Podcasts about Black Sabbath

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British heavy metal band

  • 1,820PODCASTS
  • 4,204EPISODES
  • 1h 7mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 11, 2022LATEST
Black Sabbath

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Best podcasts about Black Sabbath

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Latest podcast episodes about Black Sabbath

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Decibel Geek Podcast: Demolicious - Ep490

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 101:52


We're back this week with a brand edition of Demolicious! Sometimes, the coolest stuff gets left off of albums from our favorite artists. This week, we thought we'd highlight some of our favorite tracks that were either left off or were earlier versions of the finished product.This week you'll get cool demos and unreleased tracks from lots of great artists. Aaron brings cool songs from AC/DC, Black Sabbath, Faster Pussycat, Wednesday 13, Enuff Z'nuff, Metallica, Tuff, Micky Ratt, and Mark St. John (allegedly). Chris features tracks by Alice in Chains, Pantera, Cinderella, Scorpions, Killer Dwarfs, Alice Cooper, Thin Lizzy, and King Kobra.Finding much info on many of these songs was difficult. If you have more background on some of these tracks, please let it in the comments section. Also, let us know what are some of your favorite demos and unreleased tracks!We hope you enjoy this edition of Demolicious and SHARE with a friend!Decibel Geek is a proud member of the Pantheon Podcasts family.Contact Us!Rate, Review, and Subscribe in iTunesJoin the Facebook Fan PageFollow on TwitterFollow on InstagramE-mail UsSubscribe to our Youtube channel!Support Us!Buy a T-Shirt!Donate to the show!Stream Us!Stitcher RadioSpreakerTuneInBecome a VIP Subscriber!Click HERE for more info!Comment BelowDirect Download 

Pod Like A Hole
Black Sabbath - Ozzy, Dio, and The Extended Family. Side A

Pod Like A Hole

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 97:15


In this episode we round table all the 70's Ozzy albums of Black Sabbath, Dio's pre-Sabbath years with Elf and Rainbow, as well as the Sabbath Heaven and Hell follow up with Dio: Mob Rules.    We take some time to discuss the cast of characters that spun out of Sabbath's orbit in the 70s, but by the time we start talking about White Snake it becomes clear that's a whole podcast season unto itself.    This is Part 2 of our Black Sabbath mini season. In the previous episode we reviewed the Dio era album Heaven and Hell track by track.  Part 3 will round out our sabbath sessions with a look at Ozzy and Dio's solo careers, as well as those weird Sabbath albums with other singers.    #blacksabbath #sabbathbloodysabbath #volume4 #sabotage #mobrules #masterofreality #podlikeahole #podcast #doom #metal #cocaine  

Union Radio
Lado B || Flash de noticias: Falleció Issey Miyake y Black Sabbath se reunió

Union Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 5:55


Decibel Geek Podcast
Demolicious - Ep490

Decibel Geek Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 101:52


We're back this week with a brand edition of Demolicious! Sometimes, the coolest stuff gets left off of albums from our favorite artists. This week, we thought we'd highlight some of our favorite tracks that were either left off or were earlier versions of the finished product.This week you'll get cool demos and unreleased tracks from lots of great artists. Aaron brings cool songs from AC/DC, Black Sabbath, Faster Pussycat, Wednesday 13, Enuff Z'nuff, Metallica, Tuff, Micky Ratt, and Mark St. John (allegedly). Chris features tracks by Alice in Chains, Pantera, Cinderella, Scorpions, Killer Dwarfs, Alice Cooper, Thin Lizzy, and King Kobra.Finding much info on many of these songs was difficult. If you have more background on some of these tracks, please let it in the comments section. Also, let us know what are some of your favorite demos and unreleased tracks!We hope you enjoy this edition of Demolicious and SHARE with a friend!Decibel Geek is a proud member of the Pantheon Podcasts family.Contact Us!Rate, Review, and Subscribe in iTunesJoin the Facebook Fan PageFollow on TwitterFollow on InstagramE-mail UsSubscribe to our Youtube channel!Support Us!Buy a T-Shirt!Donate to the show!Stream Us!Stitcher RadioSpreakerTuneInBecome a VIP Subscriber!Click HERE for more info!Comment BelowDirect Download 

The Mistress Carrie Podcast
The Mistress Carrie 'Sit Rep' 08-09-2022

The Mistress Carrie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 5:18


This is the Mistress Carrie Situation Report! The 'Sit Rep' your daily Entertainment headlines, Industry Info, and everything ROCK, all in under 5 minutes! 08-09-2022. The Mistress Carrie Podcast, a proud member of the Pantheon Podcast Network!  Teenage HeadBam MargeraAnthraxWaken Fest 2023ArchitectsBring Me The HorizonBlack SabbathAXS TVOlivia Newton JohnNew films in theaters this weekNew Releases This Week Hard Rock and Metal ReleasesFind Mistress Carrie online:Official WebsiteThe Mistress Carrie Backstage Pass on PatreonTwitterFacebookInstagramYouTubeCameoPantheon Podcast Network

Rock And Roll Death Brigade
Rock And Roll Death Brigade Podcast, Episode #87 - Ozzy's Final Performance, Is This Really The End?

Rock And Roll Death Brigade

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 60:01


Rocket of TheMetalDen.com returns with a new episode of Rock And Roll Death Brigade Podcast, featuring music by BLACK SABBATH, MOTLEY CRUE, RIGOR MORTIS & LINKIN PARK, plus stand-up comedy by Sam Kinison. http://www.themetalden.com http://www.randyrocketcody.com http://www.rockyourlifewithnorafinch.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rockandrolldeathbrigade/support

Sofá Sonoro
La paranoia de Black Sabbath

Sofá Sonoro

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 47:20


Black Sabbath irrumpió en la música a lo grande, con dos discos en seis meses. Con polémica, ruido y un sonido nuevo que marcó a los chavales que estaban todavía en el instituto y que vieron un camino para sus vidas.El primer álbum de la banda fue grabado en jornadas diurnas y con un presupuesto de menos de mil libras. Poco después la banda volvía al estudio con un sonido más pulido y una colección de canciones potentes que criticaban la guerra, ensalzaban las drogas, exploraban la inestabilidad mental o dibujaban distopias.

2 Guys, 1 Popcorn Podcast
4-10: The Age of Blasting Your Filth

2 Guys, 1 Popcorn Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 117:55


Why is Nic Cage everywhere right now? Let's find out. Also, we learn more about X's penchant for animal torture, and what else kidz in Pahonicks did for fun before they all formed 2Guys1Popcorn fan clubs. Also, will we ever--EVER--make it through a 'sode without mentioning Pantera or Black Sabbath? Would you even want us to??New segment debut!!! Inside the Jactors Studio. Check it out. 'sodes: The Curse of Von Dutch, Under the Banner of Heaven, Stranger Things, The Black Phone, Elvis, Irma Vep, Leaving Las Vegas, Face/Off, The Unbearable Weight of Massive TalentTell us what you think by emailing us at 2guys1popcornpodcast@gmail.com or leave a voice message https://www.speakpipe.com/2guys1popcorn.

Rock a Domicilio
Flashback: Muere el productor de Iron Maiden y Black Sabbath.

Rock a Domicilio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 0:46


Trick or Treat Radio
TorTR #523 - Romper Room Wrap Around

Trick or Treat Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 206:58


A group of podcasters' lives become unwittingly entangled as their obsessions and insecurities manifest monsters, demons, and the Kobayashi Maru! On Episode 523 of Trick or Treat Radio we discuss Allegoria, the feature film debut from Spider One from Powerman 5000! We also discuss the struggle to produce and the appreciation of art, a local central Massachusetts urban legend, and what hitting the “brown note” might do to you. So grab issue one of Trick or Treat Radio: Year Eleven, say your gratitudes and latitudes, and strap on for the world's most dangerous podcast!Stuff we talk about: Septic, the road to year eleven, 10 year anniversary show hangover, under milk a cow, the Blackout Tapes, talking all raw, Septic, Brian Paulin, pivotal roles, Mork and Mindy, the voice in the distance, Spider One, Rob Zombie, Kobayashi Maru, Mega!! Kung Fu Radio, Danzig, cat litter and Marvel Legends figures, Powerman 5000, Birthday Massacre, being a touring musician in 2022, Pantera, Ozzy Osbourne, Black Sabbath, The Electric Hellfire Club, The Espresso Bar, Superman stealing Zod's powers, Death Valley, Bury or Berry, spelling bees, Action Comics #1, Casablanca, the king of physical media, prep schools, vocal exercises, gratitudes and latitudes, nautical boy, horror anthologies, Mickey Rourke, Creepshow, Tales from the Crypt, Shudder, John Ennis, James Lipton, Cyrano de Bergerac, suffer for your art, Vincent Van Gogh, Pablo Picasso, The Whistler, OFF Pudding, wine stains on the coffee table, “the brown note”, The Mortuary Collection, Clancy Brown, Pulp Fiction, Verotika, what defines a feature film?, Dual, The Black Phone, The Instructor, Ares' work truck, truck stop stories, Triumph, Alex Garland, Men, Cobra Cabana, and Minimum Underdrive.Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/trickortreatradioJoin our Discord Community: discord.trickortreatradio.comSend Email/Voicemail: mailto:podcast@trickortreatradio.comVisit our website: http://trickortreatradio.comStart your own podcast: https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=386Use our Amazon link: http://amzn.to/2CTdZzKFB Group: http://www.facebook.com/groups/trickortreatradioTwitter: http://twitter.com/TrickTreatRadioFacebook: http://facebook.com/TrickOrTreatRadioYouTube: http://youtube.com/TrickOrTreatRadioInstagram: http://instagram.com/TrickorTreatRadioSupport the show

UnderGRAND radio
MMA - Moja muzička avantura #1 by Željko Čačija

UnderGRAND radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 120:13


Pilot emisija Željka Čačije, iskusnog radijskog i uopšte medijskog vuka - MMA (Moja muzička avantura) . Dosta zanimljive priče i još zanimljivije muzike. Samo deo plejliste prve emisije : Black Sabbath, Black Flag, Elvis Presley, The Clash, The Pogues, Thin Lizzy, Corrosion Of Conformity...

