pieces. Gary does a great job of explaining all these and gives relevant examples of each.If your a geek - this is your episode where we talk about the latest and greatest.Gary is available at https://www.aiinc.cloud#GaryMelling #aiinc.cloud #technology #Metaverse #3davatar #informationsecurity

Business of Machining
#251 - 3 Things That Changed Our Business This Year

Business of Machining

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 44:16


TOPCIS: Winding down 2021. 3 Things that Grimsmo and Saunders that changed their businesses this year. Deep dive into ERP systems. Grimsmo ran their Kern for 136.5 hours last week! What makes us successful?

The Future of Work With Jacob Morgan
The CEO of Unit4 On Leading With Purpose, Hybrid Work, & The Human Side of Technology

The Future of Work With Jacob Morgan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 61:54


Mike Ettling, the CEO of Unit4, a software company with around 2700 employees in 26 countries that designs and delivers enterprise software and ERP applications including finance management, accounting, talent management, and student management modules. Today we are focusing on how leaders can create a sense of purpose and meaning for their employees. __________________ This episode is brought to you by my friends at Unit4 a cloud based enterprise software company which is built around a single premise. Give your people the means to focus on what matters, and the people they serve will benefit. If you want to free your people so that they can focus on the things that matter check out Unit4.com or better yet take a list to the speech their CEO Mike Ettling gave by visiting www.unit4.com/experience4u --------------------- Get the latest insights on the Future of Work, Leadership and employee experience through my daily newsletter at futureofworknewsletter.com  Let's connect on social! Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/jacobmorgan8 Instagram: https://instagram.com/jacobmorgan8 Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/jacobm Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FuturistJacob

Connected & Ready
Be our guest: how tech helps small hotels act big, with Gautam Swaroop

Connected & Ready

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 28:50


Gemma Milne talks with Gautam Swaroop, CEO of OYO International, about the impact of COVID-19 on the travel and hospitality industries, the role of technology in helping property owners respond to changes in what customers want and expect from a hotel, and new opportunities arising from innovations such as smart technology and automation.Topics of discussionThe impact of COVID-19 on the travel industry in the context of OYO International's business model (2:10)How technology has had to adapt to changing customer behaviors and preferences (8:38)The technologies and systems OYO International relies on to understand its business and its customers (10:56)The role of automation in scaling new services (13:00)Where small-to-medium size properties fit into the big picture (21:45)OYO International's vision for the future (25:58) About Gautam Swaroop:Gautam Swaroop is the Chief Executive Officer of OYO International at OYO Hotels & Homes where he oversees international operations across the United States, China, and the EU. Gautam has been with OYO since May 2020. Before joining OYO International, he worked for Dr. Reddy's Laboratories, an Indian pharmaceutical company, where he led the company's business development and strategic planning in Australia and China. Prior to joining Dr. Reddy's, Gautam had more than 10 years of experience working as Associate Principal at McKinsey & Co.Learn more:https://www.oyorooms.com/us/ Sponsor linkDynamics 365 delivers next generation ERP and CRM business applications, helping employees at every level reason over data, predict trends, and make proactive, more-informed decisions. Request a live demo of Dynamics 365 today:https://aka.ms/AA8vns5 Contact usEmail: connectedandready@microsoft.com Follow us on social mediaTwitter: https://twitter.com/msftdynamics365LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/microsoft-dynamicsYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJGCg4rB3QSs8y_1FquelBQ

Digital Enterprise Society Podcast
The Digital Enterprise Society Christmas Wish List

Digital Enterprise Society Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 34:05


 If Santa was interested in making gifts for the world of PLM, he would be very busy trying to figure out what to deliver to our listeners. But we've got Santa covered on today's episode of the Digital Enterprise Society podcast. Thom Singer and Craig Brown are joined once again by Mark Pendergast, and this time everyone has agreed to be nice rather than naughty as they dream about the future.  From PLM changes that need to happen to the killer app that all of our listeners are secretly hoping for, this episode of the Digital Enterprise Society podcast has something for everything as we bring 2021 to a close and look ahead to a bright future in 2022.    On today's podcast, you will learn: A wish for new PLM features It's time to embrace the data- we need PLM features that allow for easy ingestion of data.  Seamless measurements in the PLM context would make this data processing much easier.  This request is not impossible- it can be done easily and inexpensively.  There is a need to unclog the parts (or the products) and simplify access to the critical information.    A wish for better support There needs to be better support for reidentification.  Fit and form are generally addressed while function gets left behind.  Functions and their behaviors need to be acknowledged. Implementation needs to be a higher priority.  Some of this work has been ignored for half a century, and it's time for a change.    A wish for new scope areas The object model needs to redirect to focus on people, products, and  A workbench-oriented PLM that brings information together would allow people to do their job more efficiently.  These workbenches could optimize the ability to do an engineering task. Supply chain resiliency could be resolved with better discussions about optimized PLM.    A wish for a more ERP-like model ERP is at least 20 years ahead of PLM.  Standard business templates can help with customized processes.  Niche providers have optimized templates that have aided in their success.    A wish for evolved relationships Solution provider and vendor relationships need to evolve to a higher level.  Money tends to complicate the relationships that are formed over decades.  Everyone needs to work to do the things that make partnerships stronger.  A multi-discipline sharing of results would help to evolve relationships.  An over-focus on sales and zero focus on revenue is hurting everyone.    A wish for the latest PLM apps PLM needs to move into the business process arena to fulfill its purpose. We need the ability to utilize an integration platform.  The digital twin needs to be more readily available and in 4D. The killer app would bring high-speed internet, the cloud, and meaningful use cases together in a seamless way. Continue the conversation with us within the Digital Enterprise Society Community at www.DigitalEnterpriseSociety.org.   Digital Download: Virtual Round-Table Series

Marketing Trends
Customer-Focused Growth Led by Damien Wilson, the CEO of Røde Microphones

Marketing Trends

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 38:07


Content is a word that gets thrown around a lot, and the truth is, today it is easier than ever before to create content. A big reason for that is thanks to companies such as Røde Microphones, which create budget-minded products that constantly push the industry forward. For Røde, innovation is the name of the game and no one knows that better than Damien Wilson, the CEO of Røde Microphones. Damien has been with the company since its early days, growing into his leadership role and scaling the business in a rapid timeframe. But even for him, despite the success, the last decade has been a wild ride.“I'm a kid from the Western suburbs, which is not necessarily a nice area and I never thought I'd be sitting in New York doing business, or sitting on a couch with Guns and Roses. When I walk into Guitar Center on Sunset Boulevard and I see a Røde product, I get excited because I listened to that music of the eighties where Sunset Boulevard was the place to be.”The transformation of the audio industry has been accelerated because of the way companies such as Rode have democratized audio equipment. It no longer takes a fortune and an entire studio build-out, to get professional-sounding content. On Marketing Trends, Damien took me through how Rode has muscled it to the top to compete with legacy brands within the space. He also touches on the unique hiring challenges that Røde has been facing in Australia during the past 18 months, and how the company has been able to pivot through innovating in their use of manufacturing equipment. He also discusses how Røde handles customer feedback to ideate its product line, and how influencers can push your products further. I'm excited for you to enjoy and hopefully learn from this conversation with Damien up next on Marketing Trends. Main TakeawaysThe Secret Sauce: Innovating with Product Manufacturing Equipment: More than ever, supply chain management and sourcing are critical to the success of any business that sells products. Finding the best, most cost-effective tools to build your products might not be created for your industry. You may have to think creatively about what other industries use similar manufacturing equipment that can be modified to build your goods.It Takes Educational Background to Create Great Content: Having an education-focused mindset is a foundational part of good content creation. When you create materials that educate the consumer on products, even if they are not your own, you're building trust with the consumer. This kind of content helps build a community which helps to further push consumers down the funnel.Where to Look for New Product Inspiration: Assess all the other products, aside from your own, that your customer also uses to see where to expand product offerings. Other tools and tech they use to create their finished product could also be an area for you to cross over into. Key Quotes“One of the things that I brought immediately to the company was that style of video-based education, style marketing. Because one of the things that I thought was the big problem with audio brands, especially anything music-related, you needed to sort of teach people how to use the product and that gave them the ability to purchase.”“We have a machine that is specked for making parts for watches. Every high-end Swiss watch manufacturer will have one of these machines. It's the same machine made by Citizen, but we use it to make backplates for the microphones because the precision and the tolerance is so insane. They're making a hundred thousand dollar Rolex's, but this is for a $200 microphone. Other mic manufacturers are not thinking in that regard; they're not thinking about how we can take that machine out of that industry, put it into our version and then create a product around it. That's really the secret sauce.” “One of the things that we did a few years ago was look at our ERP system and look at how we were running the business end-to-end, and sit there and go, ‘Okay, what are the improvements? What process improvements do we need to put in place right now?' And before we didn't have a mature supply chain team in house, but we grew that super quick. And it was just at the right time, because then COVID hit [and] we started to see some interruption in supply chains. We had the ability to be able to pivot into making things that were completely available to us onshore in Australia. That meant you needed to have the right amount of raw material and all those bits and pieces, which was a testament to the supply chain team getting an AI pay system up and running quickly.”“What we're looking at now is adjacencies that we can move into. We look at our customer and say, ‘What is our customer's workflow? What are they doing?' They're podcasters; they're content creators. ‘What sort of equipment are they using?' Oh, they're wearing headphones, and those headphones don't say Røde. So maybe we need to work into that adjacency.” “Where Røde has risen to the top in terms of customer sentiment has been the fact that we deliver a product and we keep on enhancing it. And it becomes a schedule of, every three months, let's add something else to this particular product. So the customer goes, ‘Wow, you've done it again.' And it also shows that we're listening to feedback.”“I'm a kid from the Western suburbs, which is not necessarily a nice area and I never thought I'd be sitting in New York doing business, or sitting on a couch with Guns and Roses. When I walk into Guitar Center on Sunset Boulevard and I see a Røde product, I get excited because I listened to that music of the eighties where Sunset Boulevard was the place to be.”“When you get big it's like the mistakes are just amplified, right? In the past, if we made a mistake in a launch and maybe there was a component wrong, or the testing was incorrect, you may be thinking about 5,000 units. Now you're talking about, you know, 500,000. We can't afford that. So we need to have everything upstream and downstream sorted. So we know that we're not going to replicate any of those issues.”BioDamien Wilson is the CEO of The Freedman Group, home to RØDE Microphones, Aphex, Event Electronics, and SoundField. He is a multi-talented senior executive with over 25 years' experience in advertising, sales, marketing, and business development.  Prior to the Freedman Group, Wilson was Creative Director of boutique advertising agencies The Shop and Peer Group. He joined the Freedman Electronics/RØDE team in 2007 as Marketing Manager and within a year was made Global Sales and Marketing Director. He acted as General Manager of RØDE Microphones, LLC in the USA until 2013 before returning home to Australia as the new CEO of the Freedman Group in 2016.---Marketing Trends podcast is brought to you by Salesforce. Discover marketing built on the world's number one CRM: Salesforce. Put your customer at the center of every interaction. Automate engagement with each customer. And build your marketing strategy around the entire customer journey. Salesforce. We bring marketing and engagement together. Learn more at salesforce.com/marketing.

The Breakout Growth Podcast
Hacking Growth Coauthors Morgan Brown and Sean Ellis Discuss Latest Growth Insights

The Breakout Growth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 60:55


In this week’s episode of the Breakout Growth Podcast, brought to you by Rise with SAP, Sean Ellis and Ethan Garr are joined by Sean’s co-author of “Hacking Growth” Morgan Brown. The book was published back in 2017, so in this episode, we get to hear the two guys who literally wrote the book on growth “geek out” about their most important growth learnings since their initial collaboration. Morgan’s perspective on growth has been shaped by the leadership roles he has held at Inman News and Facebook, and in his current Vice-President of Growth position at Shopify. These companies are an order of magnitude larger than anything he and Sean had worked on prior to writing the book, so as we dive in we look to understand how the sheer scale of these businesses has impacted Morgan’s perspective. Would he write a different book or change anything today with the benefit of hindsight? Morgan found incredible value in the understand, identify, execute, approach, that has molded Facebook into the most sophisticated growth organization in the world. At Shopify, he is now working to grow a team that leverages structured thinking to run trustworthy experiments that use the playbook of “Hacking Growth” at scale. Sean’s own experiences working with fast-growing companies since writing the book guide his thinking on these topics, and that makes for some fascinating discussion! There is plenty to learn in this episode, but before you jump in learn more about RISE with SAP S/4Hana Cloud here. If you have ambitious goals, SAP is the technology partner you need to scale and drive innovation. Instead of relying on stitched together solutions to manage business finances, operations, and customer relations, leverage the flexibility of SAP’s cloud-based ERP solution to gain the insights that will help drive your breakout growth success. Thanks for tuning in and please rate and review the Breakout Growth Podcast wherever you listen. We discussed: * Scale matters: the humbling experiences of working at Facebook, the world’s most advanced growth organization (05:36) * The sheer number of funnels: why scale offers so much opportunity to experiment (06:47) * Building “trustworthy” experiments: developing the muscle to gain valuable learnings across an organization (11:51) * Big bets versus smaller optimization: Morgan’s belief in Hacking Growth’s iterative process to drive value (20:18) * Find the root cause: Learnings from Facebook’s understand, identify, execute approach (25:47) * Two books in one: The playbook and tactics of Hacking Growth and what still applies today (29:34)

The OCD Stories
Eva Surawy Stepney - Guilty obsessions, and the history of OCD (#307)

The OCD Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 57:08


In episode 307 I chat with Eva Surawy Stepney. Eva is a research student studying for her PhD at the University of Sheffield. Her thesis title is, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and the foundations of ‘evidence-based' practice in British Psychology, 1948-1990. In this episode we discuss who she is and her PhD research, her article 'guilty obsessions', the history of OCD, the history of psychoanalysis and the development of other psychotherapies such as ERP, the importance of Sigmund Freud to the early development of the conceptualisation of OCD, what separates OCD from phobias, how other emotions like guilt, doubt and disgust can be drivers of OCD, how Freud originally said this but how mainstream psychiatry focused only on fear until in more recent years where the research is showing that other emotions play a role too, we discuss the idea of trauma and potential links to OCD, the history of ERP, and the conference 'OCD in Society'. Hope it helps.  Show notes: https://theocdstories.com/episode/eva-guilty-obsessions-307 The podcast is made possible by NOCD. NOCD offers affordable, effective, convenient therapy available in the US and outside the US. To find out more about NOCD, their therapy plans and if they currently take your insurance head over to https://go.treatmyocd.com/theocdstories

Your Anxiety Toolkit
Ep. 214 Managing Holiday Anxiety (Q&A)

