Podcasts about Somalia

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Country in the Horn of Africa

  • 2,221PODCASTS
  • 4,244EPISODES
  • 40mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jul 3, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Somalia

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Latest podcast episodes about Somalia

Let's Talk Supply Chain
275: Women In Supply Chain, Amani Radman

Let's Talk Supply Chain

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 45:42


In today's episode of Women In Supply Chain, I'm joined Amani Radman: an amazing woman on two very special missions. To provide reliable, cost-effective transportation services through her own logistics brand; and, to champion the power of diversity in supply chain. Born in Somalia, Amani moved to the US and achieved a degree in supply logistics, management and leadership from Portland State University before going on to establish a successful corporate career. Having gained extensive experience across supplier management, business process and operations, Amani went on to found her own business, Malao Logistics, Minnesota's premier logistics company specializing in freight brokerage and transportation services. Today Amani will be talking to us about her career so far; moving out of the corporate world to found her own business; taking a family approach to logistics; and the importance of diversity in industry. Plus, she'll be sharing her experiences as a woman in supply chain, as well as her words of advice for all of the women following in her footsteps.   SHOW SPONSOR:   This Women in Supply Chain feature was made possible by our sponsor, Emerge. As a company focused on empowering and growing meaningful supply chain relationships, Emerge is proud to sponsor Women in Supply Chain. Through its freight procurement platform, Emerge offers solutions that enhance the spot and contract procurement process, enabling shippers and carriers to make more strategic decisions.   IN THIS EPISODE WE DISCUSS:   [08.37] Amani's background growing up in Somalia, and her brave decision to move to the USA to start a new life at age 18. [10.32] How Amani found supply chain, and why she's so passionate about it. “Coming from Somalia, I want to be able to connect the dots… and what is the best way to do that? With logistics, because there's always transport.” [13.25] Amani's experience at global outdoor brand Columbia Sportswear Company, and how the woman-led business inspired her. “Coming from a male-dominated company, all the leadership… everybody was a woman!... It really showed me what it is to be a woman in supply chain, and how to take it to the next level.” [15.47] Amani's previous role at Boeing, the importance of supplier diversity and how businesses should approach it. “Think of it like a mentorship program… the more you mentor us, the more we get bigger and the more we can support you – you can literally customize us the way you want to!” [20.35] The differences between corporate and small business, and why Amani made the decision to start her own company, Malao Logistics. “In corporate, things move so slow… and the supply chain doesn't wait!” [23.09] A closer look at Malao, what they do, and how they help their customers. [25.21] Some of the challenges Amani has faced whilst establishing Malao Logistics. “The hardest part is being accepted in the community… I know the journey is hard, but I have to do this for all the women… I want to be the woman they look up to and say ‘well she did it, why can't I?'” [27.22] Amani's experiences at large industry events, particularly as a woman who wears a head scarf. [32.56] How Amani found, and embraced, her voice, and her advice for others. “Don't give up on your dreams, because if you give up on yourself, don't expect anyone else to believe in you.” [36.47] The future for Amani, and for Malao Logistics. [38.42] Amani's final words of wisdom for the women following in her footsteps.   RESOURCES AND LINKS MENTIONED:   You can connect with Amani over on LinkedIn. If you'd like to hear more from Amani, check out Episode 20 of Blended – DEI in the Workplace – Not Just The Smart Thing To Do, But The Right Thing To Do. And if you want to find out more about another incredible woman building her own logistics firm, check out Episode 205, where Kristy Knichel reflects on her journey and the numerous benefits of working with a certified woman-owned and operated business. Check out our other podcasts HERE.

Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol free life!
Walking Talking Blackouts with Anneke Roussel

Tribe Sober - inspiring an alcohol free life!

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 47:59


  Anneke Roussel is a Tribe Sober member who knows all about the work hard/play hard culture.  She worked overseas in Afghanistan and Somalia and often found herself sharing bottles of scotch with her male colleagues in Mogadishu.  The combination of retirement from her exciting career and the isolation of the pandemic saw her continuing with her scotch but adding a couple of bottles of wine into the mix. In this Episode Anneke married an alcoholic – he stopped drinking via AA and Anneke went to AA so she became well aware of the 12 steps and became a sponsor She never imagined that she would become an alcoholic herself which shows that we should never become complacent Anneke had a corporate career but she also owned a restaurant which became the heart of her social life She had a severely disabled child and turned to alcohol to cope with the stress of managing her career and looking after her child. Tragically her daughter died at the age of 10 and Anneke turned to drink to try to numb the pain She took a job in Afghanistan where she worked with a bunch of hard drinking men. Only whisky was available so that's where she learned to love her whisky. She moved from Afghanistan to Somalia where she stayed for 5 years – another high stress job where sitting under the trees drinking whisky with her colleagues was the daily after work activity. Anneke returned to South Africa planning to retire and then travel the world – however Covid hit which meant that she had to live on her farm which was fairly isolated She managed to keep to her father's rule of no booze before 5pm but at 5 it was a whisky followed by two bottles of wine. We talked about how we get to the stage where we actually prefer drinking alone than being with other people – which is a real warning sign of dependence It means we are creating a relationship with alcohol, its fast becoming our best friend. Anneke felt that drinking had become part of her identity – that happens to many of us and that's why our friends are so horrified when we say we are going to quit drinking! Like me Anneke suffered from walking talking blackouts – and like me she was horrified to learn that those kind of blackouts mean that the brain become so soaked in alcohol it cannot even make memories – its not just that we have forgotten stuff! It was lockdown and SA's alcohol ban that made Anneke realise the severity of her problem. She found herself searching for liquor on the black market and didn't care how much she paid. She would go out to a restaurant, drink a bottle of wine alone and then purchase another bottle to bring home. She went to look at a rehab but the 12 steps didn't appeal to her as she definitely didn't feel powerless over alcohol At Tribe Sober we believe in putting down our glass and taking back our power!    So at Tribe Sober Anneke found “her people” and an approach that worked for her. Tribe Sober coach Lynette helped her to find her power and to learn to be kind to herself. She's worked on her “inner child” – or inner children perhaps we should say – Anneke still has the saboteur and the inner critic - she now visualises them as children sitting in a bus – but these days Anneke is in the driving seat and just tells them to be quiet! These days she is thoroughly enjoying her retirement and is so relieved that she made a conscious decision to quit so that she doesn't risk drinking her retirement away like so many people do If you are a bit older and worried about your drinking have a listen to my interview with British Psychiatrist Dr Tony – Tribe Sober podcast episode 35 She is now in her second year of sobriety so I asked her why she stuck around with the tribe – she had 3 reasons 1.   She gets a reminder of just how hard it used to be when she sees new members starting out. 2.  She loves the connection – with a group of people who understand you straight away 3.  It keeps her grounded and reminds her never to think that she might be able to moderate! More Info Subscription membership – you can join up HERE. To access our website, click HERE. If you would like a free copy of our “Annual Tracker” or our e-book 66 Days to Sobriety, please email janet@tribesober.com. If you would like to come to our Saturday afternoon Zoom Cafe as a guest and meet our community, just email janet@tribesober.com. Episode Sponsor This episode is sponsored by the Tribe Sober Membership Program.  If you want to change your relationship with alcohol then sign up today Read more about our program and subscribe HERE Book a Discovery Call with me to find out if our membership would help you Help us to Spread the Word! We made this podcast so that we can reach more people who need our help.  Please subscribe and share. If you enjoyed the podcast, then please leave us a 5-star review on Apple podcasts. Take a screenshot of your review, and DM it to Tribe Sober's Instagram page – see PS below for instructions. We'll send you something special to say thank you! We release a podcast episode every Saturday morning. You can follow Tribe Sober on Facebook, Twitter, TikTok and Instagram. You can join our private Facebook group HERE.   PS: How to Leave a Rating/Review in Apple Podcasts (on an iOS Device) Open the Podcasts app. EASY. Choose “Search” from the bottom row of icons and enter the name of the show (e.g. Recover Like a Mother) into the search field. Select the show under Shows (not under Episodes). Scroll down past the first few episodes until you see Ratings & Reviews. Click Write a Review underneath the displayed reviews from other listeners. You'll then have the option to rate the show on a 5-star scale and write a review (you can rate without writing too but it's always good to read your experience).

Das MedienMagazin
Exiljournalismus: Wie umgehen mit Fluchterfahrungen und Trauma?

Das MedienMagazin

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 28:40


JournalistInnen, die aus Kriegs- und Krisengebieten nach Deutschland flüchten, sind hier zwar relativ sicher. Aber wie verarbeiten sie oft traumatische Fluchterfahrungen, wie gehen sie damit um, dass sie Familienangehörige und KollegInnen zurücklassen mussten? Was hilft ihnen, in deutschen Medien anzukommen, Arbeit zu finden, mit der Sprache umzugehen? Darum geht es in diesem MedienMagazin, das u.a. mit einer Journalistin aus der Ukraine spricht, die bei KATAPULT Ukraine in Greifswald angekommen ist, und mit einem Journalisten aus Somalia, der innerhalb Afrikas ins Exil gehen musste.

Cinco continentes
Cinco Continentes - Emergencia nutricional en el Cuerno de África

Cinco continentes

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 7:51


Hablamos sobre la gravísima situación nutricional que afecta a millones de personas, muchas de ellas niños, en países del Cuerno de África, como Somalia, Etiopía o Kenia. Lo analizamos con la nutricionista Montse Escruela, de Médicos Sin Fronteras. Escuchar audio

The Horn
S3 Episode 13: A Strategy for Exploring Talks with Al-Shabaab in Somalia

The Horn

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 39:22


Somalia has been fighting the Al-Shabaab jihadist insurgency for well over a decade. After reclaiming control of Mogadishu and other cities in the early 2010s, government forces – with the support of African Union troops – have made limited progress since. Instead, Al-Shabaab has adopted guerilla tactics and managed to consolidate control of rural areas, while regularly conducting deadly attacks on Somali cities. A recent Crisis Group report recommended that stakeholders should at least begin to explore the feasibility of eventual political talks with Al-Shabaab, alongside pursuing existing military operations, to add another tool in the struggle to bring the longstanding conflict to an end.This week on The Horn, Alan talks to Omar Mahmood, Crisis Group's Senior Analyst for East Africa, to discuss the risks and opportunities that this approach might incur. They assess the strengths and limitations of the military campaign against Al-Shabaab and its prospects for success, as African Union forces inch closer to the end of their mandate in the country. They discuss previous attempts to engage Al-Shabaab and the group's willingness for dialogue. They talk about the impact of multiple failed rainy seasons in Somalia and the need for humanitarian assistance that reaches populations in both government and insurgent-controlled areas. They also discuss the wider implications of Somalia's Al-Shabaab outlook in the region, including how the country's neighbours and international partners might respond to the prospect of engagement with a self-professed al-Qaeda affiliate.Check out Crisis Group's report, “Considering Political Engagement with Al-Shabaab in Somalia”, in full to learn more about the situation in Somalia and efforts to bring the conflict to an end. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The John Batchelor Show
#Somalia. AlQaeda: El Shabaab grows. Bill Roggio, FDD

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 8:10


Photo: #Somalia. AlQaeda: El Shabaab grows. Bill Roggio, FDD https://www.longwarjournal.org/archives/2022/06/ep-72-somalias-controversial-ex-nisa-chief.php

Irish Tech News Audio Articles
UN – 71 Abuses Against Children in Warzones Daily

Irish Tech News Audio Articles

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 5:11


Between 2005 and 2020, the United Nations have verified over 266,000 grave violations against children in war, however they say this is only a fraction of the violations believed to have occurred, says UNICEF in a new report. The verified cases have come from over 30 conflicts spanning through Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America. Between 2016 and 2021, the United Nations have verified an average of 71 grave violations against children daily. UNICEF's report, titled 25 years of children and armed conflict: Taking action to protect children in war, found that between 2005 and 2020, at least 104,100 children have been verified killed or maimed in war, more than 93,000 have been used as child soldiers, with at least 25,700 verified as abducted in warzones. Since 2005, there have been at least 13,900 verified attacks against schools and hospitals and over 14,900 denials of humanitarian access to children. “This report lays out in the starkest possible terms the world's failure to protect its children from grave violations during times of armed conflict,” said UNICEF Executive Director Catherine Russell. “Grave violations devastate children, families, and communities – and they tear at the fabric of society, making it even harder to restore and sustain peace, security, and stability. We must refuse to accept violations against children as an unavoidable outcome of war”, she added. Staggering amounts of sexual violence against children have also occurred, with at least 14,200 child victims of rape, forced marriage, and other forms of sexual exploitation. Many children suffer from more than one grave violation, abducted children and child soldiers having an increased risk of sexual violence. Girls are especially vulnerable to sexual violence and forced marriage in these contexts. The number of verified violations has jumped since 2005, surpassing 20,000 in one year for the first time in 2014 and reaching 26,425 by 2020. The increased number of conflicts in recent years, including the ongoing wars in Yemen, Afghanistan, Ukraine, and the Tigray region, have all demonstrated the extreme impact that war has on children. These violations were committed by state and non-state actors alike, with state actors responsible for at least 26% of violations, and non-state actors accounting for approximately 58%. The increase in non-state actors in conflict, along with a lack of accountability for non-stake actors, is a major concern surrounding children in warzones. Between 2005 and 2021, sustainable and concrete measures have been put in place to prevent the suffering of children in these circumstances, with 37 Action Plans signed in 17 conflict situations – 70% of those being signed by non-state actors. The ever-growing number of armed non-State actors, the development and employment of new means and methods of warfare, the use of improvised explosive devices and other explosive weapons, particularly in populated areas, are just some of the many factors contributing to the creation of unprecedented challenges for the protection of children in situations of armed conflict. The report's findings also showed those children at heightened risk of violations – children from backgrounds of poverty, refugees, and indigenous children. Boys accounted for 73% of victims of grave violations, particularly when it came to their use as child soldiers. However 98% of victims of grave sexual violence were girls. Almost 80% of all child casualties came from five conflicts, those in Afghanistan, Israel and Palestine, Syria, Yemen, and Somalia. The use of explosive weapons such as bombs or landmines were particularly dangerous to children. In 2020, explosives were responsible for at least 47% of children killed or maimed in war. Catherine Russell said: “UNICEF and our partners will not waver in our work to prevent grave violations against children. With more children affected by conflict, violence, and crises now than at any time since the Second Wor...

