Podcasts about Georgia Tech

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Public university in the United States

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Best podcasts about Georgia Tech

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Latest podcast episodes about Georgia Tech

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
1349: 21 Jan 2022 | Top 10 Cars Sold In Netherlands ALL EVs

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 24:21


Show #1349 If you get any value from this podcast please consider supporting my work on Patreon. Plus all Patreon supporters get their own unique ad-free podcast feed. Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily for Friday 21st January. It's Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to. Thank you to MYEV.com for helping make this show, they've built the first marketplace specifically for Electric Vehicles. It's a totally free marketplace that simplifies the buying and selling process, and help you learn about EVs along the way too. Welcome to a new Patreon Producer JACK JAQUETTE SK INNOVATION AIMS TO ADVANCE ALL-SOLID-STATE BATTERIES - SK Innovation has revealed that it will be collaborating with a research team led by Professor Lee Seung-woo of Georgia Tech in the United States with the aim of advancing “the era of next-generation all-solid-state batteries.” - Professor Lee Seung-woo and his team have developed a solid electrolyte that is said to boost ionic conductivity by 100 times. - Until now realising a solid electrolyte that simultaneously ensures ionic conductivity and safety while functioning at room temperature has been the biggest hurdle with this technology. - Last October, the S.Korean battery giant SK Innovation started to work with Solid Power, to develop all-solid-state batteries that can be made in the current lithium-ion battery production facilities. Original Source : https://www.electrive.com/2022/01/19/sk-innovation-aims-to-advance-all-solid-state-batteries/ ZEEKR 001 2022 REVIEW - After owning Volvo for a decade and making numerous global investments in the automotive market, Chinese firm Geely should by now need no introductions. - Zeekr, however does. It's Geely's new all-electric brand, spun out from Lynk&Co, a nascent maker itself. Unsurprisingly, given the name, the 001 is Zeekr's first model - Billed as the world's first electric shooting brake, the 001 aims to cash in on the growth in demand for performance EVs. - 536bhp is generated by two electric motors – one per axle – and a 0-62mph time of 3.8sec makes it a match for the new BMW i4 M50. - The 001 also uses air suspension that can set the ground clearance between 117mm and 205mm and two batteries are offered, with 86kWh and 100kWh. - Charging rates can be as high as 360kW - in China. However, once these are resolved, the car is likely to be heading to Europe. The question is 'as what?' Original Source : https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-review/zeekr/001/first-drives/zeekr-001-2022-review WHITE HOUSE OPTIMISTIC EV CREDITS WILL STAY IN REWORKED SPENDING BILL - White House National Climate Advisor Gina McCarthy expressed confidence on Thursday that tax credits for electric cars would survive in a reworked Build Back Better climate and social spending bill after President Joe Biden signaled willingness to accept “chunks” of the stalled legislation. - “I'm not seeing any dispute about the need to continue to make sure that these technologies are affordable and accessible to everyone,” McCarthy said during a question and answer session at the Washington Auto Show. - The $550 billion infrastructure bill that was signed into law by Biden in November includes $7.5 billion for electrical vehicle charging stations, but a proposal to offer as much as $12,500 in tax credits for buyers of new and used plug-in car purchases remains in limbo as Congress struggles to pass Biden's proposed Build Back Better bill. - “EVs don't just help us reach our climate and air quality goals,” McCarthy said. “When you drive one of these things, you want one. So we are talking about a real market here. Not one that we have to push.” Original Source : https://www.bloombergquint.com/business/white-house-optimistic-ev-credits-will-remain-in-reworked-bbb LONDON TAXIS DRIVE ELECTRIC EXPANSION INTO GREECE AND FRANCE - The London Electric Vehicle Company, formerly known as The London Taxi Corporation and famous for its black London taxicabs, is continuing its European expansion, with dealerships announced for France and Greece. - LEVC is backed by Chinese automotive giant Geely and has been expanding its line-up with its VN5, a fully customisable electric vehicle (with range extender) that is most recognisable as a taxicab accommodating up to six passengers or fitted with accessibility features for disabled passengers. - But the VN5 can also be built out as a van - The VN5 joins the TX Taxi taxicab and TX Shuttle in LEVCs range of commercial electric vehicles, but the company has also designed the world's first electric campervan, the e-Camper, which was launched late last year. - Late 2021 saw LEVC appoint three dealerships in Sweden, and this month LEVC has appointed dealerships in France and Greece. Original Source : https://thedriven.io/2022/01/20/london-taxis-drive-electric-expansion-into-greece-and-france DECEMBER 2021: TOP 10 CARS SOLD IN NETHERLANDS ALL EVS - Dec 2021 total: 35,351 1 Skoda Enyaq 1,437 2 Ford Mustang Mach E 1,249 3 Volvo XC40 1,212  4 Volkswagen ID4 1.208 5 Audi Q4 1.147 6 Cupra Born 1.135 7 Polestar 2 1.060 8 Kia Niro 1.022 9 Volkswagen ID3 986 10 Tesla Model 3 974 Original Source : https://www.kentekenradar.nl/registraties/ S.KOREA'S LG ENERGY SOLUTION SEES RECORD RETAIL DEMAND FOR IPO - Retail investors bid for a record 114 trillion won ($96 billion) worth of shares in the IPO of South Korean battery maker LG Energy Solution (LGES), adding to the frenzy for a piece of the biggest public offering in the country. - LGES, which commands more than 20% of the global electric vehicle battery market and supplies Tesla Inc (TSLA.O), General Motors Co (GM.N) and Volkswagen AG (VOWG_p.DE) among others, had set aside about 25% of the total shares on offer for retail bidders, according to Reuters calculations. - The company is expected to list on Jan. 27. - The IPO price values LGES at about 70.2 trillion won ($60 billion) and will make it South Korea's third most-valuable company after Samsung Electronics Co (005930.KS) and SK Hynix Inc (000660.KS). Original Source : https://www.reuters.com/markets/europe/skoreas-lg-energys-108-bln-ipo-draws-record-demand-retail-investors-2022-01-19/ AUDI RS Q E-TRON AT THE DAKAR RALLY: SUCCESSFUL START INTO A NEW ERA IN ELECTRIFIED RACING Original Source : https://finance.yahoo.com/news/audi-rs-q-e-tron-150600293.html AUDI TO INSTALL ULTRA-FAST 150KW EV CHARGING ACROSS SOUTH AFRICA   Original Source : https://www.techfinancials.co.za/2022/01/20/audi-to-install-ultra-fast-150kw-ev-charging-across-south-africa/ REFRESH TESLA MODEL X WITH CCS2 CHARGE PORT SPOTTED IN NORWAY Original Source : https://driveteslacanada.ca/model-x/refresh-tesla-model-x-with-ccs2-charge-port-spotted-in-norway/ USA: ROTTEN ROBBIE DEPLOYS FIRST BATTERY-INTEGRATED EV CHARGERS IN SILICON VALLEY Original Source : https://www.petrolplaza.com/news/29045 SMART'S NEW ELECTRIC SUV WILL LOOK ALMOST LIKE THE CONCEPT #1   Original Source : https://www.carscoops.com/2022/01/smarts-new-electric-suv-will-look-almost-like-the-concept-1/ BRITISHVOLT: ELECTRIC CAR BATTERY PLANT GETS MILLIONS IN FUNDING Original Source : https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-60066432 QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM What TV, Print or Digital advertising have you seen for EVs recently which you noticed, or thought was memorable? Email me your answer now: hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. And  if you have an Amazon Echo, download our Alexa Skill, search for EV News Daily and add it as a flash briefing. Come and say hi on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter just search EV News Daily, have a wonderful day, I'll catch you tomorrow and remember…there's no such thing as a self-charging hybrid. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM/

The Her Hoop Stats Podcast: WNBA & Women’s College Basketball
Courtside 61: Luisa Harris's legacy and Caitlin Clark's dominance

The Her Hoop Stats Podcast: WNBA & Women’s College Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 59:55


The Women's Basketball Community lost a legend in Lusia Harris this week. Christy Winters-Scott (Big Ten Network) and Gabe Ibrahim talk about the first woman to ever score a basket in the Olympics and the trails she blazed for current players. They also breakdown Caitlin Clark's recent run of dominance in the Big Ten and what Iowa's ceiling is as well as Miami's upset of Georgia Tech, the big NC State-Louisville matchup, the Athletes Unlimited rosters, and Team USA's coaching staff.

Hold Me Back
The College Admission Series (CAS): Introduction

Hold Me Back

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 35:30


The college admissions process has become increasingly filled with uncertainty and stress for millions of families. In this multi-part series, Aidan and Ash interview the admission leaders of several renowned universities in an effort to demystify the admissions process so families can navigate through it in a healthy and rewarding manner. This episode reveals eye-opening data and sets the context for upcoming interviews with admission leaders from Cornell, Duke, Georgia Tech, TCU, and a nationally respected college counselor. Who was more convincing: Aidan or Ash? Vote at HoldMeBack.com

Inside Carolina Podcast
The Postgame: Heels Exposed Again in Rout

Inside Carolina Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 19:06


Venturing away from the Smith Center has not been kind to Hubert Davis's North Carolina Basketball team. The Heels crushed Georgia Tech three days ago in Chapel Hill only to travel down to Miami and be destroyed by the Hurricanes in a game for first place in the conference. The Tar Heels repeated a problematic trend of folding in the face of a physical and aggressive opponent and suffered an 85-57 defeat. InsideCarolina.com Postgame Podcast Host Tommy Ashley is joined by Dewey Burke to break down the rout. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Carolina Insider
GT recap/Miami preview, Caleb Love joins, Student caregiver for the live Rameses, Hannah King, joins

Carolina Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 78:08


Carolina was impressive again blowing out Georgia Tech in the Smith Center (4:08) and now the Heels head on the road for tough back-to-back games at Miami and Wake Forest (14:51)ACC Commissioner Jim Phillips made headlines with his comments on the ACC's stance on expanding the CFP (22:13)Audio from our Video Pod interview with Tar Heel guard Caleb Love (32:09)Recent UNC grad Hannah King talks about her role as the student caregiver for the live Rameses (40:25)Plus: we've fallen into a rabbit hole of 1980s music videos (1:08:51) and add Josh Pastner to the list of Adam's boys (1:12:49)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Carolina Insider
Hubert Davis Show 1/17/22

Carolina Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 60:01


Hubert Davis joins Jones Angell to talk about Carolina's win over Georgia Tech, preview this week's match-ups with Miami and Wake Forest, and answer Tar Heel fan's questions.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Packer And Durham
Hour 1: Weekend Recap

Packer And Durham

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 53:53


ACC Commissioner Jim Phillips says CFP expansion should wait until changes to sport are evaluated. Plus we look back at big wins from Duke, Wake, Virginia Tech, and Boston College. While North Carolina completes sweep of Georgia Tech while Florida State and Pitt get splits in their rematches. 

Carolina Insider
GT Preview, Gene Chizik and Charlton Warren join

Carolina Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 95:06


Carolina is back in action on Saturday night against Georgia Tech...we preview the second meeting of the year with the Yellow Jackets (12:13)Carolina's two new football coaches, Assistant HC for Defense Gene Chizik (24:44) and Co-Defensive Coordinator/DB Coach Charlton Warren (34:34), joinPlus: #5SecondChallenge (56:44), we have the weekend's potential winter storm COVERED (1:03:40) and does Jones ever try to use reverse mojo when calling a game? (1:18:11)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Inside Carolina Podcast
On the Beat: Chizik and Warren Hit Rewind, Hoops Has Goals In Sight

Inside Carolina Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 108:41


When news drops regarding North Carolina's major sports, the InsideCarolina.com On The Beat Live crew has it all covered. Tonight's show featured breaking transfer news out of the gate and was followed with in-depth reporting and analysis of Mack Brown's latest hires for a Carolina football program looking to right the course after a troubling 2021 campaign. Gene Chizik and Charlton Warren return to Chapel Hill to finish what they started in 2015 and 2016 under Larry Fedora, this time with a recruiting juggernaut under Brown and talent not seen in Chapel Hill in decades. The IC crew of host Tommy Ashley, Gregory Hall, Buck Sanders, Taylor Vippolis, Jason Staples and beat writer Greg Barnes dig into the nuts and bolts of the latest hires, and then venture into Hubert Davis's realm as the Tar Heel basketball team welcomes Georgia Tech into the Smith Center on Saturday night. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Locked On Boston College - Daily Podcast On Boston College Eagles Football & Basketball

Boston College men's basketball got stellar performances from Quinten Post and Brevin Galloway but it wasn't enough as the Eagles dropped their fourth straight game, this time to Georgia Tech. We break down the loss to the Yellow Jackets and look at what happened. Also, Jeff Hafley has decided to take it easy in the transfer portal. Is this the right move? We discuss. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. PrizePicks Don't hesitate, check out PrizePicks.com and use promo code: “NBA” or go to your app store and download the app today. PrizePicks is daily fantasy made easy! TrueBill Don't fall for subscription scams. Start cancelling today at Truebill.com/LOCKEDONNBA. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Right-Side Up Leadership Podcast
266 - Clay Scroggins "Why yesterday's leadership style has stopped working