Your Anxiety Toolkit

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 30:58


SUMMARY: I had so many people asking questions about how to manage holiday anxiety and stress that I decided to do an entire podcast on this.  This is part 1 of a 2-part podcast Q&A. In This Episode: Q&A from this episode include How do I enjoy the holidays? How do I let go of the last Christmas? How do I survive the Holiday blues? How do I survive the holidays? How do I manage social anxiety over the holidays? How do I manage holiday travel anxiety? How to manage the financial stress of the holidays? Mental Health Holiday gift guide? How do I let go of my holiday expectations? Links To Things I Talk About: ERP School: https://www.cbtschool.com/erp-school-lp Episode Sponsor: This episode of Your Anxiety Toolkit is brought to you by CBTschool.com.  CBTschool.com is a psychoeducation platform that provides courses and other online resources for people with anxiety, OCD, and Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors.  Go to cbtschool.com to learn more. Spread the love! Everyone needs tools for anxiety... If you like Your Anxiety Toolkit Podcast, visit YOUR ANXIETY TOOLKIT PODCAST to subscribe free and you'll never miss an episode. And if you really like Your Anxiety Toolkit, I'd appreciate you telling a friend (maybe even two). EPISODE TRANSCRIPTION This is Your Anxiety Toolkit - Episode 214. Welcome back, everybody. We are approaching the holiday season. In fact, some of you may already be in the holiday season. And if that is so, I wish you nothing but joy and peace and fulfillment. I really do. I hope you have moments of elated joy. Now, while that is my wish and my intention for you, I also know that the holidays can be pretty dang hard. It is anxiety-provoking for the best of people, let alone if you're already struggling with a mental illness or an anxiety disorder, or you're struggling with anything really. It can be so incredibly difficult. So, what I wanted to do is answer some of your questions. So, what I did is I went on to Instagram and I asked my community: What are your questions? What do you need help with over the holidays? And they've given me a bunch of things to talk about, and I'm going to go through each and every one of them. Now, this is actually a two-part podcast. This week I'm answering general questions about managing anxiety throughout the holiday season, or just general stresses. And next week, we're talking about setting boundaries during the holidays with family and loved ones. Setting boundaries. However, the truth is we don't even need to make this specific to the holidays. This is for everybody at any time. So, if you're listening to this and it's not the holidays, it'd be probably helpful to listen to it at any point in time. Before we do that, I wanted to share with you the “I did a hard thing.” The “I did a hard thing” segment is where people write in and they share what hard things that they have been doing. This is a really important part of the podcast. If you're new, or if you're being with us for a while, I really want to stress the purpose of this podcast is to inspire you, is to help you feel like you're on the right track, that you're not alarmed, that people are doing the hard thing and I want you to know how they're doing the hard thing. So, I'm going to share, this one is from Marilee and she says: “I'm facing the fear right now. We moved two weeks ago. Today when I was getting dressed and picked up my socks that were laying on the floor in the living room, a silverfish crawled out from where it was laying. I hate them. It's probably a phobia. I compulsively checked and cleaned in the previous place to get rid of them. I feel them all over my body.” As you're listening folks, you're probably feeling a little itchy and scratchy, I'm sure. “I imagine them everywhere and anywhere. My hard thing is to feel these feelings. I'm going to give myself permission to feel anxious and freak out about it, to do the reasonable thing and buy lavender scented sachets and place around the house, to not compulsively clean and check to find them. I'm doing it right now. It is hard, but I'm not going to let this fear dictate how I live in my home.” Marilee, you're literally walking the walk. This is so good. I love what you said. “I'm going to allow myself to feel the feelings. I'm going to give myself permission to feel anxious.” You're doing the hard work, and that is the hard work. Even when I'm meeting with face-to-face clients, they often will say like, “But what do I do?” And this is exactly what you do. Somebody who's doing it in real-time. So, yay. Congratulations, Marilee. You are doing the hard thing. Let's get over to the questions. We've got a ton of them. So, let's go through one by one. I'm going to do my best to address each and every one, but I'm guessing each of these could probably have an episode of their own. So, I'll do my best to manage time here. 1. How do I enjoy the moment? Some of my thoughts may get somewhat repetitive, but that's on purpose. So, here is what I'm going to encourage you to do: Going into the holidays, we want to enjoy it. Even the Christmas paper and the stockings, depending on what holiday you celebrate, and we want to be inclusive and uncover all of them, all of them are centered around community and joy and celebration. I want to give you permission to not have that expectation, to not try to make this holiday Instagramable. I know that's not a word, but you know what I mean. So, when you drop the expectation that you're going to enjoy it, then you can start to be curious about what's actually happening and be present about what's actually happening. And I want you to notice little things. This isn't a real example. Every year, I make the same mistake and I'm promising myself I'm not going to do this this time – I know that putting up all the Christmas stuff is so fun. We turn the music on, the kids get all of the decorations out. In my mind, it's such a special moment, but I'm rushing the whole time. I remember last year at the end of the holiday, I actually caught myself rushing and reminded myself, just get in touch with your senses. Of all the decorations, which one do you enjoy the most? Simple. Which texture do you enjoy the most? Which color? Which shape? Do any of them bring back memories? And just get really basic and simple. Don't worry about the overwhelming joy and the satisfaction of it ending perfectly, but just get in touch with the small things. For me, it's like, I hate wrapping presents, but I love giving presents, and I'm going to try to slow down and just really focus on the giving. And if I happen to receive a present, I'm going to really focus on the receiving. The receiving of the present. Just get in touch with the simpler things and put aside this massive goal to make this overly joyous. So, that's that. 2. How do I let go of last Christmas? Last Christmas I had COVID, and that's when my anxiety started. So, I'm going to generalize that often when we go into the holidays, we may actually have memories of events that weren't so great in the past. Maybe you had a huge family fight last year, or in this case, you had COVID last year, or you were lonely and alone last year. A lot of us are probably grieving with what's going on, and I'm going to give you permission to just grieve. Your question said, how do I let go of it? And I'm going to basically say, I think it's important to check in on what letting go will look like. Letting go isn't going to mean you have any less grief. We're not going to get rid of the uncomfortable feelings. But what you might do is you might make space for that grief, and then you might put your attention on how you want this moment to be. Only this moment. Don't even worry about the future and the holiday, but just focus on right now. Where am I? How am I? Am I okay? What's going on? Again, go back to the sense and the smells and the shapes. And allow grief, validate your grief, pushing it away. It's only gonna make it worse. So, validate it. Yeah, last year was hard. Last year was really difficult. I'm going to be super gentle with myself about that. Now, if you find you're ruminating about it, you might want to catch yourself on that and bring yourself again, back to the present moment. That's all we can do. 3. Surviving. Well, it's funny because I actually like the word “surviving.” What that means is getting through one minute at a time. Just that's sort of, you're going back to the bare bones. This is going to be hard. We know it's going to be hard. It's a beautiful day to do hard things. You know I was going to say that. And I don't mind the idea of surviving. But here is where you can make some choices. And this is important for the whole holiday, is we actually do have some choices on how we perceive the holidays. So, if we're saying, “Okay, let's just get through it minute by minute. But as I do it, I'm going to walk in with a real positive bias.” So, the thing to remember here is this positive bias and negative bias. Negative bias is, I'm going to look at the negative. Positive bias is, I'm going to look at the positive. You could also have a neutral bias. And so, what I want you to do is, as you go minute to minute, it's important that you acknowledge that you have a choice on whether you say, “This sucks. This sucks. I hate it. It's not good. I wish it was better. Why isn't it better? This sucks. I wish it was better. It sucks. I don't wish it was this way.” That's really negative bias, and that is a choice. Unfortunately, I'm giggling. That is a choice we make. Now, another choice would be to go, “This is wonderful. It's excellent. I love it.” But that might not even land either. That's not super effective either. But what you can do is take the judgment out of it and just be aware of what is happening. Again, be aware and drop the expectations. Be gentle, and find joy in the little things. Last year, we didn't get to see my husband's family. We didn't get to see my family. It was just us at home, and I thought it was going to be really terrible. But what I loved was making a big deal out of the simplest things. Like, hot chocolate, get your favorite mug, get the chocolate that you like, put the toppings on it that you like, and really savor it and watch the heat come off of it, and find joy in teeny tiny little pots of the holidays. Again, it doesn't have to be Instagramable. It doesn't have to be Pinterestable. And yeah, go minute to minute. 4. Winter blues. Now, this is a big one because some people do have a clinical diagnosis of seasonal depression. Now, if that's the case, I encourage you to go and see your doctor. There are tests they can do. There are supplements you can take. There are UV lights that you can use that have some science-backed behind it that can help with the winter blues medication you can take. So, I don't want to gloss over that as like, “Oh, you just feel sad.” No, that's actually a clinical diagnosis and you deserve to get treatment for it. And so, definitely go and see your doctor and talk to your doctor about that. 5. Social anxiety. “I panic due to social anxiety. So, how will I manage that?” Social anxiety is, again, its own diagnosis, and it's usually the fear of being judged. I will talk about this a little in next week's episode, but here is the thing to remember: The truth is, people are going to judge you. They are. But that is not a reflection of you. It is a reflection of them, and it's out of your control. If I wear fabulous purple boots to Christmas, which I am not going to, but I wish I was now that I think about it. If I wore purple boots to Christmas and a family member judged me, that's not evidence that my purple boots are ugly. It's evidence that they don't like purple, and they don't particularly like these purple boots. And that is a reflection of their views. It doesn't make them right, it doesn't make them valid and it doesn't make you wrong. The best thing we can do for ourselves is give ourselves permission to allow people to judge us. And then our job is just to feel our feelings about that and be super gentle. Ouch, it hurts when people judge us. Yeah. But that's very human. It's a part of the human condition to not be the same as everybody else. Thank goodness. We'd all be wearing purple boots to Christmas. That wouldn't be so fun after all. Now, when it comes to panic, we have tons of episodes on panic. I encourage you to go and listen to them and really double down on your practices there because the more you resist panic, the more panic will come. Your job is to allow it, to be kind, to send to yourself, to breathe through it. Don't catastrophize and wait for it to pass on its own, which it will. 6. “I do not want these holidays.” It wasn't really a question. It was a statement. It says: “Everyone is happy and serene, except me.” This is my favorite one, to be honest, this is the one that actually I think we get caught up in. Number one, there's a lot of black and white thinking here. “Everyone is happy.” Well, that's not true because I have a whole bunch of questions here from people who are telling me that they are not happy. “Everyone is serene.” Well, that's not true. Most people find their mental health goes down over the holidays. That's just the facts. So you're not alone. Sometimes I find it really helpful to share with your friends that I find the holidays really, really hard, and they're going to say, “Me too. This is what I find hard. What do you find hard?” And it might be different. They might find it difficult to get the shopping. You might find it difficult to manage the finances of gift-giving. They might find it difficult because they have food restrictions or an eating disorder. You might find it hard because you have anxiety and you might have anxiety about meeting people or OCD about contamination or whatever it may be, harm obsessions. It could be anything. And so, everybody's diagnosis and everybody's brain come with us through the holidays, which means not everybody is happy and serene. So, I want to just give you permission to not isolate yourself in your thinking and acknowledge that, no, not everybody is happy. And even if on Instagram, they have big, old happy faces. They may have just had a massive fight with their father-in-law or their sibling or somebody. You just don't know. 7. “I have travel anxiety. How can I manage that?” Well, again, travel anxiety is no different to social anxiety or any other anxiety. I think it's about your willingness to be uncomfortable, your ability to be compassionate and coach yourself through it. I would encourage everyone to start to do exposures to their fears ahead of time. That's really important. We use exposure and response prevention a lot with specific fears like travel and any other fear. I have a whole course called ERP School that teaches people how to expose themselves to their fear. And so, that's super important. That's super, super important. So, yeah, that's what I would encourage you to do. And give yourself tons of grace because not only are you traveling, but you're traveling during a difficult time. The holidays are hard to travel in, not including it's still COVID, not including we've had a lot of time where we haven't seen a lot of people. So, seeing for the first time is really, really hard. Really, really hard. You haven't had practice. You haven't been naturally exposing yourself to it, so the anxiety is going to be higher. 8. How to get through the holidays without my therapist? Here is what I'm going to encourage you all to do. I have a patient who always jokes with her family, and her family always jokes with her. When she's struggling, they sit down and they say, “WWKD.” WWKD is “What would Kimberley do?” or “What would Kimberley say” is sometimes the acronym, WWKS. And so, what I'm going to encourage you to do if you have a therapist and you're unable to see that therapist is to ask yourself, what would my therapist say about this situation? What advice would they give me? What would they tell me to do? If you don't have a therapist, you might say, “What would Kimberley have me do?” Even though I'm not your therapist, which I want to be really clear that this is a podcast, it is not therapy, but you know what I'm going to encourage people to do. I'm using mostly science-based treatment goals and tools. So, you could say, “What would the science have me do?” or “What would the general treatment look like in this setting?” And try to do that and get through it as best as you can. Again, go back to just getting through moment to moment. 9. “How to manage the financial aspect of the holidays? I don't want to let people down.” Well, here is the thing: Whether you have $10 to spend on a family member or $100 or $1,000, it's important to remember not to spend more than you have. The thing is, the people who love you don't want you to go broke because of the holidays. Most people don't want you to suffer and they definitely don't want you to be under distress financially or emotionally. And I think it's important that you acknowledge that. And it's okay to let people down. If you let people down, that's their business. It's not your business to try and control how people feel about you and what you give. The gift of giving is exactly that – it's about giving what you can, what's meaningful. If all you can afford is to write a letter to them, and if they're let down by that, again, go back to the social anxiety conversation. That is a reflection of them, it's not a reflection of you. And if you want, you can explain to them, “Money has been hard, difficult and it's tight time, and I really just want you to know that I put everything I have into this,” if that helps you. But again, we are not responsible for other people's feelings. We're not responsible for their actions. That's their responsibility. All you can do is honor yourself and be true to what's right for you. We'll talk a lot about that in the next episode. 10. “I'm always so anxious that I'm not showing enough gratitude when I get a gift. I don't want to seem like a brat.” Again, be yourself. If other people perceive you as a brat, that is a reflection of them. It's not a reflection of you. People's judgment of us is a reflection of them. It is not a reflection of us. If they think you're a brat, that's because they had expectations that you were going to act a certain way. That's their stuff. You've got to stay in your lane. Now, I think the thing to remember here is you're probably putting so much attention and energy and pressure on yourself that it's probably feeling really inauthentic. I want you to receive the gift. I want you to thank them for the gift and then allow yourself to have anxiety about whether or not it was too much or not. Again, that's their stuff. Try to be as true to you as you can. Ask yourself, what would I do if fear wasn't here and try to do that? Now, if receiving gifts is so anxiety-provoking and you totally freeze, you may want to practice saying whatever feels right to you. For me, I might say, “Wow, that is so thoughtful. Thank you so much.” That's really all you need to say. You don't need to jump up and down and get all freaked out. Just be yourself. You may even be totally calm, and then write them a beautiful Thank You card a week later and share with them what you like about it. I try to teach my children when they write Thank You cards to just say, “Thank you so much for the t-shirt. I loved the color.” “Thank you so much for my drink bottle. It will fit perfectly in my lunch box.” “Thank you so much for this toy. I have loved playing with it.” This is just basic stuff. That's all you need. It doesn't have to be a full-on production. We're getting closer here. We're getting close. 11. “The holidays make me feel alone and lonely.” I am sure you know, I recently wrote a book called The Self-Compassion Workbook for OCD. The reason I bring that up is I'm going to emphasize, so much of the time when we're suffering, all we need is compassion. So, you don't need to read the workbook for this, but I'm emphasizing the reason I wrote that book is because when we are suffering, we need self-compassion. It has to be a part of the work. So, as loneliness and aloneness show up for you, really be tender to yourself. validate yourself. Acknowledge this is true for me. I feel lonely. Don't tell yourself a story about it, though. Don't go off into the narrative of, “This means I'm a loser and no one's ever going to love me.” Don't do that because that's not a fact. There's no evidence of that. So, I don't want you to focus on that, but do give yourself permission to feel what you feel. How are we going? Are we doing good? We're almost there. A couple more to go. 12. Another year of suffering, expectations not met. So, back in the past, we did a podcast on this. It's called “It's time for a parade.” It's really early. It's like number 14 or 15 or something like that. Go back and check on that, because so often we need to really lean into the present, really lean into dropping out expectations. And again, we want to be compassionate. Yes, it is another year of suffering. I cannot agree with you more. I have multiple times broken down over the last week into tears because yet again, I'm missing my family. Literally, every single member of my family I won't get to see. And I know a lot of you have been doing this and are going through even much harder things. This has been a really rough couple of years. So, please validate yourself, acknowledge your suffering, allow yourself to grieve. Really go back to some of the tools we've talked about. Being present, getting really clear on the few rituals you want to do, the hot chocolate, the songs. Maybe it's taking a walk, maybe it's journaling, whatever it may be. I just want to take a breath and just really honor you all right now because the holidays are so hard. They're so, so hard. 13. How to show up for myself during the craziness of the holidays? Here I'm going to give it to you. I ask you a question and I want you to answer it honestly to yourself. All of the things that you've planned, how many do you actually want to do? And of the things you don't want to do, how many of the things you actually have to do? And then whatever's left over, don't do them. So often we add all this extra crap and we actually don't need to do it. You're allowed to keep it simple. You're allowed to just make it really easy. You might say to your friends, “You know what, guys, I'm not doing presents this year. I'm only doing gift cards. Buy them online, be done.” Or you might say, “I'm not cooking/baking this year. I'm going to order them from the bakery.” Done. Make it easy. You deserve and it's okay to drop the craziness. We don't need the craziness. Say no to people. We'll talk about this in next week's episode. Say no to people. Don't do what you don't want to do if you don't want to do it and it's not highly valuable to you. Here's the thing, and I'll share a story. This Thanksgiving, while I'm recording just before Thanksgiving right now, there is a couple of things I don't want to do around Thanksgiving. Now, even though I don't want to do them, I'm choosing to do them because I think they're really important for my children, particularly given the fact that they haven't had a lot of social interaction over the last year and a half. So, I'm choosing to do it. Now, what I'm going to say to myself as I do it is I'm not going to go, “Oh, I don't want to do this. Oh, I don't want to do this.” I'm going to say, “I'm choosing to do this because...” and I'm going to answer, “because my children deserve this holiday.” And when you say, “I choose to do this, because...” it brings you into a place where you're owning what you want to do and why you're doing it, even if you don't want to do it. But if it makes you crazy, don't do it. There's no need. 14. Gift guide for people with mental illness. If you go to cbtschool.com, we have a mental health gift guide. Go over and check it out. https://www.cbtschool.com/mental-health-gift-guide 15. Changes in the schedule. Now, this is where we use the tool of flexibility, and you have to be flexible during the holidays. Flexibility is dropping your expectations, dropping all of the goals and going with the flow. When things change, stop and ask yourself, what about this change is creating anxiety for me? Can I lean into it? Can I allow it? And go with it. Practice. Use it as an opportunity to practice the skill of flexibility. I'm not sure if I've done a podcast on flexibility. So, come to think of it, I will do one in the New Year. All right. You guys are so cool. I hope you have a wonderful holiday period. Before we finish the show, I want to do the review of the week. If you want to leave a review on iTunes, I would be so grateful. It would be the best Christmas gift you can give me. It'll cost you nothing. And my wish is that if you do it, not for me, I don't need the ego stroke, but the more reviews we get, the more people will click on it and the more people I can help with this free resource. So, here it is. The review of the week is from WalkerMom77, and they said: “Kimberley is a warm hug. While the content of this podcast is excellent and has inspired me to do further research, read books, etc., it's Kimberley's compassion that keeps me coming back. She is so authentic and genuine and her voice just relaxes me.” Thank you so much, WalkerMom 77. I love, love knowing that I inspire you and keep you moving forward and bring you some compassion. Well, that's it for now. I'm going to see you next week and we can talk about boundaries with family members. I hope you have a wonderful day. Sending you so much love. Please be kind to yourself. It is a beautiful day to do hard things.

