Podcasts about Purdy

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  • 303PODCASTS
  • 453EPISODES
  • 47mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 4, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Purdy

Latest podcast episodes about Purdy

Pardon Will Podcast
Transforming A City w/ Alicia Purdy

Pardon Will Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 92:24


This week David sits down with Mayor Candidate Alicia Purdy as they discuss their love and concern for Albany, Ny, and her plans to reshape the future of this city. You can find more about Alicia and her plans as well as donate to her campaign at www.TransformAlbany.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/pardonwill/support

Wake Up Warchant
(9/30/21): Secret weapon Randy Shannon, mishmash of relevant YouTube questions

Wake Up Warchant

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 77:54


(4:00) Randy Shannon filled in on Saturday for Marcus Woodson -- is he the solution? (16:00): Is Matt Rhule/Baylor a legit comparison (18:00) "Bamboo Backfield"? (25:00): MIA - high level special team play (34:00) Fear the Orange or easy dub? (39:00) Fair catch kickoffs? (43:00) What's up with the lack of first drive success? (50:00) Purdy time? (52:00) Thoughts on DJ Williams (56:00) Roll with Travis again? (1:00:00) Is Norvell maximizing the talent? (1:02:00) Can this team play with Miami, Clemson and Florida? (1:07:00) Revisiting the 4th down direct snap Music: Angel Du$t - Truck Songs Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Holiness Preaching Online
Rev. Roger Purdy- “ Salt”

Holiness Preaching Online

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 45:31


Rev. Roger Purdy --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/holinesspreachingonline/message

Holiness Preaching Online
Rev. Roger Purdy- “The coming storm”

Holiness Preaching Online

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 37:20


Rev. Roger Purdy --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/holinesspreachingonline/message

Within Brim's Skin
WBS: Alex is Purdy #130 9-21-21

Within Brim's Skin

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 38:29


Alex is Purdy #130. Within Brim's Skin -- Brimstone is joined by his wing man Alex DaPonte as they discuss lots of things including melting in Mexico and mango margaritas. They discuss problems with airline flights and why Brim is not feeling his chosen airline. Brim discusses the Gabrielle Petito case and questions why the authorities didn't bother to watch the boyfriend's house before the piece of trash got away. Essentially, he explains what gets Within Brim's Skin.

The Grindhouse Radio
WBS: Alex is Purdy #130 9-21-21

The Grindhouse Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 38:29


Alex is Purdy #130. Within Brim's Skin -- Brimstone is joined by his wing man Alex DaPonte as they discuss lots of things including melting in Mexico and mango margaritas. They discuss problems with airline flights and why Brim is not feeling his chosen airline. Brim discusses the Gabrielle Petito case and questions why the authorities didn't bother to watch the boyfriend's house before the piece of trash got away. Essentially, he explains what gets Within Brim's Skin.

Washed Up Walkons
Iowa State Recap | WUW 248

Washed Up Walkons

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 53:07


The streak extends to 6 for the Iowa in the CyHawk series. Saturday boasted the biggest game between ISU and Iowa in the history of the matchup and the it didn't disappoint if you were wearing black and gold. We all know that through 2 games the defense has played out of their mind, we discuss why that may be the case and why their confidence will only continue to grow. Special teams was huge on Saturday, even more than people think, and we talk about why Tory Taylor and Charlie Jones are literally changing the game for the Hawkeyes. Spencer Petras took another step or 2 in proving that he is the guy. We talk about the 3 throws that end the discussion on if he is a true gamer or not, however why is he taking sacks on 3rd down? We have a couple answers to that question and explain why we are optimistic. We address the teams glaring weakness in the offensive line and what we think Schott returning to the lineup could do for production. Ohio St. lost to Oregon and showed for the 2nd straight week that they are not the team that OSU usually puts on the field, and this of course leaves the top of the Big Ten more open than usual. We talk the Hawks resume, best in the country, and why this team could be special. Kevin makes an All-Time cameo from his Las Vegas hotel room, Drake rants of course, the F-bomb fund is fully loaded, and the Walkons have a HUGE bounce back week in betting picks for week 2!

Alienhard Radioshow
Alienhard Radioshow 101 - Dj Purdy

Alienhard Radioshow

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 62:34


Alienhard Radioshow by Dj Tamayo, Dj Marvel, Dj Lalo y Dj Purdy todos los jueves de 19 a 20h en www.msk-makina.net. El mejor hard Trance y Remember de los 90 desde Barcelona.

Washed Up Walkons
Iowa State Preview | WUW 247

Washed Up Walkons

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 94:20


A THICK Cy-Hawk preview. This episode has a lot going down as we react on the fly to something serious that happens minutes before recording the episode. We talk about Gameday coming to Ames, we talk about both teams being top 10 in the country, and talk about what Iowa will NEED to do if they want to be successful this weekend against the Clowns. We also discuss the 'Superbowl' concept and how this rivalry is viewed by every party involved. We cut to a guest appearance from Dan Pomeroy, lifelong Hawkeye, Walkon Army member, and all around great dude, who shares his perspective on the matchup which he has made for 43 straight meetings between the teams. He also shares some stories and gives his thoughts on the Iowa program. We finish with Wards Winners, stay tuned for the official picks on our social pages on release day.

Alienhard Radioshow
Alienhard Radioshow 100- Dj Marvel,Dj Lalo,Dj Tamayo,Dj Purdy

Alienhard Radioshow

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 239:22


Alienhard Radioshow by Dj Tamayo, Dj Marvel, Dj Lalo y Dj Purdy todos los jueves de 19 a 20h en www.msk-makina.net. El mejor hard Trance y Remember de los 90 desde Barcelona.

The Irish Tech News Podcast
A quarter of a century on the coffee roller coaster, highlights and entrepreneurial insights with Karl Purdy, Coffeeangel

The Irish Tech News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 48:43


We chat with Karl Purdy, Founder and MD of Coffeeangel. Before launching Coffeeangel, Karl was an aspiring photojournalist. Returning to Belfast in 1995 (after 20 years in Canada) to cover the first IRA ceasefire, following an uncomfortable run-in with loyalist paramilitaries, Karl found himself opening Belfast (and Ireland's) first specialty coffee shop in 1997. It was an unexpected and overnight success. Unbeknownst at the time, this little shop ultimately launched today's Irish specialty coffee scene. Relocating to Dublin in 2000 and starting again from scratch, Karl opened a little, three-wheeled coffee cart on Howth's East Pier in 2004. On its first day Coffeeangel served 150 coffees. Seventeen years later Coffeeangel now has five locations across Dublin city centre, a thriving ecommerce & wholesale business. Having served well over one million cups of delicious coffee, Karl and the team at Coffeeangel remain laser-focused on providing a world class product, efficiently and consistently with genuinely Irish customer service at the heart of it all.

Midnight Train Podcast
The Honolulu Strangler (He Totally Did It.)

