Podcasts about Hated

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  • 2,136PODCASTS
  • 2,749EPISODES
  • 45mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Oct 20, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Hated

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Latest podcast episodes about Hated

The Command Zone
Decks We Built...But Hated | #426

The Command Zone

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 89:23


It's time for you to learn from our mistakes! The Command Zone team joins Jimmy and Josh to talk about the decks we built, but ended up hating. Learn where we went wrong and what we'd do differently now. Best case, you'll learn from our cautionary tales and become better deckbuilders. Worst case, at least we've embarrassed ourselves for your amusement! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Asian Hustle Network
Elephante // The Elephante in the Room // Special Episode

Asian Hustle Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 47:23


Welcome to a special episode of the Asian Hustle Network Podcast! We are very excited to have Tim Wu Aka World Famous DJ Eleplante on this week's show. We interview Asian entrepreneurs around the world to amplify their voices and empower Asians to pursue their dreams and goals. We believe that each person has a message and a unique story from their entrepreneurial journey that they can share with all of us. Check us out on Anchor, iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play Music, TuneIn, Spotify, and more. If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe and leave us a positive 5-star review. This is our opportunity to use the voices of the Asian community and share these incredible stories with the world. We release a new episode every Wednesday, so stay tuned! A wildly innovative producer, artist, and songwriter fusing melodic electronic dance music with pop, blues, rock, and other genres, Elephante (American musical artist Tim Wu) is living what many people might call “The American Dream”. As the son of Taiwanese immigrants, his Asian-American upbringing in Michigan was unique and sometimes isolating. He graduated from Harvard University and entered corporate America at a top global consultant firm....and HATED it, so he addressed his unhappiness — “the elephant in the room” — and pursued his passion in music. To date, he's garnered hundreds of millions of streams across his two indie EPs: I Am The Elephante (2016), a nine-track exploration of progressive house, synthpop and trap; and Glass Mansion (2018), which shot to #1 on iTunes! U.S. Dance chart. His upcoming project, Heavy Glow, represents his first full-length studio album, a largely solo effort further pushing the boundaries of dance music, featuring the debut single, "High Water.” Elephante has headlined two sold-out national tours, played nightlife residencies including those at Hard Rock and Wynn Las Vegas, and appeared at major music festivals such as Lollapalooza, EDC Las Vegas, and Electric Zoo. Please check out our Patreon at @asianhustlenetwork. We want AHN to continue to be meaningful and give back to the Asian community. If you enjoy our podcast and would like to contribute to our future, we hope you'll consider becoming a patron. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/asianhustlenetwork/support

Pardon My Take
Paul Bissonnette, MNF, CFB Recap & Ben Simmons Is The Most Hated Man In Philly

Pardon My Take

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 120:32


Ben Simmons was kicked out of practice and we figure out solutions for the very weird situation in Philly (00:02:39:47 - 00:15:04). Monday Night Football and the Titans big win (00:15:04 - 00:23:13). College Football recap and who will Coach LSU next (00:23:13 - 00:37:26). Hot Seat/Cool Throne included MLB playoff talk and Aaron Boone Re-hired(00:37:26 - 00:53:55). Paul Bissonnette joins us in studio to talk hockey, being best friends with Gretzky now, and tons more (00:53:55 - 01:52:28). We finish with guys on chicks

Two Sides of FI
Retired Early and I Hated It: How NOT to FIRE, Part 2 (Post-FI/RE)

Two Sides of FI

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 26:42


Imagine hitting your FI number, retiring early, and discovering you hate it? In this episode we discuss four examples of such an outcome: from quitting the perfect job and regretting it, to feelings of depression and lack of purpose. Some are unable to find motivation without financial incentives, while others realize they haven't budgeted enough to do things they enjoy in life. This is part 2 of our How NOT to FI/RE series for part 1 and the PRE FI/RE examples, be sure to check out that video here: https://youtu.be/Jb438jvebd0 The full text of each of the Reddit posts we discussed is posted in the show notes at: https://twosidesoffi.com/how-not-to-fire-2

Career Stewardship with Michael Melcher
40. She Hated Networking. Then She Ran for Congress.

Career Stewardship with Michael Melcher

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 27:46


In 2018, Lauren Baer ran for Congress from Florida's 18th District.  She won the Democratic primary handily and came close to unseating her rival in a deep-red district.  While she had a stellar professional background, including stints working directly for two Secretaries of State and for the Ambassador to the United Nations, she was a first-time candidate and her district had never had an out, lesbian mom candidate running for the seat.  She now runs Arena.run, an organization that prepares new candidates for office and trains staff to be effective.  But years before all this, Lauren found herself in a career transition, wondering what she could or should do, and how she would accomplish that.  That's when she and our host met, and it's when she was confronted big time with the anxieties and satisfactions that come up in networking.  In this episode, Lauren talks with Coach Michael about her initial views on networking, how she made the process work with her, and how she took it to the next level when running for office. She also has great advice for people thinking of public office but who haven't quite taken the first step.  An extra-delightful and interesting episode!

Hoopsology Podcast
Why the Brooklyn Nets are the most hated team in the NBA with Nick Fay, founder of the Off The Glass Basketball Network

Hoopsology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 38:39


In this edition of Hoopsology, welcome the host of the Brooklyn Buzz: A Brooklyn Nets Podcast and founder of the Off The Glass Basketball Network, Nick Fay. This is a must-listen episode if you are a fan of the Brooklyn Nets. We break down the entire Kyrie Irving situation, why the Nets are so hated, will the Nets ever be the number one team in New York, and a lot more. Get in touch with the show through Facebook and Twitter, leave us a review on iTunes and email us at hoopsologypod@gmail.com. We are a member of the OTG Basketball Network. Follow Nick Fay here: https://twitter.com/Nick_Fay_ Be sure to check out The Brooklyn Buzz Podcast to keep up with the Nets this season! https://www.otgbasketball.com/brooklynbuzz --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hoopsology/support

DSC On Demand
Mayo in Coffee, Boyer Hated James Bond, & A Horror Movie Quiz!

DSC On Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 154:54


The DSC Show for Monday 10/11/21: Today we heard about a new weird combination, we recapped Dave's Birthday night at the movies, and we playe a horror movie quiz with GMSD!

Secret Life
I Was a Hollywood Gossip Columnist and Secretly Hated It

Secret Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 23:52


Growing up with parents who were household names in celebrity news, Meg followed in their footsteps and worked for some of the biggest celebrity news and gossip outlets in Hollywood for over a decade and secretly hated it.______If you or anyone you know is struggling with addiction, depression, trauma, sexual abuse or feeling overwhelmed, we've compiled a list of resources at secretlifepodcast.com.____To find out more information about Brianne's book Secret Life of a Hollywood Sex & Love Addict, check out the website: https://secretlifenovel.com or At Amazon______HOW CAN I SUPPORT THE SHOW?Tell Your Friends & Share Online!Subscribe, Rate & Review: Apple PodcastsFollow & Listen  Spotify |  Stitcher | Google PodcastsSpread the word via social mediaInstagramTwitterFacebook#SecretLifePodcastDonateYou can also support the show with a one-time or monthly donation via PayPal (make payment to secretlifepodcast@icloud.com) or at our WEBSITE.Connect with Brianne Davis-Gantt (@thebriannedavis)Official WebsiteInstagramFacebookTwitterConnect with Mark Gantt (@markgantt)Main WebsiteDirecting WebsiteInstagramFacebookTwitter

Rockin' the Suburbs
1218: Albums We Hated, Then Liked - Live From Suburbs Fest

Rockin' the Suburbs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 19:24


We record live from Suburbs Fest (thank you to the Marriott Fairview Park). In the first episode, B.J. Bonin talks about albums he hated at first, but now loves. Episode editor: Mary Edelberg Become a Rockin' the Suburbs patron - support the show and get bonus content - at Patreon.com/suburbspod Subscribe to Rockin' the Suburbs on Apple Podcasts/iTunes or other podcast platforms, including audioBoom, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon, iHeart, Stitcher and TuneIn. Or listen at SuburbsPod.com. Please rate/review the show on Apple Podcasts and share it with your friends. Visit our website at SuburbsPod.com Email Jim & Patrick at rock@suburbspod.com Follow us on the Twitter, Facebook or Instagram @suburbspod If you're glad or sad or high, call the Suburban Party Line — 612-440-1984. Theme music: "Ascension," originally by Quartjar, covered by Frank Muffin. Visit quartjar.bandcamp.com and frankmuffin.bandcamp.com (c) Artie S. Industries LLC

WhatCulture Wrestling
10 Wrestlers Who Hated Taking Wrestling Moves - Stone Cold Steve Austin! Kurt Angle! AJ Styles! Triple H Despised The People's Elbow?!

WhatCulture Wrestling

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 9:17


These wrestlers weren't in a rush to take these wrestling moves. Gareth Morgan presents 10 Wrestlers Who Hated Taking Wrestling Moves...ENJOY!Follow us on Twitter:@GMorgan04@WhatCultureWWEFor more awesome content, check out: whatculture.com/wwe See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Monster Of The Week: A Supernatural Podcast
Episode 250: No Funny Titles, We Just Hated This One

Monster Of The Week: A Supernatural Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 77:22


This week we continue our adventure into S15 with the second episode, Raising Hell, in which Buckleming comes crashing through the door of our fun experience and start firing off a tommy gun full of bad writing, hammy characters, awful dialogue, and, if that wasn't enough, lets go ahead and have someone hit Rowena in the face. Awful awful awful stuff. Monster of the Week is on Patreon (https://patreon.com/monsteroftheweek)! If you want to directly support the show and ensure we keep putting out that sweet hashtag content week to week, consider pledging. You get some sweet rewards like early access to weekly episodes, access to our Discord, exclusive podcasts, and more! Monster of the Week is also on Twitter (https://twitter.com/motwcast), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/monsteroftheweekpodcast/), Tumblr (https://monsteroftheweekpodcast.tumblr.com/), Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/monsteroftheweek), Tik Tok (https://www.tiktok.com/@monsteroftheweekpodcast?lang=en), and Spotify (https://open.spotify.com/show/3ahb3X2ojJNF4DTlvSiR4w). You can also buy MOTW merch at our shop (https://www.teepublic.com/stores/monster-of-the-week?utm_campaign=22527&utm_medium=affiliate&utm_source=Monsters%2Bof%2Bthe%2Bweek). Jeremy is on Twitter (https://twitter.com/jggreer), and you probably shouldn't follow him unless you know what you're doing. Chris is on Twitter (https://twitter.com/localbones), and you probably should follow him if you like #hunks and #swords. Like that intro? The music was done by our friend bansheebeat (https://twitter.com/bansheetweet), who has done all of our fancy intros over the last couple of years. Go check out his music! The vocals are by Alice Knows Karate (https://aliceknowskarate.bandcamp.com/), who also did the vocals for our Winchester Pain. She rules. Visit her Bandcamp page and buy all her music.

