Podcasts about Swahili

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Best podcasts about Swahili

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Latest podcast episodes about Swahili

Chenelle’s language learning journey podcast.
CLLJP. EP. 279. Chenelle, learning conversational Greek, finish in Swahili in 2023.

Chenelle’s language learning journey podcast.

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 31:27


today on Chenelle's language learning journey podcast. I change my mind about which languages I'm going to learn for 2023. I also speak a little bit of Greek during the podcast to indicate that Greek, Swahili in Finnish will be the languages that I'm learning for 2023 using the following resource materials: the mangolanguages.com app, the creek pod 101, finish pod 101 and the Swahili part 101 language learning series by innovative language learning, and the MICHEL, Thomas Creek foundation/advance course for Creek. If you would like to get 35% off of any of the foundation courses that MICHEL Thomas Method has to offer you can type in the promotional code: afmtchn@michelthomas.cOM and you will get 35% off any of the languages of your choice that even includes Greek. If you would like to check out which languages that mangolanguages.com has to offer, please click on the link and you will be able to find out more information. PS, I am not affiliate aid it with Mango languages at all. I just enjoy using their app, and that's why I'm recommending it to my listeners. Please follow, share, and review the podcast on all podcasting platforms were podcast or download it. Thank you so much for your support and remember, language learning is a journey, not a race. enjoy the process, enjoy the podcast, and I will see you in the next episode of Chenelle's language, learning journey podcast. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/chenelle-patrice-hancock/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/chenelle-patrice-hancock/support

Golden State Naturalist
Growth Mindset with John Muir Laws (BONUS Minisode!)

Golden State Naturalist

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 29:00


How useful is IQ? What exactly is a growth mindset, and how is it different from a fixed mindset? What shifts can we make in our thinking that will allow us to learn and grow in new ways? Should you take Swahili lessons? How does all of this apply to being a naturalist and nature journaler? In this cute tiny bonus episode, come with me and John Muir Laws as we discuss all of this and more. Links: John Muir Laws Website John Muir Laws Books Neuroplasticity Carol Dweck's Scientific American Article My website is www.goldenstatenaturalist.com My Patreon is www.patreon.com/michellefullner You can find me on Instagram or TikTok @goldenstatenaturalist Imbodhi (actual best and coziest onesies for everything). Use code GoldenStateNaturalist15 to get $15 off your first order. The theme song is called "i dunno" by grapes, and it can be found here.

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com
Learning Strategies #125 - How to Learn Swahili Conversations on The GO with Conversation Cheat Sheets

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 1:51


The Mariner's Mirror Podcast
Maritime Africa 5: The World Heritage Sites of Songo Mnara and Kilwa Kisiwani

The Mariner's Mirror Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 22:32


We continue our mini-series on maritime Africa with an episode on Songo Mnara and Kilwa, two significant maritime settlements on the Swahili Coast. In the previous episode we heard how the Swahili coast of east Africa is particularly rich in its maritime cultural heritage and trading past, where African and Arabic cultures have mixed for centuries across the Indian Ocean. In this episode we investigate two locations in great depth, both Swahili stone towns that made their place in global maritime history. Dr Sam Willis spoke with Mercy Mbogelah, who manages the ruins of both sites for UNESCO World Heritage. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com
News #245 - How to Learn Swahili in 2023. Inside: Learning Methods & Success Strategies

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 4:48


learn the best ways to make real measurable progress https://www.swahilipod101.com?src=rss01152023

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com
Monthly Review Video #51 - Swahili January 2023 Review - How to Reach Your Goal for the Year - The Long Term Strategy for Success

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 9:48


discover your new learning strategies and free resources of the month.

She's Bold Podcast
She's Bold Trailer

She's Bold Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 0:16


A podcast where we challenge traditions and mindset limiting an African woman. Featuring episodes in Swahili and some special episodes in English.

Swahili News - NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN
NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN - Swahili News at 15:30 (JST), January 06

Swahili News - NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 8:56


NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN - Swahili News at 15:30 (JST), January 06

EMPIRE LINES
Kiti Cha Enzi (Swahili Chair of Power), East Africa (19th Century)

EMPIRE LINES

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 15:18


Dr. Sarah Longair unseats European powers' efforts to control the East African coast, through a Kiti Cha Enzi, or Swahili Chair of Power, produced in the 19th century. Intricately decorated with an ivory inlay, a large, wooden throne sits proudly - not in its place of production of Witu, Kenya, but the stores of the British Museum. Kiti cha enzi, or seats of power, were used as thrones by Swahili rulers from the 18th century. Their distinctive form incorporates myriad cultural influences, highlighting the vibrant pre-colonial trading history of the Swahili community, while their symbolic use speaks to shifting patterns of power on the African coast. Produced as Germany and Britain competed for colonial control on the East African coast, this chair is a material symbol of how a small Swahili community resisted European expansion. Its seizure from the Swahili Sultan Fumo Bakari, and subsequent relocation by Admiral Fremantle to the National Maritime Museum, and later British Museum, speaks to our current interests in the colonial origins of museum objects. But it also reveals the complex rivalries between Western imperial pofwers, and how East African leaders exercised their own agency by playing them against each other. PRESENTER: Dr. Sarah Longair, Senior Lecturer in the History of Empire at the University of Lincoln. ART: Kiti Cha Enzi (Swahili Chair of Power), East Africa (19th Century). IMAGE: 'Sketch of Kiti Cha Enzi of the Sultan of Witu, British Museum Af1992,05.1. Drawing: S Longair'. SOUNDS: Radi Cultural Group. PRODUCER: Jelena Sofronijevic. Follow EMPIRE LINES at: twitter.com/jelsofron/status/1306563558063271936 Support EMPIRE LINES on Patreon: patreon.com/empirelines

Grown Girl Divorce Podcast
Salama's Story: Girl, I've Been There Too Series Episode

Grown Girl Divorce Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 50:26


Salama means safe in Swahili.  Our guest today, Salama, shares her story about divorce and co-parenting: - shining the light on verbal & physical abuse in wealthy families, - why her children, and not the unhealthy relationship, were the reason she moved forward with a divorce, - how mediation can work even in high conflict or domestic abuse cases, - what she wish she knew about divorce before starting the process, and - how she successfully negotiated the parenting schedule she wanted. The Girl, I've Been There Too Series profiles Black women who have been through divorce and are sharing their stories to provide lessons learned, real talk on navigating the process, and coming out ahead post-divorce. Please be sure to catch all our episodes by subscribing to Grown Girl Divorce podcast. For more resources and support, visit our website www.growngirldivorce.com and follow us on social media.     Grown Girl Divorce podcast is a space of relatability for Black women considering and going through a divorce. These are girlfriend conversations to educate and empower you through the process. Our host, Kimberly A. Cook, Esq., is a highly acclaimed divorce attorney and mediator breaking down divorce misinformation, dismantling stereotypes on Black families, and shining the light on the importance of diverse representation in family law. Grown Girl Divorce podcast guests are primarily women of Color providing expert information or personal stories as a way to give voice to and support Black women going through divorce.  Be sure to check out our website for resources, information, and more.  Follow us on social media and listen to our Spotify playlists.  We believe sharing is caring so please share our resources and information with your girlfriends, colleagues, and family, because you never know who needs the support.