Right-Side Up Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 33:06


On today's episode, Alan has chats with Author and Leadership Practitioner Clay Scroggins about why yesterday's leadership style has changed and no longer works. About Clay Clay is the best-selling author of How To Lead When You're Not In Charge, and How To Lead In A World of Distraction. For over two decades he worked at North Point Ministries, starting as a facilities intern (a.k.a. vice president of nothing) and eventually becoming the lead pastor of their largest campus. Clay is now a sought-after leadership speaker, engaging audiences that include the Atlanta Hawks, Mercedes Benz, Chick-fil-A, Federal Reserve Bank, and Terminus. Clay graduated from Georgia Tech with an Industrial Engineering Degree and continued on to acquire a Masters and Doctorate from Dallas Theological Seminary. Connect with Clay Website Books Facebook Twitter Instagram Level your leadership in 2022 Purchase a Right Side Up Journal https://www.rightsideupjournal.com Schedule your FREE breakthrough coaching session https://form.jotform.com/212656762431153 Invest in your leadership by joining free Right Side Up Community https://www.facebook.com/groups/rsulc

Atlanta Braves
The Buck Belue Show (01.11.2022)

Atlanta Braves

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 43:06


Hear "The Buck Belue Show" every weekday morning from 10-11a on 680 The Fan and 93.7 FM, the 680 The Fan App available on Apple and Android, with your Smart Speaker by saying Alexa or wherever you get and listen to your favorite podcast! Get the latest with the Georgia Bulldogs, Atlanta Braves, Atlanta Falcons, Georgia Tech, the World of College Football, newsmakers and more! A show dedicated to the celebration of Georgia winning the National Championship including a breakdown of the game, hear from Alabama Head Coach Nick Saban, Georgia Head Coach Kirby Smart, Georgia QB Stetson Bennett and more See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Truck N' Hustle
#123 - Building A Multi Million Dollar FinTech Company For Truckers - Robin Gregg

Truck N' Hustle

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 41:20


Robin Gregg is the CEO of RoadSync, a digital financial platform that powers business transactions in the logistics industry. Robin combines her strong leadership skills with a keen understanding of scaling startups. Prior to RoadSync, Robin held leadership roles at FleetCor, alternative payment provider Revolution Money (sold to Amex in 2010), and Capital One. Robin currently serves as a mentor for the ATDC, Georgia Tech's technology incubator and has held numerous leadership roles, including Co-President, of the Harvard Business School Club of Atlanta. She is also an active member of the Entrepreneurs' Organization. Robin holds a BA from Washington and Lee and received her MBA from Harvard Business School. Special thanks to our sponsors OTR Capital If you looking for a factoring partner choose OTR Capital learn more at https://otrcapital.com/truck-n-hustle/   TransportCFO https://bit.ly/TruckNHustle Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Carolina Insider
Hubert Davis Show - 1/10/22

Carolina Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 59:50


Hubert Davis joins Jones Angell to talk about Carolina's win over Virginia, preview this week's match-up with Georgia Tech, and answer Tar Heel fan's questions.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Atlanta Braves
The Buck Belue Show (01.10.2022)

Atlanta Braves

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 41:03


Hear "The Buck Belue Show" every weekday morning from 10-11a on 680 The Fan and 93.7 FM, the 680 The Fan App available on Apple and Android, with your Smart Speaker by saying Alexa or wherever you get and listen to your favorite podcast! Get the latest with the Georgia Bulldogs, Atlanta Braves, Atlanta Falcons, Georgia Tech, the World of College Football, newsmakers and more! Buck's BIG Take Atlanta Falcons season ended yesterday with a losing season but their is hope for Falcon fans coming out of the 2021-22 season Chris Doering, former Gator legend and SEC Network Analyst, talks about tonights National Championship matchup between the Dawgs and Tide. Quarterback Club Stetson Bennett, All American Bowl, Matt Ryan. Tom Brady and more discussed in the Q&A with Buck Buck's College Football Nuggets presented by Ace Hardware former Auburn Head Coach Gene Chizik returning to coaching Georgia Bulldog Roundtable presented by Georgia's Own Credit Union, Georgia Pack and Load, Haug Law Group, AAA and Attorney Ken Nugent we hear from a multitude of Georgia Legends on the upcoming National Championship including Herschel Walker, Aaron Murray, Ben Watson, David Pollack and Kevin Butler What's Poppin' Buck does a Q&A on some of the latest headlines around The Final Word, keys for Georgia to win their first National Championship since 1980 AND keys for Alabama to their 6th in eleven years See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

17Twenty
Episode 073 || Lewis Caralla || Are You Willing To Sprint When the Distance Is Unknown?

17Twenty

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 42:33


In our season three premiere, the crew sits down with head strength and conditioning coach at Georgia Tech, Lewis Caralla.We have talked about Coach Lew many times, including an entire BYLR hour dedicated to the powerful impact that he is having on people, and the motivational mindset that  permeates his social media.  The conversation with Coach Lew is poignant and impactful, stretching from mentorship to motivation.Get out your pen in your journal, get ready to start the year off with a bang, and prepare for a few surprises along the way.

the Unidentified Celebrity Review
Interview with Sean Webb

the Unidentified Celebrity Review

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 114:43


Today, we chatted with Sean Webb. As the author of a book that numerous U.S. Navy SEALs are calling one of the best human mind manuals currently available, Sean Webb is someone who knows the human mind pretty darn well. As an alumnus of Georgia Tech's Advanced Technologies Development Center, Sean has spent years solving complex systems problems for cutting-edge technology and supercomputing companies. Come aboard, let's get weird. 

Atlanta Braves
The Buck Belue Show (01.07.2021)

Atlanta Braves

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 43:05


Hear "The Buck Belue Show" every weekday morning from 10-11a on 680 The Fan and 93.7 FM, the 680 The Fan App available on Apple and Android, with your Smart Speaker by saying Alexa or wherever you get and listen to your favorite podcast! Get the latest with the Georgia Bulldogs, Atlanta Braves, Atlanta Falcons, Georgia Tech, the World of College Football, newsmakers and more! Buck's BIG Take there is one matchup for the Dawgs that keeps Buck up at night when looking ahead to the National Championship game against Alabama Georgia not built to attack this Bama position   Tyler Watts joined Buck on his latest Buck's Beats podcast with a look at the National Championship from an Alabama perspective "All Falcons Top 5" Derrick Thomas brings up 5 Atlanta Falcons new items Buck Belue Show Headline presented by Grease Monkey ESPN "Football Power Index" gives this team a 58.4% to win the National Championship on Monday  Georgia Bulldog Roundtable presented by Georgia's Own Credit Union, Georgia Pack and Load, Haug Law Group, AAA and Attorney Ken Nugent a look ahead to Georgia players that are NFL caliber Buck's College Football Nuggets presented by Ace Hardware Clemson Tigers Head Coach Dabo Swinney has changed his tune on this subject The Final Word Dawgs better not play scared Monday night See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Packer And Durham
Hour 3: Charlie Moore, Miami G

Packer And Durham

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 50:40


Miami Guard Charlie Moore joins the show as he gets ready to face Duke tomorrow. And Notre Dame Forward Nate Laszewski visits with the guys as the Irish prepare to take on Georgia Tech tomorrow. Plus we give you a women's hoops recap and look ahead at all the ACC Sports action in the “Bojangles Weekend Menu”

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
USFL Coaching Hires | The College Football Experience (Ep. 918)

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 32:44


The College Football Experience (@TCEonSGPN) on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network keys in on the newest USFL head football coaching hires. Pick Dundee aka (@TheColbyD) & NC Nick (@NC_Nick) go team by team in the USFL reviewing how each hire will work out in the USFL and keying on what coaches the other franchises should hire? Will Mike Riley and the New Jersey Generals be the team to lookout for in the USFL? Should Ed Orgeron be consider for the New Orleans Breakers job? Does Kevin Sumlin with the Houston Gamblers make sense? Does the Bart Andrus hire fire you up if you are a Philadelphia Stars fan? Will the Birmingham Stallions finalize the deal for Gene Chizik? Should the Pittsburgh Maulers consider Paul Johnson the former Georgia Tech and Navy head coach? Can Todd Haley make the Tampa Bay Bandits a contender with only having a NFL background? Should the Michigan Panthers consider hiring June Jones or Jerry Glanville? Will we eventually see the USFL get the San Antonio Gunslingers, Washington Federals, Memphis Showboats and Arizona Outlaws? What made the USFL so special to kids in the 1980's? We talk it all on this special USFL edition of The College Football Experience. Make sure you subscribe to The College Basketball Experience at sg.pn/tcbe Follow - Twitter | Instagram Watch - YouTube | Twitch Subscribe - Apple | Spotify Read - SportsGamblingPodcast.com Discuss - Slack | Reddit Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The College Football Experience
USFL Coaching Hires (Ep. 918)

The College Football Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 32:44


The College Football Experience (@TCEonSGPN) on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network keys in on the newest USFL head football coaching hires. Pick Dundee aka (@TheColbyD) & NC Nick (@NC_Nick) go team by team in the USFL reviewing how each hire will work out in the USFL and keying on what coaches the other franchises should hire? Will Mike Riley and the New Jersey Generals be the team to lookout for in the USFL? Should Ed Orgeron be consider for the New Orleans Breakers job? Does Kevin Sumlin with the Houston Gamblers make sense? Does the Bart Andrus hire fire you up if you are a Philadelphia Stars fan? Will the Birmingham Stallions finalize the deal for Gene Chizik? Should the Pittsburgh Maulers consider Paul Johnson the former Georgia Tech and Navy head coach? Can Todd Haley make the Tampa Bay Bandits a contender with only having a NFL background? Should the Michigan Panthers consider hiring June Jones or Jerry Glanville? Will we eventually see the USFL get the San Antonio Gunslingers, Washington Federals, Memphis Showboats and Arizona Outlaws? What made the USFL so special to kids in the 1980's? We talk it all on this special USFL edition of The College Football Experience. Make sure you subscribe to The College Basketball Experience at sg.pn/tcbe Follow - Twitter | Instagram Watch - YouTube | Twitch Subscribe - Apple | Spotify Read - SportsGamblingPodcast.com Discuss - Slack | Reddit Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Influential Entrepreneurs with Mike Saunders, MBA
Interview with Andy McDowell Life, Leadership, Small Business Coach & Founder of Generate Your Value

Influential Entrepreneurs with Mike Saunders, MBA

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 22:31


Andy is an engineer by trade and a creative by nature. He spent 22 years with the Boeing Company, where he always felt more like a life coach than a boss. In 2002, he began his journey into entrepreneurship within a Corporation when he was asked to develop an Airspace Design Consulting business from scratch that would serve the global government market. Andy has a Bachelor's Degree from Georgia Tech in Electrical Engineering and a Master's Degree in Computer Information Systems from Georgia State. Naturally, his aviation work took him around the world and enabled him to work on high-profile projects – such as preparing the Beijing and Sochi Airports for their respective Olympic Games.Learn More: https://www.generateyourvalue.com/Influential Influencers with Mike Saundershttps://businessinnovatorsradio.com/influential-entrepreneurs-with-mike-saunders/Source: https://businessinnovatorsradio.com/interview-with-andy-mcdowell-life-leadership-small-business-coach-founder-of-generate-your-value

Locked On Blue Devils - Daily Podcast On Duke Blue Devils Football & Basketball
Scoring The Basketball A Must for Duke vs. Miami Hurricanes

Locked On Blue Devils - Daily Podcast On Duke Blue Devils Football & Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 37:45


JJ Jackson chats with Jason Evans of the Duke Basketball Report about the win over Georgia Tech, Paolo Banchero's playmaking, A.J. Griffin continuing to improve, preview the game vs. Miami and more. Twitter: @LO_BlueDevils | @_JJ_Jackson_ Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. NetSuite Over twenty-seven thousand businesses already use NetSuite and RIGHT NOW through the end of the year NetSuite is offering a one-of-a-kind financing program to those ready to upgrade at NetSuite.com/LOCKEDONNCAA. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Atlanta Braves
The Buck Belue Show (01.06.2022)

Atlanta Braves

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 40:43


Hear "The Buck Belue Show" every weekday morning from 10-11a on 680 The Fan and 93.7 FM, the 680 The Fan App available on Apple and Android, with your Smart Speaker by saying Alexa or wherever you get and listen to your favorite podcast! Get the latest with the Georgia Bulldogs, Atlanta Braves, Atlanta Falcons, Georgia Tech, the World of College Football, newsmakers and more! Buck's BIG Take a BIG raise and is looming for Georgia Head Coach Kirby Smart, win or lose come Monday night in Indy Ben Watson former Dawgs TE and SEC Network analysts joins Buck to look ahead to the National Championship matchup David Pollack College Football Hall of Famer, ESPN College Football Analyst, and a Georgia Bulldog Defensive standout gives his thoughts on the National Championship game Buck Belue Show Headline presented by Grease Monkey Atlanta Hawks get the W Buck's College Football Nuggets presented by Ace Hardware College Football Playoff Committee is meeting this weekend in Indy to discuss the future of the playoffs Georgia Bulldog Roundtable presented by Georgia's Own Credit Union, Georgia Pack and Load and Attorney Ken Nugent days away from the rematch for Dawgs and Tide in Indy for the National Championship we hear from players and coaches on both sides about the game What's Poppin' Derrick Thomas talks big news around the sporting world with Buck including Antonio Brown, draft stock up for Jamaree Salyer and more The Final Word former Alabama QB Tylers Watts joined Buck on the latest Buck's Beat podcast See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Don't Worry, We'll Talk It Out
The State of Education (with Calvin Mackie, PhD)

Don't Worry, We'll Talk It Out

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 37:00


Today, I talk with the incredible Dr. Calvin Mackie about his non-profit, STEM NOLA. We discuss the culture surrounding education, the impact COVID has had on our educational systems, and the ways his organization is working to reduce educational disparities in children across America. Dr. Mackie is a contributing writer for Forbes Magazine, former engineering professor at Tulane University and an internationally renowned public speaker. He is the founder of STEM NOLA, a non-profit organization which seeks to improve educational disparities in low income children and children of color. Since 2013, STEM NOLA has engaged over 75,000 students – mostly under-served students of color – in hands-on STEM project-based learning.In 1990, he graduated Magna Cum Laude from Morehouse College with a B.S. degree, as a member of the prestigious Phi Beta Kappa National Honor Society. Simultaneously, he was awarded a B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering from Georgia Tech, where he subsequently earned his Master's and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering in 1996. 

