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  • Dec 30, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about science daily

Latest podcast episodes about science daily

Tech and Science Daily | Evening Standard
On the road with Malawi's Covid vaccination vans

Tech and Science Daily | Evening Standard

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 9:38


Ros Russell, the Editor of the Evening Standard's Vaccine for the World project, takes over the Tech and Science Daily this week, to bring you the people behind the scenes tackling Covid-19.With a fourth Covid wave around the corner, Malawi has stepped up its mobile vaccination campaigns. Today we're joined by Charles Pensulo, a journalist based in the city of Blantyre in Malawi. In an effort to increase the uptake of vaccines, Malawian health workers are taking jabs out to communities. Charles has followed one of the minibuses carrying doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine. He updates us on Malawi's vaccine rollout and why the country is struggling in the face of the Omicron variant. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Tech and Science Daily | Evening Standard
Why vaccine companies need to ‘share science' with Africa

Tech and Science Daily | Evening Standard

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 9:23


Ros Russell, the Editor of the Evening Standard's Vaccine for the World project, takes over the Tech and Science Daily this week, to bring you the people behind the scenes tackling Covid-19.Today we're joined by Professor Samba Sow, Director of CVD-Mali, a medical doctor and epidemiologist. In 2020, he was appointed WHO Special Envoy for Covid-19 in West Africa.As richer countries move on to delivering booster vaccinations against Covid, millions of people in the developing world are still waiting for their first jab. Professor Sow tells us about his role during the pandemic, his warnings about the virus threat before this one arrived, vaccine hesitancy in Africa and why it's so important that drug companies help poorer nations by sharing science. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Tech and Science Daily | Evening Standard
How the AstraZeneca vaccine was made

Tech and Science Daily | Evening Standard

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 8:58


Ros Russell, the Editor of the Evening Standard's Vaccine for the World project, takes over the Tech and Science Daily this week, to bring you the people behind the scenes tackling Covid-19.Today we're joined by Professor Teresa Lambe OBE, co creator of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine. The team at the University of Oxford lept into action to develop a vaccine in January 2020, before the virus reached the UK in March. Professor Lambe tells us about her journey through creating the vaccine ‘on a Friday night', the struggles her team faced and how she felt once she knew that they had successfully created the UK's first coronavirus vaccine. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

This is Today
I Get A Kick Out Of You

This is Today

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 10:00


This is Today features the stories that make this day unique. It's Thursday, December 9, 2021, and here is what we talk about today:National Pastry DayChristmas Card DayWeary Willie DayFrank Sinatra, Jr.Joycelyn EldersShow LinksCaffeine intake associated with reduced levels of erectile dysfunction -- ScienceDailyHelp to support this podcast:Become a Patron!Subscribe to Learning More Get bonus content on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Propaganda Report
Stacey Abrams Launches Governor Campaign with Creepy Video, 5 Factors That Make NFT's Valuable, & Binkley's Experience In The Metaverse (DNB)

The Propaganda Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 35:54


  Listen, Subscribe, Share the Show, Donate. Help us keep this train rollin! Notes & Links from Today's Show https://federalnewsnetwork.com/workforce/2021/11/agencies-should-delay-toughest-punishments-for-unvaccinated-federal-employees-biden-administration-says/ https://www.whitehouse.gov/about-the-white-house/our-government/the-executive-branch/ https://www.cnn.com/2021/12/01/entertainment/alec-baldwin-interview/index.html https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2021/12/02/president-joe-biden-covid-plan-omicron-variant/8830981002/ https://www.cnn.com/2021/12/02/europe/germany-lockdown-covid-restrictions-intl/index.html https://www.wsj.com/articles/some-professional-degrees-leave-students-with-high-debt-but-without-high-salaries-11638354602 https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2021/12/02/president-joe-biden-covid-plan-omicron-variant/8830981002/ https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2019/08/29/facts-about-american-workers/ https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/dec/02/germany-could-make-covid-vaccination-mandatory-says-merkel https://fortune.com/2021/12/01/europe-unvaccinated-fines-lockdowns-covid-mandates-america-next/ Nonverbal social interactions – even with unfriendly avatars – boost cooperation -- ScienceDaily   Scientists can control brain circuits, behavior, and emotion using light -- ScienceDaily   Woman Allegedly Breastfeeds Cat On Delta Flight As Horrified Passengers Look On (msn.com)   CNN's Brian Stelter says it's 'possible' Chris Cuomo could be back in January, | Daily Mail Online   Alec Baldwin: 'I didn't pull the trigger' of gun on 'Rust' set - CNN   BREAKING: Stacey Abrams is running for Georgia governor in 2022 (ajc.com)   Bay Area-based 'Rent-a-Hitman' is leading to arrests and saving lives; meet the man behind the website - ABC7 Los Angeles The Propaganda Report on Rokfin CCDH Spreads Hate (with Help from Biden) | Rokfin The Propaganda Report on Patreon The Propaganda Report Store Support Our Sponsors! Donate... If you find value in the content we produce and want to help us keep this train rollin, drop us a donation via Paypal or become a Patreon. (links below) Every little bit helps. Thank you! And thank you to everyone who has and continues to support the show. It's your support that enables us to continue producing shows. Paypal Patreon Subscribe & Leave A 5-Star Review... Subscribe on iTunes Subscribe on Google Play Music Listen on Google Podcasts Listen on Tunein Listen on Stitcher Follow on Spotify Like and Follow us on Facebook Follow Monica on Twitter Follow Binkley on Twitter Subscribe to Binkley's Youtube Channel https://www.paypal.me/BradBinkley https://www.patreon.com/propagandareport https://twitter.com/freedomactradio https://twitter.com/MonicaPerezShow https://www.youtube.com/bradbinkley https://www.youtube.com/monicaperez  

[ETHNICALLY] SPEAKING
S2E4: Does the way you lose your virginity affect your future sex life?

[ETHNICALLY] SPEAKING

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 31:51


The ladies debate whether how you lose your virginity affects your attitude towards sex and your future sexual encounters. Society makes us believe the first time we have sex is a monumental moment adding to the pressure, nerves, and fear that already surround the experience, but is the concept of virginity outdated? What changes physically, emotionally, and mentally after you have sex for the first time? Do religions and cultures unfairly link women's identities or value to their sexual activity? Does it matter how old you are when you become sexually active and do your views on intimacy, casual sex, and celibacy change with age? In this episode, Monah, Nushy Rose, and Sophie Hannah delve deep into what shapes individual perspectives on sex, the reason men are congratulated for losing their virginity while women are shamed, and why the female orgasm and women's pleasure is rarely prioritised in the bedroom.--------------------------------------- FOLLOW THE CONVERSATION #EthnicallySpeakingInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/unitedmelanincoYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/UnitedMelaninGroupTikTok: https://vm.tiktok.com/ZM8H5Jx9b/Twitter: https://instagram.com/unitedmelanincoFacebook: https://facebook.com/unitedmelanincoLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/unitedmelaninco/Get in touch with us: ethnicallyspeaking@unitedmelaningroup.com---------------------------------------- LINKS MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODEhttps://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2013/01/study-how-we-lose-our-virginity-shapes-our-entire-sexual-life/272596/(Article – Study: How we lose our virginity shapes our entire sexual life – Lindsay Abrams for The Atlantic)https://www.her.ie/life/these-are-the-side-effects-of-losing-your-virginity-later-in-life-309078(Article – The age at which you lose your virginity can have a huge impact on your sexual enjoyment – Cassie Delaney for Her)https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130128104732.htm(Article – 'First time' may predict lifelong sexual satisfaction – University of Tennessee at Knoxville via Science Daily)https://www.theguardian.com/science/2016/apr/18/genes-influence-the-age-at-which-you-lose-your-virginity-first-sex-dna(Article – Genes influence the age at which you lose your virginity, study shows – Ian Sample for The Guardian)https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2018/10/sexual-partners-and-marital-happiness/573493/(Article – Fewer sex partners means a happier marriage – Olga Khazan for The Atlantic)https://www.refinery29.com/en-gb/2019/01/221739/losing-your-virginity-stories(Article – Women Are Losing Their Virginity Before They're Ready. We Recall Our First Times – Natalie Gil for Refinery 29)https://helloclue.com/articles/culture/let's-lose-virginity-once-and-for-all(Article – Let's lose “virginity”, once and for all – Jennifer Neal for Hello Clue)https://www.psychologicalscience.org/news/full-frontal-psychology/virginity-and-promiscuity-evidence-for-the-very-first-time.html(Article – Virginity and promiscuity: Evidence for the very first time – Association for Psychological Science)https://www.healthline.com/health/healthy-sex/what-happens-when-you-lose-your-virginity(Article – 27 Things You Should Know Before You “Lose” Your Virginity – Annamarya Scaccia with medical review by Janet Brito, Ph.D., LCSW, CST for Healthline)https://www.refinery29.com/en-gb/2020/10/10132156/losing-virginity-not-important-young-people(Article – Losing It: Does Virginity Even Matter Anymore? – Lydia Wang for Refinery 29)https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-46794269(Article – What is the right age to lose your virginity? – Michelle Roberts for BBC News)https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2020/jan/28/the-power-of-celibacy-giving-up-sex-was-a-massive-relief(Article – The power of celibacy: “Giving up sex was a massive relief” – Lizzie Cernik for The Guardian)https://www.thecut.com/2018/02/7-women-on-choosing-to-be-celibate.html(Article – 7 People on Choosing to Be Celibate – Tessa Miller for The Cut)----------------------------------------Join Monah, Nushy Rose and Sophie Hannah, three smart, curious and opinionated highly-melanated women, as they discuss life, love and everything in between. No subject is off limits for these ladies, especially when it comes to issues affecting British communities of colour. So get ready to laugh, learn and liberate your mind, because if there's one thing you can guarantee, it's that the Ethnically Speaking ladies will be giving it to you straight. New episodes every Thursday.----------------------------------------Music by GC

Revelations Radio Network

Canary Cry News Talk #413 - 11.19.2021 HOW GREAT DAO ART: Rittenhouse Not Guilty, CRISPR Cancer, Clinton Crypto, and Aliens! - CCNT 413 WEBSITE/SHOW NOTES: CanaryCryNewsTalk.com LINKTREE: CanaryCry.Party SUPPORT: CanaryCryRadio.com/Support MEET UPS: CanaryCryMeetUps.com ravel Podcast (Basil's other podcast) Facelikethesun Resurrection (Gonz' new YouTube channel) Truther Dating experiment   INTRO/METAVERSE Gonz on Decentraland, DAO Constitution DAO almost bought a copy of the constitution (Forbes) How “internet friends” raised $20 million to bid for copy of constitution (CNBC) Note: Asia's influencers push Metaverse, “New World Order” (The Star)   FLIPPY Catholic priest robots (Daily Mail, Sir Sigrah)   RACE WAR Clip: Rittenhouse trial lawyer defends victim Rittenhouse verdict, found not guilty (CNBC, CBSN Clips) Note: Washington post analysis   CRISPR New study, CRISPR connection to cancer (Science Daily) At home virus test, thanks to CRISPR (Fast Company)   COVID19/I AM WACCINE US Plan to invest billions in jabs, billion jabs (Reuters) Pfizer SWAMPS FDA with vaccine documents (Daily Mail)   BREAK 1: Executive Producers, Paypal, Patrons   POLYTICKS Kamala Harris will be the first woman to hold Presidential Power (Reuters)   BEAST SYSTEM Hillary Clinton says Cryptocurrency will destabilize nations (Market Watch)   HIVE MIND/PSYOP Research shows hate for a collective inspires Life purpose   BREAK 2: Art, Reviews, Jingles, Meet Ups   CYBERPANDEMIC No, Klaus Shwab was not arrested (FactCheck AFP)   ALIENS/NEPHILIM UPDATE Woman on TikTok goes viral for claiming she was abducted by aliens (DailyStar UK)   ADDITIONAL STORIES: In a 5G future, physical presence not necessary (Forbes) Sportsball: Ines Kantor calls out Lebron James for China loyalty War against the digital age (The Federalist) AI to keep civilization alive (Oregon Live) Personal Flippy is becoming economical (AutoEvolution) Travis Scott sued total $750 million for Astroworld tragedy (Huffpo) How the history of Spirit Photography informs Deep Fakes (Smithsonian Mag) Smallpox and Monkeypox vaccine discussions (Precision)   PRODUCER'S ep413: NEW KNIGHT! Sir Make Way for the Lion!   Executive Producer Stephen B** Jeffrey W a.k.a. OB a.k.a. Over** Aaron J** Caroline F** Heatheruss**   Ass. Executive Producer Sir Igorious of the Squatting Slavs* Dame Lynn Lady of the Lakes*   2022 calendar producers Jackie U Jacqueline P Zephyr Books & Coffee Kevin D Mark D HeatheRuss   Producers Ashley B Scott K Finn M Dustin H Vlodomir Courtney M Christian N Amanda P Jackie U Morv Sir Sigrah the Beast Sir Casey the Shield Knight Gail M JC Pavel A Sir Sammons Knight of the Fishes Ciara Runksmash Child of God 57 Chevy Girl Shagan Gail M DrWhoDunDat   TIMESTAMPS: Jade Bouncerson JINGLES: Alex G   ART: Dame Allie of the Skillet Nation Sir Dove, Knight of Rustbeltia Ryan N - Advent of Logos Mark A   MICROFICTION Runksmash - Our bearded friend lays on a couch expressing his concerns about the ethics of Klaus' desires. The robot therapist responds with a story of how his dolphin wife doesn't question his ethics but does what she's told, Monty 23 sighs in his mech suit.

Canary Cry News Talk
KLAUS' CAGE

Canary Cry News Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 187:24


Canary Cry News Talk #409 - 11.10.2021  KLAUS' CAGE: Fishy Pfizer Meme, WEF to NWO, Deep Fake Future - CCNT 409 WEBSITE/SHOW NOTES: CanaryCryNewsTalk.com LINKTREE: CanaryCry.Party SUPPORT: CanaryCryRadio.com/Support MEET UPS: CanaryCryMeetUps.com ravel Podcast (Basil's other podcast) Facelikethesun Resurrection (Gonz' new YouTube channel) Truther Dating experiment   INTRO Fact Check: Astroworld was not a satanic ritual (Politifact) YouTube to hide “dislike” button (Verge)   FLIPPY Japanese steal Flippy    SHILLZILLA Ted Cruise finds waccine enemy, BIG BIRD! (CNN)   COVID19/I AM WACCINE Clip: Rochelle dodges question about CDC employee inoculations  Tweet: Pfizer hashtag “Science Will Win”…meme Mind jab trap, 5 rules that don't make sense (Telegraph) Moderna and NIH at odds, grapple for power (NY Times) [CBS report on Kizzie from 1/2021] Note: Syringe shortage in 2022? (Reuters) Brothel Vaccine Rewards   Party Pitch BREAK 1: Executive Producers, Paypal, Patrons   NEW WORLD ORDER/GREAT RESET Klaus Schwab congratulates UAE, Expo ceremony (Gulf News) Evergrande officially defaults (Express CO UK) NY Times saying Evergrande did not default (NY Times) (CNN analysis) Clip: How competition can create a “New World Order” (NY Times Climate Hub)   BREAK 2: Art, Reviews, Jingles, Meet Ups   DEEP FAKE How Deep Fake tech can help build material innovations (Science Daily)   METAVERSE/VR The Future Vision of the Internet (Wall Street Journal) The future of eldercare is VR (Texas Monthly) VR to help change perspective on climate change, immigration (EU)   ADDITIONAL STORIES: Cyber Polygon 2021 results and findings (Sociable) New Champions Award Winners (World Economic Forum) Kamala clip was edited, says AP fact check (AP) What will metaverse be like? (KARE 11) Advancements in brain implants (Wired) Secret tape from NRA after Columbine revealed (NPR) How companies are using AI to tell if you're lying (Consumer Report) Missing girl rescued after using hand signals on TikTok (NY Times) Why Federal Reserve chairman Powell must go (The Guardian) Landing AI, unlocking data centric AI (Forbes) Arbor Bio biotech company adds $215M for CRISPR tech (Med City News) CRISPR based medicine finally possible (The Scientist) Four legged whale discovered (Express UK) Lunar disks could change rules for astronomy (Dubai week) 25 year old Aussie wins $1 million for shot (Breezy)   PRODUCER'S ep409: Executive Producers Travis K**   Associate Executive Producers Derick H* Dustin H*   Producers Aric S, Jackie U, Amanda P, Morv, Sir Sigrah the Beast, HeatheRuss, Scott K, 57 Chevy Girl, JC, Sir Sammons Knight of the Fishes, Sir Casey the Shield Knight, Gail M, RunkSmash, Aubrey W, Andy K, Ciara, DrWhoDunDat, Child of God, Veronica D, Green Mountaineer, Raymond C   Patreon Tyler Caroline F   TIMESTAMPS: Jade Bouncerson   JINGLES: Alex G   ART: Dame Allie of the Skillet Nation Sir Dove, Knight of Rustbeltia Ryan N   MICROFICTION Runksmash - The AstroDoc steps out of the remains of the MagOctoPod, “I'm sorry, they're gone,” zi says sadly “burned up by climate change.” Resolute in what he must do BASIL fwips back to moments before they entered the hanger and takes aim at his former self.

Curiosity Daily
Why Asthma Gets Worse at Night, Earth's Largest Living Thing

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 10:17


Learn about a heroic experiment that helps explain asthma getting worse at night; and the largest living thing on earth. A heroic experiment has shed light on the centuries-old mystery of why asthma gets worse at night by Grant Currin Harrison, S. (2021, September 21). Why Does Asthma Get Worse at Night? Wired; WIRED. https://www.wired.com/story/why-does-asthma-get-worse-at-night/  Study explores why asthma worsens at night. (2021). ScienceDaily. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/09/210906151456.htm  Scheer, F. A. J. L., Hilton, M. F., Evoniuk, H. L., Shiels, S. A., Malhotra, A., Sugarbaker, R., Ayers, R. T., Israel, E., Massaro, A. F., & Shea, S. A. (2021). The endogenous circadian system worsens asthma at night independent of sleep and other daily behavioral or environmental cycles. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 118(37), e2018486118. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2018486118  The largest living thing on earth is not the blue whale by Cameron Duke Fishlake National Forest - Home. (2021). Usda.gov. https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/fishlake/home/?cid=STELPRDB5393641 Lydia Ramsey Pflanzer. (2017, May 6). Largest living organism the Armillaria ostoyae fungus. Business Insider; Business Insider. https://www.businessinsider.com/largest-living-organism-the-armillaria-ostoyae-fungus-2017-5 Marshall, M. (2018). Humongous fungus is older than Christianity and weighs 400 tonnes. New Scientist. https://www.newscientist.com/article/2182291-humongous-fungus-is-older-than-christianity-and-weighs-400-tonnes/ Prepelka, B. (2019). Sequoia Giants - General Sherman - California. Scenicusa.net. https://scenicusa.net/032906.html Schmitt, C. (n.d.). The Malheur National Forest Location of the World's Largest Living Organism [The Humongous Fungus]. https://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/fsbdev3_033146.pdf Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Curiosity Daily
Leeches in Medicine, Potty Training Cows, the Math of Eggs