Connected & Ready
How AI improves medicine from diagnosis to cure, with Chad Robins

Connected & Ready

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 24:13


Gemma Milne talks with Chad Robins, co-founder and CEO of Adaptive Biotechnologies, about his company's work in the emerging field of immune medicine, how they use technology to drive innovation, and the potential for their work to create further advancements in the area of personalized medicine.Topics of discussionAn overview of immune medicine (4:10)An overview of Adaptive Biotechnologies' T Detect antigen map (5:11)The role of data and technologies such as machine learning in immune medicine (7:41)Developing the T Detect COVID test (10:11)How technology has shaped thinking around diagnostics and therapeutics (13:08)Key diagnostic challenges (17:13)Key treatment challenges (19:53)The role of AI in furthering personalized medicine innovations (22:23) About Chad Robins:Since its founding in 2009, Chad has led Adaptive Biotechnologies in building a proprietary immune medicine platform that fuels businesses across life sciences research, clinical diagnostics, and drug discovery. Chad is routinely recognized for excellence and innovation. In 2019 and 2020, he was included in the Puget Sound Business Journal's Power 100 and has been named a Goldman Sachs Most Intriguing Entrepreneur each year since 2015. He also named 2016 Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year® – The Pacific Northwest Region Award.Learn more:https://www.adaptivebiotech.com Sponsor linkDynamics 365 delivers next generation ERP and CRM business applications, helping employees at every level reason over data, predict trends, and make proactive, more-informed decisions. Request a live demo of Dynamics 365 today:https://aka.ms/AA8vns5 Contact usEmail: connectedandready@microsoft.com Follow us on social mediaTwitter: https://twitter.com/msftdynamics365LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/microsoft-dynamicsYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJGCg4rB3QSs8y_1FquelBQ

Interior Integration for Catholics
Scrupulosity: When OCD Gets Religion

Interior Integration for Catholics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 97:58