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 102:22


Today we're taking the train to a land of paradise. Warm climate, great surf, beautiful women, and…. the Honolulu Strangler? That's right we're taking a trip to Hawaii and the land of unsolved murders. You know how we like our unsolved crimes here at the midnight train! So without further ado… Let's get into what we do know about the case and see if we can solve it like we do with so many other things.    So the Honolulu Strangler was a serial killer who was active between 1985-1986. He tortured and killed 5 women. The five victims were found with their hands bound behind their backs, sexually assaulted and strangled. The strangler's victims ranged in ages between 17 and 36 and came from different walks of life. The police had several suspects including one that… Well… is most likely the killer but… You know, the police let him go. Well get to him in a bit. First we are going to discuss the victims and then the few suspects they had. There's not a huge amount of information out there. Every source has the same information so we'll give you what we have found.     Let's start with the victims.    The first victim was Vicki Gail Purdy. She was an attractive, petite 25 year old blonde who was a transplant from North Carolina. She lived in Miliani with her husband Gary. Gary was stationed in Hawaii as a helicopter pilot for the U.S. Army. Vicki worked at the Wahiawa Video Rental store, which was a point of contention between her and Gary. Gary Purdy had long objected to his wife's place of work, for the video store was known to sell pornographic films. The police found that Vicki liked to go dancing at clubs with her friends. On May 29 Vicki went to a club with a couple friends in Waikiki. Gary was expecting her back around 9. When she did not return home Gary started to page Vicki and continued to page her throughout the night. For you young kids out there, a pager is what you used to get ahold of someone before there were cell phones. You'd get a page and then you'd have to find this thing called a pay phone to call the number back. A PayPhone is typically a coin-operated public telephone, often located in a telephone booth or in high-traffic outdoor areas, with pre-payment by inserting money (usually coins) or by billing a credit or debit card, or a telephone card.… It was nuts! At any rate… the next morning Gary finds his wife's car in the parking lot of the Shorebird Hotel. Police were contacted by a cab driver who said he had dropped Vicki off there the night before sometime around midnight. Vicki's body was found the morning of may 30th on an embankment near Keehi Lagoon. She was found with her hands tied behind her back. She had been raped, then strangled, and then killed. At first the police checked out any possible connection to the video store. On top of Gary not liking her working there, the store had a bit of a reputation already. In December of 1984, two women, a worker and the co-owner of the store, were stabbed to death at the store. Police initially took the angle that a porn obsessed man had stalked and killed Vicki. After investigation though police could find no link to the video store and the crime. They were back to square one. Her husband, Gary Purdy was a chief warrant officer with the 24th Aviation Battalion. At six feet tall and 165 pounds, he could obviously handle his own. He told media Purdy she had once “knocked the —- out of me” during an argument. He believed it would have taken two people to nab her.    Victim number two was 17 year old Regina Sakamoto. Regina was petite like Vicki, but moreso. She was only 4'11" and weighed only 105lbs. Also like Vicki, Regina was a transplant. She was originally from Kansas. People said Regina was a shy quiet girl who had planned on attending college in Hawaii in the fall. Regina's father was a military serviceman stationed in Hawaii. On January 14,1986 Regina spoke with her boyfriend at around 7:15am. She had told him that she would be late as she was not catching her usual bus. She would be missing for about a month after this. In February her body was found. She had been bound with her hands behind her back, raped and strangled just like Vicki. Oh and she was found near Keehi Lagoon as well… Same as Vicki.    After the discovery of Regina's body, homicide detectives became convinced they had a serial killer on their hands. Due to the fact that both women were found with their hands tied behind their backs, both had been raped, and both had been strangled, police surmised the cases were linked. Add to that they were both found in the same area, and it was all but assured.  The Keehi Lagoon area was part of an urban beach park. There was ready access to the ocean and it was dotted with tiny islands. It was fairly secluded and made for a good dumping ground for the killer.    Two weeks after Regina Sakamoto disappeared, but before her body was found, the killer struck again. This time it was 21 year old Denise Hughes that was the victim. Denise was a native of Washington state. Like Regina, she was also used to using the bus system and regularly took the bus to and from work. Denise failed to show up to work at her job as a secretary for a phone company. Police suspect she met the killer at the bus stop or on the bus. In February, three fishermen would find her body. There were a few differences between her body and the first two. First off she was found near Moanalua stream and not by Keehi Lagoon. Second, her body was wrapped in a blue tarp. Despite these differences and the fact that the body was pretty decomposed, they were able to assess that it was the same killer, due to the fact that she'd been bound the same way and strangled. Regina's brother would later do an interview with khon2.com and say              “She was late for school that day,” “It was in Waipahu. She was sitting at the bus stop in front of Diners in Waipahu.”   Her brother was in 5th grade at the time. He would go on to say:          "I used to look up to her. She'd babysit me and stuff like that", adding that she was “very bookish, smart, fun loving, everybody's friend, that kind of thing.”    When asked about revisiting the case, her brother says he wished they could test for DNA. Unfortunately they could only test for blood type at the time.    “It's kind of sad that both my parents, you know, they're not here to, even if it does get resolved, they're not here to see it,” Omar Sakamoto said. “I just want, what is that, closure.”   This interview was about 5 years ago when there was talk of reopening the case or at least revisiting some of the evidence.    The killings prompted the Honolulu Police Department to form a task force that included an FBI profiler who helped put together a profile of the person they believed could be the suspect.   He was described as a Caucasian male in his 30s to 40s with no criminal record. The profiler also suspected the killer targeted women near where he lived or worked.   “He's an individual who may be, at this particular juncture, may be experiencing girlfriend or marital problems and the selection of victims is probably the result of opportunity or chance encounters,” former Honolulu Police Chief Douglas Gibb said back in 1986.   Former homicide lieutenant Gary Dias was the head of HPD's homicide detail at the time. “DNA could've been a much greater asset for us in that particular case,” Dias said, “and it's useless in today's age, because 82 percent of the world are types O and A.”   “Digital evidence is extremely important toward the advancement of investigations,” Dias said. Unfortunately back then, there was no cell phone video, and surveillance video wasn't common.    The next victim was 25 year old Louise Medeiros. According to a newspaper article we found from Hawaii from 1986, Louise J. Medeiros was a young woman who had lived much of life before she knew how to live it anyway. She'd left her large family on Kauai as a teenager, opting for independence and uncertainty on her own on Oahu. In six years, she'd returned to Kauai once, for a bowling tournament, and then only called home. She'd been on welfare, gotten in trouble with the law and lived with beach people at Makaha. Three months pregnant when she was killed, the 25-year-old had never married, had three children and a daughter in a foster home. But most of the family worries about their prodigal sister were soothed when Louise came home in March for a reading of her mother's will. The family found her centered and motivated, no longer the alienated rebel. Then the day after the reunion she was gone... abducted, police assume, from a bus stop near the airport on the evening of March 26. "She was finally happy. She had found peace within herself," recalled her eldest sister, Brenda Durant, of the last visit. "We were lying in my bedroom. She'd laugh and laugh." On March 26, 1986, Medeiros boarded a red-eye flight to Oahu. From there, Medeiros told her family that she planned to take a bus to Waipahu in order to meet them following the tragic death of their mother. Medeiros was last seen alive leaving the plane after it landed in Honolulu.   Medeiros's body was found by construction workers on April 2 near the Waikele Stream. Like the other four victims, Medeiros was found partially clothed. (The  killer always removed the pants and undergarments and left his victims nude from the waist down.) She had also had her hands tied behind her back. Medeiros had been sexually assaulted and strangled.   In order to catch the killer, the HPD began sending their female officers undercover to the Honolulu International Airport and to Keehi Lagoon. By now, it was clear that the killer favored out-of-town victims or those with limited connections to Hawaii.   The killer's last known victim was 36 year old Linda Pesce. Her roommate would be the last person to see her alive. Her roommate said she saw Linda when she left home on the morning of April 29, 1986.  The next morning the roommate was informed that Linda had not shown up for work. This was odd to the roommate. She was informed a little later that Lindas car had been found near a viaduct on route 92/interstate H-1. It was at this point the roommate reported her missing to the police.  Motorists claimed that on the evening of April 29 they saw the car's emergency lights flashing, indicating it had stalled. They also described a Caucasian or mixed ancestry man in his 30s or 40s, of medium build, and a cream-colored, american made van with letters on its rear windows, both beside Pesce's vehicle.    In May of 2018, the TV show Breaking Homicide returned to the case and the show's investigators suggested that the Honolulu Strangler may have also killed 19-year-old Lisa Au in 1982. Au was last seen alive just after midnight on January 21, 1982. Her car was later found near Kapaa Quarry Road. Ten days later, on January 31, 1982, a jogger found Au's nude, decomposing body on Tantalus Lookout in Waikiki. Police were never able to officially list Au's cause of death.   Ok, now… This is where shit kinda gets crazy! Depending on the source things get a little mixed up. We've found at least two different accounts of what happened next but they both involve the same man, a man who most people think is the killer.    The first story we found was that an unidentified(at the time) 43 year old white male came to the police claiming that a psychic (also unidentified) told him where Linda Pesces body was. He said the psychic informed him the body was located on Sand Island. The man then led police to a spot on the island but Pesces body was not there. Police decided to search the entire island and then found her body. She had been strangled and her hands were bound with parachute cord like the other victims. From what I've encountered on this particular part of the story, he purposely did not go near the spot where they eventually found her body. Sounds sus af. And that just sounded weird coming from me. Moving on.   OK so that's the first version of the story. We found another version that goes a little something like this:   The as yet unidentified mean first came to police attention when Linda Pesce's body had not yet been found. He voluntarily presented himself to the authorities claiming he had found some bones on Sand Island. When investigators processed the bones they discovered they were from a pig. The man was put under surveillance and, on May 9, was arrested due to circumstantial evidence linking him to the serial killings.    So we found both of these stories in several different places and wanted to present them both. From here on out everything pretty much lines up through most sources.    So who the hell is this guy? Well it would come out much later that the mans name was Howard Gay Dutcher. So who was Howard Gay and why was he considered the prime suspect even though he'd helped find the body of Linda Pesce? Let's have a look at this guy shall we?    Gay was born in 1943 in Buffalo, New York. Not much is known about his personal history other than he joined the army and was stationed at George Air Force Base, a 30-minute drive from Apple Valley, California, where he lived for fifteen years. He was eventually discharged in 1965. Gay attended Victor Valley College, received his associate degree, and was employed by Continental Telephone in Victorville, where he held jobs as a lineman and teletype repairman. In the same year as his discharge, he married Rita Thompson, his college sweetheart, and fathered two children with her: Justin and Jason. In 1968, he was employed by Flying Tiger Line at Los Angeles International Airport. Gay's role was to train cargo aircraft mechanics around the world and, in 1980, he was relocated to Daniel K. Inouye International Airport, in Honolulu, Hawaii. Howard lived in a rented three-bedroom home in Ewa Beach. He divorced from his wife in 1983. One day, his family decided to surprise him by traveling to Honolulu, but when they showed up he was upset and even refused to let them in his home. He made them stay in a hotel and shipped them back to California two days later. His neighbors told reporters he was a gentleman, always willing to help others. A female assistant manager who worked at La Mariana Sailing Club in 1986 recognized Gay as a man who routinely stared at her, asked her to accept rides from him, and once reacted furiously when she once again refused.    The FBI's Behavioral Science Unit profiled the Honolulu Strangler as being a Caucasian male in his late 30s or early 40s who had no prior criminal record and may have been experiencing marital or girlfriend problems at the time. It said the killer may have lived or worked in the area between Sand Island and Waipahu. He was also an opportunist who cruised for victims and struck when opportunity presented itself, rather than a stalker who chose his victims. And due to prior witnesses, they had suspected the killer drove a cream colored van with words on the back.    All of these things fit Gay to a T.  On May 9th 1986, police arrested Gay. Gays girlfriend had started to police the he like bondage sex and would routinely tie her up with her hands behind her back, like the victims. Another way he fit the profile and the police thought him to be a viable suspect is that his ex wife told police that each killing coincides with a domestic dispute the couple had. The ex wife says that Gay would leave the house after the fights and would not return until the next day.  On top of that he was connected to all the crime scenes since he worked at the airport (near where most of the victims were dumped) and lived in close proximity to Waipahu, where two victims disappeared and Louise Medeiros' body was found. He also drove a cream-colored, american made van with letters on its rear windows, had a vasectomy like the man who raped three of the victims, and possibly had access to parachute cord due to his job. If that were not enough, Linda Pesce's boss claimed she had written down Gay's phone number on a note pad on the day she disappeared, since at that time Linda was looking for customers in the airport area. Gay offered to take a polygraph examination which (depending on the source)  gave an inconclusive result, or a failure result, and consented to a search at his home.  Despite all the elements against him, he was released after being held and questioned for ten hours, since prosecutors Peter Carlisle and Michael McGuigan decided they had insufficient evidence to win a case.    Two months after the arrest a woman came forward to claim she'd seen Linda chatting with a man the night she disappeared. The woman was brought in and shown a lineup and picked Gays photo out of the line up. The woman said she did not want to be a witness as she was scared because the man had seen her as well.    So what happened to Gay after this. Well… We'll tell ya. The killings stopped after Gay's arrest and release. After his release he stated, “The police have released me, that's all I know. They (the investigators) have plenty of good cause. They're doing their job”..Gay returned to California in June 1986 to see his son, Jason, graduate from high school. Three days later, Jason was killed in an automobile accident, while changing a tire on the side of the road which prompted Howard to become a born-again Christian. Gay later worked for FedEx in Memphis, Tennessee, presumably when the latter acquired Flying Tiger Line, in 1988. He died of kidney failure in November of 2003.    We found his obituary… Not one mention of his time in Hawaii...it reads as follows:    Howard Gay lived in Apple Valley, California, for fifteen years. He was stationed at George Air Force Base, where he was honorably discharged in 1965. He attended Victor Valley College, where he received his associate degree. Howard was employed at Continental Telephone in Victorville, California, as a lineman and later a teletype repairman. In 1968, he was employed by Flying Tiger Lines at LAX, and later Federal Express in Memphis, Tennessee. Howard traveled throughout the world, training aircraft mechanics on airframe and powerplant systems on large cargo planes.   Interesting….   At any rate, police spoke to many people and followed other leads on cream colored vans and things like that. Nothing solid ever came from anything else other than the Howard Gay stuff. Police that worked the case spoke years later and they all are certain that Gay was the killer. Unfortunately since he is dead and since no DNA evidence is available we may never actually get a solid answer on this case, despite there being a reward of $25,000. This seems to be one of those weird unsolved cases that everyone seems to know who did it. Crazy case!  https://www.ranker.com/list/best-horror-movies-about-islands/ranker-film   BECOME A PRODUCER! http://www.patreon.com/themidnighttrainpodcast   Find The Midnight Train Podcast: www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com www.facebook.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.twitter.com/themidnighttrainpc www.instagram.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.discord.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.tiktok.com/themidnighttrainp   And wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts.   Subscribe to our official YouTube channel: OUR YOUTUBE   Support our sponsors www.themidnighttraintrainpodcast.com/sponsors Charleyproject.org