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 15:22


Learn about the medical history of using leeches; potty training cows to help the environment; and the math behind eggs. More from zoologist Bill Schutt:  Pick up "Pump: A Natural History of the Heart" https://www.workman.com/products/pump  Website: https://billschutt.com/  Follow @BillSchuttBooks on Twitter: https://twitter.com/BillSchuttBooks Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BillSchutt1/  Potty training cows can help the environment by Steffie Drucker  BORENSTEIN, S. (2021, September 13). No bull: Scientists potty train cows to use “MooLoo.” ABC News; ABC News. https://abcnews.go.com/Weird/wireStory/bull-scientists-potty-train-cows-mooloo-79991165   Dirksen, N., Langbein, J., Schrader, L., Puppe, B., Elliffe, D., Siebert, K., Röttgen, V., & Matthews, L. (2021). Learned control of urinary reflexes in cattle to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Current Biology, 31(17), R1033–R1034. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2021.07.011  Researchers are toilet-training cows to reduce ammonia emissions caused by their waste. (2021, September 13). EurekAlert! https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/927878  Scientists have uncovered the mathematical formula for the shape of an egg by Briana Brownell  Research finally reveals ancient universal equation for the shape of an egg. (2021, August 31). News Centre - University of Kent. https://www.kent.ac.uk/news/science/29620/research-finally-reveals-ancient-universal-equation-for-the-shape-of-an-egg  Narushin, V. G., Romanov, M. N., & Griffin, D. K. (2021). Egg and math: introducing a universal formula for egg shape. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. https://doi.org/10.1111/nyas.14680   Who Laid The First Egg? Scientists Move A Step Closer To Linking Embryos Of Earth's First Animals To Adult Form. (2021). ScienceDaily. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/11/041104005307.htm   Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 598 (10-11-21): The Flu and Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:02).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-8-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of October 25, 2021.  This revised episode from November 2017 is part of a series this fall of episodes on water connections to the human body and human biology. We start with a public health mystery sound.  Have a listen for about 35 seconds, and see if you can guess what seasonal, precautionary procedure is taking place.  And here's a hint: thinking feverishlycould influence your answer. SOUNDS and VOICES - ~36 sec “Any problems with any vaccines before?”“No.”“Feeling OK today?  No fever or anything like that?”“No.”“And no allergies to foods or medications that you're aware of?”“No.”  …“So, you know, a little bit of arm soreness; that's probably the most of it.  Redness, irritation.   Might be kind of tired for a day or so, or even a low-grade fever or a headache is possible and normal.  If that were to happen, whatever you take for a headache is fine.  Any questions about anything?”“No.”“All right.” …“All right, leave that bandage on for about 10 minutes or so, and take it off anytime you remember after that.  And here's your copy for your records.  Thanks.”“Thank you.”“Have a good day.”If you guessed, a flu shot, you're right!  You heard an influenza vaccination being given in October 2017 at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg.  Flu season arrives every year with colder weather, bringing the potential to cause fever, body aches, and other symptoms, some quite serious or even fatal.  The flu affects millions of people in the United States each year, and health agencies like U.S. Centers for the Disease Control and Prevention and the Virginia Department of Health encourage vaccination for everyone older than six months, with some exceptions. But what does the flu have to do with water?  Consider these three connections. First, drinking plenty of fluids is a commonly prescribed treatment for flu sufferers in order to help prevent dehydration resulting from increased body temperature and other responses to the viral infection.  Infants, children, and the elderly are particularly at risk for dehydration. Second, the flu virus is transmitted between humans by respiratory droplets, and researchers have found that transmission is affected by air temperature and humidity. Specifically, transmission occurs more easily in cold, dry air, such as is typically found during fall and winter in temperate areas like Virginia. Third, waterfowl and shorebirds are among the various kinds of birds that harbor avian flu viruses, and water contaminated with aquatic birds' waste can potentially harbor avian flu for some time.  Understanding the factors related to the occurrence and transmission of avian viruses—including the role of contaminated water—is important in monitoring avian flu and its potential to spread to other birds, mammals, or humans. Flu season is upon us, and the CDC recommends getting a flu vaccine by the end of October.  So if you hear this… VOICE - ~3 sec – “Are you here for a flu shot?” …now you'll have not only a health connection for the flu, but some hydrological ones, too. Thanks to staff of Kroger Pharmacy and Hokie Wellness for lending their voices to this episode. We close with some music for, or rather, against the flu.  Here's about 30 seconds of “Shots,” written by Wilson Stern and performed in a 2014, flu-shot-promoting video by the University of Florida's Student Health Care Center. MUSIC - ~28 sec Lyrics:“Last year less than half the population got their flu shot.  Why you wanna be stuck at home with a fever when you could be making this party hot?”“I heard that shot made you ill.”“Naw, son, that news ain't for real.  It tells your body what the virus looks like, so it knows how to deal”“Why you tellin' me this?  I got my flu shot last year.”“This virus mutates constantly, we got new strains here.”“Shots, shots, shots, shots….” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode replaces Episode 393, 11-6-17, which has been archived. The influenza vaccination heard in this episode was performed October 24, 2017, at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, by staff of Kroger Pharmacies, assisted by staff from Virginia Tech's Hokie Wellness program.  Virginia Water Radio thanks those staff people for their willingness to be recorded. The audio excerpt of “Shots,” copyright by Wilson Stern, was taken from the 2014 University of Florida Student Health Care Center video “Flu Shots,” copyright by the University of Florida; used with permission of Wilson Stern and the University of Florida's Division of Media Properties.  The 2 min./4 sec. video is available online at http://shcc.ufl.edu/services/primary-care/flu/flu-shots-music-video-lyrics/.   More information about Wilson Stern and the group Hail! Cassius Neptune is available online at https://www.reverbnation.com/hailcassiusneptune.Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Colorized, negative-stained transmission electron microscopic image of influenza virus particles, known as virions.   Public domain photo taken in 1973 by Dr. F. A. Murphy, accessed from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Public Image Library, online at https://phil.cdc.gov/Details.aspx?pid=10072.Illustration of influenza infection, from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “Images of Influenza Viruses,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/resource-center/freeresources/graphics/images.htm.U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Protection weekly map of flu activity, as of 10/2/21.  Map accessed online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/usmap.htm, 10/11/21.U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention chart of work to develop the annual flu virus vaccine, with data for 2020-21.   Image accessed at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/resource-center/freeresources/graphics/infographics.htm. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT TYPES AND NAMES OF INFLUENZA VIRUSESThe following information is quoted from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Protection (CDC), “Types of Influenza Viruses,” November 18, 2019, online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/viruses/types.htm.“There are four types of influenza viruses: A, B, C and D.   Human influenza A and B viruses cause seasonal epidemics of disease (known as the flu season) almost every winter in the United States.  Influenza A viruses are the only influenza viruses known to cause flu pandemics, i.e., global epidemics of flu disease.  A pandemic can occur when a new and very different influenza A virus emerges that both infects people and has the ability to spread efficiently between people.  Influenza type C infections generally cause mild illness and are not thought to cause human flu epidemics.  Influenza D viruses primarily affect cattle and are not known to infect or cause illness in people. ”Influenza A viruses are divided into subtypes based on two proteins on the surface of the virus: the hemagglutinin (H) and the neuraminidase (N).  There are 18 different hemagglutinin subtypes and 11 different neuraminidase subtypes (H1 through H18 and N1 through N11 respectively).  …Current sub-types of influenza A viruses that routinely circulate in people include: A (H1N1) and A (H3N2).  In the spring of 2009, a new influenza A (H1N1) virus emerged to cause illness in people. … “Currently circulating influenza A(H1N1) viruses are related to the pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus that emerged in the spring of 2009 and caused a flu pandemic ( see CDC 2009 H1N1 Flu website for more information).  This virus, scientifically called the ‘A(H1N1)pdm09 virus,' and more generally called ‘2009 H1N1,' has continued to circulate seasonally since then.  These H1N1 viruses have undergone relatively small genetic changes and changes to their antigenic properties (i.e., the properties of the virus that affect immunity) over time.“Of all the influenza viruses that routinely circulate and cause illness in people, influenza A(H3N2) viruses tend to change more rapidly, both genetically and antigenically. … “Influenza B viruses are not divided into subtypes, but instead are further classified into two lineages: B/Yamagata and B/Victoria. …Influenza B viruses generally change more slowly in terms of their genetic and antigenic properties than influenza A viruses, especially influenza A(H3N2) viruses.  Influenza surveillance data from recent years shows co-circulation of influenza B viruses from both lineages in the United States and around the world.  However, the proportion of influenza B viruses from each lineage that circulate can vary by geographic location.“CDC follows an internationally accepted naming convention for influenza viruses.  This convention was accepted by WHO [World Health Organization] in 1979 and published in February 1980 in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 58(4):585-591 (1980) (see A revision of the system of nomenclature for influenza viruses: a WHO Memorandum[854 KB, 7 pages]).  The approach uses the following components: *the antigenic type (e.g., A, B, C); *the host of origin (e.g., swine, equine, chicken, etc.; for human-origin viruses, no host of origin designation is given); *geographical origin (e.g., Denver, Taiwan, etc.); *strain number (e.g., 15, 7, etc.); *year of isolation (e.g., 57, 2009, etc.); *for influenza A viruses, the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase antigen description in parentheses (e.g., (H1N1). “One influenza A (H1N1), A (H3N2), and one or two influenza B viruses (depending on the vaccine) are included in each year's influenza vaccines.” SOURCES Used for Audio Antonia E. Dalziel et al., “Persistence of Low Pathogenic Influenza A Virus in Water: A Systematic Review and Quantitative Meta-Analysis,” PLOS One, 10/13/16, online at http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0161929.  Anice C. Lowen and John Steel, “Roles of Humidity and Temperature in Shaping Influenza Seasonality,” Journal of Virology, Vol. 88/No. 14, July 2014, pages 7692-7695; online at http://jvi.asm.org/content/88/14/7692.full (subscription may be required for access). Anice C. Lowen et al., “Influenza Virus Transmission Is Dependent on Relative Humidity and Temperature,” PLOS, 10/19/07, online at http://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article?id=10.1371/journal.ppat.0030151. Public Library of Science, “Higher indoor humidity inactivates flu virus particles,” posted by Science Daily, 2/27/13, online at https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130227183456.htm. David Robson, The Real Reason Germs Spread in Winter, BBC Future, 10/19/15. Jeffery K. Taugenberger and David M. Morens, “1918 Influenza: The Mother of All Pandemics,” Emerging Infectious Diseases (Center for Disease Control and Prevention), Vol. 12/No. 1, January 2006, online at https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/12/1/05-0979_article. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):“Chemical Disinfectants,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/infectioncontrol/guidelines/disinfection/disinfection-methods/chemical.html;“Flu Activity and Surveillance,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/fluactivitysurv.htm(includes a weekly nationwide map of flu activity);“The Flu: Caring for Someone Sick at Home,” online (as PDF) at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/pdf/freeresources/general/influenza_flu_homecare_guide.pdf;“Flu Season,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/season/flu-season.htm;“How Flu Spreads,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/spread.htm;“Influenza (Flu),” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/index.html;“Influenza in Animals,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/other_flu.htm (information on flu in bats, birds, dogs, swine, and other animals);“Information on Avian Influenza,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/avianflu/;“National Influeza Vaccination Week,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/resource-center/nivw/index.htm;“Prevent Seasonal Flu,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/prevent/index.html;“Who Should and Who Should NOT Get a Flu Vaccination,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/prevent/whoshouldvax.htm. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Pandemic Influenza Fact Sheet for the Water Sector, 2009. Virginia Department of Health, “Epidemiology Fact Sheets/Influenza,” September 2018, online at http://www.vdh.virginia.gov/epidemiology/epidemiology-fact-sheets/influenza/. World Health Organization (WHO), “Influenza (Avian and other zoonotic),” November 13, 2018, online at https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/influenza-(avian-and-other-zoonotic). For More Information about Water an

time health science bay university agency music current national natural earth home state audio college map accent animals dark surveillance tech human water web index rain united states pond research ocean weather government taiwan education public prevention vol voice illustration chesapeake snow environment journal types organisms display images skeleton persistence msonormal virology stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens flu bacteria voices arial environmental temperature times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading hail world health organization shots biology cdc lyrics civics grade nutrients public library docs colorful signature bio query flu season scales txt roles govt human body watershed transcript humidity toc naw passwords centers disease control virginia tech neurological ls atlantic ocean infants natural resources david m influenza grades k avian influenza science daily name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes h1n1 bulletin blacksburg prevention cdc kb msohyperlink world health organization who sections life sciences stormwater david robson policymakers n1 bmp environmental protection agency epa n11 new standard acknowledgment muscular flu shots virginia department lowen cripple creek cumberland gap 7c sols plos one tmdl feeling ok bbc future john steel geological survey mayo clinic health system h3n2 plos who world health organization circulatory emerging infectious diseases living systems dalziel virginia standards water center redness space systems colorized relative humidity audio notes
Messy & Magnificent with Karlee Fain
Common + Unity: How to live longer, be happier, and find unwavering support for your success through the power of community

Messy & Magnificent with Karlee Fain

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 34:40


How many great ideas have you had throughout your lifetime? The kind that come about so suddenly that you feel their energy pulse through your body with so much intensity that it wakes you up and makes you want to move ASAP?And...how many of those have you actually followed through on? If there's some disparity between idea generation and follow-through, you're not alone. And this isn't a guilt trip. There's a reason why so many of those ideas didn't make it to fruition. What if I told you it wasn't your lack of energy or ambition… It was about your lack of community. You see, follow-through takes two important things: nourishment and community.If you want to start something new, you have to start by asking yourself one question:“What do I need in order to make showing up for this possible?”In this special 100th episode of Messy & Magnificent, Karlee launches a month-long series delivering the potent power of community to your door. She uncovers what community really is and why it's so important in our lives, not only for emotional support but also as the force behind getting things done. She shares four incredible benefits of belonging to a community, and the five types of community that every woman should belong to, in some capacity.That whole “If I want it done right I've got to do it myself” mentality will only get us so far before we start to feel stuck. Moving to the next stage requires support. We thrive in community, and it's time we recognize the role it plays in our success. If you're ready to find your ideal community and reap the benefits of connection, then this episode is for you.What You'll Learn in This Episode:The phenomenon of popular isolation (5:32)How the power of community helps us get things done (7:59)What the word community really means (21:27)The long-term benefits of friendships and community (23:29)The five types of community and why they're beneficial (25:52)People Mentioned in this Episode:Dr. Tom StedingMaria SoriosKate NorthrupResources Mentioned in this Episode:Episode 57: Trying To Do It All Yourself? How smart leaders stop being the hero and start building emotional integrity with Tom StedingStudy: Brigham Young University. "Relationships improve your odds of survival by 50 percent, research finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 July 2010. .Episode 76: Just Thrown A Curveball?! The specifics of how my company builds something new and revamps after our plans are foiled.VIDEO: The Boundary BrunchEpisode 49: Masterful Storytelling: How to Share Your Stories to Transform and Engage with Others with Dr. Maria SiroisBook: You Have the Power: Choosing Courage in a Culture of Fear by Frances Moore Lappe Jeffrey Perkins Article: What Is Community, and Why Is It Important? Featuring Riché C. ZamorEpisode 2: Nobody really gets you? How to upgrade your adult relationshipsArticle: 3 Ways To Benefit From Involvement In Your Community by Anne-Marie Faiola Study: University of Notre Dame. "Your circle of friends is more predictive of your health, study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 June 2019. List: The 5 Types of Community from FeverbeeSend your Audio Comments and Questions to anitza@everybodythrive.comConnect With Karlee: WebsiteLinkedInInstagramMessy and Magnificent is produced by the folks at Ginni Media. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Robert McLean's Podcast
Quick Climate Links: Thousands call for climate action; renewables, not gas; Earth's crust is shifting; animal world is adapting to climate change

Robert McLean's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 7:08


Check out the story “Thousands in Milan call for climate action” from SBS; The strikers say, “We are in the thick of the climate crisis and yet our government continues to subsidise their mates in the fossil fuel industry, putting all of us at risk”; Science Daily tells us: “New research links tree health to how birds respond to climate change”; Join this webinar on Wednesday, October 13, staged by “Renewables, not gas for Geelong” - A community forum on Viva Energy's proposed gas important terminal in Corio Bay and associated safety risks; From Vote Earth Now: “Key Findings of Climate Council report on security in our region: The federal government's financial support of the fossil fuel industry is actively undermining Australia's national security”; Three stories from Gizmodo: “So Much Ice Has Melted, That the Earth's Crust Is Shifting in Weird, New Ways”; “Privatization Won't Fix This”; “Climate Change May Finally Get Its Day at the Hague”; And now it's three stories from The New York Times: “How the Animal World Is Adapting to Climate Change”; “Trams, Cable Cars, Electric Ferries: How Cities Are Rethinking Transit”; “After Hurricane Ida, Oil Infrastructure Springs Dozens of Leaks”; From Vox: “The case for a more radical climate movement”; And from Energy it's: “Halogen bulb ban 'just a start' in climate change fight”; A trio of stories from The New Daily: “Road to net zero: Scott Morrison has less than a month to unite his government”; “Road to net zero: The very real financial consequences of failure at Glasgow”; “Road to net zero: What the rest of the world thinks about Australia's climate policy”;  From The Canberra Times: “School Strike 4 Climate activists in Canberra continue to call for action from lockdown”; The Financial Post tells readers: “This Is What Europe's Green Future Looks Like”; Coming up are three stories from The Conversation: “Better building standards are good for the climate, your health, and your wallet. Here's what the National Construction Code could do better”; “VIDEO: Michelle Grattan on the Nationals and climate policy, the push for independent candidates, and Malcolm Turnbull”; “Marine heatwaves during winter could have dire impacts on New Zealand fisheries and herald more summer storms”; From The Newsroom: “‘Keep 1.5 alive' is an uninspiring Glasgow goal”; The New Republic tells readers about: “Alexandra Kleeman's Not-So-Distant Dystopia”; And from The Guardian we read: “Giant sequoias and fire have coexisted for centuries. Climate crisis is upping the stakes”; Reuters has a message from The Pope: “'You are making the future today', Pope tells youth climate activists”; The British Library show readers a poster from the First World War that could apply equally to the climate crisis: “'Daddy, what did you do in the Great War?', a British recruitment poster”; Two stories from Climate Conscious on Medium: “Justice, Compassion, and Climate Change”; “Our Approach to Climate Change Is Preventing Us From Solving It”; We finish up today with two stories from The Melbourne Age: “Winds of change blow hope into industrial towns and net zero deal”; “Santos seeks carbon credits for plan to bury emissions underground”.  Enjoy “Music for a Warming World”. Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/climateconversations

British Murders Podcast
Bonus Episode - The Chris Benoit Double-Murder Suicide (Wrestling's Darkest Day) Feat. John Consignado & Ben Davies

British Murders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 91:58


In this very special bonus episode of British Murders, I am joined by John from the 'Reddit On Wiki' podcast and my lifelong friend Dav as we discuss the double-murder suicide case of former WWE wrestler Chris Benoit.⁣⁣Over a three-day period from June 22 to 24, 2007, the former two-time world champion killed his wife Nancy Benoit and their 7-year-old son, Daniel, before finally hanging himself.⁣⁣Benoit was booked to become ECW Champion at WWE's Vengeance: Night of Champions pay-per-view on Sunday, June 24, 2007, but he no-showed the event.⁣⁣On Monday, June 25, 2007, WWE cancelled their scheduled three-hour-long live Raw TV show and replaced it with a tribute to Chris Benoit's life and career.⁣⁣On Tuesday, June 26, 2007, after details of the murder-suicide became available, the company aired a recorded statement before its ECW broadcast advising that Benoit's name would not be mentioned again.⁣⁣Except for his results and listings in WWE's title history, the WWE website has removed all past mentions of Benoit, including his biography and the video tribute comments made by his fellow wrestlers.⁣You can find 'Reddit On Wiki' here:https://www.redditonwiki.com/Follow British Murders on social media:Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/britishpodcastInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/britishmurdersTikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@britishmurdersTwitter: https://twitter.com/britishmurdersYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/BritishMurdersPodcastMerchandise available here:https://teespring.com/stores/britishmurdersSupport the show on Patreon for early access to ad-free-episodes:https://www.patreon.com/britishmurdersMake a one-off donation here:https://www.buymeacoffee.com/britishmurders All episodes are available on my website:https://www.spreaker.com/show/british-murdersPlease send any British murder case suggestions to:britishmurderspodcast@gmail.comIntro music:David John Brady - 'Throw Down the Gauntlet'https://linktr.ee/davidjohnbradymusicMy recording equipment:Shure SM7B Vocal MicrophoneCloud Microphone Cloudlifter CL1Focusrite Scarlett Solo USB Audio InterfaceRode PSA-1 Professional Studio Boom ArmRecorded in:ZencastrEdited in:AudacityMastered in:AuphonicReferences:Chris Benoit. (n.d.). Popular Timelines. Retrieved August 19, 2021, from https://populartimelines.com/timeline/Chris-BenoitThe Chris Benoit Double-Murder Suicide. (2017, June 24). Wrestling-Online.Com. https://www.wrestling-online.com/timeline/the-chris-benoit-double-murder-suicide/Coulson, J. (2020, March 27). Why The Diving Headbutt Should Be Outlawed From Wrestling. TheSportster. https://www.thesportster.com/wrestling/diving-headbutt-outlawed-banned-wrestling/di Giacomo, D. (n.d.). Chris Benoit. Find a Grave. Retrieved August 19, 2021, from https://nl.findagrave.com/memorial/20095908/chris-benoitHodge, M. (2021, April 10). MAKING A MURDERER Phillip Adams – Horror CTE brain disease blamed for slew of shootings by stars as concussions ‘turned them into killers.' The Sun. https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/14609019/cte-murders-nfl-stars-brain-disease/Husney, E. (Writer), Schultz, M. (Writer). & Eisener, J. (Director). (2020, March 24). Benoit - Part One (Season 2, Episode 1) [TV Episode]. In V. Case, J. Eisener, C. Grosso, E. Husney, N. Prasad, C. Whyte (Executive Producers), Dark Side of the Ring. Vice Studio Canada.Husney, E. (Writer), Schultz, M. (Writer). & Eisener, J. (Director). (2020, March 24). Benoit - Part Two (Season 2, Episode 2) [TV Episode]. In V. Case, J. Eisener, E. Husney, N. Prasad (Executive Producers), Dark Side of the Ring. Vice Studio Canada.Nancy Benoit. (2021, February 14). Wikii. https://www.wikii.org/en/wiki/athlete/nancy-benoit-21840Pro Wrestling Wiki. (n.d.). Chris Benoit double murder-suicide. Retrieved August 19, 2021, from https://prowrestling.fandom.com/wiki/Chris_Benoit_double_murder-suicideR. (2015, March 1). Eddie Guerrero Death. Wrestler Deaths. https://wrestlerdeaths.com/eddie-guerrero-death/Sports Legacy Institute. (2007, June 9). Wrestler Chris Benoit Brain's Forensic Exam Consistent With Numerous Brain Injuries. ScienceDaily. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070905224343.htmTempest. (2020, March 27). Ten Things We Learned From Dark Side Of The Ring: Chris Benoit. WrestleTalk. https://wrestletalk.com/news/ten-things-we-learned-from-dark-side-of-the-ring-chris-benoit/Toplack, C. (2021, July 8). The Diving Headbutt: A Cautionary Tale. The Signature Spot. https://www.thesignaturespot.com/articles/2020/7/30/the-diving-headbutt-a-cautionary-taleWesley Snipes, L. (2017, June 19). 10 Years Later: 15 Facts In The Chris Benoit Murder Case That Still Shock Us. TheRichest. https://www.therichest.com/shocking/10-years-later-15-facts-in-the-chris-benoit-murder-case-that-still-shock-us/Wikipedia contributors. (2021a, August 3). Nancy Benoit. Wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nancy_BenoitWikipedia contributors. (2021b, August 15). Chris Benoit. Wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Benoit