Summary: In this episode, we explore the conventional secular and the traditional spiritual ways of understanding scrupulosity, bringing in the experts to define scrupulosity, tells us the signs of being scrupulous, speculate on the causes of the trouble, discuss that standard remedies in the secular and spiritual realms.  Then I share with you my views on it, looking at scrupulosity through an Internal Family Systems lens, grounded in a Catholic worldview.   We discuss how parts have different God images and the role of shame and anger in the experience of scrupulosity.    Description of Scrupulosity Suddenly my stomach tightens up, there's a choking in my throat, and my torture begins. The bad thoughts come. . . . I want to drive them out, but they keep coming back. . . . It is terrible to be in a struggle like this! To have a head that goes around and around without my being able to stop it; to be a madman and still quite rational, for all that. . . . I am double. . . . at the very time that I am trying to plan what I want to do, another unwanted thought is in my mind. . . . Distracting me and always hindering me from doing what I want to do.  --  Quoted in Albert Barbaste, “Scrupulosity and the Present Data of Psychiatry,” TheologyDigest, 1.3 (Autumn 1953) 182. Fr. William Doyle: Around 1900  “My confessions were bad. My confessor does not understand me, he is mistaken in me, not believing that I could be so wicked. I have never had contrition. I am constantly committing sins against faith, against purity. I blaspheme interiorly. I rashly judge, even priests. The oftener I receive Holy Communion, the worse I become,”  Around 1900 My story just turned 19 -- terrible bout of scrupulosity.   Around sexuality Just started dating the first woman I might consider marrying Physical touching -- romantic contact How far was too far? Thoughts of sex with her -- plagued me.   Do I break up with her?  How do I handle this?  What was sinful, what was not?  Was I on the road to hell?  Was I putting her on the road to hell?  I thought I was going crazy.   Review: I encourage you to review the last episode, number 86 -- Obsessions, Compulsions, OCD and IFS That episode went deep into obsessions and compulsions and  serves as a basis for today's episode.   Today's episode, number 87 is entitled Scrupulosity:  When OCD Gets Religion and it's released on December 6, 2021, St. Nick's Day.  I am Dr. Peter Malinoski, clinical psychologist and passionate Catholic and together, we are taking on the tough topics that matter to you.   We bring the best of psychology and human formation and harmonize it with the perennial truths of the Catholic Faith.    Interior Integration for Catholics is part of our broader outreach, Souls and Hearts bringing the best of psychology grounded in a Catholic worldview to you and the rest of the world through our website soulsandhearts.com Overview Start out with definitions of scrupulosity both from spiritual and secular sources, really want to wrap our minds around what scrupulosity is and the different types of scrupulosity. We will discuss the connection between scrupulosity and OCD -- discussion of OCD  We will then move to the signs of scrupulosity -- how can you tell when there is scrupulosity?  Then we will get into the internal experience of scrupulosity.  What is it like to experience intense scruples?  Had a taste in the intro, but we will get much more into that.   We will discuss what religious and secular experts have to say about the causes of scrupulosity  Then what religious and secular experts have to say about the treatment of scrupulosity -- that most recommended therapy approach and the medications typically prescribed.   After we've discussed the conventional secular and spiritual approaches to treating scrupulosity, I will how I think about scrupulosity, the root causes of scrupulosity, and how scrupulosity develops and how it can be treated.  I will give you an alternative view, grounded in a Catholic understanding of the human person and informed by Internal Family Systems thinking.   Definitions:  You know how important definitions are to me.  We really want to make sure we understand what we are talking about.   Scruple comes from the Latin word  scrupulum,  "small, sharp stone" -- like walking with a stone in your shoe. Ancient Roman weight of 1/24 of an ounce or 1.3 grams.     Something tiny, but that can cause a lot of discomfort.   Definitions from Spiritual Sources Fr. William Doyle, SJ.  Scruples and their Treatment  1897: Scrupulosity, in general, is an ill-founded fear of committing sin.  Fr. Hugh O'Donnell:   Scrupulosity may be defined as a habitual state of mind that, because of an unreasonable fear of sin, inclines a person to judge certain thoughts or actions sinful when they aren't or that they are more gravely wrong than they really are… Scrupulosity involves an emotional condition that interferes with the proper working of the mind and produces a judgement not in accordance with object truth, but with the emotion of fear.  Fr. James Jackson, article "On Scrupulosity"  A very good definition Scrupulosity is an emotional condition, an ultra-sensitivity to sin, which produces excessive anxiety and fear from the thought of eternal damnation…This condition is a religious, moral and psychological state of anxiety, fear and indecision. It is coupled with extreme guilt, depression and fear of punishment from God. However, each person who suffers from it does so uniquely. Fr. Marc Foley:  The Context of Holiness: Psychological and Spiritual Reflections on the Life of St. Therese of Lisieux Excellent, very psychologically informed study of the Little Flower  Not only the best psychological profile of St. Therese of Lisieux, but the best psychobiography of any saint from any author I've read.  A very in-depth look at her mother, St. Zelie as well and the limitations and lack of attunement in the Martin family  Highly recommended reading -- all of chapter 12 is on The Little Flower's scrupulosity.   Scrupulosity is an extremely painful anxiety disorder. It consists of annoying fear that one is offended God or could offend God at any moment and that God will cast her into hell. To protect yourself from eternal damnation, the scrupulous person dissects every thought, motive, and action in order to ascertain if she has send. And since she is deathly afraid that she might have sent, the scrupulous person seeks absolute certitude that she hasn't send in order to assuage her fears.   Definitions from Secular Sources Timothy Sisemore, Catherine Barton, Mary Keeley From Richmont Graduate University   Scrupulosity is a "sin phobia."  Jaimie Eckert, Scrupulosity Coach:  Scrupulosity is where faith and OCD collide.   International OCD Foundation Fact Sheet:  What is Scrupulosity?  By C. Alec Pollard:  A form of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) involving religious or moral obsessions. Scrupulous individuals are overly concerned that something they thought or did might be a sin or other violation of religious or moral doctrine.   Bridging the Secular and the Spiritual Joseph W. Ciarrocchi's The Doubting Disease: Help for Scrupulosity and Religious Compulsions -- published in 1995, and still the most cited text in Catholic circles, even more than a quarter century later.   Dr. Ciarrocchi, a former Catholic priest, trained as a clinical psychologist and served as professor and chairman of pastoral counseling at Loyola University in Maryland prior to his death in 2010. Scrupulosity refers to seeing sin where there is none.   He viewed scrupulosity as a sub-set of obsessive- compulsive disorder (OCD), basically a kind of “religious OCD.”  He distinguishes  developmental scrupulosity  self-limited form of scrupulosity  often occurring in adolescents  or shortly after a conversion experience (e.g. St. Ignatius of Loyola)  Temporary, usually disappears.   emotional scrupulosity -- symptoms of OCD More enduring conditions  Can vary in intensity over time, from being overwhelming to just mildly irritating  Can last for years.    Core experience of scrupulosity:  "an intrusive idea, often associated with a sinful impulse, which the person abhors but cannot shake."  "The French label the emotional condition which is sometimes part of scrupulosity "the doubting disease."  Signs of Scrupulosity What do we see.  A lot we don't see.  Fr. Thomas Santa, past director of Scrupulous Anonymous and Author of the book Understanding Scrupulosity When people struggle with the scrupulous disorder, most of the suffering, fear, and anxiety they experience happens in isolation. Scrupulosity is mostly an interior struggle, seldom manifesting itself with easily identifiable or observable mannerisms or behaviors. You can't tell if people are scrupulous by looking at them. While some compulsions of obsessive-compulsive disorder are identifiable, most of the suffering associated with the disorder is personal. Only the sufferer fully knows its debilitating nature.   Sources IOCDF Fact Sheet  Jaimie Eckert Scrupulosity Coach  The Gateway institute website  Doubting Disease 1995 by Joseph Ciarrocchi   Obsessions -- excessive concerns about Fears of Blaspheming, accusing God of being negligent or abusive or evil, cursing God  Fears of Sacrilege, abusing our Lord in the Eucharist for example  Fears about impulses -- taking one's clothes off in Church, screaming obscenities during Mass Example of the man concerned about touching his infant daughter's genitals  Sexual thoughts about a romantic partner  Sexual thoughts or images about a religious figure -- Jesus, Mary, a saint, or possibly a priest or religious.   Fears around harming others  I might cause the death of someone if I sneeze or cough during Mass --  I coughed.  Maybe I'm sick.  Maybe I have COVID.  Maybe I'm a spreader.  A pharmacist worries she will fill prescriptions incorrectly and poison customers at her pharmacy.   Fears around aggression -- Driver goes over a bump in the Church parking lot in the dark after the parish council meeting.  Is concerned he may have run over the pastor.   Cooperating in the sins of others "Man participates in a discussion about a historical figure dead for more than 1000 years, who is alleged to have been a homosexual.  He worries that he has committed the sin of detraction." -- Example from Joseph Ciarrocchi.   Being a sinful person, dishonest, lacking integrity -- honesty  Ruminating about past mistakes, errors, past sins  Purity -- looking for moral perfection  Not Loving Others enough -- Mother worrying she doesn't love her children enough.  Going to hell  Death  A loss of impulse control   Cyclical Doubts Often about salvation, selling your soul to the devil, in mortal sin   Intrusive thoughts and images 666, Satan, Hell, pornographic images, etc.   Compulsions  Behavioral Compulsions Excessive trips to confession  Repeatedly seeking reassurance from religious leaders and loved ones  Repeated cleansing and purifying rituals  Acts of self-sacrifice  Repetitive religious behaviors  Avoiding situations (for example, religious services) in which they believe a religious or moral error would be especially likely or cause something bad to happen  Avoiding certain objects or locations because of fears they may be sinful   Mental Compulsions Excessive praying (sometimes with an emphasis on the prayer needing to be  perfect)  I compulsions about praying.  Tithing prayer.  1.6 hours vs. 2.4 hours.   Needing to pray perfectly or at least adequately enough.   Repeatedly imagining sacred images or phrases Repeating passages from sacred scriptures in one's head Making pacts with God to avoid hell or buy time or just to get a little relief in the present moment.   Intense sense of guilt-- feeling guilty all the time -- about things that don't carry moral weight.    Inflated sense of responsibility Not distinguishing between thoughts and actions.   Example: Joseph Ciarrocchi The Smith family traditionally joins hands around the dinner table to give thanks in prayer before the meal. Susie, age 4, and Billy, age 6 sometimes are fidgety (and always hungry). Mrs. Smith worries that Susie, Billy, and perhaps herself haven't not “truly prayed” due to the multiple distractions: Susie is scratching her mosquito bite, Billy is leering at the chocolate pudding, and Mrs. Smith remembers she has a school board meeting after dinner. She doubts that their prayers were “heard,” and so request of the family repeat their prayers. Sometimes she makes the whole family repeat them, and sometimes only the children. Once the children needed to repeat them four times, even the Mr. Smith tried to intervene after the second time. Mrs. Smith sought advice from her pastor who urged her not to repeat the prayers, either for herself or the children. When she attempts to follow this advice, however, her entire meal is ruined as she attempts to sort out in her head whether this is acceptable to God. She will continue to worry about it throughout the rest of the evening, including her school board meeting.   Distinguishing Scrupulosity of normal religious practice IOCDF Fact Sheet:  Unlike normal religious practice, scrupulous behavior usually exceeds or disregards religious law and may focus excessively on one trivial area of religious practice while other, more important areas may be completely ignored. The behavior of scrupulous individuals is typically inconsistent with that of the rest of the faith community.     Internal Experience of Scrupulosity  Plutarch: a first century priest for the Greek god Apollo at the Temple at Delphi. He wrote about the so-called “superstitious” man, who… And so is the soul of the superstitious man. He turns pale under his crown of flowers, is terrified while he sacrifices, prays with a faltering voice, scatters incense with trembling hands, and all in all proves how mistaken was the saying of Pythagoras that we are at our best when approaching the gods. For that is the time when the superstitious are most miserable and most woebegone....   OCD Center of Los Angeles:  One of the first documented references to Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) was in a 1691 sermon by Anglican Bishop John Moore of Norwich in which he discussed men and women who were overwhelmed with unwanted thoughts, and tormented by feelings of guilt and shame over what he described as “religious melancholy.” Priests had started to notice that some churchgoers were attending confession several times a day, and repeatedly confessing to the same sins and shortcomings that they feared would result in divine judgment and eternal damnation. Their penance and absolution would provide only a fleeting glimpse of peace, and then their fears would come roaring back. William Van Ornum, A Thousand frightening fantasies: understanding and human scrupulosity in obsessive-compulsive disorder 1997 24-year-old computer programmer writes, “what worries me is that at any moment and in only a few seconds I can commit serious sin. The only remedy is confession. I worry about what I've done until I confess it; then it's all over. The problem is that I fall or worry again and need to go back.” Fr. Thomas Santa:   Being possessed by a thousand frightening fantasies Constructing a spider web in the mind. People with the disorder often feel as if they are isolated in darkness. They describe this feeling as a “cloud” that perpetually engulfs them. They feel the disorder constantly and uncomfortably, even in the background of day-to-day living.  Scrupulosity demands constant attention and can feel like a severe and unrelenting master. At best, most people who suffer with the disorder have learned to live with it. They hope it does not get more pronounced or spill into other areas of life. Relief does not exist, so any promises of relief through activities like rituals are essentially dead ends. For those who are religious, consistent spiritual practices can help and at the same time be debilitating. From Joseph Ciarrocchi's Book "Doubting Disease Bob is 28-year-old married Jewish man who works for an accounting firm. He is thrilled with the birth of his first child, a bubbly infant girl. Bob is about to be totally involved with her as a parent and share in all aspects of childcare. He was shocked by the following experience: Bob was changing his daughter's diaper when the thought, idea, or image (he wasn't quite sure which close parentheses flashed through his mind – “Touch her private parts.” The first time it happened he shuddered, tried to dismiss the idea, and hurriedly completed diapering her. All they tried not to think about it. The next time he changed her diaper, however, the idea came back, but this time in the form of a graphic picture of Bob engaging in the dreaded behavior. This time he felt nausea, became dizzy, and called his wife to finish, saying he thought he was ill and would pass out. The idea began to torment Bob. He found himself not wanting to be alone with his daughter, Les T “give in” to the simples. He refused to bathe her or change her diaper. Sensing something was drastically wrong his wife urged him to seek help. He talked to his rabbi who tried to assure him that he was not a child molester and should dismiss the thoughts.  Psychodynamic perspective  Sources Nancy McWilliams Psychoanalytic Diagnosis --  Psychdynamic Diagnostic manual   Thinking and Doing predominate over Feeling, sensing, intuiting, listening, playing, daydreaming, enjoying the creative arts and other modes that are less rationally driven or instrumental  Hold themselves to very high standards, sometimes impossibly high.   Central conflict: Rage and being controlled vs. fear of being condemned or punished.   Cooperation and rebellion Initiative and sloth Cleanliness and slovenliness Order and disorder Thrift and improvidence  Polarizations inside.   Emotion is unformulated, muted suppressed, unavailable, or rationalized and moralized.  Except anxiety and sometimes depressed mood Consign most feelings to an undervalued role, associated with childishness, weakness, loss of control, disorganization and dirt Cognition Condemning oneself for internal thought crimes -- consciously or unconsciously   Body states Hyperarousal -- expressing anxiety through the body  Often health problems due to excessive washing   Difficulties with  Play Humor  Spontaneity Pain about isolation.   Shame about being considered weird and unacceptable to others Capable of loving attachments, but often not able to express their tender selves without anxiety and shame Relational patterns -- seek relationships in which they can control the partner, sometimes partners who can reassure them  Being intimate in relationships Emotional connection  Sexuality   Causes of Scrupulosity  Spiritual Sources  Fr. James Jackson The Fathers of the Church considered scrupulosity – or psychasthenia, as the Greek Fathers called it – to be a spiritual problem which leads to a psychological malfunction.   Timothy A. Sisemore. Catherine Barton, Mary Keeley -- The History and Contextual Treatment of Scrupulous OCD  15th and 16th Century -- connected scruples to moral reasoning, addressed under conscience -- concept of erroneous conscience.  -- frees the person to act without resolving the doubt.   Secular Sources IOCDF Fact sheet:  The exact cause of scrupulosity is not known. Like other forms of OCD, scrupulosity may be the result of several factors including genetic and environmental influences.   OCDUK.com  Lots of controversy. Biological factors  Strep infections affecting the Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders associated with Streptococcal Infection  -- PANDAS   Genetic factors Runs in families -- 2001 metaanalytic review reported that person with OCD is 4 times more likely to have another family member with OCD than a person who does not have the disorder   Cognitive theory  Everyone experiences intrusive thoughts at times People with OCD have an inflated sense of responsibility and interpret these thoughts as very significant and important Caught up in a pattern of Try to resist, block or neutralize them  What is the meaning of the thought to the person?   Joseph Ciarrocchi citing David Barlow -- OCD causes Those temperamentally disposed to having high levels of nervous energy, more pronounced bodily reactions to stress, greater levels of anxiety   OCD is different from other anxiety disorders because those with OCD believe that certain kinds of thoughts are dangerous in themselves If I think certain thoughts those events will happen.  If I think certain thoughts or spontaneously imagine certain things, or if I have an impulse to do such a  thing, then I am the kind of person who would do such things.   No moral distance between the spontaneous thought or image or impulse and actually doing the act.   I must be bad.  Unclean.  Unworthy.   Model for the development of Scrupulosity Strong belief that certain thoughts are dangerous and unacceptable  Leads to the occurrence of these same intrusive thoughts  This generates significant anxiety  Leading to strong efforts to suppress the thoughts  Which accelerates the frequency of the same kinds of thought   Leading to a need to "turn off" the anxiety by any means Mental rituals  Physical rituals  These rituals are the compulsions   And then there is a temporary respite, a bit of relief.  The compulsive rituals are reinforced because they temporarily decrease anxiety.  But then we loopback to the occurrence of the intrusive thoughts again.     Psychodynamic understanding Nancy McWilliams -- Psychoanalytic Diagnosis Obsessive and Compulsive Personality styles:   Marc Foley's Approach in The Context of Holiness about St. Therese of Lisieux's scrupulosity Parental figures who set high standards of behavior and expect early conformity to them E.g. making little kids sit still during Mass   Strict and consistent in rewarding good behavior and punishing malfeasance Risk of condemning not only behaviors but the feelings that go with them Especially anger   Issues of control in families of origin.   Alternative -- a really lax family in which children are underparented Child concludes he has to model himself after a parental figure that he invents himself  Child might have an aggressive, intense temperament -- projected on to that idealized parental figure.   Self esteem comes from meeting the demands of internalized parental figures who hold them to a high standard of behavior and sometimes thought.   Value self-control over nearly all other virtues.   Discipline Order Loyalty Integrity Reliability Perseverance Is a particular religion a cause?   No: Timothy Sisemore, Catherine Barton, Mary Keeley:  A tendency to blame religion, but no more than counting OCD to be blamed on math class  Joseph Ciarrocchi "Religion doesn't cause scrupulosity and more than teach someone French history causes him to believe he is Napoleon.  All human beings exist in some cultural context.   IOCDF Fact sheet:  Scrupulosity is an equal opportunity disorder. It can affect individuals from a variety of different faith traditions. Although more research is needed to truly answer this question, there is currently no evidence to link scrupulosity to a specific religion. OCD Center of Lost Angeles It is worth noting that Scrupulosity is not partial to any one religion, but rather custom fits its message of doubt to the specific beliefs and practices of the sufferer.  Yes:  Joseph Ciarrocchi …religion may contribute when its content is presented in an overly harsh, punitive manner.  Students of such presentations are likely to associate the context of the religious message with fear and anxiety.   Jonathan Edwards, 18th Century Pastor and Theologian in the Congregational Church The God that holds you over the pit of hell, much as one holds a spider, or some loathsome insect over the fire, abhors you, and is dreadfully provoked: his wrath towards you burns like fire; he looks upon you as worthy of nothing else, but to be cast into the fire; he is of purer eyes than to bear to have you in his sight; you are ten thousand times more abominable in his eyes, than the most hateful venomous serpent is in ours. You have offended him infinitely more than ever a stubborn rebel did his prince; and yet it is nothing but his hand that holds you from falling into the fire every moment. It is to be ascribed to nothing else, that you did not go to hell the last night; that you was suffered to awake again in this world, after you closed your eyes to sleep. And there is no other reason to be given, why you have not dropped into hell since you arose in the morning, but that God's hand has held you up. There is no other reason to be given why you have not gone to hell, since you have sat here in the house of God, provoking his pure eyes by your sinful wicked manner of attending his solemn worship. Yea, there is nothing else that is to be given as a reason why you do not this very moment drop down into hell.   Heresies from Fr. James Jackson: Manicheanism:  Manichaeism states, on principle, that all matter is evil. If, for example, a child grows up with an extreme attitude to modesty – where the flesh is seen as evil because it is the cause of forbidden impulses – then the slightest catering to the demands or needs of the flesh can result in a torment which rejects the goodness of the body.  Pelagianism:  There was once a British monk named Pelagius, who taught that a man can observe God's laws by human effort alone, that grace was not needed to do so. If the heresy of Pelagianism works its way into the soul it is an easy step to thinking that any lack of perfection is entirely one's own fault. One thinks, “this business of salvation is my work, so I'd better be perfect when I …” Thus salvation becomes something one must achieve by personal effort instead of by cooperation with grace.   Jansenism:  Jansenism is another heresy in which scrupulosity can grow well. It emphasizes that Christ did not die for all, stresses man's sinfulness, and requires extreme penances on a regular basis. It leads to infrequent communions and flowers into scrupulosity as a matter of course. Jansenism flourished within Roman Catholicism primarily in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, but was condemned as heresy by Pope Innocent X in 1653. Jansenism was also condemned in 1713 by Pope Clement XI in his famous Bull Unigenitus.  