Ross Purdy Destroys Comedy
I Am A Cuck: Liam Porter vs. Ross Purdy vs. Tim Heidecker vs the Alt Right

Ross Purdy Destroys Comedy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 57:50


Liam Porter, maker of the Youtube documentary I Am A Cuck: Tim Heidecker vs the Alt Right comes on the show to talk about the documentary about Tim Heidecker's dealings with online trolls in 2016 coinciding with the rise of Million Dollar Extreme, an online comedy group seeing a television debut on Adult Swim just as Tim's output is quieting down on the network and the political social media controversy that followed.   You can watch and support it through this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5LbzgANX398

Frontstretch
Podcast: Chase Purdy on Re-Learning How to Race, Contracting COVID & His College Football Conundrum

Frontstretch

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 51:45


After a two-year sabbatical of sorts away from racing, Chase Purdy is still getting his feet under him as he's returned to the seat on a full-time basis with GMS Racing in the Camping World Truck Series this year. He joins Davey Segal this week to discuss his season to date, contracting COVID-19 and how ... Read more

Dunktown
S3E44 -Cameron Purdy + Movie Review: Twilight (2008) [Unlocked Patreon Bonus!]

Dunktown

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 74:12


Talkin' Twilight with host of the Unbitten Podcast (and member of Cutie Nation), Cam Purdy! You can watch the video of this episode, plus get access to two bonus Dunktown Postgame episodes per month, and our Cutie Nation community Discord by signing up on our Patreon!

Murph and Andy
Purdy v Seneca, CFB Vaccines, and More - Thursday Hour 2

Murph and Andy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 42:19


Purdy v Seneca, CFB Vaccines, and More - Thursday Hour 2

AKASHI MEDIA LIVE
Vent Radio in Detroit with Book Nation Host Sonya Purdy. The True Story of Florence Ballard

AKASHI MEDIA LIVE

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 139:45


Vent Radio in Detroit Host of Book Nation Sonya Purdy. Interviews Variety Chenevert the host of Akashi Media Podcast Live who is aka Nichole Renee Ballard the firstborn daughter of The Legendary Supremes Founder Florence Ballard. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/akashimediapodcastlive/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/akashimediapodcastlive/support

Heroes in Business
Ted Purdy, PGA Tour Winner, Getting High On Giving

Heroes in Business

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 62:33


After beating Tiger Woods and many years on the PGA Tour, Ted Purdy accidentally stumbled into a new career around giving to those who were less fortunate in this episode of The Health and Wealth Podcast.

KXnO Sports Fanatics
Chris' Week in Nashville, Jared Stansbury on Iowa State Football Media Day and Olympics are Over - Monday Show Hour 1

KXnO Sports Fanatics

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 44:48


Chris Williams starts the week off talking about his time in Nashville and how he got burned (AGAIN!) by Garth Brooks. After chatting about the State Fair starting this week, NFL camps rolling and the Olympics being over. Then Jared Stansbury from Cyclone Fanatic joins the show after attending Iowa State Football Media Day and talks Campbell on realignment, the offensive line, who Campell's talking about and Purdy's year.

Sports Spectrum Podcast
Iowa State QB Brock Purdy on playing for Christ and living set apart from the world

Sports Spectrum Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 32:48


Brock Purdy is a quarterback for the Iowa State Cyclones in the Big 12. He played his high school football at Perry High in Gilbert, Arizona and was voted Gatorade's Football Player of the Year for Arizona in 2017. As a true freshman at Iowa State, he started eight games and cemented himself as the Cyclones QB. Last season, Purdy led Iowa State to a 9-3 record and their first ever Big 12 Championship game appearance. In the 2021 Playstation Fiesta Bowl, Purdy was named Offensive MVP in helping the Cyclones to a 34-17 win over Oregon. Today on the podcast, we talk to Brock about the excitement surrounding the 2021 season, playing before a packed house in Ames, the importance of Christ in his life, the impact his father Shawn has made, and why he wants to live set apart from the world. -- If you enjoyed this podcast with Brock Purdy, we know you'll love these conversations as well: – Shawn Purdy - Former Pro Baseball Player – Patrick and Bo Nix (Alabama High School Football) Receive our 10-day Sports Spectrum Devotional written by professional athletes for FREE when you sign up for our Sports Spectrum Weekly Email Newsletter. Sign up  here.

Steve Jones Show
Hour 2 – Live at Purdy/ Doug Birdsong Interview

Steve Jones Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 40:02


Steve interviews Doug Birdsong at the Purdy Golf Tournament discussing Bucknell Football. Also more from the Purdy Tournament as it celebrates it’s 30th Anniversary!

Steve Jones Show
8/4/21 Hour 1 – Live at the Purdy Golf Tournament

Steve Jones Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 38:49


Hour 1 – Steve is live at the Greater Susquehanna Valley YMCA  Purdy Golf Tournament with live coverage including the first whole in one made at the Purdy Turney, also talking about problems with the Big 12, Ohio State and the FCC could be losing money.

SoundGirls Podcast
Jill Purdy: supervising sound & dialogue/ADR editor

SoundGirls Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 44:58


As a prominent Supervising Sound and Dialogue/ADR Editor in the film and television industries of both Canada and the United States, Jill Purdy has an extraordinary record of achievements and awards spanning over two decades. After graduating from both Queen's University and Sheridan College and initiating her career via a successful internship with Sound Dogs Toronto, Jill gained a distinguished reputation quickly and has continued to thrive at the top of her field. Jill was invited to become a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in 2018. In addition to 2018's Oscar-Nominated “The Shape of Water”, Jill's credits include “Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark”, “mother!”, “Molly's Game”, “Hands of Stone”, “Snow White and the Huntsman”, “Black Swan” and “On the Basis of Sex.” She is currently co-supervising Guillermo del Toro's “Nightmare Alley”.

Locked On Hawkeyes
Part two of our convo with former Hawkeye Matt Purdy on Iowa swimming and his Hayden Fry memories

Locked On Hawkeyes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 29:46


We are joined by former Iowa Hawkeye offensive lineman Matt Purdy for part two of our conversation about Iowa swimming, Gary Barta, and his memories of Hayden Fry! Make sure to check out part one with Matt yesterday and go Hawks! Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Locked On Hawkeyes
Former Hawkeye OL Matt Purdy joins the show to discuss Iowa's decision to cut four sports

Locked On Hawkeyes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 35:29


We are joined by former Iowa Hawkeye offensive lineman Matt Purdy as he discusses all that has gone done the past year after Gary Barta's abrupt decision to cut four athletic programs from the University of Iowa. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Double P Podcasts
THE CROWN Podcast Lilibet season 4, episodes 6-10 review | The Netflix Crown Jewel

Double P Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 121:31


Holly (@huntpants), Bubba (@fittentrim) and Matt (@lilibetpod) do some podcast marriage counseling as they discuss S4E06 through S4E10 of The Crown on Netflix. News is shared, games are played, and power outages happen! You'll hear what they think, but, more importantly, we want to know what YOU think! Tweet @DoublePHQ , comment on http://facebook.com/DoublePHQ or on our videos (http://youtube.com/user/fittentrim) to share what you think of the episodes discussed, and vote on the polls by checking out @Lilibetpod on twitter. #TheCrown We'll be back when Season 5 of the show is released! Show Notes: Katherine and Nerissa Bowes-Lyon https://inews.co.uk/culture/television/queen-cousins-true-story-nerissa-katherine-bowes-lyon-the-crown-what-happened-758046 - Derek “Dazzle” Jennings https://news.yahoo.com/crown-got-one-major-thing-231000601.html - Purdy performing “Can't Take My Eyes Off of You” https://entertainment-focus.com/2020/11/21/purdy-performs-frankie-valli-track-in-new-season-of-the-crown/ - Comparing Claire Foy's performance to the real Queen Elizabeth's speech https://youtu.be/RUlToHE_27U - Philip and Diana's “rocky” Relationship (a double R!) https://people.com/royals/prince-philip-rocky-relationship-with-diana-princess-diana/ - Bob Hawke's interview before being elected Prime Minister of Austrailia https://twitter.com/4corners/status/1331397908910903296) & https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2020/nov/26/the-crown-ridiculed-bob-hawke-did-not-call-the-queen-a-pig-or-a-pom-he-was-better-than-that - Princess Margaret Lung Surgery https://www.elle.com/culture/movies-tv/a34749278/princess-margaret-1985-lung-surgery-the-crown-explained/ - Commonwealth meeting in the Bahamas and Economic Sanctions https://www.bt.com/tv/drama/the-crown-queen-margaret-thatcher-relationship-audiences-truth - Diana's Birthday Dance for Charles https://www.newsweek.com/fact-check-did-princess-diana-dance-uptown-girl-prince-charles-birthday-1595031 - Sunday Times article about Elizabeth and Thatcher https://www.nbcnews.com/pop-culture/tv/crown-season-4-did-queen-elizabeth-ii-margaret-thatcher-get-n1247289 - Diana and James Hewitt https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/3075298/who-james-hewitt/ - Charles' Near Miss in the Avalanche - https://www.express.co.uk/showbiz/tv-radio/1367010/Was-Prince-Charles-almost-killed-by-avalanche-near-death-Major-Hugh-Lindsay-evg - Diana visits Harlem https://www.insider.com/the-crown-princess-diana-royal-icon-aids-patient-hug-2020-12 - Thatcher resigns as Prime Minister https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/margaret-thatcher-resigns - Margaret Thatcher Awarded the Order of Merit https://ca.style.yahoo.com/true-story-behind-margaret-thatchers-180000585.html

Babes About Bud
Episode 30: Your buds sure are purdy!