Curiosity Daily
Alibi Memory, Denisova Cave History, Cleaning Fruit & Veggies

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 12:32


Learn how often people misremember alibis; new lessons from Denisova Cave; and how to remove pesticides from produce.  People often misremember where they were on a given date, which puts criminal alibis into question by Cameron Duke Faulty memories of our past whereabouts: The fallacy of an airtight alibi. (2021). EurekAlert! https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2021-07/afps-fmo070721.php Laliberte, E., Yim, H., Stone, B., & Dennis, S. J. (2021). The Fallacy of an Airtight Alibi: Understanding Human Memory for “Where” Using Experience Sampling. Psychological Science, 32(6), 944–951. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956797620980752 Young, E. (2021, June 7). It's Surprisingly Common To Misremember Where You Were On A Specific Time And Date. Research Digest. https://digest.bps.org.uk/2021/06/07/its-surprisingly-common-to-misremember-where-you-were-on-a-specific-time-and-date/ Huge analysis of sediment DNA tells a deeper story of Denisova Cave by Cameron Duke Pleistocene sediment DNA from Denisova Cave: Sediment DNA tracks 300,000 years of hominin and animal presence at Denisova Cave. (2021). ScienceDaily. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/06/210623113857.htm Zavala, E. I., Jacobs, Z., Vernot, B., Shunkov, M. V., Kozlikin, M. B., Derevianko, A. P., Essel, E., de Fillipo, C., Nagel, S., Richter, J., Romagné, F., Schmidt, A., Li, B., O'Gorman, K., Slon, V., Kelso, J., Pääbo, S., Roberts, R. G., & Meyer, M. (2021). Pleistocene sediment DNA reveals hominin and faunal turnovers at Denisova Cave. Nature. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-021-03675-0 The Best Ways to Remove Pesticides From Produce was originally published June 29, 2018: https://omny.fm/shows/curiosity-daily/how-to-remove-pesticides-from-produce-the-misattri  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Propaganda Report
Mandate Intolerance Is Spreading & New Study Identifies A Primary Cause of Political Polarization (DNB)

The Propaganda Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 38:03


  Listen, Subscribe, Share the Show, Donate. Help us keep this train rollin! Notes & Links from Today's Show Laura Osnes (@lauraosnes) • Instagram photos and videos   Broadway star says she withdrew from show that required proof of vaccination (msn.com)   Actors' Equity Association and the Broadway League Reach Deal on Safety Plans for Reopening  · Actors' Equity Association (actorsequity.org)     (21) David Gordon on Twitter: "I reported that Laura Osnes screed to Instagram for perpetuating false information about the Covid vaccine and I suggest you do too" / Twitter   Governor Ducey Takes Action To Further Protect Arizonans From Local Vaccine Mandates | Office of the Arizona Governor (azgovernor.gov)   Quinnipiac University to fine, cut internet for unvaxxed students (nypost.com)   Some doctors write mask exemptions for students who don't need them (bangordailynews.com)   Politically polarized brains share an intolerance of uncertainty -- ScienceDaily   The Suicide Squad failed in theaters. Anti-vaxxers own a lot of blame. (mashable.com)    Wayback Machine (archive.org) The Propaganda Report on Rokfin Part I: Inside The CFR's Fear-Based Pro Vaccine Propaganda Campaign PART II: Inside The CFR's Fear-Based Pro Vaccine Propaganda Campaign (2/2) The Propaganda Report on Patreon The Propaganda Report Store Support Our Sponsors! Donate... If you find value in the content we produce and want to help us keep this train rollin, drop us a donation via Paypal or become a Patreon. (links below) Every little bit helps. Thank you! And thank you to everyone who has and continues to support the show. It's your support that enables us to continue producing shows. Paypal Patreon Subscribe & Leave A 5-Star Review... Subscribe on iTunes Subscribe on Google Play Music Listen on Google Podcasts Listen on Tunein Listen on Stitcher Follow on Spotify Like and Follow us on Facebook Follow Monica on Twitter Follow Binkley on Twitter Subscribe to Binkley's Youtube Channel https://www.paypal.me/BradBinkley https://www.patreon.com/propagandareport https://twitter.com/freedomactradio https://twitter.com/MonicaPerezShow https://www.youtube.com/bradbinkley https://www.youtube.com/monicaperez  

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
ID The Future: Scientists Discover Nanotech for Body's Blood Pressure Control, Pt. 1 (#1492)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021


On this ID the Future, physician and Evolution News writer Howard Glicksman discusses an exciting new discovery by researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine, described at Science Daily as uncovering “the location of natural blood-pressure barometers inside our bodies that have eluded scientists for more than 60 years.” As the article reports, […]

Intelligent Design the Future
Scientists Discover Nanotech for Body's Blood Pressure Control, Pt. 1

Intelligent Design the Future

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 23:57


On this ID the Future, physician and Evolution News writer Howard Glicksman discusses an exciting new discovery by researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine, described at Science Daily as uncovering “the location of natural blood-pressure barometers inside our bodies that have eluded scientists for more than 60 years.” As the article reports, “The existence of a pressure sensor inside renin cells was first proposed back in 1957. It made sense: The cells had to know when to release renin, a hormone that helps regulate blood pressure. But even though scientists suspected this cellular barometer had to exist, they couldn’t tell what it was and whether it was located in renin cells or surrounding cells.” Dr. Glicksman and Read More › Source

Marketplace All-in-One
Pandemic pups have an economic effect

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 18:00


Like so many people hanging out at home in this pandemic, our listener Joel got a dog. He wants to know if enough people got new pets to make an economic impact. On today’s show, we’ll do the numbers and answer more of your questions about wildfires and vaccines, plus get an update from Kimberly’s Uncle Davids. Here’s everything we talked about today: “F.D.A. Aims to Give Final Approval to Pfizer Vaccine by Early Next Month” from The New York Times “Q&A: When might the coronavirus vaccines get full approval?” from The Washington Post “California’s 2018 wildfires caused $150 billion in damages” from Science Daily “Thanks to sheltering in place, animal shelters are empty” from Wired “No, People Are Not Returning Pandemic Dogs in Droves” from The New York Times More pet data from Packaged Facts “DTC dog food brands are on the rise: What to know” from NBC News Some background on Kimberly’s Uncle Davids Our show needs your voice! Tell us what you think of the show or ask a question for our hosts to answer! Send a voice memo or give us a call at 508-82-SMART (508-827-6278).

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
Pandemic pups have an economic effect

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 18:00


Like so many people hanging out at home in this pandemic, our listener Joel got a dog. He wants to know if enough people got new pets to make an economic impact. On today’s show, we’ll do the numbers and answer more of your questions about wildfires and vaccines, plus get an update from Kimberly’s Uncle Davids. Here’s everything we talked about today: “F.D.A. Aims to Give Final Approval to Pfizer Vaccine by Early Next Month” from The New York Times “Q&A: When might the coronavirus vaccines get full approval?” from The Washington Post “California’s 2018 wildfires caused $150 billion in damages” from Science Daily “Thanks to sheltering in place, animal shelters are empty” from Wired “No, People Are Not Returning Pandemic Dogs in Droves” from The New York Times More pet data from Packaged Facts “DTC dog food brands are on the rise: What to know” from NBC News Some background on Kimberly’s Uncle Davids Our show needs your voice! Tell us what you think of the show or ask a question for our hosts to answer! Send a voice memo or give us a call at 508-82-SMART (508-827-6278).

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
Fantastic Domesticates and Where to Find them - Old World - Ruins 65

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 60:06


In this episode of A Life in Ruins podcast, The hosts have another off the rails discussion about domesticates. This time however, talking llamas, guinea pigs, camels, horses, goats, and dogs. You might notice that not all of them are Old World Domesticates. Honestly, you'll just have to listen to the episode understand. It is actually a very thoughtful and funny conversation about the idiosyncrasies of domestication, animal behavior, and how humans interact with animals. National suicide prevention hotline: 1-800-273-TALK Literature Recommendations not "Guns Germs and Steel" National Geographic Resource Library Encyclopedic Entry: Domestication Journal of Young Investigators: Our Furry Friends: the History of Animal Domestication American Museum of Natural History: Domestication Timeline Melinda A. Zeder 2008 "Domestication and early agriculture in the Mediterranean Basin: Origins, diffusion, and impact" in PNAS Center for Disease Control and Prevention: Farm Animals Serge Morand et al. 2014 "Domesticated animals and human infectious diseases of zoonotic origins: Domestication time matters" in Infection, Genetics and Evolution University of Liverpool 16 May 2014. "Domesticated animals provide vital link to emergence of new diseases." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily. Contact Email: alifeinruinspodcast@gmail.com Instagram: @alifeinruinspodcast Facebook: @alifeinruinspodcast Twitter: @alifeinruinspod Website: www.alifeinruins.com Store: https://www.redbubble.com/people/alifeinruins/shop ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

Curiosity Daily
Scary Shark Music, Your Brain Predicts the Future, Hydrobot

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 10:57


Learn about ominous music's effect on conservation efforts; why our brains constantly predict the future; and “Hydrobot.” Dive deeper into all your favorite Shark Week shows with Shark Week's Daily Bite Podcast hosted by Luke Tipple: Listen on Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/shark-weeks-daily-bite/id1527053422  Listen on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0dfzM1ktSB1mSKD5z4Qujm?si=R8rNBksMRS-JrgMs9JIJ5g&dl_branch=1 Learn more: https://www.discovery.com/shark-week/everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-daily-bite-podcast  Ominous background music in shark programming could hinder conservation efforts by Steffie Drucker Nosal, A. P., Keenan, E. A., Hastings, P. A., & Gneezy, A. (2016). The Effect of Background Music in Shark Documentaries on Viewers' Perceptions of Sharks. PLOS ONE, 11(8), e0159279. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0159279  Sharks get bad rap when viewed with ominous background music: Researchers demonstrate that background music affects viewers' attitudes toward sharks. (2016). ScienceDaily. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/08/160804171639.htm  Why sharks need a new soundtrack. (2018, October 24). University of California. https://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/news/why-shark-soundtracks-make-it-harder-live-underwater  Our brains are constantly predicting the future to stay in the present by Cameron Duke Chow, D. (2013, May 8). How Your Brain Tracks Moving Objects. Livescience.com; Live Science. https://www.livescience.com/29417-how-brain-tracks-moving-objects.html  eijwat. (2012). Flash-drag Effect: Optical Illusion 3D [Old title: Flash-lag Effect induced by Background 3D Motion] [YouTube Video]. In YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6XOIN4jaDQ  Maus, Gerrit W., Fischer, J., & Whitney, D. (2013). Motion-Dependent Representation of Space in Area MT+. Neuron, 78(3), 554–562. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2013.03.010  Murai, Y., & Murakami, I. (2016). The flash-lag effect and the flash-drag effect in the same display. Journal of Vision, 16(11), 31. https://doi.org/10.1167/16.11.31  Don't blink: The science of a 100-mph fastball. (2017). The Seattle Times. http://projects.seattletimes.com/2017/mariners-preview/science/  "Hydrobot" is a magnetic bead that can move water around, even upside down by Briana Brownell Water droplets become hydrobots by adding magnetic beads. (2021). ScienceDaily. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/06/210603111954.htm  ‌Si, Y., Hu, J., & Dong, Z. (2021). Bioinspired magnetically driven liquid manipulation as microrobot. Cell Reports Physical Science, 100439. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.xcrp.2021.100439  Please vote for Curiosity Daily in the 2021 People's Choice Podcast Awards! Register at https://podcastawards.com, select Curiosity Daily in the categories of Education and Science & Medicine, and then click/tap "save nominations" at the bottom of the page. Voting in other categories is optional. Your vote is greatly appreciated! Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Curiosity Daily
Does ESP Exist?

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021 13:38


Learn about ESP; why people panicked about electricity in the 1800s; and how embryos use sound to prepare for the world. Please vote for Curiosity Daily in the 2021 People's Choice Podcast Awards! Register at https://podcastawards.com, select Curiosity Daily in the categories of Education and Science & Medicine, and then click/tap "save nominations" at the bottom of the page. Voting in other categories is optional. Your vote is greatly appreciated! Is there such a thing as ESP? by Ashley Hamer (Listener question from Anay in Georgia) ESP: What can science say? (2021). Berkeley.edu. https://undsci.berkeley.edu/article/esp  ‌Engber, D. (2017, June 7). Daryl Bem Proved ESP Is Real. Which Means Science Is Broken. Slate Magazine; Slate. https://slate.com/health-and-science/2017/06/daryl-bem-proved-esp-is-real-showed-science-is-broken.html  ‌Lavoie, A. (2008, January 3). Neuroimaging fails to demonstrate ESP is real. Harvard Gazette; Harvard Gazette. https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2008/01/neuroimaging-fails-to-demonstrate-esp-is-real/  ‌Bem, D. J. (2011). Feeling the future: Experimental evidence for anomalous retroactive influences on cognition and affect. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 100(3), 407–425. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0021524  In the 1800s, the War of the Currents led to panic over electricity by Cameron Duke Lantero, Allison. “The War of the Currents: AC vs. DC Power.” Energy.gov, 18 Nov. 2014, www.energy.gov/articles/war-currents-ac-vs-dc-power  Owen, Jonathan. “Electrocution: A Shocking Misuse? : Word Count : Thinkmap Visual Thesaurus.” www.visualthesaurus.com, 19 Dec. 2013, www.visualthesaurus.com/cm/wc/electrocution-a-shocking-misuse/  Sullivan, J.P. “Fearing Electricity: Overhead Wire Panic in New York City.” IEEE Technology and Society Magazine, vol. 14, no. 3, 1995, pp. 8–16, http://doi.org/10.1109/44.464629  Wuebben, Daniel L. Power-Lined : Electricity, Landscape, and the American Mind. University Of Nebraska Press, 2019  Embryos use sound to prepare for the outside world by Cameron Duke “Embryos of Many Species Use Sound to Prepare for the Outside World.” ScienceDaily, 26 May 2021, Embryos of many species use sound to prepare for the outside world. (2021). ScienceDaily. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/05/210526132128.htm  Mariette, M. M., Clayton, D. F., & Buchanan, K. L. (2021). Acoustic developmental programming: a mechanistic and evolutionary framework. Trends in Ecology & Evolution. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2021.04.007  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Curiosity Daily
Could You Adapt to Having an Extra Thumb?

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 12:52


Learn about a robotic “third thumb”; how measuring time increases entropy; and how to distinguish friends from foes.  People's brains adapted to having a robotic "third thumb" by Steffie Drucker UCL. (2021, May 19). Robotic “Third Thumb” use can alter brain representation of the hand. UCL News. https://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/2021/may/robotic-third-thumb-use-can-alter-brain-representation-hand  ‌Kieliba, P., Clode, D., Maimon-Mor, R. O., & Makin, T. R. (2021). Robotic hand augmentation drives changes in neural body representation. Science Robotics, 6(54), eabd7935. https://doi.org/10.1126/scirobotics.abd7935  Video: https://vimeo.com/551468278 Teen turns prosthetic arm into glitter-shooting unicorn horn [VIDEO] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tf91U06GII8   Measuring time increases the entropy in the universe by Briana Brownell Pearson, A.  N., Guryanova, Y., Erker, P., Laird, E.  A., Briggs, G.  A. D., Huber, M., & Ares, N. (2021). Measuring the Thermodynamic Cost of Timekeeping. Physical Review X, 11(2). https://doi.org/10.1103/physrevx.11.021029  O'Callaghan, J. (2021, May 20). How does time work? Livescience.com; Live Science. https://www.livescience.com/how-does-time-work.html  ‌Schirber, M. (2021). Keeping Time on Entropy's Dime. Physics, 14. https://physics.aps.org/articles/v14/s54  Crane, L. (2020). Measuring time accurately increases the entropy in the universe. New Scientist. https://www.newscientist.com/article/2277050-measuring-time-accurately-increases-the-entropy-in-the-universe/  A clock's accuracy may be tied to the disorder it creates. (2021, April 28). Science News. https://www.sciencenews.org/article/clock-time-accuracy-entropy-disorder  To Scope Someone Out, See How They Judge Others by Anna Todd What you say about others says a lot about you, research shows. (2021). ScienceDaily. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100802165441.htm  Wood, D., Harms, P., & Vazire, S. (2010). Perceiver effects as projective tests: What your perceptions of others say about you. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 99(1), 174–190. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0019390  Schwantes, M. (2017, March 27). Asking This 1 Question Will Instantly Reveal Someone's Personality. Inc.com; Inc. https://www.inc.com/marcel-schwantes/how-to-read-people-instantly-by-asking-1-simple-question.html  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Risky or Not?
168. Feeding Agave Syrup to Infants

Risky or Not?