Dennis Prager podcasts
The Dennis Prager Show 20211006 – 1 Most Hated

Dennis Prager podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 38:15


Is the new most hated group in America the unvaccinated? Sure seems like it… At a Colorado hospital group, you can't get an organ transplant if you're not vaxxed… A highly regarded science professor is disinvited from giving a science lecture at MIT. His sin? He doesn't support the diversity, equity and inclusion agenda. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Girls Gone Healthy - Workout Motivation and Food Guide to Live a Cheap, Easy Healthy Lifestyle for College Girls and Women
116. Why You've Always Hated Running and What Regular Runners Do Differently - A Beginner's Guide to Running

Girls Gone Healthy - Workout Motivation and Food Guide to Live a Cheap, Easy Healthy Lifestyle for College Girls and Women

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 32:10


I have always had a bad attitude towards running. I've always felt like running is not for me. Little did I know that I have been doing it wrong. According to our guest today, running should be fun and not torture. If you have wanted to be a runner, you need to listen to this episode. Brodie will share nuggets of wisdom that will make you feel better equipped to start running. Brodie is a physiotherapist from Melbourne. He's on a mission to bring clarity and control to runners by busting misconceptions and building your running IQ. He's the run smarter physical therapy clinic owner and the host of the run smarter podcast. In this episode, Brodie shares with us important tips and techniques on running. Also, he will share some of the common running injuries and how to avoid them. Get your copy of Elite to Everyday Athlete: https://amzn.to/3ysSbqW Key Takeaways from the Episode: Running should always be fun and always leave you refreshed at the end of the run. If you are new to learning, always start with walking, then jogging before proceeding to running. It will help build your running IQ and avoid injuries. 80% of your weekly runs should be low intensity, and 20% should be working on upping the intensity. Episode Timeline: [02:25] What got Brody into dealing with running injuries? [05:34] What causes running injuries? [12:49] Where should a beginner start? [14:55] Learning running techniques Magical Quotes from the Episode:  “If you train slow and low, and then build your way up, your body adapts to that running style.” “No matter where your starting line is or what surface it's on. If you start with a lot of walks and a little bit of jogging, and then just increase it from there, your body does an amazing job of just adapting to that.” “If you can slow down the speed because it becomes a game changer.” “If you mix up a lot of walking into your running, you're enjoying the day.” Follow along at: https://www.instagram.com/liveyourpb/ Connect with Brodie: Website: https://runsmarter.online/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brodie.sharpe/ Podcast: https://app.runsmarter.online/audio Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Bert Show
She Hated Halloween...But This One Thing Made Kristin Change Her Mind!

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 6:20


Not one, not two, but three Halloween costumes for their child! And the parents didn't believe in dressingkids up for Halloween before they had one of their own! Kristin has come around FULL circle to Halloween (or, at least the costume part) since she had her son, Jimmy!  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-bert-show.

The Mac Attack Podcast
Mac Attack Hour 4: Brad Sham, Mac Top 5 Most Hated Teams and The Wrap Up

The Mac Attack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 40:38


Mac and Bone close down a Thursday show by talking about this weekend's meeting with the Cowboys with Brad Sham, revealing Mac's Top 5 most hated teams in the last 40 years and wrapping up the show discussing the Wilbon-Kiffin debacle. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

For The Love of Yourself
How to Journal as Someone Who Hated Journaling! | 56

For The Love of Yourself

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 11:57


Sharing the power behind journaling and some easy ways for you to start journaling - even if you HATE journaling! Connect with Me: Instagram @justinefuston Day Guide to Confidence FREE download https://www.justinefuston.com/freebies Food journal (ON SALE) https://www.justinefuston.com/foodjournal 1:1 coaching https://www.justinefuston.com/work-with-me Private Coaching Group https://www.justinefuston.com/groupcoaching

Lake Forest Illinois
Phil and Meghan Gayter Stars of Dad's Got a New Girlfriend Podcast

Lake Forest Illinois

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 25:18


Dad's Got a New Girlfriend! podcast stars Phil and Meghan Gayter come on the show to talk about their podcast as well as their thoughts on Lake Forest and Lake Bluff DGANG! Is a fun, insightful podcast from Father/Daughter team Phil and Meghan Gayter. Each week they explore a subject from the sublime to the ridiculous, all shared from the unique perspective of this wacky team. Sample subjects: Dad's girlfriends! ... discuss ... Ratatouille - the much-maligned dish of choice for Dad ... HATED by Meghan. Has Phil been to Iceland!? ... the number one debated topic ... has he actually been to Iceland if he just stopped at the airport? Divorce ... how tough is divorce and what affects did it have on the family pets ... The Gayters: Where pets go to die ... At what age did you drop your first "F-bomb" And so on ... Show Notes: Dik Tour, exploring points of Dikishness Ribfest coming up Merchandise Wizma? Invasi We love our Patreon Supporters Rev. Luke Back from Church of the Holy Spirit, and Matt C Alghini Have an Idea for a topic or guest? pete@lakeforestpodcast.com https://www.patreon.com/LakeForestPodcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lakeforestpodcast/message

Elliot In The Morning
EITM: The Most Hated Brands 9/27/21

Elliot In The Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 20:44


Do your least favorites make the list?

SLC Punkcast
SLC Punkcast Episode 230

SLC Punkcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 111:13


Episode 230, featuring tracks from Sharp/Shock, Eastbay, Typhoid Rosie, Mean Jeans, Quincy Punx, Amigo The Devil, Squared Off, Joan Jett, and Hated. We play great new tracks, discuss upcoming shows and tours, Eric goes deeper with his favorite album of 2021, and wrapping up the show with some Rock and Metal tracks.

The Dale Jackson Show
Dale discusses another reason teachers unions are hated. A teacher taped a face mask to a child - 9-22-21

The Dale Jackson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 4:00


Holmberg's Morning Sickness
09-21-21 - Garbage Fight Reactions - Remembering Our Most Hated Songs That Drive Us Nuts But Some Other People Love

Holmberg's Morning Sickness

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 22:02


Holmberg's Morning Sickness - Tuesday September 21, 2021

Spooky Slumber Party
Malignant

Spooky Slumber Party

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 70:58


Loved it? Hated it? Here's what the ghouls thought about James Wan's latest. Spoilers ahead…

Turf Show Times: for Los Angeles Rams fans
Rams-Colts: What I loved, what I hated, what I was indifferent about

Turf Show Times: for Los Angeles Rams fans

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 19:22


The LA Rams are 2-0 and the Turf Show Times podcast also remains undefeated. Subscribe to the show to support and get new episodes all the damn time! What I loved, what I hated, and what I was indifferent about in LA's 27-24 road win in Week 2. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

WhatCulture Gaming
10 Most Hated NPCs In Video Games - Preston Garvey! Micah Bell! Natalya! The Dog In Duck Hunt?!

WhatCulture Gaming

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 12:12


F**k Nazeem. Jess McDonell presents the 10 Most Hated NPCs In Video Games... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Preacher ‘70
Good Guys Who Hated Christ 2

Preacher ‘70

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 24:01


This is in a sermon series leading up to the crucifying of the Lord Jesus Christ.  It was preached in 1980.

Your Anxiety Toolkit
Ep. 202 The Importance of Slowing Down (with Drew Linsalata)