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com
Swahili Vocab Builder S1 #211 - Facial Expressions

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 4:16


learn essential vocabulary about common terms related to facial expressions

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com
Learning Strategies #124 - How to Learn Swahili Words by Writing Them Out

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 3:11


discover effective strategies and tips for learning Swahili

The Mariner's Mirror Podcast
Maritime Africa 4: The Swahili Coast

The Mariner's Mirror Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 33:16


We continue our mini-series on maritime Africa with an episode on the Swahili coast – a fascinating part of east Africa particularly rich in its maritime cultural heritage and trading past. The Swahili coast is distinctive for its mixture of African and Arabic cultures and the way that the two have been bound together by maritime trade across the Indian Ocean. There is also clear Chinese influence here as well, reflecting historic maritime trade routes thousands of miles longer and which date back to the Middle Ages. To find out more Dr Sam Willis spoke with Dr Stephanie Wynne- Jones form the University of York. Her work in Africa explores the deep links between people, landscapes, history and material culture and she has directed a series of excavation and survey projects in eastern Africa, including a study of early towns on Zanzibar and large-scale excavations at the World Heritage Swahili town of Songo Mnara – which we will find out more about in an upcoming episode. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com
News #244 - How to Reach Your 2023 Swahili New Year’s Resolution

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023


learn the secret blueprint to successful resolutions https://www.swahilipod101.com?src=rss01012023

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com
Video News #69 - Free Swahili Gifts of the Month - January 2023

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 1:36


Get your learning gifts for the month of January 2023

Women's Health, Wisdom, and. . . WINE!
#87 - NOURISH YOUR FLOURISH NUGGET | Habari Gani? NIA! Happy Kwanzaa (Day 5)

Women's Health, Wisdom, and. . . WINE!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 14:25


Kwanzaa (First Fruits) is a time for families and communities to come together to remember the past and to celebrate pan-African culture.Created in 1966 by Dr. Maulana Ron Karenga, Kwanzaa is an African American and Pan-African holiday that celebrates history, values, family, community and culture. The ideas and concepts of Kwanzaa are expressed in the Swahili language, one of the most widely spoken languages in Africa. The seven principles which form its core were drawn from communitarian values found throughout the African continent. These principles are: Umoja (Unity), Kujichagulia (Self-Determination), Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility), Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics), Nia (Purpose), Kuumba (Creativity), and Imani (Faith). Kwanzaa gets its name from the Swahili phrase, “matunda ya kwanza” and is rooted in first fruit celebrations which are found in cultures throughout Africa both in ancient and modern times.NIA (Purpose) - To make our collective vocation the building and developing of our community in order to restore our people to their traditional greatness.Song for reflection: Higher Ground, Stevie WonderThought for the Day: Poem About My Rights by June JordanToday's Recipe: Sauteed Pecans Today's Children's ActivityFacebook: The Eudaimonia CenterInstagram: theeudaimoniacenterTwitter: eu_daimonismFor more reproductive medicine and women's health information and other valuable resources, make sure to visit our website.Looking for a nutritional advantage this holiday season? Try LIFE and get 30% off when you visit aminoco.com/LW30.

The CEO Dialogue
Khadija Mohamed-Churchill

The CEO Dialogue

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 61:46


In Nairobi's industrial area, motorcycles piled high with bright yellow plastic tubs zip through the early morning traffic to deliver food staples like flour, cooking oil, and pulses to women who have set up makeshift stalls to cook meals for low-income workers. The street food vendors place their orders the day before via an app and pay for their purchases with mobile payment system M-Pesa. This tech-enabled business-to-business food distribution service was the brainchild of Khadija Mohamed-Churchill, who founded Kwanza Tukule (which means “first, let's eat” in Swahili) to address the lack of affordable and nutritious food for people living in Kenya's growing informal settlements. Mohamed-Churchill says building a social enterprise requires both a big heart and a clear strategic focus. In an in-depth discussion with Jean-Francois Manzoni, she reveals what motivates her and offers advice for other impact entrepreneurs on how to build a committed team and attract investors.-------Read our new magazine, I by IMD, here.Discover IMD's leadership programmes here.

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com
Swahili Vocab Builder S1 #115 - Home Interior

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 5:10


learn essential vocabulary for describing home interior

Women's Health, Wisdom, and. . . WINE!
#86 - NOURISH YOUR FLOURISH NUGGET | Habari Gani? UJIMA! Happy Kwanzaa (Day 3)

Women's Health, Wisdom, and. . . WINE!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 15:53


Kwanzaa (First Fruits) is a time for families and communities to come together to remember the past and to celebrate pan-African culture.Created in 1966 by Dr. Maulana Ron Karenga, Kwanzaa is an African American and Pan-African holiday that celebrates history, values, family, community and culture. The ideas and concepts of Kwanzaa are expressed in the Swahili language, one of the most widely spoken languages in Africa. The seven principles which form its core were drawn from communitarian values found throughout the African continent. These principles are: Umoja (Unity), Kujichagulia (Self-Determination), Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility), Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics), Nia (Purpose), Kuumba (Creativity), and Imani (Faith). Kwanzaa gets its name from the Swahili phrase, “matunda ya kwanza” and is rooted in first fruit celebrations which are found in cultures throughout Africa both in ancient and modern times.UJIMA (Collective Work and Responsibility) - To build and maintain our community together and make our community's problems our problems and to solve them together.Song for reflection: Optimistic, Sounds of BlacknessThought for the Day: Wilkerson, Isabel. The Warmth of Other Suns. Random House, 2010. P. 538"Over the decades, perhaps the wrong questions have been asked about the Great Migration. Perhaps it is not a question of whether the migrants brought good or ill to the cities they fled or were pushed or pulled to their destinations, but a question of how they summoned the courage to leave in the first place or how they found the will to press beyond the forces against them and the faith in a country that had rejected them for so long. By their actions, they did not dream the American Dream, they willed it into being by a definition of their own choosing. They did not ask to be accepted but declared themselves the Americans that perhaps few others recognized but that they had always been deep within their hearts."Today's Recipe: Caribbean Sorrel Facebook: The Eudaimonia CenterInstagram: theeudaimoniacenterTwitter: eu_daimonismFor more reproductive medicine and women's health information and other valuable resources, make sure to visit our website.Looking for a nutritional advantage this holiday season? Try LIFE and get 30% off when you visit aminoco.com/LW30 .

EMPIRE LINES
Thabo, Thabiso and Blackx, Araminta de Clermont (2010)

EMPIRE LINES

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 22:11


Dr. Chris Spring tears up stereotypes of African textiles, through Araminta de Clermont's 2010 photograph, Thabo, Thabiso and Blackx. Three young men wait at a bus stop near Cape Town in South Africa, clad in blankets of brilliant blue and rose red. Historically, these 'African' woven textiles were originally manufactured by Europeans during the colonial period. Dutch imperial traders, who first entered the Indian Ocean trade in the mid-seventeenth century, only added to the existing vigorous trade in textiles which had been carried out by Indian, Arab, and Chinese traders for many centuries before the arrival of Europeans. From indigo resist-dyed blauwdruk, to Swahili kanga, and South African shweshwe, these ‘authentic' products are truly the hybrid product of places and peoples working across and within empires - from factories in Manchester, to migrant merchants from Kutch, and businesses within the Japanese Empire. This confident photograph speaks to how patterns and designs had always been dictated by African taste, aesthetics, and patronage, and utilised by women to communicate across gendered and religious social boundaries. Now representative of diverse African identities and indigeneity, these fabrics unsettle ideas of what an 'African' textile should look like, revealing innovation and modernity - all the way to the Marvel film, Black Panther. PRESENTER: Dr. Chris Spring, artist, writer and former curator in the Department of Africa, Oceania and the Americas at the British Museum He was the curator of Social Fabric: African Textiles Today, at the British Museum and William Morris Gallery. ART: Thabo, Thabiso and Blackx, Araminta de Clermont (2010). IMAGE: 'Thabo, Thabiso and Blackx'. SOUNDS: Chad Crouch. PRODUCER: Jelena Sofronijevic. Follow EMPIRE LINES at: twitter.com/jelsofron/status/1306563558063271936 Support EMPIRE LINES on Patreon: patreon.com/empirelines

Swahili News - NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN
NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN - Swahili News at 15:30 (JST), December 20

Swahili News - NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 8:59


NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN - Swahili News at 15:30 (JST), December 20

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com
News #243 - Want to Learn Swahili with the Final, BIGGEST Discount of the Year?