Hechos Ecuador
Más de 100.000 niños murieron o fueron mutilados en conflictos entre 2005 y 2020

Hechos Ecuador

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 3:17


Entre 2005 y 2020, más de 104.100 niños fueron asesinados o mutilados; más de 93.000, reclutados; y al menos 25.700 niños fueron secuestrados en conflictos en África, Asia, Oriente Medio y América Latina, dijo este martes UNICEF en un nuevo informe. Pese a la magnitud de las cifras, se cree que son solo una fracción de las reales, ya que “las limitaciones de acceso y seguridad, y la vergüenza, el dolor y el miedo que sufren los niños y sus familias” hacen muy difícil obtener los datos. "Este informe expone con la mayor crudeza posible el fracaso del mundo a la hora de proteger a sus niños de las violaciones graves en tiempos de conflicto armado", dijo la directora ejecutiva de UNICEF, Catherine Russell. Las partes en conflicto han violado, casado a la fuerza, explotado sexualmente y cometido otras formas graves de violencia sexual contra al menos 14.200 niños. Además, las Naciones Unidas han verificado más de 13.900 ataques contra escuelas y hospitales y no menos de 14.900 incidentes en los que se ha denegado el acceso humanitario a los niños. Basado en dieciséis años de datos del Informe Anual del Secretario General sobre los Niños y los Conflictos Armados, el reporte de UNICEF muestra que la violencia contra los niños ha aumentado gradualmente desde 2005, superando los 20.000 incidentes en un año por primera vez en 2014 y alcanzando los 26.425 en 2020. Entre 2016 y 2020, hubo más de 71 violaciones diarias, lo que, según UNICEF, demuestra “el dramático impacto que los conflictos armados -y las crisis de protección cada vez más complejas y prolongadas- tienen sobre los niños”. El número cada vez mayor de actores armados no estatales, los nuevos medios y métodos de guerra, el uso de artefactos explosivos improvisados y otras armas, especialmente en zonas pobladas, son sólo algunos de los muchos factores que contribuyen a que haya “desafíos sin precedentes” para proteger a los pequeños atrapados en conflictos armados. Que cada vez se verifiquen más violaciones también pone de manifiesto “la creciente solidez del mecanismo de supervisión y presentación de informes a lo largo de los años”, señala la agencia. "UNICEF y nuestros aliados no vacilarán en nuestro trabajo para prevenir las violaciones graves contra los niños", dijo Russell. "Con más niños afectados por los conflictos, la violencia y las crisis ahora que en cualquier momento desde la Segunda Guerra Mundial, este trabajo nunca ha sido más urgente". Afganistán, el conflicto más mortífero para los niños Entre 2016 y 2020, el 82% de todas las víctimas infantiles verificadas -o unos 41.900 niños- se produjeron en cinco conflictos: Afganistán (30%), Israel y el Estado de Palestina (14%), Siria (13%), Yemen (13%) y Somalia (9%). Los niños de entornos más pobres y los refugiados, desplazados internos e indígenas, entre otros, siguen corriendo un mayor riesgo de sufrir violaciones graves. Sólo en 2020, las armas y los restos de explosivos fueron responsables de al menos el 47% de todas las víctimas, con más de 3900 niños muertos y mutilados. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/hechosecuador/message

Que se vayan todos
Aburrido 178 de besos, pistolas, disney, migrantes y aborto

Que se vayan todos

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 52:09


Los gringos firmaron algo sobre las armas, ¿ven que a la centésimo cuarta masacre va la vencida? https://apnews.com/article/shootings-violence-gun-chris-murphy-congress-ba9f727cfed75b5dcc5528180c6e432b Rusia captura otra ciudad y los Ucranianos le dicen al cabo que ni me interesaba https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2022/6/24/what-does-russias-capture-of-severodonetsk-mean-for-ukraine Tres artículos para ver desde todos lados el tema del aborto, spoiler alert ninguno de los artículos los escribió el vaticano https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2022/07/04/we-are-not-going-back-to-the-time-before-roe-we-are-going-somewhere-worse https://www.clarin.com/internacional/nene-quedo-muerte-cerebral-desafio-viral-ordenaron-dejen-morir-familia-opone_0_BRf4GV7jQw.amp.htmlhttps://www.clarin.com/internacional/nene-quedo-muerte-cerebral-desafio-viral-ordenaron-dejen-morir-familia-opone_0_BRf4GV7jQw.amp.html https://disidentia.com/el-aborto-un-conflicto-moral-o-de-derechos/ La salud mental en China, cuando tu terapista te dice que confies en el gobierno https://www.economist.com/china/2022/06/21/chinas-mental-health-crisis-is-getting-worse Le encontraron una utilidad al Aburrimiento, más allá de lo útil que es para tiktok https://www.xataka.com/medicina-y-salud/llevamos-siglos-demonizando-al-aburrimiento-acabamos-descubrir-que-mejor-que-nos-puede-pasar Una estampida de inmigrantes para entrar a Melilla pone el tem migratorio una vez más sobre el tapete https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2022/6/25/rights-groups-urge-probe-into-deaths-o Israel ¿de vuelta a Netanyahu? No tan rápido https://www.economist.com/middle-east-and-africa/2022/06/20/israels-government-collapses-prompting-the-fifth-election-in-four-years Por fin sabemos la verdad sobre Amazon, tu impaciencia es la culpable de lo que viven sus trabajadores https://www.xataka.com/empresas-y-economia/amazon-puede-reducir-lesiones-sus-empleados-almacen-no-tendras-tu-pedido-24-horas EL golpe de Buzzlightyear quizás no sea por las causas que le gusten a Dross https://www.genbeta.com/actualidad/pinchazo-lightyear-tambien-reflejo-exito-disney-plus-nos-estamos-acostumbrando-a-esperar-al-estreno-streaming Cómo una de las ciudades más conservadoras resolvió el rollo de los sin techo. https://www.nytimes.com/2022/06/14/headway/houston-homeless-people.html La fertilidad en Taiwan se desploma, lástima ahora que se van a necesitar más soldados https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-06-13/taiwan-races-to-fix-low-birthrate-before-possible-china-war/101137970 Un nuevo interface para tu computadora, las antenas de un saltamanonte https://www.technologyreview.com/2022/06/21/1054532/cyborg-locust-brain-hacked-sniff-out-cancer/ Te vamos a mencionar una compañía que no conoces y que quizás tenga millones de fotos tuyas, y no son tus selfies raras https://www.technologyreview.com/2022/06/22/1054586/hikvision-worlds-biggest-surveillance-company/ Después de todo este tiempo que tiene de sospechoso el informe de las pruebas de la vacuna Sputnik, btw la que me puse https://www.economist.com/science-and-technology/2022/06/22/are-the-russian-covid-vaccine-results-accurate Google invirtiendo millones en salud, perdón en hacer billete con la salud https://www.economist.com/business/2022/06/20/alphabet-is-spending-billions-to-become-a-force-in-health-care Disculpen una vez más ¿pero y Somalia? https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2022/jun/22/somalia-the-worst-humanitarian-crisis-weve-ever-seen Qatar nos prepara para un encuentro cultural aburrídisimo https://www.elmundo.es/deportes/futbol/mundial-de-futbol/2022/06/22/62b2b516fdddffb0a88b458e.html Y EN EL EXTRA Las fans de los beatles terminarán siendo más inteligentes que wokes y proudboys? https://www.theguardian.com/music/2022/jun/19/the-truth-about-screaming-fangirls-harry-styles-one-direction-the-beatles-bruce-springsteen

Reverend Ben Cooper's Podcast
Persecuted Church - (#271 Elim)

Reverend Ben Cooper's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 47:01


Please join Reverend Ben Cooper and Sandra Robson as they look at Bible smugglers and refugees, also looking at release international, the Ministry Open Doors and recapping over the top 10 persecuted nations in the World; Afghanistan, North Korea, Somalia, Libya, Yemen, Eritrea, Nigeria, Pakistan, Iran and India.

Eine Welt - Deutschlandfunk
Katastrophe mit Ansage - Somalia an der Schwelle zur Hungerkatastrophe

Eine Welt - Deutschlandfunk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 5:08


Diekhans, Antjewww.deutschlandfunk.de, Eine WeltDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

Ukrainecast
The Resistance

Ukrainecast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 40:26


A former Soviet soldier describes how he's now helping resistance groups in the Russian-controlled areas of Ukraine by advising them how to mount an insurgency. UNICEF's Pete Manfield describes how the war in Ukraine is taking its toll in Somalia, and BBC Africa correspondent Catherine Byaruhanga explains why some Africans are taking a pro-Russian stance. Also, a listener in Russia explains how he's using bank notes to protest against the war. This episode of Ukrainecast was made by Estelle Doyle with Natalie Ktena and Osman Iqbal. The planning producer is Louise Hidalgo. The technical producer was Michael Regaard. The editor is Alison Gee. Email Ukrainecast@bbc.co.uk with your questions and comments. You can also send us a message or voice note via WhatsApp to +44 0330 1239480.

The Take
Revisiting Somalia in the face of famine

The Take

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 21:20


Famine is a slow-moving disaster and when it is declared, people are typically dying of starvation already. It is too late to save every life. Much of Somalia is facing its third dry season which is killing crops, animals and people. The Take talks to Somalis trying to get the word out about what is happening in their country and what they hope will be done to save lives. In this episode:  Aydrus Daar (@Aydrusdaar1), executive director at WADSA, a Somali aid group working in the horn of Africa. Nisar Majid, research associate at the London School of Economics where he was recently research director on the Conflict Research Programme (Somalia portfolio). He is a fellow of the Rift Valley Institute and has worked in the Horn of Africa in various capacities for more than 20 years. Guhad Adan, research associate at the London School of Economics. He is a freelance consultant based in Nairobi and has been working as an aid practitioner and researcher in the Horn of Africa for more than 20 years. Florence Mangwende, humanitarian and resilience programme manager at Oxfam Novib. Episode credits: This episode was produced by Amy Walters with Alexandra Locke, Ney Alvarez, Negin Owliaei, Ruby Zaman, and Malika Bilal. The story editor was Tom Fenton. It was updated by Amy Walters. Our sound designer is Alex Roldan. Our engagement producers are Aya Elmileik and Adam Abou-Gad. Connect with us: @AJEPodcasts on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook

P1 Morgen
P1 Morgen - 24. jun 2022

P1 Morgen

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 165:07


Hvem er Danmarksdemokraterne og Inger Støjberg en trussel mod? Hvor slemt står det til i Somalia og Kenya? Og hvordan er man stillet, hvis SAS-strejken bliver en realitet? Dagens værter er: Bjarne Steensbeck og Kirstine Dons Christensen. www.dr.dk/p1morgen

Africa Today
Anticipated report on corruption in South Africa is out

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 40:21


A much anticipated report on corruption is out in South Africa.  The Zondo Report  criticises the African National Congress for creating an environment that enabled corruption and wide scale looting under former President Jacob Zuma. Also, an urgent appeal to the international comunity over the famine in Somalia. Those stories and more on Africa Today.

The TADAT Podcast
Episode 20.1: TADAT and Domestic Revenue Mobilization in Kenya

The TADAT Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 24:57


From January 17th to January 31st this year, senior management of revenue administrations of six African countries, including Ghana, Kenya, Rwanda, Somalia, Tanzania and Uganda, participated in a training workshop of the TADAT methodology. In this two-part episode of the TADAT podcast, Alfred Akibo-Betts speaks with five senior executives of the Kenya Revenue Authority and the Controller of Budget Kenya about the TADAT training, lessons learned, its applicability, and the plans their respective departments have for the implementation of good practices in revenue administration.

Living Planet | Deutsche Welle
Too hot to handle? Heatwaves and droughts around the world

Living Planet | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 29:59


This week on Living Planet – As Europe and North America deal with record-breaking heatwaves, we look at how cities from Ahmedabad, India to Athens, Greece handle the heat. When drought makes water a mere mirage – what are communities to do? Italy and Somalia are both struggling with diminishing water supplies. And in an odd twist, drought is also revealing some hidden secrets of the past.

BookRising
Ubah Cristina Ali Farah: Somalia in Italy and a Reckoning with Colonial History

BookRising

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 46:48


Somali-Italian writer Ubah Cristina Ali Farah joins host Bhakti Shringarpure for an episode of BookRising as part of the Trailblazing African Feminists series. In this wide-ranging and intellectually rigorous conversation, Farah speaks about living in Somalia and Italy, and the ways in which Italy has only recently begun to reckon with their colonial past. She is the author of three novels: Madre piccola (Little Mother, 2007), Il comandante del fiume (The Commander of the River, 2014) and Le stazioni della luna (Phases of the Moon, 2021). Farah also writes plays, poetry, librettos for operas as well as academic work, and has been the recipient of prestigious residences and awards including the Lingua Madre and Vittorini prizes. Moving to Italy from Somalia at the age of 20, Farah was exposed to the second generation of migrants in Italy, many of whom retained ties with their previously colonized countries. This group included Pap Khouma and Igiaba Scebo, among others, and they have all sought to explore Italy's colonial histories in Libya, Somalia, Eritrea and other places. She speaks about the Sicilian city of Palermo where many African, Asian and Middle Eastern migrants converge making it a vibrant city as well as a refuge. Palermo also becomes the center of thinking through the concept of the Black Mediterranean; a term coined by Alessandra di Maio and which elongates the histories of the Mediterranean sea as a place of cultural and political confluences rather than simply a marker of migrant journeys. Farah says that she's optimistic about the many changes taking place in Italy due to the influence of the global movement for Black lives and due to the creative and political projects that engage discussions of race, colonialism, migration and language. She takes us through the writing journeys of her three novels which tend to get published every seven years. Farah explains that it was an epiphany to read Nuruddin Farah's novels and to dive into his unique vision of Somalia. In fact, her recent novel Le stazioni della luna revives and rewrites the character of Ebla who first appeared in Nuruddin Farah's debut novel From a Crooked Rib (1970). Other influences include Ousmane Sembene, Toni Morrison and even many older Italian writers like Dante. Finally, Farah reflects on storytelling as a radical act and explains, “I started collecting and transcribing all these oral histories. I was getting a taste of the words and it was very formative for me when I started writing. And then I discovered tje beauty of the archive which also has lot of audio material. So somehow, this kind of research and the stories that I have had the privilege to find have been the fuel for me.” Bhakti Shringarpure is the Creative Director of the Radical Books Collective.