Your Anxiety Toolkit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 42:34


This week we interview Drew Linsalata, an amazing friend who has written an amazing book called, “Seven Percent Slower”  Click the link below to hear more about his book! https://theanxioustruth.com/seven-percent-slower/ Kimberley: Welcome, everybody. This episode is for you, the listener, but it's actually for me, the podcaster, more than anything. Today, we have the amazing Drew Linsalata. I've talked about Drew before. We've done giveaways. We've done a bunch of stuff together on social media. I am a massive Drew fan. So, thank you, Drew, for being here today. Drew: Oh, you're so sweet. Thank you, Kim. It's my pleasure to be here. Kimberley: Okay. So, you, you are amazing, and I would love if you would share in a minute to people a little bit about your lived experience with anxiety. Drew is just the coolest human being on the planet. So, I'm so excited to share with everybody you, because I think everybody needs Drew in their life. Drew: Wow. Kimberley: But in addition to that, we are today going to talk about something. I'm actually going to try and drop down into my own vulnerability, and not just be the host, but also be the listener today because you are talking about one particular topic that I need to work on. So, first of all, tell me a little bit about your background, your story, and we'll go from there. Drew: Sure. So, unfortunately, I lived in experience with panic disorder, agoraphobia, and intrusive thoughts and things of that nature, clinical depression, on and off, from the time I was 19 years old – 1986 all the way to around 2008, in varying degrees. So, it was a very long time. I was in and out of those problems. They came, they went. I did all the wrong things for a lot of time, trying to fix those problems, even though I knew what the right things were, because I've always been a bit of a behaviorism and cognition geek. And it took me a long time to come around to actually solving those problems. I did the medication thing that didn't work out for me. And then I really just took the time to learn what I needed to do behaviorally, cognitively, using those evidence-based things that I know you talk about all the time. And I just used them on myself and I learned as much as I could from very smart people like you. And I went and did the work and managed to get myself through the recovery from panic disorder and agoraphobia and depression and all of those things. And along the way, the things that I learned, I just started sharing with other people, which is nothing that I invented. I never claimed that I invented any of this stuff. I just became a really good messenger, I guess, in terms of explaining. Well, I learned this and then I used it this way. And that led to just helping people online back in 2008, 2009 as I was going through it. And that led to continuing to do it. And that led to starting my own podcast back in 2014, like talking to nobody with a $4 app on my phone. But it just seemed like the right thing to do to try and pay the help forward, because I had a lot of supportive people who rallied around me. And that just one thing led to another. And here we are, and the podcast is just kept going and it has led to writing two books about this stuff. One is my story, and one is the recovery guide that I wrote. And here I am, still educating about this topic and advocating and supporting where I can and just trying to contribute to the community because I felt like the community, in its form that it was in 10, 15 years ago, was so helpful to me. And I just feel like I want to give as much of that back as I can. So, yeah. Kimberley: So you've written-- I'm giggling. So, for everyone listening, if you hear me giggling, it's not because it's particularly funny. It's just so ironic to me. You wrote a book called Seven Percent Slower. Drew: Yes. Kimberley: Now I probably tell my clients every single day they need to slow down. I have done a podcast on slowing down, but it is probably the safety behavior I fall into the most. And I don't do a ton of safety behaviors anymore that this one is just so ingrained in me. So, I read your book. Thank you so much. Not only is it an amazing read, but you're hilarious. I was texting Drew yesterday, just cracking out at some of the things that he says because it's my type of humor. I just love it. So, can you share with me why this one topic? Of all the things you could have written, why is this one topic? Why was it so important to you and why is it so important? Drew: It's a good question. Up until three, four months ago. I would have not thought that I would write this book. There was no plan to write a book about learning to slow down. But what I discovered was, Seven Percent Slower is the thing that I just came up with as a little silly mental device for me when I was struggling in a big way. I knew that part of what would happen when I would get really anxious and I would begin to panic, and I would just associate that with all those nasty things, I would start just really speed up. I would rush around like crazy. And I knew I was doing that, and I knew that wasn't helping me, but I was having a hard time catching it. And one of the things that my therapist at the time, she was like, “Really, you got to start to learn to slow down.” So she gave me that good advice. Again, I didn't invent any of this. And I used to have to remind myself, I would literally walk around trying to remind myself like, “Slow down, moron. Slow down.” I would be talking to myself. The no self-compassion there, like, “Slow down.” And I was trying and trying and trying. And then for some reason, because I'm a fan of the absurd, the idea of trying to go 7% slower was born in like 2007 in my stupid brain. And it was just easy to remember, “Oh yeah, just go 7% slower. And it was just a little mental trick not to actually go 7% slower. Just remind me again to slow down. And it proved to be really helpful to me like that stuck in my head because it's silly. It's just a silly, arbitrary number. And I forgot all about it. I use it. I still use it to this day, but not really thinking of it consciously. And I have to tell so many people in the community surrounding my podcasts and my books that slow down. One of the things to do slow down – I started telling people, “Well, just try going 7% slower.” It came back to the surface again. And the response that I got from it was astounding, like, “Oh, that's so great. Yes, I'm using it. I'm doing the 7% slower thing and it's really helping me.” And I'm like, “Oh, there's a book. I need to write this.” And that's how I dragged it back up from 10, 15 years ago. And I said, “I should probably write about this and tell people what it is.” Kimberley: So, tell me how you implemented it in-- you've talked and I've heard you talk about exposures and some of the experiences you did. Can you just give me upfront for people who, first of all, want to hear about your story, what were some of the exposures you engaged in and how did slowing down impact it, both for how did it make it easier and how did it also make it more difficult? What was your experience? Drew: So I'll give you a typical morning for me. My biggest issue was-- again, my official diagnosis would have been panic disorder with agoraphobia, right? So I had a real problem leaving the house or being alone by myself or going any appreciable distance from the house. And so, a typical exposure for me, a typical morning for me when I decided I really have to fix this as I would get up, the minute I open my eyes, I put my feet on the floor, I would already be in a state of very heightened state of arousal and anxiety at that point because I knew it was coming. I was going to get dressed. I was going to get ready. I was going to hurl my butt out the door and start driving, which is the thing I was terrified to do. So, I did that every day, every single day. And right away, I learned within the first week or so like, okay, I get the principle of this, but I'm walking out the door in a blind panic. So I need to dial it back and start to work on just preparing to walk out the door first. So, I need to really acclimate to this first. And that's when I really started using the “Slow down, slow down, slow down.” So, I would get up and I would be trying to get ready and rush around and drink water and do everything I had to do to get out the door like I was on fire and it was crazy. And I started to slow down that way. And it really was a huge help, but you're right, it also made it worse because-- and this is so funny because it came up in a live I did the other day on Instagram with Jen Wolkin. She talks about mindful toothbrushing. And that is really-- the act of brushing my teeth in the morning is where Seven Percent Slower really began to shine. I wrote about it in my first book. The first thing I did before I learned to drive again was to learn to brush my teeth slowly and mindfully while I was in a complete state of panic. Yes. And just the act of slowing everything down, all I have to do is take the cap off the toothpaste. All I have to do is put the paste on the brush. All I have to do is put the cap back on. All I have to do is pick up the toothbrush. I literally would have to break down my getting-ready routine into the tiniest, little tasks and just focus on each one of those and literally act as if I was in slow motion. So, I wrote in Seven Percent Slower that one of the ways I learned to actually do that was to exaggerate it in a huge way. To me, it felt like it was brushing my teeth in slow motion. I probably was, but it really helped because it was the opposite action. So, my amygdala is screaming, “Go fast, go fast, go fast.” And I'm like, “No, no, no, I'm going to go slower and slower and slower.” And it did change my state over time. And I was able to go out and start my drive and my exposure and panic all over again. But at least I was leaving the house at a level 5 instead of a level 8. But it did make it harder because when I slowed down, I would just feel all of the things. I just have to let them come and let them come. You know the deal, and your listeners, I'm sure, know the deal. So, it was tough, but it was also tremendously helpful to me. Slowing down was one of the biggest things that changed my situation, for sure. Kimberley: Yeah. And the reason I think this is so important, this one thing and I love that you're just looking at this one thing, is I think in that moment, for the listeners, we're constantly talking about how to reduce mental compulsion. And I think the slowing down helps with that too, right? I think about there's exposure, but there's also the time before the exposure and after the exposure where you have to practice not doing the compulsion. And if you're rushing, your brain's rushing and everything. And so, I love that you're even talking about before doing the exposure, you had to slow down. Drew: Yeah. I mean really, before the exposure was exposure itself, there's no doubt about that. And I had to come to the realization that like, well, the exposure right now isn't the driving. The exposure is literally putting my shoes on right now while I panic, putting on my coat while I panic, brushing my teeth while I panic. And in Seven Percent Slower, I wrote about accidental emergency multitasking, which that's the thing that I forgot. We were talking before we went in there. I forgot I wrote that. And I'm going through my editor's notes, and I'm like, “I wrote that, how about that?” But that's true because when you-- Kimberley: Good for me. Drew: Yeah, right. Good for me. go through. So, I remember really thinking that, like when you're in that crazy terrified state, I was trying to solve every problem at once. So, there was a lot of mental compulsion in there. I was trying to go through the drive in my head. I was trying to anticipate each turn. I was trying to beat back the panic before it even happened in my head. I was thinking about yesterday's drive and how difficult that was. And slowing down, meaning it put things-- it made me focus on what was going on right now. So, it was also accidental or backdoor water down sort of ghetto mindfulness practice. I'll take it though because it worked. It put me in the present moment and it took me out of emergency accidental multitasking mentally and physically. Kimberley: I think it's pure mindfulness, right? Drew: Oh, it definitely was. And there was no-- I mean, I wrote about this in the book too. I'm not trying to read the whole book to you guys, but yes, it is part of it. There's a whole chapter called Is This Mindfulness: Do I Need to Meditate to Slow Down. It's literally one of the chapters. And well, it kind of is. If you start to learn to go slower, you will accidentally become more mindful without having to go through all the overwhelming things that sometimes people feel mindfulness is. “I have to become grateful and of the present moment, and I have to learn to appreciate the now.” No, you just have to slow down, and you'll automatically mechanically become more mindful. The rest of the stuff is window dressing. It doesn't matter. I wasn't grateful for brushing my teeth at all, but I was mindful of it, and it got me out of those compulsions in that crazy, anticipatory anxiety cycle. Let me do the exposures more effectively. Kimberley: Yeah. So, one of the things I love that you did-- and I actually did the homework. You'll be so proud of me. Drew: You did the homework. Did you use index cards? Kimberley: Huh? Drew: Did you actually use index cards, like I wrote about? I'm so old. Kimberley: I did. Usually, when I read a book, I do not follow their instructions because I don't like to follow instructions. It's not my style. Drew: I feel you. Kimberley: My husband always cringes when I go to make an IKEA piece of furniture because I am bringing out those instructions. Drew: It's going to be an extra draw leftover. We just know it. Kimberley: Oh, I could show you some photos. You would love, I tell you. But I did your homework. And this is what I thought was really interesting. So, I want to walk through. I'm going to try to be vulnerable here. I have noticed in the last week, since returning back from vacation, that my hyper-vigilance is going up a lot. I was noticing my anxiety wasn't so high, but I was engaging in a hyper-vigilant behavior. I think mostly because I'm now thinking about COVID, how to protect my children, and all the things. When we were away, we were far, far away from anybody. We didn't see anybody. So, I sat down, and I wrote the things that I do that I need to slow down at, right? And I'm just sharing it because I do the homework. I'm so proud of myself. Drew: I'm proud of you too. Kimberley: So number one is in the morning, I wake up and I sit up and I just go. I don't ease into the day. And then you talk in the book about how speed is like an escape response, right? You don't want to be in your discomfort. So, I thought that was interesting. These are ways that I've caught myself, right? So I jumped out fast. Like how can I not feel my discomfort about the day? Another one is I rushed during emails. And the big one, which I'm not happy about, is I multitask. Now I want to get your opinion on this as my dear friend, excuse me. Most people are probably multitasking, but why would multitasking be bad for anxiety? Drew: Okay. So, I will preface this by saying, I used to think that my ability-- and I will multitask like a mofo. I'm good at it. I know that cognitive scientists will tell me that I'm not because there's no such thing. We're literally tearing down our cognitive models and building new ones every time we switch from test to test. I understand all of that. But I will tell you that I'm good at it anyway. I'm going to stick with my guns, right? So, I wore it like a badge of honor. And when I have to, I can still do it. However, it absolutely fueled my anxiety state. There's no doubt about that because there's a sense of urgency that comes with multitasking. There really is. You are not present in anything when you're trying to do everything. So, that really in the end is that. And multitasking is not just physical. It's also mental. So, I'm answering an email while I'm thinking about the next email. I see your face. You know what I'm talking about. You've been there, right? You were probably there today. Kimberley: Like I said to you, I'm so grateful that you wrote this because it's so important. It's so important for the quality of our life. Last week I was exhausted at the end of the week and it's because I was rushing. I just know that's why. That's why I'm such a huge fan of what you're writing. Drew: As I was writing, things came out because I'll be honest with you, when I thought of this as my own little mental device many, many years ago, I didn't flesh it out. I just did it. You know how it goes. I didn't invent a thing. But as I was writing about it, I had to think. And this speed to me looks like both an escape-- it's both a fear response, sort of involuntary, and a safety behavior at the same time, like it keeps us from feeling the feels, right? So, yes. And I think the other thing that multitasking does is it makes us sort of-- we can put our attention to the places that we want it to be at because they're the easier things, even practically, like, I don't really want to answer this email because this is a hard email. So, I'll skip that one, mark it unread, and then go back to this one and I'll just keep marking that. You know what I mean? So, it keeps-- Kimberley: You just described my whole week last week. Drew: I hear you. The day I got to inbox 0, which was years ago – by the way, I'm not there anymore. Not even close – I was on top of the world. I was convinced like I'm now qualified to basically run the UN if I need to, because I'm at inbox 0. But I'm very guilty of that stuff where I was for a long time. I still fall into the habit. There's no doubt about that. But yes, when I find my-- sometimes I do it intentionally because I need to, and there's a time and a place for it. But when I find that I'm feeling extra stress, because one thing that I noticed about this book is that it doesn't just apply to anxiety and anxiety disorders, but it applies to stress management in general, because I still use seven percent slower, I just didn't remember that I was. And when I find that I'm feeling the effects of the stress, much of which I create myself by taking on so much, slowing down and stopping the multitasking, like close all the apps, run one app at a time, do one thing at a time, it really brings that down. It doesn't solve all my problems, but it keeps me from being overwhelmed by the physical responses that come with stress. Why am I holding my breath? Why does my neck hurt? Well, I know why. Because I'm stressed, and I got to back off. It helps. It really does help to slow down. Kimberley: It does. The final one that I listed, and I really want you to talk more on, is just a general sense of worrying, right? I mean, I think you can actually give me your opinion on this, but sometimes we do have to solve problems, right? We have to make decisions. This was a big one for us last week, is deciding whether we wanted to put our kids back in school or homeschool them, back and forth. Sometimes you do have to make those decisions, but there is a degree of just general worrying that happens. And then you can start to worry on speed at the highest speed ever. So, did you have to apply this to the speed in which you worried or try to solve problems? You're talking about physically slowing down, but did you also apply it to mentally slowing down, or they go hand in hand? Drew: That's a really good question actually. And if I think about it, the way it worked for me personally, my personal experience