Duke Basketball Report
#376 - Duke beats Georgia Tech, prepares for Miami

Duke Basketball Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 50:21


It was a sloppy affair Tuesday night in Cameron, but the Duke Blue Devils shook off the Covid rust to beat the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets, 69-57. The DBR Podcast reacts to it and previews the upcoming game against the Miami Hurricanes on Episode 376! Duke played like it hadn't played basketball in almost two weeks because...well, they haven't played basketball in almost two weeks. We discuss the good, the almost good, the bad, and the not so bad from a game that saw another set of huge performances by A.J. Griffin, Paolo Banchero, and Mark Williams. We also discuss how cool it would have been for Bobby Cremins to be able to make it back to Cameron to sit on the bench one last time. After the break, we prepare for the Canes, who come to town Saturday night. Donald gives an extensive look at his second team and what Duke fans can expect from a Miami lineup that can score a lot of points but also give them up as well. We end by touching quickly on Michael Devoe's back-and-forth with Coach K during the Tech game. We'll be back this weekend to recap the Miami game (assuming it happens), but until then, make sure you're subscribed and giving those 5 star ratings and reviews!! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Locked On Blue Devils - Daily Podcast On Duke Blue Devils Football & Basketball
Duke Basketball Beats Georgia Tech + Kevin Johns New Offensive Coordinator

Locked On Blue Devils - Daily Podcast On Duke Blue Devils Football & Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 28:01


JJ Jackson recaps the Duke Men's Basketball victory over Georgia Tech, listens to Mike Krzyzewski's postgame press conference and discusses the new offensive coordinator for Duke Football. Twitter: @LO_BlueDevils | @_JJ_Jackson_ Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. NetSuite Over twenty-seven thousand businesses already use NetSuite and RIGHT NOW through the end of the year NetSuite is offering a one-of-a-kind financing program to those ready to upgrade at NetSuite.com/LOCKEDONNCAA. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Best of The OG with Ovies & Giglio
How old does Josh Pastner want to be? Rand sings about the Georgia Tech Head Coach in "Acapella The News" and the guys answer listener questions in "Hey Joe."

The Best of The OG with Ovies & Giglio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 14:34


How old does Josh Pastner want to be? Rand sings about the Georgia Tech Head Coach in "Acapella The News" and the guys answer listener questions in "Hey Joe."  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Atlanta Braves
The Buck Belue Show (01.05.2022)

Atlanta Braves

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 38:55


Hear "The Buck Belue Show" every weekday morning from 10-11a on 680 The Fan and 93.7 FM, the 680 The Fan App available on Apple and Android, with your Smart Speaker by saying Alexa or wherever you get and listen to your favorite podcast! Get the latest with the Georgia Bulldogs, Atlanta Braves, Atlanta Falcons, Georgia Tech, the World of College Football, newsmakers and more! Buck's BIG Take Herschel Walker looks ahead to the National Championship NFL Insider Chris Mortensen presented by Atlanta Painting Company "The Mort Report" Buck's College Football Nugget presented by Ace Hardware Yellow Jackets have a well known name coming to The Flatts to join the coaching staff Atlanta Falcons Georgia Bulldog Roundtable presented by Georgia's Own Credit Union, Georgia Pack and Load and Attorney Ken Nugent Georgia QB Stetson Bennett Buck Belue Show Headlines presented by Grease Monkey people tuned, in record numbers to watch this recent football matchup The Final Word Georgia/Alabama take See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Southern Sports Today
CHUCK OLIVER SHOW 1-5 TUESDAY HOUR 2

Southern Sports Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 39:46


Chuck goes through some of the headlines in college football with ‘CFB 365.' We talk changes at Georgia Tech with Kelly Quinlan of Jackets Online. Then, we are joined by Russ Mitchell of College Football News for his weekly visit.    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

PlaybyPlay
1/5/22 North Carolina vs. Notre Dame FREE College Basketball Pick

PlaybyPlay

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 0:53


North Carolina vs. Notre Dame College Basketball Pick Prediction 1/5/2022 by Tony T. North Carolina at Notre Dame—Tar Heels ran their ACC record to 2-0 by posting blowout wins on the road at Georgia Tech by 17 and Boston College by 26. Tar Heels rank 7th in the nation from three converting on 40% and strong off the defensive glass. North Carolina strong scoring team inside that makes their free throws. They do secure the basketball and have good size.

Greater Than Code
265: Computer Science Education – Forge Your Own Path with Emily Haggard