Outlook
My dream holiday turned to horror

Outlook

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 48:00


Pirates attacked Judith and her husband in a remote Kenyan resort in 2011. Judith was dragged from her bed and taken by boat to Somalia, where she was held for over six months. Despite everything she went through, Judith Tebbutt has spent the last ten years trying to get justice for a man she believes was wrongly convicted of the crime. Due to breaking news we're bringing you this episode of Lives Less Ordinary earlier than scheduled. Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Rebecca Vincent

Better Call Daddy
240. Found My Twin At 49, Time To Shine Today! L. Scott Ferguson

Better Call Daddy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 45:41


Have you spit into a container and explored your DNA on 23 and me?  Scott Ferguson is an introvert at heart, an adventurer, and believes in giving max effort because life is short!  He's a realtor, an awesome-sauce podcaster, and found his twin at 49!  Better Call Daddy: The Safe Space For Controversy! L. Scott Ferguson is a Lifestyle Optimation Artist and hosts the Time To Shine Today Podcast. His mission is to NOT have ANYONE feel like they have NO-ONE.  Scott's story was highly sought after by people in the entertainment business, which he was not ready to share until now.  At Time To Shine Today Scott shares Knowledge Nuggets to help individuals and teams to Level UP both in business and personal. Scott is a Veteran of the United States Navy with multiple deployments to Iraq, Afghanistan, Somalia, etc in the early to mid-1990s. Scott loves to give, live intentionally, he loves the beach, fitness, yoga, rescuing fur babies, and volunteering.  Shout out to Craig Stanland for the introduction! Connect with Scott Ferguson  https://timetoshinetoday.com/ https://mobile.twitter.com/ask4ferguson https://www.linkedin.com/in/ask4ferguson   Connect with Reena bettercalldaddy.com http://linkedin.com/in/reenafriedmanwatts instagram.com/reenafriedmanwatts twitter.com/reenareena My Daddy and I would love to hear from you, subscribe and leave us a five-star review, and let me know what topics I should cover. podchaser.com/bettercalldaddy ratethispodcast.com/bettercalldaddy https://www.youtube.com/c/BetterCallDaddy    

Luke Ford
Why aren't we building any new oil refineries? (6-22-22)

Luke Ford

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 115:31


00:19 Why aren't we building new oil refineries? https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2022/06/20/refineries-profit-gas-prices/ 01:00 Tucker Carlson says Joe Biden is weak 02:40 Joe Biden gets 24% support from Hispanics 05:00 Why are so many Republican senators supporting Joe Biden? 21:00 Why aren't we building new oil refineries? https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2022/06/20/refineries-profit-gas-prices/ 36:00 Is Google's AI alive? 38:00 Porn Icon Ron Jeremy languishes in jail over rape charges, https://deadline.com/2022/03/ron-jeremy-rape-case-suspended-psychiatric-evaluations-1234981368/ 1:42:00 00:19 Why aren't we building new oil refineries? https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2022/06/20/refineries-profit-gas-prices/ 1:50:00 Max Boot has promoted wars in Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Ukraine, Pakistan, Somalia, Libya https://www.rollingstone.com/culture/culture-news/ron-jeremy-sexual-assault-grand-jury-1220497/ https://www.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/celebrities/2021/09/07/ron-jeremy-accusers-say-porn-actor-used-fame-to-assault/5753038001/ https://www.cnn.com/2020/06/23/entertainment/ron-jeremy-rape-charges/index.html https://compactmag.com/article/the-regime-s-failing-jan-6-lie https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2022/06/21/candidate-who-curiously-outperformed-bellwether-counties-trump/ https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/wichita-officer-who-killed-andrew-finch-swatting-mistake-won-t-n865626 https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/christopherm51/unite-the-right-witness-violent-plans-testimony https://www.t3.com/news/netflixs-new-true-crime-show-web-of-make-believe-is-bloody-terrifying https://decider.com/2022/06/15/web-of-make-believe-death-lies-and-the-internet-netflix-review/ https://radixjournal.substack.com/p/patriot-fronts#details Professor of Apocalypse: The Many Lives of Jacob Taubes, https://lukeford.net/blog/?p=143590 https://jezebel.com/richard-spencer-bumble-dating-profile-moderate-1849062955 https://www.unz.com/article/new-york-times-thugs-trying-to-cancel-michael-woodley-for-reporting-human-diversity-science-but-theyre-guilty-too/ https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2022/06/15/condom-stealthing-bill-congress/ http://vouchnationalism.com https://www.latimes.com/world-nation/story/2022-06-14/israeli-lawmaker-rebuked-wishing-palestinians-disappear https://postkahanism.substack.com/p/the-failure-and-importance-of-kahanism?s=r https://www.wsj.com/articles/fannie-mae-freddie-mac-fhfa-housing-finance-agency-racial-favoritism-equity-biden-bubble-market-redlining-mortgage-lending-11655059365?mod=opinion_lead_pos1 https://www.tabletmag.com/sections/news/articles/three-blind-kings-edward-luttwak 7 ideas in Zeihan's new book: https://www.nytimes.com/2022/06/14/arts/music/lizzo-lyrics-grrrls.html https://www.nytimes.com/2022/06/09/world/europe/michael-woodley-buffalo-shooting.html?smid=tw-share Join this channel to get access to perks: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSFVD7Xfhn7sJY8LAIQmH8Q/join https://odysee.com/@LukeFordLive, https://lbry.tv/@LukeFord, https://rumble.com/lukeford https://dlive.tv/lukefordlivestreams Listener Call In #: 1-310-997-4596 Superchat: https://entropystream.live/app/lukefordlive Bitchute: https://www.bitchute.com/channel/lukeford/ Soundcloud MP3s: https://soundcloud.com/luke-ford-666431593 Code of Conduct: https://lukeford.net/blog/?p=125692 https://www.patreon.com/lukeford http://lukeford.net Email me: lukeisback@gmail.com or DM me on Twitter.com/lukeford Support the show | https://www.streamlabs.com/lukeford, https://patreon.com/lukeford, https://PayPal.Me/lukeisback Facebook: http://facebook.com/lukecford Feel free to clip my videos. It's nice when you link back to the original.

The General and the Ambassador: A Conversation
US Engagement in Somalia: A Comprehensive Approach with General Thomas Waldhauser and Ambassador Donald Yamamoto.

The General and the Ambassador: A Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 40:33


Fighting Al-Shabaab, losing US soldiers, living in an Embassy bunker and managing the Trump Administration's abrupt order to pull out US troops.  National War College classmates,  General Waldhauser (former Commander US AFRICOM) and Ambassador Yamamoto (US Ambassador to Somalia) describe how they partnered to 1)  build a new Somali national army to fight Al-Shabaab; 2) relieve massive poverty and famine; and 3) juggle clan divisions/clashes to create a new national government.  

New Books Network
Mark Fathi Massoud, "Shari'a, Inshallah: Finding God in Somali Legal Politics" (Cambridge UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 76:13


Western analysts have long denigrated Islamic states as antagonistic, even antithetical, to the rule of law. Mark Fathi Massoud tells a different story: for nearly 150 years, the Somali people have embraced shari'a, commonly translated as Islamic law, in the struggle for national identity and human rights. Lawyers, community leaders, and activists throughout the Horn of Africa have invoked God to oppose colonialism, resist dictators, expel warlords, and to fight for gender equality - all critical steps on the path to the rule of law. Shari'a, Inshallah traces the most dramatic moments of legal change, political collapse, and reconstruction in Somalia and Somaliland. In Shari'a, Inshallah: Finding God in Somali Legal Politics (Cambridge UP, 2021), Massoud upends the conventional account of secular legal progress and demonstrates instead how faith in a higher power guides people toward the rule of law. Mark Fathi Massoud is professor of politics and legal studies at UC Santa Cruz, where he directs the Legal Studies Program and serves as affiliated faculty with the Center for the Middle East and North Africa. Massoud also holds an appointment as a Visiting Professor at the University of Oxford. Sara Katz is a Postdoctoral Associate in the History Department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Political Science
Mark Fathi Massoud, "Shari'a, Inshallah: Finding God in Somali Legal Politics" (Cambridge UP, 2021)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 76:13


Western analysts have long denigrated Islamic states as antagonistic, even antithetical, to the rule of law. Mark Fathi Massoud tells a different story: for nearly 150 years, the Somali people have embraced shari'a, commonly translated as Islamic law, in the struggle for national identity and human rights. Lawyers, community leaders, and activists throughout the Horn of Africa have invoked God to oppose colonialism, resist dictators, expel warlords, and to fight for gender equality - all critical steps on the path to the rule of law. Shari'a, Inshallah traces the most dramatic moments of legal change, political collapse, and reconstruction in Somalia and Somaliland. In Shari'a, Inshallah: Finding God in Somali Legal Politics (Cambridge UP, 2021), Massoud upends the conventional account of secular legal progress and demonstrates instead how faith in a higher power guides people toward the rule of law. Mark Fathi Massoud is professor of politics and legal studies at UC Santa Cruz, where he directs the Legal Studies Program and serves as affiliated faculty with the Center for the Middle East and North Africa. Massoud also holds an appointment as a Visiting Professor at the University of Oxford. Sara Katz is a Postdoctoral Associate in the History Department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books in Law
Mark Fathi Massoud, "Shari'a, Inshallah: Finding God in Somali Legal Politics" (Cambridge UP, 2021)

New Books in Law

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 76:13


Western analysts have long denigrated Islamic states as antagonistic, even antithetical, to the rule of law. Mark Fathi Massoud tells a different story: for nearly 150 years, the Somali people have embraced shari'a, commonly translated as Islamic law, in the struggle for national identity and human rights. Lawyers, community leaders, and activists throughout the Horn of Africa have invoked God to oppose colonialism, resist dictators, expel warlords, and to fight for gender equality - all critical steps on the path to the rule of law. Shari'a, Inshallah traces the most dramatic moments of legal change, political collapse, and reconstruction in Somalia and Somaliland. In Shari'a, Inshallah: Finding God in Somali Legal Politics (Cambridge UP, 2021), Massoud upends the conventional account of secular legal progress and demonstrates instead how faith in a higher power guides people toward the rule of law. Mark Fathi Massoud is professor of politics and legal studies at UC Santa Cruz, where he directs the Legal Studies Program and serves as affiliated faculty with the Center for the Middle East and North Africa. Massoud also holds an appointment as a Visiting Professor at the University of Oxford. Sara Katz is a Postdoctoral Associate in the History Department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/law

New Books in Islamic Studies
Mark Fathi Massoud, "Shari'a, Inshallah: Finding God in Somali Legal Politics" (Cambridge UP, 2021)

New Books in Islamic Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 76:13


Western analysts have long denigrated Islamic states as antagonistic, even antithetical, to the rule of law. Mark Fathi Massoud tells a different story: for nearly 150 years, the Somali people have embraced shari'a, commonly translated as Islamic law, in the struggle for national identity and human rights. Lawyers, community leaders, and activists throughout the Horn of Africa have invoked God to oppose colonialism, resist dictators, expel warlords, and to fight for gender equality - all critical steps on the path to the rule of law. Shari'a, Inshallah traces the most dramatic moments of legal change, political collapse, and reconstruction in Somalia and Somaliland. In Shari'a, Inshallah: Finding God in Somali Legal Politics (Cambridge UP, 2021), Massoud upends the conventional account of secular legal progress and demonstrates instead how faith in a higher power guides people toward the rule of law. Mark Fathi Massoud is professor of politics and legal studies at UC Santa Cruz, where he directs the Legal Studies Program and serves as affiliated faculty with the Center for the Middle East and North Africa. Massoud also holds an appointment as a Visiting Professor at the University of Oxford. Sara Katz is a Postdoctoral Associate in the History Department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/islamic-studies

New Books in African Studies
Mark Fathi Massoud, "Shari'a, Inshallah: Finding God in Somali Legal Politics" (Cambridge UP, 2021)

New Books in African Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 76:13


Western analysts have long denigrated Islamic states as antagonistic, even antithetical, to the rule of law. Mark Fathi Massoud tells a different story: for nearly 150 years, the Somali people have embraced shari'a, commonly translated as Islamic law, in the struggle for national identity and human rights. Lawyers, community leaders, and activists throughout the Horn of Africa have invoked God to oppose colonialism, resist dictators, expel warlords, and to fight for gender equality - all critical steps on the path to the rule of law. Shari'a, Inshallah traces the most dramatic moments of legal change, political collapse, and reconstruction in Somalia and Somaliland. In Shari'a, Inshallah: Finding God in Somali Legal Politics (Cambridge UP, 2021), Massoud upends the conventional account of secular legal progress and demonstrates instead how faith in a higher power guides people toward the rule of law. Mark Fathi Massoud is professor of politics and legal studies at UC Santa Cruz, where he directs the Legal Studies Program and serves as affiliated faculty with the Center for the Middle East and North Africa. Massoud also holds an appointment as a Visiting Professor at the University of Oxford. Sara Katz is a Postdoctoral Associate in the History Department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-studies

New Books in Anthropology
Mark Fathi Massoud, "Shari'a, Inshallah: Finding God in Somali Legal Politics" (Cambridge UP, 2021)