SWR2 Forum
Disco, Punk und Glamrock – Wie die Siebziger den Pop revolutionierten

SWR2 Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 44:30


DiskussionIn den 70er-Jahren explodierte die populäre Musik geradezu. Stars und Pioniere von David Bowie bis Pink Floyd, Stevie Wonder bis Bob Marley, Fleetwood Mac bis Black Sabbath und Can erfanden oder vollendeten schillernden Glam- und ätherischen Progrock, komplexen Soul und klassischen Reggae, eleganten Westcoast-Pop, finsteren Heavy Metal und hypnotischen Krautrock. Was war das für eine Zeit, die diese Goldene Ära ermöglichte? Und was ist davon übriggeblieben? Bernd Lechler diskutiert mit Jens Balzer - Buchautor und Musikkritiker für Die Zeit und Deutschlandradio, Andreas Borcholte - Musikredakteur und Kolumnist beim Spiegel, Birgit Fuß - langjährige Redakteurin der deutschen Ausgabe des Rolling Stone

Biblioteca Del Metal
Sepultura - (Los Años Cavalera / Por Debajo De Los Restos ,Volumen 1)

Biblioteca Del Metal

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 72:31


Colabora Con Biblioteca Del Metal: En Twitter - https://twitter.com/Anarkometal72 Y Donanos Unas Propinas En BAT. Para Seguir Con El Proyecto De la Biblioteca Mas Grande Del Metal. Muchisimas Gracias. La Tienda De Biblioteca Del Metal: Encontraras, Ropa, Accesorios,Decoracion, Ect... Todo Relacionado Al Podcats Biblioteca Del Metal Y Al Mundo Del Heavy Metal. Descubrela!!!!!! Ideal Para Llevarte O Regalar Productos Del Podcats De Ivoox. (Por Tiempo Limitado) https://teespring.com/es/stores/biblioteca-del-metal-1 Sepultura es una banda brasileña de thrash metal formada en 1984 en Belo Horizonte por los hermanos Max (guitarra y voz) e Igor Cavalera (batería).​ Está considerado como el grupo de heavy metal más exitoso de Brasil y uno de los más influyentes de dicho género en todo el mundo,​​​​ aunque su música se orientaría originalmente al thrash, death y groove metal y posteriormente al hardcore, metal alternativo, nu metal y metal industrial.​ Formada en el contexto de la represión policial que marcó los últimos años de la dictadura militar brasileña,​ Sepultura ha disfrutado de éxito internacional desde finales de la década de 1980 con un estilo principalmente orientado hacia el thrash metal gracias a trabajos como Arise (1991) Chaos A.D. (1993) o Roots (1996).​ El fundador y principal compositor del conjunto, Max Cavalera, dejó la agrupación abruptamente en 1996 como resultado de desacuerdos personales y posteriormente fundó Soulfly.​ Su hermano Igor hizo lo mismo en 2006 y ambos volvieron a unirse en el proyecto Cavalera Conspiracy.​ La formación actual de Sepultura está integrada por el bajista Paulo Jr. —el único integrante original que continúa en la banda—,​ el guitarrista Andreas Kisser, el vocalista estadounidense Derrick Green y el batería Eloy Casagrande.​ El grupo ha publicado quince álbumes de estudio que les ha permitido vender más de veinte millones de copias en todo el mundo hacia 2014.​ Sepultura fue formada en 1984 en Belo Horizonte, capital del estado de Minas Gerais en Brasil.​ Sus dos fundadores fueron los hermanos Max e Igor Cavalera, hijos de una modelo llamada Vânia y del diplomático italiano Graciliano Cavalera, cuya repentina muerte por un ataque al corazón dejó a la familia sin recursos financieros.​ Tras el fallecimiento de su padre, Max se interesó por su colección de vinilos para saber cual era la música que le gustaba y allí encontró el cuarto álbum de Led Zeppelin y el primero de Black Sabbath.​ A finales de ese mismo año, los dos hermanos optaron por abandonar sus estudios y dedicarse por completo a la música.​ Después de varios cambios iniciales, la formación quedó establecida con Max como guitarrista, Igor a la batería, el bajista Paulo Jr. y el vocalista Wagner Lamounier.​ Debido a desacuerdos artísticos, este último abandonó el conjunto para fundar Sarcófago, por lo que Max pasó a ser también el vocalista y Jairo Guedz se convirtió en su nuevo guitarrista.​ A lo largo de 1985, Sepultura participó en varios festivales locales y firmó un contrato con el sello discográfico Cogumelo.​ Su primer EP, titulado Bestial Devastation y grabado en solo dos días en un estudio improvisado, salió a la venta en diciembre conjuntamente con Século XX de Overdose.​ A pesar de su mala calidad, debido a la sobresaturación de los amplificadores,​ el EP permitió al grupo ser conocido en Brasil y grabar Morbid Visions en agosto de 1986.​ Aunque en esos momentos su fama se limitaba únicamente a su país de origen, debido a que sus dos primeros trabajos no fueron publicados en el resto del mundo, el hecho de ejercer de telonera de Venom en Belo Horizonte y componer temas como «Troops of Doom» ayudaron a aumentar su popularidad.​ Tras el lanzamiento de su álbum debut, el conjunto decidió trasladarse a São Paulo, la ciudad más grande de Brasil, para avanzar en su carrera.​ La banda fue una de las primeras en su nación en fusionar death y black metal junto a Sarcófago, liderada por Wagner Lamounier.​ Las dos formaciones, pioneras del heavy metal en Brasil, mantuvieron una rivalidad durante mucho tiempo: Originalmente los miembros de ambas agrupaciones eran amigos desde la infancia, pero la salida de Lamounier de Sepultura provocó una confrontación contra Max Cavalera.​ La situación no mejoraría con el tiempo, pues el batería D.D. Crazy rompería una botella en la cabeza del futuro guitarrista de Sepultura Andreas Kisser y en 2013, Max calificó a Lamounier como «un gilipollas, un mierda, por eso fue expulsado de la banda».​​ Tras su primera gira en 1987, el guitarrista Jairo Guedz dejó el grupo al perder su interés por el death metal. Su sustituto fue el mencionado Andreas Kisser, originario de São Paulo, y que había trabajado como pipa de Max Cavalera.​ La experiencia del nuevo miembro contribuyó en gran medida a la evolución del estilo de la banda en su siguiente álbum de estudio, Schizophrenia, su primer trabajo grabado de manera profesional.​ Durante los meses siguientes, Sepultura realizó conciertos con audiencias de hasta 2000 personas y el disco llega a vender más de 10 000 copias, más que grupos extranjeros como Slayer o Anthrax.​ El grupo envío varias cintas a los Estados Unidos y algunos de sus temas fueron emitidos en estaciones de radio, a pesar de que muchas de ellas eran reacias a radiar thrash metal, debido a la oposición de los encargados de locales que no querían transmitir música demasiado violenta en sus establecimientos.​ En 1988, Max decidió viajar a los Estados Unidos con la intención de conocer productores después de entablar algunas relaciones en sus conciertos.​ El conjunto llamó la atención de la discográfica Roadrunner Records, cuyo director artístico, Monte Conner, le ofreció un contrato a largo plazo y la distribución de Schizophrenia a mayor escala sin haber visto antes a la banda actuar en directo.​​ Tras firmar el acuerdo, el disco salió a la venta en Norteamérica y Europa donde cosechó buenas críticas.​ El álbum Beneath the Remains fue grabado durante nueve noches, para aprovechar tarifas más baratas, en un estudio de mala calidad de Río de Janeiro.​ Debido a que los músicos no sabían hablar inglés tuvieron que comunicarse mediante un intérprete con el productor Scott Burns.​ La buena recepción del disco, que llegó a vender 600 000 copias en todo el mundo,​ permitió al grupo realizar su primera gira mundial y ser reconocido como uno de los más famosos exponentes del death metal.​ Su primera actuación en los Estados Unidos tuvo lugar el 31 de octubre de 1989 en el Ritz de Nueva York, como acto de apertura del músico danés King Diamond.​ En 1990, la banda decidió mudarse a Phoenix, Arizona, y contratar como mánager a Gloria Bujnowski.​ La gira promocional del álbum terminaría en enero de 1991, tras un concierto en el festival Rock in Rio, en Río de Janeiro, ante más de 100 000 personas.​ A lo largo de 1990, la agrupación grabó su cuarto trabajo de estudio, Arise, en los estudios Morrisound de Tampa, Florida.​ El álbum salió a la venta en abril de 1991 y contiene los sencillos «Dead Embryonic Cells» y «Arise», cuyos vídeos musicales fueron prohibidos por el canal televisivo MTV por blasfemia.​ Su buena recepción permitió que el grupo realizara una gira mundial de dos años que incluyó dos conciertos con lleno absoluto en un estadio indonesio.​​ El éxito internacional de Sepultura sirvió como referencia para conjuntos de países donde el heavy metal no tenía cabida en los medios de comunicación.​ Por esas fechas, la agrupación grabó una versión del tema de Motörhead «Orgasmatron»,​ cuyo vídeo musical fue elegido por el público como el mejor vídeo brasileño en la edición de 1991 de los MTV Video Music Award.​ En 1992, el grupo participó en otras dos giras, en una junto a Helmet y Ministry,​ y en la otra como telonero de Ozzy Osbourne y Alice in Chains.​ Ese mismo año, Max contrajo matrimonio con la gerente Gloria Bujnowski,​ casi el doble de años mayor que él.​ En 1993 fue publicado Chaos A.D., con una temática lírica orientada hacia la denuncia social, especialmente en Brasil y que alcanzó el puesto 32 del Billboard 200,​​ algo poco común para una banda de heavy metal extranjera.​ En 1994, la banda participó en uno de los principales festivales europeos de dicho género, el Monsters of Rock, realizado en Donington Park, Inglaterra.​ Ese mismo año, el vídeo musical de «Territory» obtuvo un galardón en los MTV Video Music Awards y Max Cavalera formó el proyecto de corta duración Nailbomb, con el cual publicó un único álbum de estudio y en el que participaron su hermano Igor y Kisser.​​ En marzo de 1996 salió a la venta Roots, la cima de la popularidad en la carrera del conjunto, el cual llegó a vender más de dos millones de copias en todo el mundo y se situó entre los cinco discos más vendidos en el Reino Unido.​​​ Este trabajo contó con la colaboración de músicos como Carlinhos Brown, DJ Lethal, Mike Patton o Jonathan Davis, entre otros,​ y parte de su grabación tuvo lugar en una reserva de indígenas Xavantes en el Mato Grosso.​ Según declaraciones posteriores de Max Cavalera, este fue el primer disco que grabó Paulo Jr. ya que anteriormente las pistas de bajo eran grabadas por él y por Kisser.​ El bajista confirmó esta afirmación y remarcó que Kisser fue el que le sustituyó en Schizophrenia y Beneath The Remains, aunque destacó que «yo tuve que tocar en directo, que es el principal desafío».​ El 17 de agosto de 1996, el grupo participó en el festival Monsters of Rock como un trío con Kisser como cantante.​ Solo unas horas antes de su actuación, Max recibió la noticia de que su hijastro, Dana Wells, había fallecido en un accidente automovilístico, lo que le obligó a abandonar el recinto y tomar un vuelo hacia los Estados Unidos.​ Tras el funeral de Wells, el vocalista regresó al conjunto para continuar la gira, sin embargo, pocos meses después los miembros restantes le anunciaron su decisión de despedir a Gloria Bujnowski, esposa de Max y madre del joven fallecido, como gerente de Sepultura.​ El mismo día de diciembre, tras un concierto en el Brixton Academy de Londres, Max anunció su renuncia voluntaria a sus compañeros,​ aunque no se haría oficial hasta comienzos de 1997 y posteriormente formaría el proyecto Soulfly.​ Tras la salida de Max Cavalera, el público temió una separación definitiva del grupo, sin embargo, los tres miembros restantes anunciaron su decisión de continuar juntos.​