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022


learn about our final language deal https://www.swahilipod101.com?src=rss12182022

Friends of Kijabe
Linette

Friends of Kijabe

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 33:16


David: I want to talk a little bit about the hospital, but I'm also curious about your life. So first, just tell me your name and what you do at Kijabe Hospital. Linette: My name is Linette. I'm a medical officer, general doctor at Kijabe. I work in the Internal Medicine department in general wards.  When COVID was here in COVID ward – now it's respiratory center, and in ICU/HDU [Intensive Care Unit/High Dependency Unit] Unit. David: Why did you end up with adults? Linette: [Laughter]Well, I love internal medicine. Anything to do with Internal Medicine, I love it. Whether it's an adult or a baby. I just love it. I feel like it's easier and maybe it's easier because of where I went to school. . . Where I went to school there's a lot of lifestyle diseases, less infectious diseases.  David: When you say lifestyle, what do you mean? Linette: Like hypertension, diabetes, things like that, which is most of internal medicine. And so, it was not like Kenya where you have infectious disease to think about. I feel like that was my foundation when I came for internship, I found this safe place, this comfortable place in internal medicine.  So, it's like, oh, I know that. It's not new to me because I've seen it, and that just made me love it more and more because I felt like I know that and now I can build on that.  I mean, it turns out you don't know anything.  You don't know what you don't know! But it's fun to build on that one. Yeah. So [Internal Medicine] is my favorite one. And why adults? I'm very emotional when it comes to kids, and my pediatric rotation was full of a lot of tears. So, I was like, “No, I need to like, get myself together and be a doctor and look like a human. . .what?  Hard-board or something. . .like nothing is touching me, I'm just okay.” But inside I'm all mushy. So, I feel like kids really remove that from me. And then adults are like, “okay, I can cry about this later, let's deal with it now.” But then kids, cry now!  [Laughter] David: That's great.  You did your you did your internship at Kijabe? Linette: Yes. Yes. David: Tell us about medical school. How in the world did you go to school where you went to school? Linette: I went to school in Russia, the Russian Federation. And it was just it was a miracle of sorts because I had no idea that I could go to school in Russia. In fact, I didn't even want to be a doctor until my last year of high school when I feel I felt the Lord telling me to be a doctor. And I was really against it for like a month. I spent a month arguing with God in my closet. Like, really? You really want me to do that? I've never wanted to do that. I want to be a lawyer. I want to be a scientist. I want to do research. I had all these other plans. David: Anything but medicine. Linette: Yeah, anything but medicine. Everyone wants to be a doctor, but who is going to take out the trash?  Who's going to be the mechanic? Who's going to be the engineer?  I don't want to be a doctor, everyone's going to be a doctor.  It turns out not everyone became a doctor - I became the doctor! God has a sense of humor because the thing that I was fighting so hard not to do turned out to be the thing that I do the easiest.   I went to med school and God make it made it so easy for me to learn and to understand the concepts. . .to understand physiology and how the body works and what drug goes with that. So, I was like, "Hey, man, it's good to follow what you feel God is saying to you." And boy, am I glad I did that.  And then Russia. A friend of mine visited from Russia. I hadn't seen her for years. She was in second year [of medical school]. She told me Russia is good. David: She's Kenyan? Linette: She is Zambian. At that time, I was living in Botswana, that's where I grew up. So, my Zambian friend comes home for holiday and I'm like, "Hey, long time, I haven't seen you. It's been years. Where have you been?" She's like, "I've been in Russia." What are you doing? "I'm doing medicine." And I'm like, okay, that's amazing. I hadn't yet agreed with this whole plan to do medicine in my heart, but I thought, "This is a good like idea to look into Russia as a school option."  I didn't want to stay in Botswana to do my university. So, I asked her questions, and she said that teachers are good, the groups are small when you study so the teachers can follow you very closely. And she said everything except that they don't speak English. [Laughter] And I feel like God literally blinded me to that because I asked every question except, "What language do they speak?" I mean, I know there is Russian, but surely, surely, they speak English, right? They're white! No, they don't. And I found that out when I landed in the country. [Laughter] So, I out of curiosity, I study Russian. I'm so excited.  I'm going to Russia! And then, I land in Russia and it turns out I have survival skills now. I decided, "Well, I'm here, so I have to keep a positive mind about it and learn it as fast as possible so that life can get easier." And that's what I did. So, I learned it and life got really much easier. David: And so that was how long? Five years? Six years? Linette: Yes, six. David: And then. So, you're from Botswana. How did you get to Kenya? Linette: I'm from Kenya. David: Okay. Linette: I was born in Kenya. My parents are Kenyan, my dad is a civil engineer.  When I was five, my dad applied for a job with the government of Botswana, and he got it. He moved to Botswana to look for greener pastures. Then the family followed him. So that's where we all grew up, me and my sisters, except for my youngest sister, who was like a bit young when they moved back to Kenya when I was in third year in Russia. When they moved back now, home became Kenya again. So, when I finished with Russia, I came home to Kenya. So now I had to learn a new language, Swahili [laughter] because, I know how to say hi, but everything else is a blur because I was five when we left. But because I had learned Russian, I was like, "This is nothing impossible. Surely it's just a language." And now I speak it fairly well. I can speak Swahili and no one knows I'm not really Kenyan, but when I speak English, they know because my accent is not Kenyan. David: Yeah, Botswana - that's like the usually the voice actors and people like on TV in America, like that's the pure like, classic African accent.  So, like in Disney movies it's always a Botswana accent. David: And so, what were challenges? Did you have time off in between in between finishing medical school and starting internship? How did you end up at Kijabe? Linette: I had a whole year of nightmare. None of my papers were Kenyan, so I went through such a terrible time. I went to try and verify my degree and they said I had to verify my high school certificate. And then when I went to try and verify that, they said I had to verify the primary school certificate. And most of that was like, we need a physical letter from the governing body in Botswana. I have no family left there. How am I going to get like a real letter from them? But thank God for friends. I asked a couple of friends to help me, and they sacrificed time from their jobs to help me chase down that. It took a whole year from the time that I came back to the time that I started internship. And even after doing the whole verification thing, turns out you don't just do internship, you do pre-internship, which is like an internship, but then it doesn't count. And then you write board exams. So, I did that. And then just as I was about to ballot for a government place in the internship, a cousin of mine asked me, “have you tried Mission Hospitals?”  She had worked for Mission Hospitals and she feels like they're great. Linette: I was like, "I've never thought of that. What's that?"  She told me, "the last interview is next week, Monday, find a way there."  So, I found a way there [laughter], showed up, did the Kijabe interview and I fell in love with Kijabe just from talking to the doctors on the panel. Dr. Arianna was on that panel that day. I was I was so in love with Kijabe. I was like, I'm done. I'm going to Kijabe!  I didn't even interview the other two places. I'm going to Kijabe - I'm not going anywhere else. So, I went home all happy. I'm like, "I'm going to Kijabe, I'm going to Kijabe!" I don't know, that was just I was just so sure. I fell in love with this place before I came here. And since I came, I've not been able to leave since, like you think about going anywhere else and you're like, okay, so what's life going to be like there? Nope, I'll stick to this one. David: What particularly do you like about it?  Linette: I love the compassion with which people approach medicine.  I mean, there is science and there's evidence and there's all that. Anyone can get that anywhere, you know? But there's a human touch and aspect that you can't buy anywhere. You can't buy that. And then a lot of these doctors are Christians. . .and missionaries, they're here not because their homes are not comfortable, or their countries are not good.  I mean, I've been a foreigner. I know it's home that's always best. It's very uncomfortable to be a foreigner sometimes, but the [missionaries] are here because they feel like their call to humanity is higher or greater than their comfort.  I feel like because God told me to be a doctor, it's great to be around people who take medicine like a calling. There's also the evidence-based approach, you know.  It's not quack medicine, it's not abracadabra. It's, "Okay, I read this paper and it says, 'This approach is better for this disease.'" And that's what we do. We do that because the best idea wins.  The best idea is tested. It's tried. It's been through trials and studies and that idea wins. So, every protocol changes according to the idea, the evidence that has come up. The system of correction for mistakes, audit, is taken very seriously. Audit helps us change protocols, change our approach. It's one thing to say, "we will do" and then it's another thing to actually do. It's a culture that goes on from the highest doctor to the lowest staffer.  Even a patient assistant adheres to the protocol. That's a cultural thing that you can't buy. If people's mentality is "I'm here to get my money and go," then they would never do that. But the fact that we say something in a meeting, and it actually happens - that's wonderful.  David: Wow. That's awesome. I love it. So, internal medicine. . .What's good about it and what's hard about it? What do you love and what's the most challenging? Linette: Let me start with what's hard. What's hard is at least once or twice a week, there is this one patient, who, I'm like, "I have no idea what's going on here." And then, once in a while, there's this patient who everyone is like, "I have no idea what's going on."  Really? That's mind boggling. But then that's also why it's great because every time you think you know, you don't know.  You don't know what you don't know. But then, every time, you find out there's more to learn. I love that opportunity to grow.   I like places where I can be put under pressure to grow.  There's no bigger force or pressure than the feeling of "I don't know." Then there's this culture of mentorship that Kijabe has. I have awesome seniors who don't make me feel dumb for not knowing. So, when I don't know, there's always someone a phone call away who might know. And if they don't know, they're so honest. I love that they're so honest when they don't know. And they're always willing to offer advice on, "have you tried this, and have you tried that and how do you check this and that?" Then they teach you how they think so that you can be a proper mentee. I love that. That's what I love about internal medicine in Kijabe. I don't know about internal medicine in any other place, but here, it's like you're free to be dumb if you're dumb and we will help you get smart. David: I don't think that's a problem for you. You're very humble. Doctor Tony Nguyen is the head of internal medicine right now, and he was telling me that. . . Linette: He's my boss and he's awesome. David: Oh, that's great. He was talking about ventilated patients, that a lot of your patients are younger. Why do patients come to you? What are their issues? Linette: Well, our vented patients are younger, and most of that is because of our resource limited setting. Because of our resource limited setting, we can't afford to intubate everyone. So, our protocol favors a younger patient with less chronic disease going on. It's very sad that we have to make that decision, but we only have a very small amount of resources - in this case ventilators. David: So how many do you have that are working right now? Linette: We have five good vents.  