Babes About Bud

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 64:03


On this weeks episode we discuss the state of Nebraska. A babe is talked about in the babes in bud section and we bring 2 new stains. Enjoy!!! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/babes-about-bud/support

Anglo-Omani Society
S4 EP10: Artistry in Zanzibari Doors

Anglo-Omani Society

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 41:39


In this podcast, we speak with Janet M. Purdy, the Daniel F. & Ada L. Rice Postdoctoral Curatorial Fellow in Arts of Africa at the Art Institute of Chicago. She received her PhD in Art History in August 2020 from the Pennsylvania State University, with a focus on traditional art and architecture of Africa. Her research examines regional vocabularies and visual exchange systems of social and cultural trade networks throughout Eastern and Northern Africa, the Gulf Region, and the Indian Ocean World with a particular interest in the transmission of talismanic patterns and designs and their diverse protective functions across different mediums including textiles, metalwork, jewellery, wood carving, and architectural adornment. _________Anglo Omani Society accounts:Instagram: angloomanisocietyLinkedin: The Anglo-Omani SocietyTwitter: @AngloOmaniSOCFacebook: The Anglo-Omani Society

Focus on Albany
Alicia Purdy talks about Operation Transform

Focus on Albany

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 28:00


Alicia Purdy talks about Operation Transform

Buffalo Happy Hour
Small Business Interview #71: Don Purdy "Thunder Snow of Buffalo" - Buffalo Happy Hour

Buffalo Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 70:58


In today's conversation, Derek and Mike head over to Don Purdy's place to talk about his new book, "Thunder Snow of Buffalo". This book is all about the October Surprise Storm of 2006, Don's experience through the storm, and countless contributors ranging from Hall of Famer Marv Levy, Former Buffalo Bills Running Back Fred Jackson, Meteorologist Don Paul, and many more. This is an incredible read that goes through so many details inside and outside of the Bills Organization due to Don's long 27 year tenure as an executive with the Bills. Purchase your copy here: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/166570618X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=166570618X&linkCode=as2&tag=buffalohappyh-20&linkId=0b451c029157990d95406961b7e29473 As always, please subscribe to our YouTube Channel, it really helps us grow as a podcast which in turn helps the businesses we promote! Leave a like comment, and subscribe. New videos every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday!

8311Cast
NIL

8311Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2021 42:51


NCAA's NIL rule, other College Football, NBA, MLB, and our signature segments on this episode Music: www.purple-planet.com

HRchat Podcast
#312: The Role of Incentives in Engaging Employees w/ Rob Purdy, CarltonOne Engagement

HRchat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 26:33


In this episode, we talk about performance, incentives, and employee engagement. Bill's guest this time is Rob Purdy, CEO at CarltonOne Engagement, a firm on a mission to become “the world's leading provider of on-demand recognition, incentive, training, and reward solutions”. Rob created CarltonOne to crack the code of employee engagement alongside making a positive impact on the environment. Listen to Rob's answers to questions including: What are some historic challenges faced when trying to engage and reward top work & great performance?You've introduced technologies that make a difference in offices, factories, stores, and boardrooms of all sizes and in over 85 countries. How can technology support smaller organizations to provide the same level of incentivization as big companies enjoy?You are a lifelong environmentalist. In fact, you're also CEO at Evergrow, a firm that helps companies thrive by empowering their people to change the world. Your team there has created an AI-powered personalized employee engagement platform that recognizes a team's best work with cool rewards. Evergrow also helps companies transform the global environment by funding native tree planting. Tell me more.Traditional incentivization is still very important to encourage and recognize high-performance but so too are a host of other 'benefits' around wellness and work-life balance. How can companies mix traditional rewards with new ways to engage and retain their top performers?A big focus of CarltonOne is incentivizing and rewarding sales teams. What's unique about how Sales pros work and how they want to be recognized compared to other departments and why? CarltonOne promises to transform workplace motivation by using AI to create a one-to-one personalized engagement journey while connecting employee action to tree planting and conservation. Talk to be unique about the tech behind the platform. What does it say to a candidate or employee when the employer offers easy ways for staff to support charities that resonate with them? About CarltonOne Engagement and its PartnersCarltonOne Engagement delivers SaaS solutions to industry leaders within the employee recognition, performance, loyalty, and reward management industries around the world.CarltonOne Engagement has developed two patent-pending, proprietary software solutions; Power2Motivate (P2M) and Global Reward Solutions (GRS).Power2Motivate is a global employee recognition, performance, loyalty and reward management software. Launched in April 2007, P2M is designed to a global standard including fourteen (14) languages, a global currency converter along with a reward management solution.Global Reward Solutions is an "on-demand"​ reward management solution that consolidates reward catalogs from a vast network of global suppliers into a virtual catalog for seamless ordering, fulfillment, and customer service. GRS is a standalone API that easily integrates with existing loyalty, recognition, or performance company's solutions, enabling GRS Partner companies to offer their clients millions of reward options in over 120 countries around the globe.

Always Already Podcast, a critical theory podcast
Ep. 71 – Jedidiah Purdy, After Nature

Always Already Podcast, a critical theory podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021


In this episode, Emily and John welcome John’s colleague Gary Kroll for a discussion of Jedediah Purdy‘s After Nature: A Politics for the Anthropocene. We map the contours of the book, asking questions about the scope of the argument and both the promises and limits of its framework. Throughout we interrogate the concepts of the Anthropocene, […]

Warrior Cats What is That?
111: Protag Anxiety and Romance Man

Warrior Cats What is That?

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 49:19


Content warning for Cat Fact: Mentions of Sucide and Possible Sexual Abuse - No Graphic Descriptions - Time stamps for CW: 28:55-29:09 and 30:05-30:34 We're on the 2nd book of The New Prophecy! We enter the dome of a Riverclan cat for the first time. Fishy. We get into the real emotional side of it too aka everyone has crushes on everyone. Purdy keeps his promises and danger is around every corner. w Book: The New Prophecy: Moonrise Follow us on Twitter! WCWITCast (@WCWITCast) Follow us on Instagram! WCWITCast What We are Reading (Not Sponsored): Wake: The Hidden History of Women-Led Slave Revolts Bloodline - Kate Cary Reckoning Cat Fact Sources: Bouquet and a Cat Image Suzanne Valadon Suzanne Valadon Biography, Life & Quotes | TheArtStory Suzanne Valadon (1865-1938, French) Suzanne Valadon | Artist Profile | NMWA Blue Room Music : Happy Boy Theme by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3855-happy-boy-theme License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Sonatina in C Minor by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4393-sonatina-in-c-minor License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license This transformative podcast work constitutes as fair-use of any copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US copyright law. Warrior Cats: What is That? is not endorsed or supported by Harper Collins and/or Working Partners. All views are our own.

The Communicators
Andy Purdy, Chief Security Officer, Huawei Technologies USA

The Communicators

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 30:15


In this edition of the Communicators, Andy Purdy, Chief Security Officer of Huawei Technologies USA, discussed how the Biden Administration's tech policies may present new opportunities for Huawei, including 5G, innovation and connectivity in the United States as U.S.-China relations evolve. He also discussed the bans, past controversies and concerns about Huawei products in the U.S.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Focus on Albany
Alicia Purdy talks about the primary un Albany

Focus on Albany

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 29:00


Alicia Purdy talks about the primary un Albany

Warrior Cats What is That?
109: Everyone Goes to Thunderclan and Psychic Taste Tests

Warrior Cats What is That?

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 52:29


Note: Weird feedback during the first 10 min on Brenna's side - sorry! We love a chaotic opening here, so we got you: rambling, pet misbehaving, and mic issues to boot! We also do the podcast. Everyone at the gathering thought all the missing Warriors went to Thunderclan (except Crowpaw...we thought Crowpaw was dead.) We use twin superpowers to heal rat bites and Purdy fulfils his promise. Book: The New Prophecy: Midnight Follow us on Twitter! WCWITCast (@WCWITCast) Follow us on Instagram! WCWITCast What We are Reading (not sponsored): Embroideries - Marjane Satrapi Cat Fact Sources: De pianoles — Teylers Museum - Image reference Henriëtte Ronner-Knip - Wikipedia Knip, Henriette (1821-1909) BIOGRAPHY - Henriette Ronner-Knip (1821 - 1909) On this day… died Henriëtte Ronner-Knip Music : Happy Boy Theme by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3855-happy-boy-theme License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Sonatina in C Minor by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4393-sonatina-in-c-minor License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license This transformative podcast work constitutes as fair-use of any copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US copyright law. Warrior Cats: What is That? is not endorsed or supported by Harper Collins and/or Working Partners. All views are our own.

Simulcast
128 Journal Club Monthly Podcast May 2021

Simulcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 37:43


Ben and Vic are joined by Eve Purdy this month to discuss the UK national strategy for simulation, how to prepare for for systems-based simulation (the ‘pre-work phase') , cultural consideration in simulation debriefing, and how simulations in ACLS training may perpetuate gender bias in emergency medicine.  We give a shout out to ASPiH, the UK based learned sociality for healthcare simulation, and their conference in November 2021.  Ben impresses again with his tun of phrase including the ‘visual haiku', ‘framework mashups' and ‘paragraph of Purdy'.  Happy listening and look forward to next month! 

Marc Bernier Show Podcast
060921 V 6 Purdy Epps Joe Rose A

Marc Bernier Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2021 88:15


060921 V 6 Purdy Epps Joe Rose A by Marc Bernier

Warrior Cats What is That?
108: Pro-Purdy Party and Hawkfrost Ruins Pride

Warrior Cats What is That?