Greater Than Code

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 52:52


00:54 - Emily's Superpower: Being a Good Teacher * Greater Than Code Episode 261: Celebrating Computer Science Education with Dave Bock (https://www.greaterthancode.com/celebrating-computer-science-education) * CyberPatriot (https://www.uscyberpatriot.org/) 06:24 - Online College Courses vs In-Person Learning / Emily's Community College Path * Network Engineering (https://www.fieldengineer.com/blogs/what-is-network-engineer-definition) * Virginia Tech (https://vt.edu/) * Guaranteed Transfer Programs (https://blog.collegevine.com/an-introduction-to-guaranteed-transfer-programs/) * Loudoun Codes (http://loudouncodes.org/) * Emily Haggard: My Path to Virginia Tech (http://loudouncodes.org/2020/09/23/path_to_va_tech.html) 11:58 - Computer Science Curriculums * Technical Depth * The Missing Semester of Your CS Education (https://missing.csail.mit.edu/) 19:28 - Being A Good Mentor / Mentor, Student Relationships * Using Intuition * Putting Yourself in Others' Mindsets * Diversity and Focusing On Commonalities * Addressing Gatekeeping in Tech * Celebrating Accomplishments * Bragging Loudly * Grace Hopper Conference (https://ghc.anitab.org/) * Cultural Dynamics Spread 38:24 - Dungeons & Dragons (https://dnd.wizards.com/) * Characters as an Extensions of Players Reflections: Dave: College is what you make of it, not where you went. Arty: Teaching people better who don't have a lot of experience yet. Mandy: “Empowered women, empower women.” Empowered men also empower women. Emily: Your mentor should have different skills from you and you should seek them out for that reason. This episode was brought to you by @therubyrep (https://twitter.com/therubyrep) of DevReps, LLC (http://www.devreps.com/). To pledge your support and to join our awesome Slack community, visit patreon.com/greaterthancode (https://www.patreon.com/greaterthancode) To make a one-time donation so that we can continue to bring you more content and transcripts like this, please do so at paypal.me/devreps (https://www.paypal.me/devreps). You will also get an invitation to our Slack community this way as well. Transcript: MANDY: Hey, everybody! Welcome to Episode 265 of Greater Than Code. My name is Mandy Moore and I'm here with our guest panelist, Dave Bock. DAVE: Hi, I'm David Bock and I am here with our usual co-host, Arty Starr. ARTY: Thank you, Dave. And I'm here today with our guest, Emily Haggard. Emily is graduating from Virginia Tech with a Bachelor's in Computer Science this past December so, congratulations. She has a wide variety of experience in technology from web development to kernel programming, and even network engineering and cybersecurity. She is an active member of her community, having founded a cybersecurity club for middle schoolers. In her free time, she enjoys playing Dungeons and Dragons and writing novels. Welcome to the show, Emily. EMILY: Thank you. ARTY: So our first question we always ask is what is your superpower and how did you acquire it? EMILY: So I spent some time thinking about this and I would say that my superpower is that I'm a good teacher and what that means is that the people who come to me with questions wanting to learn something number one, my goal is to help them understand and number two, I think it's very important to make sure that whatever gap we have in our experience doesn't matter and that they don't feel that. So that they could be my 6-year-old brother and I'm trying to teach him algebra, or something and he doesn't feel like he is the 6-year-old trying to learn algebra. DAVE: I'll echo that sentiment about being a good teacher actually on two fronts, Emily. First of all, I am teaching your brother now in high school and just the other day, he credited you towards giving him a lot of background knowledge about the course and the curriculum before we ever started the class. So he seconds that you're a good teacher. And then listeners might remember, I was on a few weeks ago talking about my nonprofit and Emily was there at the beginning of me starting to volunteer in high schools. In fact, the way I met Emily, it was the fall of 2014. The first time I was volunteering at Loudoun Valley High School and one morning prior to class, there was going to be a meeting of a cybersecurity club. There were a bunch to the students milling about and there was this sophomore girl sitting in front of a computer, looking at a PowerPoint presentation of networking IP addresses, how the /24 of an IP address resolves and just all that kind of detail. Like very low-level detail about networking stuff and I was like, “Oh, that's interesting.” I wouldn't have expected a sophomore girl to be so interested in the low-level type of details of IP. And then the club started and she got up and started giving that presentation. That was not a slide deck she was reading; it was a slide deck she was creating. EMILY: Thank you. I actually remember that. [laughs] ARTY: So how did you acquire that superpower? EMILY: I think it was out of necessity. So going back to the story that David mentioned in high school, there was a cybersecurity competition called CyberPatriot that I competed in with friends and one year, all of a sudden, they just introduced network engineering to the competition. We had to configure and troubleshoot a simulated network and no one knew how to do that. So I took it upon myself to just figure it out so that my team could be competitive and win, but then part of the way that I learn actually is being able to teach something like that's how I grasp. I know that I've understood something and I'm ready to move on to the next topic is like, if I could teach this thing. So actually, I started out building all of that as a way to kind of condense my notes and condense my knowledge so that it'd stick in my head for the competition and I just realized it's already here, I should share this. So that's how I started there. Teaching network engineering to high schoolers that don't have any background knowledge is really hard. It forced me to put it in terms that would make sense and take away the really technical aspects of it and I think that built the teaching skill. DAVE: That relates to the club you started at the middle school for a CyberPatriot. How did that start? EMILY: That was initially a desire to have a capstone project and get out of high school a few weeks early. But I was sitting there with my friend and thinking about, “Okay, well, we need to do something that actually helps people. What should we do?” Like some people are going out and they're painting murals in schools, or gardening. It was like, well, we don't really like being outside and we're not really artistic. [chuckles] But what we do have is a lot of technical knowledge from all this work with CyberPatriot and we know that CyberPatriot has a middle school competition. So we actually approached the middle school. We had a sit down with, I think the dean at our local middle school. We talked about what CyberPatriot was and what we wanted to do with the students, which was have them bust over to the high school so we could teach them as an afterschool program. I guess we convinced him and so, a couple months later they're busing students over for us to teach. DAVE: Wow. And did they ever participate in competitions as middle schoolers? EMILY: Yes, they did. DAVE: Very cool. EMILY: Yeah. DAVE: Can you go into what those competitions are like? I don't think most of the audience even knows that exists. EMILY: Yeah, sure. So CyberPatriot, it's a cybersecurity competition for predominantly high schoolers that's run by the Air Force and you have a couple rounds throughout the year, I think it's like five, or so, and at each round you have 6 hours and you're given some virtual machines, which you have to secure and remove viruses from and things, and you get points for doing all of that. They added on network simulation, which was with some Cisco proprietary software, which would simulate your routers, your firewalls, and everything. So you'd have to configure and troubleshoot that as well and you would get points for the same thing. It builds a lot of comradery with all of us having to sit there for 6 hours after school and like, we're getting tired. It's a Friday night, everyone's a little bit loopy and all we've eaten is pizza for 6 hours. [laughs] DAVE: Well, that's a good jumpstart to your career, I think. [laughs] EMILY: Yes, for sure. MANDY: So while in college, I'm guessing that – well, I'm assuming that you've been pretty impacted by COVID and doing in-person learning versus online learning. How's that been for you? EMILY: I've actually found it pushes me to challenge the status quo. Online college classes, for the most part, the lectures aren't that helpful. They're not that great. So I had to pick up a lot of skills, like learning to teach myself, reading books, and figuring out ways to discern if I needed to research something further, if I really understood it yet, or not. That's a really hard question to ask actually is if you don't have the knowledge, how do you know that you don't have that knowledge? That's something I kind of had – it's a skill that you have to work on. So that is something I developed over the time when we were online and I've actually also done – I worked time for a year after high school and I took mostly online classes at the community college. Those skills started there, too and then I just built on them when I came to Virginia Tech and we had COVID happen. DAVE: Actually, I'd like to ask about that community college time. I know you had an interesting path into Virginia Tech, one that I'm really interested in for my own kids as well. Can you talk about that? EMILY: Yeah. So I, out of high school, always thought I'm going to – I'm a first-generation student. My parents did not go to college. They went to the military and grandparents before them. So I had always had it in my head that I am going to go and get that 4-year degree. That's what I want for myself. At the end of high school, I applied to Virginia Tech. I had a dream school. I wanted to go to Georgia Tech. They rejected me. Oh, well, that dream shot. I need to find something new. So I applied to Virginia Tech thinking it was going to be a safe bet. It's an in-state school, I was a very good student; they would never reject me and so, I applied for the engineering program and I was rejected. They did admit me for the neuroscience program, but it wasn't going to be what I wanted and I was realizing that I did not like either chemistry, or biology, so that would never work. And then at the same time, because of my work with CyberPatriot, I was able to get an internship in network engineering at a college not too far from where I lived. After I graduated high school, they offered me a job as a network engineer, which I took because my team was fantastic, I really liked my manager, and I was comfortable there. I took this job and I said, “Okay, I'm going to keep working on the college thing because it's what I always wanted for myself.” So I just signed up for community college and that was pretty tough working a full-time and doing community college until 11 o'clock at night and getting up the next day and doing it all over again. And from there, I decided that Virginia Tech was going to be the best option for me, just from a very logical perspective. I kind of thought Virginia Tech was a bit cult-y. I was never really gung-ho about going, but it made the most sense being an in-state school that's very well-known. I worked through community college and I applied to Virginia Tech again after 1 year at community college and they rejected me again. so I was like, “Oh no, now what do I do I?” And I realized I needed to make use of the guaranteed transfer program. One of the really cool things in Virginia at least is that a lot of the state schools have agreements with the community college, where if you get an associates with a specific GPA, you can transfer into that program and the university and your transfer's guaranteed, they can't reject you. So I was like, “Aha, they can't get rid of me this time.” Yeah, I did it and it's kind of a messy process. I actually went into that in a blog post on David has a nonprofit called Loudoun Codes. I wrote a blog post for his website and detailed that entire – being a transfer student is hard because there's a lot of credits that may not get transferred over because Virginia Tech is a little bit – all 4-year colleges are a little bit elitist in their attitude towards community college and they didn't take some of the credits that I had, which put me behind quite far, even though I had that knowledge, they said I didn't. So that added on some extra time and some extra summer semesters while I was at Tech. ARTY: Yeah. I did something similar with doing community college and then what you're talking about with the whole elitist attitude with the transfer and having a whole bunch of your credits not transferring and I'm definitely familiar with that whole experience. DAVE: Yeah. EMILY: And even now that I think about it, I remember community college, too. It's built for one specific type of student, which is great. I think they're really good at helping people who just weren't present, or weren't able to do the work and make the progress in high school. They're really good at helping those types of students. But as someone who did a whole bunch of AP classes, had a crazy GPA, they just didn't really know how to handle me. They said, “Okay, you've tested out of pretty much all of our math classes, but you are still lacking some credits.” So I had to take multi-variable calculus in community college in order to get credit to replace the fact that I tested out of pre-cal and which was kind of silly, but in the long run, it was great because I hear multi-variable calculus at Tech is pretty hard. But definitely, there's a lot of bureaucratic nonsense about college. Education is important. It's great. I've learned a lot of things, but there's still all these old ways of thinking and people are just not ready for change in college a lot of the time. The people who make decisions that is. DAVE: Well, I'd like to ask a little bit about the computer science curriculum that you've had and the angle I'm asking from when I worked at LivingSocial, I worked with one of the first group of people that had graduated from our bootcamp program and had transferred from other careers, spent 12 weeks learning software engineering skills, and then were integrated with a group of software engineers at LivingSocial. We would occasionally get into conversations about, well, if I learned to be a software engineer in 12 weeks, what do you learn in 4 years of college? So we started to do these internal brown bags that were kind of the Discovery Channel version of computer science. A lot of that material I've since recycled into the presentations I do at high school. But for your typical person who might have sidelined into this career from a different perspective, what's been your curriculum like? EMILY: I really like the parts of the curriculum that had technical depth because coming into it at my level, that's what I was lacking in certain areas. I had built the foundation really strong, but the details of it, I didn't have. The classes that Virginia Tech, like the notorious systems class and a cybersecurity class I have taken this semester, that have gone in detail with technology and pushed what I understood, those were my most valuable classes. There was a lot of it that I would've been happy without [laughs] because I'm not sure it will apply so much to my life going forward. I'm a very practical person. Engineer mindset; I don't want to worry about things that can actually be applied to the real world so much. So for me this semester, actually, it's been really challenging because I've taken a data structures and algorithms class where we're talking about NP complete versus NP hard, and what it would mean if we could solve an NP complete problem in polynomial time. It's really hard to care. It's really hard to see how that [laughs] helps. It's interesting from a pure math perspective, but coming into it as someone who was already in the adult world and very grounded, it feels like bloat. DAVE: Yeah. That stuff is interesting if you're are designing databases, but most of us are just using databases and that – [overtalk] EMILY: Right. DAVE: Stuff is all kind of baked in. EMILY: Yeah. DAVE: For the average person on a technical career path, we're far more interested in the business problems than the math problems. ARTY: I'm curious, too. There's also lots of stuff that seems like it's missing in college curriculum from just really fundamental things that you need to know as a software engineer. So did you have things like source control and continuous integration? I think back to my own college experience and I didn't learn about source control until I got out of college. [laughs] And why is that? Why is that? It seems so backwards because there's these fundamental things that we need to learn and within 4 years, can we not somehow get that in the curriculum? I'm wondering what your experience has been like. EMILY: So Virginia Tech, I think the CS department head is actually really good at being reflective because he requires every senior to take a seminar class as they exit. It's a one credit class; it's mostly just feedback for the school and I think it's really cool because he asks all of us to make a presentation, just record ourselves talking over some slides about our experience and the things we would change. That really impressed me that this guy who gets to make so many decisions is listening to the people who are just kind of peons of the system and what I said was that there are certain classes that they give background knowledge. Like there's one in particular where it's essentially the closest crossover we have with the electrical engineering department and it's really painful, as someone who works with software, to try and put myself in a hardware mindset working with AND gates, OR gates, and all that, and trying to deal with these simulated chips. It's awful and then it never comes back. We never talk about again in the curriculum and it's a prerequisite for the systems class, which has nothing at all to do with that, really. This segues into another thing. I've had an internship while I've been at Virginia Tech that's a web consultant role, or a development consultant role with a company called Acceleration. They run just a small office in Blacksburg and they have a really cool business model. They take students at Virginia Tech and at Radford, a neighboring school, and they have us work with clients on real software development projects. They pair us with mentors who have 5, 10 years of experiences, software consultants, and we get to learn all those things that school doesn't teach us. So that's actually how I learned Git, Scrum, and all that stuff that isn't taught in college even now and I went back to the CS department head and I said, “Replace that class with the class that teaches us Git, Scrum, Kanban, and even just a brief overview of Docker, AWS, and the concepts so that people have a foundation when they try to go to work and they're trying to read all this documentation, or they're asked to build a container image and they have no idea what it's talking about, or what it's for.” Yeah, going back to the original question, no, I didn't learn version control in college, but the weird thing is that I was expected to know it in my classes without ever being taught it because, especially in the upper level like 3,004 level, or 1,000 level classes, they have you work on group projects where Git is essential and some of them, especially the capstone project, are long-term projects and you really need to use Scrum, or use some sort of methodology rather than just the how you would treat a two-week project. Actually, it's interesting because David was my sponsor on my capstone project in college and he really helped my team with the whole project planning, sprint planning, and just understanding how Scrum and all that works and what it's for. DAVE: Yeah. I just shared a link that is a series of videos from MIT called The Missing Semester of Your Computer Science Education that talks about Git, version control and command line, using the back shell, stuff about using a database, how to use a debugger; just all that kind of stuff is stuff that you're expected to know, but never formally taught. ARTY: What about unit testing? EMILY: Okay. So that's an interesting exception to the rule, but I don't think they really carried it through, through my entire experience at Tech. So in the earlier classes, we were actually forced to write unit tests that was part of our assignments and they would look to see that we had – I think we had to have a 100% testing coverage, or very close to it. So that was good, but then it kind of dropped away as we went to the upper-level classes and you just had to be a good programmer and you had to know to test small chunks of your code because we'd have these massive projects and there would be a testing framework to see if the entire thing worked, but there was no unit testing, really. Whereas, at work in my internship, unit tests are paramount, like [laughs], we put a huge emphasis on that. ARTY: So earlier Emily, you had had mentioned teaching people that had no experience at all and the challenge of trying to be able to help and support people and learning to understand regardless of what their gap was in existing experience. So what are some of the ideas, principles, things that you've learned on how to do that effectively? EMILY: That's a really tough question because I've worked on building intuition rather than a set of rules. But I think a few of the major things probably are thinking about it long enough beforehand, because there's always a lot of background context that they need. Usually, you don't present a solution before you've presented the problem and so, it's important to spend time thinking about that and especially how you're going to order concepts. I've noticed, too with some of the best teachers I've had in college is they were very careful with the order in which they introduced topics to build the necessary context and that's something that's really important with complete beginners. The thing is sometimes you have to build that context very quickly, which the best trick I have for that is just to create an analogy that has nothing to do with technology at all, create it out of a shared experience that you have, or something that they've probably experienced. Like a lot of times analogies for IP addressing use the mailing service, houses on a street and things like that, things that are common to our experience. I guess, maybe that's the foundation of it is you're trying to figure out what you have in common with this person that can take them from where they are to where you are currently and that requires a lot of social skills, intuition, and practice, so. DAVE: That's a really good observation because one of the things I find teaching high school, and this has been a skill I've had to learn, is being able to put my mindset in the point of view of the student that I need to go to where they are and use a good metaphor analogy to bring them up a step. That's a real challenge to be able to strip away all the knowledge I have and be like, “Oh, this must be the understanding of the problem they have” and try to figure out how to walk them forward. EMILY: Yeah. DAVE: That's a valuable skill. EMILY: I think that's really rewarding, though because when I see in their eyes that they've understood it, or I watch them solve the problem, then I know that I did it well and that's really rewarding. It's like, okay, cool. I got them to where I wanted them to be. ARTY: Reminds me. I was helping out mentoring college students for a while and I hadn't really been involved with college for a really long time. I was working with folks that knew very, very little and it was just astounding to me one, just realizing how much I actually knew. That's easy to take for granted. But also, just that if you can dial back and be patient, it's really rewarding I found to just be able to help people, to see that little light go on where they start connecting the dots and they're able to make something appear on the screen for the first time. That experience of “I made that! I made that happen.” I feel like that's one of the most exciting things about software and in programming is that experience of being able to create and make something come to life in that way. Just mentoring as an experience is something, I think is valuable in a lot of ways beyond just the immediate being able to help someone things, like it's a cool experience being a mentor as well. EMILY: And I think it's really important, too as a mentor to have good mentors yourself. I was really lucky to have David just show up in my high school one day [laughs] and I've been really lucky consistently with the mentors in my life. In my internship that I mentioned, I worked with fantastic engineers who are really good teachers. It's difficult to