New Books in Anthropology

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 76:13


Western analysts have long denigrated Islamic states as antagonistic, even antithetical, to the rule of law. Mark Fathi Massoud tells a different story: for nearly 150 years, the Somali people have embraced shari'a, commonly translated as Islamic law, in the struggle for national identity and human rights. Lawyers, community leaders, and activists throughout the Horn of Africa have invoked God to oppose colonialism, resist dictators, expel warlords, and to fight for gender equality - all critical steps on the path to the rule of law. Shari'a, Inshallah traces the most dramatic moments of legal change, political collapse, and reconstruction in Somalia and Somaliland. In Shari'a, Inshallah: Finding God in Somali Legal Politics (Cambridge UP, 2021), Massoud upends the conventional account of secular legal progress and demonstrates instead how faith in a higher power guides people toward the rule of law. Mark Fathi Massoud is professor of politics and legal studies at UC Santa Cruz, where he directs the Legal Studies Program and serves as affiliated faculty with the Center for the Middle East and North Africa. Massoud also holds an appointment as a Visiting Professor at the University of Oxford. Sara Katz is a Postdoctoral Associate in the History Department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/anthropology

Asylum Speakers Podcast with Jaz O'Hara: Stories of Migration
41. THE JOURNEY Episode 1: Leaving Home

Asylum Speakers Podcast with Jaz O'Hara: Stories of Migration

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 45:13


I'm so happy to be bringing you episode 1 of The Journey - a 6-part podcast series following migration routes from Africa, The Middle East and Ukraine, to northern Europe.In this episode we're starting from the beginning and exploring why people first embark on their journey. Why do people leave their countries and everything they ever knew behind? What are the push factors? We'll be hearing from people from all over the world about the circumstances that forced them to first become a refugee. Our journey begins in North Africa, in Cairo, the capital city of Egypt, where we spent a week meeting many young people who have fled countries all over Africa, such as Eritrea, South Sudan, Nigeria, Sudan and Somalia and more, and are now living in Egypt. You will hear from Ahmad from Nigeria, Albino from South Sudan and Radhid from Somalia.We then head to Lebanon and hear from ‘M' who shares a different reason for leaving his country - his sexuality. Next we head to Greece to hear from Mustafa, who runs Velos Youth - a wonderful organisation supporting young asylum seekers in Athens.Finally we hear a short poem from a young Syrian named Mohamed in Istanbul, Turkey.To find out more about the organisations featured in this episode:https://stars-egypt.org/https://velosyouth.org/To buy our merch:https://theworldwidetribeshop.com/–Many of the people we spoke to along this journey are being supported by projects funded by Comic Relief. Thanks to donations from the UK public, Comic Relief's Across Borders programme has invested over £7millon in organisations supporting refugees and people seeking asylum along these routes. Find out more about Comic Relief's work and how to support it at comicrelief.com. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

David Gornoski
THINGS HIDDEN 63: Notes from the Psyop Underground

David Gornoski

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 83:53


In this episode of THINGS HIDDEN, David Gornoski sits down with Bright News editor, Shannon Braswell, and the two start the conversation by talking about America's intervention in Africa. Why did Biden decide to send American troops back into Somalia? The conversation then moves to questions surrounding media manipulation. Are people getting tired of Woke narratives in movies? What makes the cartel of entertainment as powerful as they are today? How important is radio for psychological engineering? What do we often miss in our conversations about slavery? Check out Bright News here. Visit A Neighbor's Choice website here.

Konflikt
Så skapar Putins krig svält och nya konflikter

Konflikt

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 55:59


Matpriserna skenar i stora delar av världen till följd av Putins krig i Ukraina. Detta kan leda till nya konflikter, krig och oro i andra delar av världen. Putins anfallskrig har vänt världens blickar mot Ukraina, men det har också fått konsekvenser för andra delar av världen. För ett resultat av Rysslands blockad mot ukrainska hamnar i Odessa i Svarta havet är att priset på spannmål och annan mat stiger kraftigt.Varför är det så? Ryssland och Ukraina är bland de största spannmålsproducenterna i världen och när deras spannmål inte når marknaden riskerar stora delar av världen att hamna i svält. Andra orsaker till matkrisen som vi ser just nu är torka och ökade priser för bränsle och andra produktionskostnader. Ekonomen Fredrik Wilhelmsson vid Lunds Universitet berättar att priser på spannmål redan var på väg upp innan kriget i Ukraina och att det också finns andra faktorer som gör att priset på mat nu stiger.Allt detta leder till vad David Beasley, chefen för FN:s livsmedelsprogram, kallat "en perfekt storm". I en intervju med Konflikt varnar David Beasley att i jämförelse med dagens situation kan Syrienkriget komma att framstå som en "picknick" och han berättar hur han försökt sätta press på Rysslands president Vladimir Putin att häva blockaden av hamnarna i Odessa i Ukraina.För nu tror många att matkrisen också kan leda till andra konflikter i världen. Svält och hunger är viktiga faktorer när det kommer till krig och oroligheter. Caroline Delgado på SIPRI berättar mer om det.I programmet hör vi röster från Jakobsberg utanför Stockholm där de höga livsmedelspriserna lett till konflikter i familjer där pengarna inte räcker till mat. Vi hör röster från Somalia dit svälten redan har kommit och vi hör om Mali där läget just nu är kritiskt.I Egypten, en av världens största importörer av spannmål, arbetar regimen för att försöka stävja att de höjda matpriserna ska leda till nya oroligheter. Höga priser på bröd har historiskt lett till våldsamma protester i Egypten och ilska mot höga matpriser var också ett slagord i revolterna över stora delar av Arabvärlden under den Arabiska våren 2011. Oroligheter som sen också ledde fram till blodiga krig i länder som Libyen, Jemen och Syrien. Vår korrespondent Cecilia Uddén rapporterar från Egypten.Niklas Granholm på FOI berättar om hur världens handel med mat idag sitter ihop som i ett blodomlopp och där kriget i Ukraina nu har orsakat en propp i systemet vilket gör att priserna skenar. Han beskriver också planerna på att göra en militär operation för att stoppa Putins blockad av hamnarna i Odessa i Ukraina och eskortera transportfartygen med spannmål genom Svarta havet.Så vad kan vi göra för att stävja utvecklingen och skapa mer stabilitet eller är det redan försent och är det en värld med massflykt som nu väntar oss?Rättelse: I den första version av programmet nämndes en felaktig uppgift om att Egypten är Afrikas folkrikaste land något som inte stämmer. Uppgiften är rättad. Programledare: Robin Olinrobin.olin@sverigesradio.seProducent och reporter.Simon Moser och Anja Sahlbergsimon.moser@sverigeradio.seanja.sahlberg@sverigesradio.se

Tankar för dagen
Awes Osman - Min livsresa

Tankar för dagen

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 4:39


- Jag ville studera för att sedan arbeta för mitt hemland som behövde fler utbildade, men det var bara min egen plan i livet, mitt öde blev ett helt annat. Om Awes Osman:Awes Osman är författare, lärare på folkhögskola i Nyköping och översättare. Han har gett ut böckerna "Den skinnlösa geten i Somalia" och "Svensk fika".Som ung gick han i gymnasieskolan i Somalia och reste sedan till Indien för att studera vid universitetet. Han arbetade i Mellanöstern en tid innan han fick politisk asyl i Sverige. Awes arbetar med integrationsfrågor och önskar att alla ska ha lika chanser i livet.

Konflikt
Så skapar Putins krig svält och nya konflikter

Konflikt

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 56:01


Matpriserna skenar i stora delar av världen till följd av Putins krig i Ukraina. Detta kan leda till nya konflikter, krig och oro i andra delar av världen. Putins anfallskrig har vänt världens blickar mot Ukraina, men det har också fått konsekvenser för andra delar av världen. För ett resultat av Rysslands blockad mot ukrainska hamnar i Odessa i Svarta havet är att priset på spannmål och annan mat stiger kraftigt.Varför är det så? Ryssland och Ukraina är bland de största spannmålsproducenterna i världen och när deras spannmål inte når marknaden riskerar stora delar av världen att hamna i svält. Andra orsaker till matkrisen som vi ser just nu är torka och ökade priser för bränsle och andra produktionskostnader. Ekonomen Fredrik Wilhelmsson vid Lunds Universitet berättar att priser på spannmål redan var på väg upp innan kriget i Ukraina och att det också finns andra faktorer som gör att priset på mat nu stiger.Allt detta leder till vad David Beasley, chefen för FN:s livsmedelsprogram, kallat "en perfekt storm". I en intervju med Konflikt varnar David Beasley att i jämförelse med dagens situation kan Syrienkriget komma att framstå som en "picknick" och han berättar hur han försökt sätta press på Rysslands president Vladimir Putin att häva blockaden av hamnarna i Odessa i Ukraina.För nu tror många att matkrisen också kan leda till andra konflikter i världen. Svält och hunger är viktiga faktorer när det kommer till krig och oroligheter. Caroline Delgado på SIPRI berättar mer om det.I programmet hör vi röster från Jakobsberg utanför Stockholm där de höga livsmedelspriserna lett till konflikter i familjer där pengarna inte räcker till mat. Vi hör röster från Somalia dit svälten redan har kommit och vi hör om Mali där läget just nu är kritiskt.I Egypten, en av världens största importörer av spannmål, arbetar regimen för att försöka stävja att de höjda matpriserna ska leda till nya oroligheter. Höga priser på bröd har historiskt lett till våldsamma protester i Egypten och ilska mot höga matpriser var också ett slagord i revolterna över stora delar av Arabvärlden under den Arabiska våren 2011. Oroligheter som sen också ledde fram till blodiga krig i länder som Libyen, Jemen och Syrien. Vår korrespondent Cecilia Uddén rapporterar från Egypten.Niklas Granholm på FOI berättar om hur världens handel med mat idag sitter ihop som i ett blodomlopp och där kriget i Ukraina nu har orsakat en propp i systemet vilket gör att priserna skenar. Han beskriver också planerna på att göra en militär operation för att stoppa Putins blockad av hamnarna i Odessa i Ukraina och eskortera transportfartygen med spannmål genom Svarta havet.Så vad kan vi göra för att stävja utvecklingen och skapa mer stabilitet eller är det redan försent och är det en värld med massflykt som nu väntar oss?Programledare: Robin Olinrobin.olin@sverigesradio.seProducent och reporter.Simon Moser och Anja Sahlbergsimon.moser@sverigeradio.seanja.sahlberg@sverigesradio.se

The Writer Files: Writing, Productivity, Creativity, and Neuroscience
How Bestselling Author & Pulitzer-Winner Geraldine Brooks Writes

The Writer Files: Writing, Productivity, Creativity, and Neuroscience

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 35:06


#PodcastersForJustice Bestselling author and Pulitzer Prize winner, Geraldine Brooks, spoke to me about why "truth is stranger than fiction," letting story drive narrative, and the overheard conversation that led to her latest, "Horse." Geraldine Brooks is the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel March and the international bestsellers The Secret Chord, Caleb's Crossing, People of the Book, and Year of Wonders (recently optioned by Olivia Colman). Her latest novel, Horse, is described as "... a sweeping story of spirit, obsession, and injustice across American history." TIME magazine said of the book, "Horse isn't just an animal story—it's a moving narrative about race and art." Geraldine has also written acclaimed nonfiction works including Nine Parts of Desire and Foreign Correspondence. She started out as a reporter in her hometown, Sydney, and went on to cover conflicts as a Wall Street Journal correspondent in Bosnia, Somalia, and the Middle East. Stay calm and write on ... [Discover The Writer Files Extra: Get The Writer Files Podcast Delivered Straight to Your Inbox at writerfiles.fm] In this file Geraldine Brooks and I discussed: Her early years as a war correspondent Why she chose to write a braided narrative based on an overheard conversation Reading history to find verisimilitude Empathy in fiction Writing through a pandemic And a lot more! [If you're a fan of The Writer Files, please click FOLLOW to automatically see new interviews. And drop us a rating or a review wherever you listen] Show Notes: GeraldineBrooks.com Horse: A Novel by Geraldine Brooks (Amazon Affiliate) Geraldine Brooks Amazon Author Page (Amazon Affiliate) Geraldine Brooks on Facebook Geraldine Brooks on Twitter Kelton Reid on Twitter Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

You Just Have To Laugh
246. Col Mark Morgan shares the lessons he learned from his grandfather, a medal of honor winner in World War 2.

You Just Have To Laugh

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 41:16


COL Mark Morgan is a proud American, United States Marine and an American Soldier who prides himself on service to our Nation and its people. He has honorably served our Nation for the past 33 years and still has more to give!  Col Morgan has served in every climb and place ranging from the deep winters of Alaska to the heat and dust of the African continent and the Middle East.  Combat tours include Operations Desert Shield/Storm, Operation Restore Hope in the war-torn country of Somalia and multiple rotations through Afghanistan and Iraq as part of efforts to rid the world of Al Qaeda and other terrorist's organizations.  He is from Omaha, Nebraska and is married to his beautiful wife Lora that he drives crazy with his love of flying. They have three daughters.

