Podcasts about Skidmore

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Best podcasts about Skidmore

Latest podcast episodes about Skidmore

Com d'Archi
S4#38

Com d'Archi

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 12:25


In French in this CDA S4#38 (monday online), "Research and interdisciplinarity" a resum in French by Anne-Charlotte of the interview in English with Eric Long / Skidmore, Owings & Merrill / SOM architecture office. In English in the CDAS4#39 (wednesday online), "A fantastic space " an itv in English with Eric Long, SOM Partner.En français dans le CDA S4#38 (lundi en ligne), "Recherche et interdisciplinarité" le résumé en français par Anne-Charlotte de l'interview en anglais avec Eric Long / Skidmore, Owings & Merrill / SOM agence d'architecture. En anglais dans le CDAS4#39 (mercredi en ligne), "Un espace fantastique " une itv en anglais avec Eric Long / Skidmore, Owings & Merrill / SOM, partenaire.___L'agence d'architecture Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) a vu le jour en 1936, lorsque Louis Skidmore et Nathaniel Owings se sont associés à Chicago. Un deuxième bureau a été ouvert à New York l'année suivante. En 1939, le partenariat adopte son nom actuel avec l'ajout d'un troisième membre, l'architecte et ingénieur structurel John O. Merrill. Depuis, l'agence est devenue l'une des plus prestigieuses des Etats-Unis.Dans ce numéro de Com d'Archi, nous résumons l'interview de l'associé de l'agence Eric Long, ingénieur de structures, qui témoigne sur son parcours et sur le travail exceptionnel qui est mené en Californie, notamment à l'agence de San Francisco de SOM en matière de recherche et d'innovations. Une interview à découvrir dans le numéro en anglais. Cette généreuse interview a été enregistrée le 3 janvier 2023 dans l'agence de San Francisco, sans interprète (ce qui aurait été plus confortable). En dépit de cela, il en ressort un élan remarquable, propre à cette agence qui oeuvre sur de très grands projets certes, mais laquelle n'oublie aucunement que la ville est à transformer face aux nombreux défis climatiques ! Bien au contraire.Image teaser BioBrick © Brooks Freehill - SOMRéalisation son : Julien Rebours____Si le podcast COM D'ARCHI vous plaît n'hésitez pas :. à vous abonner pour ne pas rater les prochains épisodes,. à nous laisser des étoiles et un commentaire, :-),. à nous suivre sur Instagram @comdarchipodcast pourretrouver de belles images, toujours choisies avec soin, de manière à enrichirvotre regard sur le sujet.Bonne semaine à tous ! Hébergé par Acast. Visitez acast.com/privacy pour plus d'informations.

The Secret Sits
Ken McElroy: The Town Bully: Part 2

The Secret Sits

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 40:10 Transcription Available


This is Part 2 in our series covering the bad deeds of Ken Rex McElroy.Ken Rex McElroy was a criminal and convicted attempted murderer who resided in Skidmore, Missouri. He was known as "the town bully", and his unsolved murder became the focus of international attention. Over the course of his life, McElroy was accused of dozens of felonies, including assault, child molestation, statutory rape, arson, animal cruelty, hog and cattle rustling, and burglary. With as many as 45 witnesses to his murder, no one would admit to having seen anything.Follow us on our social media at:https://drum.io/thesecretsitshttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwnfvpNBYTo9BP1sVuFsfGQTheSecretSitsPodcast (@secretsitspod) / Twitterhttps://www.instagram.com/thesecretsitspodcast/https://www.facebook.com/TheSecretSitsPodcasthttps://www.tiktok.com/@thesecretsitspodcast?lang=enSupport the showhttps://www.buymeacoffee.com/TheSecretSits#KenMcElroy #Bully #Skidmore #Missouri #Chevy #BeautyandtheBeast #Stalking #Intimidation #Karen #Assault #TrenaMcElroy #Ozark #Elvis #Cherokee #Dogs #DickMcFadin #pedophile #KansasCity #Podcast #TrueCrime #SSDGMGet 20% OFF @manscaped + Free Shipping with promo code SECRETSITS at MANSCAPED.com! #ad #manscapedpodSupport the show

The Secret Sits
Ken McElroy: The Town Bully: Part 2

The Secret Sits

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 40:10 Transcription Available


This is Part 2 in our series covering the bad deeds of Ken Rex McElroy.Ken Rex McElroy was a criminal and convicted attempted murderer who resided in Skidmore, Missouri. He was known as "the town bully", and his unsolved murder became the focus of international attention. Over the course of his life, McElroy was accused of dozens of felonies, including assault, child molestation, statutory rape, arson, animal cruelty, hog and cattle rustling, and burglary. With as many as 45 witnesses to his murder, no one would admit to having seen anything.Follow us on our social media at:https://drum.io/thesecretsitshttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwnfvpNBYTo9BP1sVuFsfGQTheSecretSitsPodcast (@secretsitspod) / Twitterhttps://www.instagram.com/thesecretsitspodcast/https://www.facebook.com/TheSecretSitsPodcasthttps://www.tiktok.com/@thesecretsitspodcast?lang=enSupport the showhttps://www.buymeacoffee.com/TheSecretSits#KenMcElroy #Bully #Skidmore #Missouri #Chevy #BeautyandtheBeast #Stalking #Intimidation #Karen #Assault #TrenaMcElroy #Ozark #Elvis #Cherokee #Dogs #DickMcFadin #pedophile #KansasCity #Podcast #TrueCrime #SSDGMGet 20% OFF @manscaped + Free Shipping with promo code SECRETSITS at MANSCAPED.com! #ad #manscapedpodSupport the show

Cheaper Than Therapy with Vanessa and Dené
Ep 128 Understanding the Feeling you Want to Feel with Flynn Skidmore

Cheaper Than Therapy with Vanessa and Dené

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 62:53


Flynn Skidmore is a therapist, content creator, and business mentor who specializes in helping people create lasting change in their lives, faster. Through Flynn's courses, community driven content, and work with individuals he finds that clients deepen their self-acceptance and start taking tangible action steps toward getting unstuck.  We sat down with Flynn to talk about: 1. Figuring out what it is we actually desire to feel in relationships so that we can come up with the best strategy for accomplishing that desired feeling. 2. The resistance that often accompanies the realization that we are the creator of our own experience. 3. Why it might be helpful to explore what we are doing or who we are with when we like being who we are the most, instead of simply attempting to be an authentic version of ourselves. We know you are going to love hearing the way Flynn offers tangible solutions from an original perspective as much as we did! Connect with Flynn *** Instagram If you love the conversations we're bringing you as much as we do, please subscribe, rate, and write a review so we can get the podcast out to even more people! *These live coaching sessions are meant for entertainment purposes only and are not to replace therapy. This podcast is, for sure, Cheaper Than Therapy.   Follow Cheaper Than Therapy on Instagram   Follow Vanessa Instagram TikTok YouTube   Follow Dené Instagram TikTok ------------------------------ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Struggling Artist Podcast
Struggling with This Podcast (3 Year Anniversary)

The Struggling Artist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 115:54


It's that time of year again! 3 years and we're still here! Please enjoy  our ridiculously long episode of fun with music from Michael Kane, Cursed Tongue, and C.E. Skidmore and the Damn Fine Band.  Thank you to everyone who listens and shares, and supports us in these ways and others. Without all of you we wouldn't still be here. And We hope to be here for many more years!A huge Thank you to Loser's Circle for allowing us to use the Song "The Great Illusion of Time"  of their album 'Took Long Enough' for the podcast. Click HERE to grab their phenomenal album!

The Secret Sits
Ken McElroy: The Town Bully: Part 1

The Secret Sits

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 37:09 Transcription Available


Ken Rex McElroy was a criminal and convicted attempted murderer who resided in Skidmore, Missouri. He was known as "the town bully", and his unsolved murder became the focus of international attention. Over the course of his life, McElroy was accused of dozens of felonies, including assault, child molestation, statutory rape, arson, animal cruelty, hog and cattle rustling, and burglary. With as many as 45 witnesses to his murder, no one would admit to having seen anything.Follow us on our social media at:https://drum.io/thesecretsitshttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwnfvpNBYTo9BP1sVuFsfGQTheSecretSitsPodcast (@secretsitspod) / Twitterhttps://www.instagram.com/thesecretsitspodcast/https://www.facebook.com/TheSecretSitsPodcasthttps://www.tiktok.com/@thesecretsitspodcast?lang=enSupport the showhttps://www.buymeacoffee.com/TheSecretSitsFollow: Read by Daylight - Here -   readbydaylight.net#KenMcElroy #Bully #Skidmore #Missouri #Chevy #BeautyandtheBeast #Stalking #Intimidation #Karen #Assault #TrenaMcElroy #Ozark #Elvis #Cherokee #Dogs #DickMcFadin #pedophile #KansasCity #Podcast #TrueCrime #SSDGMGet 20% OFF @manscaped + Free Shipping with promo code SECRETSITS at MANSCAPED.com! #ad #manscapedpodSupport the show

The Secret Sits
Ken McElroy: The Town Bully: Part 1

The Secret Sits

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 37:09 Transcription Available


Ken Rex McElroy was a criminal and convicted attempted murderer who resided in Skidmore, Missouri. He was known as "the town bully", and his unsolved murder became the focus of international attention. Over the course of his life, McElroy was accused of dozens of felonies, including assault, child molestation, statutory rape, arson, animal cruelty, hog and cattle rustling, and burglary. With as many as 45 witnesses to his murder, no one would admit to having seen anything.Follow us on our social media at:https://drum.io/thesecretsitshttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwnfvpNBYTo9BP1sVuFsfGQTheSecretSitsPodcast (@secretsitspod) / Twitterhttps://www.instagram.com/thesecretsitspodcast/https://www.facebook.com/TheSecretSitsPodcasthttps://www.tiktok.com/@thesecretsitspodcast?lang=enSupport the showhttps://www.buymeacoffee.com/TheSecretSitsFollow: Read by Daylight - Here -   readbydaylight.net#KenMcElroy #Bully #Skidmore #Missouri #Chevy #BeautyandtheBeast #Stalking #Intimidation #Karen #Assault #TrenaMcElroy #Ozark #Elvis #Cherokee #Dogs #DickMcFadin #pedophile #KansasCity #Podcast #TrueCrime #SSDGMGet 20% OFF @manscaped + Free Shipping with promo code SECRETSITS at MANSCAPED.com! #ad #manscapedpodSupport the show

Navigating the Customer Experience
179: Building that Magical Employee and Customer Journey for Success with Sarah Diegnan

Navigating the Customer Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 32:10