with this particular method or whatever you want to call it, is that it was first the physical slowing down. But then I discovered that that started to spill over. So, when I was physically going slower and being more mindful and deliberate in my behavior, it became a little easier for me to recognize that I am literally thinking about 17 problems at one time right now. I can't solve them all at one time. Some of them I can't solve at all. Kimberley: We could probably resolve or solve them already. Drew: Exactly. And it really helped me clarify that habit that I have. I'm just going to think, think, think, think, think. I'm thinking all the time. I think anyway, but I was thinking very maladaptively in those days in a big way. I was a prisoner to my thoughts and the thinking process. And it really helped me break that cycle. It's always important to me to say, slowing down and going 7% slower is not a cure for all of this or anything like that. It's not magic. It was just one part of the puzzle. It turned out to be a big part of the puzzle for me because it unlocked a lot of things, but yeah, it did slow down my mental behavior too, my ruminating, my worry, my thinking. Kimberley: Right. Yeah. I keep saying, I'm such a fan of these. And I think for me, I mean, you guys know I'm very well recovered, right? I'm mostly very healthy, mentally healthy. You might question me now that I've totally got that upside down. But I consider myself to be pretty level. What was interesting for me is, that for me is usually the first sign that you're starting to go into relapse, right? When you start to speed up. So, that's why I thought last week, I was like, the gods have all the stars aligned because I've come out of this very beautiful, long vacation where I'm managing my stress and everything. And the first thing my brain did when it got home was speed up. And if I hadn't caught it being hypervigilant, I think I would have gotten snowballed, right? And I think it's a great way, a tool to keep an eye out for your relapse as well. Drew: Yeah. I mean, actually, these are hard things to catch, don't get me wrong, because so much of it is automatic or it's a little bit beyond. The initial speeding up is beyond our control. My assertion in the book is initially, you will probably automatically speed up, but you can catch that and then change it. It takes work. And I really talked about like-- in fact, today's Instagram post is all about that really. Not that anybody has seen it because it's a podcast for the future, but it was about that. Like, “Hey, look at these. Here's 10 signs.” I did a 10 things posts. Now I'm disgusted with myself now that I think about it, but I have a list with 10 things like here is-- I think there's actually 11, to be honest with you. But here's a thing, if you find yourself doing this, if you're stumbling over your words, if you're shaking, if you're dropping things, when you're walking, if your stride length has shortened, because that's what I would do. I have reasonably long legs, but I'd be taking these little tiny penguin steps because I was rushing like crazy, like running. So, there's a bunch of practical things that you can really look at. This is what my rushing habit looks like. So I can be aware of those things and catch them and then start to slow down. Kimberley: Right. And that was what you said in the book. Write them down, identify the behaviors in which you're doing, which I thought was brilliant. Drew: Thank you. Kimberley: Yeah. Okay. I wanted to touch on, because I loved how you really talked about that, the side effect of slowing down is that you have to feel uncomfortable. Bummer, you totally ruined it. Drew: I did. What a buzzkill. Kimberley: We're going so good. Drew: Yeah. It's true. I think that was one of the chapters. I specifically wrote an entire chapter about why you probably don't want to slow down, right? Kimberley: Exactly. Drew: One of the reasons is that we view rushing around as some sort of badge of honor and achievement. If you run around like a speed demon, it must mean that you're busy and achieving things, which is not true. But also, if you slow down, you feel all the feels, and we hate that. And I'll use the word “we.” Humans are not really-- we're designed to be creatures of comfort. We don't want to feel crappy stuff. But you know that. I'm not telling anybody anything they already know. If they're listening to Your Anxiety Toolkit, you already know this, but you have to move through the crappy stuff to get past the crappy stuff. And slowing down is a good way to allow yourself to do that. Kimberley: Yeah, I agree. Drew: Yeah. Accidental happy side effect. Kimberley: I love that you brought this up. So, let's go through like, okay, slowing down. You can even maybe share your own experience. Slowing down, for me, I think it's not that I have to feel physically uncomfortable as much as I have to have a lot of uncertainty, right? I have to be uncertain, which is typically, at the end of the day, still just sensation and experience. For you in that, when you were practicing this during your exposures, what did you have to feel when you slowed down? Drew: So for me, when I would slow down, I would feel the physical sensations of panic. The one sensation that never leaves me – it's the memory of a sensation. It's not that I feel it. I rarely feel it anymore – was the feeling of my heart thudding in my back. You feel like all my chest was pounding, but it would feel like it was beating so heavily when I was in a panic that I could feel it almost beating along my spine. It was a really uncomfortable sensation. And traditionally, when I would feel that, I would do everything I could to try to not feel that – wiggle around, change position, lay down, stand up – try anything that I could to not feel that. One of the key things-- and I felt all the physical sensations, but that one sticks in my memory was when I started to slow down, I had no choice but to let my heart pound lead against my spine, and it was so uncomfortable. And I remember really just having to reason with myself as best I could like, “Just get through it for another 10 seconds. Just give it another 10 seconds. Just give it another 30 seconds.” And then it was just, “Just give it another minute.” And then it was like, “Oh, this isn't so bad.” So, it was a gradual habituation to that where I stopped being afraid of it. And slowing down meant I had to feel that. There was no more shield against feeling it. If I'm going to stand in the bathroom and slowly brush my teeth, I'm going to feel that. But I also heard the thoughts very loudly when I slowed down. And the thoughts would be panic-type thoughts, like, oh my God, what if it's not anxiety this time? What if I'm having a heart attack? What if this is a stroke? It does happen to people. Even though I'm only 30 years old or whatever it was at the time, this can happen. What if, what if, what if? Those thoughts were already loud. And when I slowed down, I essentially turned down all the other sounds. So those thoughts were really, really, really loud. And I would literally have to practice. It forced me to practice like that could be, but it's not likely. I would have to say that all the time. “That could be, but it's not likely. It could be, but it's not likely.” Yeah. And it just forced me to practice. So, I would feel the physical sensations and hear my thoughts so much louder. Hated it. Kimberley: Right. Yeah. I'm so glad that you mentioned that. I mean, I can only imagine too. When we have those symptoms that aren't textbook, like you feel your heart in your back, it's hard to just let that be there, right? You and I have joked a lot, the old Instagram posts about like, these are the 12 ways to feel a panic attack. But when you don't have something on that list and when you have something additional, that's scary, right? “Oh, crap. I've got six things that aren't even on that list. What does that mean?” Drew: Here's an interesting thing that you just made me think of now. The other thing that slowing down accomplished, and this was a happy accident also, is I like to look at it as imagine anxiety as a room. So, when your lizard brain, when your amygdala is in charge, it fills the entire room, so prefrontal cortex stuff has no room. It's pressed against the walls. It's being pushed out the door. There's no reasoning at all. When I slowed down, I actually made a little bit of room for prefrontal cortex to chime in. Winston and Seif, they will talk about wise mind in their writing. Wise mind had a chance to chime in where I was able to say, “Okay, Drew, yes, this isn't on the list of the usual stuff, but you have felt things like this 10,000 times. And all indicators are: you're healthy as a horse, you're in great shape. It's okay.” And it allowed me to tolerate that uncertainty a lot more because I was able to reason a little bit more. I was unable to talk myself off the ledge, but I was able to insert just enough reasoning because it gave me a little bit of room to work in. That helped also. I was able to actually do that, whereas before I was just frantic. That was like, “You're okay. You're okay. It's okay. It's nothing, it's nothing.” But your amygdala doesn't care. It doesn't believe you. But in that case, I was able to actually say, “Okay, hang on. I felt this zillion times before. This is likely nothing. Okay, I can go with that. I'm going to roll the dice on that. I'm good with it.” Kimberley: Right. You can see the trends that have been playing instead of thinking like it's the first time it's ever happened, even though it's happened a million times. Drew: Yeah. So, practicing slowing down gave me a little bit of space for that stuff to get a little foothold, a little handhold, and then it grew. Kimberley: Yeah. So it's interesting because I'll share with you, a big part of my recovery has been considered what I have been calling a walking meditation. So, I did a lot of meditation training in the latter stage of my recovery. And I don't love to sit and meditate because it's uncomfortable, right? But what I love to do is this end practice of walking meditation. And so, I've often called friends and said to them, this is an accountability call. I have to do a walking meditation all day. And then when you're writing this, I'm like, “That's what I was doing. I was slowing down.” And I've been just calling it something different. So, I thought that that was really fascinating because in the Zen practice, you do a lot of walking meditation, right? Being aware slowly as you engage in the day. Drew: Which is something that I think a lot of people have a hard time putting their brain around. In the beginning, I think it's hard to do that – being mindful in motion. So, to me, meditation, I always say mindfulness to me is like meditation in motion. I don't know if that makes any sense, but that's-- Kimberley: It is what it is. Drew: Okay. So, that's the way I've always thought of it for myself. Well, firstly, I learned to meditate and then I put it in motion so that I can be meditative even in a meeting or on a phone call or driving my car. That's possible, but that's the thing you have to learn. But that's part of slowing down also. When you do your walking meditation, you're intentionally slowing down. Kimberley: Yeah. I would even invite the listeners to think about when are you the most calm or coping the best is when you're actually slowed down. For me, it's when I'm with a client. When I'm with a client, I can't multitask. I am so with them, and it's their pace, which is not my pace. I can't speak at a rapid, two times speed formula in session. And that's where I feel the most connected. And that's where I feel just wonderful. And there it is right there. It's forcing me to slow down. So, I think it's helpful also to look at where are you actually being slipped, where are you forced to slow down, and how are you coping in those situations. Drew: Yeah. When you have no choice, you can actually try and remember, well, what does it look like for you? It'd be like, what does it look like when I'm in session? I just have to do that. When you're not sure, well, let me just go to what that feeling is. And those things to me also-- the last chapter of the book is called Beyond Seven Percent Slower because to me, that skill that I developed accidentally years ago serves me well now. So, one of the things in business that I get told all the time and people always say, the building could be on fire, and you're just-- I mean, I was a dude that couldn't leave his bathroom. I was so panicked and so agoraphobic, and they're like, “No problem. You do this, you get a bucket, we'll put it out. Everything's going to be cool.” That's the slowing down. And when you learn to do that, and you cultivate that skill, not only can it help you in your recovery journey, but it stays with you for a long time and it brings out the superpowers. We sometimes think that rushing and multitasking is the superpower – not really. Slowing down and letting each of your individual strengths and skills shine through because they can because you've given them space, that's where your real superpowers come out. That's probably where you are the most effective as a clinician is when you slow down and you're in that session. Kimberley: Or as a parent or as a wife or as a human, everything, right? Drew: Yeah. So, not to get all preachy about it, but I think it goes well beyond just the anxiety and stress thing. It's a good life skill in general. Kimberley: 100%. Okay. I have one more question. Drew: Sure. Kimberley: I've purposely not tried to go down the tips and tools because I just want people to actually buy the book and just go through it, like I did writing it down and really addressing it. But you talk about one thing that I wanted to talk about, which is the 92-second timer. Drew: Okay. I have to search through my Ulysses app, where did I write about 90 seconds. Kimberley: See, we just did this today. Let me tell you what I found was so helpful, is you said you set a reminder every 90 seconds to slow down. Drew: Yes. Kimberley: So, tell me, how important is that? Does it have to be 90 seconds? Was that a big piece of you retraining your brain? What did that look like? Drew: Again, that was my own-- yeah, that's right. I did do that, and I did write about it. So, I know we talked about it a little bit. That's fine. What I did was, I had an original iPhone, like OG iPhone, and I had this stupid timer. And I had this timer in there for 90 seconds. I use 90 seconds. I don't care what you use. I don't think the number is magical in any way. But when I was getting into that panic state and when I started doing my morning routine to prepare to do my driving exposures, I would just set the timer and it would repeat every 90 seconds. And that silly little timer would bring me back to slow down, slow down, slow down. It was just a cue. That's all. It was a silly little mental thing. Do I think it's critical for people? Some people might not need it. But if you do need it, I don't see that there's any crime in using it. And you could do it every 30 seconds, 60 seconds, every two minutes. It doesn't matter. It was nothing more than an auditory cue to remind me to slow down, slow down, slow down, slow down. Kimberley: The reason I bring it up is that has been crucial for me in all of my recovery, no matter what it is, is reminders. I think that it's easy to go on into autopilot. And I love that you mentioned that because I am a sticky note fan. I talk about it in my book. I love reminders. That's a crucial part of my existence. So, I just love that you brought that up because I think that we always have sticky notes like don't forget to get eggs and you've got to make a phone call. And this is the opposite of that, which is like, “Slowing down, hun. Bring it down a notch.” Drew: Kind of, because our reminders are usually to remind us to do things faster, now, don't forget them, get them done. Whereas-- Kimberley: Urgent, urgent. Drew: Yes, urgent, urgent. One of the funny things about this, the thing was, I don't have my phone with me here, but the sound was that stupid submarine alarm, like errr, errr, errr, which you would think I would have made a silly little, I don't know, like chimey, gentle thing. But I intentionally did the errr, errr because it was jarring. I needed it to jar me. And so, yeah, it was weird. I did not have to use the 90-second timer for months and months on end. It was in the beginning. It became very helpful to me. And then I spread the timer out to two minutes and then five minutes, and then we just didn't have to use the timer anymore. So, it was adaptive. I don't want anybody to think like I live my life based on this silly timer going off all the time. That's not the way it works. Kimberley: And I get that. I think that that's the cool piece here to the story you're sharing. And I would make this a big piece of what I want everyone to take away, which is, like anything, this sucks to start. It sounds like for you and it has been for me, although, like I'm saying, I'm owning up to falling off the wagon here a little, which I'm fine with. It can be a 90-second timer to start. But then that's where that muscle gets strong. It sounds like that for you, it's pretty strong now. Drew: Oh, it's really strong. It's automatic now. Yeah. It's almost automatic, but again, that's a lot of practice and repetition and really taking this to heart. It's not an overnight thing. And I still make mistakes. I just catch them faster now. Now, there's zillion things to do to get ready to launch this book. Yesterday, I fell absolutely into the trap. Totally did. Around three o'clock yesterday, I felt terrible. I was just agitated and all the stress stuff and anxiety stuff was like, oh, wait a minute here. So, I can see at least that that's the benefit of it. It's taught me to see what I'm doing and then correct it when I need to. Kimberley: Yeah. And it's great to have that. You're modeling that beautifully, right? That it's not going to always be the hardest thing. It's like something that you can learn to strengthen, which I really appreciate. Okay, tell us about where we can get this amazing book. Drew: Well, I think I made it pretty easy being a techie guy that I am. You could just go to sevenpercentslower.com, which you can either spell it seven or use the number 7, sevenpercentslower.com. We'll get you right to the page on my website that tells you about the book, which should come out plus or minus September 15th. So, I don't know when this podcast is going to air, but it's either out or not. If it's not, just get on my mailing list and I'll tell you when it is out. And yeah, that's how you got it. It's nice, friendly, short. You read it pretty quickly, I'm sure. It's not a giant 400-page monster like The Anxious Truth. It's friendly, easy, I like to think funny, easy to remember. Kimberley: It's so great. I'm actually so in love since the summer. I read all these amazing, just like short, really goes straight to the point. I cannot stand books that tell you something they could have told you in 100 pages. So I love that. I think it was exactly what I needed to hear. So I'm so grateful. Drew: Oh, I'm glad that you find it helpful, and thank you so much for giving me this little spotlight to talk about it and appreciate you. Kimberley: Of course. I probably a hundred episodes got on and went on a big lecture about how everyone has to slow down. And this is perfect timing. I think we all need it right now. Drew: Very good. Well, go get it. Sevenpercentslower.com. Hope it's helpful for everybody. Kimberley: Thank you, Drew. Drew: Thanks, Kim. Anytime. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09G227B1Z/ref=sr_1_9?dchild=1&keywords=coping+skills+for+anxiety&qid=1631488551&s=digital-text&sr=1-9