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2021 64:47


Tangletongue's pro-Purdy mentality leads to some frustration towards the traveling cats. And she trusts Purdy, even if he may be evil. Back home, the clans gather and Hawkfrost is the Regina George of this arc. Book: The New Prophecy: Midnight Follow us on Twitter! WCWITCast (@WCWITCast) Follow us on Instagram! WCWITCast What We are Reading (not sponsored): Lesbian Nuns: Breaking Silence Gideon the Ninth Harrow the Ninth Lives of the Monster Dogs Cat Fact Sources: File:The Cat's Lunch.jpg - Wikimedia Commons Marguerite Gérard Women'n Art Profile - Marguerite Gérard Music : Happy Boy Theme by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3855-happy-boy-theme License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Sonatina in C Minor by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4393-sonatina-in-c-minor License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license This transformative podcast work constitutes as fair-use of any copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US copyright law. Warrior Cats: What is That? is not endorsed or supported by Harper Collins and/or Working Partners. All views are our own.

The Convention Pulpit
Episode 106: Our Weakness Is Christ's Strength Pleasant Valley by Nathan Purdy

The Convention Pulpit

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 45:06


Sermon by Nathan Purdy BIC 2015

Focus on Albany
Alicia Purdy talks about the Mayoral Debate

Focus on Albany

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2021 29:00


Alicia Purdy talks about the Mayoral Debate

Focus on Albany
Alicia Purdy gives an update on her campaign for mayor in the City of Albany

Focus on Albany

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2021 29:00


Alicia Purdy gives an update on her campaign for mayor in the City of Albany

Dream Big Podcast
DB 251: Be The Author Of Your Own Story

Dream Big Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2021 7:39


This week’s episode is inspired by Amy Purdy.  Amy’s childhood and teen years were filled with fun and adventure. She was an incredible athlete and especially loved snowboarding.  At the age of 19, Amy had a medical emergency caused by a bacterial infection.  The doctors gave her a 2% chance to live, and had to remove her spleen and amputate both her legs below the knees. Her father also had to donate a kidney to give her a chance to survive.  Needless to say, it was a very scary time for the Purdy family and life as Amy knew it would never be the same.  In this episode, Eva shares Amy’s analogy of how after this emergency, she made a decision to look at her life as a book where she would be the author of that book and write an incredible story.  Which is exactly what she has done!  Eva shares many of Amy’s remarkable accomplishments, including winning Paralympic medals in snowboarding, being the runner-up on Dancing With The Stars, touring with Oprah, and becoming a New York Times best-selling  author.  Amy can inspire all Big Dreamers, especially those going through difficult times, to be the author of their own story.  Thank you Amy for inspiring millions and now all the Big Dreamers.  We can’t wait to read the next chapters in your incredible life :)   For our show notes, visit DreamBigPodcast.com/251

Purdy's Podcast
Purdy's Podcast: Cinco de Mayo and its Historical Importance

Purdy's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2021 15:24


Introduced by Avalon Purdy and Narrated by William C. Purdy, Ph.D., recorded Sunday, May 2, 2021 in Santa Monica, California.