Hemma hos Strage
Christian Gabel om synthar och videovåld

Hemma hos Strage

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 74:06


Han är trummis i Bob Hund, har ett förflutet i det hiphop-punkiga nittiotalsbandet Mindjive och gör som soloartist urtjusig synthmusik. Hemma hos Strage" dissekerar Christian Gabel sin låt "Videovåld" genom att spela upp dess inspirationskällor: strilande regn från ett Black Sabbath-intro, helikopterljud från Duran Duran, blodisande andetag från "Fredagen den 13:e"-soundtracket, en synthbeat från John Carpenter, skogstokiga flickkörer från Ennio Morricone och mycket mer. Han hinner också prata om dansbanan i Karlstad som gav upphov till låten "De vanställdas diskotek", om varför han alltid klär sig i brunt, om hans korta tid i metalbandet Malicious Infernal och om hur Henry Rollins blev hans något otippade ledstjärna. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Produce Like A Pro
Mike Exeter

Produce Like A Pro

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 52:10


This episode is part one of Mike Exeter's interview. Stay tuned for part two! Mike Exeter is a grammy winning producer and engineer who has worked with artists such as Black Sabbath, Judas Priest, Cradle of filth, Tony Iommi, and many more. In today's episode, Mike is going to be talking about his experiences and stories working with bands in the recording studio and how he captures their performances. Subscribe to the email list and get yourself some free goodies:https://producelikeapro.com Want to create radio ready mixes from the comfort of your home? Go check outhttps://promixacademy.com/courses/

Rock Around The Blog
Deep Purple ja Simon McBride 2022

Rock Around The Blog

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 19:49


Deep Purple soitti Suomessa uuden kitaristinsa, Simon McBriden kanssa. Sami Ruokangas oli paikalla yli 30 Purple-keikan kokemuksellaan. Jakson soittolista: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/4LBJDXZH1T5Ewmp5Hjkt4T?si=f81be0006d8a4107 Jutuissa ovat mukana myös Accept, Uriah Heep, Olutravintola Konttori, Rock In The City Kerava, Nestor, Jari Suutarinen, Vesa Heilala, Ian Paice, Don Airey, Roger Glover, Simon McBride, Joe Bonamassa, Gary Moore, Carl Sentance, Nazareth, Laurence Cottle, Black Sabbath, Jon Finnigan, Rainbow, Russ Ballard, Colosseum II, Jon Hiseman, Whitesnake, David Coverdale, John Sykes, Ludwig Van Beethoven, Ritchie Blackmore, Cozy Powell, Yngwie Malmsteen, Tommy Bolin, Steve Morse, Joe Satriani, Michael Schenker, Jeff Beck, Status Quo, Mick Box, Wolf Hoffmann, Juha Hyvönen, Monika Hyvönen, Wishing Well ja Roudari Pekanpalo.

Cover Story
Conga Line Paddy Wagon

Cover Story

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 39:03


On Side A we revisit The Cardigans. We have featured The Cardigans before and their brilliant cover of Black Sabbath's “Sabbath Bloody Sabbath.” This time, the Cardigans are covering Kraftwerk – a German band known for being the innovators and pioneers of electronic music. Our Side B takes us down South to New Orleans and Alabama as we discuss Fats Domino's easy going, boogie-woogie version of Hank William's Jambalaya. We hope you enjoy! Thanks for listening. Support the show

The Skinny with Mike and Adam
Turgid Naval Gazing Pt. 3

The Skinny with Mike and Adam

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 123:13


This week, we're bringing back a fun segment that's always fun for us to do. It's the return of ‘Turgid Naval Gazing', a segment in which we read bad reviews of great albums! Also, Adam reads the musings of a tired, sorrowful man in ‘The Adventures of Unicorn & Koala'. We also share our thoughts on the music that we've been listening to from bands and artists like Anthony Green, Palisades, Glass Tides, Dance Gavin Dance, Coheed and Cambria, Led Zeppelin, Bury Tomorrow, and Black Sabbath. ---------------------------------- Check out Mike's video game and pop culture show, The Dorkiest Podcast. Available on your favorite podcasting platform The Dorkiest Podcast • A podcast on Anchor ---------------------------------- Find us on social media: https://discord.gg/2jv87Wypvw https://www.twitter.com/TheSkinnyPod https://www.instagram.com/mikewearsprada mail to:theskinnywithmikeandadam@gmail.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theskinnywithmikeandadam/support

Into the Void: A Black Sabbath Podcast

John and Darin discuss Black Sabbath's twelfth studio album "Seventh Star" featuring Tony Iommi and Glenn Hughes. To make a donation to support the podcast please visit: https://ko-fi.com/intothevoidablacksabbathpodcast For more Black Sabbath content visit Lair of the Alchemist on Youtube