Jansenism focuses on how it was impossible for men and women to obey the Lord's commandments and to be redeemed without God's special, divine, irresistible grace. Jansenism taught that Christ died only for the elect -- a real sense of predestination  Fr. Marc Foley agrees:  Jansenism identified as the "remote cause: of St. Therese of Lisieux's troubles growing up.   Biographer Conrad de Meester: "Zelie's mother, who taught her daughters an excessive fear of offending God, used to harp on the phrase 'that's a sin' to curb the least imperfections."   Zelie had an excessive fear of sin and hell. Zelie was terrified that her five-year-old daughter Helene was in purgatory or perhaps even in hell, because she once told a lie.   Spiritual Means of Recovery Joseph Ciarrocchi “Scruples in the History of Pastoral Care” (chapter four of the Doubting Disease) puts scrupulosity in the context of church history before it was viewed through the modern lens of psychiatric diagnosis.  He describes several principles for the treatment of scruples from the pastoral care tradition. Act contrary to the scruples.   Follow the example of others without lengthy and burdensome moral reasoning.  Rely on the guidance of one spiritual advisor rather than consulting multiple spiritual authorities.  Put oneself in situations that trigger the obsessional thought.  Avoid religious rituals/prayers, which serve as compulsions.   Ciarrocchi writes that these main pastoral principles “contain  the seeds of modern behavioral treatments” that include modeling by  others,  exposure to the upsetting situation, and blocking the compulsive response. Fr. William Doyle 1873-1917 -- more than 100 years ago.   General Remedies from Fr. William Doyle Prayer -- pray in temptation  Vigilance  Struggle against depression -- sadness increases scrupulosity   Obedience to an experienced confessor -- perfect, trustful and blind obedience Obedience of action putting into practice the freedom of conscience  Obedience of understanding -- soul remaining in revolt and persisting in its own erroneous ideas. Vanquishing errors of the intellect.   Generosity in Self-Conquest -- acts of self-denial   Particular remedies from Fr. William Doyle 19th century Doubts must be ignored  Belief in the easiness of forgiveness  Presuming decisions (of the spiritual director)  Lenient view of one's faults -- magnifying glass  Promptness in acting on decisions  Broad-minded interpretation of advice -- broadening the way.   Not piling up questions   Ten Commandments for the Scrupulous -- Fr. Thomas Santa, CSsR (2013) Without exception, you shall not confess sins you have already confessed.  You shall confess only sins that are clear and certain.  You shall not repeat your penance or any of the words of your penance after confession—for any reason.  You shall not worry about breaking your pre-Communion fast unless you put food and drink in your mouth and swallow as a meal  You shall not worry about powerful and vivid thoughts, desires, and imaginings involving sex and religion unless you deliberately generate them for the purpose of offending God  You shall not worry about powerful and intense feelings, including sexual feelings or emotional outbursts, unless you deliberately generate them to offend God.  You shall obey your confessor when he tells you never to repeat a general confession of sins already confessed to him or another confessor.  When you doubt your obligation to do or not do something, you will see your doubt as proof that there is no obligation  When you are doubtful, you shall assume that the act of commission or omission you're in doubt about is not sinful, and you shall proceed without dread of sin   You shall put your total trust in Jesus Christ, knowing he loves you as only God can and that he will never allow you to lose your soul Pastoral approach here.  Predestination for heaven, Jesus will make us go to heaven.  A lot of scrupulous clients are well enough formed to not believe that.   Secular means of recovery IOCDF:  Scrupulosity responds to the same treatments as those used with other forms of OCD.  Cognitive behavior therapy featuring a procedure called “exposure and response prevention” is the primary psychological treatment for scrupulosity. A certain kind of medicines called Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) is the primary drug treatment for OCD. Treatment for scrupulosity may also include consultation from  leaders of the patient's faith tradition.  Exposure and Response prevention See the last Episode   Difficulties with ERP for scrupulosity. Joseph Ciarrocchi "Doubting Disease":  My opinion, based on the clinical and theoretical aspects of scruples, is that scruples are resistant to change because their religious nature places many of them in the domain of overvalued ideas. In other words, the person sees the stakes are so high in religious doubts (i.e. salvation depends and being correct) that the senselessness of the behavior is less evidence. After all, faith itself implies looking beyond sensory experiences in the surface meaning of reality. Scrupulous people usually know that their peers do not act the way they do. But since religious salvation is such an individual experience, can one really take a chance and ignore that's “inner voice”? Therefore, the religious aspects of scruples create a motivational drive around the symptoms which become overvalued ideas, and hence resistant to change.  Jaimie Eckert Scrupulosity Coach:  ERP can feel like it has deep moral and spiritual implications. Although it is a method that is helping you develop a normal spirituality, it can feel terribly frightening. For example, the woman who prays compulsively, repeating her prayers dozens of times until she feels they are done “right,” might be asked to pray only once and then stop, no matter how she feels. This can easily feel like a denial of faith. So scrupulous sufferers begin dropping out of treatment when ERP gets more intense.  Kevin Foss, Founder of the California OCD and Anxiety Treatment Center in Fullerton, CA:   People suffering with Religious Scrupulosity struggle with the ERP process because they fear that exposure therapy will result in a genuine sin, convey that they are OK with sin and that they do not respect God or God's will. Furthermore, Scrupulosity sufferers are generally knowledgeable of their faith's doctrine and Biblical texts, so they are quick to present chapter and verse explaining why they should avoid exposure and give in to compulsive acts. Despite my reminders of clients' logical arguments, they respond with “But you never know” and “But what if God mistakes my intention in the exposure and I'm now really guilty of sin?” So, to do anything that could potentially put that into question or undermine it was experienced as possibly damaging the practice of faith, challenging one's fundamental belief in God, or leaving one vulnerable to shifting beliefs and a slippery slope into sin. Psychodynamic approaches for treating OCD but can be applied to scrupulosity.  McWilliams  Ordinary kindness -- they know they are exasperating for reasons that are unclear to everybody Priests get frustrated.   Parents get frustrated   Do not hurry them, advise them, criticize them.   Avoid becoming the equivalent of the controlling, demanding parent -- no power struggles  But still relate warmly.  A lot of acceptance.   Avoid intellectualization  Help them express anger.   Discover their emotions and help them enjoy them.   Joseph Ciarrocchi. Doubting Disease Treatment program is laid out in his book, Doubting disease.  It is essentially exposure and response prevention.   Target the scruples you want to change Identify your obsessional scruples through self-monitoring.  Write them down.   Identify you compulsive scruples -- write them down.  Avoidance acts to reduce anxiety  Record the circumstances surrounding the scruples  Making ratings of the intensity of the anxiety triggered by each of the obsessions and compulsions.   Record the amount of time spent worrying about the scruples  Lots of forms and charts, all in the book.   Increase your Motivation to Change Looking at how motivated you are, and where you are in Prochaska and Di Clemente's stages of motivation to change.   Developing a Personal Motivation Plan Listing the Benefits of eliminating scruples  Listing the Costs of not changing scruples   Preparing for Change Setting up the plan for repeated exposure to the feared object or condition.   From the very start of the fear response, the body actually starts a counter-response mean to return the body to normal activity levels. Habituation.  Nervous system gets bored with the danger, returns to normal.   Example of jackhammer breaking up the asphalt on your road.   Exposure must be prolonged Exposure must generate significant anxiety Exposure must be repeated The compulsive response must be blocked.  Prevented from happening so it breaks the cycle of some relief from the compulsion.  Blocking the physical compulsion or the mental compulsion.   More charts and forms What I think about scrupulosity.  IFS-Informed Approach  I'm going to start with the bottom line.  I think scrupulosity is generated by a desperate attempt to find safety from a terrible, dangerous and uncaring God for shameful, undeserving, despicable sinner Scrupulosity is a twisted, frantic attempt to find some kind of safety from an angry, heartless God for me, a reprobate, a delinquent, an evildoer.  At the core, scrupulosity starts with really appalling, awful God Images -- and the scrupulous person usually isn't aware of the how terrible his or her God images really are, because they are not allowed into conscious awareness.   I discuss God images at length in episode 23-29 of this podcast, a seven episode series, all about God images, so check that out.   God Images =  My emotional and subjective experiences of God, who I feel God to be in the moment.  May or may not correspond to who God really is.  What I feel about God in my bones. This is my experiential sense how my feelings and how my heart interpret God. God images are often outside of our conscious awareness  Initially God images are shaped by the relationship that I have with my parents.     My God images are heavily influenced by psychological factors  Different God images can be activated at different times, depending on my emotional states and what psychological mode I am in at a given time.   God images are always formed experientially; God images flow from our relational experiences and  Also how we construe and make sense of those images when we are very young.  My God images can be radically different than my God concept. God Concept  = What I profess about God.  It is my more intellectual understanding of God, based on what one has been taught, but also based on what I have explored through reading.  I decide to believe in my God concept.  Reflected in the Creed, expanded in the Catechism, formal teaching.   Now I'm really going to apply IFS to Scrupulosity, grounding it in a Catholic understanding of the human person.  Discussed Robert Fox and Alessio Rizzo's Internal Family Systems approach to OCD in the last episode -- number 86 -- Obsessions, Compulsions, OCD and Internal Family Systems. Brief review:  Definition of Parts:  Separate, independently operating personalities within us, each with own unique prominent needs, roles in our lives, emotions, body sensations, guiding beliefs and assumptions, typical thoughts, intentions, desires, attitudes, impulses, interpersonal style, and world view.  Each part also has an image of God.   You can also think of them as separate modes of operating if that is helpful.   Brief review:  Self:  The core of the person, the center of the person.  This is who we sense ourselves to be in our best moments, and when our self is free, and unblended with any of our parts, it governs our whole being as an active, compassionate leader.   Here is the critical idea:  Each Part has a God Image -- each part has a way of understanding God based on its limited experience and how it understands that experience We have as many God images as we have parts.   How God images form in parts.  Parts have distorted God images for three main reasons:  Parts learn via experience and the ways they interpret experience, especially in their spiritual inferences, can be markedly different than what God has revealed about Himself through the Catholic Church -- for example, a part whose role is to be dissociated from the rest of the system so as not to overwhelm the core self and other parts with its burden of interpersonal trauma may see God as distant, disconnected and uncaring, in a Deistic way;  Parts may be very afraid of, angry at, disappointed with or disinterested in God and therefore refuse to connect with Him, preventing them from having needed corrective relational experiences of a loving God Part's understandings of God can vary wildly.  One part may be angry and rejecting of God, another parts may be terrified of God, a third grieving the loss of God, a fourth distant and cold toward God and a fifth part, in the same person, may not believe that God even exists.   As different parts come up and blend with the self, becoming more prominent in the system, they bring their God images into conscious awareness.  That explains how our conscious perspectives of God can shift.  Whichever part of us has taken over, which ever part of us has blended and is driving our bus, that part's God image is dominating in the moment So, in my view, a scrupulous person's parts are in a life and death battle with each other about God.  It's more than physical life or death.  It's about spiritual life or death, eternal life or death, the stakes couldn't be higher.   The scrupulous person's managers believe that if they don't suppress parts with negative God images, the consequence could be to be damned to hell for all eternity.   Manager parts are trying to appease God -- seek his approval, make things all right, strive to meet his demands, to be perfect Fr. Thomas La Santa:  I will make God love me by becoming perfect.  In this way God will have to love me.  An enormous amount of energy is wasted by the scrupulous person trying to "fix" himself or herself or trying to become perfect.   Fr. Marc Foley: The command "Be ye perfect..." does not enjoin us to strive for a flawless performance in the various tasks of life, but to do them as God wills us. We feel driven to do an A+ job on projects in which we have overinvested our egos. But doing God's will often demands the courage to do a C+ job because God bids us to spend our time and energy on other tasks.  In order to do that, the manager parts have to suppress or exile the parts that have "offensive" God images or who may otherwise seem inappropriate or unacceptable to God.   Those that are angry at God Those that are disappointed in God Those who are disgusted with God. Those that are indifferent toward God. Those that don't believe God exists.   All those ways of construing God makes sense if you understand the part's experience and how it construes its experience.  They are not accurate, they don't correspond to how God really is, but the part doesn't know that.   Those that generate impulses to get God's attention via acting out in negative ways.   Manager parts reject any part that experiences God in any negative way.   Parts seeing other parts as evil, harmful, and terrifying.   Demons  Lepers Tax collectors Prostitutes Dangerous sinners -- banishing them.   Manager Parts can speak for God -- they assume they know what God wants.  Not in relationship with him, though.  Really following a code or a list of rules or expectations.  It's not about relationship, really.   First two conditions for secure attachment -- 1) felt safety and protection; 2) feeling seen known, heard and understood.  Drawing from Daniel P. Brown and David S. Elliott 2016 book Attachment Disturbances in Adults: Treatment for Comprehensive Repair.   Felt safety and protection In Scrupulosity, there is no felt sense of safety and protection for so many parts, because of their God images and their fears about the God images of other parts being expressed.  .   The first primary condition of secure attachment is not met.   The most basic relational need is not met -- no felt safety, no felt protection. The first primary condition for secure attachment is felt safety and security.  It has be felt.  And not just by other parts, but by the target part.   We all have heretical God images.   Pastor Jonathan Edwards:  The wrath of God is like great waters that are dammed for the present; they increase more and more, and rise higher and higher, till an outlet is given; and the longer the stream is stopped, the more rapid and mighty is its course, when once it is let loose. It is true, that judgment against your evil works has not been executed hitherto; the floods of God's vengeance have been withheld; but your guilt in the meantime is constantly increasing, and you are every day treasuring up more wrath; the waters are constantly rising, and waxing more and more mighty; and there is nothing but the mere pleasure of God, that holds the waters back, that are unwilling to be stopped, and press hard to go forward. If God should only withdraw his hand from the flood-gate, it would immediately fly open, and the fiery floods of the fierceness and wrath of God, would rush forth with inconceivable fury, and would come upon you with omnipotent power; and if your strength were ten thousand times greater than it is, yea, ten thousand times greater than the strength of the stoutest, sturdiest devil in hell, it would be nothing to withstand or endure it.  How are you going to feel safe with a God like that?   Feeling Seen, Known, Heard, Understood   because there is no feeling of safety and protection for some parts, they don't want to be seen, heard, known and understood by God.  They don't want to be near God, they don't trust him And that makes sense, given how they see God.   Some parts may want to be seen heard known and understood by God, even if they don't feel safe -- they are desperate for attention, any kind of attention from God, even negative attention, so they signal distress by intense impulses toward acting out, especially in ways designed to get God's attention -- blasphemy, for example.  Just like a neglected little kid, desperate for some kind of attention from his father may act out.   Scrupulosity is the son of anger and the grandson of shame.  Core issues of shame that are suppressed and generate anger.  Anger is suppressed and generates fear and scruples.   Shame -- the root of so much psychological and emotional distress -- whole 13-epsiode series on shame, from episode 37 to 49.  All goes back to identity.  Who am I and Who is God.  Scrupulous individuals have a very hard time allowing their anger with God to emerge into conscious awareness and with anger in general.  Dangerous emotion But look at the unreasonably demanding and exacting God images their manager parts have -- Their God images are unjust.   Who would want to be with a God like that?  No part has a really positive God image Not wanting hell  But not really wanting heaven either -- to be face to face with a God like that for all eternity?  So God has no opportunity to show the scrupulous person, in relationship, who He really is.  Self-perpetuating. I wrote a blog on this on the Souls and Hearts website last week, on Inner Pre-Evangelization: A Focus on Internal Trust.  My Approach Lead from Self --The core of the person, the center of the person.  This is who we sense ourselves to be in our best moments, and when our self is free, and unblended with any of our parts, it governs our whole being as an active, compassionate leader.   We want to be recollected, we want the self governing all of our parts Like the conductor -- leading the musicians in an orchestra Like the captain -- leading and governing all the sailors on a ship.   When we are recollected, in self, 8 C's Calm  Curiosity  Compassion  Confidence  Courage  Clarity  Connectedness  Creativity  Kindness   Self as the secure internal attachment figure for the parts.  Parts coming to trust the self  -- Blog on  Working collaboratively with the parts -- contracting with them to not overwhelm Really accepting the parts right now, where they at.  Trusting that God is good enough to understand and tolerate our parts' feelings.   Scrupulosity as a gift, a signal. Look for the disorder underneath it.  Not a question of willpower.   Diabolical aspects Leaving people to their own devices  Discouragement, inward focus, despising self,  Spiritual Approach Not about overcoming scrupulosity  Blessed are the merciful for mercy shall be theirs  Childlike Simplicity and trust lessens our burdens.  Parvulos.  Little Children.  Dust and ashes.   Example of a parent -- would you prefer your child to be working on self-perfection  Perfectionism draws us to be big, perfect, competent, having it all together.  Jacques Phillipe:  The Way of Trust and Love -- particularly helpful for those struggling with scrupulosity.    p. 7 :  The heart of Christian life is to receive and welcome God's tenderness and goodness, the revelation of his merciful love and to let oneself be transformed interiorly by that love.   “We would like to be experienced, irreproachable, never making mistakes, never fall, possess unfeeling good judgment and unimpeachable virtues. Which is to say, we would like to have no more need of forgiveness or mercy, no more need of God and his help.  41 If we accept ourselves as we are, we also accept God's love for us. But if we reject ourselves, if we despise ourselves, we shut ourselves off from the love God has for us, we deny that love. 48-49 We need to practice gentleness toward ourselves so as not to get discouraged and condemn ourselves when faced with their weakness while also nurturing a great desire for holiness. But not a desire for extraordinary perfection. Holiness is different; it is a real desire to love God and our neighbor, and, issuing a kind of halfway love, go to loves extremes. 52 …we shouldn't fall into a kind of stubborn “therapeutic obstinacy,” with the aim of ridding ourselves absolutely of all imperfections or healing every wound. In doing that, we risk becoming impatient and concentrating our efforts on something God isn't specifically asking of us or, ultimately, paying more attention to ourselves than to him. 56-57 The more we accept ourselves as we are and are reconciled to our own weakness, the more we can accept other people and love them as they are. 49 What this podcast is all about.   Contrast that with Pastor Jonathan Edwards -- sinners in the hand of an angry God:  The bow of God's wrath is bent, and the arrow made ready on the string, and justice bends the arrow at your heart, and strains the bow, and it is nothing but the mere pleasure of God, and that of an angry God, without any promise or obligation at all, that keeps the arrow one moment from being made drunk with your blood.  Remember, you as a listener can call me on my cell any Tuesday or Thursday from 4:30 PM to 5:30 PM.  I've set that time aside for you.  317.567.9594.  (repeat) or email me at crisis@soulsandhearts.com.  The Resilient Catholics Community at Soulsandhearts.com/rcc.  So much information there and videos.   I want to invite you to the Resilient Catholics Community The Why of the RCC --  It's all about loving with your whole heart -- all of your being.  Getting over all the natural level issues that hold you back from tolerating being loved and from loving God and others.   Who  Who is the Resilient Catholics Community for? It's for you. If you really are into this podcast, if these ways of conceptualizing the human person and integration and human formation and resilience are appealing to you, then the Resilient Catholics community, the RCC may be for you.   I am looking for listeners who want to be with other like-minded Catholics on the journey, on this adventure of human formation with me.   Who deeply desire a personal, intimate relationship with God and with Mary, a real human, close connection  And who recognize they have some natural-level impediments to that deep relating  and  who are willing to make sacrifices in time, effort, money, humility and courage to grow in human formation and overcome natural-level impediments to being loved and to loving  What want to shore up their natural foundation for the spiritual life, because grace perfects nature.   Who want to become saints.   Who are willing to be pioneers at the cutting edge in this adventure of human formation.  Really at the tip of the spear, the first explorers of this human formation ground for laymen and laywomen.   First of all the RCC is My Tribe, my people, bringing together two groups into one First, faithful, orthodox, serious Catholics who are wounded and suffering and know it  And Second, who are psychologically minded (or at least want to be psychologically minded), who believe in the unconscious and who embrace the unity and multiplicity of the human person  And who want to see through the lens of a core self and parts.  Unity and multiplicity make sense.   What of the RCC $99 nonrefundable registration fee gets you the The Initial Measures Kit -- which generates the Individual Results Sheet and the Personalized Human Formation Plan 5 pages of results about your parts  -- we've done about 70 of these now, and our members are amazed at the results, how accurately we are in helping them identify their parts and how their parts relate to each other, and the why behind their parts' desires and impulses.   Weekly premium Inner Connections podcast, just for RCC community members --Lots of experiential exercises.   A complete course for working on your human formation 44 weekly sessions over the course of a year for $99 per month subscription  Daily check ins with your companion -- accountability and structure  Weekly company meetings with 7 or 8 other members in your small group.   Office hours with me  Conversation hours with me  All this for $99 per month.  And we make it financially possible for anyone who is a good fit for the RCC to join through write-offs and scholarships.  The fees are not the tail that wags the dog.   And there also is opportunities for some parts-based individual coaching as well.   Essentially, the What of the RCC is a pilgrimage together.   The When of the RCC We open twice per year to new members in December and June, open until December 31..  We are open now.  Soulsandhearts.com/rcc to register.  Call me with questions!    317.567.9594.  (repeat) or email me at crisis@soulsandhearts.com.  So sign up Soulsandhearts.com/rcc.   