Focus on Albany
Alicia Purdy talks about the Albany police and mayor

Focus on Albany

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2021 29:00


Alicia Purdy talks about the Albany police and mayor

Up Next In Commerce
Insights Learned From Digitally Transforming a $9B Company

Up Next In Commerce

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2021 51:13


No digital transformation is the same, but when a massive B2B organization embarks on that journey, you better believe that there will be a lot of lessons learned that can be applied to any other company. That’s why we wanted to talk to former Chief Digital Officer at Univar Solutions, Ian Gresham, who led the digital transformation and ecommerce implementation at this $9 billion multinational industrial distribution business. Look around at the things around you, make up, dish soap, skincare, solvents for your car. Univar probably has a part to play in that. On this episode of Up Next in Commerce, Ian tells us about the experience of bringing a massive organization into the world of digital commerce, and he reveals some of the biggest learnings from the experience that he is using now as an executive advisor to multiple businesses. For example, how should ecommerce leaders frame the building of a platform to get buy-in from the top down, and what kind of strategies should you implement to drive adoption of your platform? Interestingly, it’s a combination of moving fast but also taking it slow — tune in to learn what that means in practice. Plus, Ian shares more tips and discusses some of the insider details on the projects he’s currently working on. Enjoy! Main Takeaways:If You Build It, They.. May Not Come: When going through a digital transformation, many companies fall into the trap of believing that if they simply build and launch an ecommerce website, their customers will flock to it. In reality — and especially in the B2B space – there is an education and adoption phase that needs to happen to actually make an ecommerce site successful.M-V-P!: It’s wise to take an MVP approach to building an ecommerce platform because it forces you to focus on one specific feature that you can provide that solves a problem for a customer reliably well over and over. By offering that one solution, you can drive faster adoption of the platform because you are not overwhelming customers with a multitude of features, some of which they don’t want or need. New features can come down the road, but adoption needs to come first. And the entire organization needs to be on the same page that building a platform is an ongoing process with no set start and end date because there will always be new things to add or improve.It’s About The Journey: In businesses that rely on face-to-face interactions, the omnichannel experience is becoming more important than ever. To digitize some of the interactions and drive the adoption of more online tools, you have to start from the bottom up and understand every kind of customer and customer journey that exists within your business. From there, you can start reallocating headcount to digitize certain processes and send other resources to handle high-value customer interactions so that you know you are investing in the parts of the customer journey that are most in need.For an in-depth look at this episode, check out the full transcript below. Quotes have been edited for clarity and length.---Up Next in Commerce is brought to you by Salesforce Commerce Cloud. Respond quickly to changing customer needs with flexible Ecommerce connected to marketing, sales, and service. Deliver intelligent commerce experiences your customers can trust, across every channel. Together, we’re ready for what’s next in commerce. Learn more at salesforce.com/commerce---Transcript:Stephanie:Hey everyone. Welcome back to Up Next in Commerce. This is Stephanie Postles, your host and CEO at Mission.org. Today on the show we have Ian Gresham, Chief Marketing Officer and Digital Officer, and currently an Executive Advisor to multiple businesses. Ian, welcome to the show.Ian:Thank you very much, Stephanie. It's great to be here.Stephanie:I'm excited to have you here. I just was looking through your background and we did not cover on our call that I thought you went to University of Maryland, which I am from Maryland, so-Ian:That's right. Go Turts. Fear the turtle.Stephanie:This is already off to a wonderful start now that we have that connection. I love that. I wanted to kind of start with your background. I see you've been in a lot of marketing roles, and I wanted to hear how you got interested in marketing, what that journey looked like.Ian:Yeah, sure. I don't remember exactly how marketing became an interest. In business school, I was looking at a number of things. I think perhaps that it was the fact that it was pretty people-oriented, and it's sort of an extrovert function in business if you will. That was pretty exciting to me. There were some pretty school businesses in the Maryland area that were recruiting at the business school there, and ultimately I ended up starting my career with Black and Decker. I worked on the DeWalt brand, and it's just a great place to learn a ton of great marketing and sales skills, and get out there and interact with the world.Ian:They put you out there on the street selling and talking to real people very quickly, and it was a lot of fun.Stephanie:Are there any lessons from Black and Decker where you still use them today, or you think back to advice you got or campaigns you were running? Or is it totally different now?Ian:I guess I think that for one, they set the standard very high for brands to create excitement and create products and experiences that their customers love and are loyal to. We used to get on the DeWalt brand pictures of people who had DeWalt themed weddings. I have had the good fortune in my career to work on a few other brands like that with Craftsman and later... And Sherman Williams, we had a brand called Purdy, which is a brand of paint brushes and applicators. They make these paint brushes here in the US by hand, and painters can tell a Purdy in their hand when they're blindfolded. They know the feel of the wood. They know just how these things feel and work, and they believe in them.Ian:Anyway, to be able to work on a brand like that at Purdy, we got a video of a guy who had a funeral for a paintbrush that he had used for years and years. When it finally just wouldn't go any further, he filmed a little memorial service and buried it in his yard.Stephanie:Oh my gosh.Ian:Anyway, DeWalt's the same way. Black and Decker, they just set the bar very high in terms of brands that create amazing loyalty and amazing customer experiences, which I have tried to carry through my career as well.Stephanie:I want to dive into your time at Univar, because that company is obviously huge. I think it's what, a $9 billion company, Fortune 500.Ian:Yep.Stephanie:9,000 employees or so.Ian:Yep. Yep.Stephanie:I want to hear about your work there. First of all, what is Univar and what did your role look like there?Ian:Sure. Univar, now Univar Solutions, is a pretty global multinational industrial distribution business. So, very B2B. We sold chemicals and ingredients into many different industries, everything from food ingredients to food manufacturers, to ingredients to personal care product companies like cosmetics companies, shampoos, sunscreen, lotions, paint and coatings, adhesives, industrial use. It was just a super diverse customer base. Thousands and thousands of customers, hundreds of thousands of products, and just millions of transactions. Lots of repeat business.Ian:Some of the products we sold were very commoditized. Some were highly specialized and patent protected, and exclusive ingredients that took a much different sales approach. The customer experience around that was very different too.Stephanie:What was your role when you first started at Univar? Then where did you transition to over time?Ian:Yeah, so I spent a couple of years as the first CMO at Univar, and put in place the first global corporate strategy, built out a lot of the core marketing frameworks with market research, with brand standards, articulating our value proposition, enhancing the value proposition, and aligning how we were communicating that and the brand identity globally. Then after a couple of years somewhere along the way I picked up a responsibility for ecommerce. A couple of years into it, the CEO talked to me about this opportunity to become the first Chief Digital Officer.Ian:When we had that conversation, he made the point that he really didn't want a technical person in this role. He wanted a commercial person in this role who could think about value creation and how we leverage digital to create value for our customers and suppliers, and to differentiate ourselves in a pretty fragmented marketplace with a lot of competitors of all different sizes. To me, this was really exciting. If I think about my whole career, I'd spent time in these companies like Black and Decker, Sherwin Williams, companies that made mostly consumer-facing products that really thought a lot about innovation.Ian:Then to make the transition into B2B distribution, one of my observations was innovation was not as common as daily there as it was in these manufactured product companies. I think a huge opportunity that I saw was with digital this is a way for a distributor to innovate around customer experience. A distributor doesn't typically make products. What they make is a unique customer experience, and they deliver on that better or worse than their competition. Digital is a way for that type of business to really create a better customer experience and solve problems that have remained somewhat unsolved.Stephanie:Very cool. Were you nervous taking on not only one, taking on a role where you're really the first CMO, and now it's like and now you're going to be the first Chief Digital Officer, were you hesitant to take on a new role that the company had not had before?Ian:Yeah. When I had the conversation initially, one of my thoughts was I don't know if I'm the right person for this. But that conversation around wanting somebody who had the commercial mindset rather than a technical mindset was reassuring. I think if you look at chief digital officers as a position and the people that sort of reside in those roles today, there are few different walks of life that find people there. Sometimes it's a technical leader. Sometimes it is a commercial leader, and maybe sometimes it's a transformational sort of complex project leader type person.Ian:It's not uncommon to have a marketer in that type of a role. As I think about marketing as a field and CMO as a role, what's clear in today's world is that digital is becoming really important to marketers. It has already, but the CMO role in general has evolved a lot and it continues to evolve. Much of the change is around digital and the power of data. As I thought about this role, to me it felt very relevant to my career, and it felt like the right skill set to be adding to my toolbox.Stephanie:Yeah. Yeah, very cool. What did it look like behind the scenes when you were entering into this new role? After you started observing for a bit, what did the process look like and where did you want to evolve it to?Ian:We had already started someone. We had an ecommerce platform we had just launched, and we had some analytics work that was already underway. We had some thoughts on how digital would help in supply chain and some other ways. The idea with creating this chief digital officer role was to put it all together to create a bigger wholistic vision, to prioritize and think about which of these things do we really want to do, and what sequence do we want to do them in, and how much are they all worth to us, and what is the investment going to require?Ian:The first thing to do was start to put the elements together and continue progress for accelerated progress in the things that we already had started. Fortunately, I really enjoyed a lot of the work we were doing there. It was very customer-facing. It was on the commercial side of the business, so we had an advanced analytics team that we rapidly were growing. We were doing AI and machine learning. We had a ton of transactional data, very good CRM data, and we were able to create a lot of value out of that by identifying insights that were commercially actionable.Ian:We had a couple of marketing automation systems in place, and we were choosing and moving to one. We were using that pretty effectively to reach out and activate with our customers as well as the ecommerce platform itself. We were still really trying to drive adoption of the ecommerce platform. I guess one of the lessons we learned was we were moving.... There assumed to be a lot of pressure to have a website, an ecommerce system, a customer portal where our customers could transact. There was a bit of a race to build it and launch it. We did.Stephanie:[crosstalk] you launch it, and what did your tech stack look like? What was the perfect fit for a company of Univar's size?Ian:We were using very heavily the Salesforce B2B commerce stack. That's what we built our commerce platform on, which was originally CloudCraze then became B2B commerce for Salesforce. I'd say we had a pretty good experience there. We were able to launch a platform in weeks, not months.Stephanie:Wow. [crosstalk]. That's super fast for a company that size, because we've talked to other people who were like, "Oh, 28 weeks." It's a whole thing.Ian:It was incredibly fast. We had both a strong internal team using very good development processes, and moving fast. Also, we used outside support for the build as well. We spent some money on it. Speed and money sometimes are inversely correlated. This was kind of an example, but we built it. I guess the story that I think is relevant here though is that... Let me just say, my story is one of helping lead a company that's pretty early in a digital transformation stage, not the bleeding edge. I think that looks like a lot of the companies out there who see digital transformation as an opportunity, but an overwhelming one. Where do we start? How do we get our house in order to get going?Ian:We just knew we needed a platform and there was a race to launch it. We launched it. What we learned was the Kevin Costner movie, "If you build it they will come," Field of Dreams, is not necessarily the case in ecommerce. You have to drive adoption. You have to have a great product that makes something better for customers to use it, prefer it, and stick with it. But also, you got to do some hand holding with some of these customers that have been doing things the same way for a long time. Digital transformation is about leaving an old state of affairs and moving to something new and better, but change requires support and communication.Ian:Honestly, we had to do some handholding with customers to show them what's possible, show them how easy it is, and then once they've used it a lot of them feel like "Yeah, this is great. I like this. I didn't know this was that easy." They're just not even open to thinking about something new because they have a habit in place.Stephanie:Yeah. How did you scale that adoption? Because when I'm looking, I think you have over 100,000 customers. How do you scale adoption? Are you giving them training videos? Other than the [crosstalk] handholding, what did you guys do to really pull them onboard?Ian:Yeah, we did do some one-on-one calls. We had some webinars. We had programs where we were getting our Salesforce and customer service reps to have the same conversation on scale across all of their customers. We were trying to activate it across all our touchpoints to introduce it to customers and have that conversation with them. If they needed more support, we could put them on the phone with somebody who could help them answer questions and demo it. We had automated or sort of recorded demos they could watch online.Ian:All of that still felt like it wasn't as fast as we had hoped it would be, adoption. That was one of the lessons that we learned. I guess another thing I would suggest is it's really helpful to know what are your most valuable features, and focus them on that first. If customers need to... One of our most popular features was having a library of customer documents where they could access at any time. In the past, they had to call somebody, they had to email somebody, they had to wait. Well, this is 24/7 that they could go access documentation, is a regular thing that customers needed.Ian:Once we introduced that, it became a no brainer for a customer to say "Oh, okay. That's where I go? Thank you. That's a solution to a problem that I've been less than satisfied with in the past." I've talked to other companies that maybe handling payments was their way in, where once they started taking payments online and managing payments online, adoption went through the roof. It was one feature that customers really felt was superior to the old way of doing things, and that helped to drive adoption.Ian:There were a few things like that where we zeroed in on key features. Another key feature that we had a lot of popular success with, and was highly used on the site was Two Clip Reorder. 80% of our business was repeat purchases. For a customer to log in and then see their last several orders and be able to immediately access those and reorder turned out to be a very popular feature. I guess for a company starting the work, that it was important to do is, to really think about the customer journey today and what are those moments along the customer journey that you can make better quickly, and focus in on those and try to create the right solution that'll drive adoption around those features, is my takeaway from that.Stephanie:Yeah, and that's such a good reminder for a platform. I would see a lot of people, if you try and throw all the features, most people are probably not ready to get power user of a brand new platform and they're like, "I want to know every single feature on here," so just presenting them with the things that are pretty uniform, like you said, payments are a big thing, reordering is a really smart way to get people in the door. Then start maybe dripping out the extra features that would overwhelm them from the start.Ian:I would take it further upstream than that too, Stephanie, which is to say maybe you don't need to build a platform with all of those features on it out of the gate. If you take a true MVP view, focus on what are the moments in the customer journey that you can digitize successfully and give them a superior experience, and start there. Maybe you don't need as many features on your platform to start with, but build something that does perform very well and earns their adoption, and then add other features as you go. Beyond adoption, it's even how do you start faster and get out of the gates with some traction on it earlier?Stephanie:Yeah. Did you have any surprises from either customers or maybe your internal employees who you were also trying to train up on this new platform? Anything that you look back and you're like, "Oh, we should have probably done it this way. We could have avoided this if we would have approached it a little bit differently"?Ian:Boy, there's probably a good list of things that we would have... We learned along the way by doing. I guess I would say one of my biggest takeaways was probably we could have started smaller and been a little more rigorous or embrace that MVP concept even more.Stephanie:Rolling it out for a pilot group type of thing? Like smaller in that sense? Like don't do it [crosstalk] on there?Ian:Or is less complexity to begin with. An even simpler platform and prove that you can drive adoption around that, it's easier to explain, it's easier to build. Then there's less to change and iterate as you learn more about how to make it even better platform. But one of my takeaways I think is really embrace that idea of MVP. You can think about narrowing the scope of the customer base you launch it to. You can think about limiting the products. You can think about a lot of things to make it smaller and more manageable, and get it out the gate and just have data coming in on what's working and how is it generating value. Then build complexity around that. Know what works, and build on success rather than... This is what makes it intimidating for people who are starting the journey is, seeing the complexity of all the problems that need to be addressed, or all the features that you need.Ian:If you compare yourself with Amazon, yes it's going to be a very expensive, very big project. But you don't necessarily need to have all of the features and benefits to start with. Start small. Move fast. And work in the world of results to understand what's working and where to double down on success and invest in scale.Stephanie:How would you get your leadership team to agree on "Here's the five features that we know that maybe 80% of our customers want," how do you get everyone in the same room to all agree when everyone probably has very different customers and they all heard different things, even if it's one off their like, "I know this is important to a customer. It's very big revenue-wise for us." How do you [crosstalk] agree on something?Ian:First, I think it helps to start with a long range vision. I guess one of my other learnings would be that I've seen companies that become system-focused like "We need a platform. Let's build it. Let's turn it on. It's going to cost us $X million and take a year and a half to build." They think about it as a project with a start and an end. The reality is, you need to just think about how fast can we get to the starting point and how do you make that as fast and reasonably good as possible for their MVP. Then assure people that this is not a project that has a start and an end.Ian:It is a journey that has a starting line, and MVP is sort of how you're racing to get to a starting point. Then a multiyear potentially perpetual journey building that out. I think when you get the team in the room, you've got to have some data. You need to have data around your customer segments, around their preferences and needs. You need to sort of have an understanding of the customer journeys that exist. I think it's important to realize that it's easier to digitize simple processes than complex ones. There's a logic to we got to start small. Let's take recurring purchases with existing customers who know exactly what they want, and they buy it regularly.Ian:How do we just automate a repurchase? That's super simple. The customer would prefer to do it that way anyway versus... Later, you to get to things like troubleshooting or selling differentiated products that are a first time purchase to our customer that has a high performance need. Leave the high value add complex work to people and start with simple processes. Add complexity as you go. I think you can, between using real customer insights and the logic of what is possible in the digital world in terms of solution creation, and using a longterm like a three to five year journey map or a journey roadmap. We can assure people, "We can't get to you first, but these are the building blocks that we have to put in place in order to get to that level of complexity," and something that serves that unique customer need.Stephanie:Yeah.Ian:But there may be some things that'll never be digital or in the foreseeable... They're just too complex and they don't have the scale. You may have some one-off customer problems that only occur several times a year, and it just doesn't make sense to invest the kind of cost and a digital solution for some things. People might need to hear that too along the way.Stephanie:Yeah. What did the change management when it came to employees look like? Was there any pushback? Because I could see as an employee being like I always talk to my customer like this, we're on the phone, I do the order for them. We have this relationship. Don't mess with that. What was that like behind the scenes trying to train the employees up, get them onboard, and what kind of things [crosstalk]-Ian:Yeah.Stephanie:[crosstalk] for that.Ian:I think there are two great things to discuss on that. Great question. First, I would like to talk about Agile and how Agile played a role in adoption in our own employee environment. Second, really we had a very robust change management approach going into place at Univar Solutions that is worth talking about. First of all, Agile, this is where I became a real believer in Agile and certainly there was a lot of resistance. There were sales people who said "I don't want anybody touching my customer without me knowing about it. You shouldn't go take them a price or an offer, or anything like that without me approving it first."Ian:A lot of businesses out there are like that still