New Books in American Studies
David P. Oakley, "Subordinating Intelligence: The DoD/CIA Post-Cold War Relationship" (UP of Kentucky Press, 2019)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 54:29


In the late eighties and early nineties, driven by the post–Cold War environment and lessons learned during military operations, United States policy makers made intelligence support to the military the Intelligence Community's top priority. In response to this demand, the CIA and DoD instituted policy and organizational changes that altered their relationship with one another. While debates over the future of the Intelligence Community were occurring on Capitol Hill, the CIA and DoD were expanding their relationship in peacekeeping and nation-building operations in Somalia and the Balkans. By the late 1990s, some policy makers and national security professionals became concerned that intelligence support to military operations had gone too far. In Subordinating Intelligence: The DoD/CIA Post-Cold War Relationship (UP of Kentucky Press, 2019), David P. Oakley reveals that, despite these concerns, no major changes to national intelligence or its priorities were implemented. These concerns were forgotten after 9/11, as the United States fought two wars and policy makers increasingly focused on tactical and operational actions. As policy makers became fixated with terrorism and the United States fought in Iraq and Afghanistan, the CIA directed a significant amount of its resources toward global counterterrorism efforts and in support of military operations. Sam Canter is a policy and strategy analyst, PhD candidate, and Army Reserve intelligence officer. The opinions state here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the view of the USG, DoD, Special Operations Command, or Joint Special Operations University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books Network
David P. Oakley, "Subordinating Intelligence: The DoD/CIA Post-Cold War Relationship" (UP of Kentucky Press, 2019)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 54:29


In the late eighties and early nineties, driven by the post–Cold War environment and lessons learned during military operations, United States policy makers made intelligence support to the military the Intelligence Community's top priority. In response to this demand, the CIA and DoD instituted policy and organizational changes that altered their relationship with one another. While debates over the future of the Intelligence Community were occurring on Capitol Hill, the CIA and DoD were expanding their relationship in peacekeeping and nation-building operations in Somalia and the Balkans. By the late 1990s, some policy makers and national security professionals became concerned that intelligence support to military operations had gone too far. In Subordinating Intelligence: The DoD/CIA Post-Cold War Relationship (UP of Kentucky Press, 2019), David P. Oakley reveals that, despite these concerns, no major changes to national intelligence or its priorities were implemented. These concerns were forgotten after 9/11, as the United States fought two wars and policy makers increasingly focused on tactical and operational actions. As policy makers became fixated with terrorism and the United States fought in Iraq and Afghanistan, the CIA directed a significant amount of its resources toward global counterterrorism efforts and in support of military operations. Sam Canter is a policy and strategy analyst, PhD candidate, and Army Reserve intelligence officer. The opinions state here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the view of the USG, DoD, Special Operations Command, or Joint Special Operations University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Military History
David P. Oakley, "Subordinating Intelligence: The DoD/CIA Post-Cold War Relationship" (UP of Kentucky Press, 2019)

New Books in Military History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 54:29


In the late eighties and early nineties, driven by the post–Cold War environment and lessons learned during military operations, United States policy makers made intelligence support to the military the Intelligence Community's top priority. In response to this demand, the CIA and DoD instituted policy and organizational changes that altered their relationship with one another. While debates over the future of the Intelligence Community were occurring on Capitol Hill, the CIA and DoD were expanding their relationship in peacekeeping and nation-building operations in Somalia and the Balkans. By the late 1990s, some policy makers and national security professionals became concerned that intelligence support to military operations had gone too far. In Subordinating Intelligence: The DoD/CIA Post-Cold War Relationship (UP of Kentucky Press, 2019), David P. Oakley reveals that, despite these concerns, no major changes to national intelligence or its priorities were implemented. These concerns were forgotten after 9/11, as the United States fought two wars and policy makers increasingly focused on tactical and operational actions. As policy makers became fixated with terrorism and the United States fought in Iraq and Afghanistan, the CIA directed a significant amount of its resources toward global counterterrorism efforts and in support of military operations. Sam Canter is a policy and strategy analyst, PhD candidate, and Army Reserve intelligence officer. The opinions state here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the view of the USG, DoD, Special Operations Command, or Joint Special Operations University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/military-history