FearCast
Obsessing about obsessing, and dealing with “I’m sooo OCD”

FearCast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 32:34


Thanks for joining me for another episode! Today's episode is an listener audio question about how to deal with OCD attacking the ERP process. In it, I discuss where to find good resources for treatment when in-person or even online therapy can't be accessed, and how to face “Obsessing about… Continue reading The post Obsessing about obsessing, and dealing with “I'm sooo OCD” appeared first on FearCast Podcast.

Data And Analytics in Business
E84 - Malcolm Shroff - Data Governance and its Role During and After Your New ERP System

Data And Analytics in Business

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 37:11


Alignment and focus across the board are key in achieving a company's goals as quickly as possible by working smarter not harder. But how does the finance team work with other departments to ensure everyone is focused on a common goal? Malcolm has the answer to creating a more cooperative environment to reach that end of the rainbow. Meet Malcolm Shroff Malcolm's Role as a Financial Leader at Essence Group Malcolm Shroff is the Chief Financial Officer of Essence Group Sydney, established in 2004, and an industry recognised and accredited food contract manufacturer that formulates ideas and concepts developed with strong industry knowledge into finished FMCG. Essence Group is a leader in nutritional innovation. Malcolm's Past Experiences in Finance Malcolm is an experienced Finance, Governance, Risk & Compliance Professional with cross-continental experience in well-reputed multinational publicly listed corporations; spanning the automobile and office products / supply chain industry. Before Essence Group, Malcolm was the youngest CFO in the Tata Motors Group's history, successfully setting up and achieving operational profitability of an overseas subsidiary with positive EBIT within the first 6 months of company incorporation. In addition, he implemented the corporate restructuring of Tata Motors' passenger vehicle dealership. He was titled Merit Holder in the Final Professional Level Company Secretaryship Examinations conducted by The Institute of Company Secretaries of India, leading to the award of the ‘Company Secretary' professional qualification. Data analytics, data governance, and ERP systems In this exclusive analytics podcast episode, Malcolm shares: His recent nomination as a Governance Top 100 Finalist His advice for excelling in governance and data governance What Essence Group does as a contract manufacturer His role as the CFO of a mid-sized enterprise in Australia The success he found through the use of data analytics in his role The role of governance and data governance when selecting and implementing a new ERP system His thought process in selecting and implementing a new ERP system What to do with the data coming out of new and old ERP systems Data mapping correctly throughout different departments in the organization How reporting and data analytics can continue to function when switching ERP systems If you have a C-suite role and you're working for a mid-sized enterprise, soon to face the decision of implementing a new ERP system, this is the episode you do not want to miss out on. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/analyticsshow/message

Your Anxiety Toolkit
Ep. 213 Treating Children with OCD and Phobias (with Natasha Daniels)

Your Anxiety Toolkit

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 32:39


SUMMARY: Today we have Natasha Daniels, an OCD specialist, talking all about how to help children and teens with OCD and phobias.  In this conversation, we talk all about how to motivate our children and teens to manage their OCD, phobias, and anxiety using Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Exposure and Response Prevention (ERP), and other treatments such as self-compassion, mindfulness, and ACT. We also address what OCD treatment for children entails and what changes need to be made in OCD treatment for teens. In this episode, Natasha and Kimberley share their experiences of parenting children with phobias and OCD. In This Episode: The difference between the treatment of OCD and phobias for children What OCD therapy for kids looks like compared to OCD therapy for adults How to practice exposure and response prevention for kids and teens How to motivate teens and kids to face their fears (using Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Special tricks and tools to help parents support their children with OCD and phobias. Links To Things I Talk About: Natasha's Parenting Survival Online Program www.ATparentingsurvivalschool.com Natasha's instagram @atparentingsurvival ERP School: https://www.cbtschool.com/erp-school-lp Episode Sponsor: This episode of Your Anxiety Toolkit is brought to you by CBTschool.com.  CBTschool.com is a psychoeducation platform that provides courses and other online resources for people with anxiety, OCD, and Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors.  Go to cbtschool.com to learn more. Spread the love! Everyone needs tools for anxiety... If you like Your Anxiety Toolkit Podcast, visit YOUR ANXIETY TOOLKIT PODCAST to subscribe free and you'll never miss an episode. And if you really like Your Anxiety Toolkit, I'd appreciate you telling a friend (maybe even two). EPISODE TRANSCRIPTION This is Your Anxiety Toolkit - Episode 213. Welcome back everybody. Oh, so happy to be here. How are you? How are you doing? I've been thinking about you all so much lately, reflecting a lot after Thanksgiving, being so grateful for you and this community and for your support. So, thank you, thank you, thank you. I am super thrilled to have the amazing Natasha Daniels on. Natasha is an OCD specialist. She is an amazing therapist who is skilled at treating children with OCD and phobias. She does an incredible, incredible job. So please do check the show notes to learn more about Natasha. But today, she came on to talk about managing anxiety in the kiddos. We don't talk enough about managing anxiety with the kiddos. And the cool thing for me was, it was so synchronistic because the day that she recorded and came on, we were prepping in my family from my daughter to do a really, really, really hard thing. So, I needed to hear what she had to say. Even though I knew a lot and I'd been trained a lot on it, I just needed to hear it as a parent. And if you are a parent of someone who has anxiety, you will just love, love, love this episode. So many amazing tips and tools and skills and concepts. I just cannot tell you how grateful I am to have Natasha come on and talk about these things with us today. Before we go over to that episode, I first want to do the “I did a hard thing segment.” The first one is from Becks, and Becks is saying: “I have been so anxious that I've been carrying COVID without knowing who I'm infecting.” Now I think this is true for a lot of us, myself included. So I think we can all resonate with this story. Becks went on to say, “Recently, I have been doing five to ten lateral flow COVID tests every day to check before leaving the house. I had run out of tests and had planned to eat with a friend with her three-month-old baby. I was so anxious before leaving the house and considered canceling to avoid the doubt of passing COVID unknowingly. But I gave my fear of talking to.” I just love that you did that. “I didn't want to get fear to win this time. I wanted to see my friend and her beautiful new baby. I shared my fear with my friend, and without asking for reassurance, I spent the loveliest day with them. I have been ruminating a little since, but I keep reminding myself to return to my values and not let fear win.” Becks, amazing work. It sounds like you're waiting through some difficult fear and you totally let values win. So, that makes me so, so happy. Great job. I am so in love with you guys when you share your hard thing with us. ***** Okay, let's go over to the episode. Well, thank you again, Natasha, for being on. Before we finish this episode, I wanted to also make sure we highlighted the review of the week. I so appreciate your reviews. This one is from Paulie Bill and they said: “So helpful. I can't describe in words how much this podcast has helped me. Kimberley is so open and accepting even via headphones.” I love that. “She has sent me on the path to recovery in my anxieties. I look forward to do the work.” Thank you so much. I do love your reviews. We are on a mission to get a thousand reviews. If you would go over and leave a review on iTunes, that would be so wonderful, the biggest gift you could give me. It allows us to reach more people. When people open up the app and they see that it's highly reviewed, it means they're more likely to click on and listen. And that means I get to help more people for free with this free resource. So, thank you so much, Paulie Bill, for leaving a review. I love you all. Have a wonderful week and I'll see you here next week. Kimberley: There we go. Well, I am so excited to share the amazing Natasha Daniels. Natasha, I can't wait for you to tell us about you. I'm going to let you explain about your work. You're doing such amazing work. I'm actually so excited for this episode because we're talking about managing OCD and phobias in children. We talk a lot about this stuff, but not specifically around children. So, I'm so happy to have you here. Welcome. Natasha: Yeah. I appreciate you having me. It's always nice to talk to you. Kimberley: Yes. First, tell us about you and the work you're doing. Natasha: Well, I am a child and anxiety child therapist, and I have three kids with anxiety and OCD. So, I get it on both hats. And I provide online resources for parents who are raising kids with anxiety and OCD because we need a lot of support. Kimberley: Right. Your platform is so great. In fact, I've taken one of your training, the SPACE training, and it's so wonderful. So, I can't wait at the end for you to share about that for people and parents who are struggling, but also for clinicians. Really, really helpful. Natasha: Oh, thanks. Kimberley: Yeah. So, I want to talk with you about ERP but also just anxiety management for the kids who are struggling with OCD and phobias. In your experience, is there a difference between how treatment looks for folks who are adults and the children who have OCD and phobias? Natasha: I think on a fundamental level, it's very similar. The whole structure is identical, but then we have to take into consideration a couple of different things. One, I think you have to work on the motivation and incentivizing more than you do with someone who's coming willingly. So, a lot of times we might notice an issue going on with our child, but they're another person. And so, that approach will look different. And also, developmentally, how they can understand ERP. So, how you explain it, how you gamify it. That looks different. I think as well, we want to engage them. If you don't have an engaged child, you don't have ERP. So, that's another aspect. And then I'd say the third one, the last one is developmental aspects of it. So, we're very careful with ERP to not do a lot of education because we worry, maybe if I'm educating them, I'm actually assuring them. But with kids, I find at least with myself and my practice and with my own kids, I have to do a little bit of psychoeducation because they may not even know what's normal versus what's not normal. And so, I think that piece might be a little bit different than when you're working with adults. Kimberley: Right. Yeah. I think that's so true, particularly even, I remember when my son was really young and had a really severe dog phobia. He was around a lot of dogs, and when a dog ran at him, he actually thought they were going to kill him because they're the same size. So, it was really important that we educated him on, “This is a dog, but it's not a lion” kind of thing. So, it was really important for him. Natasha: Yeah, definitely. Kimberley: You mentioned gamifying, and I wanted to just-- can you explain what that means? Natasha: Well, I think we want to offer incentives. And so, because they don't have their-- most kids don't have that intrinsic motivation to realize the bigger picture of, “I don't want OCD. This is going to have huge ramifications in my life.” They just see now. And so, asking them to go, metaphorically, swim with a bunch of sharks, it's just not going to happen, but if we can gamify it and make it fun-- and I use bravery points or the earning stuff, and they can buy things at my bravery store. I use apps, I take-- I actually like the Privilege app. They should pay me because I promote them so much. Because it's a chore app, but it's just really easy for kids to convert it. And then they can have it on their iPad. So, I'm giving my kids points and they can hear the little change going on their iPad, like they just got something. That aspect of it really helps motivate kids to work on and do hard things because they may not philosophically get the benefits. They will long term, and even short term. Once they start doing ERP, they say, “Oh my gosh, it feels so much better.” But that's not enough. And so, gamifying, it actually makes a lot of kids come and ask me, “Can I do another exposure?” My kids always ask, “Can I do another exposure?” if they want something. “What exposures can I do for this?” And that creates a household where we're doing ERP for fun. Kimberley: I love that. You talk about that. I mean, we do live in such an electronic world, and it is an incentive, I know for me, my kids will do anything if there is some kind of electronic reward at the end there, and it's a huge piece. I have a daughter, I mentioned to you before the recording, who is doing her own set of exposures right now, and she doesn't want to do them. Then why would she? So, it's really helpful to gamify it as much as you can. I love that you mentioned that. Natasha: Yeah, it definitely helps. And I think even people who are raw screen fans and they follow the CPS model. I hear that a lot in the parenting world. He's not pro-incentive. And I interviewed him and even he was like, for anxiety and OCD, it can be a very important component, as long as you're constantly, I think, upping the game so you're doing an exposure that's harder and harder. So, they're not just getting A plus B equals C all the time. And then you're pulling back those incentives over time, spreading them out, using intermittently. So, there are ways to pull it back. Kimberley: So good. So, let's say a child at different ages, it could be-- you may even want to distinguish different age groups if that's appropriate, but let's say they have a fear of phobia or an obsession about something. Can you share what it would look to do ERP with a child? Natasha: I think the first part is really getting them to understand what it is, because I think sometimes I have parents that they are ready to go and they forget they have to really educate the child and get the child to meet them where they're at. So, understanding how OCD works, that the more you avoid, the bigger it grows, and then partnering with them, ideally, if your child is in that space. So, sometimes we have to actually work on communication and trust for a long period of time. And that might be your only step for a long time. And parents miss that. They think, “If my child's not willing to do ERP, then all bets are off.” And I say, “No, you're at the beginning of the journey.” So, to educate them and motivate them, work on communication. But then as we progress – I'll just use my kids as an example because it's easy – if they have a phobia or if they have an intrusive thought, we'll say, “Okay, what are some things--” they get the concept of, “I have to walk towards my fear or towards my discomfort.” So, we want to partner with our kids and say, “What things can we do to upset your OCD, to sit in discomfort?” And so, we might just make a list, might brainstorm. My daughter had a two-day period where she had this extreme intrusive thought about blood and it wasn't one of her themes, but it was just-- I'm going to use this as an example. And so, it just went from zero to 60. She had one science experiment. They were online. They had to look at a body with the pathways of the veins and the arteries or whatever, and she couldn't touch anyone because she didn't want to stop their blood. And so, just whatever that is for your child, just sitting at them and saying, “What are some things that we can do?” And she was very resistant. “I don't want to do anything.” And so, I was like, “Could you look at an emoji of a little thing of blood?” So, we started off making a list. And I would say, “You don't have to do all this, but let's just brainstorm some of the things that would upset your OCD right now.” And then some people pick a menu like, “Just pick one today and let's just start with that.” And that's how you begin. It's just baby steps towards learning how to sit in the discomfort. Kimberley: I love that. Now, during the exposure, what does that look like for a child? I'll give you a personal example. We were doing a video exposure with my daughter yesterday, and she was all tense up, leaning back, head in the pillow, grasping, gripping, resisting, all the things, and I educated her. So, what would it look like for a parent? How would they maybe, or in a clinician, how would they coach them through the actual exposure? Natasha: In a perfect really, we want them to take the lead, and it's so hard when they have that response. And I had done needle exposures too with my kids. And so, sometimes when I see that reaction, I'll stop, and I'll just say-- well, actually, my son had to take a COVID test. This is another example. And he wouldn't stick it up his nose. And so then, of course, I got frustrated. So, I was chasing him and I was like, “Give me your nose.” It was not a fine mom moment. And then finally, I stopped and I was like, “How do you want to handle this? What do you want to do? We cannot do it.” And then he's like, “I'll do it.” And so, I just had to walk away. But I think sometimes with exposures, it's just taking that pause and saying, “Where do you want me to poke you?” if we're talking about a poking exposure or “Where's your level of comfort?” Ideally over time, we want them to start doing these things for themselves. And so, we want them to be on automatic pilot that they're doing an exposure and we're sitting back. So, all we're doing at some point is saying, “This is less for a phobia that's situational and obviously more for an ongoing thing.” But with my daughter, with emetophobia, the fear of throwing up, I might say, “What exposure do you want to do? Let me know when you do it, and then I'll give you a brave point.” And then I might hover in the kitchen and just watch her do it, but try to be less involved. Kimberley: Right. I love that. On our end, I had to keep explaining to her that the more you tense and the more you cringe, the more you're reinforcing the fear to try and sit still. She's trying to practice. Again, she doesn't have to act perfect. I always say, “You don't have to take the fear away, but you can't be cringing and hiding behind the pillows and so forth.” That's a big piece of the work. Natasha: Yeah. And I think it's such an important piece that I think a lot of parents miss, is not surviving the exposure. For my son with this anxiety, I'd be like, “Go upstairs to do an exposure. Go get your shoes or whatever.” And this was more anxiety-based, not OCD. And he'd run upstairs like he's avoiding a killer and then he'd run back downstairs. And I'm like, “All you did was teach your brain that you survived. It's going to work.” Kimberley: Yeah. I love that. Okay. So, I love that you've already shared like you didn't have a perfect parent moment, right? Because I think parent is already-- it's hard to be a parent. We have so many expectations on ourselves. Can you give us some ideas of what to say and what not to say or how parents may support their child better in these examples? Natasha: It is really tricky. And I think start, and you're so good at this, the self-compassion piece. And I think parentally, we have to start with self-compassion and say, “You're not going to knock it out of the park all the time.” You're going to say things that you're like, “Oh my gosh, that was the worst thing to say ever.” You might trigger your child inadvertently. So, I think having that compassion first is really important. And that's why I always often share my mistakes because I'm human, we're all human. But I think in a perfect world, the ultimate goal is we're just trying to get our child to be able to sit in discomfort. So, we're not discounting their fears. And I think sometimes parents here, “I'm not supposed to accommodate,” which they, in turn, view as “I'm not supposed to support them.” And that concerns me because I think a little bit of information can be harmful. So, it's not that you can't support them, but you just want to sit and validate. I know this is hard for you. I'll take an example, just so I'm all concrete. Let's go back to emetophobia, the fear of throw up. Sometimes parents will say, “When I say you can't say--” I don't normally talk like that, like you can't say, but it's not helpful to say, “You're not going to throw up,” because you really want them to accept that they may or may not throw up and that they're going to be okay either way. I'm sure they can handle the discomfort. And so, sometimes that confuses parents because then the child's stomach is hurting and they're saying, “I'm worried I'm going to throw up.” And then they can't say anything. So, they're like, “Got to go to school, get your shoes on.” It's like turning into robots, but it's just validating the feelings. “I know this is hard for you. I know that this is really rough and I'm so--” this is how I talk to my kids, “I'm so sorry that OCD is really bothering you right now. And I know that you can handle it, no matter what happens.” And so, giving them that support and validation without the accommodation of “Nothing bad is going to happen to you.” Kimberley: Yeah. It's hard. I mean, it's funny because it's hard to see your child in pain, right? It's hard to watch them struggle. You want to take their pain away. You want to come in. And in some cases, I will even disclose, there's times where-- or maybe I'm not feeling I'm being a good parent in general and I want to rescue them so my kid likes me again. You know what I mean? There's so many components that can suck us into “Let me just rescue this one time.” Where I really am curious to hear, what I really have struggled with my patients, the thing that they're working through is when a compulsion or avoidance is done because they want their kid to go to school. Like, “Well, if I don't do this compulsion for them, they won't go to school, and I need them to go to school,” or “I need them to get their homework done. So, I'm actually going to do this compulsion for them and accommodate them because school is the most important thing at that point.” So, what, what is your advice to parents who get stuck in that accommodation cycle because they're trying to keep the kid functioning in other areas? Natasha: It's definitely a balancing act because we cannot accommodate everything at once. And so, if the ultimate goal is get them to school, and there might be some things that we have to do to get them to school, but then we have to pull back. And it can snowball. It snowballed with me. I'll just throw myself under the bus the entire interview. Why not? I mean, Natasha, it looked really good. But when my daughter was, I think, first grade, she had emetophobia, her throw up in sensorimotor OCD where she thought she was going to pee all the time. So, both of those together was a nightmare. And we just needed to get her to school. She didn't want to go to school. And so, initially, it was just, “I can't go into the cafeteria.” And so, there were accommodations made, “Oh, if it's just lunch, then we'll have you go eat in another classroom.” But OCD is never satisfied. And so, you have to have that awareness. And that was me as a parent. Intellectually, I knew, okay, you have to be careful with this because we're accommodating it. But then it was recess. Then it was PE. And then she was spending half the day in the nurse because we were over accommodating, and then we had to start to scale back and then get her back into the cafeteria. So, I think you just have to be aware that it is a balancing act that, yes, there are some things that you might have to accommodate, but then it's not a permanent thing. You have to start. You have to constantly reassess and pull back those accommodations. Kimberley: Right. And I love that you share it. It's funny because sometimes I shock myself as a clinician. I know exactly what to do and I completely forget to do it with my kids. It's so hard. And I say, I completely forget. I'm not in denial. I actually forget like, “No, no, she's my child. It's my job. I have to protect her or protect him.” So, I think it's important that we talk about that because parents can be really, really hard on themselves and beat themselves up. I know we've talked about that in the past. So, thank you so much for sharing that. Okay. So, what about in the school setting? How do you encourage parents to communicate this with teachers, personnel, or principals, and so forth? How much do you encourage people to disclose? Natasha: I think it's really important to help the school understand your child. And I know that a lot of times parents are worried about stigma or their permanent record. And so, they avoid that. But really, we're setting our kids up for failure and we're setting the teacher up for failure. So, if they're young, especially when they're young, I think it is good to write a little summary of like, these are their issues. But be specific. These are the ways that it will show up in school and these are the ways that you can help. And giving that to the teacher, I always gave that to the teacher. Whenever you'd get that thing in the mail that said, or in their backpack, “Let me get to know your child,” I'd be like, I would staple this whole clinical summary in the back or email them, or I would ask them, “Can I meet with you alone after the parent-teacher conference?” But I wanted them to-- so, sometimes parents will say, “Well, I want them to get to know my child first before they see them as having a disorder.” And I have found over and over again that it only benefited my child when they knew they had anxiety and OCD, that they weren't being a problem child. They weren't trying to go to the bathroom to avoid. They had certain issues that were going to show up. So, I do think it's important. Now, my son and my daughter, my older daughter, both also have anxiety/OCD issues. My daughter's 18. Once she hit an age, I'd ask her, do you want me to notify your teachers? She hit a bump in high school and I offered, “I can go in and talk to the counselor.” And I actually did this past year because we had another issue going on, but there was a respect issue. At that point, that was her life. And my son, who's 12, now I also ask. But when it became an issue, I said, “I need to tell your teachers. Yeah.” And so, you have to decide. Kimberley: Yeah. And now there's no rule, right? And every kid is probably different too. I know for my kids, they're such different little human beings, so my approach is way different with them. Absolutely. Okay. A couple of questions. I know I'm just coming up because I wanted to ask. So, as a parent managing, it's hard to see your kids suffer and it's also hard to see them avoid. I know it's interesting. My first reaction surprisingly was anger, right? It made me angry that this was happening. What might parents do for themselves to manage their own emotional experience when they watch their child suffering? Natasha: It could be very triggering and it could impact your relationship with your partner because you're approaching it differently. It can tap you out because you're spending so much time helping your kids, that you are forgetting to focus on yourself. And so, that cliche statement of putting the oxygen mask on yourself first actually has a lot of validity because, how you view your child, how you take care of yourself, your health, your emotional and physical health, and also how you catastrophize your child's issues will impact your child's ability to have long term success. And so, sometimes I try to get parents to connect their child's success with their own issues because that's the only thing I'll motivate them to focus inward because they're selfless and they want to focus on their child. “Don't worry about me. That's not a front-burner issue. Let me focus on my child.” And I try to get parents to see you're a pivotal point, because when you're catastrophizing and you're seeing a college student in front of you not functioning and they're in kindergarten, that's doing something to how you approach that child. That's creating a lot of anxiety with that. So, self-work is really important. Kimberley: Yeah. It's so important. It is so important. I did some reflecting this week in terms of, we have a dentist appointment that is going to be hard. It's funny, we're talking this week because this is the week that we have a huge procedure happening. And I'm doing my own work and sitting in like, it is what it is. I can support, I can encourage, I can do the exposures. But when I start getting grasping, I'm like, “No, it has to happen. She has to get it. It has to be done. And it has to be done that day.” And that's when I don't show up as the parent I want to be. And it shows up in many areas. It's not just when I'm with them. It's like, I'm angry when I'm typing and I'm frustrated when I'm taking a walk. So, it shows up in so many areas. So, I feel such deep compassion for the parent who is anticipating these upcoming events like vaccinations and Halloween being a big one for some kids. Some parents are dreading these events. Natasha: Yeah, and knowing what your own triggers are. I know what my triggers are. I know I can't handle choking. I know I can't handle-- my husband used to take my kids to get blood work because I have a thing with shots and blood work. And so, if you can tap out and have someone else do it, if it's a trigger for you, that could be helpful. Or knowing how to center yourself, I had to really fake it this past year because there was no help. And they were just sitting on my lap and they can feel my energy. They can. So, I had to authentically do my own work, not fake it because they can feel it. They can feel in your body and just say, they don't get it done. like you said, if they don't get it done, they don't get it done. If they pass out or throw up – because I think that's my phobia, it's like, I don't want them to pass out in front of me because they always do – then it's going to be okay, no matter what. Kimberley: Did you, as a parent, if you don't mind me asking, have to do your own exposures to their exposures? Natasha: Taking them has been an exposure. It's actually not an exposure because it's just happening to me. But I didn't. I actually didn't. I just do my own internal work. I find just telling myself that it doesn't matter if they pass out and they do. And they still do. And it's all still okay. Kimberley: You're amazing. It's really inspiring actually to know you're walking the walk, not just talking the talk. It's really quite impressive. Natasha: Oh, thanks. Kimberley: Yeah. So, what do you do if your child adamantly does not want to engage in treatment? Natasha: It's really important that we get them to enter treatment approaches on their own, because I really feel like we can break their ability to embrace approaches lifelong if we strong-arm them and we force them and we do things. I've had parents say like, “I just take their hand and I make them touch stuff.” And I think that child's never going to do that on their own then because we're always going to dig our heels back. So, I think it's meeting your child where your child is at. And there's always an entry point. It may not be the entry point you want, and I totally get that because my son, he did not want to do anything initially. And that's frustrating when your child's starving to death, but it's not going-- you can't force it. You can't grab the steering wheel and drive for them. And so, what do they need for me to get them to that point? Do they need-- do I just have to work on communication with them? Do I just have to work on them trusting? They say something and I just listen. Can I just get them to watch a bunch of YouTube videos or read a couple of books and give them bravery points for doing that? That's treatment. That's education. So, I think it's just finding out where does your child want to start. Kimberley: Right. I know I took one of your courses, the SPACE training, which was amazing. And I found that really helpful too, is to just catch-- if they don't want to do treatment to catch where the accommodation is happening on the parents end. Did you want to share a little about that? Natasha: Yeah. I think that SPACE Program, Eli Lebowitz's SPACE Program, is huge because it finally empowers parents to do something, even if their children don't want anything to do with it. So, you can work on your trust and communication, but then there are-- OCD is a family affair, we often say, and there's a lot that we can do that OCD wants us to do. And so, working on how we approach it, what kind of family environment do we create in our home? What things do we pull back, our accommodation? There's a lot of work that a parent can do on their own. And that's what the SPACE program does. And I have a study guide because I think some people just want a video of like, “Just break it down for me, Natasha.” Kimberley: That was me. I want the bullet point version. Natasha: Yeah. Kimberley: That's what that does. And it was amazing. Okay. So, thank you so much. This has been so incredibly helpful. I'm wondering if you could give us some major points, things that you really feel that we need to know either as clinicians or parents or loved ones of a child who's struggling with OCD and anxiety. What are some main points or things that you want us to know of before we sign off for the day? Natasha: Well, I think you cover a lot in your podcast with such good information. So, I would just add to that and say, don't forget to make it fun, right? I mean, all this doom and gloom, the kids can feel that. And we can make OCD fun and we can gamify it. So, that's really important. And I think the other part is not forgetting to highlight the superpowers that kids with anxiety and OCD have, letting them know that there are amazing qualities that come with a person who has anxiety or OCD. And my kids get proud of that. They start to feel like, “I'm intuitive,” or “I'm kind-hearted,” or they'll even actually say, “My superpower is...” So, don't forget that part. That piece is important. Kimberley: So important, particularly because with OCD and anxiety comes so many qualities, right? They can have qualities. They're so brave. They're so courageous. They're so resilient. These are things that will serve them for why. Natasha: Totally. Kimberley: Yeah. Well, I thank you so much. Number one, as a human being, thank you, because I needed this this week without even realizing it. Natasha: I'm glad you need it timely. Kimberley: It was such great timing, but also thank you for all the amazing work that you do. I think this is an incredible resource. So, can you tell us where people go to hear more about you? Natasha: Yeah. And thank you for your work. I think that you're just putting such good stuff out there. People can find, if they want to look at my online courses, they can go to atparentingsurvivalschool.com. And I provide online resources for parents and courses to teach you how to help your kids crush anxiety and OCD. They can also listen to my podcast. Kimberley: Great. And I'll have links in the show notes for anyone who wants to access that. I am so grateful to you. Thank you so much for doing such great work. Natasha: Thanks for having me.