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021


Dr. Don and Professor Ben talk about the risks of infant botulism from feeding agave syrup to infants. Dr. Don - risky ☣️ Professor Ben - risky ☣️ Clostridium botulinum Spores in Infant Foods: A Survey | Journal of Food Protection Clostridium Botulinum in Honey, Syrups and Dry Infant Cereals | Journal of Food Protection Infantile Botulism in a 2-Month-Old Female Prevention | Botulism | CDC Welcome to the Infant Botulism Treatment and Prevention Program Agave nectar, placebo both perceived better than doing nothing for cough in kids -- ScienceDaily

Beautiful Illusions
EP 16 - Partisan Pizza

Beautiful Illusions

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2021 71:43


Visit our website BeautifulIllusions.org for a complete set of show notes and links to almost everything discussed in this episodeSelected References:2:12 - The “Big Mac” pizza is one of of many “Gourmet Pizzas” served at Illiano's Pizza & Italian Cuisine in Middletown, CT3:45 - See “The Definitive Guide to New Haven Pizza”, the “New Haven-style pizza” Wikipedia entry, and the website for Frank Pepe's Pizzeria Napoletana4:05 - I'm currently using Andrew Janigan's updated version for NYC Thin-Crust Pizza Dough, which is terrific, and for more detail about the process check out his three part series on dough and baking pizzas5:21 - See “The History of Pizza” (CNN Travel, 2021)8:15 - For more on pizza styles see “Do You Know These Regional Pizza Styles?” (Serious Eats, 2018)8:40 - See Adam Kuban's current site, Famous Original Slice, and this profile from Serious Eats where he mentions, among other things, his pizza cognition theory10:00 - See “Chefs Weigh In: Is Chicago Deep Dish Pizza Really Pizza?” (Eater, 2014), “Why Deep Dish Can't Be Considered Pizza in a Court of Law” (Thrillist, 2016), and the Wikipedia entry on Chicago-Style Pizza12:10 - See “What Is a Controlled Experiment?” (ThoughtCo, 2019)17:53 - The Yale repertory Theatre18:54 - See “How the Difference Between Your Experiencing Self and Your Remembering Self Shapes Your Happiness” (Brainpickings, 2011) and watch “Daniel Kahneman: The Riddle of Experience Vs. Memory” (TED, 2010)19:02 - Listen to Beautiful Illusions Episode 14 - Talkin' Baseball Stories & Beautiful Illusions from May 202123:54 - See the Jimi Hendrix Wikipedia entry, bio from JimiHendrix.com, “Jimi Hendrix' use of distortion to extend the performance vocabulary of the electric guitar” (Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 1998), “100 Greatest Guitarist lists” from Rolling Stone (Hendrix comes in at #1) and Guitar World (Hendrix comes in at #2), and watch his legendary Woodstock performance of “The Star Spangled Banner” (YouTube)25:21 - Watch Jimi Hendrix play acoustically and listen to an acoustic jam session from 196828:42 - Molecular gastronomy29:05 - See “Modern Art: History and Concepts” (The Art Story) and the “Modern Art” Wikipedia entry29:40 - See “Pumpkin Spice Is Overrated and We Need to Talk About It” (Eating Well, 2019) and the “Pumpkin Pie Spice” Wikipedia entry29:58 - See “Why do so many people find pineapple on pizza offensive?” (GoodFood, 2019) and the “Hawaiian Pizza” Wikipedia entry32:29 - J. Kenji Lopez-Alt (official site) and bio from Serious Eats36:50 - See “The Happiness Benefits of Trying New Things” (The Atlantic, 2021)38:40 - The Big Five Personality Traits40:37 - The Epic of Gilgamesh40:48 - For more on the long history of bread see “14,000-Year-Old Piece Of Bread Rewrites The History Of Baking And Farming” (NPR, 2018), “Who Invented Bread?” (LiveScience, 2018), the “History of Bread” Wikipedia entry, “Why San Francisco does sourdough best” (BBC Travel, 2020), and “What Makes San Francisco Sourdough Unique?” (KQED, 2017)43:16 - Watch Mihaly Csikszentmihaly's TED Talk “Flow, The Secret To Happiness”46:18 - See “Stream Jimmy Montague's horn-fueled, '70s-inspired new album ‘Casual Use'” (Brooklyn Vegan, 2021) and visit the album's Bandcamp page47:50 - Listen to Beautiful Illusions Episode 02 - Our Back Pages from September 2020 where Jeff and Darron discuss their long-standing obsession with Bob Dylan51:50 - See “Category Learning in the Brain” (Annual Review of Neuroscience, 2010) and “How the brain forms categories” (ScienceDaily, 2012)54:35 - The new Yankee Stadium opened in 2009 and “our version” of Yankee Stadium was actually the renovated version of the original stadium built in 192355:09 - See “A Guide to Italian Certifications” (Eataly) and “DOP Foods of Italy: What They Are, and How to Find Them” (Walks of Italy)56:55 - See the “Neopolitan pizza” Wikipedia entry and the website of the Associazione Verace Pizza Napoletana, an association set up in 1984 to preserve the Neapolitan pizza tradition and their 14-page document outlining the requirements for certification59:38 - See the “Carbonara” Wikipedia entry, “Watch Michelin-Starred Chefs Cook Carbonara” (Fine Dining Lovers, 2017), “Smoky Tomato Carbonara” (New York Times, 2021), “'Stop this madness': NYT angers Italians with 'smoky tomato carbonara' recipe” (The Guardian, 2021), “New York Times' Tomato Carbonara Recipe (Rightly) Causes International Incident” (The Daily Beast, 2021), and pre-dating the recent controversy “Italian Icons: Carbonara, a Squabble Recipe” (Find Dining Lovers, 2015) and “Carbonara Purists Can't Stop the Pasta Revolution” (The New Yorker, 2016)1:01:09 - Listen to Beautiful Illusions Episode 06 - What We Talk About When We Talk About Politics from November 2020 and Beautiful Illusions Episode 13 - What We Talk About When We Talk About Politics Part 2: Just the Facts from April 20211:01:15 - James Madison: A Biography by Ralph Ketcham1:02:10 - Madison lays out his views on a large diverse republic in Federalist No. 10, see the Wikipedia entry as well1:03:00 - See “Aristotle's Ethics: The Doctrine of the Mean” (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)1:07:45 - See “The Jefferson Dinner” (JeffersonDinner.org)1:07:50 - Seven and a Half Lessons About the Brain by Lisa Feldman BarrettThis episode was recorded in June 2021The “Beautiful Illusions Theme” was performed by Darron Vigliotti (guitar) and Joseph Vigliotti (drums), and was written and recorded by Darron Vigliotti

Bob Enyart Live
RSR's List of Not So Old Things

Bob Enyart Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2021


  [While Bob & Cheryl Enyart go fishing we invite you to enjoy from the RSR archives our favorite List of Not So Old Things! Photos from today, June 25, 2021.] -- Finches Diversify in Decades, Opals Form in Months,  Man's Genetic Diversity in 200 Generations, C-14 Everywhere: Real Science Radio hosts Bob Enyart and Fred Williams present their classic program that led to the audience-favorites rsr.org/list-shows! See below and hear on today's radio program our list of Not So Old and Not So Slow Things! From opals forming in months to man's genetic diversity in 200 generations, and with carbon 14 everywhere it's not supposed to be (including in diamonds and dinosaur bones!), scientific observations fill the guys' most traditional list challenging those who claim that the earth is billions of years old. Many of these scientific finds demand a re-evaluation of supposed million and billion-year ages. * Finches Adapt in 17 Years, Not 2.3 Million: Charles Darwin's finches are claimed to have taken 2,300,000 years to diversify from an initial species blown onto the Galapagos Islands. Yet individuals from a single finch species on a U.S. Bird Reservation in the Pacific were introduced to a group of small islands 300 miles away and in at most 17 years, like Darwin's finches, they had diversified their beaks, related muscles, and behavior to fill various ecological niches. Hear about this also at rsr.org/spetner. * Opals Can Form in "A Few Months" And Don't Need 100,000 Years: A leading authority on opals, Allan W. Eckert, observed that, "scientific papers and textbooks have told that the process of opal formation requires tens of thousands of years, perhaps hundreds of thousands... Not true." A 2011 peer-reviewed paper in a geology journal from Australia, where almost all the world's opal is found, reported on the: "new timetable for opal formation involving weeks to a few months and not the hundreds of thousands of years envisaged by the conventional weathering model." (And apparently, per a 2019 report from Entomology Today, opals can even form around insects!) More knowledgeable scientists resist the uncritical, group-think insistence on false super-slow formation rates (as also for manganese nodules, gold veins, stone, petroleum, canyons and gullies, and even guts, all below). Regarding opals, Darwinian bias led geologists to long ignore possible quick action, as from microbes, as a possible explanation for these mineraloids. For both in nature and in the lab, opals form rapidly, not even in 10,000 years, but in weeks. See this also from creationists by a geologist, a paleobiochemist, and a nuclear chemist. * Finches Speciate in Two Generations vs Two Million Years for Darwin's Birds?  Darwin's finches on the Galapagos Islands are said to have diversified into 14 species over a period of two million years. But in 2017 the journal Science reported a newcomer to the Island which within two generations spawned a reproductively isolated new species. In another instance as documented by Lee Spetner, a hundred birds of the same finch species introduced to an island cluster a 1,000 kilometers from Galapagos diversified into species with the typical variations in beak sizes, etc. "If this diversification occurred in less than seventeen years," Dr. Spetner asks, "why did Darwin's Galapagos finches [as claimed by evolutionists] have to take two million years?" * Blue Eyes Originated Not So Long Ago: Not a million years ago, nor a hundred thousand years ago, but based on a peer-reviewed paper in Human Genetics, a press release at Science Daily reports that, "research shows that people with blue eyes have a single, common ancestor. A team at the University of Copenhagen have tracked down a genetic mutation which took place 6-10,000 years ago and is the cause of the eye colour of all blue-eyed humans alive on the planet today." * Adding the Entire Universe to our List of Not So Old Things? Based on March 2019 findings from Hubble, Nobel laureate Adam Riess of the Space Telescope Science Institute and his co-authors in the Astrophysical Journal estimate that the universe is about a billion years younger than previously thought! Then in September 2019 in the journal Science, the age dropped precipitiously to as low as 11.4 billion years! Of course, these measurements also further squeeze the canonical story of the big bang chronology with its many already existing problems including the insufficient time to "evolve" distant mature galaxies, galaxy clusters, superclusters, enormous black holes, filaments, bubbles, walls, and other superstructures. So, even though the latest estimates are still absurdly too old (Google: big bang predictions, and click on the #1 ranked article, or just go on over there to rsr.org/bb), regardless, we thought we'd plop the whole universe down on our List of Not So Old Things!   * After the Soft Tissue Discoveries, NOW Dino DNA: When a North Carolina State University paleontologist took the Tyrannosaurus Rex photos to the right of original biological material, that led to the 2016 discovery of dinosaur DNA, So far researchers have also recovered dinosaur blood vessels, collagen, osteocytes, hemoglobin, red blood cells, and various proteins. As of May 2018, twenty-six scientific journals, including Nature, Science, PNAS, PLoS One, Bone, and Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, have confirmed the discovery of biomaterial fossils from many dinosaurs! Organisms including T. Rex, hadrosaur, titanosaur, triceratops, Lufengosaur, mosasaur, and Archaeopteryx, and many others dated, allegedly, even hundreds of millions of years old, have yielded their endogenous, still-soft biological material. See the web's most complete listing of 100+ journal papers (screenshot, left) announcing these discoveries at bflist.rsr.org and see it in layman's terms at rsr.org/soft. * Rapid Stalactites, Stalagmites, Etc.: A construction worker in 1954 left a lemonade bottle in one of Australia's famous Jenolan Caves. By 2011 it had been naturally transformed into a stalagmite (below, right). Increasing scientific knowledge is arguing for rapid cave formation (see below, Nat'l Park Service shrinks Carlsbad Caverns formation estimates from 260M years, to 10M, to 2M, to it "depends"). Likewise, examples are growing of rapid formations with typical chemical make-up (see bottle, left) of classic stalactites and stalagmites including:- in Nat'l Geo the Carlsbad Caverns stalagmite that rapidly covered a bat - the tunnel stalagmites at Tennessee's Raccoon Mountain - hundreds of stalactites beneath the Lincoln Memorial - those near Gladfelter Hall at Philadelphia's Temple University (send photos to Bob@rsr.org) - hundreds of stalactites at Australia's zinc mine at Mt. Isa.   - and those beneath Melbourne's Shrine of Remembrance. * Most Human Mutations Arose in 200 Generations: From Adam until Real Science Radio, in only 200 generations! The journal Nature reports The Recent Origin of Most Human Protein-coding Variants. As summarized by geneticist co-author Joshua Akey, "Most of the mutations that we found arose in the last 200 generations or so" (the same number previously published by biblical creationists). Another 2012 paper, in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology (Eugenie Scott's own field) on High mitochondrial mutation rates, shows that one mitochondrial DNA mutation occurs every other generation, which, as creationists point out, indicates that mtEve would have lived about 200 generations ago. That's not so old! * National Geographic's Not-So-Old Hard-Rock Canyon at Mount St. Helens: As our List of Not So Old Things (this web page) reveals, by a kneejerk reaction evolutionary scientists assign ages of tens or hundreds of thousands of years (or at least just long enough to contradict Moses' chronology in Genesis.) However, with closer study, routinely, more and more old ages get revised downward to fit the world's growing scientific knowledge. So the trend is not that more information lengthens ages, but rather, as data replaces guesswork, ages tend to shrink until they are consistent with the young-earth biblical timeframe. Consistent with this observation, the May 2000 issue of National Geographic quotes the U.S. Forest Service's scientist at Mount St. Helens, Peter Frenzen, describing the canyon on the north side of the volcano. "You'd expect a hard-rock canyon to be thousands, even hundreds of thousands of years old. But this was cut in less than a decade." And as for the volcano itself, while again, the kneejerk reaction of old-earthers would be to claim that most geologic features are hundreds of thousands or millions of years old, the atheistic National Geographic magazine acknowledges from the evidence that Mount St. Helens, the volcanic mount, is only about 4,000 years old! See below and more at rsr.org/mount-st-helens. * Mount St. Helens Dome Ten Years Old not 1.7 Million: Geochron Laboratories of Cambridge, Mass., using potassium-argon and other radiometric techniques claims the rock sample they dated, from the volcano's dome, solidified somewhere between 340,000 and 2.8 million years ago. However photographic evidence and historical reports document the dome's formation during the 1980s, just ten years prior to the samples being collected. With the age of this rock known, radiometric dating therefore gets the age 99.99999% wrong. * Devils Hole Pupfish Isolated Not for 13,000 Years But for 100: Secular scientists default to knee-jerk, older-than-Bible-age dates. However, a tiny Mojave desert fish is having none of it. Rather than having been genetically isolated from other fish for 13,000 years (which would make this small school of fish older than the Earth itself), according to a paper in the journal Nature, actual measurements of mutation rates indicate that the genetic diversity of these Pupfish could have been generated in about 100 years, give or take a few. * Polystrates like Spines and Rare Schools of Fossilized Jellyfish: Previously, seven sedimentary layers in Wisconsin had been described as taking a million years to form. And because jellyfish have no skeleton, as Charles Darwin pointed out, it is rare to find them among fossils. But now, reported in the journal Geology, a school of jellyfish fossils have been found throughout those same seven layers. So, polystrate fossils that condense the time of strata deposition from eons to hours or months, include: - Jellyfish in central Wisconsin were not deposited and fossilized over a million years but during a single event quick enough to trap a whole school. (This fossil school, therefore, taken as a unit forms a polystrate fossil.) Examples are everywhere that falsify the claims of strata deposition over millions of years. - Countless trilobites buried in astounding three dimensionality around the world are meticulously recovered from limestone, much of which is claimed to have been deposited very slowly. Contrariwise, because these specimens were buried rapidly in quickly laid down sediments, they show no evidence of greater erosion on their upper parts as compared to their lower parts.- The delicacy of radiating spine polystrates, like tadpole and jellyfish fossils, especially clearly demonstrate the rapidity of such strata deposition. - A second school of jellyfish, even though they rarely fossilized, exists in another locale with jellyfish fossils in multiple layers, in Australia's Brockman Iron Formation, constraining there too the rate of strata deposition. By the way, jellyfish are an example of evolution's big squeeze. Like galaxies evolving too quickly, galaxy clusters, and even human feet (which, like Mummy DNA, challenge the Out of Africa paradigm), jellyfish have gotten into the act squeezing evolution's timeline, here by 200 million years when they were found in strata allegedly a half-a-billion years old. Other examples, ironically referred to as Medusoid Problematica, are even found in pre-Cambrian strata. - 171 tadpoles of the same species buried in diatoms. - Leaves buried vertically through single-celled diatoms powerfully refute the claimed super-slow deposition of diatomaceous rock. - Many fossils, including a Mesosaur, have been buried in multiple "varve" layers, which are claimed to be annual depositions, yet they show no erosional patterns that would indicate gradual burial (as they claim, absurdly, over even thousands of years). - A single whale skeleton preserved in California in dozens of layers of diatom deposits thus forming a polystrate fossil. - 40 whales buried in the desert in Chile. "What's really interesting is that this didn't just happen once," said Smithsonian evolutionist Dr. Nick Pyenson. It happened four times." Why's that? Because "the fossil site has at least four layers", to which Real Science Radio's Bob Enyart replies: "Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha", with RSR co-host Fred Williams thoughtfully adding, "Ha ha!" * Polystrate Trees: Examples abound around the world of polystrate trees:  - Yellowstone's petrified polystrate forest (with the NPS exhibit sign removed; see below) with successive layers of rootless trees demonstrating the rapid deposition of fifty layers of strata. - A similarly formed polystrate fossil forest in France demonstrating the rapid deposition of a dozen strata. - In a thousand locations including famously the Fossil Cliffs of Joggins, Nova Scotia, polystrate fossils such as trees span many strata. - These trees lack erosion: Not only should such fossils, generally speaking, not even exist, but polystrates including trees typically show no evidence of erosion increasing with height. All of this powerfully disproves the claim that the layers were deposited slowly over thousands or millions of years. In the experience of your RSR radio hosts, evolutionists commonly respond to this hard evidence with mocking. See CRSQ June 2006, ICR Impact #316, and RSR 8-11-06 at KGOV.com. * Yellowstone Petrified Trees Sign Removed: The National Park Service removed their incorrect sign (see left and more). The NPS had claimed that in dozens of different strata over a 40-square mile area, many petrified trees were still standing where they had grown. The NPS eventually removed the sign partly because those petrified trees had no root systems, which they would have had if they had grown there. Instead, the trees of this "fossil forest" have roots that are abruptly broken off two or three feet from their trunks. If these mature trees actually had been remnants of sequential forests that had grown up in strata layer on top of strata layer, 27 times on Specimen Ridge (and 50 times at Specimen Creek), such a natural history implies passage of more time than permitted by biblical chronology. So, don't trust the National Park Service on historical science because they're wrong on the age of the Earth. * Wood Petrifies Quickly: Not surprisingly, by the common evolutionary knee-jerk claim of deep time, "several researchers believe that several millions of years are necessary for the complete formation of silicified wood". Our List of Not So Old and Not So Slow Things includes the work of five Japanese scientists who proved creationist research and published their results in the peer-reviewed journal Sedimentary Geology showing that wood can and does petrify rapidly. Modern wood significantly petrified in 36 years these researchers concluded that wood buried in strata could have been petrified in "a fairly short period of time, in the order of several tens to hundreds of years." * The Scablands: The primary surface features of the Scablands, which cover thousands of square miles of eastern Washington, were long believed to have formed gradually. Yet, against the determined claims of uniformitarian geologists, there is now overwhelming evidence as presented even in a NOVA TV program that the primary features of the Scablands formed rapidly from a catastrophic breach of Lake Missoula causing a massive regional flood. Of course evolutionary geologists still argue that the landscape was formed over tens of thousands of years, now by claiming there must have been a hundred Missoula floods. However, the evidence that there was Only One Lake Missoula Flood has been powerfully reinforced by a University of Colorado Ph.D. thesis. So the Scablands itself is no longer available to old-earthers as de facto evidence for the passage of millions of years. * The Heart Mountain Detachment: in Wyoming just east of Yellowstone, this mountain did not break apart slowly by uniformitarian processes but in only about half-an-hour as widely reported including in the evolutionist LiveScience.com, "Land Speed Record: Mountain Moves 62 Miles in 30 Minutes." The evidence indicates that this mountain of rock covering 425 square miles rapidly broke into 50 pieces and slid apart over an area of more than 1,300 square miles in a biblical, not a "geological," timeframe.  * "150 Million" year-old Squid Ink Not Decomposed: This still-writable ink had dehydrated but had not decomposed! The British Geological Survey's Dr. Phil Wilby, who excavated the fossil, said, "It is difficult to imagine how you can have something as soft and sloppy as an ink sac fossilised in three dimensions, still black, and inside a rock that is 150 million years old." And the Daily Mail states that, "the black ink was of exactly the same structure as that of today's version", just desiccated. And Wilby added, "Normally you would find only the hard parts like the shell and bones fossilised but... these creatures... can be dissected as if they are living animals, you can see the muscle fibres and cells. It is difficult to imagine... The structure is similar to ink from a modern squid so we can write with it..." Why is this difficult for evolutionists to imagine? Because as Dr. Carl Wieland writes, "Chemical structures 'fall apart' all by themselves over time due to the randomizing effects of molecular motion." Decades ago Bob Enyart broadcast a geology program about Mount St. Helens' catastrophic destruction of forests and the hydraulic transportation and upright deposition of trees. Later, Bob met the chief ranger from Haleakala National Park on Hawaii's island of Maui, Mark Tanaka-Sanders. The ranger agreed to correspond with his colleague at Yellowstone to urge him to have the sign removed. Thankfully, it was then removed. (See also AIG, CMI, and all the original Yellowstone exhibit photos.) Groundbreaking research conducted by creation geologist Dr. Steve Austin in Spirit Lake after Mount St. Helens eruption provided a modern-day analog to the formation of Yellowstone fossil forest. A steam blast from that volcano blew over tens of thousands of trees leaving them without attached roots. Many thousands of those trees were floating upright in Spirit Lake, and began sinking at varying rates into rapidly and sporadically deposited sediments. Once Yellowstone's successive forest interpretation was falsified (though like with junk DNA, it's too big to fail, so many atheists and others still cling to it), the erroneous sign was removed. * Asiatic vs. European Honeybees: These two populations of bees have been separated supposedly for seven million years. A researcher decided to put the two together to see what would happen. What we should have here is a failure to communicate that would have resulted after their "language" evolved over millions of years. However, European and Asiatic honeybees are still able to communicate, putting into doubt the evolutionary claim that they were separated over "geologic periods." For more, see the Public Library of Science, Asiatic Honeybees Can Understand Dance Language of European Honeybees. (Oh yeah, and why don't fossils of poorly-formed honeycombs exist, from the millions of years before the bees and natural selection finally got the design right? Ha! Because they don't exist! :) Nautiloid proves rapid limestone formation.* Remember the Nautiloids: In the Grand Canyon there is a limestone layer averaging seven feet thick that runs the 277 miles of the canyon (and beyond) that covers hundreds of square miles and contains an average of one nautiloid fossil per square meter. Along with many other dead creatures in this one particular layer, 15% of these nautiloids were killed and then fossilized standing on their heads. Yes, vertically. They were caught in such an intense and rapid catastrophic flow that gravity was not able to cause all of their dead carcasses to fall over on their sides. Famed Mount St. Helens geologist Steve Austin is also the world's leading expert on nautiloid fossils and has worked in the canyon and presented his findings to the park's rangers at the invitation of National Park Service officials. Austin points out, as is true of many of the world's mass fossil graveyards, that this enormous nautiloid deposition provides indisputable proof of the extremely rapid formation of a significant layer of limestone near the bottom of the canyon, a layer like the others we've been told about, that allegedly formed at the bottom of a calm and placid sea with slow and gradual sedimentation. But a million nautiloids, standing on their heads, literally, would beg to differ. At our sister stie, RSR provides the relevant Geologic Society of America abstract, links, and video. *  Now It's Allegedly Two Million Year-Old Leaves: "When we started pulling leaves out of the soil, that was surreal, to know that it's millions of years old..." sur-re-al: adjective: a bizarre mix of fact and fantasy. In this case, the leaves are the facts. Earth scientists from Ohio State and the University of Minnesota say that wood and leaves they found in the Canadian Arctic are at least two million years old, and perhaps more than ten million years old, even though the leaves are just dry and crumbly and the wood still burns! * Gold Precipitates in Veins in Less than a Second: After geologists submitted for decades to the assumption that each layer of gold would deposit at the alleged super slow rates of geologic process, the journal Nature Geoscience reports that each layer of deposition can occur within a few tenths of a second. Meanwhile, at the Lihir gold deposit in Papua New Guinea, evolutionists assumed the more than 20 million ounces of gold in the Lihir reserve took millions of years to deposit, but as reported in the journal Science, geologists can now demonstrate that the deposit could have formed in thousands of years, or far more quickly! Iceland's not-so-old Surtsey Island looks ancient.* Surtsey Island, Iceland: Of the volcanic island that formed in 1963, New Scientist reported in 2007 about Surtsey that "geographers... marvel that canyons, gullies and other land features that typically take tens of thousands or millions of years to form were created in less than a decade." Yes. And Sigurdur Thorarinsson, Iceland's chief  geologist, wrote in the months after Surtsey formed, "that the time scale," he had been trained "to attach to geological developments is misleading." [For what is said to] take thousands of years... the same development may take a few weeks or even days here [including to form] a landscape... so varied and mature that it was almost beyond belief... wide sandy beaches and precipitous crags... gravel banks and lagoons, impressive cliffs… hollows, glens and soft undulating land... fractures and faultscarps, channels and screes… confounded by what met your eye... boulders worn by the surf, some of which were almost round... -Iceland's chief geologist * The Palouse River Gorge: In the southeast of Washington State, the Palouse River Gorge is one of many features formed rapidly by 500 cubic miles of water catastrophically released with the breaching of a natural dam in the Lake Missoula Flood (which gouged out the Scablands as described above). So, hard rock can be breached and eroded rapidly. * Leaf Shapes Identical for 190 Million Years?  From Berkley.edu, "Ginkgo biloba... dates back to... about 190 million years ago... fossilized leaf material from the Tertiary species Ginkgo adiantoides is considered similar or even identical to that produced by modern Ginkgo biloba trees... virtually indistinguishable..." The literature describes leaf shapes as "spectacularly diverse" sometimes within a species but especially across the plant kingdom. Because all kinds of plants survive with all kinds of different leaf shapes, the conservation of a species retaining a single shape over alleged deep time is a telling issue. Darwin's theory is undermined by the unchanging shape over millions of years of a species' leaf shape. This lack of change, stasis in what should be an easily morphable plant trait, supports the broader conclusion that chimp-like creatures did not become human beings and all the other ambitious evolutionary creation of new kinds are simply imagined. (Ginkgo adiantoides and biloba are actually the same species. Wikipedia states, "It is doubtful whether the Northern Hemisphere fossil species of Ginkgo can be reliably distinguished." For oftentimes, as documented by Dr. Carl Werner in his Evolution: The Grand Experiment series, paleontogists falsely speciate identical specimens, giving different species names, even different genus names, to the fossil and living animals that appear identical.) * Box Canyon, Idaho: Geologists now think Box Canyon in Idaho, USA, was carved by a catastrophic flood and not slowly over millions of years with 1) huge plunge pools formed by waterfalls; 2) the almost complete removal of large basalt boulders from the canyon; 3) an eroded notch on the plateau at the top of the canyon; and 4) water scour marks on the basalt plateau leading to the canyon. Scientists calculate that the flood was so large that it could have eroded the whole canyon in as little as 35 days. See the journal Science, Formation of Box Canyon, Idaho, by Megaflood, and the Journal of Creation, and Creation Magazine. * Manganese Nodules Rapid Formation: Allegedly, as claimed at the Wikipedia entry from 2005 through 2021: "Nodule growth is one of the slowest of all geological phenomena – in the order of a centimeter over several million years." Wow, that would be slow! And a Texas A&M Marine Sciences technical slide presentation says, “They grow very slowly (mm/million years) and can be tens of millions of years old.” But according to a World Almanac documentary they have formed "around beer cans," said marine geologist Dr. John Yates in the 1997 video Universe Beneath the Sea: The Next Frontier. There are also reports of manganese nodules forming around ships sunk in the First World War. See more at at youngearth.com, at TOL, in the print edition of the Journal of Creation, and in this typical forum discussion with atheists (at the Chicago Cubs forum no less :). * "6,000 year-old" Mitochondrial Eve: As the Bible calls "Eve... the mother of all living" (Gen. 3:20), genetic researchers have named the one woman from whom all humans have descended "Mitochondrial Eve." But in a scientific attempt to date her existence, they openly admit that they included chimpanzee DNA in their analysis in order to get what they viewed as a reasonably old date of 200,000 years ago (which is still surprisingly recent from their perspective, but old enough not to strain Darwinian theory too much). But then as widely reported including by Science magazine, when they dropped the chimp data and used only actual human mutation rates, that process determined that Eve lived only six thousand years ago! In Ann Gibbon's Science article, "Calibrating the Mitochondrial Clock," rather than again using circular reasoning by assuming their conclusion (that humans evolved from ape-like creatures), they performed their calculations using actual measured mutation rates. This peer-reviewed journal then reported that if these rates have been constant, "mitochondrial Eve… would be a mere 6000 years old." See also the journal Nature and creation.com's "A shrinking date for Eve," and Walt Brown's assessment. Expectedly though, evolutionists have found a way to reject their own unbiased finding (the conclusion contrary to their self-interest) by returning to their original method of using circular reasoning, as reported in the American Journal of Human Genetics, "calibrating against recent evidence for the divergence time of humans and chimpanzees,"  to reset their mitochondrial clock back to 200,000 years. * Even Younger Y-Chromosomal Adam: (Although he should be called, "Y-Chromosomal Noah.") While we inherit our mtDNA only from our mothers, only men have a Y chromosome (which incidentally genetically disproves the claim that the fetus is "part of the woman's body," since the little boy's y chromosome could never be part of mom's body). Based on documented mutation rates on and the extraordinary lack o