The Fan Morning Show
Most Hated Pittsburgh Athletes

The Fan Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 7:02


Ryan Braun retired yesterday. We're not huge fans of his...who are the most hated athletes in Pittsburgh sports history?  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WhatCulture Wrestling
10 Wrestlers That Visibly Hated Working For WWE - Cody Rhodes! Paul Heyman! Ronda Rousey! Brock Lesnar TWICE?!

WhatCulture Wrestling

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 9:19


Sting forces a smile... Simon Miller presents 10 Wrestlers That Visibly Hated Working For WWE...ENJOY!Follow us on Twitter:@SimonMiller316@WhatCultureWWEFor more awesome content, check out: whatculture.com/wwe See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Bear Creek Church, Medford, OR
Hated Because Of Jesus – John 15:18-25

Bear Creek Church, Medford, OR

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021


The post Hated Because Of Jesus – John 15:18-25 appeared first on Bear Creek Church, Medford, OR.

The Sneaky Sports Podcast
NFL Week 1 Predictions, Reacting To The NFL's Most Hated Teams Study & More | S3 E68

The Sneaky Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 53:08


In Today's Episode of The Sneaky Sports Podcast We Preview Week 1 Of The NFL Season & Give Our Game Picks, React To A Study Of The NFL's Most Hated Teams in 2021, Discuss The Ravens Signing Le'Veon Bell (Recorded Before Gus Edwards Injury), & Talk TJ Watt's Hold In With The Steelers (Recorded Before Extension) --- --- --- Hosts: Ben Casalinho, Frank Casalinho, Nick Graffeo --- --- --- Follow Us Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sneakysport... TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@sneakysportsp... Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/sneakysportspod/ --- --- --- Watch The Sneaky Sports Podcast On YouTube (Subscribe!): youtube.com/sneakysportspodcast --- --- --- Make Sure to Rate or Review The Podcast Whether Your on Apple Podcasts or Spotify! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/sneakysportspodcast/support

Shoboy Show
Are You The Most Hated According To Your Zodiac Sign?

Shoboy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 31:42


Today on the show, Becca taps into the universe to tell you who are the most loved and hated zodiac signs! Meanwhile, in the "Jealousy Trip," Cindy wants to prank her man because he's threatening to kick her out of his house! He thinks Cindy cheated because her ex stopped by for 10 minutes—find out why! Also, Shoboy announces the winners of the “Asi Se Baila” challenge between him and Becca—where they battled it out on the dance floor! Lastly, the president of the “No Sabo Crew” Eddie The Virgin is challenged in pronouncing the Spanish word "electrodoméstico" and using it in a sentence!  Follow us @ShoboyShow  Listen Live 6-10AM PST  M-Fri on ShoboyShow.com  Shoboy: @edgarisotelo Becca:  @BeccaMGuzman Eddie The Virgin: @EddieSotelo  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

BJ Shea Daily Experience Podcast -- Official
BJ & MIGS Podcast 09-09-21-7A: “I hated my job so I once did BLANK.”