David: I think your definition of good is different from mine. Linette: Like, it keeps the patient alive. That's good enough. David: So, that's the distinction. There's actual good, because you have some good [ventilators] and others from 1953 and it's a small miracle. . . Linette: It's working. It's working. (laughter) David: But that makes me very nervous. Linette: It does. It does. But then we live by faith. I mean literally surviving on small miracles. So, there's two really, really good ventilators that have this nice screen. David: The GE ones? Linette: Yeah. They have all these screens that you can read. And then there's these [old] ones which are guessing some of the stuff in the background.  David: It's totally manual, right? You have dials, you can adjust, but there's no waveform, there's no tidal volume, you're just. . . Linette: Guessing. There's nothing to see. It's just put in the settings that you want and hope and pray that that's it. Then if that doesn't work, you try something else and see if that works. And that's how we live. Imagine. David: Yeah, not that that's not good, but that's what I'm hoping we can improve on someday. Linette: If I have five solid ventilators, I think I can depend on. I mean, I think they can save five lives.  David: And so, you're saying you can have protocols for younger people.  What about - I don't know if you call it a dance or juggling - interactions between different departments work because? I mean, patients are surgical or medical somewhat, but there's a lot of overlap. Linette: Yes. It's a lot of teamwork that's required because a lot of patients in the ICU are surgical. But then if they're in the ICU, they're your patient [medical team]. They are surgical, but they're still yours. And that [relationship] needs a lot of communication between us, a lot of understanding, because sometimes we see with our eyes the medical stuff and they see with their eyes, the surgical stuff.  And we don't see what they see, and they don't see what we see. So, every time we make decisions, it's important to like double back and ask them, "Okay, we want to do this. Is this going to affect what you are doing in any way? Is this going to harm the patient instead of help the patient?" Because sometimes you might do something and maybe cause bleeding or maybe it does something that we didn't intend to do, but the surgeon would have known that, and we didn't. So, it takes a lot of teamwork to survive a patient in ICU.   Linette: Sometimes when we are admitting patients, we feel like this patient might need intubation and we might not be able to give them that resource, we try our best to refer them at the door before they even get to the point of deteriorating and needing the intubation. We just tell them, "Look, it's not looking good.” Usually, it's the family we are talking to because [the patient] is so badly off, and we tell them “It's not looking good. It's likely they're going to need intensive care. We don't have room, please go to another place.” Some of them refuse. Oh gosh, some of them refuse. They're like, “we don't have anywhere else to go.”  Those are tough because they end up staying in Casualty forever. And then we end up like creating an Intensive Care Unit in Casualty because you can't just watch someone die. That's a hard thing. And then some of them die. That's the painful part because you're like, "If we had this, they wouldn't have died," but we don't. David: Do you have a sense of what it would take? I mean, we want to get we want to get some new ventilators. We want to get ten, maybe more, high dependency unit beds. What would it take to treat everybody you think we should be treating? Linette: Oh, my gosh. A lot of money! David: Well, not in the money sense, but how many HDU beds? How many ward beds? What would it take to do everything you would love to see us doing? Linette: That would be crazy, because, if I compare it to what other hospitals are actually achieving, they can have anywhere from 20 to 30 or 40 ICU beds and we have 5. So that's a huge dream for us.  And then we have ten HDU (High Dependency Unit) beds. You can imagine if they have 20 ICU, they have like double that for HDU and we have only 10. So, it's going to take that much more muscle.  Then the other issue is staffing, because we are so few in our department and a lot of our people are missionaries. It's wonderful because they are here to help, but then they can't always be here to help because they have their homes to go back to. So, we have a lot of visiting doctors who come in. Oh my gosh, when they come, we're like, oh, we can breathe a little bit, you know.  We breathe for like a month. And then they go and then we're dying again.  We have ECCCOs who are in ICU every week. David: What does that stand for? Linette: It's Emergency and Critical Care Clinical Officer. They are clinical officers who have a higher degree in critical care and emergencies. They're awesome. Awesome. They run the ICU very well. A whole ICU really depends on an ECCCO. If the ECCCO is good, they respond to the emergency quickly. They call the doctor quickly. And they a lot of times you get to [the patient], they're already intubated.  They are so good. They respond to emergencies very, very quickly.  So, there's always one just one in a whole week who does the day and then one in a whole week who does a night and then one in a whole week who does casualty. If we were to ever expand, I think more beds would be overwhelming for one ECCCO.  And sometimes we have two because there's one and then a student. But then sometimes that could slow the [senior] one down because they're trying to do teaching, you know, like they're trying to show the other one. So that would take more doctors, more critical care nurses who by the way, are so awesome.  David: And there's training, there's a lot of training going on. This is one of the things I look at. I think, "five beds." There's the patient side. There are more patients who need help.  But then the training side, Oh my goodness. We have a critical care nursing program. We have the emergency and critical care clinical officer training program. Linette: Yes. David: And when I just look at it, I think we need to take care of more patients so they can, to use an exercise term, do more push-ups.The more patients they see, the better they will be coming out of school. Linette: It's much better for them. David: And then you're also taking the nurse anesthetists. They come through. Linette: On rotations, higher degree nurses doing their rotations and the anesthesia residents and surgical residents. David: Oh, and surgical. So that's part of their that's part of their residency? Linette: Yeah, there are a lot of learners, actually. Our teams are more than the patients by far. By far. David: That's at least 50 learners in a year.  Linette: They could be more, because per week, it's crazy.  The last time I was in the ICU, I had three ECCCO students and three KRNA's (Kenya Registered Nurse Anesthetists) and one more intern and two or critical care nurses. That's ten learners.  And then if you're on the rotation, you have to teach the ICU curriculum for that week.  David: So, you're doing that teaching? Linette: Yes. Yes. I teach. Right now, I took a break because I've been so busy with my family, but I teach physiology in the school. David: Oh, for the nursing students?  Linette: For the clinical officers. Linette: I teach human physiology. David: Awesome. That is a lot. Linette: Yeah, it is. That's why I, like, put a pause on it, because I'm like, “Let me just have a baby first and then I can think about it.” David: Yeah, that's awesome. How old is your little one? Linette: He's turning one [year old] this week.  David: So, you're entering a new phase, you're starting to sleep. And you're also starting to, realize, every second there's more trouble. Linette: He can get into. Yes, I'm battling chronic fatigue. He's such a handful. He's all over the place. And then he just discovered how to walk. So now it's like, "get everything out of the way." And just when you think you got everything out of the way, he discovers another one. David: What would it take to build a proper ICU?   That will be a phase-three of the hospital master plan.  This year there will be a new oxygen and facilities plant that they're calling an Energy Center. That will go It will be just outside of Wairegi [the men's ward]. That's part one.  Part two is the new outpatient center.  And then part three will be where outpatient currently is. They want to build a huge building that will be maternity, internal medicine, ICU. I think it'll take that [building] to get to 30 or 40 beds. But I'm hopeful that we can figure out how to do something substantially more in the near term.  If we get equipment, it can roll where it needs to go.  Knocking out walls and things like that are permanent, but equipment can follow the need. If it needs to go to Centennial [ward], it can go to Centennial. If it needs to go wherever, it can go wherever. So, I hope I hope we can do a substantial expansion this year. Because it's important and it needs to happen for you guys to be able to do what you're good at. Linette: Yeah. And now we have a renal unit, so we have, super-sick patients who we used to refer because we didn't have a renal unit. Now that we have an actual dialysis center in our hospital, we get called more and more into the unit because they code on the dialysis bench and we have to go there and resuscitate.  That's an ICU patient.  They cannot be anything less.  If you resuscitate, and then you don't have a ventilator, you'll just be bagging and bagging and bagging and you're like, "okay, I'll be the vent for now." But then, "how long am I going to do this? Are we going to get an ambulance? Are we going to go to another hospital?"   Most of them don't have the money to go to a hospital with an ICU. Kijabe is so friendly, in terms of ICU cost, on your pockets. So, you tell them about any other hospital in the family is like, "no, we can't afford that happen." David: Do you have to save ventilators? You have that dialysis situation. Do you have to reserve ventilators for surgical patients? Like if somebody knows something bad just came in, they're going to surgery. Linette: All the time. Yes. Every night I'm on call, I'm like, "how many ventilators do we have?" And the ECCCO tells me we have three vents. And then they're like, “the surgery team called ICU and they said that they're taking in a complicated case, and they want us to save a vent." So, if I get any emergencies overnight and I had four vents and I'm saving that one for the surgical patient.  If I get any anything in casualty that needs an intubation, I can't accept. So, I have to refer. And that's terrible for those who come crashing because they crash, and our reflex is to intubate. We don't even think, we just intubate. And then suddenly somebody is bagging and we're like, "we don't have a vent."  Sometimes we end up having to give away the vent we have reserved for an emergency, and that causes a whole chain reaction of problems because now the surgeon is angry at you because they saved the vent for the patient, and they've already cut. And you're like, "let's pray to God that you come out of anesthesia." Yeah, it's just a jumble, it's just a mess on those bad nights. And then sometimes we have to quickly extubate someone who we didn't plan to extubate today. Maybe we plan to extubate them tomorrow, and we're like, “maybe tomorrow they'll be able to get off the vent,” and then we're like, "Okay, you need to breathe for yourself now because we're coming off now." But you see, that's a problem because you're extubating prematurely and you're like, “fingers crossed, legs crossed, please breathe.” And then they breathe, and you say, "Thank you!"  David: So how do you manage all this emotionally?  Linette: That is just it's painful. It is very painful. Sometimes there is moral injury that comes with denying the vent to some patients because you're like, “if I had intubated, I am not 100% sure that you wouldn't have made it.” I'm just basing this decision on your co-morbidities or your other diseases and the fact that you have significant disease.   There's this other [patient] with less significant disease and that you are likely to not make it. So that's a bit hard.  David: What do you do with that? Like, how do you how do you process this?  How do you not explode? Linette: Our culture in the ICU is when you have a really tough time, we debrief, we call the chaplain to come talk to us, or the palliative team. They're very good at counseling staff members about "What are you feeling about this? What are you feeling about having to extubate this one? What are you feeling about having to do this?" And everyone opens up their heart and says, "Well, I feel like crap, like this is terrible." And, well, I have a good husband at home and he's like a doctor now because I take all my stories to him. So, I just offload on him and he's a very good listener. So, I feel better because I have that at home.  I have good support at home.  David: I love that.  Linette: Yeah. It's a tough journey, but it's also fun because we see people and its life changing. It's the difference between life and death for someone. So, our extubation days are really good. Like, "Yes, you did it, we saved one! And then 10 million more to go!” Always celebrate the small wins. David: I love that. Awesome. Thank you so much, Linette Linette: Thank you for having me. David: Appreciate, you're amazing. Linette: Thanks.