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Real Science Radio
RSR's List of Not So Old Things

Real Science Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2021


[While Bob & Cheryl Enyart go fishing we invite you to enjoy from the RSR archives our favorite List of Not So Old Things! Photos from today, June 25, 2021.] -- Finches Diversify in Decades, Opals Form in Months,  Man's Genetic Diversity in 200 Generations, C-14 Everywhere: Real Science Radio hosts Bob Enyart and Fred Williams present their classic program that led to the audience-favorites rsr.org/list-shows! See below and hear on today's radio program our list of Not So Old and Not So Slow Things! From opals forming in months to man's genetic diversity in 200 generations, and with carbon 14 everywhere it's not supposed to be (including in diamonds and dinosaur bones!), scientific observations fill the guys' most traditional list challenging those who claim that the earth is billions of years old. Many of these scientific finds demand a re-evaluation of supposed million and billion-year ages. * Finches Adapt in 17 Years, Not 2.3 Million: Charles Darwin's finches are claimed to have taken 2,300,000 years to diversify from an initial species blown onto the Galapagos Islands. Yet individuals from a single finch species on a U.S. Bird Reservation in the Pacific were introduced to a group of small islands 300 miles away and in at most 17 years, like Darwin's finches, they had diversified their beaks, related muscles, and behavior to fill various ecological niches. Hear about this also at rsr.org/spetner. * Opals Can Form in "A Few Months" And Don't Need 100,000 Years: A leading authority on opals, Allan W. Eckert, observed that, "scientific papers and textbooks have told that the process of opal formation requires tens of thousands of years, perhaps hundreds of thousands... Not true." A 2011 peer-reviewed paper in a geology journal from Australia, where almost all the world's opal is found, reported on the: "new timetable for opal formation involving weeks to a few months and not the hundreds of thousands of years envisaged by the conventional weathering model." (And apparently, per a 2019 report from Entomology Today, opals can even form around insects!) More knowledgeable scientists resist the uncritical, group-think insistence on false super-slow formation rates (as also for manganese nodules, gold veins, stone, petroleum, canyons and gullies, and even guts, all below). Regarding opals, Darwinian bias led geologists to long ignore possible quick action, as from microbes, as a possible explanation for these mineraloids. For both in nature and in the lab, opals form rapidly, not even in 10,000 years, but in weeks. See this also from creationists by a geologist, a paleobiochemist, and a nuclear chemist. * Finches Speciate in Two Generations vs Two Million Years for Darwin's Birds?  Darwin's finches on the Galapagos Islands are said to have diversified into 14 species over a period of two million years. But in 2017 the journal Science reported a newcomer to the Island which within two generations spawned a reproductively isolated new species. In another instance as documented by Lee Spetner, a hundred birds of the same finch species introduced to an island cluster a 1,000 kilometers from Galapagos diversified into species with the typical variations in beak sizes, etc. "If this diversification occurred in less than seventeen years," Dr. Spetner asks, "why did Darwin's Galapagos finches [as claimed by evolutionists] have to take two million years?" * Blue Eyes Originated Not So Long Ago: Not a million years ago, nor a hundred thousand years ago, but based on a peer-reviewed paper in Human Genetics, a press release at Science Daily reports that, "research shows that people with blue eyes have a single, common ancestor. A team at the University of Copenhagen have tracked down a genetic mutation which took place 6-10,000 years ago and is the cause of the eye colour of all blue-eyed humans alive on the planet today." * Adding the Entire Universe to our List of Not So Old Things? Based on March 2019 findings from Hubble, Nobel laureate Adam Riess of the Space Telescope Science Institute and his co-authors in the Astrophysical Journal estimate that the universe is about a billion years younger than previously thought! Then in September 2019 in the journal Science, the age dropped precipitiously to as low as 11.4 billion years! Of course, these measurements also further squeeze the canonical story of the big bang chronology with its many already existing problems including the insufficient time to "evolve" distant mature galaxies, galaxy clusters, superclusters, enormous black holes, filaments, bubbles, walls, and other superstructures. So, even though the latest estimates are still absurdly too old (Google: big bang predictions, and click on the #1 ranked article, or just go on over there to rsr.org/bb), regardless, we thought we'd plop the whole universe down on our List of Not So Old Things!   * After the Soft Tissue Discoveries, NOW Dino DNA: When a North Carolina State University paleontologist took the Tyrannosaurus Rex photos to the right of original biological material, that led to the 2016 discovery of dinosaur DNA, So far researchers have also recovered dinosaur blood vessels, collagen, osteocytes, hemoglobin, red blood cells, and various proteins. As of May 2018, twenty-six scientific journals, including Nature, Science, PNAS, PLoS One, Bone, and Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, have confirmed the discovery of biomaterial fossils from many dinosaurs! Organisms including T. Rex, hadrosaur, titanosaur, triceratops, Lufengosaur, mosasaur, and Archaeopteryx, and many others dated, allegedly, even hundreds of millions of years old, have yielded their endogenous, still-soft biological material. See the web's most complete listing of 100+ journal papers (screenshot, left) announcing these discoveries at bflist.rsr.org and see it in layman's terms at rsr.org/soft. * Rapid Stalactites, Stalagmites, Etc.: A construction worker in 1954 left a lemonade bottle in one of Australia's famous Jenolan Caves. By 2011 it had been naturally transformed into a stalagmite (below, right). Increasing scientific knowledge is arguing for rapid cave formation (see below, Nat'l Park Service shrinks Carlsbad Caverns formation estimates from 260M years, to 10M, to 2M, to it "depends"). Likewise, examples are growing of rapid formations with typical chemical make-up (see bottle, left) of classic stalactites and stalagmites including:- in Nat'l Geo the Carlsbad Caverns stalagmite that rapidly covered a bat - the tunnel stalagmites at Tennessee's Raccoon Mountain - hundreds of stalactites beneath the Lincoln Memorial - those near Gladfelter Hall at Philadelphia's Temple University (send photos to Bob@rsr.org) - hundreds of stalactites at Australia's zinc mine at Mt. Isa.   - and those beneath Melbourne's Shrine of Remembrance. * Most Human Mutations Arose in 200 Generations: From Adam until Real Science Radio, in only 200 generations! The journal Nature reports The Recent Origin of Most Human Protein-coding Variants. As summarized by geneticist co-author Joshua Akey, "Most of the mutations that we found arose in the last 200 generations or so" (the same number previously published by biblical creationists). Another 2012 paper, in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology (Eugenie Scott's own field) on High mitochondrial mutation rates, shows that one mitochondrial DNA mutation occurs every other generation, which, as creationists point out, indicates that mtEve would have lived about 200 generations ago. That's not so old! * National Geographic's Not-So-Old Hard-Rock Canyon at Mount St. Helens: As our List of Not So Old Things (this web page) reveals, by a kneejerk reaction evolutionary scientists assign ages of tens or hundreds of thousands of years (or at least just long enough to contradict Moses' chronology in Genesis.) However, with closer study, routinely, more and more old ages get revised downward to fit the world's growing scientific knowledge. So the trend is not that more information lengthens ages, but rather, as data replaces guesswork, ages tend to shrink until they are consistent with the young-earth biblical timeframe. Consistent with this observation, the May 2000 issue of National Geographic quotes the U.S. Forest Service's scientist at Mount St. Helens, Peter Frenzen, describing the canyon on the north side of the volcano. "You'd expect a hard-rock canyon to be thousands, even hundreds of thousands of years old. But this was cut in less than a decade." And as for the volcano itself, while again, the kneejerk reaction of old-earthers would be to claim that most geologic features are hundreds of thousands or millions of years old, the atheistic National Geographic magazine acknowledges from the evidence that Mount St. Helens, the volcanic mount, is only about 4,000 years old! See below and more at rsr.org/mount-st-helens. * Mount St. Helens Dome Ten Years Old not 1.7 Million: Geochron Laboratories of Cambridge, Mass., using potassium-argon and other radiometric techniques claims the rock sample they dated, from the volcano's dome, solidified somewhere between 340,000 and 2.8 million years ago. However photographic evidence and historical reports document the dome's formation during the 1980s, just ten years prior to the samples being collected. With the age of this rock known, radiometric dating therefore gets the age 99.99999% wrong. * Devils Hole Pupfish Isolated Not for 13,000 Years But for 100: Secular scientists default to knee-jerk, older-than-Bible-age dates. However, a tiny Mojave desert fish is having none of it. Rather than having been genetically isolated from other fish for 13,000 years (which would make this small school of fish older than the Earth itself), according to a paper in the journal Nature, actual measurements of mutation rates indicate that the genetic diversity of these Pupfish could have been generated in about 100 years, give or take a few. * Polystrates like Spines and Rare Schools of Fossilized Jellyfish: Previously, seven sedimentary layers in Wisconsin had been described as taking a million years to form. And because jellyfish have no skeleton, as Charles Darwin pointed out, it is rare to find them among fossils. But now, reported in the journal Geology, a school of jellyfish fossils have been found throughout those same seven layers. So, polystrate fossils that condense the time of strata deposition from eons to hours or months, include: - Jellyfish in central Wisconsin were not deposited and fossilized over a million years but during a single event quick enough to trap a whole school. (This fossil school, therefore, taken as a unit forms a polystrate fossil.) Examples are everywhere that falsify the claims of strata deposition over millions of years. - Countless trilobites buried in astounding three dimensionality around the world are meticulously recovered from limestone, much of which is claimed to have been deposited very slowly. Contrariwise, because these specimens were buried rapidly in quickly laid down sediments, they show no evidence of greater erosion on their upper parts as compared to their lower parts.- The delicacy of radiating spine polystrates, like tadpole and jellyfish fossils, especially clearly demonstrate the rapidity of such strata deposition. - A second school of jellyfish, even though they rarely fossilized, exists in another locale with jellyfish fossils in multiple layers, in Australia's Brockman Iron Formation, constraining there too the rate of strata deposition. By the way, jellyfish are an example of evolution's big squeeze. Like galaxies evolving too quickly, galaxy clusters, and even human feet (which, like Mummy DNA, challenge the Out of Africa paradigm), jellyfish have gotten into the act squeezing evolution's timeline, here by 200 million years when they were found in strata allegedly a half-a-billion years old. Other examples, ironically referred to as Medusoid Problematica, are even found in pre-Cambrian strata. - 171 tadpoles of the same species buried in diatoms. - Leaves buried vertically through single-celled diatoms powerfully refute the claimed super-slow deposition of diatomaceous rock. - Many fossils, including a Mesosaur, have been buried in multiple "varve" layers, which are claimed to be annual depositions, yet they show no erosional patterns that would indicate gradual burial (as they claim, absurdly, over even thousands of years). - A single whale skeleton preserved in California in dozens of layers of diatom deposits thus forming a polystrate fossil. - 40 whales buried in the desert in Chile. "What's really interesting is that this didn't just happen once," said Smithsonian evolutionist Dr. Nick Pyenson. It happened four times." Why's that? Because "the fossil site has at least four layers", to which Real Science Radio's Bob Enyart replies: "Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha", with RSR co-host Fred Williams thoughtfully adding, "Ha ha!" * Polystrate Trees: Examples abound around the world of polystrate trees:  - Yellowstone's petrified polystrate forest (with the NPS exhibit sign removed; see below) with successive layers of rootless trees demonstrating the rapid deposition of fifty layers of strata. - A similarly formed polystrate fossil forest in France demonstrating the rapid deposition of a dozen strata. - In a thousand locations including famously the Fossil Cliffs of Joggins, Nova Scotia, polystrate fossils such as trees span many strata. - These trees lack erosion: Not only should such fossils, generally speaking, not even exist, but polystrates including trees typically show no evidence of erosion increasing with height. All of this powerfully disproves the claim that the layers were deposited slowly over thousands or millions of years. In the experience of your RSR radio hosts, evolutionists commonly respond to this hard evidence with mocking. See CRSQ June 2006, ICR Impact #316, and RSR 8-11-06 at KGOV.com. * Yellowstone Petrified Trees Sign Removed: The National Park Service removed their incorrect sign (see left and more). The NPS had claimed that in dozens of different strata over a 40-square mile area, many petrified trees were still standing where they had grown. The NPS eventually removed the sign partly because those petrified trees had no root systems, which they would have had if they had grown there. Instead, the trees of this "fossil forest" have roots that are abruptly broken off two or three feet from their trunks. If these mature trees actually had been remnants of sequential forests that had grown up in strata layer on top of strata layer, 27 times on Specimen Ridge (and 50 times at Specimen Creek), such a natural history implies passage of more time than permitted by biblical chronology. So, don't trust the National Park Service on historical science because they're wrong on the age of the Earth. * Wood Petrifies Quickly: Not surprisingly, by the common evolutionary knee-jerk claim of deep time, "several researchers believe that several millions of years are necessary for the complete formation of silicified wood". Our List of Not So Old and Not So Slow Things includes the work of five Japanese scientists who proved creationist research and published their results in the peer-reviewed journal Sedimentary Geology showing that wood can and does petrify rapidly. Modern wood significantly petrified in 36 years these researchers concluded that wood buried in strata could have been petrified in "a fairly short period of time, in the order of several tens to hundreds of years." * The Scablands: The primary surface features of the Scablands, which cover thousands of square miles of eastern Washington, were long believed to have formed gradually. Yet, against the determined claims of uniformitarian geologists, there is now overwhelming evidence as presented even in a NOVA TV program that the primary features of the Scablands formed rapidly from a catastrophic breach of Lake Missoula causing a massive regional flood. Of course evolutionary geologists still argue that the landscape was formed over tens of thousands of years, now by claiming there must have been a hundred Missoula floods. However, the evidence that there was Only One Lake Missoula Flood has been powerfully reinforced by a University of Colorado Ph.D. thesis. So the Scablands itself is no longer available to old-earthers as de facto evidence for the passage of millions of years. * The Heart Mountain Detachment: in Wyoming just east of Yellowstone, this mountain did not break apart slowly by uniformitarian processes but in only about half-an-hour as widely reported including in the evolutionist LiveScience.com, "Land Speed Record: Mountain Moves 62 Miles in 30 Minutes." The evidence indicates that this mountain of rock covering 425 square miles rapidly broke into 50 pieces and slid apart over an area of more than 1,300 square miles in a biblical, not a "geological," timeframe.  * "150 Million" year-old Squid Ink Not Decomposed: This still-writable ink had dehydrated but had not decomposed! The British Geological Survey's Dr. Phil Wilby, who excavated the fossil, said, "It is difficult to imagine how you can have something as soft and sloppy as an ink sac fossilised in three dimensions, still black, and inside a rock that is 150 million years old." And the Daily Mail states that, "the black ink was of exactly the same structure as that of today's version", just desiccated. And Wilby added, "Normally you would find only the hard parts like the shell and bones fossilised but... these creatures... can be dissected as if they are living animals, you can see the muscle fibres and cells. It is difficult to imagine... The structure is similar to ink from a modern squid so we can write with it..." Why is this difficult for evolutionists to imagine? Because as Dr. Carl Wieland writes, "Chemical structures 'fall apart' all by themselves over time due to the randomizing effects of molecular motion." Decades ago Bob Enyart broadcast a geology program about Mount St. Helens' catastrophic destruction of forests and the hydraulic transportation and upright deposition of trees. Later, Bob met the chief ranger from Haleakala National Park on Hawaii's island of Maui, Mark Tanaka-Sanders. The ranger agreed to correspond with his colleague at Yellowstone to urge him to have the sign removed. Thankfully, it was then removed. (See also AIG, CMI, and all the original Yellowstone exhibit photos.) Groundbreaking research conducted by creation geologist Dr. Steve Austin in Spirit Lake after Mount St. Helens eruption provided a modern-day analog to the formation of Yellowstone fossil forest. A steam blast from that volcano blew over tens of thousands of trees leaving them without attached roots. Many thousands of those trees were floating upright in Spirit Lake, and began sinking at varying rates into rapidly and sporadically deposited sediments. Once Yellowstone's successive forest interpretation was falsified (though like with junk DNA, it's too big to fail, so many atheists and others still cling to it), the erroneous sign was removed. * Asiatic vs. European Honeybees: These two populations of bees have been separated supposedly for seven million years. A researcher decided to put the two together to see what would happen. What we should have here is a failure to communicate that would have resulted after their "language" evolved over millions of years. However, European and Asiatic honeybees are still able to communicate, putting into doubt the evolutionary claim that they were separated over "geologic periods." For more, see the Public Library of Science, Asiatic Honeybees Can Understand Dance Language of European Honeybees. (Oh yeah, and why don't fossils of poorly-formed honeycombs exist, from the millions of years before the bees and natural selection finally got the design right? Ha! Because they don't exist! :) Nautiloid proves rapid limestone formation. * Remember the Nautiloids: In the Grand Canyon there is a limestone layer averaging seven feet thick that runs the 277 miles of the canyon (and beyond) that covers hundreds of square miles and contains an average of one nautiloid fossil per square meter. Along with many other dead creatures in this one particular layer, 15% of these nautiloids were killed and then fossilized standing on their heads. Yes, vertically. They were caught in such an intense and rapid catastrophic flow that gravity was not able to cause all of their dead carcasses to fall over on their sides. Famed Mount St. Helens geologist Steve Austin is also the world's leading expert on nautiloid fossils and has worked in the canyon and presented his findings to the park's rangers at the invitation of National Park Service officials. Austin points out, as is true of many of the world's mass fossil graveyards, that this enormous nautiloid deposition provides indisputable proof of the extremely rapid formation of a significant layer of limestone near the bottom of the canyon, a layer like the others we've been told about, that allegedly formed at the bottom of a calm and placid sea with slow and gradual sedimentation. But a million nautiloids, standing on their heads, literally, would beg to differ. At our sister stie, RSR provides the relevant Geologic Society of America abstract, links, and video. *  Now It's Allegedly Two Million Year-Old Leaves: "When we started pulling leaves out of the soil, that was surreal, to know that it's millions of years old..." sur-re-al: adjective: a bizarre mix of fact and fantasy. In this case, the leaves are the facts. Earth scientists from Ohio State and the University of Minnesota say that wood and leaves they found in the Canadian Arctic are at least two million years old, and perhaps more than ten million years old, even though the leaves are just dry and crumbly and the wood still burns! * Gold Precipitates in Veins in Less than a Second: After geologists submitted for decades to the assumption that each layer of gold would deposit at the alleged super slow rates of geologic process, the journal Nature Geoscience reports that each layer of deposition can occur within a few tenths of a second. Meanwhile, at the Lihir gold deposit in Papua New Guinea, evolutionists assumed the more than 20 million ounces of gold in the Lihir reserve took millions of years to deposit, but as reported in the journal Science, geologists can now demonstrate that the deposit could have formed in thousands of years, or far more quickly! Iceland's not-so-old Surtsey Island looks ancient. * Surtsey Island, Iceland: Of the volcanic island that formed in 1963, New Scientist reported in 2007 about Surtsey that "geographers... marvel that canyons, gullies and other land features that typically take tens of thousands or millions of years to form were created in less than a decade." Yes. And Sigurdur Thorarinsson, Iceland's chief  geologist, wrote in the months after Surtsey formed, "that the time scale," he had been trained "to attach to geological developments is misleading." [For what is said to] take thousands of years... the same development may take a few weeks or even days here [including to form] a landscape... so varied and mature that it was almost beyond belief... wide sandy beaches and precipitous crags... gravel banks and lagoons, impressive cliffs… hollows, glens and soft undulating land... fractures and faultscarps, channels and screes… confounded by what met your eye... boulders worn by the surf, some of which were almost round... -Iceland's chief geologist * The Palouse River Gorge: In the southeast of Washington State, the Palouse River Gorge is one of many features formed rapidly by 500 cubic miles of water catastrophically released with the breaching of a natural dam in the Lake Missoula Flood (which gouged out the Scablands as described above). So, hard rock can be breached and eroded rapidly. * Leaf Shapes Identical for 190 Million Years?  From Berkley.edu, "Ginkgo biloba... dates back to... about 190 million years ago... fossilized leaf material from the Tertiary species Ginkgo adiantoides is considered similar or even identical to that produced by modern Ginkgo biloba trees... virtually indistinguishable..." The literature describes leaf shapes as "spectacularly diverse" sometimes within a species but especially across the plant kingdom. Because all kinds of plants survive with all kinds of different leaf shapes, the conservation of a species retaining a single shape over alleged deep time is a telling issue. Darwin's theory is undermined by the unchanging shape over millions of years of a species' leaf shape. This lack of change, stasis in what should be an easily morphable plant trait, supports the broader conclusion that chimp-like creatures did not become human beings and all the other ambitious evolutionary creation of new kinds are simply imagined. (Ginkgo adiantoides and biloba are actually the same species. Wikipedia states, "It is doubtful whether the Northern Hemisphere fossil species of Ginkgo can be reliably distinguished." For oftentimes, as documented by Dr. Carl Werner in his Evolution: The Grand Experiment series, paleontogists falsely speciate identical specimens, giving different species names, even different genus names, to the fossil and living animals that appear identical.) * Box Canyon, Idaho: Geologists now think Box Canyon in Idaho, USA, was carved by a catastrophic flood and not slowly over millions of years with 1) huge plunge pools formed by waterfalls; 2) the almost complete removal of large basalt boulders from the canyon; 3) an eroded notch on the plateau at the top of the canyon; and 4) water scour marks on the basalt plateau leading to the canyon. Scientists calculate that the flood was so large that it could have eroded the whole canyon in as little as 35 days. See the journal Science, Formation of Box Canyon, Idaho, by Megaflood, and the Journal of Creation, and Creation Magazine. * Manganese Nodules Rapid Formation: Allegedly, as claimed at the Wikipedia entry from 2005 through 2021: "Nodule growth is one of the slowest of all geological phenomena – in the order of a centimeter over several million years." Wow, that would be slow! And a Texas A&M Marine Sciences technical slide presentation says, “They grow very slowly (mm/million years) and can be tens of millions of years old.” But according to a World Almanac documentary they have formed "around beer cans," said marine geologist Dr. John Yates in the 1997 video Universe Beneath the Sea: The Next Frontier. There are also reports of manganese nodules forming around ships sunk in the First World War. See more at at youngearth.com, at TOL, in the print edition of the Journal of Creation, and in this typical forum discussion with atheists (at the Chicago Cubs forum no less :). * "6,000 year-old" Mitochondrial Eve: As the Bible calls "Eve... the mother of all living" (Gen. 3:20), genetic researchers have named the one woman from whom all humans have descended "Mitochondrial Eve." But in a scientific attempt to date her existence, they openly admit that they included chimpanzee DNA in their analysis in order to get what they viewed as a reasonably old date of 200,000 years ago (which is still surprisingly recent from their perspective, but old enough not to strain Darwinian theory too much). But then as widely reported including by Science magazine, when they dropped the chimp data and used only actual human mutation rates, that process determined that Eve lived only six thousand years ago! In Ann Gibbon's Science article, "Calibrating the Mitochondrial Clock," rather than again using circular reasoning by assuming their conclusion (that humans evolved from ape-like creatures), they performed their calculations using actual measured mutation rates. This peer-reviewed journal then reported that if these rates have been constant, "mitochondrial Eve… would be a mere 6000 years old." See also the journal Nature and creation.com's "A shrinking date for Eve," and Walt Brown's assessment. Expectedly though, evolutionists have found a way to reject their own unbiased finding (the conclusion contrary to their self-interest) by returning to their original method of using circular reasoning, as reported in the American Journal of Human Genetics, "calibrating against recent evidence for the divergence time of humans and chimpanzees,"  to reset their mitochondrial clock back to 200,000 years. * Even Younger Y-Chromosomal Adam: (Although he should be called, "Y-Chromosomal Noah.") While we inherit our mtDNA only from our mothers, only men have a Y chromosome (which incidentally genetically disproves the cla