BJ Shea Daily Experience Podcast -- Official

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 32:18


Beat Migs. A mail carrier was caught tossing mail out of their truck. Luke Warm Topic  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Daytime Confidential
Top 5 Actors We Hated in One Role, but Loved in a Different Role

Daytime Confidential

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 51:04


On today's Daytime Confidential podcast Luke Kerr, Mike Jubinville, Joshua Baldwin and Carly Silver count down the Top 5 Actors We Hated in One Role, but Loved in a Different Role.  All this and more on the the latest Daytime Confidential episode! Twitter: @DCConfidential, @Luke_Kerr, @Mike Jubinville, @JillianBowe, Josh Baldwin and Carly Silver. Facebook: Daytime Confidential Subscribe to Daytime Confidential on iTunes, Google Play, and Spotify.

Sports Best
Sports Best - Most Hated Teams in USA

Sports Best

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 18:00


Larry and Andrew get into it on the most hated teams in the USA, the lack of US born players in the US open finals, losing the LPGA title on US soil and lots of mayo.

The Onside Zone with Big O
Podcast Tuesday - Most Hated Sports Teams 09 07 2021

The Onside Zone with Big O

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 12:50


Big O looks at the list of Most Hated Sports Teams

Mad Radio
Payne & Pendergast Hour 3: How Hated are the Astros, and Texans Depressing Playoff Chances

Mad Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 38:17


Seth and Sean discuss which former Texan they'd bring back in a hype man role, assess just how hated the Houston Astros are based on a map of most hated teams by state, and take a look at the Texans' hilariously bad chances at making the playoffs this season. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

World's Strongest Podcast - Massenomics
Ep. 283: Anthony Oliveira of the TWC Stay Hated Podcast

World's Strongest Podcast - Massenomics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 111:37


Big Anthony is the host of the TWC Stay Hated Podcast.  His podcast has become THE go-to podcast of multiply powerlifting.  We compare multiply/raw powerlifting, discuss internet haters, and wash it all down with a nice Bob Evans breakfast. The Strength Co: https://www.thestrength.co/ Hybrid Performance Method: https://www.hybridperformancemethod.com/ MASS to save 5% on all training & nutrition Fusion Sports Performance: https://www.fusionsp.net/ MASS to save 20% on all FSP supplements Spud Inc: https://www.spud-inc-straps.com/ Texas Power Bars: https://www.texaspowerbars.com/

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies
What Did Frank Kern Learn from His Failed Agencies?