today. There's a lot of trepidation about change. Really, we just had to find a support somewhere in the business who believed that they had an opportunity. The reality is that the speed you can move in digital is an opportunity. We could touch the entire national customer base for a given product in seconds, where it might take weeks for our traditional Salesforce to get out in front of those customers. We found somebody who wanted to work with, and try, and experiment. We put together a plan to target the right customers with the right offering given out there via marketing automation.Ian:We started at a very small scale, and it was to be honest, so small. We knew going into it, this is not going to move the needle at all. It's just too small. Everyone was being too cautious. But we ran the experiment and it came back, and sure enough we just didn't have enough scale to get any movement. But that was what we learned from it. We took it as a learning. We started too small. We need to open the target zone here of customers. The second trial we did, very quickly with a larger customer base, we started to see some progressing results. We picked up a few other learnings. So, we quickly ran a third iteration of it, and by that time we sent this experiment out, this message to customers, and we got real traction on it.Ian:The conversation which started from "Wait a minute. I don't know, why are we messing with customers without salesperson involvement?" to within about three to four weeks having results that were very promising. The conversation flipped, and the business team was saying to the digital and marketing team, "How can we do more of this? What do you need from me to do more of that? Because that felt good. That was a great solution that aligned with my business themes." In that sense, Agile, this idea of start small, run real experiments to get real data, and then once you prove a hypothesis about something that works, the discussion about investing and scale is much easier and you actually have a pull for the solution rather than pushing it into the business teams.Ian:I think first, Agile is a great adoption tool and a process for working cross-functionally with the rest of the business to help drive adoption of digital solutions. Second, I wanted to talk about change management. I would say I commend Univar Solutions for the approach here where part of this came in as well as it relates to an acquisition, and a lot of change that we were rolling out, because we were integrating two companies. I guess I would say as companies think about investing in digital, they're really thinking about how they spend every penny and they make those pennies go as far as they can.Ian:Usually, it is not natural to say "We need to hire people to help communicate." Meaning, communicate through and train our employees, communicate and train our customers. It feels like can't we just have existing people have that conversation? But the reality is, we did hire a change management leader. We started staffing out change management roles to integrate with customer service, to integrate with sales and to interact with customers. I guess a learning, looking in the rear view mirror was, that is the way to do it.Ian:You might even want to have customer adoption teams or cross-functional teams that involve adoption leaders throughout the company.Stephanie:What did this role look like? I mean, you're bringing someone in. Their role is to do change management. What does their day to day look like? How are they supposed to be partnering with teams?Ian:We had a leader at Service Central level who was thinking about putting together training programs, putting together communication, and coordinating timelines and rollout structures, and plans. So, full-time they were... Now, they weren't just working on digital. They might have been rolling out other major changes in the corporation, but digital transformation is something that fits that bill. My point is to have a dedicated structure in place, probably with a leader whose overseeing it, and potentially ambassadors in a variety of cross-functional teams or functions, like sales, customer service, sales ops, and even customer-facing adoption sort of agents is very fruitful.Ian:If you've invested and you believe in an ROI that will come with this, then adoption is an important factor that limits your ROI. I would just suggest that the company starting and going down this journey are thinking about all the investment and systems, and infrastructure of digital. Don't spare too much on adoption in favor of technology because you will be spending money on technology that's poorly used. It's worth the investment to drive timely, effective adoption and satisfaction with everybody in the ecosystem.Stephanie:One point I'm thinking about is all these things are changing, and a lot of the managers... I mean, I've seen this in the past companies I've worked for, well we need more head count. We always need more head count. For what's happening behind the scenes here, you just need to throw more people at it. How did you approach your teams who probably were all saying something similar I would assume? Did you supply more heads to try and solve problems? Or were you like "Hey, let's rework the talent pool. Let's put people on different roles." What did that look like?Ian:Yes. The answer is yes. No, certainly, you are thinking about head count, but this is where as a B2B business we started talking about omnichannel and sort of reconfiguring how we handle customer needs. In a business that has traditionally been very sales driven and relied on field sales reps to deal with face to face with customers for a lot of things, which many businesses out there still do, we started to think more about these customer journeys. There's simple, there's more complex, and there's very complex types of customer journeys, or events on a customer journey that need support.Ian:How do you start digitizing from the bottom up, the most simple, and how do you drive adoption of those? You can build a plan that drives the customer to self-serve options in order to reallocate head count into new... Sort of reinvest it into higher value activities from handling regular orders and replenishment orders to digitizing that and then thinking about how are we reallocating head count to digitize more complex processes, or to handle more high value added customer engagement opportunities. You can go from customer service handling manual work to more sales reps that are technically proficient and able to go sell a high value customer on a high value solution.Ian:As you up the continuum of complexity with digital, you're continually reinvesting head count by creating a self-serve option, driving adoption, and then moving head count into a higher value space.Stephanie:That's great. Yeah, I can see a lot of companies struggling with that now, and thinking how do I put these people in new roles, and then train them. Is it worth all that? Or should I hire someone who's already done this before? Tricky place to be, but I like that.Ian:Yeah. You can think too in today's world post-COVID, I think there's a continuum from digital to sort of inside... Or let's say digital, customer service, inside sales and then your outside sales or national count. Sort of that hierarchy of the types of resources you're applying against customer needs. The inside sales team becomes an even more potentially bigger team. They make more calls a day than outside sales rep can, and in an omnichannel environment they have the tools that you're investing in with ecommerce and digital to be even more efficient and have more intelligence at their fingertips to handle those customers as well.Stephanie:Thinking about intelligence at your fingertips, I want to shift back to the topic of AI. I know we mentioned it earlier that you guys are starting to experiment with that. You have a really big catalog at Univar. You have high frequency of transactions, a lot of stuff going on. What did that look like, introducing that into some of your processes? What did that world look like?Ian:Yeah, sure. Let me say, I am such a huge believer in AI and machine learning, and the opportunity here. This is sort of a revolution that's just starting. We were building out AI and machine learning use cases and deploying those, and integrating them with our entire sales and customer service ecosystem sort of. I think first, if there are companies out there that are wondering about this, I would say a lot of people quickly go to debates about is it AI or not? Or is just a formula?Ian:I saw a couple authors of a book Competing in the Age of AI. I saw them speak recently and one of the authors said "Look, you can get into a debate if you want to. I suggest that you just forget about that. It's not even worth debating. The reality is, if it is, if you're using algorithms and automation to do something a human used to do, let's call that AI." AI isn't all about sort of recreating human-centric consciousness or something, or super complex. More and more, the vast majority of AI application is going to be in super focused problem solving sort of settings.Ian:That's what we are looking at, at Ford. I would say any company out there that has lots of transactions, lots of customers, lots of products, any of those combinations probably has a great opportunity here because if you've got the data from transactions, from your CRM system, and especially if you have a large catalog and you're only selling a portion of that to most of your customers, there are insights hiding in all that data. In a B2B environment, it can be very valuable to understanding and optimizing your pricing.Ian:Pricing is hard to manage, and there are a lot of variables. AI can allow you to put many variables together and create some really sophisticated ways to monitor competitive things, or going on regents to look at how you're pricing customers across your own business, but bring some timely intelligence and automation to recommending optimum prices. AI allows you to predict and prevent customer turn. You can put together dynamics across a variety of variables that might indicate when a customer's regular purchasing cycle is changing, and there may be other factors involved that would indicate that this customer is likely to leave us.Ian:We've had a few things that are not correlated with success here and retention. Certainly, everybody has experienced as a consumer going online and seeing customers like you also bought. AI allows you to see and make those connections with more certainty and a higher understanding of what's the probability of success on these things in order to invest in automation and turning that into a feature, or marketing automation.Ian:This was super exciting, and we had success building teams out internally, bringing in data scientists and setting them loose on different business opportunities where they could build an algorithm and then we connected it through marketing automation or ecommerce to drive real financial benefit and results for the company.Stephanie:Yeah, that's awesome. What kind of insights did you get, or "aha" moments where you're like, "We never would have stumbled on that without building out these algorithms"?Ian:An example would be that we had a customer segmentation model in place but AI created an outcome that had 34 micro-segments of customers that was driving certain activity that was really generating value. No human could manage coming up with 34 micro-segments of customers based on many different variables. That's an example of how AI is able to piece together insights that just humans wouldn't get around to and couldn't connect on the right kind of actions probably with that in place.Ian:Like I said before, if you're a business that has a lot of transactional data, AI might be for you. If you have a lot of customers, a variety of customers, AI might help you. If you have a big catalog that you're trying to sell to a lot of customers, AI might help you. I think that there are plenty of businesses that think it's too farfetched or too sophisticated. I'm a believer that it's more within reach than people think, and that that's not just for any one business but it's already starting to change everything about online merchandising for some businesses, and marketing automation.Ian:It's worth diving into.Stephanie:Awesome. I spent a lot of time diving into Univar because obviously the company is amazing. Your story there, all your stories, are awesome. I also want to hear about what you're doing today. I know you're advising, an investor. Tell me what are you up to these days?Ian:Yeah, so I've started working with another sort of distribution business that is starting their own digital transformation, a very similar story. I believe that there are plenty of them out there. Also, I've been helping a business where I'm an investor that is called Parcel Home. This is an IOT connected device. It's launching in Europe. It's been in Europe for a couple of years and we're getting ready to launch it in the UK. Essentially, it's a delivery box that install outside your home on your front porch or out by the street. It's IOT connected, so with your phone you can access and monitor it. You can delivery people codes, so like if you were to purchase on Amazon, you'd just go in your delivery instructions and instruct them to use a code on the box.Ian:When they get there, they punch in the code. It unlocks. They leave your packages in the box. They close it. Then as you get home it notifies that you have received packages today. Make sure you go get them. You can enable other people in your home to use it, and you can set one-time codes for somebody who's just coming by to pick something up or drop something off. Or set it up as a recurring solution for all your deliveries.Stephanie:I can't believe that [crosstalk] haven't had that yet. I'm just thinking about how archaic dropping off a box of Amazon, there's a $500.00 item in there potentially, and it's just sitting on my front porch for [crosstalk].Ian:I know. I had the same thought. People buy multi expensive things, and then the package gets left on your front doorstep and it feels like really I think in that situation it's like security is essentially the fact that it's concealed in paper or cardboard. The only thing protecting it is the fact that somebody's not sure what it is, but it's sitting out there outside your home for a while.Stephanie:Could be a baby bottle. Could be a high end TV. I don't know.Ian:Yeah, $500.00 handbag or something like those, yeah. We see and there are some sort of online communities for neighborhoods where we see people talking about package theft. We know that's an issue.Stephanie:Oh, I know that from being in the Bay area.Ian:Weather is an issue. If it's left outside and you have precipitation or things like this, it can damage packages. I think now there are places where it's just not okay to read the package because of threats of theft or something, so they have to ring the bell or knock on the door and interrupt now what are Zoom or Microsoft Teams, or whatever online meetings. It's a nuisance as well.Ian:Anyway, this is a startup business that has been active in the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, and launching in Denmark here this spring as well as UK later this year. And really, direct-to-customer. So, building out regeneration assets and processes, a sales and marketing funnel and the processes to support that, and thinking about, as many companies are now, living in an almost purely digital environment and interacting with customers in that way.Stephanie:Yeah, that's awesome. Do you feel like you have certain lessons from the past that you're able to bring to this company to kind of help accelerate their progress? Or is it just such like a different field and startup where you're really having to kind of relearn the industry and what startups are doing versus really large Fortune 500 type of companies?Ian:I think it's some of both. It is. As you're launching, there are some fundamentals that even startups may or may not have the talent or resources in place. They just need to do some of the blocking and tackle about marketing and PR as you're entering a new market. How do you approach PR? There are some basics about press engagement for instance, that I can help with, but we're also learning about influencers, micro-influencers, and how to... That's an ever-changing game. There are new sort of marketplaces of influencers where brands can go and evaluate who are the influencers with audiences that matter to me, and how do I transact with them, or come to a mutually beneficial agreement to work with certain influencers? How do I scale that kind of work and what kind of investment do I need to do that?Ian:It's an important way that brands are reaching people now. Every moving target, with new platforms: TikTok, et cetera. It's a combination of executing on known best practices and staying in touch with what's working today. In a startup, you have a business that in the course of a year their commercial processes may change many times over. You add one additional person into the working team, and suddenly new processes emerge, or people reallocate different tasks. So, it's a very dynamic environment in that way.Stephanie:That's awesome. Yeah, I will be watching them closely. I'll be excited to see them expand, and hopefully they come here.Ian:Yeah.Stephanie:Well, let's shift over to the lightening round. The lightening round is brought to you buy Salesforce Commerce Cloud. This is where I ask a question, and you have a minute or less to answer. Are you ready, Ian?Ian:All right, I guess I am ready. I didn't even know about the lightening round.Stephanie:It's easy [inaudible]. What one thing will have the biggest impact on ecommerce in the next year?Ian:I honestly think we'll see... If we rewind, people have entrenched behaviors. Take my family for instance, we were buying groceries online from a source. Everything got disrupted. We were a loyal online customer, but certain products and processes changed and we had to change to adapt to what our needs were. Many customers change brands and change their choice of where they purchase these things in the last year. I think the question will be, where did things land? Do people stick with the new brands that they've adopted? Or do brands settle back into a way that they win their customers back who've experimented and gone somewhere else? I think we're still in the turbulence of COVID.Stephanie:Mm-hmm (affirmative), yep. I agree. What do you predict then? Do you think people go back to kind of what they knew before? Or do you think now it's so ingrained with the new stuff they've been doing that that's the new way of living?Ian:I think more and more people will stick with their new solutions. To me, some of that is surprising because honestly we have bought through Amazon and Whole Foods, which I would think Amazon has got this under control, but for certain reasons a Target has over-delivered on new solutions and the product is [inaudible]. We had stopped buying from them. That's an example where competition moved fast and have different relationships with some of those customers now. I think that businesses better get used to where things are now, and it's going to be hard to re-win customers that they've lost.Stephanie:Yep. Yeah, same thing with Walmart. I feel like they've stepped it up in a huge way-Ian:Yes.Stephanie:On very quick delivery. I ordered a planter the other day and it showed up the same day. I didn't really understand the delivery process because it seemed like just some random person, but I'm like, "Hm, my planter's here," in that same day.Ian:Yeah.Stephanie:Which made me kind of rethink where before I'd be like, "Yeah, I'm not going to Walmart because it could take a couple of days, and shipping and all this." But yeah, they stepped it up.Ian:Yeah. I totally agree. They've done a great job.Stephanie:What's the nicest thing anyone's ever done for you?Ian:The nicest thing anybody's ever done for me? Whoa, that's tough. Other than my wife bearing children? I would say that [crosstalk]. That's a big one. It's hard to beat that.Stephanie:That is a good one.Ian:I don't know if I could top that. That's a big deal. And as a father, there's this moment where you're like you're going into that experience and you realize "I really don't control anything about the things that matter most to me. I just have to sit here and hope it all goes well."Stephanie:Yeah. Yeah. If you were to have a podcast what would it be about, and who would your first guest be?Ian:I think I'd have to have a podcast about what people are passionate about, and the lengths that they will go to to pursue their passions. I don't know who my first guest would be, but I think that the most interesting conversations are when you talk to people about stuff that they really love, that they love doing, and that they... That's what lights people up. I think I might start with unexpected guests, people that are sort of somebody in your own neighborhood that nobody knows, but there are amazing things happening that people are...Ian:I love these sort of stories of real humans of, kind of stories where somebody just went to great lengths. I read a great story that's a good example. A little restaurant in Baltimore that made Fusion Asian food, there's a woman who came to visit her kids in Baltimore regularly. Loved a certain dish they had there. Then she came down with terminal cancer. She lived in Connecticut there in Baltimore, and the kids this woman had called the restaurant and said, "Hey, can we get the recipe? We'd just like to prepare it for her in her final weeks."Ian:The owner of the restaurant was like, "You know what, where does she live? We'll be there." They drove six or seven or eight hours and prepared it on the back of the tailgate of their truck, and knocked on their door and brought this food to her. Anyway, that sort of thing is... That makes for great stories.Stephanie:Oh, goosebumps over here. That's amazing.Ian:Yeah, totally.Stephanie:We need that podcast. Someone sponsor this. Ian needs a sponsor. Oh yeah, that's really great. I'd definitely listen to that. What one thing do you not understand today that you wish you did?Ian:Let's focus it back on ecommerce.Stephanie:Okay.Ian:A big question that I don't see an answer to that I really think is a big opportunity is, if I think about real world brick and mortar shopping it's a very rich experience. If you think about walking in a store and walking back to the department you're going to, you past thousands of products and many, many, many opportunities for a retailer to sell something to you: visually, stimulations, [inaudible] signs, POP, that kind of thing. Digital ain't there yet.Ian:It's a long way away from it. At best, we're saying customers like you also bought, or... You know what I mean? It's a cross merchandising that gets relegated to a side banner or below the fold kind of merchandising. It's hard to imagine replicating the richness of an in-store experience, but I'm really curious to see how that evolves because brick and mortar is becoming less and less... It's not going away, it's just that's a rich experience of hard to replicate, and how many online browsing occasions do you need to replicate or replace all of those stimulus that retailers or brands can present you with in-store effectively?Ian:I guess I'm wondering, without that in place what's the output of the whole system here? Do people become just way more replenishment purchase-oriented and less new purchase? Or can we find other ways to effectively introduce people to products they didn't know they were looking for?Stephanie:Mm-hmm (affirmative), that's a good one. Definitely something that I'll be watching closely over this next year, because I love retail. I love going into stores, especially if they have a good experience, good curation, the collection. I feel like you can't beat that, even in a digital world and things like... Yeah, it's hard to get there.Ian:The real world shopping can also be a social experience that online is not anywhere close to replicating either. How you share it with somebody, it's a little different experience online too.Stephanie:Yeah, and you go with someone and... Yeah. Well, that is a great answer. Ian, thank you so much for joining us on the show today. It's been a pleasure having you. Where can people find out more about you and your work?Ian:Reach out to me on LinkedIn. It's LinkedIn slash in/slash... Whatever. IanLGresham.Stephanie:I'll link it up. [crosstalk].Ian:Yeah, there you go. I'd love to connect with you. If there's anybody that has questions about digital transformation or how to connect with customers in that way, I'm happy to have a good conversation about it. Thank you, Stephanie, for having me today. It's been a great conversation.Stephanie:Thanks so much.