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

While I'm still on hiatus, I invited questions from listeners. This is an hour-long podcast answering some of them. (Another hour-long Q&A for Patreon backers only will go up next week). Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ There is a Mixcloud of the music excerpted here which can be found at https://www.mixcloud.com/AndrewHickey/500-songs-supplemental-qa-edition/ Click below for a transcript: Hello and welcome to the Q&A  episode I'm doing while I'm working on creating a backlog. I'm making good progress on that, and still hoping and expecting to have episode 151 up some time in early August, though I don't have an exact date yet. I was quite surprised by the response to my request for questions, both at the amount of it and at where it came from. I initially expected to get a fair few comments on the main podcast, and a handful on the Patreon, and then I could do a reasonable-length Q&A podcast from the former and a shorter one from the latter. Instead, I only got a couple of questions on the main episode, but so many on the Patreon that I had to stop people asking only a day or so after posting the request for questions. So instead of doing one reasonable length podcast and one shorter one, I'm actually doing two longer ones. What I'm going to do is do all the questions asked publicly, plus all the questions that have been asked multiple times, in this one, then next week I'm going to put up the more niche questions just for Patreon backers. However, I'm not going to answer *all* of the questions. I got so many questions so quickly that there's not space to answer them all, and several of them were along the lines of "is artist X going to get an episode?" which is a question I generally don't answer -- though I will answer a couple of those if there's something interesting to say about them. But also, there are some I've not answered for another reason. As you may have noticed, I have a somewhat odd worldview, and look at the world from a different angle from most people sometimes. Now there were several questions where someone asked something that seems like a perfectly reasonable question, but contains a whole lot of hidden assumptions that that person hadn't even considered -- about music history, or about the process of writing and researching, or something else. Now, to answer that kind of question at all often means unpacking those hidden assumptions, which can sometimes make for an interesting answer -- after all, a lot of the podcast so far has been me telling people that what they thought they knew about music history was wrong -- but when it's a question being asked by an individual and you answer that way, it can sometimes, frankly, make you look like a horribly unpleasant person, or even a bully. "Don't you even know the most basic things about historical research? I do! You fool! Hey everyone else listening, this person thinks you do research in *this* way, but everyone knows you do it *that* way!" Now, that is never how I would intend such answers to come across -- nobody can be blamed for not knowing what they don't know -- but there are some questions where no matter how I phrased the answer, it came across sounding like that. I'll try to hold those over for future Q&A episodes if I can think of ways of unpicking the answers in such a way that I'm not being unconscionably rude to people who were asking perfectly reasonable questions. Some of the answers that follow might still sound a bit like that to be honest, but if you asked a question and my answer sounds like that to you, please know that it wasn't meant to. There's a lot to get through, so let's begin: Steve from Canada asks: “Which influential artist or group has been the most challenging to get information on in the last 50 podcasts? We know there has been a lot written about the Beatles, Beach Boys, Motown as an entity, the Monkees and the Rolling Stones, but you mentioned in a tweet that there's very little about some bands like the Turtles, who are an interesting story. I had never heard of Dino Valenti before this broadcast – but he appeared a lot in the last batch – so it got me curious. [Excerpt: The Move, “Useless Information”] In the last fifty episodes there's not been a single one that's made it to the podcast where it was at all difficult to get information. The problem with many of them is that there's *too much* information out there, rather than there not being enough. No matter how many books one reads on the Beatles, one can never read more than a fraction of them, and there's huge amounts of writing on the Rolling Stones, on Hendrix, on the Doors, on the Byrds... and when you're writing about those people, you *know* that you're going to miss out something or get something wrong, because there's one more book out there you haven't read which proves that one of the stories you're telling is false. This is one of the reasons the episodes have got so much longer, and taken so much more time. That wasn't the case in the first hundred episodes -- there were a lot of artists I covered there, like Gene and Eunice, or the Chords, or Jesse Belvin, or Vince Taylor who there's very little information about. And there are some coming up who there's far less information about than people in the last fifty episodes. But every episode since the Beatles has had a surfeit of information. There is one exception -- I wanted to do a full episode on "Rescue Me" by Fontella Bass, because it would be an interesting lens through which to look at how Chess coped with the change in Black musical styles in the sixties. But there was so little information available about her I ended up relegating it to a Patreon bonus episode, because she makes those earlier artists look well-documented. Which leads nicely into the next question. Nora Tillman asks "Forgive this question if you've answered it before: is there literally a list somewhere with 500 songs you've chosen? Has the list changed since you first composed it? Also, when did you first conceive of this list?" [Excerpt: John Reed and the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company, "As Someday it May Happen"] Many people have asked this question, or variations upon it. The answer is yes and no. I made a list when I started that had roughly two hundred songs I knew needed to be on there, plus about the same number again of artists who needed to be covered but whose precise songs I hadn't decided on. To make the initial list I pulled a list out of my own head, and then I also checked a couple of other five-hundred-song lists -- the ones put out by Rolling Stone magazine and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame -- not because I wanted to use their lists; I have very little time for rock critical orthodoxy, as most of my listeners will likely have realised by now, but because I wanted to double-check that I hadn't missed anything obvious out, and that if I was missing something off their lists, I knew *why* I was missing it. To take a ludicrous example, I wouldn't want to get to the end of the 1960s and have someone say "Wait a minute, what about the Beatles?" and think "I *knew* I'd forgotten something!" Then, at the start of each fifty-episode season, I put together a more rigorous list of the fifty songs coming up, in order. Those lists *can* still change with the research -- for example, very early on in the research for the podcast, I discovered that even though I was completely unfamiliar with "Ko Ko Mo" by Gene and Eunice, it was a hugely important and influential record at the time, and so I swapped that in for another song. Or more recently, I initially intended to have the Doors only have one episode, but when I realised how much I was having to include in that episode I decided to give them a second one. And sometimes things happen the other way -- I planned to do full episodes on Jackie Shane and Fontella Bass, but for both of them I couldn't find enough information to get a decent episode done, so they ended up being moved to Patreon episodes. But generally speaking that fifty-song list for a year's episodes is going to remain largely unchanged. I know where I'm going, I know what most of the major beats of the story are, but I'm giving myself enough flexibility to deviate if I find something I need to include. Connected with this, Rob Johnson asks how I can be confident I'll get back to some stories in later episodes. Well, like I say, I have a pretty much absolute idea of what I'm going to do in the next year, and there are a lot of individual episodes where I know the structure of the episode long before we get to it. As an example here... I don't want to give too much away, and I'm generally not going to be answering questions about "will artist X be appearing?", but Rob also asked about one artist. I can tell you that that artist is one who will not be getting a full episode -- and I already said in the Patreon episode about that artist that they won't -- but as I also said in that episode they *will* get a significant amount of time in another episode, which I now know is going to be 180, which will also deal with another artist from the same state with the same forename, even though it's actually about two English bands. I've had the structure of that episode planned out since literally before I started writing episode one. On the other hand, episode 190 is a song that wasn't originally going to be included at all. I was going to do a 1967 song by the same artist, but then found out that a fact I'd been going to use was disputed, which meant that track didn't need to be covered, but the artist still did, to finish off a story I'd started in a previous episode. Patrick asks:"I am currently in the middle of reading 1971: Never a Dull Moment by David Hepworth and I'm aware that Apple TV have produced a documentary on how music changed that year as well and I was wondering what your opinion on that subject matter? I imagine you will be going into some detail on future podcasts, but until recently I never knew people considered 1971 as a year that brought about those changes." [Excerpt: Rod Stewart, "Angel"] I've not yet read Hepworth's book, but that it's named after an album which came out in 1972 (which is the album that track we just heard came from) says something about how the idea that any one year can in itself be a turning point for music is a little overstated -- and the Apple documentary is based on Hepworth's book, so it's not really multiple people making that argument. Now, as it happens, 1971 is one of the break points for the podcast -- episodes 200 and 201 are both records from July 1971, and both records that one could argue were in their own way signifiers of turning points in rock music history. And as with 1967 it's going to have more than its fair share of records, as it bridges the gap of two seasons. But I think one could make similar arguments for many, many years, and 1971 is  not one of the most compelling cases. I can't say more before I read Hepworth's book, which won't be for a few months yet. I'm instinctively dubious of these "this year was the big year that changed everything" narratives, but Hepworth's a knowledgeable enough writer that I wouldn't want to dismiss his thesis without even reading the book. Roger Pannell asks I'm a fairly recent joiner-in too so you may have answered this before. What is the theme tune to the podcast please. [Excerpt: The Boswell Sisters, “Rock and Roll”] The theme song to the podcast is "Rock and Roll" by the Boswell Sisters. The version I use is not actually the version that was released as a single, but a very similar performance that was used in the film Transatlantic Merry-Go-Round in 1931. I chose it in part because it may well be the first ever record to contain the phrase "rock and roll" (though as I've said many times there's no first anything, and there are certainly many records which talk about rocking and/or rolling -- just none I know of with that phrase) so it evokes rock and roll history, partly because the recording is out of copyright, and partly just because I like the Boswell Sisters. Several people asked questions along the lines of this one from Christopher Burnett "Just curious if there's any future episodes planned on any non-UK or non-North American songs? The bonus episodes on the Mops and Kyu Sakamoto were fascinating." [Excerpt: Kyu Sakamoto, "Sukiyaki"] Sadly, there won't be as many episodes on musicians from outside the UK and North America as I'd like. The focus of the podcast is going to be firmly on British, American, Irish, and Canadian musicians, with a handful from other Anglophone countries like Australia and Jamaica. There *are* going to be a small number of episodes on non-Anglophone musicians, but very few. Sadly, any work of history which engages with injustices still replicates some of those injustices, and one of the big injustices in rock history is that most rock musicians have been very insular, and there has been very little influence from outside the Anglophone world, which means that I can't talk much about influential records made by musicians from elsewhere.  Also, in a lot of cases most of the writing about them is in other languages, and I'm shamefully monolingual (I have enough schoolboy French not to embarrass myself, but not enough to read a biography without a dictionary to hand, and that's it). There *will* be quite a few bonus episodes on musicians from non-Anglophone countries though, because this *is* something that I'm very aware of as a flaw, and if I can find ways of bringing the wider story into the podcast I will definitely do so, even if it means changing my plans somewhat, but I'm afraid they'll largely be confined to Patreon bonuses rather than mainline episodes. Ed Cunard asks "Is there a particular set of songs you're not looking forward to because you don't care for them, but intend to dive into due to their importance?" [Excerpt: Jackie Shane, "Don't Play That Song"] There are several, and there already have been some, but I'm not going to say what they are as part of anything to do with the podcast (sometimes I might talk about how much I hate a particular record on my personal Twitter account or something, but I try not to on the podcast's account, and I'm certainly not going to in an episode of the podcast itself). One of the things I try to do with the podcast is to put the case forward as to why records were important, why people liked them at the time, what they got out of them. I can't do that if I make it about my own personal tastes. I know for a fact that there are people who have come away from episodes on records I utterly despise saying "Wow! I never liked that record before, but I do now!" and that to me shows that I have succeeded -- I've widened people's appreciation for music they couldn't appreciate before. Of course, it's impossible to keep my own tastes from showing through totally, but even there people tend to notice much more my like or dislike for certain people rather than for their music, and I don't feel anything like as bad for showing that. So I have a policy generally of just never saying which records in the list I actually like and which I hate. You'll often be able to tell from things I talk about elsewhere, but I don't want anyone to listen to an episode and be prejudiced not only against the artist but against the episode  by knowing going in that I dislike them, and I also don't want anyone to feel like their favourite band is being given short shrift. There are several records coming up that I dislike myself but where I know people are excited about hearing the episode, and the last thing I want to do is have those people who are currently excited go in disappointed before they even hear it. Matt Murch asks: "Do you anticipate tackling the shift in rock toward harder, more seriously conceptual moves in 1969 into 1970, with acts like Led Zeppelin, The Who (again), Bowie, etc. or lighter soul/pop artists such as Donna Summer, Carly Simon or the Carpenters? Also, without giving too much away, is there anything surprising you've found in your research that you're excited to cover? [Excerpt: Robert Plant, "If I Were a Carpenter"] OK, for the first question... I don't want to say exactly who will and won't be covered in future episodes, because when I say "yes, X will be covered" or "no, Y will not be covered", it invites a lot of follow-up discussion along the lines of "why is X in there and not Y?" and I end up having to explain my working, when the episodes themselves are basically me explaining my working. What I will say is this... the attitude I'm taking towards who gets included and who gets excluded is, at least in part, influenced by an idea in cognitive linguistics called prototype theory. According to this theory, categories aren't strictly bounded like in Aristotelian thought -- things don't have strict essences that mean they definitely are or aren't