Cloud Accounting Podcast
Transforming Hotel Accounting With Megan Walker

Cloud Accounting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 23:21


Meet Our Guest:Megan Walker, CPA - Vice President of Accounting and Finance at Oxford Corporatehttps://www.linkedin.com/in/megan-walker-cpa-39843973/Learn more about Oxford Collection:https://www.oxfordcollection.com/Need CPE? Subscribe to the Earmark Accounting Podcast: https://podcast.earmarkcpe.comGet CPE for listening to podcasts with Earmark CPE: https://earmarkcpeGet in TouchThanks for listening and for the great reviews! We appreciate you! Follow and tweet @BlakeTOliver and @DavidLeary. Find us on Facebook and, if you like what you hear, please do us a favor and write a review on iTunes, or Podchaser. Interested in sponsoring the Cloud Accounting Podcast? For details, read the prospectus, and NOW, you can see our smiling faces on Instagram! You can now call us and leave a voicemail, maybe we'll play it on the show. DIAL (202) 695-1040Need Accounting Conference Info? Check out our new website - accountingconferences.comLimited edition shirts, stickers, and other necessitiesTeePublic Store: http://cloudacctpod.link/merchSubscribe Apple Podcasts: http://cloudacctpod.link/ApplePodcasts Podchaser: http://cloudacctpod.link/podchaser Spotify: http://cloudacctpod.link/Spotify Google Play: http://cloudacctpod.link/GooglePlay Stitcher: http://cloudacctpod.link/Stitcher Overcast: http://cloudacctpod.link/Overcast Want to get the word out about your newsletter, webinar, party, Facebook group, podcast, e-book, job posting, or that fancy Excel macro you just created? Why not let the listeners of The Cloud Accounting Podcast know by running a classified ad? Hit the link below to get more info!Go here to create your classified ad: https://cloudacctpod.link/RunClassifiedAd

All The Hard Things
#87 - What Does NOT Work For OCD Treatment - Part II

All The Hard Things

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 33:24


In this episode, I talk about therapies, techniques, and interventions that could be harmful or detrimental to OCD treatment. I discuss... - ice packs, law of attraction concepts, focusing too much on content, and more - benzodiazepine use for OCD/during treatment - mistakes therapists make including not focusing enough on lifestyle exposures, not having the right demeanor during exposure work, and more For OCD treatment, check out NOCD - head to www.treatmyocd.com and schedule your free 15 minute phone call to get connected with a licensed therapist who specializes in Exposure and Response Prevention. NOCD is a mobile therapy platform and includes video sessions with a therapist, in addition to peer support, ERP tools, and more. This podcast should not be substituted, nor is meant to act as a substitute, for legitimate mental health treatment/a legitimate mental health treatment provider. This podcast and any information in it is solely the reflection of general knowledge and cannot be taken as a personal therapeutic recommendation. To find a therapist near you to work more directly with these issues, head over to IOCDF.org, psychologytoday.com, or nami.org. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jennaoverbaugh/support

The Breakout Growth Podcast
Crushing it: Truebill's Journey from Death's Doorstep to Hyper Growth

The Breakout Growth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 59:12


In the last 48 months, the fintech app Truebill, which helps users manage their personal finances, has had 47 months of exceptional growth. But in this week’s episode of the Breakout Growth Podcast, brought to you by Rise with SAP, Ethan Garr and Sean Ellis find out that before this hypergrowth tear began, the company was actually on death’s doorstep. Four years ago, the two-year-old startup had just three months of runway remaining, and Co-founder and Chief Revenue Officer Yahya Mokhtarzada was told by one of his investors that the only option was to sell. He figured the company had the bandwidth for two more experiments; one of those tests would change everything! The test shifted the business from an affiliate to a premium subscription model, and the surprising conversion result didn’t just buy more time, it was the final piece needed for Truebill to achieve Product/Market Fit. Since then, Truebill’s breakout growth success has been a story of “eternal tweaking” where Yahya has come to learn that if you are doing growth right, resources never free up the way you expect. As Chief Revenue Officer in a B2C business, he sees his role as one of setting up teams to stay focused on the things that matter and ensuring individuals can continuously thrive by leveraging their creativity. And creativity seems to be one of the key success factors for Truebill. If you download the app, you might be surprised by the “pay what you think is fair” pricing model, and other unique elements that drive users to aha moments where they start thinking about their finances and saving money in different ways. There is plenty to learn in this episode, but before you jump in learn more about RISE with SAP S/4Hana Cloud here. If you have ambitious goals, SAP is the technology partner you need to scale and drive innovation. Instead of relying on stitched together solutions to manage business finances, operations, and customer relations, leverage the flexibility of SAP’s cloud-based ERP solution to gain the insights that will help drive your breakout growth success. Thanks for tuning in. Please subscribe and share the Breakout Growth Podcast with your colleagues and friends. We discussed: * “The app I always needed:” how an annoying $40/month subscription fee drove Truebill’s inception (04:14) * Chief Revenue Officer: a very different role in B2B vs. B2C (07:01) * “We weren’t the cool kids:” Struggling to find traction and Product/Market Fit (11:10) * Crunch time: 3 months of runway and time for two experiments. What a last-chance test on premium subscriptions taught Truebill (22:27) * Building growth: The LTV/CAC rat