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Curiosity Daily
Mammals Can Breathe Through Their Butts

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021 12:00


Learn how mammals breathe through their butts; how babies remember their birth language; and your reflection in a spoon. Mammals can breathe through their butts, and this could help humans with respiratory failure by Grant Currin Breathing Through the Rectum Saves Oxygen-Starved Mice and Pigs. (2021). The New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/2021/05/14/science/rectum-breathing-oxygen.html  Okabe, R., Chen-Yoshikawa, T. F., Yoneyama, Y., Yokoyama, Y., Tanaka, S., Yoshizawa, A., Thompson, W. L., Kannan, G., Kobayashi, E., Date, H., & Takebe, T. (2021). Mammalian enteral ventilation ameliorates respiratory failure. Med. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.medj.2021.04.004  Even If They Don't Use It, Babies Remember Their Birth Language by Ashley Hamer Adoptees advantaged by birth language memory. (2017). ScienceDaily. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170118082828.htm  ‌Early development of abstract language knowledge: evidence from perception–production transfer of birth-language memory | Royal Society Open Science. (2017). Royal Society Open Science. https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/full/10.1098/rsos.160660  Why is your reflection upside down in a spoon? by Ashley Hamer (Listener question from Bella in Austin, Texas) Matthews, R. (2019). Why is your reflection upside-down in a spoon? BBC Science Focus Magazine; BBC Science Focus Magazine. https://www.sciencefocus.com/science/why-is-your-reflection-upside-down-in-a-spoon/  Physics Tutorial: Reflection and Image Formation for Convex Mirrors. (2021). Physicsclassroom.com. https://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/refln/Lesson-4/Reflection-and-Image-Formation-for-Convex-Mirrors  Q & A: Why is your reflection upside down in a spoon? | Department of Physics | University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. (2021). Illinois.edu. https://van.physics.illinois.edu/QA/listing.php?id=1985&t=why-is-your-reflection-upside-down-in-a-spoon It's AumSum Time. (2017). Concave Mirror - Why is your reflection upside down on a spoon? | #aumsum #kids #science [YouTube Video]. In YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N6n0FAZ_6N8  Why mirrors flip horizontally but not vertically (Curiosity Daily listener question): https://omny.fm/shows/curiosity-daily/bad-news-about-your-wearable-sleep-tracker  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer — for free! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Curiosity Daily
A Robot That Talks to Itself Might Be Easier to Interact With

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 11:41


Learn about interacting with robots that talk to themselves; “mad honey,” a rare, dangerous hallucinogen; and “alief.” Robots that talk to themselves might be easier to interact with by Grant Currin Pepper the humanoid and programmable robot | SoftBank Robotics. (2021). Softbankrobotics.com. https://www.softbankrobotics.com/emea/en/pepper  Pipitone, A., & Chella, A. (2021). What robots want? Hearing the inner voice of a robot. IScience, 102371. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.isci.2021.102371  Pepper the robot talks to itself to improve its interactions with people. (2021). ScienceDaily. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/04/210421124654.htm  "Mad honey" is a weird, rare, dangerous hallucinogen used as medicine around the Black Sea by Steffie Drucker Johnson, S. (2021, April 23). “Mad honey”: The rare hallucinogen from the mountains of Nepal. Big Think; Big Think. https://bigthink.com/culture-religion/mad-honey  ‌The Hallucinogenic Honey of Nepal and Turkey. (2017, November 12). Atlas Obscura. https://www.atlasobscura.com/foods/mad-honey-red-hallucinogen  ‌Hess, P. (2017, July 17). Mad Honey: What to know before eating hallucinogenic honey from Nepal. Inverse; Inverse. https://www.inverse.com/mind-body/33974-mad-honey-nepal-rhododendron-grayanotoxin-hallucinogenic  ‌Jansen, S. A., Kleerekooper, I., Hofman, Z. L. M., Kappen, I. F. P. M., Stary-Weinzinger, A., & van der Heyden, M. A. G. (2012). Grayanotoxin Poisoning: “Mad Honey Disease” and Beyond. Cardiovascular Toxicology, 12(3), 208–215. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12012-012-9162-2  Alief Is When You Act In Opposition To Your True Beliefs by Ashley Hamer Gendler, T. S. (2008). Alief in action (and reaction). Mind & Language, 23(5), 552-585. http://www.errol-lord.com/uploads/1/8/6/6/18669048/gendler-aliefinaction.pdf  Bloom, P. (2010, May 30). The Pleasures of Imagination. The Chronicle of Higher Education; The Chronicle of Higher Education. https://www.chronicle.com/article/the-pleasures-of-imagination/  ‌Kawakami, K., Dovidio, J. F., Moll, J., Hermsen, S., & Russin, A. (2000). Just say no (to stereotyping): effects of training in the negation of stereotypic associations on stereotype activation. Journal of personality and social psychology, 78(5), 871. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Sander-Hermsen-2/publication/12497209_Just_Say_No_to_Stereotyping_Effects_of_Training_in_the_Negation_of_Stereotypic_Associations_on_Stereotype_Activation/links/5602972108ae849b3c0e11f1/Just-Say-No-to-Stereotyping-Effects-of-Training-in-the-Negation-of-Stereotypic-Associations-on-Stereotype-Activation.pdf  Blair, I. V. (2002). The Malleability of Automatic Stereotypes and Prejudice. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 6(3), 242–261. https://doi.org/10.1207/s15327957pspr0603_8  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer — for free!  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

That's Cool News | A weekly breakdown of positive Science & Tech news.
60. Self-Driving Shipment Truck, Faster Internet Standard, NASA is Venus Bound

That's Cool News | A weekly breakdown of positive Science & Tech news.

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 43:56


Cool News Timestamps: Google's speedier internet standard is now an actual standard | Engadget (01:29) New tool activates deep brain neurons by combining ultrasound, genetics | ScienceDaily (07:31) A Self-Driving Truck Got a Shipment Cross-Country 10 Hours Faster Than a Human Driver | SingularityHub (16:07) Ordinary Microscope Sees in Super-Resolution With Specially Engineered Light-Shrinking Material  | SciTechDaily (26:15) Elon Musk: SpaceX Ocean Spaceport Deimos Under Construction for Starship Launch Next Year | TechTimes (38:21) ----more---- Podcast Links: Website: https://thatscoolnews.com/ Support the Podcast: https://thatscoolnews.com/support Review The Podcast: https://thatscoolnews.com/review Email List: https://thatscoolnews.com/email Follow On Social Media: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thatscoolnews/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Thats_Cool_News  Join the Community: Discord: http://thatscoolnews.com/discord Facebook Group: https://thatscoolnews.com/group

Curiosity Daily
How Do Wild Animals Know What to Eat?

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2021 12:59


Learn why helping others feels like helping ourselves, how wild animals eat healthy, and how the Sahara feeds the Amazon. We're less likely to remember the things we've given to friends than strangers by Kelsey Donk We’re Worse At Remembering Exactly What We’ve Given To Friends Than What We’ve Given To Strangers. (2021, April 12). Research Digest. https://digest.bps.org.uk/2021/04/12/were-worse-at-remembering-exactly-what-weve-given-to-friends-than-what-weve-given-to-strangers/  Uğurlar, P., Posten, A.-C., & Zürn, M. (2021). Interpersonal closeness impairs decision memory. Social Psychology, 52(2), 125–129. https://doi.org/10.1027/1864-9335/a000439  How do wild animals eat a healthy diet when humans struggle to? by Ashley Hamer (Listener question from Jason in Port Ewen, New York) Predators hunt for a balanced diet. (2012). ScienceDaily. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120110192942.htm  Provenza, F. (2018, November 30). Animals Can Help Us Rediscover Our Nutritional Wisdom. Scientific American Blog Network. https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/animals-can-help-us-rediscover-our-nutritional-wisdom/  Strauss, S. (2006). Clara M. Davis and the wisdom of letting children choose their own diets. Canadian Medical Association Journal, 175(10), 1199–1199. https://doi.org/10.1503/cmaj.060990  Schatzker, M. (2015, April 9). How Flavor Drives Nutrition. WSJ; The Wall Street Journal. https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-flavor-drives-nutrition-1428596326  Tucker, A. (2009, July 14). Why Modern Foods Hijack Our Brains. Smithsonian Magazine; Smithsonian Magazine. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/why-modern-foods-hijack-our-brains-63123747/  Deckersbach, T., Das, S. K., Urban, L. E., Salinardi, T., Batra, P., Rodman, A. M., Arulpragasam, A. R., Dougherty, D. D., & Roberts, S. B. (2014). Pilot randomized trial demonstrating reversal of obesity-related abnormalities in reward system responsivity to food cues with a behavioral intervention. Nutrition & Diabetes, 4(9), e129–e129. https://doi.org/10.1038/nutd.2014.26  The Amazon Rainforest feeds on millions of tons of dust from the Sahara Desert per year by Grant Currin Saharan Dust Feeds Amazon’s Plants. (2011). NASA. https://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/nasa-satellite-reveals-how-much-saharan-dust-feeds-amazon-s-plants  Yu, H., Chin, M., Yuan, T., Bian, H., Remer, L. A., Prospero, J. M., Omar, A., Winker, D., Yang, Y., Zhang, Y., Zhang, Z., & Zhao, C. (2015). The fertilizing role of African dust in the Amazon rainforest: A first multiyear assessment based on data from Cloud‐Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations. Geophysical Research Letters, 42(6), 1984–1991. https://doi.org/10.1002/2015gl063040  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer — for free!  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dr. Howard Smith Oncall
Yogurt Prevents Bowel Polyps And Cancer

Dr. Howard Smith Oncall

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2021 1:04


  Vidcast:  https://youtu.be/V0cOYpNRyZQ   Eating yogurt twice a week lowers a man's risk of developing adenomatous, cancer-producing polyps by 26%.   Researchers studied colonoscopy data from over 88,000 participants in the continuing Health Professionals and Nurses Health Studies.  Sadly, the data did not show any beneficial association between yogurt consumption and polyps in women.   The investigators feel that the live culture bacteria found in yogurt likely feed on the carcinogenic substances found in the gastrointestinal tract.  They also point to yogurt's known anti-inflammatory properties as helpful in reducing colon adenoma formation.   So guys—try to enjoy several cups of yogurt a week especially if you have a personal or family history of bowel polyps or bowel cancer.   BMJ. "Yogurt may help to lower pre-cancerous bowel growth risk in men: Observed association strongest for growths highly likely to become cancerous." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 June 2019. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/06/190618192027.htm.   #Yogurt #polyps #cancer  