Sarah Diegnan is ChartHop's VP of Customer Experience, after leading implementations at Acuity Brands, Opower and Oracle, she brings operational excellence to creating and delivering a world class customer experience for all ChartHop's customers. She is an expert in leading a customer journey, partnering with customers from the first moments of onboarding through successful execution of all account goals, making sure customers are getting the most out of CharterHop. In addition to her SaaS experience, Sarah was a practicing structural engineer at Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, and worked for the commercial real estate developer, Tishman Speyer.   Questions   Can you share a little bit about your journey, how you got to where you are today? What catalyst got you into the customer experience journey? And just a little bit about who you are in your own words? Could you tell us a little bit about your company ChartHop and what is the service or product that you provide? What is your view on the customer journey through an HR lens. And how do you think EX impacts customer outcomes, the ins and outs of a customer health score? Are there any emerging trends that you've seen in the CX space, in the employee experience space that you think organization should really be paying greater attention to or tapping into as we embark on our new year? Could you share with us what's the one online resource, tool, website or app that you absolutely can't live without in your business? Now could you also share with us maybe one or two books that have had a great impact on you, it could be a book that you read a very long time ago, or even one that you read quite recently, but it surely has created an impact maybe had great value in your leadership delivery and you just really would love to share it with us. Could you share with our listeners what's the one thing that's going on in your life right now that you're really excited about? Either something you're working on to develop yourself or your people. Where can listeners find you online? In times of adversity or challenge, do you have a quote or saying that you tend to revert to, it kind of helps to get you back on track or get you back refocused if for any reason you get derailed.   Highlights   Sarah's Journey   Me: Now, we always like to give our guests an opportunity to share with us in their own words, a little bit about their journey, how you got to where you are today? What catalyst got you into the customer experience journey? And just a little bit about who you are in your own words?   Sarah shared that sometimes she likes to say that she has a bit of a meandering path to where she is today. But she thinks that's actually something that is common amongst customer experience professionals is it takes a lot of different skill sets and she thinks you can build those at a lot of different areas. And so, she started her career as a structural engineer, was something that she always wanted to be when she was a little kid, people would ask, what do you want to do, and she wanted to design buildings, she wanted to design skyscrapers.   And so, that is what she did, she set out to do it, and she went to school, she went to engineering school, and she loved it, she really did. And she thinks architecture and buildings will always have a very, very special place in her heart. However, what she started realizing when she hit about year 4, year 5, being a structural engineer is that it's a very narrow piece of a we'll call it building lifecycle, very, very narrow.   And she had the fortune to work with a project manager who was representing the owner, and she really had purview of the whole project, sort of end and all the pieces coming together to build these amazing buildings. And she had lunch with her and said, “I would like to do your job, can you tell me how to do it?” And one of the first things she said was, “Well, I went to business school, because you need to learn the business side of the business or of buildings.” She was like, great. So, she did that, she went to business school and coming out of business school, she thought working in real estate development was the place for her.   She did that for a couple years, and again, realized it was still a little too narrow in a lot of ways. And living in the Bay Area, it's really easy to get the start-up itch, you sort of look around, and tech is everywhere. And she had the fortune of literally running into a friend, running in Golden Gate Park in San Francisco. And she said, “You need to talk to my sister. She is at a start-up and they're selling commercial lighting controls and they need an engineer who understands buildings, building operators, engineers.” And she said, “You know what, I know that person, that person is me.” And that was her very first job. We called it project operations and this was a long time ago. But it was customer experience.   It was the start of customer experience, and it was sort of the start of her journey to where she is today. ChartHop is her fourth start-up and throughout her career, she's sort of grown into taking on more and more teams and have gotten to a point today where she leads all of customer experience at ChartHop, and that includes professional services, their customer success team, their technical support team, and their account management slash renewals team.   So, sort of a crazy story how she got here, but the reality is, it's working with customers that she loves. It's the project management and the operational piece and she's sort of grown that throughout the years as an engineer, as a real estate professional and now as a tech professional.   About ChartHop and What Service or Product Does ChartHop Provide?   Me: Amazing. So, Sarah, you are at a company called ChartHop and for those of our listeners that don't know what ChartHop does, could you tell us a little bit about your company and what is the service or product that you provide?   Sarah stated that it's a great question, she's happy to talk a little bit about it. So, ChartHop is really transforming the way companies think about managing and supporting their people. So, what that means is, they can take people data from all your different systems, so your HR system, your talent acquisition, system equity, and put it all in one place.   And the thing that makes ChartHop really special is that it's not just for HR professionals, or it's not just for the CEO, it is truly for every single person at the company, your individual contributors, all the way through to your CEO. And the reason why that's so important is because what you're doing is you're creating a very transparent organization; you're creating a one stop shop for everybody in the organization to get all the information that they need.   If you're an individual contributor, it's really all the information that you need to understand and navigate the organization, or someone in her role, it gives her the ability to look in one place to understand everybody in her organization, where might they be on a vesting schedule? How long have they been at ChartHop? What has their performance look like over the years?   And so, it's, it's really designed to create a transparent organization. It's designed to make sure that leadership is making good decisions, especially when we start thinking about DEIB in the workplace. And one of the key attributes is really, it's for everyone at a company, not just the HR team.   Views on the Customer Journey – How Does EX Impact Customer Outcomes – Ins and Outs of a Customer Health Score   Me: So, HR plays a very important role in an organization. And I'd love for you to maybe take a few minutes and discuss with us your view on the customer journey through an HR lens. And how do you think EX impacts customer outcomes, the ins and outs of a customer health score?   Sarah shared thar those are all great questions. And she thinks part of what attracted her to ChartHop was this sort of, she'll call it intersection of HR and or employee experience and customer experience. Like most people that are listening to this podcast, if you're managing and leading a customer experience team, it probably means that you are leading a pretty big team. When you're talking about services in an organization, it's human capital. If robots could do our jobs, if a health score, which she'll get into in a minute, was just two plus two is four, we wouldn't be here.   And so, you have to take care of your people and she thinks that's first and foremost why EX and CX are in a lot of ways the same thing, and they influence each other. She thinks time and time again, we've learned that happy employees, employees that understand the mission, employees that are driven by that mission, are going to be your highest producers, and they're going to be the most productive.   And if you think about putting that motivated, high performer on a call with your customer, that's infectious, absolutely infectious. That motivation and that desire to drive value with the customer is going to translate every single time. And so, it is so important as CX leaders to really be thinking about that. And really thinking about how to engage your team, not just in, “Hey, these are the metrics, we need to hit as a company,” or “Hey, this is what you need to do with your customers.” But really investing time, investing professional development, and really thinking about the employee experience, because it is going to translate.   She also thinks one of the interesting things she's been able to do at ChartHop is really work closely with head of HR and think about how the employee experience is truly also how we think about a customer journey. If you think about those magic moments for a customer journey, there's onboarding and implementation, you have to nail that, you have to have customers coming out of that phase of the journey, and just feeling so excited and so pumped that they bought ChartHop and that they're using ChartHop, that's the same thing you want your employees to feel when they're coming out of onboarding, internal onboarding, you want them to feel so excited, you want them to feel so empowered. You want them to understand what they're doing at ChartHop.   And so, you can really see the overlap, and this is something she's worked really closely with their head of HR at ChartHop to make sure that they are tracking together so to speak. When you start thinking about driving adoption for customer journey, that is the exact same as working with someone on your team on what their professional development is. You chart out someone's professional development the exact same way you're going to chart out a customer's objective planning with you.   And so, really thinking about all of those things and making sure that they're aligned. And one of the questions asked also was to talk a little bit about health score. She thinks health scores are absolutely fascinating. And also, just really where you get to sort of like, leave your fingerprint, your true unique fingerprint on how you think about your customer base. She mentioned this before, two plus two is four, that's great and she's sure all the professionals out there could put together a really, really smart mathematical equation to take you to the number of support tickets, bugs, time to launch, outcome of a use case and sort of put a number together and come out with a magic number at the other end.   But that doesn't really capture everything that goes into customer health. It is truly an art and a science. And she thinks science is really important, it is important to calculate that number, that magic number that says, “Hey, if they're above 80%, they're happy, below 80% they're yellow, below 30% they're red.”   Great, so we have a stoplight. But what is the customer saying to you on the phone? What is the customer bringing to you in your weekly calls? What is the customer saying during quarterly business reviews?   That's going to be a different level of understanding of how happy that customer is.   And one example that she gives a lot to her team is just thinking through if you have a customer who is really excited about working with you on beta features, or alpha features, and it's like, “Hey, I want to be there, I want to test it with you.” Then if you're basing their health solely on sort of like number of bugs, it's not going to look pretty.   But if that customer is signing up for it, and excited about it, then there's a different overlay that you need to put on that customer. And so, she really truly thinks it's an art and a science of how you think about health score.   And again, just to sort of come full circle, it's the same exact thing with employees.   You can't just look at one dimension, humans are multi dimension, and you have to look at a lot of different factors to really assess. Is this person a flight risk or are you going to keep them for another couple of years. And so, it's really thinking about things both from just a pure human perspective and from a numbers.   Me: Brilliant, awesome, thank you for sharing all of that Sarah, great insights and nuggets as it relates to HR customer experience, the health score, integrating all of that looking at the human dimension is so, so important if you really want to create a strong culture.   Trends Emerging in 2023 as it Relates to Customer Experience and Employee Experience   Me: Now, you've been in the customer experience space for quite some time. And I just wanted to know, as we exit one calendar year and jump into another, are there any emerging trends that you've seen in the CX space, in the employee experience space that you think organizations should really be paying greater attention to or tapping into as we embark on our new year?   Sarah shared that this is such a great question. And something she's been definitely thinking a lot about, especially as she's sure most people are doing this too, going into planning, going into next year's fiscal planning. She thinks it's a couple of things. And she's used this word before, and so she doesn't want to overuse it, but it's relevant, is transparency.   If she thinks about the CX organization and just employees in general, they're sort of demanding, she thinks that's the right word. They're demanding more transparency.   We've seen a lot about pay transparency and really posting pay scales. And that ripples through all parts of the organization, it's not just pay, it's truly transparency in who reports to who and what are people working on and what deals are closing. And so, she thinks that's a really big trend that folks need to take a step back and make sure that they're being as transparent as possible with their employees.   She thinks that also leads true because of the remote environment. She knows a lot of companies ChartHop is one of them, they're still remote and so really focusing on transparency to her also means focusing on communication, sort of overly communicating with your employees, making sure they truly understand what we're all doing right, what direction are we pointed at, what is our mission? What should we be thinking about day in and day out.   And she thinks that that actually also is something that she's thinking about with their customers. Transparency with their customers looks a little bit different but it's something that she's continuing to see and think about.   Every one again, this goes back to sort of the human nature, like humans have different ways of learning and that is something that she's hearing customers really sort of demand again, use that word demand from us right now, as customer success professionals is customers want to learn how they want to learn.   And what she means by that is she actually truly spoke to a customer this morning, that was like, “Hey, your CSMs are great. But I sort of want to figure some of the stuff out myself. I want to read a help article.” She has other customers say to her, “I want more videos. I want more in app communication.”   And she sort of feels like all of that is about communication, all of that is about transparency, all of that is about sort of meeting people where they are. And so, she thinks that's a big trend to be thinking about as you're thinking through your customer journey for your specific product is all the different ways to communicate with your customer. And a not be annoying.   So not to be annoying, but just sort of meet the customer where they're at, like, “Hey, if you want to read something, here's the link to the doc, if you want to see a step by step video, here's driving to you're learning centre.” And so, that's a big trend that she's seeing right now is customers really wanting to choose their path and sort of choose how they want to learn about your product.   Me: It's interesting you said that because I actually attended a Customer Success Conference in Washington in October, and I sat in a session where they spoke about community and more organizations building out their community pages on their websites where if you do have an issue, you don't actually have to get in touch with the company because the community can help you because other people have had similar issues, and I thought that was so brilliant that if we could really get more of that.   When I think about my own devices, like even my Apple computer or my phone, if there's something wrong or something I'm not sure about, I automatically go to Google. And usually, Google populates based on the SEO, the Apple community comes up like in the first two or three resolution options that Google provides you with and 9 out of 10 times someone else has had that issue, and the answer is right there waiting for you. So, I totally get when they say they want to have the opportunity to be able to fix it on their own.   Sarah shared that she loves that. She thinks community is so important. She also thinks that that's where you get really cool thought Leadership. You get folks that are using your product in ways that you had no idea, you're like, wow, she would get on the phone with customers and be like, “Wow, that was super clever. I never thought about doing it that way.” And so, she loves the concept of a community, and we can all learn from our peers in so many ways. She loves that.   App, Website or Tool that Sarah Absolutely Can't Live Without in Her Business   When asked about an online resource that she can't live without in her business, Sarah stated that that's such a great question. So, first and foremost, she do have to say it is that again, she mentioned this a couple moments ago is that part of her job description is leading a large team, it's just always what it's like in a customer experience organization. So, to be totally true, ChartHop has really changed how she manage teams. And so, she'd say that's tool number one. Even at some point, if she were to leave, she would definitely advocate for that platform. It helps her navigate so many things with her team that it's so important.   She thinks number two, is video conferencing. She knows that there is Zoom fatigue in the world, she truly appreciates it, and she feels it. But being face to face with your customer is priceless. It is so hard to pick up on tone in an email, it's so hard to really convey what you're trying to say without having that face to face and with so much less travel, that is so critical. You have to put a face to a name, that's how you build relationships and build rapport.   And then the last one she's going to say, which goes back to her very nerdy engineering days because she at her core, she is an engineer is really Excel or Google Sheets. She uses Excel all the time, it's what she needs to run her business.   Me: Brilliant, brilliant Excel is a very powerful tool.   Sarah agreed absolutely, people don't get as jazzed about it, but she does, it's truly her go to.   Books that Have Had the Biggest Impact on Sarah   When asked about books that have had an impact, Sarah shared that she has one in mind that she read probably about 8 years ago, and she recently reread it, because their CEO loves it as well. And so, he had all the executive team read it, it's called The Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Leadership Fable, the title of it is so great. It's by Patrick Lencioni. It's so great, because it's transferable both from a leadership team perspective, but also from a CX perspective.   And so, what she means by that is, the whole concept of the book is that there is a first team, and your first team is not who you think it is, a lot of people think that your first team are the people that report to you. And the concept is that that's not actually true. Your first team are your peers in the organization and the reason why it's your peers is because together you are a matrix. You're a matrix organization, and together, you all need to work to reach the ultimate company goal, not your own goal, it's not like “How does Sara reach her goals across customer experience?” No, no, no, it's how do we, as an executive team work together to reach our goals as a company?   And so, it's really this concept of you have to have a common goal number one, and like, your team goal can't outshine the common goal. And the reason why she likes it for customer experience, as well and it's something that she drives with her leadership team, is they are a matrix environment, they have four separate teams that report to her, but together, these four teams need to work together for the one common goal of creating the absolute best customer experience for their customers.   And so, if that is what we're keeping in mind, if truly every single day we show up and say our goal is to provide the best customer experience to our customers, then the right thing to do is very easy, or who does what becomes very clear. And so, it's a book that really resonates with her, and she recommends, it's a very quick read. And she recommends it as both a CX professional, but also just as you're continuing to sort of move up the ladder as you think about working across teams as well sort of cross functionally, it's an absolute great read.   Me: Very nice. So, we'll definitely have the link to that book in the show notes of this episode. While you were explaining what the book was about in summary, especially the example you gave off, one person's goal should not outshine the overall goal of the company. I thought of football, I guess because we're in World Cup season now. And I said to myself, one person's goal cannot outshine the overall team's goal, which is to win the game.   Sarah agreed, exactly. So, she coaches her two boys' soccer team. They call it Soccer, Football. There are some really great football soccer commercials happening now by the way.   And it's so true, it's something that she really talks to the kids about from a young age, both when you score a goal and when the team scores against you, it's not the goalie's fault, it went through every single player before it got to the goalie. And same concept, the person who scores it touched a lot of feet before it got to that person that eventually put the ball on the back of the net. So, you are exactly right. She is a sports nerd. Same concept, so she loves it.   Me: That just popped in my mind a while ago, I was like wow, it's such a simple statement. But it's so profound and you everybody kind of has that mindset in an organization, I think the employee and the customer experience can be phenomenal.   What Sarah is Really Excited About Now!   When asked about something she's really excited about, Sarah shared that that's a really great question. So, she'll give two answers. Personally, what she's working on, she's a member of an organization, it's a women's networking organization. And they meet once a month with a peer group, is actually interesting, this is now becoming a theme, a peer group. So, other women who are at her same level and sort of going through sort of the same things and they're all in the same macro environment.   And so, even if maybe some of them are not customer experience professionals, they're marketing professionals, most are in the start-up environment. But it's something that she's really embracing. And each month they meet and we all bring to the table something that they're facing or something that they're thinking about or challenge that they're going through with the company, and really working on being reflective, that is something that she's working on is, when you are in it every day with customers, you sort of create this world where you're sort of go, go, go, go go.   And she thinks that a little bit more reflection is always really good. And so, that is something that professionally she's working on is sort of taking those, it's only two hours once a month, but really taking the time to reflect like, sort of prepare for those meetings and sort of reflect on herself.   And then for her team, this might sound a little funny, but she's actually right now, hiring a new leader for the for the customer success team. And she's so excited to partner with this new leader because the customer success managers at ChartHop are absolutely phenomenal, truly phenomenal. And she's excited to get a leader in seat that is really going to work with them, both from a professional development standpoint, and also just a process perspective but really dive in and take that team to the next level. And so, that's really her focus is just finding and hiring such an amazing leader for an amazing team.   Where Can We Find Sarah Online   LinkedIn – Sarah Diegnan   Quote or Saying that During Times of Adversity Sarah Uses   When asked about a quote or saying that she tends to revert to, Sarah stated yes, that's a good one. One of the things she thinks about is, and the folks out there listening, and the customer experience org can sort of relate to this is that some days you show up and you have a list of things to do and none of those things get done. Because at the end of the day, we are going to follow the lead of our customers, and so, if a customer needs to talk to her, she's going to drop everything to talk to that customer and she's sure every single person that's listening does the same exact thing.   And so, in the moments when she's thinking to herself, “Wow, I am buried. Like, how am I going to get all of this done?” She goes back to something that her mom would always say to her, “It'll all get done, Sarah, it will all get done.” And it's something that she thinks about a lot. How it all gets done is sort of in the background, it's truly just believing in yourself, and believing that you're going to figure it out and having that confidence that as her mom would say, “It's all going get done, Sarah, it's all going to get done.”   Me: Thank you so much for sharing Sarah, for taking time out of your very busy schedule to hop on this podcast, have this great conversation, give our listeners greater insights as to what they can do, what they can improve on, what are some of the emerging trends that you've seen, the fact that we need to be more transparent, we need to be more collaborative. Some of the different applications that you've used and are continuing to use to enhance your work that you do daily to improve your productivity as well as to get your job done. And of course, working towards the overall goal which is to create that magical experience for your customers at ChartHop.   Please connect with us on Twitter @navigatingcx and also join our Private Facebook Community – Navigating the Customer Experience and listen to our FB Lives weekly with a new guest   Grab the Freebie on Our Website – TOP 10 Online Business Resources for Small Business Owners   Links The Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Leadership Fable by Patrick Lencioni   The ABC's of a Fantastic Customer Experience   Do you want to pivot your online customer experience and build loyalty - get a copy of “The ABC's of a Fantastic Customer Experience.”   The ABC's of a Fantastic Customer Experience provides 26 easy to follow steps and techniques that helps your business to achieve success and build brand loyalty. This Guide to Limitless, Happy and Loyal Customers will help you to strengthen your service delivery, enhance your knowledge and appreciation of the customer experience and provide tips and practical strategies that you can start implementing immediately! This book will develop your customer service skills and sharpen your attention to detail when serving others. Master your customer experience and develop those knock your socks off techniques that will lead to lifetime customers. Your customers will only want to work with your business and it will be your brand differentiator. It will lead to recruiters to seek you out by providing practical examples on how to deliver a winning customer service experience!

Dark Poutine - True Crime and Dark History
Christmas 2022: Safe Cracking Santa & his Murderous Elf

Dark Poutine - True Crime and Dark History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 68:39


Episode 249: As this is our special Christmas episode. It is our tradition to tell a Yuletide-themed yarn. This one is about a duo of bandits who burglarized various shopping malls across the United States and Canada year after year during the holidays. Their insidious M.O. was to work from the inside. The group's leader, a safe cracker named Willie Thomas Soke and his sidekick, a little person of colour called Marcus Skidmore, would acquire jobs inside the department store. Soke, a foul-mouthed, chronic alcoholic and sex addict, would play the store's Santa Claus, and Skidmore, his evil sidekick, would be one of Santa's elves. Finally, after the murder of the head of a mall security manager named Johnny ‘Gin' Calhoun at a Phoenix, Arizona, shopping complex, the pair were brought to justice in 2003. This was thanks partly to the unwitting help of a Canadian-born 10-year-old boy, Thurman Merman, who was living in Phoenix with his grandmother. Sources: Achondroplasia | Johns Hopkins Medicine City of Phoenix, Arizona, Police Department Kiss an Angel Good Mornin' - song and lyrics by Charley Pride | Spotify Simon Fraser University The University of British Columbia ‘Documentary': Bad Santa Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Crime and Coffee Couple - True Crime Podcast
Ken Rex McElroy - A Revenge Story

Crime and Coffee Couple - True Crime Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022 52:25


Ken McElroy, by all accounts, was not an appreciated man in the town of Skidmore, Missouri. He was alleged to have committed many crimes but had his thumb on the local law enforcement and judicial system. How is he getting away with all this? When will it end? Find out with us!Want BONUS EPISODES!? Become a Patron:https://www.patreon.com/crimeandcoffeecoupleSend us a nice message on Instagram, TikTok, or Twitter! We'd love to hear from you!https://www.instagram.com/crimeandcoffee2/https://www.tiktok.com/@crimeandcoffee2https://twitter.com/crimeandcoffee2References:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tZktTdGHaJY (Buzzfeed Unsolved: “The Strange Killing of Ken Rex McElroy)https://fox2now.com/news/true-crime/missouri-town-keeps-bullys-murder-a-secret-for-40-years/https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m6uAHmJ1E_whttps://allthatsinteresting.com/ken-mcelroyBook: In Broad Daylight by Harry N Macleanhttps://www.bustle.com/p/13-things-about-ken-mcelroys-shooting-you-need-to-know-before-watching-no-one-saw-a-thing-18497585No One Saw a Thing (Episodic documentary found it on Youtube) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m6uAHmJ1E_wSupport the showIf you're on an iPhone, review us on Apple Podcasts please! Scroll to the bottom of the page and hit the stars ;)If you're listening on Spotify please leave us a 5-star review!We appreciate you more than you know.Podcast Intro and Outro music:Seductress Dubstep by Audionautix http://audionautix.comCreative Commons Music by Jason Shaw on Audionautix.com

Crime, Cults, & Coffee.
Episode 114: "Romaine the Farmer”/ Ken McElroy

Crime, Cults, & Coffee.

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 51:07


What became a case of whodunit, also came with the question “who was the victim & who was the criminal”? Ken McElroy was known as “the town bully”, although it went WAY further than that. In 1981, the townspeople of Skidmore, Missouri had finally had enough. Fearful and feeling the justice system had failed them… they decided to face their problem head-on. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/crime-cults-and-coffee/support

Latter-day Life Coaches
103. Faith Filled Questioning with Meagan Skidmore

Latter-day Life Coaches

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 39:23


In the spring of 1820, the question by a young boy about which church he should join opened the Restoration of the gospel and allowed God to once again speak to men on earth. If Joseph Smith had never had that question, where would your life be today? Even though our religion was brought back to earth through a question, we as members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints often have a lot of fear around asking questions. Many fear asking questions will draw them away from God instead of closer to Him. Coach Meagan Skidmore found herself several years ago in a position where her faith and her lived reality did not match up and she had a lot of questions. This put Meagan on a very unknown path and what she found is that as she turned to God with her questions her faith deepened. She wants to share that same hope with others who have questions and show them how questions can be a great tool one uses to expand and grow their faith. This is a wonderful episode with so much great information. Your faith will be fortified as you listen.  For more information about Meagan and for links to access all she has to offer, please click HERE! To watch this interview on YouTube, go HERE. For more information and available downloads, go to: https://ldslifecoaches.com/ All content is copyrighted to Heather Rackham and featured coaches. Do not use without permission.

Abraham's Table
Symbols of Faith: Division or Diversity? Part 2

Abraham's Table

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 38:35


Imam Shaheed, Rabbi Case, and Rev. Skidmore continue their conversation about the symbols of our faiths: how they divide, unite, and distinguish the faithful. We continue the conversation about the role and function of faithful dress, and we talk a bit about the cross as a symbol in the Christian faith.

Arroe Collins
Classic Rock Report Led Zeppelin April 12 2016

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 1:03


Robert Plant and Jimmy Page have an L.A. date set for May 10th, but it's not a Led Zeppelin reunion show. Rather, it's the start date for a jury trial over the claim they ripped off the opening riff from a song by the band Spirit for "Stairway to Heaven." On Friday, U.S. District Judge Gary Klausner ruled that Led Zep's 1971 classic is similar enough to "Taurus," a 1967 instrumental track by Spirit, to have a jury decide whether Plant and Page committed copyright infringement. The suit was filed by Michael Skidmore, a trustee for the late Randy California, who wrote "Taurus" and played guitar in Spirit. Skidmore points out that Spirit and Zeppelin toured together in 1968 and '69 and Page may have been motivated to write "Stairway" after hearing "Taurus" performed live by Spirit. There is some good news for the Zep camp, though. The judged dropped claims against bassist John Paul Jones and Warner Music, so only Page and Plant remain on the hook.

Arroe Collins
Classic Rock Report Led Zeppelin April 12 2016

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 1:03


Robert Plant and Jimmy Page have an L.A. date set for May 10th, but it's not a Led Zeppelin reunion show. Rather, it's the start date for a jury trial over the claim they ripped off the opening riff from a song by the band Spirit for "Stairway to Heaven." On Friday, U.S. District Judge Gary Klausner ruled that Led Zep's 1971 classic is similar enough to "Taurus," a 1967 instrumental track by Spirit, to have a jury decide whether Plant and Page committed copyright infringement. The suit was filed by Michael Skidmore, a trustee for the late Randy California, who wrote "Taurus" and played guitar in Spirit. Skidmore points out that Spirit and Zeppelin toured together in 1968 and '69 and Page may have been motivated to write "Stairway" after hearing "Taurus" performed live by Spirit. There is some good news for the Zep camp, though. The judged dropped claims against bassist John Paul Jones and Warner Music, so only Page and Plant remain on the hook.