The Bledsoe Show
What Matters Most

The Bledsoe Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 79:26


00:01.12 Max Shank Here's the deal. So there's a perfect, no intro this we're just here now you're here we're here I'm here you're here. We're all here the official show but this is for just the like inner club. But anyway I was going to say a case study. 00:02.60 mikebledsoe It's the first one. 00:16.94 mikebledsoe We'll do the intro when we start the official show. 00:35.54 Max Shank On viewer engagement. One of the best I've ever seen was this Youtube channel called Ants Canada okay I think it's like a filipino dude. It's some asian guy who has this Youtube channel called Ants Canada and every fucking film. 00:51.20 mikebledsoe Ahead. 01:14.58 Max Shank Is about ants and ant colonies and he sells ant gear but basically he has this membership that he calls the Ac senate right? and so he basically has people pay to have a say in all kinds of weird stuff like. What are we gonna do with this new colony. What are we gonna name this thing and he gives them like preferential voting rights for what happens in the community. It's so crazy. How ah how much this guy connects with the audience. And's so it's a weird stuff ah because ants and ant colonies are pretty weird but talk about a case study for how to engage with an audience. This guy is dialed ants Canada case study ants st ants canada is a case study for. 02:57.28 mikebledsoe Aunts Canada alright. 03:07.76 Max Shank How to engage with your audience on multiple levels. He sells physical products. He has basically ah a membership where you get called? yeah like ants like the bug the insect. Yeah exactly it's incredible. 03:28.28 mikebledsoe It's a and TS like like the like the insect to podcast. 03:46.40 Max Shank No, it's video series Youtube thing. It's not a podcast but he sells ant colony plastic molded parts to people. He also has this this. It's the weirdest thing I've ever heard of like you would wonder like why is it that people would pay to get to make decisions but he has positioned the joy of naming a new ant colony or deciding what to do. In this like new video series as good as Tom Sawyer ah portraying the benefits of whitewashing offense. He's like wouldn't you guys like to make this decision for him like they are driving his content and paying to drive the content. It's. 05:30.86 mikebledsoe It's really I mean it's as Facebook Twitter you know create the platform. Yeah create the platform and just let them let the let the people be the product was that the people will create the product. They'll be the product. 05:32.38 Max Shank It's unbelievable Youtube oh my god what an acquisition. 06:02.50 mikebledsoe And then you just sell advertising. 06:08.32 Max Shank It's like ah what they did with was it Hong Kong or Singapore can't I remember 1 of them. It's like the guy's name was Lee coshing you ever hear that guy. Ah. 06:30.90 mikebledsoe E. 06:41.24 Max Shank Rikash xing Hong Kong business magnate none richest guy in the world. His whole thing. He just like built up. Ah let's see hold on. I don't know his whole thing was about owning the port that that was the that was the ah whole story. Basically. 07:24.20 mikebledsoe Ah, yeah, it's kind of like the the gold rush. The people who made the most money were the ones selling the shovels I think that's where maybe Levi's came from the blue jeans is yeah I'm not 100% sure on this but I I think that ah that. 07:38.16 Max Shank Right. Um, leave eyes. 08:03.32 mikebledsoe That denim company or maybe another denim company Levi's make sense though. Ah made their fortune and their start by selling denim clothing to miners. It's really durable. 08:25.20 Max Shank Like little kids or like go look for gold in the mines Now they probably send sell more to little kids I don't know I don't wear a lot of jeans. Do you wear a lot of jeans. 08:36.64 mikebledsoe Look go look for golden mines. Yeah, yeah, off to I'd like to not anymore not with the not with the clothes that come out today I just discovered. Um. 09:02.16 Max Shank I Hardly wear jeans. It's not that comfortable. 09:15.54 mikebledsoe Viori made a new pant that is looks really clean, but dude great for travel because I can wear them in a hundred degree weather I might as well be wearing shorts they breathe So well, they look nice and you know I. 09:24.24 Max Shank Ah. Are yeah. 09:51.22 mikebledsoe I Don't even like to wear shorts I don't like to wear casual shorts I Either want to wear pants or athletic shorts and it might be something it might be like spillover from the the military because that's pretty much how it works there. But I think like casual shorts look silly on men. Ah. 10:01.80 Max Shank A. 10:17.60 Max Shank Right? right. Um, like what? what do you mean?? casual shorts like cargo pants. 10:31.28 mikebledsoe That's just like you know like yeah like like cargo shorts or just like the shorts that are pants that are cut off. You know it's It's like those are kind of silly. It's like when I just wear athletic shorts I'm like an athletic shorts and fanny pack or I'm going to be wearing. 10:49.96 Max Shank Ah, you know what. 11:07.94 mikebledsoe You know some slacks. 11:10.94 Max Shank You know what? I'm really into is like the like the ah Rei type of hiking pant and I and I want to get some that turn into shorts but I was thinking about it and I don't know if I would rather have them unzip all the way. 11:22.78 mikebledsoe Yeah. 11:47.58 Max Shank Or if I would want to have them roll up and clip on I haven't seen many like that there are some out there because I have I have a couple pairs totally but the utility I mean. 11:51.50 mikebledsoe I think roll up and clip on makes more sense there. There are some out there I've seen some yeah the zip out I try to avoid moving parts as I try to. Until the zipper breaks plus rolling up just looks way cooler. That's that's the real Rob there they look cooler than having a zipper hanging off your shorts. 12:26.52 Max Shank Is fantastic. So maybe maybe the roll up till the zipper breaks. Yeah, that's a good point. Those are my my favorite pants I got a couple at Costco they're just. 12:57.00 Max Shank Yeah, that's a great point I went on a bike ride yesterday actually mountain bike ride for the None time in like years. Ah, all because I was learning about air compressors and how our compressors work. 13:03.40 mikebledsoe I mean. 13:34.56 Max Shank And so I was getting out my air compressor and I was like how how does my air compressor work. How powerful is this thing Really what kind of stuff because I bought one when I got my house because I was like every house needs an air compressor because I was ah like I didn't really know? Yeah, like yeah. 13:59.32 mikebledsoe Oh like a proper air compressor one with a big tank. Yeah, not the kind that you carry around in your car. Yeah something you could use with tools and whatnot. Yeah yeah, I'm into those those. 14:12.76 Max Shank Like a little pancake. No no I wouldn't It's a little too big and heavy for that. Yeah, like a nail gun staple gun that kind of thing and so those things are savage. 14:36.38 mikebledsoe I've got some air compressor tools. If if you're gonna work on a car I don't know how I don't know how I worked on a car before I have that which I don't really work on cars much anymore. But I remember that being a major upgrade. 15:04.26 Max Shank Yeah I think knowing how to put stuff together like that is such an underrated ability because I notice as I am problem solving in the garage with my hands. It makes me it makes it easier for me to visualize how to put other things together. Like Ideas. You know this attaches to this and you have to divide this. You have to sharpen this. You have to round off these edges. There are all these problem solving things that go on with how to put stuff together and it makes me even think of like mathematics how that factors in to. 15:43.16 mikebledsoe Yeah, well, there's um. 16:20.62 Max Shank Putting stuff together and how much how much you just learn through the process of doing it. You know it's good to know arithmetic. But I have it. 16:32.70 mikebledsoe There's a book. There's a book called the metaphors we live by and have you read it did you did you buy it on my recommendation or did you just happen to get it simultaneously. Wow Yeah I I hardly run in anyone who's read it. Ah. 16:52.62 Max Shank I think I had I think I bought it before? Yeah yeah, ah yes, and like most books I've read I maybe retained like 10% 17:08.18 mikebledsoe But have you read it. 17:22.74 mikebledsoe Got it? Yeah so metaphors we live by really highlights how the mind works and that everything in the mind is a metaphor to something an objective reality and so ah so kind of like the. 17:53.96 Max Shank Right now. 18:00.98 mikebledsoe Projectile and project metaphor We talked about before yeah eyeballs. Um. 18:06.94 Max Shank Eyeballs eyeballs are super reliable but they're not showing you objective reality because there are a lot of layers. 18:19.88 mikebledsoe Well, they are but you're not filtering it. But anyways. 18:32.44 Max Shank Well your eyes don't show you objective reality your eyes show you? How light is reacting with matter but there's a lot going on that is beyond. The visible spectrum is what I'm saying. 18:44.12 mikebledsoe Yeah. 18:55.10 mikebledsoe Totally. But so one of the things it talks about is ah like ontological metaphors and so one is how we refer to the mind. So the mind is a machine so there's all these examples of. 19:26.90 Max Shank A. 19:33.86 mikebledsoe Ah, that in in the English language the mind is a machine and it's also brittle and so when you look at the English language as a whole the majority of the references to the mind is that it's a mechanical thing that's brittle. 19:48.36 Max Shank A. 20:09.12 Max Shank Right? It sounds dangerous. Sounds like a dangerous belief to me like that that makes me a little queasy even based on how I see the mind or how I would try to define the mind or even just the brain. 20:13.48 mikebledsoe And so ah, people believe that it yes and. 20:44.32 mikebledsoe Yeah, but but you know and and it's common language is as people are talking are unconsciously talking about it in this way. So they're further embedding this thing is true and so they they they don't know how to treat their own own mind or organize it because they actually have an incorrect. 20:48.30 Max Shank Like the organ because I think that's different. 21:00.58 Max Shank Um, right right. 21:23.92 mikebledsoe Or an inaccurate view of what it actually is ah so one of the things the book talks about is how we use objects to ah create Concepts so anything that's conceptual. We're having we need to. 21:28.26 Max Shank He no. 21:48.00 Max Shank E. 21:58.28 mikebledsoe Associate it with an object out in physical space and so ah, one of the things that I've noticed I'm in total agreement with you I've been I've been meditating on this because I read that book about a year ago and I noticed that as I've been doing more physical tasks and building things that my ability to problem solving in the conceptual realm has gone way up and anytime I'm having a conceptual problem I go work on something that's on an object I go build something or fix something. Ah. 22:45.12 Max Shank A. 23:07.18 mikebledsoe All of a sudden the world makes more sense and I think part of that is if we spend too much time in the conceptual Realm without being in the objective Realm Then we end up. Ah, we end up way out in this place that doesn't make any sense. And and we become ungrounded and I know you and ah I are alike in this way because we love the mental Masturbation. We'll go off into some conceptual Realm and start changing. You know, ah physicists do this. They'll change one lot of physics to solve a problem and then they try to. Bring it back and so and then reapply to law and and it's one way of doing experimentation but the problem is a lot of people start doing that and they never come back to Earth and so I think having that balance between doing things and objective reality and conceptual. And conceptualizing things is really really beneficial. 25:12.48 Max Shank Oh Yeah I was laughing so many times there because it makes me think about how enslaved people are by thinking certain things matter and the word matter is funny right? Because. Stuff matters. Ah you know water is matter air is matter and these ideas that we have. It's like we think too many things matter that aren't matter at all. 25:51.44 mikebledsoe Right. 26:02.36 mikebledsoe This bottle is matter. 26:26.50 mikebledsoe Ah, well does just to make the statement that something is matter that isn't matter pulls you out of reality. You've become ungrounded. 26:28.36 Max Shank And you are just more and more divorced from reality because hold right? of course look um these words and ideas are. Very useful and it's never the complete truth because they're just symbols right? but they are concrete enough to give us the plans to make a plane or a computer I mean that's all language derived and that's how the matter is directed. So. The ideas are like the pattern like Pattern Pattern father and the stuff the substance the matter the mother ma her modern is ah guided by our ideas. But if you don't have what's that yeah. 28:09.34 mikebledsoe Oh man I'm loving these metaphors that that makes so much sense because that the father is is the structure of like the pattern structure and the matter is the stuff. 28:23.80 Max Shank Yeah, if you don't yeah if you don't have the father's the pattern the Pattern the pattern right? mother is the matter. Yeah, the stuff and the ah the energy. 28:47.40 mikebledsoe Yeah. 28:55.84 Max Shank It's like kinetic and potential I mean there are a lot of ways that you can ah yin and young and dichotomize these ideas right? But ah my point is that we are made of matter you eat an orange. You actually are that orange is becoming you. And your body is able to break it down into its basic components and then that stuff becomes you and the stuff that doesn't become you becomes shit or sweat or something like I mean it's crazy, but it literally becomes you so this idea. That when you um, get your hands involved. You get so much of your brain involved and then it's rooted in a reality that is very easy to understand. It's very It's all about, um. God I guess it's all about power really when you get down to it because we're talking about ah force times distance ah or work over time is power ah, power is work over time work is force times distance. And that's that's a reality that's easy to track momentum things like that all this dark matter. Ah like black hole shit is mental masturbation. It's fine. It's mental masturbation though. But once you start getting in there and you can do macrame you can. Ah, make something out of wood. You could carve something out of Clay. Ah but building that connection between your creativity and your curiosity and this physical reality is critical and if you apply that same thing to fitness. Fitness is essentially ah how well you're able to deliver force how well you're able to deliver force into your right leg so you can run and take a step with your right leg and how well you can absorb. 32:56.36 mikebledsoe Yeah. 33:21.00 Max Shank And return Force I Mean That's why my latest training program is called elasticity because it's all about absorbing and returning forests without ah permanent deformation and that's that's like as close as you can get to the best longevity practice. And we all have our pet loves for ah what makes fitness good or what makes you live a long time. But if you ah you know have good friendships and family kind of ties if you have fun and if you. Ah, fast. So You just don't eat too Much. You'll live a really long time even if you're just like medium elastic Fitness you just need ah a basic level of how to interact with your environment with these alternating forces. 34:48.74 mikebledsoe Yeah. 35:06.26 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 35:11.64 Max Shank Ah, so it just it's very centering even climbing a tree go climb a tree and then you are like intimately associated with the forces required to lift you up off the ground and once you're in those situations you have room to explore and then this. Idea of like what matters or like what you should be fucking prideful of like I God I was just thinking the other day you know almost every holiday is about victimization that we have. Like almost every holiday is like it fucking kills me because we have like okay we have like memorial day that's ah, it's for the people who were killed like we are appreciating those poor victims but that's what they were. They were victims and of course we don't talk about like why they were victimized. 36:44.78 mikebledsoe Yeah. 37:07.34 Max Shank Because people don't really like that when you go in? Oh dude I'll be fucking kicked right out of the cemetery if I say these guys died for nothing but the fucking ambitions of old politicians with nothing better to do than tell other people how to live their fucking lives. 37:07.66 mikebledsoe Of you start getting into that but people will get offended. 37:46.40 Max Shank And so people don't like people don't like that no way because you know to generalize Bobby Joe went into that Vietnam and he did his country proud and that is a way better belief to take with you than he died for nothing. 37:46.40 mikebledsoe Um, people don't like that. No no. 38:08.42 mikebledsoe Yeah, you know what? um. 38:25.90 Max Shank But some fuck fuckwit politicians who just think they know best right. 38:32.20 mikebledsoe Yeah I um, my girlfriend and I are out. We do things around town and Texas is a very patriotic place and I which means I get a lot of discounts because I'm a veteran and. 39:04.54 Max Shank The. 39:09.66 mikebledsoe I get a 5% discount on my guns at Cabels. Ah, it's i't I can't get a discount on guns anywhere. Ah yeah, but I get in free at play at parks and stuff and in Texas where other people are paying to get in anyways. So I get. 39:20.44 Max Shank That's pretty cool and. 39:46.30 mikebledsoe Hit with thank you for your service pretty frequently and and Ashley my fiancee she she knows how I feel about every you know about a lot of things she goes. What's it like what's it like to hear that because you know I always just say oh yeah, you're welcome. You know that's what my. 39:49.18 Max Shank If. 40:05.30 Max Shank Um, ah a threat. 40:24.30 mikebledsoe My my pleasure you know, whatever it is that comes to mind at the time you know whatever I'm just trying to make them feel good about them giving me a compliment or whatever. But and when I did join I did think I was going in to be of service to humanity that was. 40:29.28 Max Shank Ah, thank you. 40:42.14 Max Shank Right. 41:01.94 mikebledsoe Impression I was under but the yeah where I stand now is like yeah I don't feel proud I don't feel ashamed I kind of just I'm very neutral about it. It's I've dealt with the fact that I got duped and like. 41:19.78 Max Shank He no. 41:36.18 Max Shank I Guess you could call that neutral. Ah. 41:41.94 mikebledsoe Yeah I mean I got well I got duped and I've accepted it I'm at peace with it right? like we've all been duped. We've all been duped and you know what I'm I'm lucky because you know I did get some really great experiences out of that that made me a very resilient guy and. 41:52.52 Max Shank Ah, ah, okay, right. 42:08.80 Max Shank Yeah, and. 42:17.24 mikebledsoe You know there's There's a lot of benefits I got from it most mostly the discounts but the. 42:28.64 Max Shank I Just imagine if someone said take you for your service and he said yeah I was probably a mistake. Or or just like I wouldn't recommend I wouldn't recommend it. 42:46.66 mikebledsoe Ah, you know I'm I'm trying that out. Well, it's bad enough that people are going to hear this on the show. Ah, but yeah, it's like ah that's all we know. But yeah, it's um. 43:08.84 Max Shank Um, hey look it's not for everybody. It wasn't for you. That's all we know it wasn't for you. It wasn't for you. 43:24.40 mikebledsoe But what you're saying is accurate because the the way Well the well we can go back to the holidays. But when I look at when I look at um, the government and military service and all these things is when I started looking at the government is just there's a book called the Sovereign individual and in that book they talk about how. 43:28.98 Max Shank These holidays. 44:04.14 mikebledsoe Formation of government and how they were there to protect farmers from people who would come and take their shit and if they didn't hire them. They were gonna take their shit and if they did hire them. They're gonna take a percentage of their shit and so ah. Basically when you. 44:42.80 Max Shank Basically you got guys with the swords and you got guys with the hose right till in the field then you got a sword guy and you got a hoe guy I'm more of a hoe guy I think. 