figure out how to good teacher without having first had good teachers yourself and regardless of the level of experience I have, I think I will always want to have that mentor relationship so that I can keep learning. One of the things, too is a lot of my mentors are quite different from mine. Like I am a very quiet introvert person. I would not say I'm very charismatic. I would say David is the opposite of all those things. So wanting to build those skills myself, it's good to have a role model who has them. DAVE: Well, thank you for that compliment. EMILY: Yeah. MANDY: That's really interesting that you said to find mentor that's the opposite of yourself. I literally just heard the same thing said by a different person last week that was like, “Yeah, you should totally find someone who you want to be, or emulate,” and I thought that was really good advice. EMILY: I agree with that completely. There's a lot of conversation around diversity in computer science and that's definitely a problem. Women do not have the representation they should, like I've always gone through classes and been 1 of 3 women in the class. [chuckles] But I think one of the ways in which we can approach this, besides just increasing the enrollment number, is focusing on commonalities—kind of what I mentioned before— from the perspective of mentors who are different than their students. Maybe a male mentor trying to mentor a female student. Focusing on your commonalities rather than naturally gravitating towards people who are like you; trying to find commonalities with people who are different from you. I think that's important. From the student perspective, it's less about finding commonalities more about, like you said, finding the things you want to emulate. Looking at other groups of people and figuring out what they're good at and what things you would like to take from them. [laughs] So. DAVE: Yeah, that's been an interesting challenge I've noticed in the school system is that in the elementary school years, boys and girls are equally competent and interested in this material. By the time they get to high school, we have that 70/30 split of males versus females. In the middle school, the numbers are all over place, but in the formal classes, it seems to be at 70/30 split by 7th grade and I can't really find any single root cause that causes that. Unfortunately, I think I saw some stuff this week with Computer Science Education Week where students as young as first grade are working with small robots in small groups and there always seems to be the extrovert boy that is like, “It's a robot. I'm going to be the one that plays with it,” and he gatekeeps access to girls who are like, “It's my turn.” It's really discouraging to see that behavior ingrained at such a young age. Any attempt I try to address it at the high school level – well, not any attempt, but I feel like a lot of times I can come off as the creepy old guy trying to encourage high school age girls to be more interested in computer science. It's a hard place for me to be. EMILY: Yeah. I don't think you're the creepy old guy. [laughter] I think this is a larger topic in society right now is it's ingrained in women to be meek and to not be as confident, and that's really hard to overcome. That sounds terrible. I don't think people consciously do that all the time. I don't think men are consciously trying to speak over women all the time, but it it's definitely happened to me all over the place—it's happened at work, it's happened in interviews. I think getting over that is definitely really tough, but some of the things that have helped me are to see and celebrate women's accomplishments. Like every time I hear about Grace Hopper, it makes me so happy. I know one time in high school, David took a few other female students and I to a celebration of women's accomplishments and the whole thing, there were male allies there, but the topic of the night was women bragging loudly about the things that they've accomplished. Because that's not something that's encouraged for us to do, but it's something that it builds our confidence and also changes how other people see us. Because the thing is, it's easy to brag and it's saddening that people will just implicitly believe that the more you say you did. So the more frequently you brag about how smart you are, the more inclined people are to believe it because we're pretty suggestible as humans. When women don't do that, that subtly over time changes the perspective of us. We have to, very intently – I can't think of a word I'm trying to say, but be very intentional about bragging about ourselves regardless of how uncomfortable it is, regardless of whether we think we deserve it, or not. MANDY: I also think it's really important for women to also amplify other women, like empowered women empower women. So when we step up and say, “Look at this thing Emily did, isn't that cool?” EMILY: Yeah. MANDY: That's something that we should be doing to highlight and amplify others' accomplishments. EMILY: For sure. I've been to the Grace Hopper conference virtually because it was during COVID times, but that was a huge component of it was there would be these networking circles where women just talk about the amazing things that they've done and you just meet all these strangers who have done really cool things. It goes in both directions, like you said, you get to raise them up and also be encouraged yourself and have something to look forward to. ARTY: It sounds like just being exposed to that culture was a powerful experience for you. EMILY: For sure. ARTY: I was thinking about our conversation earlier about role models and finding someone to look up to that you're like, “You're a really cool person. I admire you.” Having strong women as role models makes it much easier for us to operate a certain way when we interact with other people, and stay solid within ourself and confident within ourself and not cave in. When all the examples around us of women are backing off, caving in, and just being submissive in the way that they interact with the world, those are the sort of patterns we pick up and learn. Likewise, the mixed gender conversations and things that happen. We pick up on those play of dynamics, the things that we see, and if we have strong role models, then it helps us shift those other conversations. So if we have exp more experience with these things, like the Grace Hopper conference and being able to go into these other that have a culture built around strong women and supporting being a strong woman, then you can take some of those things back with you in these other environments and then also be a role model for others. Because people see you being strong and standing up for yourself, being confident and they might have the same reaction to you of like, “Wow, I really admire her. She's really cool.” And then they start to emulate those things too. So these cultural dynamics, they spread and it's this subconscious spreading thing that happens. But maybe if we can get more experiences in these positive environments, we can iteratively take some of those things back with us and influence our other environments that, that maybe aren't so healthy. EMILY: Yeah. I agree. And I think also, it's important to be honest and open about where you started because it's easy, if you're a really confident woman walking into the room, for people to think you've always been that way. I think it's important to tell the stories about when you weren't, because that's how other people are going to connect with you and see a path forward for themselves. Definitely. I'll start by telling a story. I think it's just a million small experiences. I was a strong student in high school. I was very good at math. We had study halls where we'd sit in the auditorium and we'd all be doing homework, and students would often go to the guy in my math class who knew less than I did and ask for help. I would just sit there and listen to him poorly help the other students and mostly just brag about himself, and just be quiet and think about how angry it made me, but not really be able to speak up, or say anything. I'm very different now. Because of the exposure that I've had, I am much more quick to shut that down and to give a different perspective when someone's acting that way. MANDY: But how cool would it have been if that guy would've been like, “Don't ask me, ask Emily”? DAVE: That's a really important point because I hear women talk about this problem all the time and I don't think the solution is a 100% in the women's hands. I think that it's men in the room. My own personal experience, most of my career has been spent in government contracting space and, in that space, the percentage of women to men is much higher. It's still not great, but I think there's a better attempt at inclusion during recruiting. I think that there's a lot of just forces in that environment that are more amenable to that as a career path for women. And then when I started consultancy with my two business partners, Kim and Karen, that was an unheard-of thing that I had two women business partners and at the time we started it, I didn't think it was that big of a deal at all. But then we were suddenly in the commercial space and people thought it was some scam I was running to be a minority owned company and my partner was my wife, or I'd go into a meeting and somebody thought I brought a secretary and I was like, “No, she's an engineer and she's good, if not better than me.” It opened my eyes to the assumptions that people make about what the consulting rates even should be for men versus women and it's in that environment I learned that I had to speak up. I had to represent to be a solution to that problem. I think you can get in an argument with other guys where they aren't even convinced there's a problem to solve. They'll start talking about, “Oh, well, women just aren't as interested in this career path.” It's like, I've known plenty that are and end up leaving. EMILY: I think definitely having support from both sides has been really important because it is typically men in places of authority and to have them be encouraging and not necessarily forcing you into the spotlight, but definitely trying to raise you up and encourage you to speak out means a lot. ARTY: Yeah. I found most of the teams I've been on, I was the only woman on the team, or one of two maybe and early on, when nobody knows you, people make a lot of assumptions about things. The typical thing I've seen happen is when you've got a woman programmer is often, the bit is flipped pretty early on of that oh, she doesn't know what she's doing and stuff, we don't need to listen to what she says kind of thing and then it becomes those initial conversations and how things are framed, tend to affect a lot of how the relationships on the team are moving forward. One of the things that I learn as just an adaptive thing is I was really smart. So what I do, the first thing on the team I'd find out what the hardest problem was, that none of the guys could solve and figure it out, and then I would go after that one. My first thing on the team, I would go and tackle the hardest thing. I found that once you kick the ass of the biggest baddy on the yard, respect. [laughter] So I ended up not having problems moving forward and that the guys would be more submissive toward me, even as opposed to the other way around. But it's like you come into a culture that is dominated by certain ways of thinking in this masculine hierarchy, alpha male thing going on and if that's the dominant culture, you have to learn to play that game and stake yourself in that game. Generally speaking, in this engineering world, intelligence is fairly respected. So I've at least found that that's been a way for me to operate and be able to reset that playing field anyway. MID-ROLL: This episode is supported by Compiler, an original podcast from Red Hat discussing tech topics big, small, and strange. Compiler unravels industry topics, trends, and the things you've always wanted to know about tech, through interviews with the people who know it best. On their show, you will hear a chorus of perspectives from the diverse communities behind the code. Compiler brings together a curious team of Red Hatters to tackle big questions in tech like, what is technical debt? What are tech hiring managers actually looking for? And do you have to know how to code to get started in open source? I checked out the “Should Managers Code?” episode of Compiler, and I thought it was interesting how the hosts spoke with Red Hatters who are vocal about what role, if any, that managers should have in code bases—and why they often fight to keep their hands on keys for as long as they can. Listen to Compiler on Apple Podcasts, or anywhere you listen to podcasts. We'll also include a link in the show notes. Our thanks to Compiler for their support. ARTY: Well, speaking of games, Arty, one of the things that Emily mentions in her bio is playing Dungeons and Dragons and this is an area where as well as I know Emily from her high school years, this is not something I know much about Emily at all. So I'd like to talk about that. Play, or DM, Emily? EMILY: Both. But I really enjoy DMing because it's all about creating problems to solve, in my opinion, like you throw out a bunch of story threads. The way I approach things is I try actually, unlike a lot of DMs, I do not do a lot of world building for places my players haven't been. I pretty much, there are bright light at the center of the world and anything the light doesn't touch doesn't exist. I haven't written it and I don't really look at it that often. So I'm constantly throwing out story threads to try and see what they latch onto and I'll dive into their character backstory to see what they are more predisposed to be interested in. It's like writing a weekly web comic. You don't have necessarily a set beginning and end and you don't really know where you're going to end up in between, but you end up with all these cool threads and you can tie them together in new and interesting ways. Just seeing the connections between those and being able to change what you want something to be on the fly is really cool and just very stimulating mentally for me. So it's like a puzzle exercise the whole time and it is also an interesting social exercise because you're trying to balance the needs of each person. I feel like D&D allows you to know people on a really deep level, because a lot of times, our characters are just – that we're playing. I guess, I didn't really explain what D&D is; I just made an assumption that people would know. It's a tabletop role playing game where you make a character. You're usually heroic and you're going about on this adventure trying to help people solve problems and these characters tend to be just naturally an extension of ourselves. So you get to see all the things that subconsciously the person doesn't real about themselves, but that show up in their character. I think that's really cool. DAVE: So do you have a weekly game, or how often do you play? EMILY: I try to run a weekly game. College often gets in the way. [laughs] DAVE: How many players? EMILY: It ranges from 3 to 4, sometimes 5. It's really cool because it's also, most of them are people that I met during the pandemic. So we've played predominantly online and this is the way we've gotten to know each other. We've become really close in the year, or so since we started playing together through the game that I DM and through the game that one other person in the group DMs and it's cool. It's definitely a way to kind of transcend the boundaries of Zoom and of video calls in general. DAVE: Hmm. ARTY: How did you end up getting into that? EMILY: It was just a friend group in high school. Someone said, “Hey, I would like to run a Dungeon and Dragons game. Do you want to play?” And I said, “Oh, what's that?” I've always loved books and reading so it was kind of a natural progression to go from reading a story to making a story collaboratively with other people. So that just immediately, I had a connection with it and I loved the game and that's been a huge part of my hobbies and my outside of tech life ever since. DAVE: Yeah. I played D&D as a kid in the late 70s, early 80s, but my mom took all my stuff away from me when that Tom Hanks movie came out that started the whole Satan panic thing. So I didn't play for a long time until my own kids were interested after getting hooked on Magic. Seeing my own kids interested in D&D, the story building, the writing, the math that they had to do, like I don't know why any parent wouldn't encourage their kids to play this game. It's just phenomenal. The collaborative, creative, sharing, math; it's got everything. EMILY: Yeah. I'm an introverted person so it takes a lot to make me feel motivated to be in a group with other people consistently, but D&D does that and it does it in a way that's not, I guess, prohibitive to people who are naturally shy. Because you're pretending to be someone else and you're not necessarily having to totally be yourself and you're able to explore the world through a lens that you find comfortable. DAVE: That's really cool. EMILY: I guess, also, it kind of goes back to our conversation about teaching. Being a DM, a lot of my players are people who have not played before, or very, very new. Like, maybe they've read a lot about it, maybe they've watched them [43:18] shows, but they maybe haven't necessarily played. D&D does require a lot of math and there's a lot of optimization, like you can get very into the weeds with your character sheet trying to make the most efficient battle machine, whatever and that's not really always approachable. Especially when I started introducing my younger siblings to D&D, I used versions, D&D like games that were similar, but not quite D&D. Like less math, a very similar amplified character sheets so you're looking at fewer numbers, or fewer calculations involved just to kind of get the essence, because there's a few core concepts in D&D. You have six statistics about your character that they change a little bit between different types of role-playing games, but they're pretty universal, I think for the most part. It's constitution, strength, dexterity, wisdom, intelligence, and charisma. Once you kind of nail those concepts down and once a person understands what those skills are supposed to mean, that really opens the gates to understanding a lot more about the core mechanics of D&D outside of the spell casting stuff and all the other math that's involved. I think just simplifying the game down to that makes them fall in love with the narrative and collaborative aspect of the game, and then be more motivated to figure out the math, if they weren't already predisposed to that. DAVE: So if somebody were interested in picking up a game trying to figure it out, where would they start? EMILY: It really to depends on the age group. If you're going to play with high school students, I would definitely say if none of you have played before, then pick up a player's handbook, maybe a dungeon master's guide if you're going to DM, you've never DM before because it gives a lot of tips for just dealing with the problems that arise in a collaborative storytelling game. And then probably just a prewritten module so you don't have to worry about building your own story, because these modules are stories that are written by professional game developers and you can take pieces of them and iterate it on yourself so you don't have to start with nothing. But if you are going for a much younger audience, I can't remember off the top of my head what it was, but it's essentially an animal adventure game. It's very much D&D without using the word D&D because I think it's a different company, it's copyrighted, and whatnot. But you have these little cute dog characters and they're trying to defeat an evil animal overlord who wants to ruin the town festival. It's very family friendly, like there's no death like there is in regular D&D and it's just a chance to engage with the character creation aspect of it. MANDY: That's really cool. So we're about heading towards our time, but I really appreciate you coming on the show, Emily and I wanted to just ask you, if you could give any advice to young girls looking to get into tech, or software engineering, what advice would you give them? EMILY: I think don't be afraid to walk off the path. A lot of my life has been kind of bucking the prewritten path that a lot of people are told is the best one because it didn't work for me, or whatever reason, and I think it's important just to not be afraid of that and to be courageous in making your own path. MANDY: That's great advice. So should we head into reflections, everyone? Who wants to start us off? DAVE: I'll start with one. I mentioned that when asked Emily about her path into college, that I was interested in a similar path for my own kids. I had a really strange college path that I started out a music major, ended up a computer science major, and had a non-traditional path. I've always believed that college is what you make of it, not where you went. Where you went might help you get your first job, but from then on, it's networking, it's personality, it's how well you did the job. Talking to Emily about her path, just reinforces that to me and helps me plot a path for what I might have my own children do. I have triplet boys that are in 9th grade. So we're starting to think about that path and not only would a path through Virginia Community College save us a fortune, [laughs] it would also be a guaranteed admission into Virginia Tech, or one of the Virginia schools so it's definitely something worth to consider. So I appreciate that knowledge, Emily. ARTY: I've been thinking a lot about how we can better teach people that don't have a lot of experience yet. We've got so much stuff going on in this field of software engineering and it's really easy to not realize how far that this plateau of knowledge that we live in and work with every day to do our jobs, and how important it is to bring up new folks that are trying to learn. One of the things you said, Emily was about teaching is being able to find those shared things where we've got a common understanding about something—you used metaphor of male delivery to talk about IP addresses, for example. But to be thinking in those ways of how do we find something shared and be able to get more involved with mentoring, reaching back, and helping support people to learn because software is super cool. It really is! We can build amazing, amazing things. It'd be awesome if more of us were able to get involved and have that experience and having good mentors, having good role models, all of those things make a big difference. MANDY: I just love the conversation that we had about men and women in technology and for me, I love to reiterate the fact that empowered women empower women and I even want to take that a step further by saying especially right now in our field, empowered men also empower women. So I think that that's something that really needs to be said and heard and not perceived as like Dave said oh, he felt like the creepy guy encouraging girls, or women to get involved in tech. I think it's cool. Dave has personally, he's mentored me. He's gotten me more interested. I used to do assistant work and now I'm learning programming and it's because I've been encouraged to do so by a lot of different men in the industry that I've been lucky to know. DAVE: Well, thank you, Mandy. You certainly have a who's who of mentors. MANDY: I am very, very lucky to know the people I know. DAVE: I'm quite honored to even be named on that list of people you know. [laughter] EMILY: I think the thought I keep coming back to is one that I've mentioned, but didn't really crystallize in my head until this morning when I was preparing for this recording is, I listened to David's interview and I thought about like, “Oh wow, he did really well on the podcast, all these things that I wish I did.” It really crystallized the idea that your mentor should be different from you and should have skills you don't, and you should seek them out for that reason. Mentors tend to be the people that I run into and I haven't really thought about it that way before, but that gives me a different perspective to go out and intentionally seek out those people. That definitely gives some food for thought for me. [laughs] MANDY: I love intentionally seeking out people who are different from myself in general, just to learn and get perspectives that I might have never even thought of before. But with that, I guess we will wrap up. Emily, it's been so nice having you on the show. Congratulations and best of luck on your exams. I know being – [overtalk] DAVE: I can't believe you took the time to do this with your exams coming up. MANDY: I know! EMILY: I'm procrastinating as hard as I can. [laughter] MANDY: But it's been so nice to have you on the show. Dave, thank you for coming and being a guest panelist and Arty, it's always wonderful to host with you. So I just wish everybody a happy new year and we'll see you next week! Special Guests: Dave Bock and Emily Haggard.