members of categories. But rather, categories have fuzzy boundaries, and there are things at the centre that are the most typical examples of the category, and things at the border that are less typical. For example, a robin is a very "birdy" bird -- it's very near the centre of the category of bird, it has a lot of birdness -- while an ostrich is still a bird, but much less birdy, it's sort of in the fuzzy boundary area. When you ask people to name a bird, they're more likely to name a robin than an ostrich, and if you ask them “is an ostrich a bird?” they take longer to answer than they do when asked about robins. In the same way, a sofa is nearer the centre of the category of "furniture" than a wardrobe is. Now, I am using an exceptionally wide definition of what counts as rock music, but at the same time, in order for it to be a history of rock music, I do have to spend more time in the centre of the concept than around the periphery. My definition would encompass all the artists you name, but I'm pretty sure that everyone would agree that the first three artists you name are much closer to the centre of the concept of "rock music" than the last three. That's not to say anyone on either list is definitely getting covered or is definitely *not* getting covered -- while I have to spend more time in the centre than the periphery, I do have to spend some time on the periphery, and my hope is to cover as many subgenres and styles as I can -- but that should give an idea of how I'm approaching this. As for the second question -- there's relatively little that's surprising that I've uncovered in my research so far, but that's to be expected. The period from about 1965 through about 1975 is the most over-covered period of rock music history, and so the basic facts for almost every act are very, very well known to people with even a casual interest. For the stuff I'm doing in the next year or so, like the songs I've covered for the last year, it's unlikely that anything exciting will come up until very late in the research process, the times when I'm pulling everything together and notice one little detail that's out of place and pull on that thread and find the whole story unravelling. Which may well mean, of course, that there *are* no such surprising things. That's always a possibility in periods where we're looking at things that have been dealt with a million times before, and this next year may largely be me telling stories that have already been told. Which is still of value, because I'm putting them into a larger context of the already-released episodes, but we'll see if anything truly surprising happens. I certainly hope it does. James Kosmicki asks "Google Podcasts doesn't seem to have any of the first 100 episodes - are they listed under a different name perhaps?" [Excerpt: REM, "Disappear"] I get a number of questions like this, about various podcast apps and sites, and I'm afraid my answer is always the same -- there's nothing I can do about this, and it's something you'd have to take up with the site in question. Google Podcasts picks up episodes from the RSS feed I provide, the same as every other site or app. It's using the right feed, that feed has every episode in it, and other sites and apps are working OK with it. In general, I suggest that rather than streaming sites like Google Podcasts or Stitcher or Spotify, where the site acts as a middleman and they serve the podcast to you from their servers, people should use a dedicated podcast app like RadioPublic or Pocketcasts or gPodder, where rather than going from a library of podcast episodes that some third party has stored, you're downloading the files direct from the original server, but I understand that sometimes those apps are more difficult to use, especially for less tech-savvy people. But generally, if an episode is in some way faulty or missing on the 500songs.com webpage, that's something I can do something about. If it's showing up wrong on Spotify or Google Podcasts or Stitcher or whatever, that's a problem at their end. Sorry. Darren Johnson asks "were there any songs that surprised you? Which one made the biggest change between what you thought you knew and what you learned researching it?" [Excerpt: The Turtles, "Goodbye Surprise"] Well, there have been a few, in different ways. The most surprising thing for me actually was in the most recent episode when I discovered the true story behind the "bigger than Jesus" controversy during my reading. That was a story I'd known one way for my entire life -- literally I think I first read about that story when I was six or seven -- and it turned out that not one thing I'd read on the subject had explained what had really happened. But then there are other things like the story of "Ko Ko Mo", which was a record I wasn't even planning on covering at first, but which turned out to be one of the most important records of the fifties. But I actually get surprised relatively little by big-picture things. I'll often discover fun details or new connections between things I hadn't noticed before, but the basic outlines of the story never change that much -- I've been reading about music history literally since I learned how to read, and while I do a deep dive for each episode, it's very rare that I discover anything that totally changes my perspective. There is always a process of reevaluation going on, and a change in the emphases in my thought, so for example when I started the project I knew Johnny Otis would come up a fair bit in the early years, and knew he was a major figure, but was still not giving him the full credit he deserved in my head. The same goes for Jesse Belvin, and as far as background figures go Lester Sill and Milt Gabler. But all of these were people I already knew were important, i just hadn't connected all the dots in my head. I've also come to appreciate some musicians more than I did previously. But there are very few really major surprises, which is probably to be expected -- I got into this already knowing a *LOT*, because otherwise I wouldn't have thought this was a project I could take on. Tracey Germa -- and I'm sorry, I don't know if that's pronounced with a hard or soft G, so my apologies if I mispronounced it -- asks: "Hi Andrew. We love everything about the podcast, but are especially impressed with the way you couch your trigger warnings and how you embed social commentary into your analysis of the music. You have such a kind approach to understanding human experiences and at the same time you don't balk at saying the hard things some folks don't want to hear about their music heroes. So, the question is - where does your social justice/equity/inclusion/suffer no fools side come from? Your family? Your own experiences? School/training?” [Excerpt: Elvis Costello and the Attractions, "Little Triggers"] Well, firstly, I have to say that people do say  this kind of thing to me quite a lot, and I'm grateful when they say it, but I never really feel comfortable with it, because frankly I think I do very close to the absolute minimum, and I get by because of the horribly low expectations our society has for allocishet white men, which means that making even the tiniest effort possible to be a decent human being looks far more impressive by comparison than it actually is. I genuinely think I don't do a very good job of this at all, although I do try, and that's not false modesty there. But to accept the premise of the question for a moment, there are a couple of answers. My parents are both fairly progressive both politically and culturally,  for the time and place where they raised me. They both had strong political convictions, and while they didn't have access to much culture other than what was on TV or in charting records or what have you -- there was no bookshop or record shop in our town, and obviously no Internet back then -- they liked the stuff out of that mix that was forward-thinking, and so was anti-racist, accepting of queerness, and so on. From a very early age, I was listening to things like "Glad to be Gay" by the Tom Robinson Band. So from before I really even understood what those concepts were, I knew that the people I admired thought that homophobia and racism were bad things. I was also bullied a lot at school, because I was autistic and fat and wore glasses and a bunch of other reasons. So I hated bullying and never wanted to be a bully. I get very, very, *very* angry at cruelty and at abuses of power -- as almost all autistic people do, actually. And then, in my twenties and thirties, for a variety of reasons I ended up having a social circle that was predominantly queer and/or disabled and/or people with mental health difficulties. And when you're around people like that, and you don't want to be a bully, you learn to at least try to take their feelings into consideration, though I slipped up a great deal for a long time, and still don't get everything right. So that's the "social justice" side of things. The other side, the "understanding human experiences" side... well, everyone has done awful things at times, and I would hope that none of us would be judged by our worst behaviours. "Use every man to his desert and who should 'scape whipping?" and all that. But that doesn't mean those worst behaviours aren't bad, and that they don't hurt people, and denying that only compounds the injustice. People are complicated, societies are complicated, and everyone is capable of great good and great evil. In general I tend to avoid a lot of the worst things the musicians I talk about did, because the podcast *is* about the music, but when their behaviour affects the music, or when I would otherwise be in danger of giving a truly inaccurate picture of someone, I have to talk about those things. You can't talk about Jerry Lee Lewis without talking about how his third marriage derailed his career, you can't talk about Sam Cooke without talking about his death, and to treat those subjects honestly you have to talk about the reprehensible sides of their character. Of course, in the case of someone like Lewis, there seems to be little *but* a reprehensible side, while someone like Cooke could be a horrible, horrible person, but even the people he hurt the most also loved him dearly because of his admirable qualities. You *have* to cover both aspects of someone like him if you want to be honest, and if you're not going to be honest why bother trying to do history at all? Lester Dragstedt says (and I apologise if I mispronounced that): "I absolutely love this podcast and the perspective you bring. My only niggle is that the sound samples are mixed so low. When listening to your commentary about a song at voice level my fingers are always at the volume knob to turn up when the song comes in." [Excerpt: Bjork, "It's Oh So Quiet"] This is something that gets raised a lot, but it's not something that's ever going to change. When I started the podcast, I had the music levels higher, and got complaints about that, so I started mixing them lower. I then got complaints about *that*, so I did a poll of my Patreon backers to see what they thought, and by about a sixty-forty margin they wanted the levels to be lower, as they are now, rather than higher as they were earlier. Basically, there seem to be two groups of listeners. One group mostly listens with headphones, and doesn't like it when the music gets louder, because it hurts their ears. The other group mostly listens in their cars, and the music gets lost in the engine noise. That's a gross oversimplification, and there are headphone listeners who want the music louder and car listeners who want the music quieter, but the listenership does seem to split roughly that way, and there are slightly more headphone listeners. Now, it's literally *impossible* for me to please everyone, so I've given up trying with this, and it's *not* going to change. Partly because the majority of my backers voted one way, partly because it's just easier to leave things the way they are rather than mess with them given that no matter what I do someone will be unhappy, and partly because both Tilt when he edits the podcast and I when I listen back and tweak his edit are using headphones, and *we* don't want to hurt our ears either. Eric Peterson asks "if we are basically in 1967 that is when we start seeing Country artists like Johnny Cash and Waylon Jennings - the Man who Survived the Day the Music Died - start to bring more rock songs into their recordings and start to set the ground work in many ways for Country Rock ... how do you envision bringing the role they play in the History of Rock and Roll into the podcast?" [Excerpt: The Del McCoury Band, "Nashville Cats"] I will of course be dealing with country rock as one of the subgenres I discuss -- though there's only one real country-rock track coming up in the next fifty, but there'll be more as I get into the seventies, and there are several artists coming up with at least some country influence. But I won't be looking at straight country musicians like Jennings or Cash except through the lens of rock musicians they inspired -- things like me talking about Johnny Cash briefly in the intro to the "Hey Joe" episode. I think Cocaine and Rhinestones is already doing a better job of covering country music than I ever could, and so those people will only touch the story tangentially. Nili Marcia says: "If one asks a person what's in that room it would not occur to one in 100 to mention the air that fills it. Something so ubiquitous as riff--I don't know what a riff actually is! Will you please define riff, preferably with examples." Now this is something I actually thought I'd explained way back in episode one, and I have a distinct memory of doing so, but I must have cut that part out -- maybe I recorded it so badly that part couldn't be salvaged, which happened sometimes in the early days -- because I just checked and there's no explanation there. I would have come back to this at some point if I hadn't been thinking all along that I'd covered it right at the start, because you're right, it is a term that needs definition. A riff is, simply, a repeated, prominent, instrumental figure. The term started out in jazz, and there it was a term for a phrase that would be passed back and forth between different instruments -- a trumpet might play a phrase, then a saxophone copy it, then back to the trumpet, then back to the saxophone. But quickly it became a term for a repeated figure that becomes the main accompaniment part of a song, over which an instrumentalist might solo or a singer might sing, but which you remember in its own right. A few examples of well-known riffs might include "Smoke on the Water" by Deep Purple: [Excerpt: Deep Purple, "Smoke on the Water"] "I Feel Fine" by the Beatles: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Feel Fine"] "Last Train to Clarksville" by the Monkees: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Last Train to Clarksville"] The bass part in “Under Pressure” by Queen and David Bowie: [Excerpt: Queen and David Bowie, “Under Pressure”] Or the Kingsmen's version of "Louie Louie": [Excerpt: The Kingsmen, "Louie Louie"] Basically, if you can think of a very short, prominent, instrumental idea that gets repeated over and over, that's a riff. Erik Pedersen says "I love the long episodes and I suspect you do too -- thoroughness. of this kind is something few get the opportunity to do -- but have you ever, after having written a long one, decided to cut them significantly? Are there audio outtakes you might string together one day?" [Excerpt: Bing Crosby and Les Paul, "It's Been a Long, Long Time"] I do like *having* done the long episodes, and sometimes I enjoy doing them, but other times I find it frustrating that an episode takes so long, because there are other stories I want to move on to. I'm trying for more of a balance over the next year, and we'll see how that works out. I want to tell the story in the depth it deserves, and the longer episodes allow me to do that, and to experiment with narrative styles and so on, but I also want to get the podcast finished before I die of old age. Almost every episode has stuff that gets cut, but it's usually in the writing or recording stage -- I'll realise a bit of the episode is boring and just skip it while I'm recording, or I'll cut out an anecdote or something because it looks like it's going to be a flabby episode and I want to tighten it up, or sometimes I'll realise that because of my mild speech impediments a sentence is literally unspeakable, and I'll rework it. It's very, very rare that I'll cut anything once it's been recorded, and if I do it's generally because when I listen back after it's been edited I'll realise I'm repeating myself or I made a mistake and need to cut a sentence because I said the wrong name, that sort of thing. I delete all the audio outtakes, but even if I didn't there would be nothing worth releasing. A few odd, out of context