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 28:07


Have you had a few failures in the agency world? Everyone is afraid of failure. But when you change perspective and treat it like a lesson instead of a defeat. That's the lesson from today's guest, Frank Kern, a well-known marketing consultant and agency owner who has ventured to start several agencies over the years. In this episode, Frank discusses some of his failures from these past businesses, the lessons learned, and what he would do differently. He offers valuable advice for anyone starting a digital marketing agency. He offers an honest and upfront take on every stumble, from starting in the advertising world without really knowing the rules, not listening to his own advice, and taking on every client, even the bad ones. Don't be afraid to start over. Frank shares the knowledge he has gained over the years starting different agencies and learning from the mistakes made in each new venture. He has never been afraid to start over. “That's what I love about the advertising business,” he says, “it's never going away”. So there's always a new opportunity waiting for the ones who dare to take that step and learn from past mistakes. He is now enjoying his most successful venture and is very glad everything happened as it did. Don't try to grow too fast. This is the first lesson Frank has taken from his past agencies. Where in the past he used to take as many clients as he could get, now he sets a target. Five clients a week. This enables him and his team to not be reactive and build out operations. It's been a learning curve for them. Drilling into the process, making sure there are checklists, getting better at inner team communications. But Frank says it's been worth it and that he's definitely seeing the results. Take accountability. Having a business partner is not easy and takes serious commitment. Some prefer to not even attempt it. Frank has been lucky to have a few amicable separations from past partners. The secret? He doesn't really know, but he shares the importance of taking accountability for your mistakes. “If things are your damn fault, you have to realize they're your fault”. YOUTUBE AUDIO LINK Sponsors and Resources Wix: Today's episode is sponsored by the Wix Partner Program. Being a Wix Partner is ideal for freelancers and digital agencies that design and develop websites for their clients. Check out Wix.com/Partners to learn more and become a member of the community for free. Subscribe Apple | Spotify | iHeart Radio | Stitcher | Radio FM Don't Be Afraid to Start Over in the Agency World, Just Like Frank Kern Jason: [00:00:00] What's up, agency owners? Jason Swenk here, and I have another amazing guest, Frank Kern. If you guys haven't heard of, uh, he is amazing. I've learned so much from him over the years on writing copy and marketing and direct response. Kind of the godfather of direct response marketing. A lot of you guys know Frank Kern and he's done a bunch of agencies in the past, so we're going to talk about his experience with marketing and his agency. Let's go ahead and get into the show. What's up, Frank? How's it going? Frank: [00:00:40] Dude, I was just watching the intro roll. I love the just two seconds of pensive staring off into the distance. Jason: [00:00:47] Well, I don't want to lose anybody's attention. Especially people with ADD like us. So, you know, you got try to keep them there. Frank: [00:00:55] I didn't tell you this pre-interview. So if I don't make any sense today it's because I have dyslexia and ADD and I woke up at 12:52 and… No, or 12 something, and my dyslexia… I mean, I have the biggest font size ever on my watch. And I thought it was, I thought it said 4:52. So I took my ADD meds, which I keep right beside the bed. And they kicked in. I've been awake since 2:00 AM I'm just like… so stupid right now. Jason: [00:01:24] There you go. Well, that makes it fun for a podcast. Frank: [00:01:28] Yeah, that's my disclaimer. Jason: [00:01:30] Awesome. Well, um, for the people that have lived under a rock for a little bit… Tell us kind of a little bit of your origin story about how and why you've wanted to create an agency over the past couple of years. Frank: [00:01:45] Uh, okay. I'll be mercifully brief because this isn't even remotely interesting for anybody. Um, sold credit card machines door to door. Hated it, very bad at it. Um, Googled or there wasn't Google back then, it was 1999. Did a search for how to sell credit card machines on the internet cause I didn't wanna have to talk to people. They were all mean to me because I was going door to door and interrupting their, uh, place of business. Discovered direct response marketing and advertising that way and started selling courses. Sold one that got me in trouble with the government. Um, it's important to learn the rules of advertising if you want to do advertising. I did not learn them, but, uh, after that I did. And um, then, sold stuff about dog training and kind of cut my teeth on that and sold a lot of marketing-related information. And always felt like… It's going to sound really weird, but I always felt like it didn't count, you know? Like that's… to use my, uh, my late grandfather's term it's Mickey mouse BS. And I was like, I need to do it for real. I need to actually build campaigns and do stuff with real businesses. So it was for that reason and because I absolutely love advertising and I get to hit refresh on other people's stats besides my own. Um, that's why I did it. Jason: [00:03:00] Yeah. Well, um, you, uh, like I told you a couple of years ago, you kn… I found you and Jeff Walker and a couple other people through a Tony Robbins event I went, where they sent out the, I guess the money masters or something. And that's right when I was coming off selling the agency and I'd never heard of direct response at all. And I was like, wow, if I could put this together with what I know here… I was like, man, this could be a pretty good machine. Uh, so I want to thank you for, for, for doing what you've done over the years. And, and, uh, you've been… Someone that has really figured out how to make someone kind of respond to you. You know, especially in the marketing front. What what's kind of like, how did you go about figuring that out? Or was that just kind of intuition? Like I know you were saying, well, I just hated getting kicked out of strip joints and all these kinds of restaurants I was going into. I needed to get them to come to me. You know, how did you figured it out? Frank: [00:04:05] Well, I started by making horribly egregious unsubstantiated claims in advertising because that's what I responded to. And of course, I didn't realize there were things like regulatory bodies. This is again in 1999. And then I learned that you really can't do that and it's frowned upon. Um, so I wanted to see, well, what, what if you don't do that at all? And, um, I kind of stumbled over the whole philosophy of results in advance, which is the easiest way to convince somebody you can help them is to actually help them in advance of asking for their business. So that's always been my big secret, you know, and it was just doing that. Jason: [00:04:43] Yeah. And so when, when you started the first agency, what were some of the challenges that you experienced? Uh, and how did you overcome them? Frank: [00:04:57] Dude, so the first one… I think this is number four for me. We've got it right now, finally. But I've been attempting this since 2010, all right? So we're 12 years into your boy, Frankie, trying to make, trying to work 30 times harder for way less money, basically. When you, I know, but I like it. I can't help it, you know, and I would rather do this and make less money than do the other stuff. I don't know why. But anyway, the first one was a partnership between my cousin, Trey Smith and I and Jordan "Wolf of Wall Street" Belfort. And we had a plan, Trey and I mainly had this plan, which was we would create lead gen pages for home services companies and then manage their Google PPC accounts. We would charge a flat fee and then like, you know, let's say it was 600 bucks a month or something. And we'd spend 400 bucks on traffic and we'd keep the $200 bucks. It, uh, we did roughly 15 seconds of research, you know, and were convinced that we were geniuses. And Jordan's job was to, uh, hire and train salespeople. Cause neither Trey nor I are qualified to do that at all. So, um, that failed spectacularly, you know? So we, uh, by we, I mean, I leased a bank building in, uh, on Prospect Street all the way in California that… You know, we hired, I wanna say 40 people off of Craigslist. You know, and Jordan was training them up and then he had to go on tour to sell his stuff. And then like, nothing really happened. I got to, I got to have a lease on a bank building for a couple of years. So that was fun. Jason: [00:06:41] So why did that fail though? Like what, looking back, what could you have done to make that work? Frank: [00:06:48] Um, I could have, uh, used ads to get them, you know. So for whatever dumb reason, uh, I oftentimes fail to heed my own advice, which is all right if you want to grow the business, take the thing that's working real good and do a whole lot more of that. And then find a way to systemize and automate and scale from there. So we had this method of getting customers, which was internet ads. But when we partnered with Jordan, we were like, nope, we're not going to do that, we're going to do something we have no idea how to do, which is to call them out of the blue and then, uh, try to sell them something, you know, and so that was dumb. Uh, I mean, I'm sure people make it work, but we didn't know what the heck we were doing. And of course that model, I think would probably have ultimately doomed us because there wasn't enough margin in it. Jason: [00:07:42] Yeah. So what was version two? Frank: [00:07:46] Uh, let's see. Version two was current branding. It, that was so close to working. That's where, uh, we would do video campaigns for people. So we'd script their videos. They would shoot the footage. We would have it edited. We would run them. Excuse me, I'm losing my voice already. That's what happens in the wake up at two. Um, we would run their Facebook media for them and everything. And that actually was going pretty good. Um, I did what, uh, what I think a lot of people who are creative types do is I immediately outsource the operation. And I outsourced it to someone who didn't understand advertising. Really good understanding of operations, but didn't understand advertising. And all of this is on me because I never sat down and said, here's how the business works and here's how all the moving pieces work. So we ended up over-hiring tremendously and didn't make any money, you know, but that was, that was pretty close. Jason: [00:08:46] Okay. And then what about option three or version three? 3.0. Frank: [00:08:50] So version 3 was, uh, we tried, um, in-house again, uh, current branding once again. But instead of doing all that production for people, we were like, you know what, man? We're just gonna run their media for them at a pretty decent price. I just arbitrarily pulled 2,800 bucks off my butt. You know, like seems like an easy yes. And, um, that was going great. And then I decided it would be a good idea to partner with Grant Cardone and, uh, form Cardone Kern. I did that because I made a lot of assumptions that I'd never discussed with Grant. Uh, so again, I, I want to take full responsibility for this. I'm not here to say Grant is a bad guy or anything. So I partnered with him thinking that they would have the infrastructure that we needed to grow the agency. Cause you know, you go down to his operation, it's pretty impressive. They got meetings and stuff and… you know, meetings and stuff and people wear suits and they, they really look like they know what they're doing. And they do, but not for an ad agency. So when we partnered together, oh, and I also thought his audience was primarily business owners like brick and mortar people. So my vision for that, and this was incidentally, a conclusion that I drew after going to one event and talking to one attendee who was a roofer. And I was like, this would be the easiest client to win forever. This must be what all of his customer base is like. We should partner up, you know, and so zero foresight on, uh, on my part. So we, it, it blew up. Um, well it blew up in a good way. We got to walk clients really fast. We grew it to damn it, it was $895 a month, just under $900, a grand. And then, uh, we started hemorrhaging because the operations were bad. We, uh, by we, I mean, I, uh, had to hire a team. And then I had one dude to help me manage them. And he was good, but he was inexperienced too, in terms of trying to manage a team that big. So we just did a bad job, ultimately. Mainly is a result of operations, like missing calls, you know, like dumb things that operations people know how to do. Jason: [00:11:04] So what were some of the… I don't want to put words in your mouth about some of the assumptions, like thinking about, you know, if you were going to partner… Because a lot of people listening on the show, they, they reach a, a plateau or they're, they're kind of an inner plateau and they go, I need a partner because I can't, I don't, I feel like I've reached my max and I need to work with someone. And then they were like, well, let's just join together. So, you know, so many people are doing this and then it blows up in their face. So what would, what would have been some of those questions or assumptions to check with your partner and go, and then be like, oh, well let's kind of try this out or no, this is probably not going to work out that you could have avoided. Frank: [00:11:48] Yeah, I probably should have said, okay, I'm operating under the assumption that you're going to provide this team. Is that a true assumption? And he would have said no, because he doesn't lie. You know, he's not a bad person. Just, I've never had the damn sense to ask him. And Grant so busy he's like, all right, cool. Don't mess it up. Sounds like a good idea. Let's go. You know, so it was, we didn't really talk it out. So that probably would have been the first question was, you know, here's my assumption is this accurate? And, um, that would, that really would have been it. I think we could have overcome everything else. You know, he would've said, no, dude, I don't have that. And I'm not going to give you that you got to go build your own. I would have said, oh, I could do that on my own; I don't need us to partner together for this. We would rather keep all of the money and… You know, if I'm going to have all the headaches anyway, I might as well keep all the money. Jason: [00:12:38] Yeah. And so what, what are we looking like at version four now of, you know, post, you know, kind of making that partnership go away? I think this is the version you're on right now. Is that right? Frank: [00:12:53] Yes. Yeah. So we're looking great. What I learned is number one, don't try to grow too fast. So our target is five clients a week, you know, where it used to be as many as you can get, let's just hire more people, right? Nope, five a week. That's it, you know. So that was lesson number one. And that enables you to not be reactive and building out your operations. And lesson number, whatever number we're on is most of this stuff, I mean, I don't know about you dude, but ads are easy, you know? It's not, I mean, don't, don't tell clients it's for God's sake, but it's not really that hard. But the operations behind it, especially when you do it, we do, which is we're full service. So we'll, you know, the first thing we typically do is go fix their email. Cause that makes everything work better and they get immediate sales and then they're happy, you know? So that requires so many tiny little things to go right. That, um, that's just been a tremendous. Um, a lesson it has been that big of a learning curve, really. It's just more. Okay. Let's just keep drilling into this process, you know? And make sure there's checklists and yada yada, yada, yada. So it's been good. And then inner team communication is still we're good at it, but we could really be better at that. Um, but with clients we're good. But between ourselves, you know, we're doing… Jason: [00:14:28] When you're an agency partner with Wix, you unlock an entire digital ecosystem for creating, managing, and growing your agency. Get the full coding and design freedom to create anything your clients need, along with the tools to manage and collaborate with your team seamlessly from anywhere. And when it comes to growing your agency, you can get matched with new leads every day and earn revenue share for every website you guys create. They're backed by the Wix industry, leading security and site performance. You'll also have a dedicated account manager on standby 24/7. So you can reach your goals and start setting new ones. See for yourself, head over to wix.com/partners. And re-imagine what your agency can accomplish. Yeah. When I, when I look at kind of the stages of agency owners that go through, they go through, there's like six. And I look at kind of the first stage is like, figuring out, like, how do I get the clients? And then the next is like, how do we get the right clients? The next is like, like, how do I replace myself from not being the salesperson or being the account manager for the clients? And then it's like, how do I build the team? And it's just like all these little stages you have to go through or systems that you need to actually set up in order to kind of, you know, get you to a point where you can pick and choose and do the things that you love doing. Like, cause I was telling you years ago it was like most agency owners are accidental. They don't want to get into it. They just, they knew how to do something really cool in marketing. And someone's like, hey, do you do this for me? And they're like, okay, you're going to give me money to do this? Like, all right, let me go do more of that and, uh, you just kind of fall into it. And then, like you're saying you're being reactionary. Um, one thing I, I have a question and probably a lot of people have a question on is, let's say you have a partner now. You got in, we didn't go over the assumptions that we figured out. Um, how can they actually go to their partner… Like how can we make a pleasant split up? Uh, you know, in order for us to go our own ways, because a lot of people, even including me, I had a partner and I looked at it like, if you don't know the bad partner, you're the bad partner. Um, that's kinda how I looked at it. And that's one of the reasons why we sold, um, you know, it was a good offer, but still I probably would have been still doing it. Um, I'm lucky that I had did have a partner that we disagree. But like what, what, what would you suggest to these people listening? Like how can you do a, a good breakup? Frank: [00:17:17] I have no idea. Um, I just ended up giving everything to the partner. I'm like, okay. Like, well, our very first one, you know, it was clear that it wasn't working and everything was in my name. So I was able to be like, all right, guys, this isn't working. Um, I'll keep paying the lease. It's in my name. See y'all later. And nobody, you know, no one cared, uh, because they're like, oh, thank God we have to mess with this anymore. This was way harder than we thought. With Grant, I just gave him the agency. I was like, we were still doing, um, I can't remember, maybe half a million a month or something in billings? At the time, I was like, you can have it. And I never talked to him, actually. I talked to other people in the organization. I voiced some things that I needed and I wasn't able to get them. And I was like, well, this isn't really gonna work for me. Um, y'all can just have this, if you want. We can just be cool. And they're like, alright. Jason: [00:18:18] So how do you get to a point where… I love that, because a lot of people would spend years and years fighting back and forth. No, I did this, my name is on blah, blah, blah, all this kind of stuff. And like tons of resentment versus you're like, fucking take it. Like, let me restart. Like, how do you do that? How do you, how do you get rid of those emotions that a lot of us would struggle with? Frank: [00:18:46] Well, if things are your damn fault, you have to realize they're your fault. And so like if it was a different scenario and Grant had misled me. And said, yeah, we got this, dude. Here's everything I'm going to do to the letter and then just didn't do it. And then it was like F you Frank. Then I would be mad, you know, we'd have a really serious problem. Um, but he didn't, I just didn't ask. So I had to, it was my damn fault, you know. It wasn't his. So what am I going to do? But you know, pitch a fit? If some dude, you know… he's got other stuff going on. He's gotta roll on out. But also in our business, it's like, it's easy to just to start another one. There's this, this is what I love about the advertising business. It's, it's never going away. You know, it doesn't matter what the economy does. It's like we ain't going anywhere. It could be world war three, you know. I've always made this joke and it's old by now that the world war three could happen and there'd be like seven people left. One of them selling cockroaches or something. And he's going to go to the guy with a bigger cave wall and be like, hey, I'll give you five cockroaches. If I can advertise my cockroach sales on your wall there, you know, like in, it'll take off from there. It's just never going anywhere. So I have no scarcity around it. Jason: [00:20:10] Well, you know, that's how I look at agencies is, you know, when we had the big gold rush, right? And the people that got the richest were the ones selling the stuff to make gold. That's kind of how I look at agencies. Um, especially as when COVID hit and everything started shutting down, I was like, you know, hey agencies are going to get a lot of business because people can't do what they used to do anymore. And, uh, and I, I guessed right on that. But I love how you, you say take ownership in your own mistake. It's like, it was my fault. And I, I think too many times, including myself, probably, I mean, that's a hard thing to do. Admitting, going, hey, I could have avoided this. This is my mistake. Let's just move on. And hit the reset button. And it's kind of like monopoly, let's play another game, here we go. It's like, I screwed up that one. Frank: [00:21:05] Yeah. I'm glad I screwed up that one. Cause this one's great. And I get to keep all of the money. So like, okay. You know, this actually worked out pretty good. Otherwise, it'd be giving most of the money to Grant. Nice enough guy. But, um, I'd prefer that I keep it. Jason: [00:21:22] I think he's got enough money too. Frank: [00:21:25] Oh, yeah. I think he, I hope they're doing well. Jason: [00:21:28] Yeah. Well, awesome. Well, Frank, this has been amazing, man. Is there anything I didn't ask you that you think would benefit the audience? Frank: [00:21:37] No. I want to ask you something. Because you said something that really hit me at the beginning. You were like, I've never even heard of direct response until after I'd sold the agency. And I think me and you were joking around about this by email. I was like, if I didn't have this damned, uh, I guess like moral compass and inability to sell something that is not measurable. I would be a zillionaire, you know, but I just can't do it. And I don't even know how to attempt to do it. Because I know there was some value to it and like having cool stuff and well-branded things. I don't know how to make those things, but that's why God made other people, you know. Um, how do you sell that kind of stuff? Not with a clear conscience. I, I don't think there's anything wrong with doing it as long as a client knows the game going in, you know.  But how…? Jason: [00:22:25] Well, we… Yeah, our agency, we developed, um, user experiences, you know, from websites and then we built applications. So if you think of sites like Legal Zoom, we built that, uh, you think of Hitachi Power Tools or Lotus Cars, their website, like none of those websites back then had really caught actions other than find my dealer, you know, Legal Zoom did about getting in, but we never really ran ads. Um, so we always said, you have to have this amazing, like when someone comes to your website, you have to have this amazing experience and tell the right story in order for them to, um, you know, build an trust you. You know, we never really, we, we, we didn't get their people's email addresses; even though looking back at the agency, we were one of the first to build e-commerce stores. We were one of the first to build an email marketing system. So our clients could broadcast to their clients. Like, and we were one of the first to build a CMS system, but we did what typical agency owners did was we kept working on our clients that kept paying the bills and we couldn't keep up. And then we, uh, started using other partners, like MailChimp. Like, we started all that before MailChimp. So, you know, everyone, uh, misses the boat. Uh, I think we missed the boat, but at the end of the day, I'm right where I'm supposed to be. I'm loving life and doing everything, so… Frank: [00:23:54] You get to have the pensive view off the balcony in your opening for the Podcast, man. The only way is like, we will make you more than you pay us or we'll refund the difference plus 20%. I mean, the company is called Grow Ads for God's sake, but that's like hard work. I mean, it's actually not because you just choose the right clients, but you know what I mean? It seems to me, hey, the grass is always greener, but I'm like, man, these dudes that are getting paid half a million bucks to make a commercial. Those are the ones that are the smartest people in the room. Jason: [00:24:24] Yeah. Well, I mean, it's, you got to do what you enjoy doing, right? Like you said, the grass is greener on the side that you water. So, you know, whatever side you want to water, like it's going to be, you know, you're going to enjoy it. I always just hate when people do something that they don't want to do in the agency just to make money. I think that's a big, big mistake. I'm like the money will come. Like all the, you know, the mastermind members and the clients I've worked with over the years that have had, you know, the best lives, it's the ones that they, they didn't care about the money. They just cared about doing the right thing and doing what they wanted to do. And that made all the difference. So… Frank: [00:25:03] Well, you've made a whole boatload of it. And I've made, spent a whole boatload of it. At the end of the day. That's really it, you know, am I going to have a good time today? Jason: [00:25:15] Well, I look at it as like you make money to save time in other things. So you have time to, um, you know, one of the things when, when I ask our mastermind members… I probably shouldn't tell people listening because now you know my trick question, but I ask them the first question usually is what do you do for fun? If they say I work all the time, I don't let them in. Frank: [00:25:37] Oh, dude, you wouldn't let me in then cause I really do all the time. But I love it so much, man. But because it's because I'm finally doing. Jason: [00:25:44] Yeah, but you surf and you do all… or do you still surf or no? Frank: [00:25:49] Seriously. Like, I'm in this little room right now and it's my pool house.And so I get up kind of pool house, go back. Um, I've gotten that routine, you know, during COVID and everything. But really, I really like it, you know, like to me, it's so cool. But I'm an addict. Like I'm a hard core ad person specifically with direct response. So I get to hit refresh a whole lot of other people's stats all the time. I get the dopamine hit constantly. You're like, ooh, hit, refresh on this to see how this is going. Okay. Is it refreshing over there? Hot damn. Moving on. What else can we do? You know? So to me it's not work, really. Jason: [00:26:27] Oh, yeah. Well, I mean, that's, that's the whole thing. But I still, I do want you to take some time off. Gotta have some time. So... Frank: [00:26:37] Well, you know, weekends and stuff. I'll sit around and walk over to the other house, the main house. Hang out there. Jason: [00:26:44] Well, awesome. Well, what's the website people go in and check out? Is it growads.com or…? Frank: [00:26:49] It's .org. I didn't have the money for the.com. Actually, I never even looked to see how much the.com costs cause .org seemed cooler to me. Jason: [00:26:58] Well, I think .org usually ranks higher anyway .org ranks higher in Google anyway. Frank: [00:27:04] Oh, I don't even know about that stuff. Jason: [00:27:06] Claim that. Frank: [00:27:10] I have no idea about SEO because I have ads. You know, it's like, you want to get known? Run ads. Yeah, or go to frankkern.com. Both of those sites will cure your insomnia pretty well. I think if you have it. Jason: [00:27:26] Whatever. Everyone goes, check out both those sites. And thanks so much, Frank for coming on the show. And if you guys want to be surrounded by amazing agency owners where, you know, we have a lot of fun, we're going over constantly what's working, what's not working. Sharing and being able to see what you're not able to see because we're too damn freaking close to it. I want you guys to go to digitalagencyelite.com. This is our inclusive mastermind. And until next time have a Swenk day.