Drinking The Cool Aid
Ken McElroy // 140 // The town bully // PT 3

Drinking The Cool Aid

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 55:42 Transcription Available


Ken Rex McElroy was accused of many felonies, but continuously escaped conviction, except for the last one.  In 1981, he was convicted of attempted murder for shooting Bo Bowenkamp at the local grocery store.  Ken was murdered while he was out on bond, but no one in Skidmore saw a thing.https://www.drinkingthecoolaid.com/RESOURCES:In Broad Daylight: A murder in Skidmore, Missouri (scribd.com)No One Saw a Thing S01E01 The Killing of Ken Rex McElroy - Bing videoNo One Saw a Thing S01E02 Conspiracy of Silence - Bing videoNo One Saw a Thing S01E03 Don't Mess With Skidmore - Bing videoNo One Saw a Thing S01E04 Cycle of Violence - YouTubeNo One Saw a Thing S01E05 A Pound of Flesh - YouTubeNo One Saw a Thing S01E06 Small Town Requiem - Bing videoMan Pleads Guilty in Botched-Sex-Change Case | Fox NewsThe Head-Scratching Case of Missing Branson Perry | Talk Murder To MeThe Bizarre Events of Skidmore, Missouri | by Cathy Coombs | The Mystery Box | MediumLynching of Raymond Gunn | Raymond Gunn (nodawaycountymus.wixsite.com)

Micro-Digressions: A Philosophy Podcast
Black Friday Special episode: Famine, Affluence and Morality, Part 1

Micro-Digressions: A Philosophy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 72:29


The first of a two-part series on Peter Singer's famous argument that we must give our expendable income to highly effective charities.  This episode features guest Travis Timmerman of Seton Hall University. (Note: Jim Skidmore participated in the first part of this conversation, but his audio wasn't useable due to technical difficulties. That explains a few references to a third participant. Skidmore will appear in part 2). 

Realtor Conversations
Justin and Courtney Skidmore

Realtor Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 20:25


Justin and Courtney Skidmore are joining us in this episode. They're going to open up about trends in the market, both new and long-standing. Justin also discusses how his skills from previous roles have translated to greater success in his real estate career. We also hear why right now is the best time to buy or sell your home.   In this episode: The interesting situations Justin has managed to sell in. Why Justin and Courtney chose to join a new brokerage, THE MINNESŌTAN. What makes MINNESŌTAN unique. What Courtney and Justin have noticed regarding trends in the market recently. How the current interest rate compares with historical interest rates. What Courtney and Justin did before they got into real estate. How Justin's previous role in retail influences the way he does business now. The one thing you can do with a client to nearly assure a sale. One of the best skills a real estate professional can possess. An example of where markets can vary even in close proximity. The special event Justin and Courtney held for Halloween. The biggest reason real estate slows down in the winter in Minnesota. What to expect as a buyer or a seller in today's market. How a shift in perspective can help you make decisions as a buyer or seller. Why you shouldn't put off making moves in the market now.   Contact Justin and Courtney Justin's Phone: 712-266-6497   Justin's Email: justin@minnesotan.com  Courtney's Phone: 715-220-2218 Courtney's Email: courtney@minnesotan.com

Drinking The Cool Aid
Ken McElroy // 139 // The town bully // PT 2

Drinking The Cool Aid

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 57:53 Transcription Available


Ken Rex McElroy was accused of many felonies, but continuously escaped conviction, except for the last one.  In 1981, he was convicted of attempted murder for shooting Bo Bowenkamp at the local grocery store.  Ken was murdered while he was out on bond, but no one in Skidmore saw a thing.https://www.drinkingthecoolaid.com/RESOURCES:In Broad Daylight: A murder in Skidmore, Missouri (scribd.com)No One Saw a Thing S01E01 The Killing of Ken Rex McElroy - Bing videoNo One Saw a Thing S01E02 Conspiracy of Silence - Bing videoNo One Saw a Thing S01E03 Don't Mess With Skidmore - Bing videoNo One Saw a Thing S01E04 Cycle of Violence - YouTubeNo One Saw a Thing S01E05 A Pound of Flesh - YouTubeNo One Saw a Thing S01E06 Small Town Requiem - Bing videoMan Pleads Guilty in Botched-Sex-Change Case | Fox NewsThe Head-Scratching Case of Missing Branson Perry | Talk Murder To MeThe Bizarre Events of Skidmore, Missouri | by Cathy Coombs | The Mystery Box | MediumLynching of Raymond Gunn | Raymond Gunn (nodawaycountymus.wixsite.com)

Trumpcast
Political Gabfest: What If Twitter Dies?

Trumpcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 63:14


This week, David Plotz, Emily Bazelon, and John Dickerson discuss the future of Twitter, the ghoulish World Cup, and a minister's allegation that Justice Alito leaked the outcome of the Hobby Lobby case. Here are some notes and references from this week's show: Jodi Kantor and Jo Becker for The New York Times: “Former Anti-Abortion Leader Alleges Another Supreme Court Breach” Jodi Kantor for The New York Times: “Allegation of Supreme Court Breach Prompts Calls for Inquiry and Ethics Code” Rob Schenck for The New York Times: “I Was an Anti-Abortion Crusader. Now I Support Roe v. Wade” Kara Voght and Tim Dickinson for Rolling Stone: “SCOTUS Justices ‘Prayed With' Her — Then Cited Her Bosses to End Roe” Here are this week's chatters: John: Variety: “Bob Dylan Fans Who Bought $600 ‘Hand-Signed' Books With Replica Autographs Will Receive Refunds From Publisher” Emily: Rozina Ali for The New York Times Magazine: “‘How Did This Man Think He Had the Right to Adopt This Baby?'”  David: Politics and Prose: City Cast DC Live Taping with Michael Schaffer, David Plotz, and Anton Bogomazov - at Union Market; Slate's One Year, Season 4: 1942 Listener chatter from Laurent Dugois: In Broad Daylight: A Murder in Skidmore, Missouri, by Harry N MacLean; All That's Interesting: “The Story Of Ken McElroy — The Vicious Bully Killed By His Town” For this week's Slate Plus bonus segment Emily, David, and John contemplate the conundrum of what they would like to tell their younger selves but wouldn't be able to convince them of. Submit your conundrums for the 2022 conundrum episode at slate.com/conundrum.    Tweet us your questions and chatters @SlateGabfest or email us at gabfest@slate.com. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Cheyna Roth. Research by Bridgette Dunlap. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Slate Daily Feed
Political Gabfest: What If Twitter Dies?

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 63:14


This week, David Plotz, Emily Bazelon, and John Dickerson discuss the future of Twitter, the ghoulish World Cup, and a minister's allegation that Justice Alito leaked the outcome of the Hobby Lobby case. Here are some notes and references from this week's show: Jodi Kantor and Jo Becker for The New York Times: “Former Anti-Abortion Leader Alleges Another Supreme Court Breach” Jodi Kantor for The New York Times: “Allegation of Supreme Court Breach Prompts Calls for Inquiry and Ethics Code” Rob Schenck for The New York Times: “I Was an Anti-Abortion Crusader. Now I Support Roe v. Wade” Kara Voght and Tim Dickinson for Rolling Stone: “SCOTUS Justices ‘Prayed With' Her — Then Cited Her Bosses to End Roe” Here are this week's chatters: John: Variety: “Bob Dylan Fans Who Bought $600 ‘Hand-Signed' Books With Replica Autographs Will Receive Refunds From Publisher” Emily: Rozina Ali for The New York Times Magazine: “‘How Did This Man Think He Had the Right to Adopt This Baby?'”  David: Politics and Prose: City Cast DC Live Taping with Michael Schaffer, David Plotz, and Anton Bogomazov - at Union Market; Slate's One Year, Season 4: 1942 Listener chatter from Laurent Dugois: In Broad Daylight: A Murder in Skidmore, Missouri, by Harry N MacLean; All That's Interesting: “The Story Of Ken McElroy — The Vicious Bully Killed By His Town” For this week's Slate Plus bonus segment Emily, David, and John contemplate the conundrum of what they would like to tell their younger selves but wouldn't be able to convince them of. Submit your conundrums for the 2022 conundrum episode at slate.com/conundrum.    Tweet us your questions and chatters @SlateGabfest or email us at gabfest@slate.com. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Cheyna Roth. Research by Bridgette Dunlap. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Political Gabfest
What If Twitter Dies?

Political Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 63:14


This week, David Plotz, Emily Bazelon, and John Dickerson discuss the future of Twitter, the ghoulish World Cup, and a minister's allegation that Justice Alito leaked the outcome of the Hobby Lobby case. Here are some notes and references from this week's show: Jodi Kantor and Jo Becker for The New York Times: “Former Anti-Abortion Leader Alleges Another Supreme Court Breach” Jodi Kantor for The New York Times: “Allegation of Supreme Court Breach Prompts Calls for Inquiry and Ethics Code” Rob Schenck for The New York Times: “I Was an Anti-Abortion Crusader. Now I Support Roe v. Wade” Kara Voght and Tim Dickinson for Rolling Stone: “SCOTUS Justices ‘Prayed With' Her — Then Cited Her Bosses to End Roe” Here are this week's chatters: John: Variety: “Bob Dylan Fans Who Bought $600 ‘Hand-Signed' Books With Replica Autographs Will Receive Refunds From Publisher” Emily: Rozina Ali for The New York Times Magazine: “‘How Did This Man Think He Had the Right to Adopt This Baby?'”  David: Politics and Prose: City Cast DC Live Taping with Michael Schaffer, David Plotz, and Anton Bogomazov - at Union Market; Slate's One Year, Season 4: 1942 Listener chatter from Laurent Dugois: In Broad Daylight: A Murder in Skidmore, Missouri, by Harry N MacLean; All That's Interesting: “The Story Of Ken McElroy — The Vicious Bully Killed By His Town” For this week's Slate Plus bonus segment Emily, David, and John contemplate the conundrum of what they would like to tell their younger selves but wouldn't be able to convince them of. Submit your conundrums for the 2022 conundrum episode at slate.com/conundrum.    Tweet us your questions and chatters @SlateGabfest or email us at gabfest@slate.com. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Cheyna Roth. Research by Bridgette Dunlap. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Secret History of the Future
Political Gabfest: What If Twitter Dies?

The Secret History of the Future

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 63:14


This week, David Plotz, Emily Bazelon, and John Dickerson discuss the future of Twitter, the ghoulish World Cup, and a minister's allegation that Justice Alito leaked the outcome of the Hobby Lobby case. Here are some notes and references from this week's show: Jodi Kantor and Jo Becker for The New York Times: “Former Anti-Abortion Leader Alleges Another Supreme Court Breach” Jodi Kantor for The New York Times: “Allegation of Supreme Court Breach Prompts Calls for Inquiry and Ethics Code” Rob Schenck for The New York Times: “I Was an Anti-Abortion Crusader. Now I Support Roe v. Wade” Kara Voght and Tim Dickinson for Rolling Stone: “SCOTUS Justices ‘Prayed With' Her — Then Cited Her Bosses to End Roe” Here are this week's chatters: John: Variety: “Bob Dylan Fans Who Bought $600 ‘Hand-Signed' Books With Replica Autographs Will Receive Refunds From Publisher” Emily: Rozina Ali for The New York Times Magazine: “‘How Did This Man Think He Had the Right to Adopt This Baby?'”  David: Politics and Prose: City Cast DC Live Taping with Michael Schaffer, David Plotz, and Anton Bogomazov - at Union Market; Slate's One Year, Season 4: 1942 Listener chatter from Laurent Dugois: In Broad Daylight: A Murder in Skidmore, Missouri, by Harry N MacLean; All That's Interesting: “The Story Of Ken McElroy — The Vicious Bully Killed By His Town” For this week's Slate Plus bonus segment Emily, David, and John contemplate the conundrum of what they would like to tell their younger selves but wouldn't be able to convince them of. Submit your conundrums for the 2022 conundrum episode at slate.com/conundrum.    Tweet us your questions and chatters @SlateGabfest or email us at gabfest@slate.com. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Cheyna Roth. Research by Bridgette Dunlap. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Universe The Game
#61: Flynn Skidmore | Spirituality, The Ego, Money, Consciousness Evolution, And Psychology

Universe The Game

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 163:18


Today's guest is Flynn Skidmore, who is a therapist, teacher, and video creator. I got to sit down and talk with him for a couple of hours all about the nature of reality on a variety of topics. I wasn't able to make an intro to this podcast because I haven't been feeling well, so hopefully you don't mind. Flynn's Links: https://www.instagram.com/flynnskidmore/ Nick's Links: https://linktr.ee/nick.zei

Unresearched Podcast Presents The Steve & Saul 20min Power HR!!!!
Unresearched w/Steve & Saul- The murder of Rex McElroy & The Town that let it Happen

Unresearched Podcast Presents The Steve & Saul 20min Power HR!!!!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 22:55


Rex McElroy was a piece of shit that no one in his town of Skidmore, Missouri liked. he was considered a brutish bully, who escaped justice multiple times, until the town decided they had had enough...He was eventually murdered, in broad daylight, in front of most of the town, with countless witnesses, yet his murder is still considered unsolved...yet no one cares to even bother to get to the bottom of this mystery... Was his murder justified? Listen and find out! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/unresearchedpodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unresearchedpodcast/support

Drinking The Cool Aid
Ken McElroy // 138 // The town bully // PT 1

Drinking The Cool Aid

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 61:08 Transcription Available


Ken Rex McElroy was accused of many felonies, but continuously escaped conviction, except for the last one.  In 1981, he was convicted of attempted murder for shooting Bo Bowenkamp at the local grocery store.  Ken was murdered while he was out on bond, but no one in Skidmore saw a thing.https://www.drinkingthecoolaid.com/RESOURCES:In Broad Daylight: A murder in Skidmore, Missouri (scribd.com)No One Saw a Thing S01E01 The Killing of Ken Rex McElroy - Bing videoNo One Saw a Thing S01E02 Conspiracy of Silence - Bing videoNo One Saw a Thing S01E03 Don't Mess With Skidmore - Bing videoNo One Saw a Thing S01E04 Cycle of Violence - YouTubeNo One Saw a Thing S01E05 A Pound of Flesh - YouTubeNo One Saw a Thing S01E06 Small Town Requiem - Bing videoMan Pleads Guilty in Botched-Sex-Change Case | Fox NewsThe Head-Scratching Case of Missing Branson Perry | Talk Murder To MeThe Bizarre Events of Skidmore, Missouri | by Cathy Coombs | The Mystery Box | MediumLynching of Raymond Gunn | Raymond Gunn (nodawaycountymus.wixsite.com)

Natalia Benson
Content, Consistency & Authentic Confidence w/ Flynn Skidmore

Natalia Benson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 64:30


Flynn Skidmore is a Holistic Therapist who helps his clients create a next-level life and become the most joyful, magnetic version of themselves. In this episode, Flynn and Natalia discuss all things consistency, accessing what you desire, and how choosing expansion can attract what is meant for you.WE EXPLORE:• Honoring your body and taking breaks• Becoming your most authentic self• Overcoming the fear of being seen• A powerful exploration of feeling• How what we want is available right now• Creating content from a heart-centered placeFollow Flynn:  @flynnskidmoreFlynn's website: flynnskidmore.comMoney Mastery for Business OwnersA 2-HOUR MASTERCLASS EXPERIENCEjoin me for just $33 & get ready to prosper your business x finances for 2023!https://nataliabenson.lpages.co/money-mastery-masterclass-nov/Ways to work with Natalia:Apply to work with me 1:1: https://www.nataliabenson.com/11-offeringExplore the Money Membership: https://magicalwomenandmoney.com/Grab your Free 5 Day Money Training for Spiritual Solopreneurs: https://bit.ly/moneymastery4bizownersConnect on Instagram: @natalia_bensonSupport the show

Unwavering : Toxic Masculinity from the Dudes Den
The one where we talk about Trump being a cry baby.

Unwavering : Toxic Masculinity from the Dudes Den

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 88:32


Kevo talks the need for the country to go back to election "DAY"; Former President Trump cant leave well enough alone; Florida votes for freedom; Gov. Desantis is the future of conservative politics; The town of Skidmore, MO has an unprecedented past in todays true crime segment

The Brady Farkas Show
Norwich Hockey Coach Cam Ellsworth, 11-10-22

The Brady Farkas Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 4:49


Brady sits down with Cam Ellsworth, Norwich hockey coach, ahead of the Cadets home-opening weekend against Castleton and Skidmore. They talk about the two wins last weekend, the value of coming from behind to win and how you prepare for a Saturday game in a quick turnaround.

The Midwest Crime Files
The Curse of Skidmore, MO

The Midwest Crime Files

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 66:56


A tiny towns violent history is starting to make people believe that it is possibly cursed. This is the story that started it all...Support the show

Abraham's Table
Nationalism?

Abraham's Table

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 35:37


In the context of Russia's invasion of Ukraine, tensions in the Middle East, and in light of the rise of Christian nationalism in our own country, Imam Shaheed, Rabbi Case, and Rev. Skidmore discuss the relationship between religion and nation. From Constantine, to Israel, to the Islamic Caliphate, faith struggles to define the relationship between faith and political power in ways that are faithful and life giving.