sentences, the occasional paragraph just repeating something I'd already said, a handful of actual incorrect facts, and a lot of me burping, or trying to say a difficult name three times in a row, or swearing when the phone rings in the middle of a long section. Lucy Hewitt says "Something that interests me, and that I'm sure you will cover is how listeners consume music and if that has an impact. In my lifetime we've moved from a record player which is fixed in one room to having a music collection with you wherever you go, and from hoping that the song you want to hear might be played on the radio to calling it up whenever you want. Add in the rise of music videos, and MTV, and the way in which people access music has changed a lot over the decades. But has that affected the music itself?" [Excerpt: Bow Wow Wow "C30 C60 C90 Go!"] It absolutely has affected the music itself in all sorts of ways, some of which I've touched on already and some of which I will deal with as we go through the story, though the story I'm telling will end around the time of Napster and so won't involve streaming services and so forth. But every technology change leads to a change in the sound of music in both obvious and non-obvious ways. When AM radio was the most dominant form of broadcasting, there was no point releasing singles in stereo, because at that time there were no stereo AM stations. The records also had to be very compressed, so the sound would cut through the noise and interference. Those records would often be very bass-heavy and have a very full, packed, sound. In the seventies, with the rise of eight-track players, you'd often end up with soft-rock and what would later get termed yacht rock having huge success. That music, which is very ethereal and full of high frequencies, is affected less negatively by some of the problems that came with eight-track players, like the tape stretching slightly. Then post-1974 and the OPEC oil crisis, vinyl became more expensive, which meant that records started being made much thinner, which meant you couldn't cut grooves as deeply, which meant you lost bass response, which again changed the sound of records – and also explains why when CDs came out, people started thinking they sounded better than records, because they *did* sound better than the stuff that was being pressed in the late seventies and early eighties, which was so thin it was almost transparent, even though they sounded nowhere near as good as the heavy vinyl pressings of the fifties and sixties. And then the amount of music one could pack into a CD encouraged longer tracks... A lot of eighties Hi-NRG and dance-pop music, like the records made by Stock, Aitken, and Waterman, has almost no bass but lots of skittering high-end percussion sounds -- tons of synthesised sleighbells and hi-hats and so on -- because a lot of disco equipment had frequency-activated lights, and the more high-end stuff was going on, the more the disco lights flashed... We'll look at a lot of these changes as we go along, but every single new format, every new way of playing an old format, every change in music technology, changes what music gets made quite dramatically. Lucas Hubert asks: “Black Sabbath being around the corner, how do you plan on dealing with Heavy Metal? I feel like for now, what is popular and what has had a big impact in Rock history coincide. But that kind of change with metal, no? (Plus, prog and metal are more based on albums than singles, I think.)” [Excerpt: Black Sabbath, “Sabbath Bloody Sabbath”] I plan on dealing with metal the same way I've been dealing with every other subgenre. We are, yes, getting into a period where influence and commercial success don't correlate quite as firmly as they did in the early years -- though really we've already been there for quite some time. I've done two episodes so far on the Byrds, a group who only had three top-twenty singles in the US and two in the UK, but only did a bonus episode on Herman's Hermits, who had fourteen in the US and seventeen in the UK. I covered Little Richard but didn't cover Pat Boone, even though Boone had the bigger hits with Richard's songs. In every subgenre there are going to be massive influences who had no hits, and people who had lots of hits but didn't really make much of a wider impact on music, and I'll be dealing with the former more than the latter. But also, I'll be dealing most with people who were influential *and* had lots of hits -- if nothing else because while influence and chart success aren't a one-to-one correlation, they're still somewhat correlated. So it's unlikely you'll see me cover your favourite Scandinavian Black Metal band who only released one album of which every copy was burned in a mysterious fire two days after release, but you can expect most of the huge names in metal to be covered. Though even there, simply because of the number of subgenres I'm going to cover, I'm going to miss some big ones. Related to the question about albums, Svennie asks “This might be a bit of a long winded question so just stick with me here. As the music you cover becomes more elaborate, and the albums become bigger in scale, how do you choose a song which you build the story around while also telling the story of that album? I ask this specifically with the White Album in mind, where you've essentially got four albums in one. To that end, what song would you feel defines the White Album?” [Excerpt: The Beatles, “Revolution #9”] Well, you'll see how I cover the White Album in episode one hundred and seventy-two -- we're actually going to have quite a long stretch with no Beatles songs covered because I'm going to backfill a lot of 1967 and then we're getting to the Beatles again towards the end of 1968, but it'll be another big one when we get there. But in the general case... the majority of albums to come still had singles released off them, and a lot of what I'm going to be looking at in the next year or two is still hit singles, even if the singles are by people known as album bands. Other times, a song wasn't a single, but maybe it was covered by someone else -- if I know I'm going to cover a rock band and I also know that one of the soul artists who would do rock covers as album tracks did a version of one of their songs, and I'm going to cover that soul artist, say, then if I do the song that artist covered I can mention it in the episode on the soul singer and tie the two episodes together a bit. In other cases there's a story behind a particular track that's more interesting than other tracks, or the track is itself a cover version of someone else's record, which lets me cover both artists in a single episode, or it's the title track of the album. A lot of people have asked me this question about how I'd deal with albums as we get to the late sixties and early seventies, but looking at the list of the next fifty episodes, there's actually only two where I had to think seriously about which song I chose from an album -- in one case, I chose the title track, in the other case I just chose the first song on the album (though in that case I may end up choosing another song from the same album if I end up finding a way to make that a more interesting episode). The other forty-eight were all very, very obvious choices. Gary Lucy asks “Do you keep up with contemporary music at all? If so, what have you been enjoying in 2022 so far…and if not, what was the most recent “new” album you really got into?” [Excerpt: Stew and the Negro Problem, "On the Stage of a Blank White Page"] I'm afraid I don't. Since I started doing the podcast, pretty much all of my listening time has been spent on going back to much older music, and even before that, when I was listening to then-new music it was generally stuff that was very much inspired by older music, bands like the Lemon Twigs, who probably count as the last new band I really got into with their album Do Hollywood, which came out in 2016 but which I think I heard in 2018. I'm also now of that age where 2018 seems like basically yesterday, and when I keep thinking "what relatively recent albums have I liked?" I think of things like The Reluctant Graveyard by Jeremy Messersmith, which is from 2010, or Ys by Joanna Newsom, which came out in 2006. Not because I haven't bought records released since then, but because my sense of time is so skewed that summer 1994 and summer 1995 feel like epochs apart, hugely different times in every way, but every time from about 2005 to 2020 is just "er... a couple of years ago? Maybe?" So without going through every record I've bought in the last twenty years and looking at the release date I couldn't tell you what still counts as contemporary and what's old enough to vote. I have recently listened a couple of times to an album by a band called Wet Leg, who are fairly new, but other than that I can't say. But probably the most recent albums to become part of my regular listening rotation are two albums which came out simultaneously in 2018 by Stew and the Negro Problem, Notes of a Native Song, which is a song cycle about James Baldwin and race in America, and The Total Bent, which is actually the soundtrack to a stage musical, and which I think many listeners to the podcast might find interesting, and which is what that last song excerpt was taken from. It's basically a riff on the idea of The Jazz Singer, but set in the Civil Rights era, and about a young politically-radical Black Gospel songwriter who writes songs for his conservative preacher father to sing, but who gets persuaded to become a rock and roll performer by a white British record producer who fetishises Black music. It has a *lot* to say about religion, race, and politics in America -- a couple of the song titles, to give you some idea, are "Jesus Ain't Sitting in the Back of the Bus" and "That's Why He's Jesus and You're Not, Whitey". It's a remarkable album, and it deals with enough of the same subjects I've covered here that I think any listeners will find it interesting. Unfortunately, it was released through the CDBaby store, which closed down a few months later, and unlike most albums released through there it doesn't seem to have made its way onto any of the streaming platforms or digital stores other than Apple Music, which rather limits its availability. I hope it comes out again soon. Alec Dann says “I haven't made it to the Sixties yet so pardon if you have covered this: what was the relationship between Sun and Stax in their heyday? Did musicians work in both studios?” [Excerpt: Booker T. and the MGs, "Green Onions"] I've covered this briefly in a couple of the episodes on Stax, but the short version is that Sun was declining just as Stax was picking up. Jim Stewart, who founded Stax, was inspired in part by Sam Phillips, and there was a certain amount of cross-fertilisation, but not that much. Obviously Rufus Thomas recorded for both labels, and there were a few other connections -- Billy Lee Riley, for example, who I did an episode on for his Sun work, also recorded at the Stax studio before going on to be a studio musician in LA, and it was actually at a Billy Lee Riley session that went badly that Booker T and the MGs recorded "Green Onions". Also, Sun had a disc-cutting machine and Stax didn't, so when they wanted to get an acetate cut to play for DJs they'd take it to Sun -- it was actually Scotty Moore, who was working for Sun as a general engineer and producer as well as playing RCA Elvis sessions by 1962, who cut the first acetate copy of "Green Onions". But in general the musicians playing at Stax were largely the next generation of musicians -- people who'd grown up listening to the records Sam Phillips had put out in the very early fifties by Black musicians, and with very little overlap. Roger Stevenson asks "This project is going to take the best part of 7 years to complete. Do you have contingency plans in case of major problems? And please look after yourself - this project is gong to be your legacy." [Excerpt: Bonzo Dog Doodah Band, "Button Up Your Overcoat"] I'm afraid there's not much I can do if major problems come up -- by major problems I'm talking about things that prevent me from making the podcast altogether, like being unable to think or write or talk. By its nature, the podcast is my writing and my research and my voice, and if I can't do those things... well, I can't do them. I *am* trying to build in some slack again -- that's why this month off has happened -- so I can deal with delays and short-term illnesses and other disruptions, but if it becomes impossible to do it becomes impossible to do, and there's nothing more I can do about it. Mark Lipson asks "I'd like to know which episodes you've released have been the most & least popular? And going forward, which episodes do you expect to be the most popular? Just curious to know what music most of your listeners listen to and are interested in." [Excerpt: Sly and the Family Stone, "Somebody's Watching You"] I'm afraid I honestly don't know. Most podcasters have extensive statistical tools available to them, which tell them which episodes are most popular, what demographics are listening to the podcast, where they are in the world, and all that kind of thing. They use that information to sell advertising spots, which is how they make most of their money. You can say "my podcast is mostly listened to by seventy-five year-olds who google for back pain relief -- the perfect demographic for your orthopedic mattresses" or "seven thousand people who downloaded my latest episode also fell for at least one email claiming to be from the wallet inspector last year, so my podcast is listened to by the ideal demographic for cryptocurrency investment". Now, I'm lucky enough to be making enough money from my Patreon supporters' generosity that I don't have to sell advertising, and I hope I never do have to. I said at the very start of the process that I would if it became necessary, but that I hoped to keep it ad-free, and people have frankly been so astonishingly generous I should never have to do ads -- though I do still reserve the right to change my mind if the support drops off. Now, my old podcast host gave me access to that data as standard. But when I had to quickly change providers, I decided that I wasn't going to install any stats packages to keep track of people. I can see a small amount of information about who actually visits the website, because wordpress.com gives you that information – not your identities but just how many people come from which countries, and what sites linked them. But if you're downloading the podcast through a podcast app, or listening through Spotify or Stitcher or wherever, I've deliberately chosen not to access that data. I don't need to know who my audience is, or which episodes they like the most -- and if I did, I have a horrible feeling I'd start trying to tailor the podcast to be more like what the existing listeners like, and by doing so lose the very things that make it unique. Once or twice a month I'll look at the major podcast charts, I check the Patreon every so often to see if there's been a massive change in subscriber numbers, but other than that I decided I'm just not going to spy on my listeners (though pretty much every other link in the chain does, I'm afraid, because these days the entire Internet is based on spying on people). So the only information I have is the auto-generated "most popular episodes" thing that comes up on the front page, which everyone can see, and which shows the episodes people who actually visit the site are listening to most in the last few days, but which doesn't count anything from more than a few days ago, and which doesn't count listens from any other source, and which I put there basically so new listeners can see which ones are popular. At the moment that's showing that the most listened episodes recently are the two most recent full episodes -- "Respect" and "All You Need is Love" -- the most recent of the Pledge Week episodes, episodes one and two, so people are starting at the beginning, and right now there's also the episodes on "Ooby Dooby", "Needles and Pins", "God Only Knows", "She Loves You" and "Hey Joe". But in a couple of days' time those last five will be totally different. And again, that's just the information from people actually visiting the podcast website. I've deliberately chosen not to know what people listening in any other way are doing -- so if you've decided to just stream that bit of the Four Tops episode where I do a bad Bob Dylan impression five thousand times in a row, you can rest assured I have no idea you're doing it and your secret is totally safe. Anyway, that's all I have time for in this episode. In a week or so I'll post a similar-length episode for Patreon backers only, and then a week or two after that the regular podcast will resume, with a story involving folk singers, jazz harmony, angelic visitations and the ghost of James Dean. See you then.