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com
Learning Strategies #123 - How to Drill Swahili Words on Repeat with the Audio Slideshow

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 2:52


discover effective strategies and tips for learning Swahili

OUTTAKE VOICES™ (Interviews)
Boston Gay Men's Chorus Holiday Series

OUTTAKE VOICES™ (Interviews)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 9:47


Sarah Shoffner the new Executive Director of the Boston Gay Men's Chorus (BGMC) talks with Emmy Winner Charlotte Robinson host of OUTTAKE VOICES™ about their upcoming holiday concert series entitled “Joyful & Triumphant & Gay.” Founded in 1982 this fabulous 200+ voice ensemble is presenting their first live holiday concert since 2019. Upcoming performances under BGMC Music Director Reuben Reynolds are December 16th, 17th and 18 at New England Conservatory's Jordan Hall in Boston, MA. The title of the show is a tribute to Dean X. Johnson the accompanist and assistant director of the New York City Gay Men's Chorus (NYCGMC) who died of AIDS in 1998 at age 42. Johnson composed “Joyful and Triumphant!” with fellow NYCGMC member Jeff Baron at the height of the AIDS crisis in 1992. “Joyful & Triumphant & Gay” opens with the traditional French carol “Sing We Now of Christmas” and features classics like Bruckner's “Ave Maria” and “Locus iste” alongside modern holiday fare that includes Cyndi Lauper's “Christmas Conga”, “A Place Called Home” from “A Christmas Carol: The Musical” and Kylie Minogue's “Christmas Isn't Christmas 'Til You Get Here.” The concert will also feature two pieces by American composer Jacob J. Narverud including “Sisi Ni Moja” which means we are one in Swahili and a performance of the powerful “Ukrainian Bell Carol” as a reminder of the horrible human costs of war and our capacity for joy despite them. The chorus will also debut a new suite by BGMC Principal Accompanist and Assistant Music Director Chad Weirick which draws on classic carols and Christmas music to reflect his experience of the COVID-19 pandemic. We talked to Sarah about what she hopes to accomplish with BGMC and her spin on our LGBTQ issues.  Sarah Shoffner joined BGMC as Executive Director in September 2022. Sarah's expertise is in developing strategies and programs to help arts and other nonprofit organizations achieve their operational and artistic goals. Shoffner most recently served as Boston Ballet's Benefactors' Circle Development Officer. Previously she served as BGMC's Engagement Manager for six years where she modernized the organization's development systems including ticketing processes and launched the Ovation Society, BGMC's donor loyalty program. In addition to the leadership roles Shoffner has held in nonprofit arts organizations Sarah holds a Master of Science in Arts Administration from Boston University and two degrees from the University of South Florida in Business Management and Dance Studies. BGMC's fabulous holiday show “Joyful & Triumphant & Gay” celebrates the season with traditional favorites, modern classics and just lots of gay camp fun. For More Info & Tix… LISTEN: 600+ LGBTQ Chats @OUTTAKE VOICE  

International Voices with Udo Fluck
December 20222: Managing Cultural Adjustment and Culture Shock – An Insightful Conversation with the Refugee Congress Delegate for Montana

International Voices with Udo Fluck

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 43:46


This is the 3rd and final episode of a series focusing on “Managing Cultural Adjustment and Culture Shock”. In this last episode of 2022, Udo visits with Paul Mwingwa, a resettled refugee from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, who wears many different hats, in addition to being the Refugee Congress Delegate for Montana. Paul is also a Caseworker Assistant at the International Rescue Committee (IRC) in Missoula, a member of the Refugees Advisory Council (RAC) for the IRC, a Swahili language instructor and he works as a private contractor at the Lifelong Learning Center in Missoula. Please join Udo for this interesting conversation about resettlement as an invaluable protection tool, that the support for refugees in their resettling process is critical and the importance of making refugees feel that they are part of a new community . Successfully resettled refugees help enrich their local communities, creating a cultural diversity within the local population and helping nurture understanding and appreciation for social diversity. If your interests are in global and intercultural education, programming, cultural and global competence, and international affairs, we hope you join the International Voices podcast series after a short winter break. There will be no podcast in January, please reconnect in February 2023, for a new episode of International Voices.