Rauce Thoughts
I Was VIOLATED!!!!!!

Rauce Thoughts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 13:38


Rauce's girl took a photo of his junk and he hated it. Hates the photo. Hates the violation. Hated the entire experience

The Matt Thomas Show
Dale Brinson On Mobile, Favorite AstroWorld Rides, MLB Teams Hated By State, Big 12 Expansion, Non-Florida Stories

The Matt Thomas Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 133:36


Hollywood Unlocked [UNCENSORED​]
435: Natalie Nunn On Being Most Hated Bad Girl & Hating Sarah Oliver

Hollywood Unlocked [UNCENSORED​]

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 54:42


Pod Bash
Panda's First Show & The Most Hated Song of All Time!!!

Pod Bash

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 97:39


STOP!!!! RONIN TIME!!!!!!! Ladies and Gentlemen ... Chunga, Chandler and Josh are honored to welcome Gregg Paschall to Radio Ronin!! Chunga has been trying to get Gregg to be on the show since the radio days and now IT'S FINALLY TIME!! Chunga, Chandler and Josh have all just returned from Disneyland! They had a great time and want to say thanks to all of the Goblins they got to meet while they were there! SO MUCH FUN!!! CHUNGA POLL: What's your most hated song of all time!?!? Post your answers below!!! Hey, whatcha doing this Saturday night?! Wanna hang out with Gregg and Josh? Listen to the show for details! AND!!! The Halloween season is rapidly approaching!!! Because of this, EVERY episode of Radio Ronin between now and October 31st will feature a Halloween movie review and recommendation from Gregg! Listen NOW to hear what the first movie is!!!

BJ Shea Daily Experience Podcast -- Official
BJ & MIGS Podcast 09-01-21-7A: “When did you get revenge on a job that you hated”?

BJ Shea Daily Experience Podcast -- Official

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 27:13


Beat Migs. A woman might get 15 years in prison for destroying her company's database after they fired her. Luke warm topic.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Flipping Genius - THE Car Flipping podcast #CarFlipping #FlippingCars
EP 85: I Almost Hated To Spring That One On That Bonehead!

Flipping Genius - THE Car Flipping podcast #CarFlipping #FlippingCars

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 27:04


In Episode 85, Randy shares one of the worst kept secrets on the Internet! If you have listened to more that thirty seconds of Flipping Genius, you know that our host has his own way of doing things. Randy shares what that looks like and talks about ways you can duplicate his style and create your own. He also invites listeners and MEMBERS OF OUR CAR FLIPPING FORUM to share their insights, opinions, suggestions and questions. Let's get to it Flippers! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/flippinggenius/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/flippinggenius/support

The Christian O’Connell Show
FULL: The Russians Hated Circuses

The Christian O’Connell Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 68:17


Another big day of Who's Calling Christian. And A-Z of the 80s continues with the Letter "O"

Sounder at Heart: for Seattle Sounders and Reign FC fans
We loved the PNW Experience, we hated the Sounders game

Sounder at Heart: for Seattle Sounders and Reign FC fans

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 44:07


Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Blood Origins
Episode 108 - A Hunter || Hated by anti-hunters

Blood Origins

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 36:09


Robbie gets the sordid details of the experience of one professional badger culler, who for safety's sake we have decided to keep anonymous, with years of harassment at the hands of anti-hunting extremists who have terrorized he and his family. Podcast is brought to you by: Carbon Unwind: https://apps.apple.com/us/app/id1512187506 Dog And Gun Coffee: www.dogandguncoffee.com Duck Dens: www.theduckdens.com  Pladra: www.pladra.com Civilware: www.civilware.com Dew Rosas: https://dewrosas.com/  Wren & Ivy: https://www.wrenandivy.com/  Splitting Image Taxidermy: https://www.splittingimagetaxidermy.co.za/  Minus33: https://www.minus33.com/  See more from Blood Origins: https://bit.ly/BloodOrigins_Subscribe Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Worst Friends Forever
Episode 332 - Media We Hated: "Let's Not Dissect It"

Worst Friends Forever

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 66:42


This week we're talking about the things we hated as kids — cartoons, movies, books — and the fact the Emily K. hated the cartoon Cow and Chicken so much she could cry.

The CouRage and Nadeshot Show
#62 - TSM Myth on Daequan and Hamlinz's Disappearance & Why Ninja Hated Him

The CouRage and Nadeshot Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 53:09


On this CouRage and Nadeshot Show podcast, TSM Myth  comes on as a guest to talk about  a lot of things including the latest on Daequan and Hamlinz disappearance from the spotlight, challenging Shroud and Symfuhny to a boxing match, why he quit Fortnite, ranked Apex Legends' popularity, and more!

Daytime Confidential
Top 5 Characters We Hated from Jump and Still Hate

Daytime Confidential

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 29:31


On this Top 5 episode of the Daytime Confidential podcast Luke Kerr, Jillian Bowe and Joshua Baldwin are counting down the Top 5 Characters We Hated From Jump and Still Hate.  All this and more on the the latest Daytime Confidential episode! Twitter: @DCConfidential, @Luke_Kerr, @Mike Jubinville, @JillianBowe, Josh Baldwin and Carly Silver. Facebook: Daytime Confidential Subscribe to Daytime Confidential on iTunes, Google Play, and Spotify.