Surf and Sales
S3E48 - Is Warm Calling the New Cold Calling with Peter Skidmore

Surf and Sales

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 46:44


The skills you learn early in your sales career never go away as you grow your career, even when you become a founder.  What it means to slow down to speed up Navigating the founder mindset to focus on the "one thing." Two keys to successful leadership. The difference between rejection as a founder and sales.  The value of time is driving decisions Chasing time is more valuable than chasing money. Why the sales interview process is still broken

The Lunar Society
Brian Potter - Future of Construction, Ugly Modernism, & Environmental Review

The Lunar Society

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 145:57


Brian Potter is the author of the excellent Construction Physics blog, where he discusses why the construction industry has been slow to industrialize and innovate.He explains why:* Construction isn't getting cheaper and faster,* We should have mile-high buildings and multi-layer non-intersecting roads,* “Ugly” modern buildings are simply the result of better architecture,* China is so great at building things,* Saudi Arabia's Line is a waste of resources,* Environmental review makes new construction expensive and delayed,* and much much more!Watch on YouTube. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or any other podcast platform. Read the full transcript here.Follow me on Twitter for updates on future episodes.More really cool guests coming up; subscribe to find out about future episodes!You may also enjoy my interviews with Tyler Cowen (about talent, collapse, & pessimism of sex). Charles Mann (about the Americas before Columbus & scientific wizardry), and Austin Vernon about (Energy Superabundance, Starship Missiles, & Finding Alpha).If you end up enjoying this episode, I would be super grateful if you share it, post it on Twitter, send it to your friends & group chats, and throw it up wherever else people might find it. Can't exaggerate how much it helps a small podcast like mine.A huge thanks to Graham Bessellieu for editing this podcast and Mia Aiyana for producing its transcript.Timestamps(0:00) - Why Saudi Arabia's Line is Insane, Unrealistic, and Never going to Exist (06:54) - Designer Clothes & eBay Arbitrage Adventures (10:10) - Unique Woes of The Construction Industry  (19:28) - The Problems of Prefabrication (26:27) - If Building Regulations didn't exist… (32:20) - China's Real Estate Bubble, Unbound Technocrats, & Japan(44:45) - Automation and Revolutionary Future Technologies (1:00:51) - 3D Printer Pessimism & The Rising Cost of Labour(1:08:02) - AI's Impact on Construction Productivity(1:17:53) - Brian Dreams of Building a Mile High Skyscraper(1:23:43) - Deep Dive into Environmentalism and NEPA(1:42:04) - Software is Stealing Talent from Physical Engineering(1:47:13) - Gaps in the Blog Marketplace of Ideas(1:50:56) - Why is Modern Architecture So Ugly?(2:19:58) - Advice for Aspiring Architects and Young Construction PhysicistsTranscriptWhy Saudi Arabia's Line is Insane, Unrealistic, and Never going to Exist Dwarkesh Patel Today, I have the pleasure of speaking with Brian Potter, who is an engineer and the author of the excellent Construction Physics blog, where he writes about how the construction industry works and why it has been slow to industrialize and innovate. It's one of my favorite blogs on the internet, and I highly, highly recommend that people check it out. Brian, my first question is about The Line project in Saudi Arabia. What are your opinions? Brian Potter It's interesting how Saudi Arabia and countries in the Middle East, in general, are willing to do these big, crazy, ambitious building projects and pour huge amounts of money into constructing this infrastructure in a way that you don't see a huge amount in the modern world. China obviously does this too in huge amounts, some other minor places do as well, but in general, you don't see a whole lot of countries building these big, massive, incredibly ambitious projects. So on that level, it's interesting, and it's like, “Yes, I'm glad to see that you're doing this,” but the actual project is clearly insane and makes no sense. Look at the physical arrangement layout–– there's a reason cities grow in two dimensions. A one-dimensional city is the worst possible arrangement for transportation. It's the maximum amount of distance between any two points. So just from that perspective, it's clearly crazy, and there's no real benefit to it other than perhaps some weird hypothetical transportation situation where you had really fast point-to-point transportation. It would probably be some weird bullet train setup; maybe that would make sense. But in general, there's no reason to build a city like that. Even if you wanted to build an entirely enclosed thing (which again doesn't make a huge amount of sense), you would save so much material and effort if you just made it a cube. I would be more interested in the cube than the line. [laughs] But yeah, those are my initial thoughts on it. I will be surprised if it ever gets built. Dwarkesh Patel Are you talking about the cube from the meme about how you can put all the humans in the world in a cube the size of Manhattan? Brian Potter Something like that. If you're just going to build this big, giant megastructure, at least take advantage of what that gets you, which is minimum surface area to volume ratio.Dwarkesh Patel Why is that important? Would it be important for temperature or perhaps other features? Brian Potter This is actually interesting because I'm actually not sure how sure it would work with a giant single city. In general, a lot of economies of scale come from geometric effects. When something gets bigger, your volume increases a lot faster than your surface area does. So for something enclosed, like a tank or a pipe, the cost goes down per thing of unit you're transporting because you can carry a larger amount or a smaller amount of material. It applies to some extent with buildings and construction because the exterior wall assembly is a really burdensome, complicated, and expensive assembly. A building with a really big floor plate, for instance, can get more area per unit, per amount of exterior wall. I'm not sure how that actually works with a single giant enclosed structure because, theoretically, on a small level, it would apply the same way. Your climate control is a function of your exterior surface, at some level, and you get more efficient climate control if you have a larger volume and less area that it can escape from. But for a giant city, I actually don't know if that works, and it may be worse because you're generating so much heat that it's now harder to pump out. For examples like the urban heat island effect, where these cities generate massive amounts of waste heat, I don't know if that would work if it didn't apply the same way. I'm trying to reach back to my physics classes in college, so I'm not sure about the actual mechanics of that. Generally though, that's why you'd want to perhaps build something of this size and shape. Dwarkesh Patel What was the thought process behind designing this thing? Because Scott Alexander had a good blog post about The Line where he said, presumably, that The Line is designed to take up less space and to use less fuel because you can just use the same transportation across. But the only thing that Saudi Arabia has is space and fuel. So what is the thought process behind this construction project? Brian PotterI get the sense that a lot of committees have some amount of success in building big, impressive, physical construction projects that are an attraction just by virtue of their size and impressiveness. A huge amount of stuff in Dubai is something in this category, and they have that giant clock tower in Jeddah, the biggest giant clock building and one of the biggest buildings in the world, or something like that. I think, on some level, they're expecting that you would just see a return from building something that's really impressive or “the biggest thing on some particular axis”. So to some extent, I think they're just optimizing for big and impressive and maybe not diving into it more than that. There's this theory that I think about every so often. It's called the garbage can theory of organizational decision-making, which basically talks about how the choices that organizations make are not the result of any particular recent process. They are the result of how, whenever a problem comes up, people reach into the garbage can of potential solutions. Then whatever they pull out of the garbage can, that's the decision that they end up going with, regardless of how much sense it makes. It was a theory that was invented by academics to describe decision-making in academia. I think about that a lot, especially with reference to big bureaucracies and governments. You can just imagine the draining process of how these decisions evolve. Any random decision can be made, especially when there's such a disconnect between the decision-makers and technical knowledge.Designer Clothes & eBay Arbitrage Adventures Dwarkesh PatelTell me about your eBay arbitrage with designer clothes. Brian Potter Oh man, you really did dive deep. Yeah, so this was a small business that I ran seven or eight years ago at this point. A hobby of mine was high-end men's fashion for a while, which is a very strange hobby for an engineer to have, but there you go. That hobby centers around finding cheap designer stuff, because buying new can be overwhelmingly expensive. However, a lot of times, you can get clothes for a very cheap price if you're even a little bit motivated. Either it shows up on eBay, or it shows up in thrift stores if you know what to look for. A lot of these clothes can last because they're well-made. They last a super, super, super long time–– even if somebody wore it for 10 years or something, it could be fine. So a lot of this hobby centered around finding ways to get really nice clothes cheaply. Majority of it was based around eBay, but it was really tedious to find really nice stuff on eBay. You had to manually search for a bunch of different brands, filter out the obviously bad ones, search for typos in brands, put in titles, and stuff like that. I was in the process of doing this, and I thought, “Oh, this is really annoying. I should figure out a way to automate this process.” So I made a very simple web app where when you searched for shoes or something, it would automatically search the very nice brands of shoes and all the typos of the brand name. Then it would just filter out all the junk and let you search through the good stuff. I set up an affiliate system, basically. So anybody else that used it, I would get a kick of the sales. While I was interested in that hobby, I ran this website for a few years, and it was reasonably successful. It was one of the first things I did that got any real traction on the internet, but it was never successful in proportion to how much effort it took to maintain and update it. So as I moved away from the hobby, I eventually stopped putting time and effort into maintaining the website. I'm curious as to how you even dug that up. Dwarkesh Patel I have a friend who was with you at the Oxford Refugees Conference, Connor Tabarrok. I don't know if you remember him. Brian Potter Nice. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah. Finding other information about you on the internet was quite difficult actually. You've somehow managed to maintain your anonymity. If you're willing to reveal, what was the P&L of this project? Brian Potter Oh, it made maybe a few hundred dollars a month for a few years, but I only ever ran it as a side hobby business, basically. So in terms of time per my effort or whatever, I'm sure it was very low. Pennies to an hour or something like that. Unique Woes of The Construction Industry   Dwarkesh Patel A broad theme that I've gotten from your post is that the construction industry is plagued with these lossy feedback loops, a lack of strong economies of scale, regulation, and mistakes being very costly. Do you think that this is a general characteristic of many industries in our world today, or is there something unique about construction? Brian Potter Interesting question. One thing you think of is that there are a lot of individual factors that are not unique at all. Construction is highly regulated, but it's not necessarily more regulated than medical devices or jet travel, or even probably cars, to some extent, which have a whole vat of performance criteria they need to hit. With a couple of things like land use, for example, people say, “Oh, the land requirements, could you build it on-site,” explaining how those kinds of things make it difficult. But there is a lot that falls into this category that doesn't really share the same structure of how the construction industry works.I think it's the interaction of all those effects. One thing that I think is perhaps underappreciated is that the systems of a building are really highly coupled in a way that a lot of other things are. If you're manufacturing a computer, the hard drive is somewhat independent from the display and somewhat independent from the power supply. These things are coupled, but they can be built by independent people who don't necessarily even talk to each other before being assembled into one structured thing. A building is not really like that at all. Every single part affects every single other part. In some ways, it's like biology. So it's very hard to change something that doesn't end up disrupting something else. Part of that is because a job's building is to create a controlled interior environment, meaning, every single system has to run through and around the surfaces that are creating that controlled interior. Everything is touching each other. Again, that's not unique. Anything really highly engineered, like a plane or an iPhone, share those characteristics to some extent. In terms of the size of it and the relatively small amount you're paying in terms of unit size or unit mass, however, it's quite low. Dwarkesh Patel Is transportation cost the fundamental reason you can't have as much specialization and modularity?Brian Potter Yeah, I think it's really more about just the way a building is. An example of this would be how for the electrical system of your house, you can't have a separate box where if you needed to replace the electrical system, you could take the whole box out and put the new box in. The electrical system runs through the entire house. Same with plumbing. Same with the insulation. Same with the interior finishes and stuff like that. There's not a lot of modularity in a physical sense. Dwarkesh Patel Gotcha. Ben Kuhn  had this interesting comment on your article where he pointed out that many of the reasons you give for why it's hard to innovate in construction, like sequential dependencies and the highly variable delivery timelines are also common in software where Ben Koon works. So why do you think that the same sort of stagnation has not hit other industries that have superficially similar characteristics, like software? Brian Potter How I think about that is that you kind of see a similar structure in anything that's project-based or anything where there's an element of figuring out what you're doing while you're doing it. Compared to a large-scale manufacturing option where you spend a lot of time figuring out what exactly it is that you're building. You spend a lot of time designing it to be built and do your first number of runs through it, then you tweak your process to make it more efficient. There's always an element of tweaking it to make it better, but to some extent, the process of figuring out what you're doing is largely separate from the actual doing of it yourself. For a project-based industry, it's not quite like that. You have to build your process on the fly. Of course, there are best practices that shape it, right? For somebody writing a new software project or anything project-based, like making a movie, they have a rough idea for how it's going to go together. But there's going to be a lot of unforeseen things that kind of come up like that. The biggest difference is that either those things can often scale in a way that you can't with a building. Once you're done with the software project, you can deploy it to 1,000 or 100,000, or 1 million people, right? Once you finish making a movie, 100 million people can watch it or whatever. It doesn't quite look the same with a building. You don't really have the ability to spend a lot of time upfront figuring out how this thing needs to go. You kind of need to figure out a way to get this thing together without spending a huge amount of time that would be justified by the sheer size of it. I was able to dig up a few references for software projects and how often they just have these big, long tails. Sometimes they just go massively, massively over budget. A lot of times, they just don't get completed at all, which is shocking, but because of how many people it can then be deployed to after it's done, the economics of it are slightly different. Dwarkesh Patel I see, yeah. There's a famous law in software that says that a project will take longer than you expect even after you recount for the fact that it will take longer than you expect. Brian Potter Yeah. Hofstadter's law or something like that is what I think it is. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah. I'm curious about what the lack of skill in construction implies for startups. Famously, in software, the fact that there's zero marginal cost to scaling to the next customer is a huge boon to a startup, right? The entire point of which is scaling exponentially. Does that fundamentally constrain the size and quantity of startups you can have in construction if the same scaling is not available?Brian Potter Yeah, that's a really good question. The obvious first part of the answer is that for software, obviously, if you have a construction software company, you can scale it just like any other software business. For physical things, it is a lot more difficult. This lack of zero marginal cost has tended to fight a lot of startups, not just construction ones. But yeah, it's definitely a thing. Construction is particularly brutal because the margins are so low. The empirical fact is that trying what would be a more efficient method of building doesn't actually allow you to do it cheaper and get better margins. The startup that I used to work at, Katerra, their whole business model was basically predicated on that. “Oh, we'll just build all our buildings in these big factories, get huge economies of scale, reduce our costs, and then recoup the billions of dollars that we're pumping into this industry or business.” The math just does not work out. You can't build. In general, you can't build cheap enough to kind of recoup those giant upfront costs. A lot of businesses have been burned that way. The most success you see in prefabrication type of stuff is on the higher end of things where you can get higher margins. A lot of these prefab companies and stuff like that tend to target the higher end of the market, and you see a few different premiums for that. Obviously, if you're targeting the higher end, you're more likely to have higher margins. If you're building to a higher level of quality, that's easier to do in a factory environment. So the delta is a lot different, less enormous than it would be. Building a high level of quality is easier to do in a factory than it is in the field, so a lot of buildings or houses that are built to a really high level of energy performance, for instance, need a really, really high level of air sealing to minimize how much energy this house uses. You tend to see a lot more houses like that built out of prefab construction and other factory-built methods because it's just physically more difficult to achieve that on-site. The Problems of Prefabrication Dwarkesh Patel Can you say more about why you can't use prefabrication in a factory to get economies of scale? Is it just that the transportation costs will eat away any gains you get? What is going on? Brian PotterThere's a combination of effects. I haven't worked through all this, we'll have to save this for the next time. I'll figure it out more by then. At a high level, it's that basically the savings that you get from like using less labor or whatever is not quite enough to offset your increased transportation costs. One thing about construction, especially single-family home construction, is that a huge percentage of your costs are just the materials that you're using, right? A single-family home is roughly 50% labor and 50% materials for the construction costs. Then you have development costs, land costs, and things like that. So a big chunk of that, you just can't move to the factory at all, right?  You can't really build a foundation in a factory. You could prefab the foundation, but it doesn't gain you anything. Your excavation still has to be done on-site, obviously. So a big chunk can't move to the factory at all. For ones that can, you still basically have to pay the same amount for materials. Theoretically, if you're building truly huge volume, you could get material volume discounts, but even then, it's probably not looking at things like asset savings. So you can cut out a big chunk of your labor costs, and you do see that in factory-built construction, right? These prefab companies are like mobile home companies. They have a small fraction of labor as their costs, which is typical of a factory in general, but then they take out all that labor cost while they still have their high material costs, and then they have overhead costs of whatever the factory has cost them. Then you have your additional overhead cost of just transporting it to site, which is pretty limited. The math does not really work out in favor of prefab, in terms of being able to make the cost of building dramatically cheaper. You can obviously build a building in a prefab using prefab-free methods and build a successful construction business, right? Many people do. But in terms of dramatically lowering your costs, you don't really see that. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah, yeah. Austin Vernon has an interesting blog post about why there's not more prefabricated homes. The two things he points out were transportation costs, and the other one was that people prefer to have homes that have unique designs or unique features. When I was reading it, it actually occurred to me that maybe they're actually both the result of the same phenomenon. I don't know if I'm pronouncing it correctly, but have you heard of the Alchian-Allen theorem in economics? Brian Potter Maybe, but I don't think so. Dwarkesh Patel Basically, it's the idea that if you increase the cost of some category of goods in a fixed way––let's say you tax oranges and added a $1 tax to all oranges, or transportation for oranges gets $1 more expensive for all oranges––people will shift consumption towards the higher grade variety because now, the ratio of the cost between the higher, the more expensive orange and the less expensive orange has decreased because of the increase in fixed costs. It seems like you could use that argument to also explain why people have strong preferences for uniqueness and all kinds of design in manufactured houses. Since transportation costs are so high, that's basically a fixed cost, and that fixed cost has the effect of making people shift consumption towards higher-grade options. I definitely think that's true. Brian PotterI would maybe phrase this as, “The construction industry makes it relatively comparatively cheap to deliver a highly customized option compared to a really repetitive option.” So yeah, the ratio between a highly customized one and just a commodity one is relatively small. So you see a kind of industry built around delivering somewhat more customized options. I do think that this is a pretty broad intuition that people just desire too much customization from their homes. That really prevents you from having a mass-produced offering. I do think that is true to some extent. One example is the Levittown houses, which were originally built in huge numbers–– exactly the same model over and over again. Eventually, they had to change their business model to be able to deliver more customized options because the market shipped it. I do think that the effect of that is basically pretty overstated. Empirically, you see that in practice, home builders and developers will deliver fairly repetitive housing. They don't seem to have a really hard time doing that. As an example, I'm living in a new housing development that is just like three or four different houses copy-pasted over and over again in a group of 50. The developer is building a whole bunch of other developments that are very similar in this area. My in-laws live in a very similar development in a whole different state. If you just look like multi-family or apartment housing, it's identical apartments, you know, copy-pasted over and over again in the same building or a bunch of different buildings in the same development. You're not seeing huge amounts of uniqueness in these things. People are clearly willing to just live in these basically copy-pasted apartments. It's also quite possible to get a pretty high amount of product variety using a relatively small number of factors that you vary, right? I mean, the car industry is like this, where there are enough customization options. I was reading this book a while ago that was basically pushing back against the idea that the car industry pre-fifties and sixties we just offering a very uniform product. They basically did the math, and the number of customization options on their car was more than the atoms in the universe. Basically just, there are so many different options. All the permutations, you know, leather seats and this type of stereo and this type of engine, if you add it all up, there's just a huge, massive number of different combinations. Yeah, you can obviously customize the house a huge amount, just by the appliances that you have and the finishes that are in there and the paint colors that you choose and the fixtures and stuff like that. It would not really theoretically change the underlying way the building comes together. So regarding the idea that the fundamental demand for variety is a major obstruction, I don't think there's a whole lot of evidence for that in the construction industry. If Construction Regulation Vanished… Dwarkesh Patel I asked Twitter about what I should ask you, and usually, I don't get interesting responses but the quality of the people and the audience that knows who you are was so high that actually, all the questions I got were fascinating. So I'm going to ask you some questions from Twitter. Brian Potter Okay. Dwarkesh Patel 0:26:45Connor Tabarrok asks, “What is the most unique thing that would or should get built in the absence of construction regulation?”Brian Potter Unique is an interesting qualifier. There are a lot of things that just like should get built, right? Massive amounts of additional housing and creating more lands in these really dense urban environments where we need it, in places like San Francisco–– just fill in a big chunk of that bay. It's basically just mud flat and we should put more housing on it. “Unique thing” is more tricky. One idea that I really like (I read this in the book, The Book Where's My Flying Car),  is that it's basically crazy that our cities are designed with roads that all intersect with each other. That's an insane way to structure a material flow problem. Any sane city would be built with multiple layers of like transportation where each one went in a different direction so your flows would just be massively, massively improved. That just seems like a very obvious one.If you're building your cities from scratch and had your druthers, you would clearly want to build them and know how big they were gonna get, right? So you could plan very long-term in a way that so these transportation systems didn't intersect with each other, which, again, almost no cities did. You'd have the space to scale them or run as much throughput through them as you need without bringing the whole system to a halt. There's a lot of evidence saying that cities tend to scale based on how much you can move from point A to point B through them. I do wonder whether if you changed the way they went together, you could unlock massively different cities. Even if you didn't unlock massive ones, you could perhaps change the agglomeration effects that you see in cities if people could move from point A to point B much quicker than they currently can. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah, I did an episode about the book, where's my flying car with Rohit Krishnan. I don't know if we discussed this, but an interesting part of the book is where he talks about transistor design. If you design transistors this way, can you imagine how slow they would be? [laughs] Okay, so Simon Grimm asks, “What countries are the best at building things?”Brian Potter This is a good question. I'm going to sort of cheat a little bit and do it in terms of space and time, because I think most countries that are doing a good job at building massive amounts of stuff are not ones that are basically doing it currently.The current answer is like China, where they just keep building–– more concrete was used in the last 20 years or so than the entire world used in the time before that, right? They've accomplished massive amounts of urbanization, and built a lot of really interesting buildings and construction. In terms of like raw output, I would also put Japan in the late 20th century on there. At the peak of the concern and wonder of “Is Japan gonna take over the world?”, they were really interested in building stuff quite quickly. They spent a lot of time and effort trying to use their robotics expertise to try to figure out how to build buildings a lot more quickly. They had these like really interesting factories that were designed to basically extrude an entire skyscraper just going up vertically.All these big giant companies and many different factories were trying to develop and trying to do this with robotics. It was a really interesting system that did not end up ever making economic sense, but it is very cool. I think big industrial policy organs of the government basically encouraged a lot of these industrial companies to basically develop prefabricated housing systems. So you see a lot of really interesting systems developed from these sort of industrial companies in a way that you don't see in a lot of other places. From 1850 to maybe 1970 (like a hundred years or something), the US was building huge massive amounts of stuff in a way that lifted up huge parts of the economy, right? I don't know how many thousands of miles of railroad track the US built between like 1850 and 1900, but it was many, many, many thousands of miles of it. Ofcourse, needing to lay all this track and build all these locomotives really sort of forced the development of the machine tool industry, which then led to the development of like better manufacturing methods and interchangeable parts, which of course then led to the development of the automotive industry. Then ofcourse, that explosion just led to even more big giant construction projects. So you really see that this ability to build just big massive amounts of stuff in this virtuous cycle with the US really advanced a lot of technology to raise the standard of development for a super long period of time. So those are my three answers. China's Real Estate Bubble, Unbound Technocrats, and JapanDwarkesh Patel Those three bring up three additional questions, one for each of them! That's really interesting. Have you read The Power Broker, the book about Robert Moses? Brian Potter I think I got a 10th of the way through it. Dwarkesh Patel That's basically a whole book in itself, a 10th of the way. [laughs] I'm a half of the way through, and so far it's basically about the story of how this one guy built a startup within the New York state government that was just so much more effective at building things, didn't have the same corruption and clientelism incompetence. Maybe it turns into tragedy in the second half, but so far it's it seems like we need this guy. Where do we get a second Robert Moses? Do you think that if you had more people like that in government or in construction industries, public works would be more effectively built or is the stagnation there just a result of like other bigger factors? Brian Potter That's an interesting question. I remember reading this article a while ago that was complaining about how horrible Penn Station is in New York. They're basically saying, “Yeah, it would be nice to return to the era of like the sort of unbound technocrat” when these technical experts in high positions of power in government could essentially do whatever they wanted to some extent. If they thought something should be built somewhere, they basically had the power to do it. It's a facet of this problem of how it's really, really hard to get stuff built in the US currently. I'm sure that a part of it is that you don't see these really talented technocrats occupy high positions of government where they can get stuff done. But it's not super obvious to me whether that's the limiting factor. I kind of get the sense that they would end up being bottlenecked by some other part of the process. The whole sort of interlocking set of institutions has just become so risk averse that they would end up just being blocked in a way that they wouldn't when they were operating in the 1950s or 1960s.Dwarkesh Patel Yeah, yeah, that's interesting. All right, so speaking of Japan, I just recently learned about the construction there and how they just keep tearing stuff down every 30 to 40 years and rebuilding it. So you have an interesting series of posts on how you would go about building a house or a building that lasts for a thousand years. But I'm curious, how would you build a house or a building that only lasts for 30 or 40 years? If you're building in Japan and you know they're gonna tear it down soon, what changes about the construction process? Brian Potter Yeah, that's interesting. I mean, I'm not an expert on Japanese construction, but I think like a lot of their interior walls are basically just paper and stuff like that. I actually think it's kind of surprising that last time I looked, for a lot of their homes, they use a surprising post and beam construction method, which is actually somewhat labor-intensive to do. The US in the early 1800s used a pretty similar method. Then once we started mass producing conventional lumber, we stopped doing that because it was much cheaper to build out of two-by-fours than it was to build big heavy posts. I think the boring answer to that question is that we'd build like how we build mobile homes–– essentially just using pretty thin walls, pretty low-end materials that are put together in a minimal way. This ends up not being that different from the actual construction method that single-family homes use. It just even further economizes and tightens the use of materials–– where a single-family home might use a half inch plywood, they might try to use three-sixteenths or even an eighth inch plywood or something like that. So we'd probably build a pretty similar way to the way most single-family homes and multi-family homes are built currently, but just with even tighter use of materials which perhaps is something that's not super nice about the way that you guys build your homes. But... [laughs]Dwarkesh Patel Okay, so China is the third one here. There's been a lot of talk about a potential real estate bubble in China because they're building housing in places where people don't really need it. Of course, maybe the demographics aren't there to support the demand. What do you think of all this talk? I don't know if you're familiar with it, but is there a real estate bubble that's created by all this competence in building? Brian PotterOh, gosh, yeah, I have no idea. Like you, I've definitely heard talk of it and I've seen the little YouTube clips of them knocking down all these towers that it turns out they didn't need or the developer couldn't, finish or whatever. I don't know a huge amount about that. In general, I wish I knew a lot more about how things are built in China, but the information is in general, so opaque. I generally kind of assume that any particular piece of data that comes out of China has giant error bars on it as to whether it's true or not or what the context surrounding it is. So in general, I do not have a hard opinion about that. Dwarkesh Patel This is the second part of Simon's question, does greater competence and being able to build stuff translate into other good outcomes for these countries like higher GDP or lower rents or other kinds of foreign outcomes? Brian Potter That's a good question. Japan is an interesting place where basically people point to it as an example of, “Here's a country that builds huge amounts of housing and they don't have housing cost increases.” In general, we should expect that dynamic to be true. Right? There's no reason to not think that housing costs are essentially a supply-demand problem where if you built as much as people wanted, the cost would drop. I have no reason to not think that's true. There is a little bit of evidence that sort of suggests that it's impossible to build housing enough to overcome this sort of mechanical obstacle where the cost of it tends to match and rise to whatever people's income level are. The peak and the sort of flattening of housing costs in Japan also parallel when people basically stopped getting raises and income stopped rising in Japan. So I don't have a good sense of, if it ends up being just more driven by some sort of other factors. Generally though I expect the very basic answer of “If you build a lot more houses, the housing will become cheaper.”Dwarkesh PatelRight. Speaking of how the land keeps gaining value as people's income go up, what is your opinion on Georgism? Does that kind of try and make you think that housing is a special asset that needs to be more heavily taxed because you're not inherently doing something productive just by owning land the way you would be if you like built a company or something similar?Brian Potter I don't have any special deep knowledge of Georgism. It's on my list of topics to read more deeply about. I do think in general, taxing encourages you to produce less of something for something that you can't produce less of. It's a good avenue for something to tax more heavily. And yeah, obviously if you had a really high land value tax in these places that have a lot of single-family homes in dense urban areas, like Seattle or San Francisco, that would probably encourage people to use the land a lot more efficiently. So it makes sense to me, but I don't have a ton of special knowledge about it. Dwarkesh Patel All right, Ben Kuhn asked on Twitter, “What construction-related advice would you give to somebody building a new charter city?”Brian Potter That is interesting. I mean, just off the top of my head, I would be interested in whether you could really figure out a way to build using a method that had really high upfront costs. I think it could otherwise be justified, but if you're gonna build 10,000 buildings or whatever all at once, you could really take advantage of that. One kind of thing that you see in the sort of post-World War II era is that we're building huge massive amounts of housing, and a lot of times we're building them all in one place, right? A lot of town builders were building thousands and thousands of houses in one big development all at once. In California, it's the same thing, you just built like 6 or 10 or 15,000 houses in one big massive development. You end up seeing something like that where they basically build this like little factory on their construction site, and then use that to like fabricate all these things. Then you have something that's almost like a reverse assembly line where a crew will go to one house and install the walls or whatever, and then go to the next house and do the same thing. Following right behind them would be the guys doing the electrical system, plumbing, and stuff like that. So this reverse assembly line system would allow you to sort of get these things up really, really fast, in 30 days or something like that. Then you could have a whole house or just thousands and thousands of houses at once. You would want to be able to do something similar where you could just not do the instruction the way that the normal construction is done, but that's hard, right? Centrally planned cities or top-down planned cities never seem to do particularly well, right? For example, the city of Brasilia, the one that was supposed to be a planned city— the age it goes back to the unfettered technocrat who can sort of build whatever he wants. A lot of times, what you want is something that will respond at a low level and organically sort out the factories as they develop. You don't want something that's totally planned from the top-down, that's disconnected from all the sorts of cases on the ground. A lot of the opposition to Robert Moses ended up being that in a certain form, right? He's bulldozing through these cities that are these buildings and neighborhoods that he's not paying attention to at all. So I think, just to go back to the question, trying to plan your city from the top down doesn't have a super, super great track record. In general, you want your city to develop a little bit more organically. I guess I would think to have a good sort of land-use rules that are really thought through well and encourage the things that you want to encourage and not discourage the things that you don't want to discourage. Don't have equity in zoning and allow a lot of mixed-use construction and stuff like that. I guess that's a somewhat boring answer, but I'd probably do something along those lines. Dwarkesh Patel Interesting, interesting. I guess that implies that there would be high upfront costs to building a city because if you need to build 10,000 homes at once to achieve these economies of scale, then you would need to raise like tens of billions of dollars before you could build a charter city. Brian Potter Yeah, if you were trying to lower your costs of construction, but again, if you have the setup to do that, you wouldn't necessarily need to raise it. These other big developments were built by developers that essentially saw an opportunity. They didn't require public funding to do it. They did in the form of loan guarantees for veterans and things like that, but they didn't have the government go and buy the land. Automation and Revolutionary Future Technologies Dwarkesh Patel Right, okay, so the next question is from Austin Vernon. To be honest, I don't understand the question, you two are too smart for me, but hopefully, you'll be able to explain the question and then also answer it. What are your power rankings for technologies that can tighten construction tolerances? Then he gives examples like ARVR, CNC cutting, and synthetic wood products. Brian Potter Yeah, so this is a very interesting question. Basically, because buildings are built manually on site by hand, there's just a lot of variation in what ends up being built, right? There's only so accurately that a person can put something in place if they don't have any sort of age or stuff like that. Just the placement itself of materials tends to have a lot of variation in it and the materials themselves also have a lot of variation in them. The obvious example is wood, right? Where one two by four is not gonna be exactly the same as another two by four. It may be warped, it may have knots in it, it may be split or something like that. Then also because these materials are sitting just outside in the elements, they sort of end up getting a lot of distortion, they either absorb moisture and sort of expand and contract, or they grow and shrink because of the heat. So there's just a lot of variation that goes into putting a building up.To some extent, it probably constrains what you are able to build and how effectively you're able to build it. I kind of gave an example before of really energy efficient buildings and they're really hard to build on-site using conventional methods because the air ceiling is quite difficult to do. You have to build it in a much more precise way than what is typically done and is really easily achieved on-site. So I guess in terms of examples of things that would make that easier, he gives some good ones like engineered lumber, which is where you take lumber and then grind it up into strands or chips or whatever and basically glue them back together–– which does a couple of things. It spreads all the knots and the defects out so they are concentrated and everything tends to be a lot more uniform when it's made like that. So that's a very obvious one that's already in widespread use. I don't really see that making a substantial change.I guess the one exception to that would be this engineered lumber product called mass timber elements, CLT, which is like a super plywood. Plywood is made from tiny little sheet thin strips of wood, right? But CLT is made from two-by-four-dimensional lumber glued across laminated layers. So instead of a 4 by 9 sheet of plywood, you have a 12 by 40 sheet of dimensional lumber glued together. You end up with a lot of the properties of engineered material where it's really dimensionally stable. It can be produced very, very accurately. It's actually funny that a lot of times, the CLT is the most accurate part of the building. So if you're building a building with it, you tend to run into problems where the rest of the building is not accurate enough for it. So even with something like steel, if you're building a steel building, the steel is not gonna be like dead-on accurate, it's gonna be an inch or so off in terms of where any given component is. The CLT, which is built much more accurately, actually tends to show all these errors that have to be corrected. So in some sense, accuracy or precision is a little bit of like a tricky thing because you can't just make one part of the process more precise. In some ways that actually makes things more difficult because if one part is really precise, then a lot of the time, it means that you can't make adjustments to it easily. So if you have this one really precise thing, it usually means you have to go and compensate for something else that is not built quite as precisely. It actually makes advancing precision quite a bit more complicated. AR VR, is something I'm very bullish on. A big caveat of that is assuming that they can just get the basic technology working. The basic intuition there is that right now the way that pieces are, when a building is put together on site, somebody is looking at a set of paper plans, or an iPad or something that tells them where everything needs to go. So they figure that out and then they take a tape measure or use some other method and go figure out where that's marked on the ground. There's all this set-up time that is really quite time consuming and error prone. Again, there's only so much accuracy that a guy dragging a tape 40 feet across site being held by another guy can attain, there's a limit to how accurate that process can be. It's very easy for me to imagine that AR would just project exactly where the components of your building need to go. That would A, allow you a much higher level of accuracy that you can easily get using manual methods. And then B, just reduce all that time it takes to manually measure things. I can imagine it being much, much, much faster as well, so I'm quite bullish on that. At a high level and a slightly lower level, it's not obvious to me if they will be able to get to the level where it just projects it with perfect accuracy right in front of you. It may be the case that a person moving their head around and constantly changing their point of view wont ever be able to project these things with millimeter precision––it's always gonna be a little bit jumpy or you're gonna end up with some sort of hard limit in terms of like how precisely you can project it. My sense is that locator technology will get good enough, but I don't have any principle reason believing that. The other thing is that being able to take advantage of that technology would require you to have a really, really accurate model of your building that locates where every single element is precisely and exactly what its tolerances are. Right now, buildings aren't designed like that, they are built using a comparatively sparse set of drawings that leaves a lot to sort of be interpreted by the people on site doing the work and efforts that have tried to make these models really, really, really precise, have not really paid off a lot of times. You can get returns on it if you're building something really, really complex where there's a much higher premium to being able to make sure you don't make any error, but for like a simple building like a house, the returns just aren't there. So you see really comparatively sparse drawings. Whether it's gonna be able to work worth this upfront cost of developing this really complex, very precise model of where exactly every component is still has to be determined. There's some interesting companies that are trying to move in this direction where they're making it a lot easier to draw these things really, really precisely and whave every single component exactly where it is. So I'm optimistic about that as well, but it's a little bit TBD. Dwarkesh Patel This raises a question that I actually wanted to ask you, which is in your post about why there aren't automatic brick layers. It was a really interesting post. Somebody left in an interesting comment saying that bricks were designed to be handled and assembled by humans. Then you left a response to that, which I thought was really interesting. You said, “The example I always reach for is with steam power and electricity, where replacing a steam engine with an electric motor in your factory didn't do much for productivity. Improving factory output required totally redesigning the factory around the capabilities of electric motors.” So I was kind of curious about if you apply that analogy to construction, then what does that look like for construction? What is a house building process or building building process that takes automation and these other kinds of tools into account? How would that change how buildings are built and how they end up looking in the end? Brian Potter I think that's a good question. One big component of the lack of construction productivity is everything was designed and has evolved over 100 years or 200 years to be easy for a guy or person on the site to manipulate by hand. Bricks are roughly the size and shape and weight that a person can move it easily around. Dimensional lumber is the same. It's the size and shape and weight that a person can move around easily. And all construction materials are like this and the way that they attach together and stuff is the same. It's all designed so that a person on site can sort of put it all together with as comparatively little effort as possible. But what is easy for a person to do is usually not what is easy for a machine or a robot to do, right? You typically need to redesign and think about what your end goal is and then redesign the mechanism for accomplishing that in terms of what is easy to get to make a machine to do. The obvious example here is how it's way easier to build a wagon or a cart that pulls than it is to build a mechanical set of legs that mimics a human's movement. That's just way, way, way easier. I do think that a big part of advancing construction productivity is to basically figure out how to redesign these building elements in a way that is really easy for a machine to produce and a machine to put together. One reason that we haven't seen it is that a lot of the mechanization you see is people trying to mechanize exactly what a person does. You'd need a really expensive industrial robot that can move exactly the way that a human moves more or less. What that might look like is basically something that can be really easily extruded by a machine in a continuous process that wouldn't require a lot of finicky mechanical movements. A good example of this technology is technology that's called insulated metal panels, which is perhaps one of the cheapest and easiest ways to build an exterior wall. What it is, is it's just like a thin layer of steel. Then on top of that is a layer of insulation. Then on top of that is another layer of steel. Then at the end, the steel is extruded in such a way that it can like these inner panels can like lock together as they go. It's basically the simplest possible method of constructing a wall that you can imagine. But that has the structural system and the water barrier, air barrier, and insulation all in this one really simple assembly. Then when you put it together on site, it just locks together. Of course there are a lot of limitations to this. Like if you want to do anything on top of like add windows, all of a sudden it starts to look quite a bit less good. I think things that are really easy for a machine to do can be put together without a lot of persistent measurement or stuff like that in-field. They can just kind of snap together and actually want to fit together. I think that's kind of what it looks like. 3D Printer Pessimism & The Rising Cost of LabourDwarkesh Patel What would the houses or the buildings that are built using this physically look like? Maybe in 50 to 100 years, we'll look back on the houses we have today and say, “Oh, look at that artisanal creation made by humans.” What is a machine that is like designed for robots first or for automation first? In more interesting ways, would it differ from today's buildings? Brian Potter That's a good question. I'm not especially bullish on 3D building printing in general, but this is another example of a building using an extrusion process that is relatively easy to mechanize. What's interesting there is that when you start doing that, a lot of these other bottlenecks become unlocked a little bit. It's very difficult to build a building using a lot of curved exterior surfaces using conventional methods. You can do it, it's quite expensive to do, but there's a relatively straightforward way for a 3D-printed building to do that. They can build that as easily as if it was a straight wall. So you see a lot of interesting curved architecture on these creations and in a few other areas. There's a company that can build this cool undulating facade that people kind of like. So yeah, it unlocks a lot of options. Machines are more constrained in some things that they can do, but they don't have a lot of the other constraints that you would otherwise see. So I think you'll kind of see a larger variety of aesthetic things like that. That said, at the end of the day, I think a lot of the ways a house goes together is pretty well shaped to just the way that a person living inside it would like to use. I think Stewart Brand makes this point in––Dwarkesh Patel Oh, How Buildings Learn. Brian Potter There we go. He basically makes the point that a lot of people try to use dome-shaped houses or octagon-shaped houses, which are good because, again, going back to surface area volume, they include lots of space using the least amount of material possible. So in some theoretical sense, they're quite efficient, but it's actually quite inconvenient to live inside of a building with a really curved wall, right? Furniture doesn't fit up against it nicely, and pictures are hard to hang on a really curved wall. So I think you would see less variation than maybe you might expect. Dwarkesh Patel Interesting. So why are you pessimistic about 3D printers? For construction, I mean. Brian Potter Yeah, for construction. Oh God, so many reasons. Not pessimistic, but just there's a lot of other interesting questions. I mean, so the big obvious one is like right now a 3D printer can basically print the walls of a building. That is a pretty small amount of the value in a building, right? It's maybe 7% or 8%, something like that. Probably not more than 10% of the value in a building. Because you're not printing the foundation, you're not printing like the overhead vertical, or the overhead spanning structure of the building. You're basically just printing the walls. You're not even really printing the second story walls that you have in multiple stories. I don't think they've quite figured that out yet. So it's a pretty small amount of value added to the building. It's frankly a task that is relatively easy to do by manual labor. It's really pretty easy for a crew to basically put up the structure of a house. This is kind of a recurring theme in mechanization or it goes back to what I was talking about to our previous lead. Where it takes a lot of mechanization and a lot of expensive equipment to replace what basically like two or three guys can do in a day or something like that. The economics of it are pretty brutal. So right now it produces a pretty small value. I think that the value of 3D printing is basically entirely predicated on how successful they are at figuring out how to like deliver more components of the building using their system. There are companies that are trying to do this. There's one that got funded not too long ago called Black Diamond, where they have this crazy system that is like a series of 3D printers that would act simultaneously, like each one building a separate house. Then as you progress, you switch out the print head for like a robot arm. Cause a 3D printer is basically like a robot arm with just a particular manipulator at the end, right?So they switch out their print head for like a robot arm, and the robot arm goes and installs different other systems like the windows or the mechanical systems. So you can figure out how to do that reliably where your print head or your printing system is installing a large fraction of the value of the building. It's not clear to me that it's gonna be economic, but it obviously needs to reach that point. It's not obvious to me that they have gotten there yet. It's really quite hard to get a robot to do a lot of these tasks. For a lot of these players, it seems like they're actually moving away from that. I think in ICON is the biggest construction 3D printer company in the US, as far as I know. And as far as I know, they've moved away from trying to install lots of systems in their walls as they get printed. They've kind of moved on to having that installed separately, which I think has made their job a little bit easier, but again, not quite, it's hard to see how the 3D printer can fulfill its promises if it can't do anything just beyond the vertical elements, whichare really, for most construction, quite cheap and simple to build. Dwarkesh Patel Now, if you take a step back and talk how expensive construction is overall, how much of it can just be explained by the Baumol cost effect? As in labor costs are increasing because labor is more productive than other industries and therefore construction is getting more expensive. Brian Potter I think that's a huge, huge chunk of it. The labor fraction hasn't changed appreciably enough. I haven't actually verified that and I need to, but I remember somebody that said that they used to be much different. You sent me some literature related to it. So let's add a slight asterisk on that. But in general the labor cost has remained a huge fraction of the overall cost of the building. Reliably seeing their costs continue to rise, I think there's no reason to believe that that's not a big part of it. Dwarkesh Patel Now, I know this sounds like a question with an obvious answer, but in your post comparing the prices of construction in different countries, you mentioned how the cost of labor and the cost of materials is not as big a determiner of how expensive it is to construct in different places. But what does matter? Is it the amount of government involvement and administrative overhead? I'm curious why those things (government involvement and administrative overhead) have such a high consequence on the cost of construction. Brian Potter Yeah, that's a good question. I don't actually know if I have a unified theory for that. I mean, basically with any heavily regulated thing, any particular task that you're doing takes longer and is less reliable than it would be if it was not done right. You can't just do it as fast as on your own schedule, right? You end up being bottlenecked by government processes and it reduces and narrows your options. So yeah, in general, I would expect that to kind of be the case, but I actually don't know if I have a unified theory of how that works beyond just, it's a bunch of additional steps at any given part of the process, each of which adds cost. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah. Now, one interesting trend we have in the United States with construction is that a lot of it is done by Latino workers and especially by undocumented Latino workers. What is the effect of this on the price and the quality of construction? If you have a bunch of hardworking undocumented workers who are working for below-market rates in the US, will this dampen the cost of construction over time? What do you think is going to happen? Brian Potter I suspect that's probably one of the reasons why the US has comparatively low construction costs compared to other parts of the world. Well, I'll caveat that. Residential construction, which is single-family homes and multi-family apartment buildings all built in the US and have light framed wood and are put together, like you said, by a lot of like immigrant workers. Because of that, it would not surprise me if those wages are a lot lower than the equivalent wage for like a carpenter in Germany or something like that. I suspect that's a factor in why our cost of residential construction are quite low. AI's Impact on Construction ProductivityDwarkesh Patel Overall, it seems from your blog post that you're kind of pessimistic, or you don't think that different improvements in industrialization have transferred over to construction yet. But what do you think is a prospect of future advances in AI having a big impact on construction? With computer vision and with advances in robotics, do you think we'll finally see some carry-over into construction productivity or is it gonna be more of the same? Brian Potter Yeah, I think there's definitely gonna be progress on that axis. If you can wire up your computer vision systems, robotic systems, and your AI in such a way that your capabilities for a robot system are more expanded, then I kind of foresee robotics being able to take a larger and larger fraction of the tasks done on a typical construction site. I kind of see it being kind of done in narrow avenues that gradually expand outward. You're starting to see a lot of companies that have some robotic system that can do one particular task, but do that task quite well. There's a couple of different robot companies that have these little robots for like drawing wall layouts on like concrete slabs or whatever. So you know exactly where to build your walls, which you would think would not be like a difficult problem in construction, but it turns out that a lot of times people put the walls in the wrong spot and then you have to go back and move them later or just basically deal with it. So yeah, it's basically a little Roomba type device that just draws the wall layout to the concrete slab and all the other systems as well–– for example, where the lines need to run through the slab and things like that. I suspect that you're just gonna start to see robotics and systems like that take a larger and larger share of the tasks on the construction site over time. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah, it's still very far away. It's still very far away. What do you think of Flow? That's Adam Neumann's newest startup and backed with $350 million from Andreeseen Horowitz.Brian Potter I do not have any strong opinions about that other than, “Wow, they've really given him another 350M”. I do not have any particularly strong opinions about this. They made a lot they make a lot of investments that don't make sense to me, but I'm out of venture capital. So there's no reason that my judgment would be any good in this situation–– so I'm just presuming they know something I do not. Dwarkesh Patel I'm going to be interviewing Andreeseen later this month, and I'm hoping I can ask him about that.Brian Potter You know, it may be as simple as he “sees all” about really high variance bets. There's nobody higher variance in the engine than Adam Neumann so, maybe just on those terms, it makes sense. Dwarkesh Patel You had an interesting post about like how a bunch of a lot of the knowledge in the construction industry is informal and contained within best practices or between relationships and expectations that are not articulated all the time. It seems to me that this is also true of software in many cases but software seems much more legible and open source than these other physical disciplines like construction despite having a lot of th