Chelsea FanCast
Chelsea FanCast #916 - My Chelsea with Andy Cairns of Therapy?

Chelsea FanCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 124:31


Stamford Chidge talks to Andy Cairns, singer and guitarist from the legendary band Therapy?, about his love of all things Chelsea.My Chelsea returns with Andy Cairns, singer and guitarist from the legendary band Therapy? to talk about his support of Chelsea. Formed in 1990, and influenced by bands such as Black Sabbath, Killing Joke, Sonic Youth, Rapeman, Hüsker Dü, Butthole Surfers, The Undertones, That Petrol Emotion, Captain Beefheart, Motörhead, Mudhoney, early Metallica, Fugazi and The Stooges, Therapy? are now in to a 32 year and 23 album career, selling out gigs all around the world.In spite of growing up in Northen Ireland, Andy Cairns just happens to be a massive Chelsea supporter and season ticket holder since 1994, and a mate of Chelsea FanCast's Mark Meehan. We invited Andy in for a chat about how he became a Chelsea fan, his first game, favourite players growing up, his favourite matches, his best and worst Chelsea moments, his all time Chelsea hero and his favourite Chelsea chant.As well as being a great singer/guitarist in a legendary band, Andy is a top bloke who both loves and knows his Chelsea. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

InObscuria Podcast
Ep. 136: Aussie Pub Rock with Craig Elvin - No.2

InObscuria Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 115:48


No worries this week as we once again say G'Day to our number 1 guest from Down Under; CRAIG ELVIN! We Americans may know AC/DC and a few select other Aussie bands, but the CEO of Pub Rock is back to take us further on our continuing sonic journey across the continent to hear where that meat and two veg rock originated. Grab a pint and get ready to rock - - - Aussie-style!What is it we do here at InObscuria? On most shows, Kevin opens the crypt to exhume and dissect from his personal collection; an artist, album, or collection of tunes from the broad spectrum of rock, punk, and metal. This go-round we turn the microphone over to Craig Elvin to give us all a schooling on more lost, forgotten and should have beens selections of Aussie Pub Rock. Our hope is always that we turn you on to something new.Songs this week include:Buffalo - “Sunrise (Come My Way)” from Volcanic Rock (1973)Australian Crawl - “Things Don't Seem” from Sirocco (1981)The Radiators - “Comin' Home” from Feel The Heat (1980)Baby Animals - “Working For The Enemy” from Baby Animals (1991)Sunnyboys - “Happy Man” from Sunnyboys (1981)Skyhooks - “Women In Uniform” from Guilty Until Proven Insane (1978)Johnny Diesel & The Injectors - “Parisienne Hotel” from Johnny Diesel & The Injectors (1989)Please subscribe everywhere that you listen to podcasts!Visit us: https://inobscuria.com/https://www.facebook.com/InObscuriahttps://twitter.com/inobscuriahttps://www.instagram.com/inobscuria/Buy cool stuff with our logo on it!: https://www.redbubble.com/people/InObscuria?asc=uCheck out Robert's amazing fire sculptures and metal workings here: http://flamewerx.com/If you'd like to check out Kevin's band THE SWEAR, take a listen on all streaming services or pick up a digital copy of their latest release here: https://theswear.bandcamp.com/If you want to hear Robert and Kevin's band from the late 90s – early 00s BIG JACK PNEUMATIC, check it out here: https://bigjackpnuematic.bandcamp.com/

Aliens, Ghosts and Bigfoot Oh My! Stranger Things Happen Everyday.
David Icke - SATURN ISN'T WHAT YOU THINK IT IS EITHER!

Aliens, Ghosts and Bigfoot Oh My! Stranger Things Happen Everyday.

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 53:44


David Icke - SATURN ISN'T WHAT YOU THINK IT IS EITHER!Sheriff in the ancient Egyptian was a law-giver and his badge was always a six-pointed star which is a symbol of Saturn. US Sheriffs in the wild west up to today still wear the six-pointed star. It is interesting that Saturn's symbol is the 6-pointed star, Saturn is the 6th planet from the sun, Saturn-day is the 6th day of the week, and now NASA is receiving images of “the Saturn Hexagon” (6-sided) atmospheric formation at Saturn's poles. The 6th chakra of the human energy system is the 3rd eye/pineal gland (6, 3 times = 666). When your 3rd eye chakra opens you develop your 6th sense of intuition and spirituality. From a consciousness perspective, the 6th sense, your intuitions/hunches, are messengers of god, your guardian angels. Isn't it interesting that angels have haloes/rings around their heads and Saturn is the only planet with a halo/ring around it?“That is why today, when you get married, you get married before God. And the symbol of that God is the ring that is put on each other's fingers. The ring of Saturn. In the marriage phrases, one also begins to see what that has to do with Saturn. So when you get married, you get married with a ring and the symbol of that God is the ring, the ring of Saturn. You're wearing God's ring. And the yarmulke was the round ring that you wear on your head, for Saturn your God. Even in the middle ages, in the temples, Catholic monks would shave their heads in a round circle, and the Hebrews, instead of doing that, would wear the yarmulke. But it all had to do with the round rings of Saturn.” -Jordan Maxwell, “Matrix of Power”“The ancient name of Saturn was, as mentioned, EL. It is the reason why those that were chosen by EL, were called Elites. In fact the words, Elect, Elder, Elevated, Elohim, Temple, Circle, Gospel, Apostle, Disciple, Evangelists, etc., all derive from the Cult of EL. Angels are messengers of god. But god was EL, which is why we have the names of the Archangels bearing the ‘el,' suffix – Raphael, Michael, Uriel, Gabriel, etc,.” -Michael Tsarion, “Astrotheology and Sidereal Mythology”The plural term Elohim appears over 2500 times in the Old Testament but is falsely translated in most versions. This fact of plurality explains why in Genesis ‘Gods' said, ‘Let us make man in our image.' As stated, Elohim refers to both ‘gods' and ‘goddesses,' and its singular form, El, served as a prefix or suffix to names of gods, people and places, whence Emmanu-El, Gabri-El, Beth-El, etc. Even ‘Satan' was one of the Elohim.” -Acharya S., “The Christ Conspiracy” (67)The gods of EL-o-him are ang-EL-s, the messengers of god. When witches cast a spe-EL, they put the “Hex” (6) on someone, and when chefs deep fry something, they “Deep 6” it. It is the EL-ites who run the world today. El-ite comes from the “Isra-El-ites” which came from the Egyptian worship of the Moon (Isis), the Sun, (Ra), and Saturn (Elohim), hence Is-Ra-El.In Islamic tradition, the “Rock” is where Muhammad ascended to Heaven accompanied by the ang-el Gabri-el. The Dome of the “Rock” was built in the 600 AD era and was won back by the Israelites on 06/07/67 after the “6 day war.” The Dome's outer walls measure 60 (6×10) feet wide and 36 (6×6) feet high. The Knights Templar claimed the Dome of the Rock was the site of the Temple of Solomon and set up their “Templum Domini” adjacent to it during the 12th century.“Saturn is an important key to understanding the long heritage this conspiracy has back to antiquity. The city of Rome was originally known as Saturnia or City of Saturn. The Roman Catholic church retains much of the Saturn worship in its ritual. Saturn also relates to Lucifer. In various occult dictionaries Saturn is associated with evil. Saturn was important to the religion of Mithra, and also the Druids.” –Fritz Springmeier, “Bloodlines of the Illuminati”Rome was known to the “Romans” as Saturnia, not Rome, and Saturn was one of their gods. Black is both Saturn's color and Satan's color. The black holy bible tells us Satan is 666. Saturn is the 6th planet, its symbol is a 6-pointed star, it supposedly has hexagon weather formations, and Saturn-day, the 6th day, is Ozzy Osbourne's “Black Sabbath.”Is this all just divine coincidence or is our perception of Saturn and the other planets being manipulated by the Masonic magicians at NASA?