On The Rise Podcast
On The Rise Podcast - Sn. 3 - Ep. 7 - Michael Miller - Nambarii Print and Apparel

On The Rise Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 28:03


Episode Summary : If you were asked to work with any of your parents, would you be okay with that? For some of us, it would be one of the most challenging tasks. Today I have a fantastic duo joining me on the show, Mike Miller and Mike Miller Junior of Nambarii. Their journey started when one of the Co-founders revamped a design found in a tattoo book that became the NAMBARII logo before establishing NAMBARII in 2021. At that time, the NAMBARII logo was tattooed on all three of the Co-founders and later by one of the Co-founders children.  Just for fun, the NAMBARII logo was placed on Polo shirts, T-shirts, stickers, and car decals, receiving attention and several inquiries on the design. The attention confirmed that they had something appealing and unique, which led them to trademark the design. They came up with the brand name Nambarii, a Swahili name meaning Number. Their inspiration behind Nambarii is their belief that anything is possible with an immense number of positive people unifying. Their goal was to bring people together. They have built the business for themselves and their future generations. In this episode, they share their entrepreneurship journey with us. Listen and learn. Getting to Know our Guest : Mike Miller and Mike Miller junior is a father and son duo who do business together. They are passionate about creating a company that will serve them now and future generations. They firmly believe in black-owned businesses.  Quotes : "When you can't make them see the light, make them feel the heat."- President Ronald Reagan "The only way to succeed is to persist." It's weird how you meet somebody at a certain point in your life, and you kind of circle back and have different roles. "You might think what you're doing is stupid, or no one will listen to you as long as you try. Someone's going to buy and listen." "Confidence comes with experience." Connect with Mike Miller and Mike Miller Jr : Instagram : https://www.instagram.com/nambarii_/?... Website : https://nambarii.com/

The Pan-African Food Festival
SWAHILI CUISINE with Jocelyn and Jaela Salala

The Pan-African Food Festival

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 69:23


Sisters Jocelyn and Jaela Salala are on a mission to change the food scene. Jocelyn is the visionary behind the bold food blog, Salala Stirs the Pot, and Jaela is the force and spirit propelling Chef Keith Corbin's Alta Adams Wine Shop. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/panafricanfoodfestival/message

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com
Swahili Vocab Builder S1 #116 - Home Items

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 3:28


learn vocab related to home items

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com
Learning Strategies #122 - How to Learn Swahili While On a Walk or a Commute

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 3:37


discover effective strategies and tips for learning Swahili

Tracing Owls
Speak of the Popobawa - with Dr. Katrina Daly Thompson

Tracing Owls

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 56:23


Dr. Thompson, Professor of African Cultural Studies at Uw-Madison, joins to discuss Popobawa discourse. Yes, today we will be talking about talking about monsters! Dr. Thompson's book "Popobawa: Tanzanian Talk, Global Misreadings" explores the use of a supernatural entity as a linguistic tool which allows individuals of different backgrounds to indirectly convey political issues, convey their personal authority, or even safely discuss sexual identity in an oppressive landscape. We also touch upon the role of international media in spreading and reshaping local folklore, the intricacies of Swahili language and culture, and the Popobawa as a trickster archetype. ====================== Huge THANK YOU!!! to Dr. Katrina Daly Thompson for agreeing to guest on the show, allowing the Popobawa to once more re-emerge in their life ❤️ Visit Dr. Thompson's website at katrinadalythompson.com Follow them on Twitter @putawaytheglobe Contact them via e-mail katrina.daly.thompson@wisc.edu ====================== Send us suggestions and comments to tracingowlspodcast@gmail.com Follow us on Instagram @tracingowls or Twitter @TracingOwls Check our Linktree: linktr.ee/darwinsdeviations Intro sampled from "Something strange lurks in the shadows" by Francisco Sánchez (@fanchisanchez) Sound effects obtained from https://www.zapsplat.com ====================== FURTHER READING: POPOBAWA IS DEAD! | Tanzanian Affairs Katrina Daly Thompson (2017): Popobawa: Tanzanian Talk, Global Misreadings. Indiana University Press Walsh, Martin. (2014). Killing Popobawa: collective panic and violence in Zanzibar. 10.13140/2.1.1585.9522. Walsh, Martin. (2009). The politicisation of Popobawa: changing explanations of a collective panic in Zanzibar. Journal of Humanities. 1. 23-33.

Swahili News - NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN
NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN - Swahili News at 15:30 (JST), December 05

Swahili News - NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 8:56


NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN - Swahili News at 15:30 (JST), December 05

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com
Monthly Review Video #50 - Swahili December 2022 Review - The 2 Minute Rule to Cracking Through the Hard Parts of Language Learning

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 6:25


discover your new learning strategies and free resources of the month.

The Dirt Podcast
View to a Kilwa: The Medieval Swahili Coast

The Dirt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 49:29


This week, while Anna and Amber's actual selves will be on the West Coast, the show heads for the East Coast-- of Africa, that is! Take a whirlwind tour of the Swahili coast and the economic and cultural exchanges over land and sea it has enjoyed for more than a thousand years, before zooming in on the very powerful, and very cool, medieval sultanate of Kilwa Kisawani. To learn more:Making History: An archaeologist unearths the history of the Swahili States (Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin)East Africa: Five Million Years of History (The Public Medievalist)Early African History: fire, farming, Egypt, and the Bantu (Quatr.us)Collins & Pisarevsky (2004). "Amalgamating eastern Gondwana: The evolution of the Circum-Indian Orogens". Earth-Science Reviews.Richard Pankhurst, An Introduction to the Economic History of Ethiopia, (Lalibela House: 1961)Recipe for ambergris and eggsEarly Global Connections: East Africa between Asia, and Mediterranean Europe (Global Middle Ages)Kilwa Kisiwani: Medieval Trade Center of Eastern Africa (Thought.Co)A lost city reveals the grandeur of medieval African civilization (Gizmodo)Chami FA. 2009. Kilwa and the Swahili Towns: Reflections from an archaeological perspective. In: Larsen K, editor. Knowledge, Renewal and Religion: Repositioning and changing ideological and material circumstances among the Swahili on the East African coast. Uppsala: Nordiska Afrikainstitututet.Fleisher J, Wynne-Jones S, Steele C, and Welham K. 2012. Geophysical Survey at Kilwa Kisiwani, Tanzania. Journal of African Archaeology 10(2):207-220.Pollard E. 2011. Safeguarding Swahili trade in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries: a unique navigational complex in south-east Tanzania. World Archaeology 43(3):458-477.Pollard E, Fleisher J, and Wynne-Jones S. 2012. Beyond the Stone Town: Maritime Architecture at Fourteenth–Fifteenth Century Songo Mnara, Tanzania. Journal of Maritime Archaeology 7(1):43-62Wynne-Jones S. 2007. Creating urban communities at Kilwa Kisiwani, Tanzania, AD 800-1300. Antiquity 81:368-380.Wynne-Jones S. 2013. The public life of the Swahili stonehouse, 14th–15th centuries AD. Journal of Anthropological...