Hoop Heads
Andre Cook - St. Edward's University Men's Basketball Head Coach - Episode 698

Hoop Heads

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 89:40


Andre Cook is entering his 14th season as the Head Men's Basketball Coach at St. Edward's University in Austin, Texas.  He has led St. Edward's to nine winning seasons in his tenure with an overall record of 221-152 including a program record 30 wins in 2018-19. That season The Hilltoppers snagged the Heartland Conference Regular Season title, Heartland Conference Tournament Championship and advanced to the NCAA Regional Final while being ranked as high as #2 nationally during the season. Cook was named the 2019 Clarance Gaines Award winner, given by CollegeInsider.com to the Division II National Coach of the Year and NABC District Coach of the Year. Cook came to St. Edward's from Hudson Valley Community College, where he compiled an overall record of 119-40 in five seasons. He previously served as an assistant at Union College from 1994-1996 while earning his master's degree in teaching social studies.  Cook also coached basketball at Hudson Falls High School from 1996-2004 where he also taught and served as assistant principal. Cook played four years at Skidmore College and is in the top 10 in scoring at Skidmore with over 1,000 points. In 2012, Cook was inducted into the Capital District Basketball Hall of Fame in Albany, New York. If you're looking to improve your coaching please consider joining the Hoop Heads Mentorship Program.  We believe that having a mentor is the best way to maximize your potential and become a transformational coach. By matching you up with one of our experienced mentors you'll develop a one on one relationship that will help your coaching, your team, your program, and your mindset.  The Hoop Heads Mentorship Program delivers mentoring services to basketball coaches at all levels through our team of experienced Head Coaches. Find out more at hoopheadspod.com or shoot me an email directly mike@hoopheadspod.com Follow us on social media @hoopheadspod on Twitter and Instagram and be sure to check out the Hoop Heads Podcast Network for more great basketball content. Be prepared to take some notes as you listen to this episode with Andre Cook, Men's Basketball Head Coach at St. Edward's University inAustin, Texas. Website - https://gohilltoppers.com/sports/mens-basketball (https://gohilltoppers.com/sports/mens-basketball) Email - andrec@stedwards.edu Twitter - https://twitter.com/CoachAndreCook (@CoachAndreCook) Visit our Sponsors! https://www.drdishbasketball.com/ (Dr. Dish Basketball) Mention the Hoop Heads Podcast when you place your order and get $300 off a brand new state of the art Dr. Dish Shooting Machine! http://www.fastmodelsports.com/ (Fast Model Sports) FastModel Sports has the most compelling and intuitive basketball software out there! In addition to a great product, they also provide basketball coaching content and resources through their blog and playbank, which features over 8,000 free plays and drills from their online coaching community. For access to these plays and more information, visit http://fastmodelsports.com (fastmodelsports.com) or follow them on Twitter @FastModel. Use Promo code HHP15 to save 15% https://www.coachingportfolioguide.com/hoopheads (The Coaching Portfolio) Your first impression is everything when applying for a new coaching job.  A professional coaching portfolio is the tool that highlights your coaching achievements and philosophies and, most of all, helps separate you and your abilities from the other applicants. Special Price of just $25 for all Hoop Heads Listeners.   Twitter Podcast - https://twitter.com/hoopheadspod (@hoopheadspod) Mike - https://twitter.com/hdstarthoops (@hdstarthoops) Jason - https://twitter.com/jsunkle (@jsunkle) Network - https://twitter.com/HoopHeadsPodNet (@HoopHeadsPodNet) Instagram https://www.instagram.com/hoopheadspod/ (@hoopheadspod) Facebook https://www.facebook.com/hoopheadspod/ (https://www.facebook.com/hoopheadspod/) YouTube

Feedstuffs in Focus
What U.S. cattle producers can learn from Brazilian ranchers response to extreme weather

Feedstuffs in Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 12:33


Farmers and ranchers around the world are increasingly forced to adapt to changing weather patterns. And while a lot of agricultural research has focused on mitigation strategies for crop production, livestock producers face a unique set of challenges that have not yet received the same level of academic inquiry. One professor at the University of Illinois is working to change that.A new study from the University of Illinois examined how cattle ranchers in Brazil are responding to climate change in the Amazon. Previous research shows the dry season is increasing up to 0.6 days per year, putting more stress on animals. That is pushing ranchers to sell their cattle early, according to Marin Skidmore, assistant professor in the Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics at U of I. Her paper was recently published in the American Journal of Agricultural Economics, and in this episode we talk with Dr. Skidmore about her findings, and the implications for U.S. cattle producers dealing with extended drought here at home.You can read more of our coverage of the impacts of climate change on the livestock industry in the pages of Feedstuffs. You can find our latest issue and past editions by visiting Feedstuffs.com and clicking on “Digital Editions.”This episode is sponsored by United Animal Health, a leader in animal health and nutrition. You can learn more about United Animal Health and how they are working to advance animal science worldwide by visiting their website UnitedANH.com.

Flow
How Has U.S. Foreign Policy Affected Immigration?

Flow

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 20:36


In this video I dive into the history of American involvement in Latin American politics and its effect on immigration to the U.S. #usa #uspolitics #latinamerica #history References Ali, Malik. n.d. “Intervention in Nicaragua.” Teaching American History. Accessed September 11, 2022. https://teachingamericanhistory.org/document/intervention-in-nicaragua/. Bensaid, Adam. 2019. “The secret history of US interventions in Latin America.” TRT World. https://www.trtworld.com/americas/the-secret-history-of-us-interventions-in-latin-america-23586. Campbell, Duncan. 2003. “Kissinger approved Argentinian 'dirty war' | World news.” The Guardian. https://www.theguardian.com/world/2003/dec/06/argentina.usa. Doyle, Kate, and Carlos Osorio. n.d. “U.S. POLICY IN GUATEMALA, 1966-1996.” The National Security Archive. Accessed September 11, 2022. https://nsarchive2.gwu.edu/NSAEBB/NSAEBB11/docs/. Feierstein, Daniel, Marcia Esparza, and Henry R. Huttenbach, eds. 2010. State Violence and Genocide in Latin America: The Cold War Years. N.p.: Routledge. “Fulgencio Batista (1901-1973) | American Experience | Official Site.” n.d. PBS. Accessed September 11, 2022. https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/castro-fulgencio-batista-1901-1973/. Gonzalez, Juan. 2011. Harvest of Empire: A History of Latinos in America. N.p.: Penguin Publishing Group. Iber, Patrick J. 2013. ““Who Will Impose Democracy?”: Sacha Volman and the Contradictions of CIA Support for the Anticommunist Left in Latin America.” Diplomatic History 37, no. 5 (April): 995-1028. https://academic.oup.com/dh/article-abstract/37/5/995/357705?redirectedFrom=fulltext&login=false. Osorio, Carlos. 2013. “OPERATION CONDOR ON TRIAL: LEGAL PROCEEDINGS ON LATIN AMERICAN RENDITION AND ASSASSINATION PROGRAM OPEN IN BUENOS AIRES.” The National Security Archive. https://nsarchive2.gwu.edu/NSAEBB/NSAEBB416/. Skidmore, Thomas E. 1989. The Politics of Military Rule in Brazil, 1964-1985. N.p.: Oxford University Press. Tienda, Mara, and Susana Sanchez. 2013. “Latin American Immigration to the United States.” National Library Medicine 142, no. 3 (July): 48-64. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4638184/

Paradise After Dark
Strange Place ~ Skidmore, MO

Paradise After Dark

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 36:13


Can a tiny town in rural Missouri be cursed with evil and violence?Join our Patreon and enjoy early and ad-free episodes, tons of bonus episodes, discounts on our merchandise and more! www.patreon.com/palmahawkmedia Visit our website paradiseafterdark.com for links to our store, Patreon, tip jar and more! Facebook.com/paradiseafterdarkpodcastInstagram @paradiseafterdarkpodcastTwitter @paradisedark239TikTok @palmahawkmediaIf you see something say something!!Music by Captain Fathands @ captainfathands.com

The Medical Sales Podcast
Capital Equipment King To Medrep Meeting CEO With Peter Skidmore Part 2

The Medical Sales Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 27:08


This is part 2 of Peter Skidmore's story and how the idea of MedRep Meeting came to be. In this episode, Samuel Gbadebo and Peter Skidmore talk about what it's like being in the medical aesthetics space. Discover what skills you need to be successful and whether or not you even want to be there at all. Learn more about what Peter believes in and that finding happiness is always more important than money.   Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share! Here's How »   Join the Medical Sales Podcast Community today: evolveyoursuccess.com

Extra Lap RC
Joni Skidmore #Xray #fx #mbmodels #worldsafinalist

Extra Lap RC

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 69:09


Joni talks about finishing in the top 10 at the redovan worlds.

Midnight Train Podcast
Vigilante Justice - What Goes Around Comes Around. Sort Of.