Ghosts That Hunt Back TV - True Ghost Bigfoot and UFO Stories
David Icke - SATURN ISN'T WHAT YOU THINK IT IS EITHER!

Ghosts That Hunt Back TV - True Ghost Bigfoot and UFO Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 53:44


David Icke - SATURN ISN'T WHAT YOU THINK IT IS EITHER!Sheriff in the ancient Egyptian was a law-giver and his badge was always a six-pointed star which is a symbol of Saturn. US Sheriffs in the wild west up to today still wear the six-pointed star. It is interesting that Saturn's symbol is the 6-pointed star, Saturn is the 6th planet from the sun, Saturn-day is the 6th day of the week, and now NASA is receiving images of “the Saturn Hexagon” (6-sided) atmospheric formation at Saturn's poles. The 6th chakra of the human energy system is the 3rd eye/pineal gland (6, 3 times = 666). When your 3rd eye chakra opens you develop your 6th sense of intuition and spirituality. From a consciousness perspective, the 6th sense, your intuitions/hunches, are messengers of god, your guardian angels. Isn't it interesting that angels have haloes/rings around their heads and Saturn is the only planet with a halo/ring around it?“That is why today, when you get married, you get married before God. And the symbol of that God is the ring that is put on each other's fingers. The ring of Saturn. In the marriage phrases, one also begins to see what that has to do with Saturn. So when you get married, you get married with a ring and the symbol of that God is the ring, the ring of Saturn. You're wearing God's ring. And the yarmulke was the round ring that you wear on your head, for Saturn your God. Even in the middle ages, in the temples, Catholic monks would shave their heads in a round circle, and the Hebrews, instead of doing that, would wear the yarmulke. But it all had to do with the round rings of Saturn.” -Jordan Maxwell, “Matrix of Power”“The ancient name of Saturn was, as mentioned, EL. It is the reason why those that were chosen by EL, were called Elites. In fact the words, Elect, Elder, Elevated, Elohim, Temple, Circle, Gospel, Apostle, Disciple, Evangelists, etc., all derive from the Cult of EL. Angels are messengers of god. But god was EL, which is why we have the names of the Archangels bearing the ‘el,' suffix – Raphael, Michael, Uriel, Gabriel, etc,.” -Michael Tsarion, “Astrotheology and Sidereal Mythology”The plural term Elohim appears over 2500 times in the Old Testament but is falsely translated in most versions. This fact of plurality explains why in Genesis ‘Gods' said, ‘Let us make man in our image.' As stated, Elohim refers to both ‘gods' and ‘goddesses,' and its singular form, El, served as a prefix or suffix to names of gods, people and places, whence Emmanu-El, Gabri-El, Beth-El, etc. Even ‘Satan' was one of the Elohim.” -Acharya S., “The Christ Conspiracy” (67)The gods of EL-o-him are ang-EL-s, the messengers of god. When witches cast a spe-EL, they put the “Hex” (6) on someone, and when chefs deep fry something, they “Deep 6” it. It is the EL-ites who run the world today. El-ite comes from the “Isra-El-ites” which came from the Egyptian worship of the Moon (Isis), the Sun, (Ra), and Saturn (Elohim), hence Is-Ra-El.In Islamic tradition, the “Rock” is where Muhammad ascended to Heaven accompanied by the ang-el Gabri-el. The Dome of the “Rock” was built in the 600 AD era and was won back by the Israelites on 06/07/67 after the “6 day war.” The Dome's outer walls measure 60 (6×10) feet wide and 36 (6×6) feet high. The Knights Templar claimed the Dome of the Rock was the site of the Temple of Solomon and set up their “Templum Domini” adjacent to it during the 12th century.“Saturn is an important key to understanding the long heritage this conspiracy has back to antiquity. The city of Rome was originally known as Saturnia or City of Saturn. The Roman Catholic church retains much of the Saturn worship in its ritual. Saturn also relates to Lucifer. In various occult dictionaries Saturn is associated with evil. Saturn was important to the religion of Mithra, and also the Druids.” –Fritz Springmeier, “Bloodlines of the Illuminati”Rome was known to the “Romans” as Saturnia, not Rome, and Saturn was one of their gods. Black is both Saturn's color and Satan's color. The black holy bible tells us Satan is 666. Saturn is the 6th planet, its symbol is a 6-pointed star, it supposedly has hexagon weather formations, and Saturn-day, the 6th day, is Ozzy Osbourne's “Black Sabbath.”Is this all just divine coincidence or is our perception of Saturn and the other planets being manipulated by the Masonic magicians at NASA?

Nostalgia Trap
Record Trap Ep 2 - The Devil in the Music, Part One

Nostalgia Trap

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 92:20


Where does American popular music come from, and what does the devil have to do with it? On Part One of a two-part series on music and the occult, Justin Farrar and I discuss Peter Bebergal's excellent history Season of the Witch: How the Occult Saved Rock and Roll, as we explore the eerie mythology that haunts the origins of blues and rock. Some of the musicians and other figures mentioned in this episode include Robert Johnson, Clarence Ashley, Big Mama Thornton, Elvis Presley, Led Zeppelin, David Bowie, Black Sabbath, Tommy Johnson, Skip James, Kurt Cobain, R.E.M., Harry Smith, The Geto Boys, and lots more.  For more episodes of Record Trap and access to the entire Nostalgia Trap universe, subscribe at patreon.com/nostalgiatrap. 

The Drop with Danno on GFN 광주영어방송
2022.07.28 Sampled & AMPED with Dan Lloyd

The Drop with Danno on GFN 광주영어방송

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 120:24


As broadcast July 28, 2022 with plenty of extra sauce to slather on.  Well, it's late July so we're having a barbecue to start the show tonight with some newer and older funky favorites, but maybe not the most familiar tracks if you're American.  Lots of African, UK, and French influences going on here with some Ethiopians, Russians, and Danes thrown into the jam for flavor.  For our second hour Dan Lloyd once again kicks down the studio door to rock out, with some amazing covers from St. Vincent and The Linda Lindas being big highlights, along with new tunes from Ozzy Osbourne, Dry Cleaning, Cigar, and many others to taste test on a record-setting 13 track throwdown from Gwangju's Rock Maestro.#feelthegravityTracklisting (Start):Part I (00:00)Tom Misch feat De La Soul – It Runs Through MeLabi Siffre – I Got The…William Onyeabor vs. Hot Chip – Atomic BombMr. Jukes feat BJ The Chicago Kid – Angels/Your Love Part II (31:31)Coubo – MyrrhGalimatias – BlowbackFKJ – Better Give U UpCrayon – After The Tone (Duñe remix)DJ Cam – Soulshine Mulatu Astatke & Black Jesus Experience – Mascaram Setaba Part III (60:23)Ozzy Osbourne – Degradation Rules ft Tony IommiPool Kids – Arm's LengthLinda Lindas – Tonite (The Go-Go's cover)St. Vincent – Piggy ft Dave Grohl (Nine Inch Nails cover)THICK – Tell MyselfDry Cleaning – Anna Calls From theArctic Part IV (92:38)Cigar – Legacy of the 7 PliesTeens in Trouble - DecomposingOsees – A Foul FormNo Trigger – No TattoosThe Garden – Orange County Punk Rock LegendBuilt to Spill - SpiderwebPalm – Feathers 

Pod Like A Hole
Black Sabbath: Heaven and Hell - Pod Like A Hole Podcast

Pod Like A Hole

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 137:39


"You've got to bleed for the dancer!"   New Episode of Pod Like A Hole: Black Sabbath's Heaven and Hell - Featuring Ronnie James Dio on vocals.    The meat of this episode is over an hour of discussing Heaven and Hell track by track. As well as our personal Sabbath journeys, Hellfest, Ozzy's new song, and of course the contrast of Ozzy's Zombie vocals against Dio's Operatic flourish.  Eric Marc and Steve are joined by a special guest host - Rob from Portland, a man who has Black Sabbath credentials that will light your hair on fire.  This is part one of a two part Sabbath series, next episode we will have a wild and woolly chat about Sabbath's discography and the other bands in their and Dio's orbit.    "Anyone can write a song about saving the earth, but to do it on the epic scale of a Zelda game, you might meet reach more people"   #blacksabbath #dio #sabbath #ozzy #hellfest #eugene

The Five Count
An Evening With Wendy Dio…

The Five Count

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 119:42


Check Playlist This episode of The Five Count featured an exclusive interview with Wendy Dio. Wendy is best known as the wife and longtime manager of Ronnie James Dio. She was with Ronnie through his time in Rainbow, Black Sabbath, and Dio until his death in 2010. During the show she discussed Dio's musical legacy, her memories of the Hear ‘N Aid Sessions in 1986, and Dio's new Holy Diver (Super Deluxe Edition) boxed set. Get your copy now! During the rest of the show we discussed our plans to ride wild donkeys in the desert, Ton told the story of how he almost died eating Chinese food, and we slammed numerous cans of Flamin' Hot Mountain Dew. Ton was choking by show's end! https://youtu.be/2lvs2FzF64o

scoop16
Body Count Ernie C Interview on The Bear 3.29.97

scoop16

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 4:30


Back in 1997 I talked to 'Ernie C' Cunnigan of Body Count about the 'Cop Killer' song controversy, racism, his guitar heroes, producing the Black Sabbath album 'Forbidden', singing on the Body Count album 'Violent Demise: The Last Days', and his time living in Detroit while going to elementary school. This interview aired on 102-7 The Bear on 'The Loud Guitar Show' 3.29.97.

History Makers Radio
Steve and Ainsley Apirana

History Makers Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022


Steve and Ainsley Apirana are Singer/Songwriters based in the Sunshine C