Dr. Howard Smith Oncall
IVF and Heart Failure During Pregnancy

Dr. Howard Smith Oncall

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2021 1:29


Vidcast:  https://youtu.be/dZ_q5BJtlzQ Women who use assisted reproduction techniques including in-vitro fertilization and intracystoplasmic sperm injection are 5 times more likely to suffer pregnancy-associated heart failure.  This conclusion comes from a study at Germany's Hannover Medical School presented last week to the European Society of Cardiology.   This pregnancy-associated heart failure is due to so-called peripartum cardiomyopathy or PPCM, and this condition affects one in every 1000 pregnant women around the world.  It threatens the life of mother and baby alike.  Assisted reproduction is now added to known risk factors including twin pregnancy, many past pregnancies, very young or very old mothers, obesity, and substance abuse.   PPCM is heralded by shortness of breath, leg edema and swelling, and excessive nighttime urination.  Since these same symptoms are all too common during the late third trimester, the study authors suggest that all women who conceive with medical help have a cardiology consultation and an echocardiogram shortly before their due date or just after delivery.   European Society of Cardiology. "In vitro fertilization linked to deadly heart disease in pregnancy." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 May 2019. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/05/190525132201.htm     #IVF #assistedreproduction #heartfailure #peripartumcardiomyopathy #obstetrics #womenshealth  

Dr. Howard Smith Oncall
Relief For Hot Pepper Heartburn

Dr. Howard Smith Oncall

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2021 1:08


  Vidcast:  https://youtu.be/GYPIGUKq8v8   If you're suffering stomach and esophageal ache from enjoying Buffalo wings or accidentally swallowing that red pepper hidden in your Szechuan chicken , the food scientists at Penn State have some first aid for you.  It turns out that the best liquid for neutralizing pepper burn is good old milk.   The study looked at 72 subjects each using 7 different liquids as rescues after drinking a hot Bloody Mary mix containing Scoville-rich red peppers.  Milk, regular and skim, followed by Kool Aid were best at relieving the pepper pain.  Carbonated beverages such as cola, seltzer, and beer helped the least.  Plain old water was in-between.   So if you find yourself the victim of some hot sauce at a barbecue or elsewhere, quickly swig some milk.  In the pinch, I'll bet that ice cream would also do the trick.   Penn State. "Milk: Best drink to reduce burn from chili peppers." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 June 2019. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/06/190625133526.htm.   #Hotsauce #pepper #milk  

Curiosity Daily
Why Cavities Are So Sensitive to the Cold

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2021 12:55


Learn about why cavities are so cold-sensitive; an ant that shrinks its brain; and why swimming makes you extra hungry. Here's why dental cavities are so sensitive to cold by Cameron Duke Bernal, L., Sotelo-Hitschfeld, P., König, C., Sinica, V., Wyatt, A., Winter, Z., Hein, A., Touska, F., Reinhardt, S., Tragl, A., Kusuda, R., Wartenberg, P., Sclaroff, A., Pfeifer, J. D., Ectors, F., Dahl, A., Freichel, M., Vlachova, V., Brauchi, S., & Roza, C. (2021). Odontoblast TRPC5 channels signal cold pain in teeth. Science Advances, 7(13), eabf5567. https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.abf5567  How teeth sense the cold. (2021). EurekAlert! https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2021-03/hhmi-hts032421.php  There’s an ant that shrinks its brain to try to become the queen by Cameron Duke Annie, R. (2021, April 13). These Ants Shrink Their Brains for a Chance to Become Queen. The New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/13/science/ants-brains-queen.html  Penick, C. A., Ghaninia, M., Haight, K. L., Opachaloemphan, C., Yan, H., Reinberg, D., & Liebig, J. (2021). Reversible plasticity in brain size, behaviour and physiology characterizes caste transitions in a socially flexible ant ( Harpegnathos saltator ). Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 288(1948). https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2021.0141  Urbani, C. B., Boyan, G. S., Blarer, A., Billen, J., & Musthak Ali, T. M. (1994). A novel mechanism for jumping in the indian antHarpegnathos saltator (Jerdon) (Formicidae, Ponerinae). Experientia, 50(S1), 63–71. https://doi.org/10.1007/bf01992052  Swimming Really Does Make You Hungrier Than Other Forms of Exercise by Ashley Hamer Harvard Health Publishing. (2021). Calories burned in 30 minutes for people of three different weights - Harvard Health. Harvard Health; Harvard Health. https://www.health.harvard.edu/diet-and-weight-loss/calories-burned-in-30-minutes-of-leisure-and-routine-activities  ‌Exercise In Cold Water May Increase Appetite, UF Study Finds. (2021). ScienceDaily. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/05/050504225732.htm ‌ Sportscience Compeat: Swimmers: Body fat mystery! (1997). Sportsci.org. http://www.sportsci.org/news/compeat/fat.html  Harmon, K. (2011, May 10). Sink or Swim: Muscle versus Fat. Scientific American. https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/muscle-versus-fat/  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer — for free!  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

That's Cool News | A weekly breakdown of positive Science & Tech news.
59. Sense of Touch from Robotic Arm, Graphene infused Concrete, New Tool to Fight Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria

That's Cool News | A weekly breakdown of positive Science & Tech news.

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2021 45:44


Cool STEM News: Scientists Added a Sense of Touch to a Mind-Controlled Robotic Arm | SingularityHub (01:43) Fight against antibiotic-resistant bacteria has a glowing new weapon | ScienceDaily (13:06) Colombian Coffee Is Now Used to Build Houses | Interesting Engineering (20:29) World's first graphene-enhanced concrete slab poured in England | New Atlas (28:45) Good Bacteria Can Reduce Chemotherapy Side Effects – Clean Up Toxins in the Body | SciTechDaily (36:59) ----more----Podcast Links: Website: https://thatscoolnews.com/ Support the Podcast: https://thatscoolnews.com/support Review The Podcast: https://thatscoolnews.com/review Email List: https://thatscoolnews.com/email Follow On Social Media: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thatscoolnews/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Thats_Cool_News  Join the Community: Discord: http://thatscoolnews.com/discord Facebook Group: https://thatscoolnews.com/group

Revelations Radio Network
CHIMERA CREEP CONGRESS

Revelations Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2021


Canary Cry News Talk 343 - 05.28.2021 - CHIMERA CREEP CONGRESS: Vindications, Resistance Rising, Epstein, Polytick Prop, Aliens Week Prep  Our LINK TREE: https://linktr.ee/canarycrynewstalk SUBSCRIBE TO US ON: NewPodcastApps.com PAYPAL: https://bit.ly/3bwg6gk    Chinese Financial Expert on Bitcoin adoption, “We’re All Gonna Die” (Clip) 3:27   FLIPPY 6:40 -LA, Restaurants scramble for workers, orders for Flippy on the rise (Dot LA)   NEPHILIM UPDATE 19:00 -Senate Dems reject ban on human-animal chimeras (Fox, Tweet, Proposed Amendment)   WACCINE/PANDEMIC SPECIAL 27:45 -Man made virus no longer being considered fringe by Facebook (Politifact) -CDC will not investigate mild infection of jabbed (NY Times) -New Study shows mild rona builds lasting antibody (Science Daily) -Alabama governor signs bill banning jab passports (CNN) -Inhalable Nanobody prevents/treats rona in hamsters (AAAS) -Resistance to Waccine Mandate building (Wapo) -FDA document on child jabs unapproved (FDA)   BREAK (producer party) 1:35:50   EPSTEIN DIDN’T 2:18:15 -Epstein guards to avoid jail time, judge (The Hill)   POLYTICK 2:22:38 -Biden presents $SIX TRILLION budget (LA Times) -ADL calls Biden to appoint Jewish Liaison amid rise in Anti-Semitic attacks (CBS) -Caitlyn Jenner will Cancel, Cancel Culture (Desert News) -Defund police Atlanta Councilman car stolen, thanks cops (NY Post) -Right Wing Media is SO Dangerous (Shillzilla, CNN/KCTV5) -25% of Republicans believe satan worshipping pedo’s control US Gov, Media, Finance (Insider)   ALIENS 3:10:29 -Joe Biden knows about aliens, according to one guy (Express) -Ron Watkins start Wikileaks for Aliens (Vice)   ADDITIONAL STORIES -First Vaxamillion winner announced, Ohio (Twitter) -CA gives out over $100 million in jab prizes, “Vax for the win” (LA Times) -Florida ban of jab passports creates ocean of confusion (USA Today) -Melbourne Australia enters 4th lockdown (Bloomberg) -Inhaling CRISPR to treat rona (Free Think) -MIT Digger Finger can sense things beneath surface (New Atlas)  -Colorado Children Hospital state of emergency over suicide rise (Colorado Sun) -40% chance world gets REALLY HOT, past Paris Agreement (AP) -Woman sped through jab site, arrested (Knoxville, TN) -Hunter Biden invited VP Joe to shady business meeting (Fox) -3 bills in Ohio introduced to protect jab mandates and discrimination (Waccine) -Wuhan lab leak questions Chinese mine (WSJ) -US Research pagans influence on politics (Wild Hunt) -

Curiosity Daily
Human Screams Communicate a Rainbow of Emotions

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2021 12:45


Learn about 5G’s wireless power grid potential; the emotions of human screams; and the 3 categories of friendships. We could use 5G as its own wireless power grid by Grant Currin Leveraging the 5G network to wirelessly power IoT devices. (2021). ScienceDaily. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/03/210325150019.htm  Eid, A., Hester, J. G. D., & Tentzeris, M. M. (2021). 5G as a wireless power grid. Scientific Reports, 11(1). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-79500-x  Gaura, E., & James Peter Brusey. (2021, April 9). Nikola Tesla: 5G network could realise his dream of wireless electricity, a century after experiments failed. The Conversation. https://theconversation.com/nikola-tesla-5g-network-could-realise-his-dream-of-wireless-electricity-a-century-after-experiments-failed-158665  Human screams communicate at least six different emotions by Steffie Drucker Human screams communicate at least six emotions. (2021). EurekAlert! https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2021-04/p-hsc040721.php   Kiefer, P. (2021, April 15). The human scream that’s the most recognizable | Popular Science. Popular Science. https://www.popsci.com/story/science/human-scream-study/   JV Chamary. (2021, April 23). Are Humans More Sensitive To Screams From Sex Than Fear? Forbes. https://www.forbes.com/sites/jvchamary/2021/04/14/science-human-screams/?sh=2be610c12fc2   Frühholz, S., Dietziker, J., Staib, M., & Trost, W. (2021). Neurocognitive processing efficiency for discriminating human non-alarm rather than alarm scream calls. PLOS Biology, 19(4), e3000751. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.3000751  Screams used with permission from Sascha Frueholz Friendships fall into three categories by Anna Todd McCabe, J. (2016). Friends with Academic Benefits. Contexts, 15(3), 22–29. https://doi.org/10.1177/1536504216662237  ‌Wang, A. X. (2016, October 26). Ivy League research says there are three types of social friendships people make. Quartz; Quartz. https://qz.com/819754/ivy-league-research-says-there-are-three-types-of-social-friendships-people-make/  ‌Most People’s Friendships Fall Into One of Three Categories. (2017, January 6). Mentalfloss.com. https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/90636/most-peoples-friendships-fall-one-three-categories  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer — for free!  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Curiosity Daily
Science Is a Process — and Bill Nye Explains Why

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2021 15:44


Bill Nye discusses the 2 things that make “science” what it is. Then, you’ll learn about how female tree frogs have noise-canceling lungs; and why your stomach growls when you’re hungry. Additional resources from Bill Nye: Official website https://billnye.com/  Bill Nye’s podcast, Science Rules! https://www.askbillnye.com/  Pick up “Bill Nye's Great Big World of Science” on Amazon https://amzn.to/3u8iKQi  “Everything All at Once: How to Think Like a Science Guy, Solve Any Problem, and Make a Better World” on Amazon https://amzn.to/3whsk5j  Follow @BillNye on Twitter https://twitter.com/BillNye  This frog has noise-canceling lungs by Cameron Duke Lee, N., Christensen-Dalsgaard, J., White, L. A., Schrode, K. M., & Bee, M. A. (2021). Lung Mediated Auditory Contrast Enhancement Improves the Signal-to-Noise Ratio for Communication in Frogs. Current Biology. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2021.01.048  This frog has lungs that act like noise-canceling headphones. (2021). ScienceDaily. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/03/210304145430.htm  Why your stomach growls when you're hungry by Ashley Hamer (Listener question from Safin in Lisbon, Portugal) Why does your stomach growl when you are hungry? (2002, January 21). Scientific American. https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-does-your-stomach-gro/  ‌What Makes Your Stomach Growl? (2020, February 12). Wonderopolis.org. https://wonderopolis.org/wonder/what-makes-your-stomach-growl  Follow Curiosity Daily to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer — for free! You can also listen to our podcast as part of your Alexa Flash Briefing; Amazon smart speakers users, click/tap “enable” here:https://www.amazon.com/Curiosity-com-Curiosity-Daily-from/dp/B07CP17DJY See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Curiosity Daily
Why Cannabis Gives You the Munchies

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2021 12:07


Learn about why cannabis gives people the munchies; the Bicameral Mind theory that says the ancient Greeks lacked consciousness; and the evolutionary reason why you listen to songs on repeat.  Why does cannabis give you the munchies? by Grant Currin Hull, M. (2019, April 17). The science behind munchies: cannabis and your appetite. Examine.com; Examine.com. https://examine.com/nutrition/cannabis-munchies/  How cannabis affects appetite: Brain changes. (2018). ScienceDaily. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/07/180717094747.htm  ‌Stromberg, J. (2014, February 9). A Scientific Explanation of How Marijuana Causes the Munchies. Smithsonian Magazine; Smithsonian Magazine. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/scientific-explanation-how-marijuana-causes-munchies-180949660/  Deng, B. (2015). Marijuana flips appetite switch in brain. Nature. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature.2015.16957  The "Bicameral Mind" Theory Says the Ancient Greeks Lacked Consciousness by Reuben Westmaas Overview of Julian Jaynes’s Theory of Consciousness and the Bicameral Mind | Julian Jaynes Society. (2020, October 7). Julian Jaynes Society. https://www.julianjaynes.org/about/about-jaynes-theory/overview/  ‌Patches, M. (2016, October 17). Why the Bicameral Mind Theory Is Crucial to Unlocking “Westworld.” Thrillist; Thrillist. https://www.thrillist.com/entertainment/nation/westworld-bicameral-mind-theory-real  There's an Evolutionary Reason Why You Listen to Some Songs on Repeat originally aired November 15, 2018 https://omny.fm/shows/curiosity-daily/why-you-listen-to-songs-on-repeat-aluminum-foil-wi  12 THINGS I FORGOT by Steven Wilson on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/track/3U5qkg3OoX0KQxEaGqLYQT?si=9jL7NH_1SHGiw01W3BuHHA  Follow Curiosity Daily to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer — for free! You can also listen to our podcast as part of your Alexa Flash Briefing; Amazon smart speakers users, click/tap “enable” here:https://www.amazon.com/Curiosity-com-Curiosity-Daily-from/dp/B07CP17DJY See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Leadership Today Podcast
Episode 111 - Can You Overdose on Mindfulness?

Leadership Today Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2021 8:20


Summary Is becoming more mindful automatically better for us and our well-being? And does being more mindful help those around us? The research is really clear - more mindfulness is not always better. Thankfully we also know how to avoid these mindfulness downsides.    Transcript Hello and welcome to episode 111 of the Leadership Today podcast where each week we bring research to life in your leadership. This week we explore whether it’s possible to overdose on mindfulness. Mindfulness has seen dramatically increased popularity in recent years, particularly within Western organisations. And why not? Mindfulness has repeatedly demonstrated lots of personal benefits for individuals. As a result, mindfulness almost automatically appears in leadership development training with the typical recommendation being that people should just do more.  But can you have too much of a good thing? Let’s take optimism and curiosity as an example. Both are generally positive. However the research shows us that you can absolutely be too optimistic and you can also be too curious. Not only can having too much optimism and curiosity have negative impacts for the individual, it can also have negative impacts on those around them. Does mindfulness demonstrate a similar pattern? And does mindfulness encourage people to help others more? It’s important to appreciate that mindfulness is not one thing, so let’s take a look at some of the research around specific types of mindfulness.  There’s mindful attention which focuses on mind–body awareness and perception of what is going on for us mentally and physically in the moment. The research shows that mindful attention is positive up to a point, but too much can lead to worse mental health outcomes. As the researcher Amit Bernstein highlights, this includes increased rates of depression, anxiety, dissociation, and substance abuse, along with decreased ability to tolerate pain. These negative outcomes can be somewhat decreased when the individual is being non-judgemental and non-reactive. Mindful attention works best when we are observing rather than responding. But that’s easier said than done. Research demonstrates that mindful meditation can help increase the amount and depth of sleep up to a point. But once people get beyond around 30 minutes of mindful meditation a day, people actually demonstrated decreased quality of sleep in both depth and amount. Then there’s mindful emotion regulation where we seek to gain greater control over our emotions, increase our emotional regulation and accept what we are experiencing. Again, this can have lots of positive impacts, but in excess research demonstrates it can lead to emotional blunting - where people experience fewer positive and fewer negative emotions. As a results life can become flat and dull. It is better to think of mindfulness like many other things in psychology as having an inverted U relationship to well-being. Up to a point mindfulness can absolutely increase wellbeing. But as someone continues to increase the amount of mindfulness, there will be a point where well-being actually declines. So for the individual you can have too much of a good thing. But what about the impact on others? What’s the impact of mindfulness on what us psychologists call ‘pro-social behaviour’ - effectively, doing good things for other people. Research about to be published in the journal of Psychological Science shows that mindfulness can make some people more selfish - that is, they do fewer good things for others than they otherwise would have as a result of mindfulness. This is the case for those participants who had more of an independent outlook to start with. Increased mindfulness for those who tend to be more independent resulted in them undertaking fewer prosocial behaviours than a control group - mindfulness resulted in them becoming even more independent in their actions. However, for those who viewed themselves as interdependent, mindfulness increased prosocial behaviour. When it comes to mindfulness, it’s important to recognise where you start and the outlook you bring. Let’s put all of this in a cultural context. Most mindfulness practices that are being used in organisational settings have been derived from East Asian and particularly Buddhist traditions. In East Asian cultures people tend to be more interdependent in their outlook - on average, people tend to focus more on others and their contribution to a broader society rather than on themselves. The recent research we just explored suggests that in these cultures mindfulness will increase this focus on others, and lead to greater prosocial behaviours. In Western countries however people tend to be more independent in their outlook. Mindfulness may increase that independent focus and reduce the amount of prosocial behaviour that otherwise would have been demonstrated. There is a risk when we rip a practice like mindfulness out of its cultural and spiritual context hoping to just get the upside impact. So in our Western business context should we abandon mindfulness altogether? It’s true that becoming more mindful is not automatically better for individuals and those around them. It depends both how the mindfulness is set up and how self-aware and mindful the individual already is. It’s perhaps better to think of mindfulness in the way we think about exercise and sleep. Clearly exercise and sleep are both helpful and necessary for wellbeing and health. But just telling everyone to do an hour more exercise a day, or to sleep two hours longer every night is not great advice. You can end up having too much exercise and too much sleep. It all depends on what they the individual is currently doing. The research by Poulin, Ministero, Gabriel, Morrison and Naidu that I quoted earlier shows that you can vary the outcomes of mindfulness by initially increasing people’s interest in others. When the researchers primed people for interdependence, they saw a 40% increase in the likelihood of volunteering for a not for profit organisation following mindfulness. When people were primed for independence, they were 33% less likely to volunteer after some mindfulness practice. At work, we can help people appreciate the role they play in building an interdependent culture. As leaders, we can help our people to think of the role they and the organisation play in their community.  If we do this, practices such as mindfulness are more likely to then lead to greater individual and social outcomes. When it comes to mindfulness, it’s important to recognise we all start from a different base. More is not always better. When we are being mindful, we need to not just focus on ourselves, but also on how we can be a benefit to others. As always, the research I have referred to is in the show notes with a big thanks to ScienceDaily who continue to serve up great research in my email inbox each day. Have a great week as you look after yourself and others. SIGN UP FOR A FREE 30 DAY TRIAL OF LEADERSHIP TODAY ON-DEMAND   Research Michael Poulin, Lauren Ministero, Shira Gabriel, Carrie Morrison, Esha Naidu. Minding your own business? Mindfulness decreases prosocial behavior for those with independent self-construals. Psychological Science (forthcoming), 2021 DOI: 10.31234/osf.io/xhyua University at Buffalo. "Mindfulness can make you selfish: A pioneering new study examines the social effects of mindfulness." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 April 2021. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/04/210414100147.htm Willoughby B Britton Can mindfulness be too much of a good thing? The value of a middle way. Current Opinion in Psychology 2019, 28:159–165  https://www.brown.edu/research/labs/britton/sites/britton-lab/files/images/Britton_2019_Can%20mindfulness%20be%20too%20much%20of%20a%20good%20thing.pdf