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 127:20


www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com  Become a Patron and get more episodes! www.patreon.com/accidentaldads  Imagine the scene: A serial murderer is guided by a specific “code” that kills only those who are guilty. He has access to crime scenes as a blood splatter analyst for the Miami police, gathering information and analyzing DNA to confirm a target's guilt before killing them. Sound familiar? It should, it's the premise of the TV show, “Dexter.”   Ah, yes, Dexter. I love that show. We figured we would talk about the life of Dexter even though Logan, of course, has never seen it. Jk.   Obviously, murder is never acceptable, right? It's the worst crime we can commit against one another, right? But what if, someone who didn't believe in the “thou shall not kill” premise decided to murder someone you love? What if someone raped or beat someone you love? What if a child was purposefully abused, raped, or arguably worse, murdered? Does that horrendous situation change the narrative? Would you, COULD YOU, take the life of the person or persons responsible for your now substantial and debilitating loss? I want you to honestly think about that as we go through today's episode.    Bottom line, do specific human piles of shit DESERVE TO DIE?   Pedro Rodrigues Filho, or Killer Petey, is a Brazilian serial murderer. He was convicted and is notorious for hunting out and murdering only criminals as a teenager, between the ages of 14 and 19, particularly an entire gang in retaliation for the killing of his pregnant girlfriend.   He served 34 years in prison before being released in 2007, having been formally imprisoned for 71 murders but claimed to have killed over 100 drug traffickers, rapists, and murderers. Filho was initially sentenced to eight more years in jail in 2011 on accusations of inciting violence and deprivation of liberty. However, he was released in 2018 after serving seven years on the condition that he behaved himself. Nevertheless, he murdered 47 inmates inside the prisons where he was held captive, most of whom were rapists.   Since his second release from prison in 2018, when he declared himself to be reformed from his self-declared vigilantism as a youth and committed to not committing any more crimes, Filho has gained notoriety as a YouTube personality in Brazil. He runs the channel Pedrinho EX Matador, later renamed 2P Entretenimento, where he comments on current crimes and teaches the general public that committing crimes is not something to be proud of.   South of Minas Gerais in Santa Rita do Sapuca, on a farm, Rodrigues was born. His father was abusive and, all in all, a piece of shit and had kicked his mother's belly during a fight while she was pregnant, leaving the poor unborn child with a bruised skull.    In a quarrel with an older relative at age 13, he shoved the young man into a sugar cane press, nearly killing him, and had pondered leaving him there to die before deciding to save him. He claimed that this was the first time he had felt the urge to kill.   When Filho was fourteen years old, his father was accused of stealing food from the high school kitchen where he worked as a security guard, resulting in him losing his job. In vengeance, Filho killed the vice-mayor of Alfenas with Filho's Grandfather's shotgun, as he was the one who fired his father. A month later, he killed another guard at the school whom he believed to be the real thief.    On the run, Rodrigues took refuge in Mogi das Cruzes, Greater São Paulo, where he began robbing drug dens and killing drug traffickers, making him a celebrity in the news media as the vigilante “Pedrinho Matador” (Lil' Petey Killer). Filho killed one of the gang leaders in the area he was ransacking. After killing the gang leader, he took over his role and began running the same gang, almost like a Riddick moment where you keep what you kill.   During this time, he met a woman named Maria Aparecida Olympia, nicknamed Botinha. After they found out they were pregnant, Filho proposed! So awesome to see that this man, with what could be perceived as a savage beast-like mentality, actually has a pretty big heart.   Unfortunately, a rival gang leader brutally murdered Filho's fiancee during Olympia's pregnancy.   After finding out about the murder, Filho kind of went full John Wick. He and a few of his friends went to the wedding of the rival gang member. The hit squad brutally massacred all involved in the death of his soon-to-be wife and the mother of his child. He killed 7 at the wedding and injured 16 more. All of this came after Filho went on a torture spree to find out who was involved initially. We don't know precisely how many were killed or hurt leading up to this point. Dudes an absolute monster and gave zero fucks.   Speaking of giving zero fucks, the boyfriend of Filho's favorite cousin knocked her up! Pretty exciting news. Except for the fact that the boyfriend refused to marry her, so… Filho shot and killed him.  Remember how we mentioned that Filho's Father was a piece of shit? Well, it gets worse. A few months after the massacre at the wedding, Filho found out that his mother had been killed. By his father. Who had butchered and dismembered her with a machete. After his father was committed to prison, Filho went and paid him a visit! While at the conjugal, Filho stabbed him 22 times! Not only did he kill his father, but he carved his heart out of him and took a rather large bite out of it. Amazing that he still somehow doesn't have any jail time or was even caught! Brazil, what's up down there?   Well, after a few years of Filho continuing his lifestyle of a gang leader, it's known that he killed a few more before good old Johnny Law caught up to him in 1973. After he was sentenced to 126 years in prison, he was transported in a police car with another inmate, where he supposedly murdered him in the police car.   Filho served only 34 years, however, while in prison. This is because the maximum time a criminal can serve is thirty years when convicted, according to Brazilian law. This was later changed to 40 years in 2019.    While in prison, he didn't slow down much on the killing. He murdered 47 other criminals serving time in the same prison as him. They were the worst of the worst, though. Murderers, rapists, sex traffickers, etc. That's valiant, right?   But being a killer of killers creates a pretty strong and bad reputation among other criminals. Especially when most of the prison population has that on their rap sheet. So he made some enemies while there.   He was ambushed by some of these people. During the ambush, he killed three of his attackers and injured the other two. One bad motherfucker.   He was up for release in 2003 but because of the murders within the prison, he was given an extra four years. But he only murdered bad guys. I mean, there was just the one-off murder of his cellmate because he snored too loud, but I mean, come on, who hasn't thought about that? No? Just me? Hmm. Anyways. He did mention that he enjoyed a few of the murders just because they were terrible people, and he wanted to kill them.   He was formally let free on April 24, 2007, but on September 15, 2011, he was detained at his home and later found guilty of riot and false imprisonment. He acknowledged that the fact that his girlfriend was not in jail was his primary reason for wanting to be released. However, he was ultimately sentenced to 128 years for these offenses.   Filho was released in 2018 due to Brazil's repeal of the law stating that those with a diagnosis of psychopathy can be imprisoned indefinitely and that the country's maximum penalty is 30 years. Since then, he has created a YouTube channel where he shares his experiences. In addition, he tries to teach others to not follow in his footsteps.   So let's sum this guy up:   Most of the time, Filho hunted down the various types of offenders he wanted to kill by looking up their names and addresses. He then brutally killed them in several methods. However, he admitted that his preferred method was to hack or stab them to death with swords. Usually, when he learned of a crime, that prompted him to take action. When driven by rage rather than thrill, he would occasionally capture criminals (usually professional criminals and drug dealers) and torture them to death. He sometimes modified his approach by following the path taken by his victims when they committed their own crimes, such as when he murdered his father or when he murdered seven people in one day.   Now how about we look at some other folks with the same motifs? Now they may not have as extensive of a rap sheet as Filho, but these following people had decided to make it known for taking justice into their own hands when the Justice system didn't seem to do enough for them. Marianne Bachmeier   She was a struggling single mother who learned with horror that her daughter Anna, age 7, had died. The girl missed school on May 5, 1980, and somehow ended up at the home of Klaus Grabowski, a 35-year-old butcher who lived next door. Later, a cardboard box containing Anna's remains was discovered on the side of a nearby canal. Grabowski was detained very quickly after his fiancée called the police to report the incident since he already had a criminal record for child abuse. Grabowski argued that he hadn't sexually molested the little girl before killing her, even after confessing to the crime.   Instead, Grabowski made the strange claim that the young girl had attempted to “blackmail” him by saying she would tell her mother he had assaulted her if he didn't give her money. Grabowski further claimed that the primary motivation for his decision to kill the kid in the first place was this alleged “blackmailing.”    The murder of Marianne Bachmeier's daughter had already infuriated her. But when the murderer related this tale, she grew even more irate. She was determined to get retribution when the man was put on trial a year later.   At Grabowski's 1981 trial in the Lübeck district court, his defense claimed that since he had been deliberately castrated for his crimes years earlier, he had only committed the offense due to a hormone imbalance.   The third day of the trial was Bachmeier's breaking point. She concealed a .22-caliber Beretta handgun in her handbag, took it out in the courtroom, and fired eight shots at the murderer. Grabowski received six rounds of fire before passing away in a pool of blood on the courthouse floor. Bachmeier reportedly responded, “I wanted to kill him,” according to Judge Guenther Kroeger.   Although it was evident from the several witnesses and Bachmeier's comments that it was indeed her who killed Grabowski, she was shortly placed on trial for the crime. She said, “He killed my daughter... I meant to shoot him in the face but I shot him in the back... I hope he's dead.”   With some celebrating Bachmeier as a hero and others denouncing her conduct, the “Revenge Mother” case swiftly gained notoriety in Germany. Before shooting Grabowski, Bachmeier said that she saw visions of Anna in the trial and could no longer stand for him to misrepresent her daughter. She allegedly sold her story to Stern magazine to pay her defense lawyers for $158,000.   In the end, the courts found Bachmeier guilty in 1983 of deliberate manslaughter. For her acts, she received a six-year prison term. Jason Vukovich   Unlike other real-life vigilantes, Jason Vukovich's search for justice began years before he set out to pursue it. Vukovich, born to a single mother in Anchorage, Alaska, on June 25, 1975, was quickly adopted by his mother's new husband, Larry Fulton. Fulton seemed devout in public, but in reality, he molested Vukovich during his nightly “prayer sessions.”   Vukovich and his brother were often beaten with belts and pieces of wood in addition to sexual torture. And to make matters worse, Fulton got away with all these horrific offenses, which infuriated Vukovich. As a result, Vukovich, who fled terrified at 16, spent years getting by on narcotics and small-time thievery.   He returned to Alaska in 2008, but his desire to get revenge on pedophiles like Fulton didn't go away. It culminated in 2016. Vukovich started by browsing the neighborhood sex offenders list. He then attacked and stole from three of the guys on the list as the last act.   In June 2016, Vukovich went after the three guys. Targeting Albee first, he drove to the residences of Andres Barbosa, Charles Albee, and Wesley Demarest. Then, on the morning of June 24, Vukovich broke into the man's house and smacked the 68-year-old before robbing him and fleeing.   Two days later, he approached Barbosa in a very identical manner. However, he arrived at the door at 4 a.m. this time. He assaulted Barbosa with a punch to the face, stole his truck, and fled the scene with two female accomplices and a hammer. Demarest was instructed to get on his knees as Vukovich struck him in the fucking face with a hammer.   Vukovich claimed, “I am an angel of vengeance. “I'm going to administer justice to those you injured.”   Shortly after, the hammer, stolen items, and a notepad with the names of the persons in it were all discovered by police on Vukovich who was hiding in a nearby car. As a result, 18 charges of assault, robbery, burglary, and theft were brought against him. He decidedly took a plea deal.   According to allthatsintersting.com, in 2018, Vukovich was sentenced to 28 years in prison, after which the judge stated that “vigilantism won't be accepted in our society.”   Vukovich has since expressed regret for his actions and urged others in his position not to follow in his footsteps: “I began my life sentence many, many years ago, it was handed down to me by an ignorant, hateful, poor substitute for a father. I now face losing most of the rest of my life due to a decision to lash out at people like him. To all those who have suffered like I have, love yourself and those around you, this is truly the only way forward.”   Gary Plauché   Now I'm pretty sure we all already know this story, but it fits the agenda of what we share.   Jeff Doucet, a 25-year-old karate teacher in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, enjoyed the total confidence of his young pupils and their parents. But on February 19, 1984, when Doucet took Jody Plauché, then 11 years old, for what was intended to be a 15-minute automobile journey, that confidence was horribly betrayed.   When their son didn't come home that day, Gary and June Plauché became quite concerned—and with good reason. Doucet had taken their small boy hostage and was transporting him to the West Coast. Before booking a room at a hotel in Anaheim, California, Doucet shaved his beard and colored Jody's hair to ward off suspicion.   The youngster was repeatedly assaulted there by Doucet until he eventually gave Jody permission to phone his parents. Jody was returned to his family after the police quickly tracked down the call and apprehended Doucet. In the meantime, Gary Plauché, Jody's father, traveled to the Baton Rouge airport to meet Doucet at arrivals and murder him.   Plauché drew a .38 pistol from his boot on March 16, 1984, as soon as he spotted Doucet at the airport. He had been talking to a friend on the other end of a payphone while waiting for Doucet to show up. Even saying, “Look out, he's coming. A shot is soon to be heard. The subsequent gunshot was recorded on tape since television cameras were filming.   Plauché had murdered the abuser of his kid, shooting a hollow-point bullet into Doucet's head from three feet away. Later, he was put on trial for murder, but the judge sitting on the opposing side of the courtroom was lenient. As a result, Plauché was shortly released after receiving a sentence of seven years with a suspended term, five years of probation, and 300 hours of community service.   Jody Plauché, on the other hand, took a while to comprehend all the trauma that had occurred to him at a young age. "I was outraged with what my father did after the incident," Jody said. “I did not want Jeff killed. I felt like he was going to go to jail, and that was enough for me.”   He continued, “But my parents, they didn't force me into recovery. They kind of let me recover at my own pace, and it took a while… but I was able to work through it and eventually accept my dad back in my life.” Jody eventually turned his experience into a book titled Why, Gary, Why?. Tityana Coppage Tityana Coppage is a woman from Kansas City, Missouri. She was known as a strong woman who tried to help and lead her family as a young adult. She was only 21 when she lost her brother – and it wasn't the first loss her family had to come to terms with. Her family was extended to several younger brothers with different last names who she cared for equally and passionately.   The brother she lost was Jayson Ugwuh Jr. He was a 16-year-old high school student who loved basketball and rap. He was a bright, cheerful kid despite knowing personal tragedies from mere years beforehand. He was gunned down in public on January 10 while walking with some of his friends. A car came up, opened fire, and then sped away. What provoked the incident remained a mystery. The only solid fact was that Jayson Jr. was the primary victim. Tityana and Jayson both endured a shocking loss in 2016 when a drive-by shooting claimed the lives of her young brother Jayden Ugwuh and younger cousin Montell Ross.   The boys were just 9 and 8, respectively, at the time of death. Jayson was present for the shooting and held his little brother Jayden as he faded and died from the bullet wounds.   The killer was never found. Tityana was only 16 when the incident occurred, leaving her mentally changed.   A few days before the killing of Lars, Coppage posted a tribute to her brother on Facebook. The post read: “I tried to shield y'all from everything I had to witness as a kid. I supported anything and everything you wanted to do in life. I tried to give you the best so you wouldn't have to look for fake love in the streets,” she wrote in the January 11 post. “I worked hard and long hours to keep a roof over y'all head, nice clothes and shoes on y'all feet refrigerator full of groceries. The streets didn't rise y'all I did this sh*t 10 toes down. I was at those games as much as I could, I was paying for your studio time for your trips no matter the cost. All I wanted is to see you happy finish school and make it to the top. But some how I still failed you. This wasn't you Jayson you was so sweet so quite a honorable young man why didn't you just hear me out I only wanted more time with you that's all.”   The object of Tityana's vengeance was Keith Lars. Just two days after her brother's death and burial, she gathered as much evidence as possible to affirm the identity of her brother's murderer.   She traced him as the car owner that carried the gunman who killed her brother and armed herself before they met. Lars didn't go down quietly.   They exchanged gunfire, but Tityana came alive and left Lars dead in his car in the parking lot in the city's northeast section. Court records state that Lars was found in the back of a Toyota near Virginia Avenue and Admiral Boulevard in Kansas City on January 13, with officers determining that the shooting had occurred close to the 500 block of Benton Boulevard. At that scene, police found 23 shell casings from two types of bullets. 8 were .45 caliber, and 15 were 9mm.   Was Tityana just an ordinary woman pushed beyond the brink to perform such a murderous act?   She had already seen injustice win with the still-unsolved deaths of her young siblings, and she didn't have enough trust in the system to properly avenge her brother's death.   She assumed the guilt of Lars and got in contact with someone called “Auntie” to arm herself with a .45 pistol, saying “I used to many on Bro!”    The fact that multiple gunshots were fired proves she was an amateur with a firearm. Thanks to witnesses who came forward and surveillance footage in the parking lot where the murder took place, authorities quickly identified Coppage. They arrested her for the murder, booking her into Jackson County Jail on a $200,000 bond.   Evidence was quickly collected against Coppage, and she did not deny the charges.   She insisted that she got justice for her dead brother, even going as far as to text his cell phone to assure him that she was sending his killer to him.   At the time, no formal evidence was collected, or investigations were pending towards Lars as the suspect, though he was armed and did drive the same, or very similar, truck seen at Jayson's murder scene. She admitted during questioning that she knew Lars would be in the parking lot when she shot him. However, Tityana initially claimed that the murder was accidental and that she only shot him in self-defense because he fired his weapon at her first. Coppage was spurred toward Lars by members of her community who seemed to indicate a shared but hushed knowledge of events that led to her brother's death.   The police weren't able to corroborate as much in their reporting. So all anyone seemed to know was that Lars may as well have been guilty and could have had his own criminal history.   Therefore, the extended family of the community assisted Coppage's vigilante act she grew up around. Coppage does not deny what she did or why and is charged with second-degree murder, which is murder without premeditation or planning.   By her admission, she fired her gun at the vehicle with Lars in it, but she claimed that he fired first and her weapon was meant for protection.   She was celebratory over his death, particularly over vengeance, meaning she went there assuming he was guilty and was armed to act. Coppage contacted Lars before the meeting to tell him she was coming to ask questions.   She claimed to call him to try and settle differences between him and her father, knowing that if she didn't take action, he absolutely would.   COPPAGE TEXTED HER DECEASED BROTHER AFTER KILLING LARS AS WELL. The message sent to Her brother's phone read: “I owe em that body,” according to an affidavit. This message and the ones sent to “Auntie” led authorities to file murder charges.   Rap artists DaBaby and 42 Dugg made public posts on Instagram voicing solidarity and have reached out to pay $20,000 each of her bond as support.   She is currently awaiting trial.   Jorge Porto-Sierra   Ok, so here we have someone that TECHNICALLY didn't kill anyone, but that wasn't for lack of trying.   When authorities responded to the scene at the Friendly Village Inn & Motel on U.S. Route 192 in Florida in 2018, witnesses recalled seeing Jorge shout, “I'm going to kill you, child molester,” as he drenched the property in gasoline with a cigarette in his hand.  Porto-Sierra then returned to the parking lot and attacked two individuals sitting in their car. After that, he rammed his Ford Focus into their vehicle and poured gasoline into it through an open window. Just as Porto-Sierra was preparing to set the car on fire, police arrived on the scene. He was quickly surrounded and told to surrender.   The 50-year-old Porto-Sierra admitted that he had planned to “barbecue all the child molesters on fire and kill them.” However, when police asked him why he didn't, Porto-Sierra claimed that the police had arrived too fast for him to do so.   Authorities soon discovered that at least two of the men Porto-Sierra targeted were indeed convicted, sex offenders. One man had been standing outside his room when Porto-Sierra leaped out of his car and launched into a tirade, prompting him to rush inside his room.   “They raped kids, they are all child molesters that all live here and deserve to die,” Porto-Sierra later said as he justified his actions to the police. While the Friendly Village Inn & Motel is indeed a popular place for convicted sex offenders (because it's far away from schools and playgrounds), and at least two of Porto-Sierra's targets were known sex offenders, the real-life vigilante still broke the law and thus found himself arrested for his actions.   As of 2020, Porto-Sierra is being held on no bond at the Osceola County Jail and charged with 4 counts of attempted murder.   André Bamberski Andre was born to Polish immigrants in France in the 1930s. He was in the thick of the war that affected him growing up. Later, Andre became a chartered accountant and married Danièle Gonnin, having two kids. However, at the time of the incident, Andre and Danièle were divorced, and the latter was married to Dieter Krombach, a doctor, in Lindau, Germany. Danièle initially told Andre that Dieter believed Kalinka died due to a heat stroke or the effects of a concussion from a few years prior. However, Andre wasn't so sure. Dieter had stated that on the morning of Kalinka's death, he had found her in bed, unresponsive; rigor mortis had already set in. However, Dieter tried to revive her by injecting her with a nervous system stimulant and two other stimulants. But that didn't work, and Kalinka was dead. The autopsy report read by Andre later showed that Kalinka had blood around her torn vagina. Inside, there was a whitish substance that was never tested. Besides injection marks on her arms, Kalinka had undigested food in her stomach. Experts later believed she died from asphyxiation from regurgitating her own food. All of this left Andre with only one theory: Dieter was responsible for the death. Andre believed Dieter raped and then killed Kalinka with an injection, possibly to keep her from talking about it. While the German prosecution closed the case, saying Kalinka died of natural causes, Andre didn't give up, following Dieter across Europe for years to bring him to justice. About a year after Kalinka's death, Andre went to Lindau, handing out fliers accusing Dieter of murder. He was arrested and then fined and sentenced in absentia. However, that didn't stop Andre. He then prodded the French authorities, eventually leading to Kalinka's body's exhumation; she was a French citizen. This time, it was revealed that her genitals had been missing since the autopsy, and there was no trace of them. Andre's work paid off when a French court convicted Dieter in absentia of violence, bringing on death without intention to do so, and sentenced him to 15 years. But with Germany refusing extradition, Dieter essentially remained a free man for many years. Then, in 1997, Dieter was convicted of raping a 16-year-old in his clinic. He received a two-year suspended sentence in addition to his license being revoked. But a couple of years later, Dieter moved around and worked in several clinics by providing a photocopy of his license as proof. Andre didn't give up, even hiring private detectives to find out what Dieter was up to. He said, “All my friends and family, including my father, told me to quit it at this point. They said, ‘You're not going to achieve anything.' But I'm a Slav, you see, and the Slavs are very emotional. I cried all the time when I thought about Kalinka. It was a question for me of moral duty. That was the most important thing: to get the truth.”   While Dieter received a 26-month prison sentence, he was released early, and Andre learned he was back to work yet again. Andre then resolved to bring Dieter to France in any way possible. He was in Bregenz, Austria, hoping to look for more information about Dieter in Scheidegg, Germany. Andre talked about kidnapping Dieter and eventually heard from Anton Krasniqi, who agreed to help him. In October 2009, Dieter was taken from his house by Anton and two other accomplices and left outside a building in Mulhouse, France, paving the way for Dieter's trial. While Dieter's pattern of drugging and raping women came to light, he was sentenced to 15 years behind bars. As for Andre, he admitted to knowing about the kidnapping plot but insisted he wasn't involved in the actual act. In June 2014, he was found guilty of ordering the kidnap and received a one-year suspended sentence. In the end, Andre was happy with the result. He believed that he had kept his promise to Kalinka about giving her justice. Regarding why Dieter would kill Kalinka, Andre said, “Kalinka had asked to move back to Toulouse, and to no longer stay with Krombach. She was about to escape from him: That could have been a motive. But one will never know. One can never know.” Andre quit his full-time job in 1999 to dedicate himself to bringing Dieter to justice. Through it all, he was supported by his partner (also called Danièle) for several years. Now in his 80s, Andre seems to live in Toulouse, France, and enjoying some much-needed time off.   This one is a DOOZY!    Drąsius Kedys was born on September 4, 1972, in Garliava, Lithuania. He and his former girlfriend Laimutė Stankūnaitė had a daughter in February 2004. Stankūnaitė was underage when she gave birth to Kedys' daughter. The couple split in 2006, and the parents got embroiled in a bitter custody battle. His former girlfriend, with the help of Andrius Ūsas, a politician and advisor to the former Speaker of the Seimas Viktoras Muntianas, obtained custody in November 2006. Kedys had visitation rights every other weekend, But later Stankunaite gave up her custody rights, giving them to the father. On November 29, 2008, Kedys submitted a formal complaint to the police, claiming Ūsas paid Stankūnaitė to sexually molest his daughter. In December 2008, Kedys obtained full custody of his daughter with no visitation rights for Stankūnaitė. The courts repeatedly confirmed that Stankūnaitė had no case to answer, thus dismissing Kedys' allegations against his former girlfriend as unsubstantiated. Nevertheless, the pre-trial investigation against Ūsas continued. In February 2009, Kedys further pressed accusations against Violeta Naruševičienė, Stankūnaitė's sister, claiming the former had participated in allowing men to molest her 4-year-old daughter. Finally, in July 2009, Kedys accused Jonas Furmanavičius, a district judge, and an individual known as Aidas of partaking in the molestation. All those people (except for Aidas) professed their innocence and accused Kedys of slander, criminal libel, and death threats. Kedys was frustrated with the apparent lack of progress in official investigations and convinced that the case was being deliberately stonewalled. So, he sent out 200 DVDs to Lithuanian politicians, media outlets, and law-enforcement agencies, featuring homemade video footage of his daughter's explicit testimony against three “uncles.” In addition, he promised to send the subtitled version to Members of the European Parliament. However, many sources criticized Kedys, who acted as the cameraman, for asking his daughter leading questions and heavily editing the film (it contained 50 segments filmed across nine occasions). On October 5, 2009, Furmanavičius and Naruševičienė were shot dead in Kaunas. Kedys became the prime suspect. On the same day, a national search of Kedys was announced, soon followed by an announcement of an international investigation, as he was thought to have left the country shortly after the murders. Kedys' friends Raimundas Ivanauskas and Eglė Barauskaitė were charged with accessory to murder.  The story caused an uproar in Lithuania, with much of the public siding with Kedys. In the public mind, the case was seen as a father's futile attempts to pursue justice and protect his daughter and being driven to desperate measures by anger at the injustice. Others questioned whether the killings were actually commissioned by Kedys himself. On April 17, 2010, at 6:49 a.m., after six months of a police search, a man fishing found Drąsius Kedys' body near Kaunas Reservoir. An autopsy concluded he had died between the evening of April 15 and the morning of the 16th. According to the official report, the cause of death was “choking on vomit” while being heavily intoxicated. However, his relatives were convinced that Kedys was murdered, pointing out wounds on his body. Kedys' relatives demanded a second opinion from independent experts. Finally, in April 2011, a report was received from the Swedish National Forensic Service confirming Kedys had died from alcohol and drug poisoning and that he choked on the contents of his own stomach. The Swedish report differed from the Lithuanian experts in determining “the injuries on the body appeared before his death” and that the “possibility of drowning is not excluded.” On April 24, Kedys was buried in Jonučiai cemetery. According to media reports, 6-10,000 people from across the country attended the ceremony. Ūsas, the main suspect in the pedophilia case, was officially charged with the sexual molestation of a minor. However, he was found drowned in a swamp in June 2010. The death was ruled an accident. Nevertheless, the court case against Ūsas continued, and the court found him innocent in November 2012.   Mirriam Rodriguez   Miriam's 20-year-old daughter mysteriously disappeared in 2012. Her daughter had been kidnapped and subsequently murdered, and several men were perpetrators of the crime. Dissatisfied with the Mexican justice system, Miriam decided to take matters into her own hands. To fool authorities and her daughter's kidnappers, Miriam changed her appearance as best she could and used fake identification to make it more difficult to trace her.  One of Miriam's first “victims” was a member of a Mexican cartel who was implicit in the kidnapping and murder of her daughter. She cornered him, held him at gunpoint, and told him, “If you move, I'll shoot you.” But she was just getting started. She eventually tracked down her daughter's killers one by one all across the country. But unfortunately, her vigilantism led to her ultimate downfall when multiple gunmen managed to kill her outside her home.  Becoming a vigilante against organized criminals is a considerable risk, but it was one that Miriam was willing to take to seek justice for her daughter.   Speaking of people standing up against gangs…   El Salvador's Mara Salvatrucha gang is better known as MS-13. Formed in Los Angeles in the 1980s, many members were deported for vicious crimes. However, several of them continued their criminal activity back home. The gang terrorized a nation plagued by a high poverty rate and a virtually helpless police force — until real-life vigilantes stepped up to help. Spanish for “Black Shadow,” Sombra Negra was first formed around the early 1990s due to El Salvador's authorities being glaringly overpowered by MS-13. Frustrated by the situation, Sombra Negra started targeting gang members for execution — especially MS-13 members. Sombra Negra members come dressed in black with bandanas over their faces. They patrol the streets in unlicensed vehicles and with tinted windows. And one of their primary missions is to capture MS-13 members — and make them “disappear.” As Sombra Negra has grown more powerful over the years, so have the legends of their brutal retribution against the gang members.   From sexual torture to dismemberment, the paramilitary group of vigilantes became more of a death squad than a traditional band of crimefighters. In El Salvador, it seemed that only extreme measures would stop MS-13. “Most of the victims were blindfolded, their hands or thumbs tied behind their backs, and they had received tiros de gracia (a coup de grâce), shots to the base of the skull at close range by weapons such as assault rifles and machine guns,” a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services report said.  From home invasions to sudden killings in the streets, Sombra Negra carries out its mission ruthlessly and describes it as a “social cleansing.” And some authorities are grateful. Even El Salvador's head of National Assembly Guillermo Gallegos has admitted: “Morally I support this type of expression because people are tired of the way of delinquency.” In the end, it's worth noting that many people have mixed feelings about real-life vigilantes. While they may sympathize with their motives in some cases, they may also find some of their choices reckless or unnecessarily dangerous. But there's no question that these vigilantes have left a massive impression on the world — for better or worse.   And there's another set of gang-fighting vigilantes…   Pablo Escobar needs little, if any, introduction. One of the most infamous drug lords in modern history, the Colombian kingpin ran a colossal cocaine empire that saw thousands of people killed. Yet, with corrupt authority figures in his pocket, Escobar's reign appeared resolute — until it wasn't. In the early 1990s, Escobar had two rival cartel members murdered when they visited him in an opulent prison (which he had built for himself). Fidel Castano, the other cartel's boss, was none too pleased. And so he helped form Los Pepes. Short for “Perseguidos por Pablos Escobar,” the paramilitary group welcomed “People Persecuted by Pablo Escobar.” Escobar was marked after he walked out of his prison in July 1992. At this point, even the U.S. government and CIA were aiding Los Pepes in their quest to find the kingpin. But unfortunately, Los Pepes also engaged in bloody bombings against Escobar that killed and injured civilians.   Some of these nearly killed their target, including a car bomb that injured Escobar's daughter. For more than a year, Los Pepes ruthlessly attacked anyone in Escobar's circle — from friends and relatives to public supporters and officials. Finally, it was in 1993 when they closed in on the man himself. After Los Pepes forced Escobar into hiding, Colombian intelligence intercepted a phone call from Escobar to his son. Now confident of his whereabouts, Colombian police and military forces headed for Escobar's newfound hiding place in the neighborhood of Los Olivos — ready for retribution after years of brutal violence in the country.  Whether Los Pepes members played an active role in killing him remains hotly contested, but one thing is sure: Without their vigilant quest to find Escobar, he would likely lead many more to their deaths. Ultimately, he was chased across rooftops and gunned down while on the run.   And lastly, what happens when an ENTIRE TOWN decides a lousy guy needs to die? It didn't take long for Ken McElroy to become the resident “bully” of Skidmore, Missouri. And considering his crimes, the “bully” label was putting things lightly. For years after he dropped out of school, he was accused of everything from theft and arson to child molestation and statutory rape. But despite being indicted 21 times, he dodged convictions at every turn. After McElroy raped a 12-year-old girl, he divorced his wife and married the child when she was 14 to avoid a statutory rape charge. When her parents objected, he shot their dog and burned down their house. And after he shot a farmer in 1976, he somehow produced two witnesses who claimed that McElroy was nowhere near the scene of the crime that day. Ken McElroy was a true terror for Skidmore residents, who wanted him removed immediately. McElroy's downfall was a long time coming, but it truly fell into motion in 1980 after he shot the town's elderly grocer in the neck. Though McElroy was charged with attempted murder and eventually convicted, he appealed the case and was released on bond.   Soon afterward, it seemed the entire town was present at a gathering on July 10, 1981, to discuss Ken McElroy. Though exactly what they said is unclear, there's no question that they decided McElroy had to go. Residents heard that McElroy had gone to the D&G Tavern for a drink. In a prime example of real-life vigilantes in action, the community walked to the bar to confront him. And with no warning, someone began shooting. Some accounts describe up to 50 vigilantes involved in the onslaught. In the end, McElroy was shot multiple times and struck by at least two firearms. He succumbed to the wounds in his truck. No one called an ambulance — or agreed to testify against another person in court. To this day, no one has ever been charged with his death.   Top 10 Vigilante Films https://screenrant.com/best-vigilante-films/