Wake Up Warchant
(3/24/21): Snipes from the Tribal Council, odds of an FSU title in Indy, QB reps and RB numbers

Wake Up Warchant

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2021 49:18


(2:00) Dad Corner -- taking the boy to Indy! (9:00) Taking shots on what was a fair question (18:00) FSU a 3 point underdog...peeking ahead to Gonzaga? (22:00) What amount of money would have made you ok with Auburn picking off Jameis in the end zone? (24:00) Tuesday football interview recaps (28:00) DL getting praise -- good sign (30:00) Rodemaker still bought in, Purdy's absence more reps for the rest (38:00) FSU overleveraged at RB and in more pressing need at OL and WR? Music: August Burns Red - Icarus Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Why Are You Like This?
I've Only Seen Saved with Danielle Purdy

Why Are You Like This?

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2021 44:08


This week I am joined by the wonderful Danielle Purdy. We talk about growing up in the Evangelical Church, the powerful importance of queer clothing, and reveal just how far Danielle was willing to go for an 8X10 of Jonathan Taylor Thomas. *Don't forget to rate, comment and subscribe* Follow Danielle: @danielle.purdy Follow Ryan: @rtayrews Follow the pod: @YRUlikethispod

KFC Radio
Mary Beth Barone, Space Race 2.0, & The Dean Browning, Dan Purdy, Patti Labelle Fiasco

KFC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2020 117:28


Subscribe, Rate, and Leave a Review! - It is uncharacteristically hot in NYC - Space Race 2.0 is on against Russia for a new vaccine - We explain the Dean Browning, Dan Purdy, Patti Labelle Fiasco - AITA Thursday - Voicemails (01:20:30) Mary Beth Barone joins the show! We talk about @draghisass, what makes someone a fuckboy, therapy, and we answer the age old question, would you have sex with Bernie Sanders? Let us know what you think on twitter: @KFCRadio @KFCBarstool @Feitsbarstool @MaryBethBarone Subscribe to our youtube for daily videos: youtube.com/c/kfcradio