Atlanta Braves
The Buck Belue Show (01.04.2022)

Atlanta Braves

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 44:40


Hear "The Buck Belue Show" every weekday morning from 10-11a on 680 The Fan and 93.7 FM, the 680 The Fan App available on Apple and Android, with your Smart Speaker by saying Alexa or wherever you get and listen to your favorite podcast! Get the latest with the Georgia Bulldogs, Atlanta Braves, Atlanta Falcons, Georgia Tech, the World of College Football, newsmakers and more! Buck's BIG Take  Keys for the Dawgs to win the rematch against Alabama Buck Belue Show Headlines presented by Grease Monkey a big acquisition in the world of trading cards announced overnight Buck's College Football Nuggets presented by Ace Hardware Oklahoma QB Caleb Williams has entered the portal, is Georgia a fit? Falcons-Saints flexed? Looking for a replacement for Matt Ryan Georgia Bulldog Roundtable presented by Georgia's Own Credit Union, Georgia Pack and Load and Attorney Ken Nugent former Dawgs QB Aaron Murray talks about the upcoming game and a new venture he as start that allows you to support current players on the Georgia Football team Quarterback Club should Falcons go after this QB in the draft? The Final Word Trae Young goes off and sets records in a losing effort for the Hawks See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Packer And Durham
Hour 2: Malik Williams, LOU F

Packer And Durham

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 56:26


Louisville Forward Malik Williams joins the show fresh off their win against Georgia Tech and a 3-0 start for the Cardinals. Plus ESPN CFB Writer Bill Connelly visits with the guys to share his thoughts on where Miami football is right now. And we head to the courts & preview tonight's Florida State/Wake Forest matchup, NC State at Virginia Tech, and Virginia at Clemson.  

Locked On Blue Devils - Daily Podcast On Duke Blue Devils Football & Basketball
Duke Basketball vs. Georgia Tech Preview + Joey Baker's Improved Play

Locked On Blue Devils - Daily Podcast On Duke Blue Devils Football & Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 28:53


JJ Jackson chats with Duke Blogger Brian Horace about the play of Joey Baker this season, A.J. Griffin coming into form and preview the game between the Blue Devils and Georgia Tech. Twitter: @LO_BlueDevils | @_JJ_Jackson_ Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. NetSuite Over twenty-seven thousand businesses already use NetSuite and RIGHT NOW through the end of the year NetSuite is offering a one-of-a-kind financing program to those ready to upgrade at NetSuite.com/LOCKEDONNCAA. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Coast to Coast Hoops
1/4/2022-Coast To Coast Hoops

Coast to Coast Hoops

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 94:12


Greg recaps Monday's college basketball results, talks to Brendan Schaeffer, host of The Big Show for ESPN Radio KTGR in Missouri about the SEC in general & Tuesday's SEC games & Greg picks & analyzes EVERY Tuesday college basketball game. Podcast Highlights 1:33-Recap of Monday's results 9:07-Interview with Brendan Schaeffer 24:59-Start of picks with Ohio vs Akron 27:06-Picks & analysis for Auburn vs South Carolina 29:18-Picks & analysis for Eastern Michigan vs Western Michigan 31:26-Picks & analysis for Toledo vs Central Michigan 33:38-Picks & analysis for Texas A&M vs Georgia 36:01-Picks & analysis for Michigan vs Rutgers 38:09-Picks & analysis for Illinois vs Minnesota 40:15-Picks & analysis for Oklahoma vs Baylor 42:25-Picks & analysis for Kent St vs Ball St 44:12-Picks & analysis for LSU vs Kentucky 46:33-Picks & analysis for NC State vs VA Tech 48:51-Picks & analysis for Florida St vs Wake Forest 50:57-NY Post Pick Texas vs Kansas St 53:24-Picks & analysis for Butler vs Seton Hall 55:18-Picks & analysis for Vanderbilt vs Arkansas 57:10-Picks & analysis for Kansas vs Oklahoma St 59:31-Picks & analysis for Providence vs Marquette 1:01:34-Picks & analysis for Air Force vs Colorado St 1:03:57-Picks & analysis for Virginia vs Clemson 1:06:27-Picks & analysis for Georgia Tech vs Duke 1:08:33-Picks & analysis for Tulsa vs Memphis 1:11:26-Picks & analysis for Long Beach St vs CS Fullerton 1:13:43-Start of extra game picks with Colgate vs Lehigh 1:15:44-Picks & analysis for Holy Cross vs Loyola MD 1:17:55-Picks & analysis for Central Arkansas vs Eastern Kentucky 1:20:19-Picks & analysis for Liberty vs Stetson 1:22:51-Picks & analysis for Boston U vs Navy 1:25:12-Picks & analysis for Army vs Bucknell 1:27:15-Picks & analysis for North Alabama vs Lipscomb Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Atlanta Braves
The Buck Belue Show (01.03.2022)

Atlanta Braves

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 43:43


Hear "The Buck Belue Show" every weekday morning from 10-11a on 680 The Fan and 93.7 FM, the 680 The Fan App available on Apple and Android, with your Smart Speaker by saying Alexa or wherever you get and listen to your favorite podcast! Get the latest with the Georgia Bulldogs, Atlanta Braves, Atlanta Falcons, Georgia Tech, the World of College Football, newsmakers and more! Buck's BIG Take we are getting an SEC Championship rematch in the National Championship of Dawgs and Tide and Buck has 5 things the Dawgs need to do in order not have a repeat of the outcome from the earlier matchup The Mailman Stetson Bennett Delivers, looking good in the Orange Bowl against Michigan and gets a tip of the cap from former Dawgs QB Buck Belue Headlines presented by Grease Monkey Atlanta Falcons QB Matt Ryan penalized for taunting and we hear from Matt Ryan on the penalty  Buck's College Football Nuggets presented by Ace Hardware Ole Miss Matt Corral will be ok and Buck gives his thoughts on the comments made by ESPN's Kirk Herbstreit Alabama Weakness? As the rematch of Georgia/Alabama approaches, Buck does see one difference in this Alabama team since the SEC Championship that he hopes Georgia can take advantage of NFL Top 5, 5 takeaways from this past weekend in the NFL Georgia Bulldog Roundtable presented by Georgia's Own Credit Union, Georgia Pack and Load and Attorney Ken Nugent College Football Hall of Famer and Georgia Legend Kevin Butler talks about the win over Michigan in the Orange Bowl and looks ahead to the matchup against Alabama The Final Word Atlanta lost a sports Icon over the weekend and Buck remembers his friend   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duke Basketball Report
#375 - Duke prepares for Georgia Tech

Duke Basketball Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 35:26


The Duke Men's Basketball Team is starting its return from a Covid outbreak that sidelined the team for the better part of two weeks. They are scheduled to be back in action tomorrow night against the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets, and the DBR Podcast crew is here to preview the game on Episode 375! First, Coach K spoke to the media this morning and gave some insight on what the team had been dealing with during the Covid pause. With most of the team and coaching staff sidelined due to the infectious virus, the team is just started to return to practice today. The crew discusses what that means for a team that hasn't played since December 22nd. Expect more rotations and a deeper bench against the Yellow Jackets, along with the rust that comes with a ramp up in conditioning. After the break, we break down Georgia Tech and what we can expect tomorrow night. They're a team that doesn't have big wins, and there are some areas where Duke has a clear advantage. We discuss the eye test as well as the advanced metrics along with how Duke may match up against the Yellow Jackets. We've received a ton of emails after our mailbag episode, and we're answering them as quickly as we can! Continue to send your questions to DBR Podcast at Gmail dot com, and when we have another lull in the action, we will take the time on the show to answer a few of them! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Locked On ACC- Daily College Football & Basketball Podcast
Louisville Women's Basketball Gets 12th Straight After Win Against Georgia Tech; Why ACC Women's Hoops is Must Watch TV

Locked On ACC- Daily College Football & Basketball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 36:43


Louisville Cardinals get their 12th win on the year after beating tough Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets; ACC finished 2-4 in bowl games this year, can the conference ever get on the CFP main stage with multiple teams? ACC Men's Hoops weekend recap and what to look forward to on Tuesday. Can Duke get back on track after COVID pause. Follow @LockedOnACC on Twitter & Subscribe on YouTube. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. NetSuite Over twenty-seven thousand businesses already use NetSuite and RIGHT NOW through the end of the year NetSuite is offering a one-of-a-kind financing program to those ready to upgrade at NetSuite.com/LOCKEDONNCAA. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Packer And Durham
Hour 3: Malik Osborne, FSU F

Packer And Durham

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 50:40


Florida State Basketball Forward Malik Osborne joins the show after beating NC State on Saturday in Raleigh. And Louisville Forward Emily Engstler visits with the guys fresh off her game winning shot against Georgia Tech.. Plus we recap all the weekend's hoops action and look ahead to some key matchups this week.

The Red Zone With Nick Coffey
1.3: New Year, Right Foot

The Red Zone With Nick Coffey

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 117:41


Nick reacts to Louisville's win over Georgia Tech and also talks bowls and more basketball. Plus, Fast Five.

Lost in the Stacks: the Research Library Rock'n'Roll Radio Show
Encore of Episode 352: More Publishing, More Problems

Lost in the Stacks: the Research Library Rock'n'Roll Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 60:34


Guest: Dr. Mike Filler of Georgia Tech. First broadcast July 28 2017. Playlist at https://www.wrek.org/2017/07/playlist-for-lost-in-the-stacks-from-friday-july-28th-more-publishing-more-problems-episode-352/ "Let's start with the good news first."