Play to Potential Podcast
655: 84.03 Harsh Mariwala - Remove Escape Buttons

Play to Potential Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 6:48


NUGGET CONTEXT Harsh speaks about his belief in Prof Ram Charan's maxim – Remove Escape Buttons. Harsh speaks about how he leveraged this insight in the way he went about pursuing the International Business and implementing the ERP system in Marico. GUEST Harsh Mariwala is Founder and Chairman of Marico, an FMCG giant well known for brands like Parachute and Saffola. He has recently Co-Authored the book - Harsh Realities (Published by Penguin Random House) along with Management Guru, Ram Charan. The book is a story of how Harsh broke away from the shackles of family-run Bombay Oil Industries Ltd, which was a commodities business to set up a professionally run Marico including all the trials and tribulations along the way.  Some of the themes we covered included how he tactfully separated from his family business, how he broke away from the shackles of mediocre talent that often haunt SMEs, his evolution along the way as a leader, his transition to a Professional CEO and how he has managed to assemble a set of advisors in his Board and otherwise to guide him on his journey. Published in Dec 2021. HOST Deepak is a Leadership Advisor and an Executive Coach. He works with leaders to improve their effectiveness and in helping them make better decisions specifically around organizational and career transitions. He currently runs Transition Insight (www.transitioninsight.com) and works with leaders to handle phases of transition thoughtfully. He has worked as an Operations Consultant with KPMG in UK, Strategy Consultant with McKinsey in the US and as a Leadership Consultant with EgonZehnder (a Swiss Leadership Advisory firm) where he helped companies recruit CEOs, CXOs and Board Members and worked on Leadership Development. Deepak is a certified CEO Coach and is an alumnus of IIT Madras, IIM Ahmedabad and London Business School. His detailed profile can be found at https://in.linkedin.com/in/djayaraman OTHER GUESTS 1.Vijay Amritraj 2.Amish Tripathi 3.Raghu Raman 4.Papa CJ 5.Kartik Hosanagar 6.Ravi Venkatesan 7.Abhijit Bhaduri 8.Viren Rasquinha 9.Prakash Iyer 10.Avnish Bajaj 11.Nandan Nilekani 12.Atul Kasbekar 13.Karthik Reddy 14.Pramath Sinha 15.Vedika Bhandarkar 16.Vinita Bali 17.Zia Mody 18.Rama Bijapurkar 19.Dheeraj Pandey 20.Anu Madgavkar 21.Vishy Anand 22. Meher Pudumjee 23.KV Shridhar (Pops) 24.Suresh Naraynan 25.Devdutt Pattanaik 26.Jay Panda 27.Amit Chandra 28.Chandramouli Venkatesan 29.Roopa Kudva 30.Vinay Sitapati 31.Neera Nundy. 32.Deepa Malik 33.Bombay Jayashri. 34.Arun Maira 35.Ambi Parameswaran 36.OP Bhaat 37.Indranil Chakraborty 38.Tarun Khanna 39. Ramachandra Guha 40. Stewart Friedman 41. Rich Fernandez 42. Falguni Nayar 43. Rajat Gupta 44. Kartik Hosanagar 45. Michael Watkins 46. Matt Dixon 47. Herminia Ibarra 48. Paddy Upton 49. Tasha Eurich 50. Alan Eagle 51. Sudhir Sitapati 52. James Clear 53. Lynda Gratton 54. Jennifer Petriglieri. 55. Matthew Walker 56. Raj Raghunathan 57. Jennifer Garvey Berger 58. BJ Fogg 59. R Gopolakrishnan 60. Sir Andrew Likierman. 61. Atul Khatri 62. Whitney Jonson 63. Venkat Krishnan 64. Marshall Goldsmith 65. Ashish Dhawan 66. Vinay Sitapati 67. Ashley Whillans 68. Tenzin Priyadarshi 69. Ramesh Srinivasan 70. Bruce Feiler 71. Sanjeev Aggarwal and T. N. Hari 72. Bill Carr 73. Jennifer Wetzler 74. Sally Helgesen 75. Dan Cable 76. Tom Vanderbilt 77. Darleen DeRosa 78. Amy Edmondson 79. Katy Milkman 80. Harish Bhatt 81. Lloyd Reeb 82. Sukhinder Cassidy DISCLAIMER All content and opinions expressed in the podcast are that of the guests and are not necessarily the opinions of Deepak Jayaraman and Transition Insight Private Limited. Views expressed in comments to blog are the personal opinions of the author of the comment. They do not necessarily reflect the views of The Company or the author of the blog. Participants are responsible for the content of their comments and all comments that are posted are in the public domain. The Company reserves the right to monitor, edit, and/or publish any submitted comments. Not all comments may be published. Any third-party comments published are third party information and The Company takes no responsibility and disclaims all liability. The Company reserves the right, but is not obligated to monitor and delete any comments or postings at any time without notice.

Your Anxiety Toolkit
Ep. 212 How much ERP Should I do daily

Your Anxiety Toolkit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 15:33


SUMMARY: In today's podcast, we take a deep dive into a common question I get from followers and CBTschool.com members. HOW MUCH ERP SHOULD I BE DOING DAILY?  Because ERP is such an important part of OCD treatment and OCD therapy, I wanted to outline how you might set up an ERP plan for yourself and how that can help you with your OCD treatment. In This Episode: What is ERP (exposure and response prevention)? What an Exposure and Response Prevention plan looks like. How to determine how much ERP you should do each day Why it is important to practice ERP for OCD, health anxiety, and other anxiety disorders. How to taper off doing ERP once your obsessions and compulsions have reduced. How to practice self-compassion during ERP Links To Things I Talk About: ERP School: https://www.cbtschool.com/erp-school-lp Kimberley's ERP Book: The Self-Compassion Workbook for OCD CBTschool.com Episode Sponsor This episode of Your Anxiety Toolkit is brought to you by CBTschool.com.  CBTschool.com is a psychoeducation platform that provides courses and other online resources for people with anxiety, OCD, and Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors.  Go to cbtschool.com to learn more. Spread the love! Everyone needs tools for anxiety... If you like Your Anxiety Toolkit Podcast, visit YOUR ANXIETY TOOLKIT PODCAST to subscribe free and you'll never miss an episode. And if you really like Your Anxiety Toolkit, I'd appreciate you telling a friend (maybe even two). EPISODE TRANSCRIPTION This is Your Anxiety Toolkit – Episode 212. Welcome. I am so thrilled today to talk to you about a question I get asked all the time, which is, how long should I be doing exposure and response prevention per day? So we are going to go all the way through that here in just a sec. But before we do that, we always start the show with our “I did a hard thing.” Now, each week people submit their “I did a hard thing” and we share it because we want to spread the word on all of the hard things that people are doing to inspire you, to help you realize you're not alone and to help give you that little bit of motivation to face your fears as well. Now, what we usually do after that is we do the review of the week as well, which is where people leave a review on iTunes for this podcast, Your Anxiety Toolkit. But today, somebody left a review that was also the “I did a hard thing.” So I thought, no better opportunity than to do both at once. This is from Jayjenpeezy, and they said: “Right on time! I cannot even begin to say how helpful this podcast is and I have incorporated into parts of my daily meditations and/or listen to it on my walks. A few weeks ago I was admitted to the ER and kept overnight for an observation and what the doctors originally thought was tachycardia turned out to be a panic attack which I had never experienced to that degree before. I spent the next few weeks even more anxious at the thought that it would happen again and thought I'd lost my mind and began taking antidepressants as a quick solve which now I know is not the solution I truly needed. (Mind you, I am speaking only for myself and understand that not everyone is able to be off their prescription meds.)” I love that you included that. “After doing some research I learned about this podcast and ERP and am starting to feel much better about a lot of things. I've also changed my diet to be more alkaline, incorporated daily meditation, gratitude journaling and have been able to finally leave my house to take daily walks. The journey is different for everyone but as she continuously reminds me that “it's a beautiful day to do hard things” and that panic attacks are not actually attacking you it's your adrenaline rushing through you and in time comes to pass when you are able to meet it eye to eye. I also learned to look at it as willful tolerance,” we have a whole episode on that “and it is not so scary anymore. I am taking it one day at a time and am mindful of being present as possible. Ending up in the emergency room while my children were left at home at night was enough for me to take any and all necessary steps to not allow my anxiety control me. Sending love to all and may the force be with you.” I love that. Let's just say that is the perfect marry between “I did a hard thing” and a review. So thank you so much to our reviewer, Jayjenpeezy. I am in such admiration of you. So let's get over to the show. Today, we are talking specifically about how long or how frequent your ERP should be. Now, when I say “should,” I'm going to disclose here, it's different for everybody, but I'm going to tell you just briefly what I would tell any of my clients. And then from there, you get to go and decide what is right for you. Okay? So, let's go over to that topic. When someone asks me how long or how frequent and what duration I should do for an exposure, I almost always tell them the same thing. In ERP School, the online course for OCD, and in my new book, The Self-Compassion Workbook For OCD, I say exactly the same thing in both, which is ideally, you should practice exposures for around 45 to 90 minutes per day. Now, I know that doesn't work for everybody. So you have to go and do and find a balance of what's right for you. But let me show you how you might incorporate that 45 minutes to 90 minutes per day. While it's totally fine if you do this, in fact, I applaud you if you do this, but I don't suggest that you do it just in one lump sum time. It's hard to schedule 45 to 90 minutes if you have a job, a family, or you go to school or you have another mental illness that you're working through. What I encourage people to do is to displace that time throughout the day. Again, you can follow my rule. I did a whole episode about scheduling and how it's important for your recovery. You can schedule it into your day in blocks, like for 15 minutes after breakfast, you do an imaginal, or for 15 minutes before lunch, you'd go and face something that you're afraid of. For 10 minutes before you go and make coffee, you may do some of your homework. You can schedule it in blocks. I like that. That's my preference if it were me. But a lot of people, what I encourage them to do is pair it with activities you're already doing, or you would already be doing had you not had OCD or this fear. So an example might be, as you're driving to work, you could be listening to your scripting in ERP School, our online for OCD, and in The Self-Compassion Workbook For OCD. We explain extensively how to do scripting and imaginals. You can do that while you drive to work. You can do that while you make your breakfast. You can do that while you wash the dishes. You can do that while you walk around the block. You can do it while you stretch. You can do it while you're in the shower. These are activities where you don't actually have to stop what you're doing to do exposures. You can do many exposures in your normal daily life. In addition, let's say you have the fear of contamination or doing some activity and fear of what thoughts you may have. I would encourage you to try to go about your day, having the thought on purpose. So you don't have to, again, stop your day and stop your schedule and your normal functioning. You could start to implement these things that you're afraid of throughout the day. Or if again, something you're avoiding, you may then want to practice implementing that back into your day, particularly if it brings you fulfillment and wellness and more functionality into your day. Instead of, let's say, you have a compulsion where you ask somebody to accommodate you, you might actually choose to do it yourself. You get points for that. That is an exposure. That should go towards your 45 to 90 minutes per day. Now that being said, that's just exposures. The response prevention is something that you do throughout the entire day. For those of you who don't really understand the difference, an exposure is where you face yourself to your fear or your obsession. You face that fear of obsession. Response prevention is then not engaging in a compulsive behavior to reduce, remove, or eliminate the discomfort, uncertainty, or feeling that you're experiencing. Some form of discomfort it usually is. The response prevention is something you will practice for the whole 24 hours as best as you can. Now, does that mean you need to do your exposure? Let's say your exposure is to touch a certain object or face a certain object or have a thought. Does that mean you need to go completely cold turkey from your compulsion? No. In a perfect world, yes, that would be the case, but we don't live in a perfect world. You don't have super powers. I wouldn't expect my clients, myself, or you to go from 0 to 100. What we can do there is we can practice it in small baby steps. You face your fear and you say, “Okay, I'm going to try and do response prevention for the next five minutes.” Then you move it up to 10 minutes. Then you move it up to 15 minutes. Then you might move it up to an hour or whatever feels right to you. What we're talking about here is, do as much response prevention as you can, work your way up. As we say in ERP School, ERP is really like a ladder building hierarchy. You start small and you work your way up slowly. Preferably you have a plan. You know what the plan is, you know what the first step is, you know what the second step is. Life isn't perfect, like I said, so I don't expect it to be perfect. But I think with that model, where you first practice accumulating 40 to 90 minutes of exposures, and then you practice response prevention as much as you can, as you build up and build up and build up steps, you have a great ERP plan right there, an amazing ERP plan. One thing to consider. When my husband came on the podcast, it's episode 99. He talked about his panic attacks that he had an agoraphobia he had on airplanes. He brought up the concern of, it's not like he could get on a plane for 10 minutes and then get on a plane for 15 minutes and then get off. There are certain situations where you have to go from 0 to 100. So you have to get on the plane and stay on the plane. In his case, it was 17 hours to Australia. So there will be situations where you have to take that huge leap. That is okay. You can still tolerate that. I still want to reinforce and empower you to believe you can still tolerate those big, big exposure jumps from 0 to 100 or from maybe four or five to 100. You can still tolerate those. I don't want you to feel like it's not possible. Anyone can face their fear. It just depends on how willing they are to be uncomfortable. But what he did as he led up to that is find creative ways to practice the scenario and simulate the scenario as best as he could. He took the train. He took little buses. He took the trolley. There's a small trolley back and forth from the mall, so he practiced on that and practiced tolerating his panic. So you can find ways. Even if it's not the specific fear, you can find other ways to simulate that fear or that thought or that sensation so that you can practice building up to those bigger, longer exposures where you don't get to choose how long you do the exposure for. So there are some ideas on how you can practice ERP, what frequency, what duration. Now the other question I commonly get is, do I have to do it every day? No, you don't have to do it every day, but I always encourage my patients to do it as much as you can. This is like building a muscle. So the more mental push-ups you do, the better and stronger you get. Now we also know that you can do too many pushups and burn out. And so it's important to keep an eye on that. I always try to talk about balance. So try to find a plan or a system or a routine in your calendar that is sustainable, that you can continue to do over time. Some people have written in and said, “I went full gung-ho, went hard, burnt out. The idea of ERP was so overwhelming after that. So I stopped.” So I really discourage you from going that kind of way. You don't have to be perfect. Please don't do this perfectionistically. Find little baby ways to implement it throughout your day so you don't burn out. That is how you do this work for a long period of time. That is how you get better. That's how you do it in a healthy, compassionate way. So that is how we do it. You don't have to do it every day. In fact, some of my patients schedule different obsessions on different days. Other patients take a six-day exposure and take Sunday off or one day off a week. You could do whatever feels right to you. Just be really honest with yourself. When you schedule your ERP, are you scheduling it because of your values and your self-compassion or are you scheduling it because you're secretly afraid? Even if it's that, even if it's the letter and your scheduling because you're secretly afraid, no problem. We are doing the best we can with what we have. Just be really honest with yourself, and look and work on that if that's the main issue. Thank you so much for being here today. I am honored to spend this time chatting with you. Hopefully, you got a ton from this episode. I love when I get questions from you guys. If you are, go over to Instagram and you can chat with me there. I'll leave the link in the show notes. You can always ask me questions there. I often do Q and A's and I'd be more than happy to answer your questions. All right, you guys know what I'm going to say. It's a beautiful day to do hard things. Go and do the hard thing. You will not be sorry. You will be so empowered. You will feel so much better. It is hard work, so be gentle with yourself. But I believe in you. Have a good day.

The OCD Stories
Story: Katie Strang (OCD Illustrated) (#304)

The OCD Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 54:32


In episode 304 I chat with Katie Strang. Katie is a therapist, who advocates on Instagram through the account OCD Illustrated. We discuss her OCD story, her themes, going to inpatient care, social anxiety, learning to take her symptoms less seriously, how she structures ERP now after therapy, we discuss how friends and family reducing accommodation can make OCD better, the value in connecting with people who have other symptoms than your own, words of hope and much more. Hope it helps.  Show notes: https://theocdstories.com/episode/story-katie-strang-304  The podcast is made possible by NOCD. NOCD offers affordable, effective, convenient therapy available in the US and outside the US. To find out more about NOCD, their therapy plans and if they currently take your insurance head over to https://go.treatmyocd.com/theocdstories