44:46.40 mikebledsoe Exactly and some and yeah, some so like in the beginning it was just like who who is ah who's got the most brute force and then over time they accumulated armor horses like a ah Knight in armor. Can take out like 20 people on foot. You know like the this is yeah this is this is it and so true that yeah, but but here's the thing is before the and but. 45:30.20 Max Shank This is grounded in reality too unless one of those guys on foot happens to have a really nice bow and arrow and then that guy's fucked speaking of projectiles. 46:00.98 mikebledsoe Before the invention of the rifle to become skilled to be able to afford the time and the money to be a great soldier. It was it was rare and so only a select few had been in the position to do so and so. 46:36.56 Max Shank Even ants do this. They divide up the labor into soldiers and the workers back to the ants again. 46:39.00 mikebledsoe You it. Yeah, yeah, and so the so the whole formation of the idea government has been basically the same it's it's identical to the Mob. You know you're. 47:13.84 Max Shank It's identical to any group. It's about specialization Ideally right. 47:17.42 mikebledsoe I Know if any group but like but any group that uses the threat of Force violence and coercion. So not every organization does that and so. 47:40.12 Max Shank Um, is there any group where everybody does the same thing I think it's always about specialization. 47:48.78 mikebledsoe It is about specialization but what I'm saying is what makes these organizations special is that they ah they rule by violence and a threat of violence coercion. These things that that's how they get people to comply. 48:25.26 Max Shank Um, without nonviolently with like words instead of Swords basically. 48:27.50 mikebledsoe With their rules. Well they use words. But if you disobey those words you will then meet you know. 48:46.80 Max Shank Well, that's leverage right? That's that's really, um, how control works because if you if you ah if you don't follow the words and they just have to sword everybody to death. It's.. It's like not very good for anybody like now all the farmers are now all the farmers are.. It's kind of like a strike.. Basically I mean all these all these parallels within the symbolism of language I I have this idea that words have evolved basically the same as anything else. 49:25.76 mikebledsoe It's not good for anybody. Yeah, so they got to use the there's ah. 50:01.92 Max Shank In Nature longer sharper Claws Stronger Armor Camouflage Decoy Venom you know people fucking hurt each other with words all the time and only sometimes do they hurt. 50:25.80 mikebledsoe And. 50:36.14 Max Shank Ah, people with actual like sticks or weapons or something like that and sometimes they turn them on themselves right? We we fucking think Shitty things about ourselves we put ourselves through these I mean ah I guess I'm a fitness guy so we put ourselves through these like ball bursting workouts. 50:37.36 mikebledsoe Yeah, they've gotten so good at can most of the time. 51:13.82 Max Shank That are only harming us because we're just like so desperate. Um for some pie in the sky vision that we have I mean it's crazy how much language causes harm and self-harm. But anyway my point is like it's too inefficient. To go fucking hit everybody with the sword. It's way more efficient to just threaten the sword. 51:54.80 mikebledsoe Yeah, the the the evolution has been that we use these words and so it was the words were simple and the sword was strong and then over time while the Swords gotten stronger. But the the words have become. People have gotten very clever lawyers are some of the most clever people on the planet ah politicians are basically they're just Lawyers. So These people are creating these words. Yeah, they create these words and you know, um, there are certain people. 52:40.40 Max Shank Oh yeah. 52:52.18 Max Shank Um, the word Warriors the word warriors. 53:10.96 mikebledsoe Who are there's a very small population of people who are pretty much I think you and I fall in this category kind of like yeah you know those are just words and you want me to do this but I'm not going to and then you have the majority of the population that are like you're going to defy those words and. 53:44.18 Max Shank Right. 53:46.84 mikebledsoe And they completely freak out and they don't know what to do? They think that you're a bad person because you're ignoring these words. Um that somebody else put together and in order to try to control you so. 54:07.22 Max Shank Well because otherwise like you are ruining their paradigm. You're destroying their sense of reality because they're like well I can't do that and I'm like actually there there are just consequences to everything you do you know that. 54:18.14 mikebledsoe Totally destroying it. 54:35.42 mikebledsoe Yeah, you can do anything you want. You can do a lot of things. 54:42.84 Max Shank That's it you could do whatever there are consequences like if you tie a noose around your neck whack off in the closet. There's a much higher chance that you will die from hanging. But there's also a decent chance. You'll have an orgasm that's like None or so of the usual 1 55:20.40 mikebledsoe There's otherwise to do that You hit me up on my private blog on on how to do that without choking yourself. But anyways. 55:22.40 Max Shank So. 55:32.68 Max Shank Fellas you hear that Mike is offering orgasm boosters free orgasm boosters. What kind of percentage can you offer increase 50% increase a 3 hold on. 55:40.64 mikebledsoe Free orgasm boosters at least 50% now now I would say out. No no like 300 I mean yeah and yeah, with with just common common things you can pick up at the store. 56:07.68 Max Shank Ah, 300% increase 56:19.18 Max Shank Like cocaine. Ah. 56:19.76 mikebledsoe Nothing you don't have to go see a drug dealer. But if you no, no, no like like over the counter things. But then um, yeah, over the counter and then um, you know if you want to get into the other I can guarantee like a None x but you know that's going to require some hard to get ahold of. 56:30.20 Max Shank Over the counter. 56:55.60 Max Shank Honestly I think ah I think I think this would be something that you you could probably do a one pager on this for our premium Inner Circle club. 56:57.88 mikebledsoe Substances. 57:20.56 mikebledsoe I Feel like this whole episode's going to be an inner Circle Club show. Ah you know this is the commercial This is this is actually it. This is this one. We're giving away for free. This is the one you get for free from now on the pre ship. This. 57:23.38 Max Shank Like I would be interested in like a little that's all it is This is just for the this is this is it. We're gonna air this and and to be fair, we might be Fucked. We might be fucked because this might get us. Ah. Extradited or what's the excommunicated because of all the stuff we've said. 58:01.30 mikebledsoe Well this is why I want everyone to go and get a ah podcasting 2.0 app on your phone instead of Spotify because Spotify itunes. They could just take us off anytime they want because some sjw employee gets pissed off. 58:24.12 Max Shank Oh my God can you imagine? Holy God I Think that's I think the pendulum is swinging back I think people are craving uncensored Oh I Love it. 58:36.96 mikebledsoe So ah. I think so I think so but not but not the employees of Apple and Spotify. They're gonna be the last ones you know and Twitter but I it will shake out it but we need. But. 59:00.98 Max Shank Yeah, we'll we'll see how it all shakes out I mean ah Seasons change Seasons change. 59:19.58 mikebledsoe Decentralization is what will force it and so using a podcasting 2.0 app is part of the decentralization movement. So I like ah podverse myself. So if you just go and download podverses. Our shit will never be taken off of that. But. 59:54.40 Max Shank Bu ya. 59:59.20 mikebledsoe But Spotify has taken down None I think over 70000 podcast episodes in the last year yeah based on the content. No now they remove certain content. They even pull down some of Rogan's content 01:00:12.90 Max Shank Whoa Really I thought they were cool. Not cool. Bummer I Do know that by the way if there was ever something that. Ah. 01:00:35.00 mikebledsoe But not all of it. 01:00:45.96 Max Shank Was valuable but let's be able to say words other this is a core value. This is a core value here. Okay folks this is this. It's rooted in reality look. It's fine talkytackytacky ever Blah Blah Blah blah. But as soon as someone comes in with the stick. 01:00:53.40 mikebledsoe Come on. Well this goes back to what you were just saying. 01:01:24.88 Max Shank You got to like fucking face that reality and so if we can't resolve our differences with words. There's only None choice left and that's physical violence I think everybody should be versed in physical and verbal violence. Not necessarily so they can be violent toward other people. But so they can recognize it number None and defend it number None 01:02:07.86 mikebledsoe Well I like that I like to Define violence as the person who initiates force so I would I would say ah be well versed in debate because ah or or diplomacy right? So like to me. 01:02:36.76 Max Shank Right. 01:02:43.20 mikebledsoe War is just an extension of Diplomacy You know we were like oh diplomacy failed I'm like no this is just we're still being diplomatic. It's just a very violent diplomacy and so the same thing with the words is you know we start off with disagreement. We're trying to work it out things escalate We can't. 01:03:06.64 Max Shank Interesting. 01:03:17.88 Max Shank Great. 01:03:20.60 mikebledsoe Find agreement in the words because people aren't You're right, People are not trained in the ability to listen to understand and then communicate the wall just goes up and you've talked about rhetorical fallacies before the wall goes up and then now it just becomes a mudsling contest. 01:03:56.66 Max Shank Um, yeah. 01:03:58.60 mikebledsoe That that will result if that doesn't get resolved in some way it will result in physical force. This is why the None amendment's important because if only yeah and and because if only 1 group of people has access to violence. 01:04:13.74 Max Shank The None and the second those are almost all that's important. But. 01:04:35.10 Max Shank Um, oof because then you go. 01:04:37.56 mikebledsoe Then then we're in big trouble which takes me back to the point I was making hang on the point I was making which is like the when I look at when I look at ah government. It's hard to tell the difference between government and the mom because they're basically saying give us. A certain amount of your profits give us a certain amount of your of your hard work and we'll make sure that your shop doesn't get burnt down. You know we'll make sure your kid doesn't get beat up in the alley and they're basically saying the mob is basically saying. Overtly, they're saying we'll protect you from other people. Yeah, covertly, they're saying pretty much if you don't pay us None of our thugs are going to come get you which is which is the same thing that happens with the Us government is they say. 01:05:50.12 Max Shank It's called a protection ring. It's called a protection ring. It's been around for a long time. 01:06:09.36 Max Shank Ah, right? yeah. 01:06:23.82 mikebledsoe We're going to protect you from all these outside guys and we got police officers stationed in there. We're gonna protect you as long as you. But if you if you don't give us a None of your life then we're actually gonna come fuck you up and so that's the price of the club. Yeah tough shit. There's like no way out. 01:06:26.48 Max Shank Move. 01:06:41.98 Max Shank Right? That's the price of the club and if you don't like it well tough shit This is the only club in town. It's the only club in town. It's like ah you know there is a thing about power companies. You know when you have a single. 01:07:03.56 mikebledsoe And so well hang on. So so so so when I started when I recognized this this extremely similar ah view of government and the mom. 01:07:16.98 Max Shank Go go ahead? yeah. 01:07:38.98 mikebledsoe And I just started looking at all these governments around the world as just mobs that are controlling different geographical locations by by which um are mainly dissected based on Language. So if the language changes that's where the border begins. When there's a different language because you can't control people anymore because they can't understand you and so ah government control happens and within the borders of language and then you basically just have you just have. 01:08:35.50 Max Shank K case that's http://dciendocappassosenorexplicka me and espanio poque non anddo. 01:08:50.98 mikebledsoe Exactly. So. So so when you start looking at the world as or the government as just mobsters that are ruling really large pieces of geography and they're all. You know, jocking for position. Everything makes a lot more sense like the Russia Ukraine thing makes way more sense if you just think about it as a couple of mobsters that are that are jocking for position and the United States has done a good job of like. United States has done an incredible job of being very strategic in the way that it's done things. It hasn't it hasn't necessarily ah won with brute force for instance with the Ukraine thing is if you think about mobsters are running Ukraine right now right. Because anyone who has a government is being There's a mob and so those mobsters. Yeah, yeah, yeah, well the good the good mobsters of Ukraine are um, just you know the the us government is lending them. What None 01:10:50.92 Max Shank No, but those are the good mobs. We like them. They're the good mobs. 01:11:18.20 mikebledsoe Billion dollars a month or something like that that they're never going to be able to pay back all right? So if only someone would come tell me what to think? So so then ah. 01:11:22.22 Max Shank Oh my God I Wish someone would tell me who the good guys are and who the bad guys are if only someone would come and let me know what to believe about this. 01:11:56.32 mikebledsoe So then you got so the way I see it is the us government has done an incredible job at buying the people of Ukraine as slaves and so because they're under the control of the Ukraine mob the ukraine mob how are they going to pay back that money they can't pay back that money. So basically they're going to be in debt to the us and the Ukraine is the breadbasket of europe so they produce the the lion's share of the wheat and other things necessary for making a lot of food products and in Europe and so now. The way I see it is the us government. Everyone is everyone is going. You know? Yes for Ukraine I'm like I'm like the us government just enslaved the people of Ukraine and you cheered them along the whole way and is like yeah we are like you know and that is um, that's 0 comment on what. Putin's doing you know whatever you call him more criminal. Whatever the guy's not a good guy. The guy's not a good guy but but people miss that. 01:13:56.16 Max Shank It's it's about relationships. It's about relations. It's about relationships. It's about relationships and it's about trying to understand what the connection is between those relationships and in order to really get it. You got to reduce the number of parties down, you got to put the words like none and None out of your mind and just say what is the relationship between these different entities or individuals and what you're saying about the us specifically is. They recognize the power of both words and swords because words, okay, nothing scales better than words because it requires no material transfer. It requires only a transfer of pressure waves basically on some level and and. Transfer of ah it's just it scales way easier than actual bullets and actual swords and and if you have both then then you're like King of the castle. Basically so we have crazy weapons and we also have. 01:15:38.90 mikebledsoe Ah, especially with the internet and everything just repeats easily. 01:16:13.92 Max Shank Ah, lawyers and bankers and politicians that use words the same way that we're using Bullets and missiles and shit like that and we have we have ah stuff that's happening behind closed doors I mean Okay, let's talk about language again just for a second because. 01:16:25.28 mikebledsoe Totally. 01:16:50.54 Max Shank Want to talk about the word conspiracy conspiracy happening all the time people are meeting in secret to discuss plans all the time we would have to be totally naive if we don't think that's going on basically everywhere like every every group is meeting in secret. 01:17:24.88 mikebledsoe The Cia is ah is a series of conspiracies. 01:17:29.90 Max Shank We meet in secret we meet? yeah and of course they can't tell everybody everything I mean how fucking schizophrenic do you have to be your level 1 clearance your level 10 clearance I'm a level 10 cia wizard. So I know like 90% of the secrets but only 10% of this I mean it's. 01:17:42.24 mikebledsoe So it's a conspiracy. Yeah. 01:18:09.70 Max Shank It's Insane. So ah, kind of tying it back to how we use language and use ideas bringing it back to reality Once again, just doing something with material objects that exist somewhat. Independently of Language. You know how you interact with a tree or the ground of course you have the word tree and ground in your mind but your movement and your creative expression through physical materials. Even if you don't think you have a knack for it. It's very grounding experience. 01:19:37.32 mikebledsoe Back to physical materials. Yeah, well they? um well what's interesting is my friend Jesse Elder he he's been studying the law extensively the last couple years and um. 01:19:42.80 Max Shank Um, that that's what I tried to bring us on back because. 01:20:17.64 mikebledsoe Basically looking at like the foundation of law you know, not you know what are all these little laws that are floating around that are getting passed all the time and changing. But you know yeah, but like what is the the sole basis and we go back in history. What is law. 01:20:33.00 Max Shank To contract. It's It's just a contract that's it. 01:20:52.36 mikebledsoe You know how does it operate so he did that and if you can figure out the fundamental principles of how these things work a lot of things get real simple so he did that and one one of the it's what. 01:21:11.92 Max Shank It's conditional phrases right? I mean I'm not trying to diminish but isn't it like it's conditional. Phrases. It's consequences like the code of Hamurabi was a system of laws but they are very simple if you steal. A woman then you get your eye plucked out and you have to marry her some shit like that. Basically and if you're talking about arbitration which is a little different than law. Basically you are just dealing with an arbitrur like a judge who is deciding. 01:21:45.68 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah. 01:22:20.32 Max Shank Who's right when they present like the clay tablets or something like can you imagine being. Ah, you know an arbiter back then but that's what they would do so that guy gets to decide but you have it's just enforcing contracts I think and every every relationship you have. 01:22:22.72 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, yeah. 01:22:43.74 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, that's what it comes down to. 01:22:59.30 Max Shank Because a contract is oh gosh. It's ah it's a projected relationship. How about that using the words that we've been thinking about so a contract is a a relationship projection or a relative projection between one or more. 01:23:17.86 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah. 01:23:31.28 mikebledsoe Yeah, you're gonna do these things I'm gonna do these things if we don't follow through then it breaks down. There's the consequences. 01:23:39.44 Max Shank Entities yeah, and it works with yourself too. It works with yourself too. You make a you make a to do list. Maybe you sign at the bottom so I'm going to do this by the end of today you made a contract with yourself. You break the contract but you're also the judge here and you go like what happened. You know should I should I go to jail should I be full of shame or something like that should I punish myself. Do I get 50 lashes? Yeah, um, but I think we do that. 01:24:15.46 mikebledsoe Should I punish myself emotional jail ah, ah so so jet so Jesse started digging digging into like the principles of law. And None of the results that I've seen in his life is. He's become extremely analog. Ah he is like he he sees the matrix I mean when you look at I mean the law is the matrix and so ah, everything that. 01:24:55.98 Max Shank Totally. Ah. 01:25:18.14 Max Shank It's a matrix. 