The Medical Sales Podcast
Capital Equipment King To Medrep Meeting CEO With Peter Skidmore Part 1

The Medical Sales Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 25:53


Medical sales reps hardly have any time for themselves or their families. But with MedRep Meeting, sales reps are now going to have more than enough time. With MedRep Meeting, all the legwork will be done for them. Their day-to-day schedule will be set based on the doctors that they want to meet with. This means less time on the phone and more time for yourself. Join Samuel Gbadebo as he talks to Peter Skidmore about his company. As a med rep himself, he had no time back then. But now he is giving time back to reps. Learn how this idea came to be today.

Sync'd Up
Ep. 4: Should You Split the Bill on a First Date? feat. Therapist and Business Mentor Flynn Skidmore

Sync'd Up

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 61:20


You're gonna want to grab a pen and a paper because this week I am joined by therapist and business mentor, Flynn Skidmore! Yes, I got to pick the mind of a hot male therapist, ask all the hard hitting questions, and discuss the challenges that come with periods of transformation, dating, self esteem, and more. We got deep, we got vulnerable, and incredible insights came through. Can't wait for you all to hear and gain some tangible takeaways :) More in this episode: - Navigating life from a place of empowerment and confidence - Setting boundaries in relationships - Seeking external validation and how to handle it - Hot takes on manifestation - What goes through a guy's mind after sex - Struggles in dating Follow Flynn on IG: @flynnskidmore Follow Sabrina on IG: @sabrinasablosky

Enduring Interest
Marc Conner and Lucas Morel on Ralph Ellison's “The Little Man at Chehaw Station” and “What America Would be Like Without Blacks”

Enduring Interest

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 72:04


Ralph Ellison wrote one of the greatest novels of the twentieth century, Invisible Man. He was also a gifted essayist and in this episode we discuss two essays in particular: “The Little Man at Chehaw Station” and “What America Would be Like Without Blacks.” The former was first published in The American Scholar in the Winter 1977/78 issue. In my view it's one of the finest meditations on American identity ever written. That latter first appeared in Time magazine in April of 1970. They both appeared in a collection called Going to the Territory in 1986 and can also be found in The Collected Essays of Ralph Ellison published by Modern Library.   We discuss the problem of aesthetic communication in American democracy, why the American condition is a “state of unease,” and the centrality of writing and our founding documents to American identity. Ellison loved both the traditional and the vernacular and was deeply attuned to how the interaction of these elements produced a complex cultural pluralism. Although written over 40 years ago, these essays seem quite timely. Consider this (from the “Little Man” essay): “In many ways, then, the call for a new social order based upon the glorification of ancestral blood and ethnic background acts as a call to cultural and aesthetic chaos. Yet while this latest farcical phase in the drama of American social hierarchy unfolds, the irrepressible movement of American culture toward the integration of its diverse elements continues, confounding the circumlocutions of its staunchest opponents.”   Our guests are Marc C. Conner and Lucas Morel. Marc Conner is President of Skidmore College (and Professor of English). Prior to coming to Skidmore in summer 2020, Marc was Provost and the Ballengee Professor of English at Washington and Lee University. His primary area of scholarship and teaching is literary modernism, both narrative and poetry, including Irish modernism, the modern American novel and African-American literature. He has authored and edited eight books, primarily about the work of Ralph Ellison, Toni Morrison, Charles Johnson, and James Joyce, including The Selected Letters of Ralph Ellison, named one of the 100 notable books of the year by The New York Times. Lucas Morel is the John K. Boardman, Jr. Professor of Politics and Head of the Politics Department at Washington and Lee University. He is the author of Lincoln and the American Founding and Lincoln's Sacred Effort: Defining Religion's Role in American Self-Government. He's also edited two books on Ralph Ellison: Ralph Ellison and the Raft of Hope: A Political Companion to “Invisible Man” and more recently, The New Territory: Ralph Ellison and the Twenty-First Century (which he co-edited with Marc Conner). Dr. Morel conducts high school teacher workshops for the Ashbrook Center, Jack Miller Center, Gilder-Lehrman Institute, Bill of Rights Institute, and Liberty Fund.

The Color Authority™
Human Betterment by Design with Shashi Caan

The Color Authority™

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 56:25 Transcription Available


Shashi Caan talks about the cultural color differences among the three continents that she has lived on, the application of color in architecture and her life mission to increase human betterment through color and design in the world.  From generation gaps to the main design principles to futurist thinking, Shashi Caan her passion for her profession sparks through the entire conversation. Shashi is all about collaboration and understanding what is going on in the world to find solutions to today's problems. Shashi Caan is a distinguished thought leader for architectural design internationally. As a practitioner, design educator and author, her dedication to furthering human betterment through and by design is reflected in her 30- year design career. Co-founder and leader of THE SC COLLECTIVE (2002), the inventively structured firm, Shashi is also the Co- founder and President of Globally We Design – GloWD (2015), an independent design futures think thank, through which her ReDesignEd Educators Forum facilitated the Universal Design Education Charter in 2018 and The Johannesburg Declaration in 2019. Shashi was formerly Associate Partner and Design Director with Skidmore, Owings and Merrill (SOM), in New York and Chair of the Interior Design Department at Parsons, the New School for Design. In her service to industry capacity, Shashi also serves as Chief Executive Officer on the Executive Committee of International Federation of Interior Architects/Designers (IFI) Executive Board. She is a former two-term President for the International Federation of Interior Architects/Designers (IFI) and has been recognized as a Fellow of the IFI and Fellow of Royal Society of the Arts, UK. She holds honorary fellowships from the Australian Institute of Designers, the British Institute of Interior Design, as well as the American Society of Interior Design. Amongst others, her past volunteer and executive board level service includes the US International Interior Design Association (IIDA) , NY's Interiors Committee of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), and the United Nations Association (UNA). She was Contract Magazine's US Designer of the Year (2004), granted the Golden Seat Architectural Master Award of China (2012), and appointed JDP Design Ambassador to Japan (2013), this amongst her many awards and accolades for design projects and design leadership across the world. With countless published writings, her seminal book, Rethinking Design and Interiors: Human Beings in the Built Environment (2011), has been translated into multiple languages.