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com
News #242 - How to Learn Swahili in 2023… with the Biggest Holiday Deals

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 3:47


learn how to get the best deals with our holiday countdown sale https://www.swahilipod101.com?src=rss12042022

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Swahili Vocab Builder S1 #157 - Job Search

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 1:49


learn essential vocabulary for job searching process

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Learning Strategies #121 - How to Learn Swahili with FREE Printable Resources

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 2:33


discover effective strategies and tips for learning Swahili

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com
News #241 - You Don’t Want To Miss This Massive Update from SwahiliPod101

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 5:22


learn about our upcoming newest study tools and lessons https://www.swahilipod101.com?src=rss11272022

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Video News #68 - Free Swahili Gifts of the Month - December 2022

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 1:49


Get your learning gifts for the month of December 2022

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Swahili Vocab Builder S1 #163 - Shape

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 3:10


learn essential vocabulary related to different shapes

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com
Throwback Thursday S1 #17 - How to Learn With Your Own Teacher

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 3:33


discover effective strategies and tips for learning Swahili

Language Hacking
#123 Kelsey Lechner on Speaking 6 Very Different Languages

Language Hacking

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 44:24


How much does living in different countries shape your personality and influence your personal development?In an episode packed with cultural exploration anecdotes, writer, translator, and educator Kelsey Lechner shares her experience with learning six vastly different languages, keeping her career tightly related to languages in unexpected ways, and adapting to new cultures while living in countries like Tanzania, Japan, and Bangladesh.Kelsey also shares her flexible language learning strategy pointers, which she developed while learning Japanese, Spanish, Mandarin Chinese, Swahili, and Bengali. She and Benny discuss how social acceptance works when trying to adjust to new cultures, how to take missteps in cross-cultural communication in stride, and how to deal with culture shocks.(Psss… Wait until minute 28 for a funny anecdote about how mixing up Bangladesh and Spanish led Kelsey to hit up on someone without meaning to!)Mentioned in this Episode Anki Kelsey's posts on Fluent in 3 Months Join Our PatreonEnjoy the podcast? Subscribe to our Patreon to support what we do!Podcast theme: “A New Beginning” by Shannon Kennedy

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com
Learning Strategies #120 - 5 Simple Ways to Learn New Swahili Words

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 3:20


discover effective strategies and tips for learning swahili

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com
News #240 - 7 Swahili Learning Hacks that You Didn’t Know About

Learn Swahili | SwahiliPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 7:23


learn seven features that will help you learn https://www.swahilipod101.com?src=rss11062022

The Social Change Career Podcast
S9E9: Changing the World Through Language & Culture with Diana Suarez

The Social Change Career Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 41:45


In this episode, learn from innovator and educator Diana Suarez founder and CEO of GLOT. Diana has been working at the intersection of education and social impact for more than a decade.  In this episode session Diana shares her rich experience working on innovation and impact in a wide-variety of education roles including in the nonprofit, public and higher education sectors. She discusses her lessons building an innovative non-profit that is working to advance language literacy and social impact within Colombia and globally. In addition, she highlights the key trends in education for impact careers, recommendations for those wanting to work in global education and tips for how to upskill.     DIana is Productivity and Quality engineer, with an MSc in Environment and development. She ispassionate about children, languages, and social impact. For Diana, education is the tool to fight poverty and reduce inequalities.She has more than 12 years of experience in the educational sector, working for universities, the government and non-state actors leading projects and partnerships at the national and international level.   Diana is  the Founder and CEO of GLOT Inc, an International organization that creates social impact through languages. She is an adjunct professor at a business school with the course International Relations. A  Spanish native speaker, DIana speaks English, French, some basic Swahili, and is currently learning Italian. This session is supported by the Rotary Peace Fellowship, a fully-funded master's degree or certificate in peace and development studies.     

Grown Girl Divorce Podcast
Nia's Story: Girl I've Been There Too Series Ep.118

Grown Girl Divorce Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 77:07


Nia means “purpose” in Swahili. Today's guest in our "Girl, I've Been There Too" series recognized that her purpose in life is to set an example for her child and, in doing so, had to make a difficult decision. In this episode, Nia shares with us: - The impact our parents' divorce can have on our own thoughts on marriage and divorce; - How to question what you really want from a therapist; - Why finding a home was a top priority; and - The best resources for talking to young children about divorce. Nia is one of several women profiled in our "Girl, I've Been There Too" series sharing with our village so that we too may learn from our shared experiences how to navigate the divorce process.  This series isn't detailing stories about an Ex spouse but rather focuses on how these Black women survived the divorce process and thriving as they move forward. These are real stories from real women just like you.   Please be sure to subscribe to the Grown Girl Divorce podcast to catch new episodes of the "Girl, I've Been There Too" series and for conversations with experts helping to educate and empower you through divorce. Our website has additional resources including free downloads, blogs, Spotify playlist, and much more.  Please follow us on our social media channels and join our village!    #growngirldivorce #blackpodcasts #divorcesupport #blacklove #financialfreedom #legacycreation #blackgirlsthriving #divorcepodcasts #coparentingtips #blendedfamilyjourney #mochamoms #blackmamas #womenbreadwinners #blackdivorcelawyers #selfcarepodcasts 

Speaking Tongues
117. Speaking Punjabi & Urdu

Speaking Tongues

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 52:50


Hello Language Lovers! Thank you for joining me for this episode of Speaking Tongues- the podcast in conversation with multilinguals. This week, I'm so happy to share this conversation with Khawar, the founder of Somos, about his heritage languages of Punjabi and Urdu. Now, Somos is a startup which provides affordable language education and supports language teachers, by allowing them to earn a living from their wages. In this episode, Khawar tells us about his heritage and lineage from India, through Kenya and into the UK. He talks about growing up hearing these two languages peppered with Swahili words. We talk about the relationships between Punjabi and Urdu spoken at home and how identity and language are affected in a country like England. He tells us about coming from a big family, his special connection with his grandmother and shares some of the lessons he learned from her and their connection through food. We talk about the inspiration in building Somos and how reflecting on racial strife in London and his own heritage and community has impacted the work he does now. Thank you Khawar for this terrific conversation and for sharing your story and culture with all of us. If you enjoy episodes of Speaking Tongues, don't forget to subscribe, rate and review the Speaking Tongues Podcast on Apple Podcasts and like and subscribe on YouTube so that other language lovers like ourselves can find the show! Special shout out to Speaking Tongues' recent supporters and Patrons Heidi L., Linnea H. , Pat N. and Yari A. If you've been a long time listener of the show or a recent listener, you can now pledge ongoing support for the show on Buy Me a Coffee dot com or on Patreon dot com. And as you know, I wrote a book! My food ‘zine of international language and cuisine, Taste Buds Vol 1. is available now for purchase! Check social media for the sneak peek inside of the book and make sure you purchase for yourself and your friends! Links to all platforms are below! Ok, Let's chat! To Find Somos: Website: https://somos.education/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/_somosgram/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/somoseducation LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/somos-education/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/_somostweets Speaking Tongues Podcast: Follow on IG: @speakingtonguespod Follow on Twitter: @stpodcasthost Like our Facebook Page: @speakingtonguespod Subscribe on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJFOPq3j7wGteY-PjcZaMxg Did you enjoy this episode? Support Speaking Tongues on Buy me a Coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/speakingtongues Pledge on-going monthly support. Join my Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/speakingtonguespodcast Buy my book here https://www.lulu.com/en/us/shop/elle-charisse/taste-buds-vol-1/paperback/product-wn2n46.html?page=1&pageSize=4 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/speaking-tongues/message

Outrage and Optimism
175. Hali Hewa: Gender and the Climate Crisis with Sofanit Mesfin

Outrage and Optimism

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 27:25


Welcome to the fifth episode of the Hali Hewa Podcast. ‘Hali Hewa' is a Swahili term for ‘climate ' and this podcast series is hosted and produced by Kenyan climate activist, Abigael Kima. In the lead up to the COP27 international climate negotiations, which are now just a month away, Abigael interviews African climate change experts and activists on the issues that matter most to them. Guests sign off each episode by sharing what they feel the COP27 conference must deliver on. Our guest today is Sofanit Mesfin. Sofanit is a gender specialist working as the Regional Gender and Social Inclusion Coordinator at Ripple Effect, formerly known as ‘Send A Cow'. Ripple Effect works with smallholder farmers to equip them with knowledge and skills enabling them to improve their livelihoods and thrive. Farmers working alongside Ripple Effect learn more, grow more and sell more. They can feed their families nutritious food, and by having a surplus to sell can invest in their farms, send their children to school and build sustainable agri-businesses. In this episode, Sofanit takes us through her journey working with women farmers in different African countries to deliver training programs that help them adapt to a changing climate. She explains how and why women and children are disproportionately affected by the impacts of climate change, and what Ripple Effect is doing to ease the burden on women, children and their households. Sofanit also explains how other stakeholders can come on board to support this kind of work, ensuring that more and more communities get support to build resilience and secure a healthy future for themselves and their children. Sofanit signs off the show by sharing what she wants the upcoming COP27 climate conference in Egypt to deliver in November. Enjoy the show! Learn more about Ripple Effect Linkedin | Facebook | YouTube | Twitter | Website [Note: I recently had the privilege to visit women farmers in Busia and Bungoma in the Western Region of Kenya. I learned a lot from them about methods to improve food production, and how these practices allowed them to better their lives and that of their families. Follow the Hali Hewa Podcast on social media to see these interviews]