Gender: A Wider Lens Podcast
19 - ADHD & Gender Dysphoria

Gender: A Wider Lens Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2021 50:26


Hyper-active, inattentive, immature, and impulsivity are just some of the common traits associated with ADHD. These may not have an obvious link to Gender Dysphoria and yet gender variance is found to be 6.64 times more likely among individuals with ADHD. We discuss how ADHD manifests in girls and boys, how society responds to ADHD traits, and how this interaction can lead to gender-related issues. Links:   ADHD and Gender Dysphoria https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140312103102.htm (Sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140312103102.htm)   Girls and ADHD https://www.verywellmind.com/adhd-in-girls-symptoms-of-adhd-in-girls-20547 (Verywellmind.com/adhd-in-girls-symptoms-of-adhd-in-girls-20547)   Travel Programs for Adolescents/Teens/Young Adults: http://adolesco.org/ (Adolesco.org/) https://www.habitat.org/ (Habitat.org/) https://www.semesteratsea.org/ (Semesteratsea.org/) https://www.volunteerhq.org/coronavirus-update/ (Volunteerhq.org/coronavirus-update/)   Elle Palmer: How my Personality Influenced my Identity https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H8FrT2M44Co&feature=emb_logo (Youtube.com/watch?v=H8FrT2M44Co&feature=emb_logo)   Richard Branson: ADHD: The Entrepreneur's Superpower https://www.forbes.com/sites/dalearcher/2014/05/14/adhd-the-entrepreneurs-superpower/?sh=11f9010459e9 (Forbes.com/sites/dalearcher/2014/05/14/adhd-the-entrepreneurs-superpower/?sh=11f9010459e9)   Michael Phelps: How swimming saved Michael Phelps: An ADHD Story https://www.additudemag.com/michael-phelps-adhd-advice-from-the-olympians-mom/ (Additudemag.com/michael-phelps-adhd-advice-from-the-olympians-mom/)   Gabor Maté (2000) Scattered: How Attention Deficit Disorder Originates and What You Can Do About It https://drgabormate.com/book/scattered-minds/ (Drgabormate.com/book/scattered-minds/) Extended Notes A lot of diagnoses are flying around and it's easy to go, “yeah, yeah.” What is ADHD? How do you define it? It's hard to force yourself to focus when you're really uninterested in something. ADHD is actually a good thing and it was used for our survival. When society/school tells these children they're slow or that they're not performing well, it can really perpetuate a lot of negative self-talk and make the problem worse. Stella can see how a lot of children with ADHD have been impacted with how poor or low self-esteem. Has ADHD always existed or is this just the byproduct of our environment? Since ADHD kids have a hard time tracking the details, they might be seen as silly or slow. Do ADHD kids seem shyer because of how many times people tell them to “stop” doing things or being who they are? Stella and Sasha wonder what kind of personality they'd truly have if they were just “free to be.” ADHD kids try their best to structure themselves and they can also end up being really obsessed with goals. Once these kids have their minds set on something, they become hyper-focused on achieving it. Even if it means it's not 100% what they want. Social media is made for an ADHD person. How do ADHD traits show up in boys and girls, especially those with gender dysphoria? A lot of successful people have ADHD. it's a great trait to have in the “real world.” Sasha relates to the ADHD symptoms. She loves to try something new. The old, the boring, and the routine are actually important for people, but ADHD people can't seem to get behind it. A slow life is not the only way to get ahead. There is a world out there for ADHD people to thrive in. This podcast is partially sponsored by ReIME, Rethink Identity Medicine Ethics: https://rethinkime.org/ (Rethinkime.org) Learn more about our show: https://linktr.ee/WiderLensPod (Linktr.ee/WiderLensPod) Support this podcast

Biblical Genetics
Mutations are not as random as you think

Biblical Genetics

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2021 21:29


The idea that mutations are random is an important concept for evolutionary theory. Yet, multiple areas of research are telling us that mutation placement and type are not at all random. There is also no reason to believe that mutation rates have remained constant over history. Join Dr Rob and he wades into the deep waters of mutation theory. Links: Guiblet WM, et al. 2021. Non-B DNA: a major contributor to small- and large-scale variation in nucleotide substitution frequencies across the genome, Nuc Ac Res 49(3):1497–1516. Sholtis S, Unusual DNA folding increases the rates of mutations, ScienceDaily.com, 9 Feb 2021. Pyne ALB, et al. 2021 Base-pair resolution analysis of the effect of supercoiling on DNA flexibility and major groove recognition by triplex-forming oligonucleotides. Nat Commun 12:1053.

Curiosity Daily
Why That Thing You Just Learned Is Suddenly Everywhere

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2021 13:55


Writer, producer, and “Flash Forward” podcast host Rose Eveleth explains why so many technology breakthroughs never pan out. Then, learn about real-life giant sand worms and why the Baader-Meinhof Phenomenon makes you notice some things more than others. Additional resources from Rose Eveleth: Rose's website: http://roseveleth.com/  Flash Forward podcast: https://www.flashforwardpod.com/  Flash Forward Presents: https://www.ffwdpresents.com/  Follow Rose on Twitter: https://twitter.com/roseveleth  The spice must flow: Giant sand worms used to roam the ocean floor 20 million years ago by Grant Currin Giant sand worm discovery proves truth is stranger than fiction: Trace fossil reveals more about this ancient creature’s behavior. (2021). ScienceDaily. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/01/210121163134.htm  ‌Pan, Y.-Y., Nara, M., Löwemark, L., Miguez-Salas, O., Gunnarson, B., Iizuka, Y., Chen, T.-T., & Dashtgard, S. E. (2021). The 20-million-year old lair of an ambush-predatory worm preserved in northeast Taiwan. Scientific Reports, 11(1). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-79311-0  Sample, I. (2021, January 21). Giant worm’s undersea lair discovered by fossil hunters in Taiwan. The Guardian; The Guardian. https://www.theguardian.com/science/2021/jan/21/giant-worm-undersea-lair-discovered-fossil-hunters-taiwan  Blame The Baader-Meinhof Phenomenon For The Things You Notice More Than Others first aired July 15, 2018 https://omny.fm/shows/curiosity-daily/the-universe-in-consciousness-w-bernardo-kastrup-i  Subscribe to Curiosity Daily to learn something new every day with Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer. You can also listen to our podcast as part of your Alexa Flash Briefing; Amazon smart speakers users, click/tap “enable” here: https://www.amazon.com/Curiosity-com-Curiosity-Daily-from/dp/B07CP17DJY  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

3D From Nothing
Brandon Crain Interview-Texas Metal Printing, Printing New skin, new houses and Rockets

3D From Nothing

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2021 34:09


This week Tom Gendich interviews Brandon Crain. Brandon Crain has more than 15 years of in-depth, technical, and hands-on experience in traditional subtractive manufacturing. He has worked his entire career as a team member of a growing and successful family run waterjet cutting and machining service company. Brandon has experience in all areas of a thriving small business, including shipping and receiving, purchasing, sales, quality management, and business management. Understanding and experiencing 15 years of busted knuckles, broken tools, and scrapped parts, he gained interest in the growing 3D metal printing / DMLS (Direct Metal Laser Sintering) industry. Recognizing the capability of additive manufacturing technologies and seeing opportunity to participate in the next industrial revolution, Brandon and his wife, Kristi, established Texas Metal Printing, LLC. This week we have:3D printing of new skin can help burn victims!ScienceDaily.com talks about “A new handheld 3D printer can deposit sheets of skin to cover large burn wounds -- and its "bio ink" can accelerate the healing process.The device, developed by a team of researchers from the University of Toronto Engineering and Sunnybrook Hospital, covers wounds with a uniform sheet of biomaterial, stripe by stripe.The bio ink dispensed by the roller is composed of mesenchymal stroma cells (MSCs) -- stem cells that differentiate into specialized cell types depending on their environment. In this case, the MSC material promotes skin regeneration and reduces scarring.” Would you buy a 3D printed house?“Take a Peek Inside the First of Its Kind to Hit the Real Estate MarketThe same technology used in small 3D printers can print a real house—and the first 3D home is already on the multi-list. Three-dimensional printing isn’t just for little things—SQ4D, pronounced “S-squared,” a New York construction company, uses patent-pending 3D technology, known as Autonomous Robotic Construction System (ARCS), to print houses on-site. Now, the company’s first full-size spec house is on the market, and it looks a lot like a traditional house. Check out their 3-bedroom, 2-bath house in Riverhead, New York, and keep reading to find out more about this new type of construction. Printing Rockets. 3Dprint.com says that “Indian space startup AgniKul Cosmos has developed and test-fired a fully 3D printed rocket engine. Produced as a single component in one run, the higher stage semi-cryogenic liquid propulsion engine called Agnilet was built to support its orbital-class launch vehicle Agnibaan. Even though several space agencies and companies are using additive manufacturing (AM) to churn out rocket parts and engines – most notably SpaceX, Relativity Space, and NASA –, AngiKul claims Agnilet is the first single-piece 3D printed rocket engine to pass a fire test successfully.Igniters, injectors, cooling channels, mounts, manifolds for fuel and oxygen, and nozzle are just a few of the hundreds of components that go into making a rocket engine. Moreover, most of these are incredibly complex geometries that traditionally require several conventional fabrication techniques and machining processes, such as welding, brazing, and drilling, to create a flight-worthy engine.  --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thomas-gendich/support

Curiosity Daily
Scientists Finally Know How Sandcastles Work

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2021 10:37


Learn about why we still don’t know how eels reproduce and how scientists solved a 150-year-old question about how sandcastles hold together.  We still don't know how eels reproduce by Grant Currin TED-Ed. (2020). No one can figure out how eels have sex - Lucy Cooke [YouTube Video]. In YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RFi6ISTjkR4  Epic Eel Migration Mapped for the First Time. (2015, October 27). National Geographic News. https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/2015/10/151027-american-eel-migration-animal-behavior-oceans-science/  100-year-old mystery solved: Adult eel observed for the first time in the Sargasso Sea. (2015). ScienceDaily. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/10/151027132839.htm  Scientists have solved a 150-year-old equation that governs how sandcastles hold together by Grant Currin Ouellette, J. (2020, December 9). Physicists solve 150-year-old mystery of equation governing sandcastle physics. Ars Technica; Ars Technica. https://arstechnica.com/science/2020/12/physicists-solve-150-year-old-mystery-of-equation-governing-sandcastle-physics/  ‌Pakpour, M., Habibi, M., Møller, P., & Bonn, D. (2012). How to construct the perfect sandcastle. Scientific Reports, 2(1). https://doi.org/10.1038/srep00549  ‌Yang, Q., Sun, P. Z., Fumagalli, L., Stebunov, Y. V., Haigh, S. J., Zhou, Z. W., Grigorieva, I. V., Wang, F. C., & Geim, A. K. (2020). Capillary condensation under atomic-scale confinement. Nature, 588(7837), 250–253. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-020-2978-1  Subscribe to Curiosity Daily to learn something new every day with Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer. You can also listen to our podcast as part of your Alexa Flash Briefing; Amazon smart speakers users, click/tap “enable” here: https://www.amazon.com/Curiosity-com-Curiosity-Daily-from/dp/B07CP17DJY See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Curiosity Daily
“Popular Opinion” Isn’t What You Think

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2021 12:27


Learn about why popular opinion might not be as popular as you thought; a new analysis that’s debunked the blood type diet; and a pool of water in Kidd Creek Mine in Timmins, Ontario, Canada, that’s 2 billion years old.  One person repeating an opinion makes people think it's a popular opinion by Kelsey Donk People Often Think An Opinion Heard Repeatedly From The Same Person Is Actually A Popular Opinion. (2020). ScienceDaily. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070520183447.htm  Weaver, K., Garcia, S. M., Schwarz, N., & Miller, D. T. (2007). Inferring the popularity of an opinion from its familiarity: A repetitive voice can sound like a chorus. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 92(5), 821–833. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.92.5.821  A new analysis has debunked the blood type diet by Grant Currin New study debunks blood type diet. (2020). EurekAlert! https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-12/pcfr-nsd120420.php Kahleova, H., Petersen, K. F., Shulman, G. I., Alwarith, J., Rembert, E., Tura, A., Hill, M., Holubkov, R., & Barnard, N. D. (2020). Effect of a Low-Fat Vegan Diet on Body Weight, Insulin Sensitivity, Postprandial Metabolism, and Intramyocellular and Hepatocellular Lipid Levels in Overweight Adults. JAMA Network Open, 3(11), e2025454. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.25454  Barnard, N. D., Rembert, E., Freeman, A., Bradshaw, M., Holubkov, R., & Kahleova, H. (2020). Blood Type Is Not Associated with Changes in Cardiometabolic Outcomes in Response to a Plant-Based Dietary Intervention. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2020.08.079  Shmerling, R. H. (2017, May 12). Diet not working? Maybe it’s not your type - Harvard Health Blog. Harvard Health Blog. https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/diet-not-working-maybe-its-not-your-type-2017051211678 The World's Oldest Known Pool of Water Is a Staggering 2 Billion Years Old by Joanie Faletto Kidd Creek Mine | AMNH. (2021). American Museum of Natural History. https://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/permanent/planet-earth/why-is-the-earth-habitable/where-do-the-earth-s-riches-come-from/kidd-creek-mine  ‌Gilllis, L. (2019, June 17). Is there new life for Kidd Mine? Northern Ontario Business; Northern Ontario Business. https://www.northernontariobusiness.com/regional-news/timmins/is-there-new-life-for-kidd-mine-1510179  McGill University. (2016, November 3). Channels. https://www.mcgill.ca/channels/news/it%E2%80%99s-whats-underneath-counts-263769  ‌Holland, G., Lollar, B. S., Li, L., Lacrampe-Couloume, G., Slater, G. F., & Ballentine, C. J. (2013). Deep fracture fluids isolated in the crust since the Precambrian era. Nature, 497(7449), 357–360. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature12127  ‌Li, L., Wing, B. A., Bui, T. H., McDermott, J. M., Slater, G. F., Wei, S., Lacrampe-Couloume, G., & Lollar, B. S. (2016). Sulfur mass-independent fractionation in subsurface fracture waters indicates a long-standing sulfur cycle in Precambrian rocks. Nature Communications, 7(1). https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms13252  Subscribe to Curiosity Daily to learn something new every day with Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer. You can also listen to our podcast as part of your Alexa Flash Briefing; Amazon smart speakers users, click/tap “enable” here: https://www.amazon.com/Curiosity-com-Curiosity-Daily-from/dp/B07CP17DJY See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Mind Over Finger Podcast
090 Dr. Frank Diaz: Mindful Musician

The Mind Over Finger Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 12, 2021 61:55


I'm very excited to welcome Dr. Frank Diaz to the show this week to cover a topic that is at the core of everything Mind Over Finger is: mindfulness. In our conversation, Frank elaborates on: How he defines what mindfulness is Mindfulness techniques that can be helpful for musicians The sequence he likes to use when he teaches mindfulness Performance-related trauma How we owe it to ourselves to tap into our inner resources … and much more!    Frustrated with your playing?  Unsatisfied with you career?  Ready for a change? Whatever your challenge, you don't have to go at it alone, and I can help.    THE MUSIC MASTERY EXPERIENCE will be back in June 2021 This is my LIFE CHANGING, highly personalized group coaching program where I show you how to implement mindful & effective practice techniques, how to make them habits, and get RESULTS! The Music Mastery Experience gives you all the tools you need to elevate your performance Save your spot at http://www.mindoverfinger.com/mme and get access to all the early access bonuses   MORE ABOUT FRANK DIAZ: Website: http://www.mb-wp.org/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mbwpinstitute/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/musiczendude Some fun YouTube videos featuring Frank: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xzA87p8B6zE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DoIhqKAqlW8 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RSKyy66M-Is Frank's book recommendation: In Tune: Music as the Bridge to Mindfulness by Richard Wolf Dr. Frank Diaz is associate professor of music at the Jacobs School of Music and affiliate faculty for the department of cognitive science at Indiana University. He is also the founder and Director of the Institute for Mindfulness-Based Wellness and Pedagogy, where he collaborates with an international group of musicians, educators, and scholars on disseminating research and best practices on the art of mindful living, teaching, and performance. Frank has taught mindfulness to thousands of students across the US and internationally, and has served as a guest scholar, teacher, and advisor for numerous academic, civic, and arts institutions across the US and abroad. His research on mindfulness has been published in peer-reviewed and practitioner journals and has been featured on NPR, CNN, Science Daily, and the Huffington Post.     Join the Mind Over Finger Tribe for access to my weekly live videos and to exchange with a community of like-minded musicians!   Visit www.mindoverfinger.com and sign up for my newsletter to get your free guide to an exceptionally productive practice using the metronome!  This guide is the perfect entry point to help you bring more mindfulness and efficiency into your practice and it's filled with tips and tricks on how to use that wonderful tool to take your practicing and your playing to new heights!   If you enjoyed the show, please leave a review on iTunes!  I truly appreciate your support!     THANK YOU: Most sincere thank you to composer Jim Stephenson who graciously provided the show's musical theme!  Concerto #1 for Trumpet and Chamber Orchestra – Movement 2: Allegro con Brio, performed by Jeffrey Work, trumpet, and the Lake Forest Symphony, conducted by Jim Stephenson. Thank you to Susan Blackwell for the introduction!  You can find out more about Susan, her fantastic podcast The Spark File, and her work helping creatives of all backgrounds expand their impact by visiting https://www.susanblackwell.com/home. Also a HUGE thank you to my fantastic producer, Bella Kelly!   MIND OVER FINGER: www.mindoverfinger.com https://www.facebook.com/mindoverfinger/ https://www.instagram.com/mindoverfinger/

Curiosity Daily
A Distant Galaxy Is Warping the Milky Way

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2021 11:09


Author Jen Sincero explains why it’s important to form and maintain habits. You’ll also learn about why phantom limb sensations are way more common than you think; and how the Large Magellanic Cloud, or LMC, is warping the Milky Way galaxy. Additional resources from author Jen Sincero Pick up "Badass Habits: Cultivate the Awareness, Boundaries, and Daily Upgrades You Need to Make Them Stick" from Amazon: https://amzn.to/37l87kN  Website: https://www.jensincero.com/  Twitter: https://twitter.com/jensincero  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jensincero/  Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/TheJenSincero  Phantom Limb Sensations Are Way More Common Than You Think by Ashley Hamer Ramachandran, V. (1998). The perception of phantom limbs. The D. O. Hebb lecture. Brain, 121(9), 1603–1630. https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/121.9.1603  Neurosci. (2016, March 11). Neuroscientifically Challenged. Neuroscientifically Challenged. https://www.neuroscientificallychallenged.com/blog/know-your-brain-primary-somatosensory-cortex  Virtual reality eases phantom limb pain. (2017). ScienceDaily. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170531102921.htm  Kumar, Kv., Suresh, B., Misri, Z., Chakrapani, M., Mohan, U., & babu, Sk. (2013). Effectiveness of mirror therapy on lower extremity motor recovery, balance and mobility in patients with acute stroke: A randomized sham-controlled pilot trial. Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology, 16(4), 634. https://doi.org/10.4103/0972-2327.120496  Cortical homunculus: A WHAT Lives Inside My Brain? (2009, March 18). NPR.org. https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=101960403 The Milky Way once collided with the Large Magellanic Cloud by Grant Currin Galaxy encounter violently disturbed Milky Way, study finds. (2020). EurekAlert! https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-11/uoe-gev112320.php  ‌Petersen, M. S., & Peñarrubia, J. (2020). Detection of the Milky Way reflex motion due to the Large Magellanic Cloud infall. Nature Astronomy. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41550-020-01254-3  Ravilious, K. (2015). Earth was a frozen Snowball when animals first evolved. BBC.com. http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20150112-did-snowball-earth-make-animals  Subscribe to Curiosity Daily to learn something new every day with Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer. You can also listen to our podcast as part of your Alexa Flash Briefing; Amazon smart speakers users, click/tap “enable” here: https://www.amazon.com/Curiosity-com-Curiosity-Daily-from/dp/B07CP17DJY  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.