The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast

Avi Kumar is Founder and CEO of Kuware, an almost 14-year-old business that bills itself “as a full-service agency, but a little bit more focused on strategy than actual implementation.” The shift away from “traditional marketing services and taking customers as they came” started 5 years ago. Today, the agency works with clients who want to put some strategy behind their efforts and are less concerned about the agency providing implementation. Avi says it was very difficult when the agency first made that transition to, while it was trying to grow the business, turn away customers that did not have a strategy focus. Current clients not only need be willing to work with Kuware's fractional CMO to develop a strategy . . . they also have to be ambitious about “big growth,” have funding or be ready to move to the next level, or to be invested in brick-and-mortar with a solid, fixed budget. When all the pieces are In place, the agency can say, “Get the whole package. We can really move you to the next level.”  If a prospective client is not yet serious about their business, they are not ready for Kuware. The planning process takes a few months. Although written for a longer period of time, the agency contract allows a client to fire the agency within the first month. This tasks the agency to provide enough proof within that first month to gain a client's trust that the value that will come. In this interview, Avi describes the challenge for a growing agency of deciding “who to turn away.” The agency does not “fire” its small, established clients . . . but once a new monthly billing threshold Is set (based on its 50% billing “midpoint”), it will not take on new customers that fall below that threshold. The agency keeps developing processes to meet client needs and raising that threshold as more clients come onboard. Avi addresses in detail the impacts of hiring in changing an agency, managing its expenses, and determining people's perceptions of an agency's capabilities. Avi started his career as an engineer, a microprocessor architect. On sabbatical from Intel, Avi decided to try ecommerce, did very well at it, and used it as an “on-ramp” to marketing. To ensure controllable costs and fast client service, the agency maintains a salaried development team in Avi's home-country, India. He pays everyone 20% over the market, so that in the 11 years the company has been in India, “nobody has quit.” The agency recently acquired a white-label PPC service which helps small agencies provide reasonably priced PPC for small niches in local markets. The PPC service is separate from Kuware's agency operations, but the agencies which use it are the same small agencies to which Kuware refers clients that don't fit its criteria. Avi can be found on LinkedIn, on his agency's website at: https://kuware.com/, or at: Avi@kuware.com. ROB: Welcome to the Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast. I'm your host, Rob Kischuk, and I am joined today by Avi Kumar, Founder and CEO at Kuware based in Austin, Texas. Welcome to the podcast, Avi. AVI: Thank you, Rob. Thank you for inviting me to this. ROB: It's good to have you on. You're from one of those popular cities where everybody's moving to in Austin, Texas, but let's focus on Kuware for a moment here. Why don't you tell us about the firm and where you specialize?  AVI: Certainly. Kuware is now coming up on its 14th year as a business. We right now bill ourselves as a full-service agency, but a little bit more focused on strategy than actual implementation. We do do the implementation, but what we found is what was lacking for a lot of businesses is they needed to figure out what kind of marketing they should do because just saying, “Just do Facebook ads” or “Just do this or that.” So we added that layer five years back, and we service it through a fractional CMO or a part-time CMO who comes on board and helps guide the strategy, and then go to the implementation. That's what, in five years, we have evolved to. Before that, we were more traditional, just taking on business as it came in a sense. If somebody wants ads, okay, we'll do it. Need websites, being full-service, we'll do that. But now we only take clients who want the strategy as part of it and who want to spend time figuring things out before implementing it. So that's what we have evolved and started specializing that way. ROB: That can be a pretty difficult transition. Lots of people start an agency as the order-takers, the people who can say, “What's your budget? We'll do our darndest with it. What are you trying to do? You want clicks, here's your clicks.” How do you take someone who comes to you and they think they know what they want – there is this challenger sale moment where you're like, “Hey, wait a minute, let's take a step back. What do you really want?” Sometimes they're like, “No, I just want this ad. I just want to spend this budget. That's my job.” AVI: That's an excellent point. For us, I discovered this process along the way. We had some clients that had a few people in-house who were doing social media. We did their website and we managed the ecommerce and we were trying to do that. Then slowly, as I got to know the client for a while – and this client was with us for almost 10 years – after a few years, I said to them, “You know that person you keep hiring for social media and they keep quitting after six months? Why don't you give us that, too?” They said, “Okay, you got it. Makes sense.” Then I said, “Who's planning your marketing?” They hired somebody, a new person, young, assuming that they knew what they're doing, and in a year and a half they quit. So, I said, “What if we manage the whole thing for a fixed price for you? We'll do the strategy.” So that's how we started. This was a company, a brand of sunglasses, prescription glasses. They created the category. In this case, being a single owner business, but a pretty good-sized business, we fine-tuned this, and then we convinced them, “Hey, you should sell direct. Don't just sell through opticians only. Why don't you sell direct also?” They said, “No way. Our retailers would be mad.” So, we figured out a strategy, convinced them, and they almost doubled their sales without losing any retailers. Then I learned that this is what they needed – a little bit of the business side, but marketing-centric. If I go and build myself as a business consultant, it'll be hard to explain that. Most marketers do give some business advice for free and some marketing strategy for free. So, I said, “Well, this client was willing to pay, and he sold.” They sold the company to Hilco. Much larger, $300 million company. They kept us around for a year because they were actually amazed at what we could do with our team. And they had a 50-people marketing team. They let us run this, and then eventually they absorbed it in-house. That was the time I said, “Okay, we can do this for other clients and start selling it.” The hardest point was what you did identify: if somebody comes to us, “We've just got $2,000” – turning down that $2,000 was hard, because you're still building the agency. They're willing to give you $2,000 per month for a few months. We had to tell them, “Sorry, we don't do that anymore. You should really spend money to figure out what you need and then plan.” The other thing we started realizing is that this only works for companies who really think they want to double, triple, or who are brick-and-mortar who have fixed money already and they have a fixed budget. It doesn't work for somebody who's just trying and playing and not serious about the business. They need to be somebody who's also ambitious. Either they've got funding, or they have decided now to really move to the next stage. Only then can we tell them, “Get the whole package. We can really move you to the next level.” The other challenge is this stuff takes time, a few months. We sign them up for longer, but we have a deal that you can fire us within the first month. So, we've got to do enough in the first month to buy in their trust that, “These guys are not just planning. They're actually saying things which make sense.” It took us a while, but we do have a system now where we are able to show them within a month the value that will come. Even if actual sales might not happen, they will see enough plans to say, “This will work” and continue on a longer term contract. As a small agency, that's the thing you've got to decide at some point, who to turn away. We keep increasing the threshold – “This much, no, this much, no, this much, no,” and then we moved on from there. It was a transition, for sure. ROB: What size metric would you use to describe that you were at when you felt like you needed to start cutting off this low-end, very transactional customer? AVI: Basically, in size metrics, what we said is that when we switched to more than 50% who we were billing at least $5k a month, then we said we might lose some – we didn't fire any client if they were small ones. But we said, “We won't take anymore, because we have proven that more than 50% of our revenue comes from these bigger clients who are willing to” – so that was our criteria. Once we get more than 50% of clients paying $5,000 a month and they are going for strategy – and usually the average client ends up at 20 to 25. So, we said, “Don't take anymore. Just existing ones.” We do have some for now, 12 years, existing clients working. We're still doing their social media. But it's a lot fewer of them. ROB: That also makes sense, how you're able to then incubate this capability within the firm. It's hard to go from not having an offering to having an offering, but when 50% of your clients need the service, you're able to start building the processes, building the people. You're not trying to go from nothing to something. You're saying, “Here's the offering. Now we know how to maybe repeat it a little bit.” AVI: Absolutely. By the way, the building process part – even though we've been doing this overall 13 years and the last 5 years, this – it's an ongoing process. It's never set as a cookie-cutter, ever. Things change and the business changes. What we have said is just agree to the fact that the process itself will be changing, but we need a process. That's what we've been doing. ROB: Processes are all about enablement. They're not about restrictions, they're not about tying hands. They create freedom. It's hard to feel that, because I'm not a process kind myself, but it's necessary, or else you go crazy. AVI: Yeah, absolutely. ROB: Avi, what led you into this business in the first place? What led you to start an agency and originally start taking some ad budgets and then continue figuring out what the business needed to be? AVI: I worked for a major corporation. I was a microprocessor architect. I worked on Pentium 4. I worked on some low power processors for Intel and going into Apple. It was a very different area. So, when I wanted to do something, I realized it's impossible, almost, to start a hardware business. You want to do chip design? It's very expensive. And I did try that for about a year. I had some funding from the Chinese government, but it didn't go very far. Then I had to pivot and say, okay, I want to do my own thing. My sabbatical came up; I left Intel. I wanted to start something different. I had enough money from Intel, from stock options, so I said, let's play the stock market and do things on the side. That's when I started looking at ecommerce and started doing and selling things from my connections in China online. This was 14 years back or so. I was not expecting to do well. Everybody knows so much SEO, they're talking about techniques, and I'm a hardware guy. And marketing – I mean, yeah, I did have an MBS somewhere along the line, but they don't teach you marketing there. It was more management. So, I was thinking this would never work. But soon I found I became the number one seller of Windows XP online, and an Adobe reseller, by just doing a few things online. That's what got me thinking, okay, if I can do this in three to four months, then I think I can help others too and create a business out of it. It seems like it's not as – the system, everybody's not exploited it yet. I used to assume that marketing guys knew everything; “How will I learn this?” That's where we just kept on doing ecommerce. First a lot more ecommerce. We were doing Zen Cart, if you can remember that. Then moved on to Drupal Commerce and Magento. Did a lot more ecommerce initially. The thing was, ecommerce people have money. They're selling something, always. So that's what we did a lot more, and then we moved on to B2B. So it was more of a slow process, and I didn't trust myself in marketing for the first five years. I kept telling people, “I know slightly more than the customers but not much more.” That was a learning process also, just to try to figure that out. ROB: Right, but ecommerce is a pretty good on-ramp for a lot of mathematical minds. It adds up. You can put some money in, you can get some money out, get some feedback on whether or not you're doing a good job. This is one of these funny episodes we have from time to time where you're a computer engineer from UT Austin, got your MBA, I'm a computer engineer from Georgia Tech, I have my MBA, and we get to hang out and talk marketing. [laughs] We have these episodes every year or so. We have engineers who have made their way into the marketing world. AVI: The phrase I use is ecommerce is the closest you can get to engineering in marketing. If you're used to engineering, ecommerce is the closest thing you can touch which looks/feels a little bit like engineering. ROB: As you've had to grow the capabilities, grow the firm, sometimes you think about those key hires that have come at a moment where you needed a little something different in the business or it was really an inflection point. What are some of the people or roles that have made a difference in Kuware? AVI: Early days, the first hire which people talk about, it should be done earlier than later, before contracting. I'm talking about beyond contracting. Of course, contracting and outsourcing still works, and we all have done that and we still do some of it. But your first full-time hire I think should be done as soon as possible. It really changes the game because you have to think about two people. You have to make enough money for two people now. You start thinking more seriously than just playing it as a game at that point. You're responsible for people's salaries at that point. I think that was a key. And that person was great. She was not a great marketer, but she was a great person to work with. Then as I moved on, into the CMO world, I needed people with credentials beyond me so when I took them to clients, they'd say, “Oh yeah, they have experience. They can handle our CMO.” So those became our key employees later because their credentials they had from other places got us to easily sell that service – which we already knew how to do, but people still want to know who will be the CMO. Those became key people for us. I think the next key thing for me was stop outsourcing. We used to do development outsourcing to India. Being of Indian origin, I said, “I'm just going to go to India and set up shop,” because I learned my first outsourcing team were outsourcing to somebody else. Being an Indian, I thought, “They will not fool me because I'm Indian origin, right?” But that happened to me. So, then I said, “I want my actual salaried team in India.” If you have a system, if you are doing it for low cost, I would say start owning the piece of it somehow. To me, that building of the business that way gave us the stability that I never had to think – I mean, I can give a quote on any website without spending too much time now. I don't have to depend on a freelancer or somebody telling me how much it'll be so I can pad it and add my expense and do it because it's all in-house. I think that changed the game for us, and for our customers, because now when customers say something needs to be fixed, it'll be fixed overnight. And if it's a small thing, we don't even worry about billing it. It's not worth the time to bill it. And they're happy. Customers are happy that this happened so quickly. ROB: Right, it's a strategy to overserve. It makes a ton of sense. For people who find that idea, though, of salaried employees outside of their country intimidating, how did you get over that hill? I think about setting up a legal entity. What's the local compliance, what's all that look like? I would be scared a little bit. How do you think about it? AVI: It was a hassle, for sure, absolutely. I would rather do business, I used to say those days, in China than India. I spent a lot of time in China with Intel. In India, in many places, things are not as clear. So, it was just a question of, I'm going to risk getting two to three people, and how much is it? It's money which will go away. As long as I can afford that money, worst case, this will fail. That's how I started. I start all situations by saying, “Can I afford this failure, this much money, pragmatically?” And that's what I did with it. It worked. Great. We had to make some changes there. Another thing I did for outsourcing is I said I'm going to pay everybody over 20% the market. As a result, in our 11 years of company in India, nobody has quit. ROB: Wow. AVI: We have fired people because they didn't work out, but they don't quit because they're going to another job. And India is like Silicon Valley of 2000, where people quit every three months for more money. We have managed to do that by keeping the salary slightly higher and not getting too greedy on how we pay them and compensate them in India. ROB: Yeah, this past year we have a partner who's very much in that outsourcing space in India, and I feel like they had to do about 25% bumps across the board to stop the bleeding from people. They had really good retention and then they got hit by the COVID compensation wave over there. AVI: Yeah. I was concerned. My being of Indian origin didn't help that part, because that was definitely the same worry, a U.S. company dealing with these entities in India. ROB: One thing that you shared with us as we were booking is that you've recently undertaken an acquisition, which is a different sort of adventure in another entity. Talk about that process, how you figured out who you wanted to acquire, how you closed that transaction. AVI: Sure. For a year and a half, I was saying, “I need to grow faster; should I invest?” This opportunity – this is a white label PPC service. The reason I was very intrigued by this is we do PPC for our clients. Our clients' ad spends are in hundreds of thousands of dollars per month, so these are big, and they allow us to experiment. I thought, we do this and our clients let us do whatever; are we really good? There must be somebody who does only PPC. If anybody does only PPC and nothing else, they must be good because that's all they do. So, I used to keep hiring consultants from other companies to audit us. But anything they told us was not eye-opening. Some good ideas. When I ran into this opportunity, Rob Warner's company InvisiblePPC – he's out of the UK – I said, “Oh, you guys do just PPC ads, and you do it for agencies, and you are not working with a $100,000 budget. Most of your clients are spending $5,000-$10,000 a month, which means these small clients, if they don't see the results, are going to fire you. You've got to figure this out very quickly on $5,000, so you must be really good, right? I'm very intrigued just understanding how you do this.” I had a technical interest in seeing how he does it. As I talked to Rob more, I realized they really know. And by the way, the secret sauce, which I'm happy to give away, is simple: if you do the same kind of ads again and again, and once you spend hundreds of millions of dollars doing it for those sectors, you become really good. What the white label service does – it only works for smaller agencies who cannot do their ads, and we take only what we call smart niches. If it is a local business – plumber, HVAC – those we have figured out exactly, so we can tell you for $1,000, you'll get so many leads, guaranteed. Because we have been doing it for so long. It's unlike our main agency business. There, every client is special, is different. We have to figure out and tell them in advance the cost per acquisition, work together. Here, we are able to actually tell our clients that “This is what it'll be.” It's an amazing business that way. If it fits the right kind of client and right agency, it's like a no-brainer. You will not lose money. How often can a marketer go to a client and say, “Yes, I'll get you a lead for this much, guaranteed, don't worry, and first month you'll have it. You won't have to wait for two months for me to do planning”? That's what this white label business does. Once I saw inside, doing this again and again and spending that much money and becoming a Google Premier Partner and having access to all that is amazing. That's where I felt great – it's a technology kind of business, and I understand this stuff, and Rob had built a lot of tools which are proprietary tools that others don't have. I can tell who is advertising in the local market. I can use that. Even SEMrush don't do that. So we can really target that kind of thing. As a growth strategy, I think if it matches and you understand the business, then acquire. That's what I learned. If we were taking on something else which we didn't do at all, then we'd have to figure it out. At least the systems we follow there, but we know PPC. We have done it. We understand the business in general. And we can keep it separate in a sense and not mess with it. We are a big agency. Our clients are not the clients of agencies who come there, because it's a very different business. Also, as I was telling you, those $2,000 a month ones who we don't want to take on, now we can pass on to those agencies and say, “Hey, we don't deal with that. Here are some clients for you. You guys do their social, because unfortunately we don't take them on.” ROB: The predictability of it certainly makes sense. If you're a plumber, there's lots of places you can get leads, and you're going to pay for them. You're going to pay for Yelp, you're going to pay for Angie's List. If your PPC partner can't be in that ballpark or better – there's a price tag. They know what the expected price is, and you have to match it. But I guess those platforms also know what the going rate is for a PPC lead and they probably reprice a little bit according to the market rate as well. AVI: Exactly. It's just the volume and having done the same thing. HVAC in Boston to Austin will not be that different. It will be very similar pricing. We have data on both cities, so we can tell you exactly. I'm amazed at the fact that you can have this predictable marketing and still saying, “Let's figure it out together.” ROB: Some agencies are probably glad for the business, they're glad for the backend help. I can see some of them being a little bit apprehensive about working with a white label PPC partner that's also owned by somebody who could arguably steal the business if the client grows up. How do you calm those fears? AVI: In some ways, if they don't know the details, it's a legitimate fear. If I was an agency, I'd worry about that. Two things. There are different people running those two companies. I just own it, and I kept that team intact. My team is not talking to them. I mean, they're talking in the sense – our business, we transition to them the smaller ones. But otherwise, keep it separate. That's one. The other one is we have looked at the market. We don't take on local clients who need local SEO. These are exactly that. So those ones, that is never our market. Unless they are a nationwide company, they're not our client. It becomes a very different story. That's what we tell them. And here's the other part. I teach our company – we have started presenting to our company the details of how to build an agency. Exactly how to build an agency. That's available to our agency partners. We're teaching those as courses. “Go and build your agency like this if you want. This is what we did.” That's the added value we are giving to them. We'll tell you how we do it so you can compete with us and grow if you want to. That's open. Just to be fair, there's no doubt we will add more white label services. Right now it's pure PPC, but I do foresee – why not Facebook ads too? But we will keep that always focused on a special market, not for everybody because it just does not make sense. ROB: It helps to think about that all in abundance. There really is no shortage of business out there for most people in services firms; it's just about earning that business, being known, liked, and trusted, all of that sort of thing. If we rewind a little bit, Avi, and look at the big picture of Kuware, we look at the journey, what are some key things you've learned along the way that you might go back and tell yourself to do a little bit differently if you had to start fresh? AVI: One thing which it took me a long time to learn, because I came from salaried employee, very well compensated options and things – I was not used to this concept – even if the bank was willing to give me a loan, I would not take it. I said, “It needs to be bootstrapped or it needs to be VC funding.” So one of the things I would tell myself is, hey, if it is a business, you want to grow it? Get that capital. Not as equity capital if possible. That's the only way you'll grow, and it's okay. Be comfortable with it. The other part I've learned is that things will break. Get used to it. This took a while. Initially, “What are we going to do now?” When we acquired this business, things happened, and I realized that I'm so calm about it. It's okay. I would be surprised if things didn't break. That means something is hidden, something is not working right. That is the advice I would give everybody. Stay calm. You'll figure it out. Things will go wrong. It's a business. Things will not run smoothly, ever. In fact, if they're running too smoothly, then you're not aggressive enough. You're not growing. Things will have to break, and then they break, you'll figure it out. That's the advice I would give myself if I went back when I used to get very worried and unable to sleep. Now I can handle it. ROB: There are so many ways to respond to that breaking. There is sleeplessness, there is frustration. Some people take it out on people, and I think that's something people dread when they're going to work for a smaller, privately held business. Sometimes somebody needs to be fired, and the rest of the time you just go figure it out together. It's usually not the first one. It's usually not that somebody needs to be fired because it's usually my fault in the business anyhow. AVI: Correct. I tell people in my team, don't do the same mistake again and again. I learned this at Intel. You're allowed to every day do a mistake, but don't do the mistake you did yesterday. In a smaller business it's harder, but I said, “It's okay. It'll happen.” The other thing is a rule – we came up with this – a lot of times it's clients. At that time, I've got all the way down through the hierarchy that any of our associates can fire a client because it's not working. They don't have to go all the way to ask us because it's a big client. Some clients say “Eff this, eff that.” I don't have a problem if they talk to me in a friendly manner and they're friendly and they do that. But if they do that with meanness, then the f-word is a problem at that point. Then we don't take it. As simple as that. So, our employees feel very empowered, and as a result they go to bat for us. They will do extra work because they know they have the right to decide if somebody is not working right with them. Those are the kinds of things – that took a while. Earlier, it was always this worry about what'll happen. One client goes and what happens? But slowly – it's a journey, for sure. ROB: It sounds like you have your mind and your eyes already a little bit on what else might be viable as a white label service to add on. What comes to mind? Is it Instagram in a box? Is it SEO? What scales similarly?  AVI: The local SEO will scale. Facebook ads is very similar and will scale. TikTok ads will scale. They are very specialized services, and Facebook and all is harder, but it's getting very specialized. Anything which is specialized and localized will scale and can be added as a service, and it's harder for people to learn. Those will scale. But at the same time, I'm not of the mindset, like some other white label agencies, “We'll do everything for you.” If you're running a marketing agency, there's a part of it you've got to do. You cannot just be a manager outsourcing everything to somebody. You've got to find some areas where you're good, especially if you want to grow. You've got to start owning a few of those pieces. That's what I tell the agency owners. You don't do PPC right now, but if you find that's the area eventually you want, you've got to take it on. There are some things you've got to start keeping in-house. Otherwise you're becoming a manager and you will not learn the marketing aspects to grow to the next level. I'm not envisioning building a white label agency which does “Just give it to us, we'll take care of it for you. Just talk to the clients.” I want to keep it specific services which you handle here, and we will do it for you kind of thing. ROB: Got it. That's really interesting. It'll be interesting to hear as you evolve in that direction, as you consider more acquisitions. There's all sorts of mechanics to get into in acquisitions that we won't deal with in the moment, but are fascinating in and of themselves. Avi, when people want to find and connect with you and with Kuware, where should they go to find you? AVI: I am most active on LinkedIn. That's the best way to find me. Kuware also. I'm just Avi at Kuware. That will work. Also direct email will absolutely work. LinkedIn message will always work. Of course, LinkedIn has become a little bit – everybody's trying to prospect so much, and we offer a service too, so we are in the same game in some ways. But for sure, any message which has something substantial gets through fine. That's not a problem. LinkedIn will be the best way to find me. Avi at kuware.com would be the other great way to do it. I do hardly any Twitter at all. ROB: [laughs] Sometimes it's safer that way. Avi, thank you so much for taking the time to come on the podcast, to share with the audience. We will be glad to keep an eye on your journey, and certainly wish you the best. Maybe we'll all get out to Austin next year. We'll see. AVI: Yeah, that would be great, Rob. Thank you. It was very natural talking to you. That part was absolutely great. I'm looking forward to staying connected and chatting more. ROB: Sounds good. Thank you so much, Avi. Be well. AVI: All right. ROB: Thank you for listening. The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast is presented by Converge. Converge helps digital marketing agencies and brands automate their reporting so they can be more profitable, accurate, and responsive. To learn more about how Converge can automate your marketing reporting, email info@convergehq.com, or visit us on the web at convergehq.com.

Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets
Coach Pastner Radio Show (Dec 27)

Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 55:58


Coach Pastner joins Andy Demetra for weekly update on Georgia Tech basketball.

Basketball Conference: The ACC Football Podcast
2021 Bowl Previews - Gator Bowl

Basketball Conference: The ACC Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 14:52


Our 2021 Bowl Previews wrap up with a look at the action that's set to happen (and more that was *supposed* to happen) on New Year's Eve, INCLUDING: Wake Forest is taking on Rutgers in the Gator Bowl after Texas A&M had to back out of the game due to COVID issues. Now, they'll face a 5-7 Scarlet Knights team that was doing....what, exactly, for the few weeks between the end of the season and the announcement they'd be in this game? Miami had to drop out of the Sun Bowl, and has been replaced by a directional Michigan team. All of this, plus our final picks and VanGorderCoin wagers of the year, and MORE! Use promo code "GOACC" for 10% off your first order of premium, great-looking, officially-logo'd Georgia Tech gear at Section103.com! Rate and subscribe on Apple Podcasts and Spotify! Follow us on Twitter and Instagram!

Official Seattle Seahawks Podcasts
Seahawks Stories: Steve Raible

Official Seattle Seahawks Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 63:49


Robert Turbin is joined by former wide receiver and current broadcaster Steve Raible to discuss his football playing days as well as life as the Voice of the Seahawks. Today's show: Introduction to football (04:27), playing at Georgia Tech (09:27), playing for the expansion Seahawks (19:48), meeting his wife (35:27), his journey into broadcasting (40:41), and the meaning behind Super Bowl XLVIII (57:51).

Basketball Conference: The ACC Football Podcast
2021 Bowl Previews - Mayo Bowl & Peach Bowl

Basketball Conference: The ACC Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 17:35


Our bowl previews continue, as we look at a pair of interesting matchups on December 30: North Carolina renews their rivalry with South Carolina in the Mayo Bowl, and there's not much reason to expect a lot of defense to be played in this game. Pittsburgh takes on Michigan State in the Peach Bowl, missing one key piece that makes this game a lot easier to predict. All of this, plus spread picks, VanGorderCoin wagers, and MORE! Use promo code "GOACC" for 10% off your first order of premium, great-looking, officially-logo'd Georgia Tech gear at Section103.com! Rate and subscribe on Apple Podcasts and Spotify! Follow us on Twitter and Instagram!

Basketball Conference: The ACC Football Podcast
2021 Bowl Updates & Previews - Cancelled Bowls, Pinstripe Bowl & Cheez-It Bowl

Basketball Conference: The ACC Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 23:41


The guys got back together to continue previewing the ACC's bowl lineup, but started with some updates on three ACC teams who were previously scheduled to play in bowl games that have since had their participation cancelled. After that, the discussion got into the December 29 bowl games, INCLUDING: Virginia Tech takes on Maryland in a game where anyone pretending to know what will happen prior to kickoff is almost certainly lying. Clemson faces off with Iowa State in an interesting, fun game where one side should definitely be favored....but which one? All of that, plus VanGorderCoin wagers, and MORE! Use promo code "GOACC" for 10% off your first order of premium, great-looking, officially-logo'd Georgia Tech gear at Section103.com! Rate and subscribe on Apple Podcasts and Spotify! Follow us on Twitter and Instagram!

Learnings from Leaders: the P&G Alumni Podcast
Luis Silberwasserat, Univision - President, TV Networks

Learnings from Leaders: the P&G Alumni Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 44:05


“It's not just one Latino or one Hispanic group, it's much more nuanced. It's less about the language and more about who we are and what our role is in this country.” Luis Silberwasser is Univision's President of the Television Networks Group, where he oversees the company's TV networks, as well as its entertainment, news and sports divisions along with its ops and tech teams. Luis is a seasoned, award-winning TV executive with 25+ years' experience building TV networks and creating entertainment content focusing on International, U.S. Hispanic and Latin American markets. Prior to joining Univision, Luis served as Telemundo Networks' President where he modernized the brand and transformed the company's content strategy. Earlier in his career, Luis served as Discovery Networks EVP and Chief Content Officer, having risen through the company's senior ranks. And of course, Luis got his start in brand management at P&G in Beauty Care. Luis studied industrial engineering at Georgia Tech, and received his MBA from Harvard Business School. Luis is a proud dual citizen of the United States and Columbia, passionate about Futbol, History, and Latin music, and lives in Miami with his wife and four children. You'll enjoy this candid conversation about creating content that resonates across cultures and generations.

The Drive
The Drive | Hour 1 | 12.20.21

The Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 45:22


Nick Ferguson filled in for Tyler and opened the show talking with DMac about Demaryius Thomas' funeral and what his legacy was coming out of Georgia Tech. The fellas then gave their thoughts on Denver's loss to the Bengals. How bad was the fumble from Drew Lock in the 4th quarter? DMac explained that the Broncos' season is over even though they're not mathematically eliminated yet.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.