01:25:20.20 mikebledsoe Yeah, it's a matrix I would I would say it's probably like based one of the base layers of the matrix and then um like the media sits on top of that. But um, he he's gone extremely analog like he's living. He's got twenty acres he's living out on it. He doesn't deal with crypto he. Ah, you know tries that work primarily in gold and silver and like getting he's getting very analog. He's using technology like he's installing a solar farm. He's doing. He's doing some things to harness technology but he's become very analog and. 01:26:28.14 Max Shank Right. 01:26:37.76 mikebledsoe What is valuable and so and what he values is analog and so in a world where right now so much of the value is digital and which is which is somewhat of a physical manifestation of something conceptual and so. 01:26:49.52 Max Shank So true. 01:27:14.22 mikebledsoe Because we're talking about Energy. Ah Bitcoin is just energy and because it requires energy from the sun whether it come in the form of solar oil. Whatever it is ah it it comes in the form of energy that's being exchanged so there is a physical component to it. But. Which is actually way more tangible than say the Us dollar which has ah which is primarily ruled by what whatever somebody thinks or a group of people think instead of being ruled by actual physical world laws and. 01:28:15.72 Max Shank Um, that well money is its own like ah shared. It's actually a conspiracy so money is a human conspiracy just like language. 01:28:33.40 mikebledsoe It's yeah well fiat currency would be yeah, say more. 01:28:53.50 Max Shank That's that's it money is a conspiracy just like language I mean the fact that. 01:28:55.70 mikebledsoe Some people some people understand I mean you're right? because there are very. There's a there is a handful of select people who make decisions in secret about the money supply. 01:29:23.52 Max Shank Oh I mean just like it's not ah like a like okay so steak is not a human conspiracy like a dog still understands. What steak is it might know it by a different name like maybe steak for a dog is like. 01:29:49.14 mikebledsoe Right. 01:29:58.00 Max Shank Wolf Af or something like that I don't I don't know exactly what it's like for a dog but like money is and language are purely human conspiracies like we made all this stuff up because it's useful so they're useful lies. Essentially words are useful symbols so that we can. 01:30:09.82 mikebledsoe I'll go ask my buddies dog. 01:30:35.78 Max Shank Project these ideas ah into ah interchangeable parts Basically and that's what we're looking for with money is it's the ultimate interchangeable part because it's like ah an I O you that everybody agrees on it's a. Ah, accepted anywhere right? So it's money's like God It's if you believe in it it it is ah infinite Power. It's total potential and it's such a useful tool. There's no I can't. 01:31:31.92 mikebledsoe Yeah. 01:31:49.52 Max Shank It's so difficult for me to envision a society where we didn't have a way to exchange goods modularly. You know people talk about the fungibility or non-fungibility of token. Sometimes the fact that a dollar is a dollar is a dollar is a dollar is a dollar and I mean it did used to be backed by gold which was cool but let's not be too wistful over the glory days. But in any case. The fact that we have it and that we can change it and move it so quickly means that I can you know ah work under a bridge given hand jobs send it back to my scientist grandpa in Hungary and he can use that money. To build a nuclear fusion reactor or something like that right? That's that's incredible that you don't have to but based on my hungarian physicist ah grandfather I was thinking of him every time I gave a hand job under the bridge. 01:33:40.52 mikebledsoe That's based on a true story folks. 01:34:04.94 Max Shank I was just thinking this is going to be unlimited energy for everybody I'm not going to let you down pop pop anyway, ah, but but that's that's what I mean is like you you can turn hand jobs into cold fusion potentially and that is why money is cool. Ah, so we wouldn't have these computers and microphones the ubiquity of the cell phone like all this stuff was done because we were able to transfer this um potential of human action and it just it kind of reminds me of this funky idea I had. When I was none learning about like the coins and the cryptos and things like that and I thought it'd be cool to have something called like a handycoin that was ah just based off of the value that a person placed on like 1 hour of labor. 01:35:50.38 mikebledsoe I Thought you were gonna say hand jobs but handicoin and a yeah. 01:35:59.34 Max Shank No, not not not hand that would be even better. None coin equals one hj full stop. That's actually a better idea now that I think about anyway, but the whole idea was like you know you can put a posting on Craigslist or you can. Ah, go out to home depot and you can find like ah, a laborer who will do sometimes skilled sometimes unskilled. No no, no, no, but but but that's what that would be for is just for unskilled labor. Every hour is equal and so. 01:36:43.94 mikebledsoe Um, are you are you saying that every hour is equal in value. No no okay. 01:37:05.52 mikebledsoe Ah, so you create a caste system. 01:37:12.36 Max Shank The value of that coin the value of that coin would be related to what someone is willing to do for an hour like 1 hour of unskilled labor. Ah, but at least it's tied to like. 01:37:37.54 mikebledsoe Isn't that how just capitalism works. 01:37:50.30 Max Shank The floor of ah one of of labor per hour right? It's like it's like it sets the floor which it is a value. Yeah, but it's so it's different. It's only correlated to ah. 01:37:51.24 mikebledsoe So there's a minimum. 01:38:02.88 mikebledsoe Sounds like a minimum wage. 01:38:23.40 Max Shank Like someone actually doing real work I don't know like I said it's not a night. It's not an idea that I've taken over the finish line. Ah, but it's ah this idea that it needs to be tied to something and right now it's tied to our belief and that works. 01:38:32.00 mikebledsoe I'm not sure I'm following. 01:39:02.40 mikebledsoe Yeah I I think the problem that people have with money right now is that? Ah, there are a handful of people who are controlling how it flows so ah, not necessarily. 01:39:03.26 Max Shank Weirdly enough it. It's not great, but it's okay like if. 01:39:29.48 Max Shank Has that always been the case. 01:39:39.64 mikebledsoe Not not to this degree I would say that. Um, so for instance when when the dollar is tied to gold money. Well I'm I'm talking about primarily money so like um so on 1 hand you have. 01:39:52.24 Max Shank Are we talking about money or wealth or both and. 01:40:16.00 Max Shank Um, like not. 01:40:17.52 mikebledsoe And organization that decides. Ah how much the interest rates are going to be like what's what's the debt going to be worth and then you and then they also control the amount of money that's in the system. So those are like really big picture things. So so of when you're. 01:40:49.44 Max Shank Oh yeah, big time. 01:40:56.00 mikebledsoe When you're working with gold which you know all governments have inflated there even when it was gold. They did things like shave off the edges and you know there's ah until people figured it out and they lost faith in it. Yeah, they have so you can't fake it and so then um, so. 01:41:14.14 Max Shank That's why those coins have ridges right? That's why they put the ridges on the coins. Ah. 01:41:31.34 mikebledsoe The money supply and then the cost of debt is 2 major things that are that are employed big picture and then you have taxes so that I think the tax code is 176000 pages something like that. Ah, it might be a little bit maybe 76 maybe oh there. There's a. 01:41:56.40 Max Shank I think maybe only 76 but but but but None like you that should be simple. 01:42:09.52 mikebledsoe There's a ton of there's all, there's but there's basically all these rule the whole point in the tax code is to incentivize people under a certain type of behavior and it's it's. 01:42:32.34 Max Shank And hide and hide what's actually happening and create as much of a smokescreen as possible for what's actually going on. 01:42:43.48 mikebledsoe Yeah, there's they they want to they want to confuse like the majority of people need to be confused about what's going on because if the majority of people knew exactly what was going on there'd be riots in the streets. But the. 01:43:07.80 Max Shank We would sell a lot more guillotines if that were the case Guillotine sales. That's that's what I'm actually getting into right now you know pendulums and government swing I think we're like perfect time to invest in guillot in Guillotines I think ah. 01:43:28.34 mikebledsoe Well, how let's look at the tax code I got to do this search on the tax code. 01:43:44.46 Max Shank You know you can sell your ultimate Orgasm formula and then I'm going to sell guillotines for the coming revolutions. 01:43:53.44 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, we got figure I got to figure out how this tax code thing. Um all right. There's the myth of the 70000 page federal tax code. 01:44:10.78 Max Shank It's really long. 01:44:19.60 Max Shank It has to do with um like references to it because there are amendments to the tax code and there are cases that have modified how it's interpreted. 01:44:38.52 mikebledsoe So the tax code has nearly tripled is it ah the tax code has nearly tripled and linked over the last thirty years um 70000 is not true. The tax code was only 20 so so it's it's. It's like triple of the None pages. So I think it's anyways thirty years ago is 2600? Oh no, none the tax code was only about 20. It's so funny and this blog says it's only None pages long. Um, yeah, but the point so. 01:45:47.60 Max Shank Ah, it shouldn't even be 2600 words long fuckers. Let alone pages. 01:45:50.40 mikebledsoe So um, yeah, so the so the so you've got a small group of people controlling the supply of the money you got a small group of people controlling the ah cost of the debt and then you have a small I think between. Ah, the senate the congress and all the the the the top government I think is around None and something like None something people so None something people are controlling 350000000 people. 01:46:55.92 Max Shank It's leverage. 01:47:07.30 mikebledsoe With a 2600 page tax code that incentivizes certain types of purchases disincentivizes other types of purchases. Um it ah it does it does really incentivize investing in real estate which is interesting because you can. 01:47:21.92 Max Shank Right. 01:47:35.14 Max Shank Well let's also look at this because it's not ah like those politicians are only like fabricating these ideas in their own mind. They're having people come in and say like hey we're this ah business that does one ah 0 every month. 01:48:07.94 mikebledsoe These politicians don't write these laws. These laws are being brought to them. 01:48:14.22 Max Shank And and and right and like hey Joe blow politician um, you know I was thinking. Ah you know you could you could really help us out. Ah, but you know I don't want you to work too hard. So I I went I went ahead and prepared the law for you. 01:48:49.32 mikebledsoe Yeah, which the law the which the law is like 10000 pages long. There's no way who the fuck reads those things. No one reads that shit. 01:48:52.82 Max Shank I went ahead and had my lawyers prepare this law for you and I I left this spot at the it's about 10000 pages I sent a copy to all your colleagues already I put a place here for you to sign your name at the bottom and I think it's a really really good idea for you to do this. 01:49:27.48 mikebledsoe And and we'll we'll pay your son like $10000000 a year for advisory. 01:49:32.46 Max Shank And because like power. Oh dude that guy is that guy is fucking set but you know Hidden hidden in that fucking quagmire of verbal violence in that fucking law that's been written is. How um competition and free market is prevented right? It's not like going to be awesome for everybody. Ah, it's gone too far but it's just because we have set up the rules of the game. 01:50:24.98 mikebledsoe Yep. 01:50:46.98 Max Shank To allow for too much of ah human error. Basically. 01:50:49.88 mikebledsoe Yeah, and so this is where um so we have to believe in the money I'm talking about belief which means you got to trust it right? And so we're at a in my lifetime we're at a record breaking low of trust in. 01:51:10.16 Max Shank Yeah. 01:51:28.32 mikebledsoe Government or the record breaking low and trust in media I think that in since the emergence of crypto there has been a trickling of people in droves that don't trust the money that that trust ah 1 of the things that web 3 01:51:59.64 Max Shank A. 01:52:07.38 mikebledsoe Really ah has brought about is it requires less trust because you can't fuck with it like it doesn't matter how much somebody wants to change something. It's not humanly possible to change some of these rules and how these crypto. 01:52:46.54 Max Shank Question for you is web 3 basically trying to use blockchain technology to store web data and provide server. Ah for websites. 01:52:47.00 mikebledsoe Cryptos work. Yeah. 01:53:13.50 mikebledsoe Yeah, there's that's that's one that's so it's a ledger well blockchain is just a really advanced ledger system that's automatically updated in decentralized web 3 in blockchain everyone in the same. 01:53:23.66 Max Shank It's like decentralized web servers. 01:53:35.48 Max Shank No, but web 3 I'm asking. Okay, I'm okay. 01:53:51.80 mikebledsoe Yeah, the the way I understand it. It's it's just web 3 is kind of you say blockchain and people get a little confused and go web 3 and they go oh like you know web one was we can send information from computer to computer web two was we have html and everything's visually we have visual graphics and. And we can. There's clickable things and and then social media and then Web 3 is blockchain mother of all demos. 01:54:39.84 Max Shank You should see the mother look up the mother of all demos sometime it shows what it's fucking great I think it was in the 60 s we were able to do like ah word documents and video chat and all kinds of shit in like the 60 s. 01:55:14.74 mikebledsoe Um, yeah, yeah, yeah. 01:55:19.48 Max Shank Called the mother of all demos um wild what was capable way back then and then that wasn't ubiquitous for people that wasn't common for people until forty years later something like that not nuts. 01:55:41.10 mikebledsoe Right? Yeah, there's that's it's fascinating. Um. 01:55:54.74 Max Shank So that's the leverage though is how fast we can communicate a message a lot of ah censorship speaking of like the None amendment kind of. 01:56:06.90 mikebledsoe Well, there's also you not just how fast can you communicate a message but can it actually get through the noise. How loud how loud is your message and how well received is it because there's there's a there's a level of skill that's involved in being heard. 01:56:21.14 Max Shank Yeah, well and. Absolutely no question I mean I think that's why stand-up comedy is one of those places where the rubber meets the road on free speech a little bit because if you're allowed to say anything as long as it's a joke. Then you can still at least get that message into people's minds without having ah it be controlled and that's ultimately what drives a population if if suddenly it was the law like so that's that's what's kind of interesting. You know I don't think it's good to have. Like a lot of power in the hands of a few people. It's back to leverage same thing as a hammer right? It's physical leverage in different ways. Um, but if they suddenly made it like the law to kill None puppy every week like let's just say that became the law people would not do that. 01:58:27.84 mikebledsoe Well, it's got to be Ah, it's got to be done in small bits I mean all right? So this may actually happen. Yeah this this may actually happen right? So they So there's the media's put out the yeah, the media has put out some notices that. 01:58:29.80 Max Shank Because the collective consciousness of whether that's okay or not. 01:58:44.64 Max Shank You're like talking Boiling Boiling Frog right? Yeah yeah, the puppy killing oh shit, you know what you're right? The puppy flew. 01:59:07.84 mikebledsoe You know some people are getting getting. Ah yeah, they're getting Well they're getting coronavirus they're It's like oh statistically we find that people who are around dogs more get coronavirus. Whatever. 01:59:17.52 Max Shank Copy flu. 01:59:27.40 Max Shank Oh God Oh don't don't even put this out. It's so easily could happen. You could get people to kill puppies as long as you said puppies increased the no fucking way. Wow. 01:59:35.98 mikebledsoe So so here's the thing there are cities in China where they've gone in and killed all the dogs. Yeah, and so it's already happened and so um, which. 02:00:04.80 Max Shank Heavy heavy. 02:00:12.90 mikebledsoe When we think about that happening in China we go. Yeah that's totally believable because they're under some weird you know they're they're under some like heavy mind control. But I think that people I think americans give themselves way too much credit on how ah how little. They they think they they're being exposed and are subject to way less propaganda I would say it's less propagandized in the United States like we're not as susceptible because there's so much competing information where there's not as much competition for information there. But the propaganda is real. 02:01:04.92 Max Shank Overt. It's just yeah, ah. 02:01:26.32 mikebledsoe And so all you gotta do? It's been proven in the last two years all you gotta do is make people think that they're gonna die if they don't do this thing and they'll fucking. Do it. They'll strap 3 masks on they'll put an experimental vaccine in their body and they'll they'll ah make statements like. 02:01:56.76 Max Shank Oh god we just got flagged. That's us we're done. He's in Texas go get him I was never here. Ah. 02:02:01.54 mikebledsoe We should throw people. We're done off Spotify. Ah I'm in Texas I'm in Texas good luck. So yeah, um. 02:02:34.34 Max Shank Oh my gosh. So it's all it really is it all comes down to force right? It all comes down to how much of an impact you can make with words or with stuff it all comes and it's leverage. 02:02:52.90 mikebledsoe Yeah, because with the words you can still like if if ah, a small group of people can convince the large group of people that I'm a bad guy. They don't even have to get their hands dirty and so they use mind control to create violence. 02:03:21.18 Max Shank Totally, you're separated from it. 02:03:32.34 mikebledsoe And that's another thing we've witnessed big time in the last two years is they don't have to fucking create violence. They'll all they got to do is leverage some media to get people really hot and bothered then put. 02:03:50.38 Max Shank Nobody wants to get their hands dirty. 02:04:08.20 mikebledsoe Certain Spokes holes out there to to tell people how they should think what they should think and next thing you know things are burning. Yeah. 02:04:18.56 Max Shank Hurt people hurt people right? hurt people hurt people. Ah and the more removed you are from the impact the easier it is like imagine if ah. Kind of like in game of thrones. The one who passes the sentence or the one who passes the sentence should carry it out like if you're gonna sentence a guide to death. Yeah, that was a stark thing. Yeah, well, it's cause it's like really warm weather and there's. 02:05:02.80 mikebledsoe Yeah I mean that that was ah and ah that was a stark thing as the the northerners believed in that but you know you go to the South a bunch of soft pussies. 02:05:32.40 Max Shank Ah titties and asses everywhere on the beach like I I don't blame them I get it like I I wouldn't be too like I wouldn't be too Stern with duty if the beach was like full of naked chicks and coconuts like what are we fighting for. 02:05:34.12 mikebledsoe Teddy's everywhere I I. 02:06:07.20 Max Shank There's food and titties everywhere. Ah but I think that idea of if you're going to be the one who passes the sentence you should carry it out the corollary or the inverse of that is if you can pass judgment. 02:06:06.20 mikebledsoe Ah, ah. 02:06:44.66 Max Shank And be totally removed from the action if you can tell a guy to tell another guy to tell another guy to tell another guy to take a drone to this other guy so that guy can drone this fucking stranger

MedicalMissions.com Podcast
Evidenced Based Practices for Healthcare Missions to Muslims

MedicalMissions.com Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022


The Fruitful Practice research team believes that the mission community should be “good stewards” of the insight and knowledge we have collectively gained about Muslim ministry during the past twenty or thirty years. That is why we have studied best practices of Ministry in the Muslim world for over 15 years. Our goal has been to intentionally learn from successful missionaries, then pass that knowledge along to others who are engaging Muslims with the gospel.