Outrage and Optimism
174. These are Powerful Times

Outrage and Optimism

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 70:21


Welcome to another episode of Outrage + Optimism! In this episode, co-host Christiana Figueres is joined by an all-female cast. You'll hear from climate activist Abigael (Abbie) Kima from Kenya about her recent visit with His Holiness, the Dalai Lama, and Isabel Cavelier, Colombian climate activist and recent recipient of the prestigious Climate Breakthrough Award, an initiative of the Climate Breakthrough Project.  We also feature music from the British indie rock duo, Penelope Isles. First, Abbie Kima brings Christiana up to date with her podcast, the Hali Hewa Podcast一“Hali ya Hewa” is Swahili for “climate”一covering indigenous people, women, and climate emergencies from the African perspective. Kima also recounts her extraordinary (collective) meeting with the Dalai Lama at the Mind & Life Institute in Dharamsala. She discusses his teachings about how oneness across all people is innately linked to global climate action. Next, Christiana chats with Isabel Cavelier about her fascinating climate journey. Isabel touches on her early work helping develop the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs一the United Nations framework for global peace and prosperity一her climate action organization Transforma, and her work in the climate movement today. They also touch on Cavelier's Climate Breakthrough Award, one of the field's most distinguished honors.  Finally, we close the episode with indie rock band Penelope Isles's new release, “Underwater Record Store.”   See you next week!   NOTES AND RESOURCES    To learn more about our planet's climate emergency and how you can transform outrage into optimistic action subscribe to the podcast here. Shoutout to our very own Freya Newman on her research being published in Nature Communications!   Want to participate in the COP27 Civic Imagination Lab? REGISTER HERE   -   GUESTS   Abigael Kima LinkedIn | Twitter | Facebook| YouTube | Instagram Listen to Abbie's Hali Hewa Podcast   Isabel Cavelier Adarve LinkedIn | Twitter | Facebook Learn more about Isabel's award from Climate Breakthrough   Transforma LinkedIn | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram   -   MUSIC   Penelope Isles Twitter | Facebook | Instagram Clay's Recommendation: Check out their LIVE KEXP and AudioTree Performances!

The WorldView in 5 Minutes
Honeymoon couple rescues 20 babies from burning building, 1 in 6 U.S. stocks lost 80% of value this year, 20 Christians beheaded in Congo, Africa

The WorldView in 5 Minutes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022


It's Tuesday, October 18th, A.D. 2022. This is The Worldview in 5 Minutes heard at www.TheWorldview.com.  I'm Adam McManus. (Adam@TheWorldview.com) By Kevin Swanson 20 Christians beheaded in Congo, Africa Twenty Christians in Congo, Africa were beheaded. Among the martyrs was an Anglican evangelist, reports International Christian Concern. The gruesome attack, led by the Allied Democratic Forces, an Islamic terrorist group, occurred on the night of October 4th in the village of Kainama, Beni territory in Nord Kivu, Congo. One eyewitness told International Christian Concern, “I heard them. They were shouting in Arabic and Swahili, saying that the kafirs [nonbelievers] should be killed, all of them, and make Congo an Islamic state. ‘Shoot all of them. Kill all of them, and burn their houses, these notorious Christians.'” Proverbs 3:31-33 says, “Do not envy a man of violence and do not choose any of his ways, for the devious person is an abomination to the Lord, but the upright are in His confidence. The Lord's curse is on the house of the wicked, but He blesses the dwelling of the righteous.” Irish Christian teacher jailed for refusing to say fake pronouns This from Ireland. A Christian teacher who refused to use the preferred pronoun for a student pretending to change gender will spend Christmas in jail, reports LifeSiteNews.com.  Enoch Burke was jailed for refusing to comply with court orders, relating to his teaching at the Church of Ireland school in Multyfarnham located in Westmeath County, Ireland. Chinese longevity outpaces American longevity The East is on the rise.  The average life expectancy for the Chinese now exceeds Americans. While China averaged 77.1 years at the time of death, the U.S. numbers dropped off to 76.1 — almost a three-year decline in just three years. The COVID pandemic reportedly contributed to about half of the decline. Scripture gives one principle on this. Ephesians 6:2-3 says, “Honor your father and mother” (this is the first commandment with a promise), “that it may go well with you and that you may live long in the land.” India's Supreme Court's pro-abortion ruling The Indian Supreme Court has ruled to make abortion more accessible to women in that country, according to U.S. News & World Report. The ruling held that single women had equal rights to abortion as married women, removing a significant block to abortion in the second largest nation in the world. Abortion is legal almost everywhere in the world today, with restrictions still in Peru, most of Africa, the Philippines, Paraguay, Brazil, Myanmar, parts of Mexico, parts of the United States, Turkey, Syria, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Honduras, and the Dominican Republic. Poll: Republican voters have the edge going into mid-term election A New York Times/Siena College poll has found that 49% of American voters are voting Republican, with 45% going Democrat in the upcoming November election. The biggest shift occurred with independent women voters. Back in September, this voting block favored Democrats by 14%. Now, they favor Republican candidates by 18%. The reason?  Not their stance on abortion, but their stance on the economy. Only 5% of voters considered abortion the top issue, with 44% of voters most concerned about the economy. Sam's Club jacks up its membership fee Now inflation is hitting Sam's Club membership.  For the first time in a decade, Sam's Club membership fees will increase to $50 from $45. And “Plus” membership fees are slated for an increase to $110 from $100. That's the first increase for “Plus” membership in 23 years. But  Costco says they have no immediate plans to up the annual fee for their membership. 1 in 6 U.S. stocks lost 80% of value this year Has the stock market already crashed? Wolf Street reports that over 1,000 stocks in the US stock market (roughly 1 in 6) has lost 80% of its value this year. While the favored stocks remain high, this could portend more propping up, as the everything bubble slowly pops. Market volatility may be best figured by Elon Musk's Tesla stock, with its total market cap imploding from $1.2 trillion back down to $630 billion in a year— losing almost half its value. Honeymoon couple rescues 20 babies from burning building Here's one way to spend your honeymoon!  While a Rhode Island couple visited Barcelona, Spain on their honeymoon, they saw flames coming out of a burning building.   Doran Smith explained what she witnessed. SMITH: “I saw a flame coming out of the doorway next to the door that these women had come out of. So, I said, ‘There's a fire!'” David Squillante's father and grandfather were both firefighters, so he knew exactly what to do at that moment. He told WJAR News that he rushed into the building, SQUILLANTE: “Instinct took over. I found myself looking at 15-20 babies sleeping. Immediately just kind of lined everybody up and we started grabbing them putting them into the cribs.” SMITH: “We were just literally taking cribs with a few kids in it and rolling it across the street to the high school lobby.” SQUILLANTE: “It was probably 10 minutes, but it seemed like an instant. It turned out to be okay.” No doubt David and his new bride, Doran, will remember that life-saving moment on their honeymoon for years to come. Close And that's The Worldview in 5 Minutes on this Tuesday, October 18th, in the year of our Lord 2022. Subscribe by iTunes or email to our unique Christian newscast at www.TheWorldview.com. Or get the Generations app through Google Play or The App Store. I'm Adam McManus (Adam@TheWorldview.com). Seize the day for Jesus Christ.