Podcasts about ATP

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Best podcasts about ATP

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Latest podcast episodes about ATP

Intercollegiate Tennis Association
Always be Refining

Intercollegiate Tennis Association

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 57:43


Josh Goffi has been the head men's coach at the University of South Carolina since 2010. He also served as an assistant coach for the men's team at Duke from 2008-2010 and for the women's team at Arizona State from 2006-2008.   He was a successful player at Clemson and reached a career high ATP doubles ranking of 121 and a singles ranking of 488. In this podcast we discuss his father's influence on his coaching philosophy and gather his thoughts on recruiting, player development and intentionally managing your culture.   You can also find some additional tips from Josh about Player Development in Chapter 9 of the Coach Masterclass.

The Ready Play Tennis Podcast
Mugu & Zverev Cap Incredible 2021 Tennis Season

The Ready Play Tennis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 64:16


Merch drops Friday, November 26th on the Ready Play Shopify store! Support The Ready Play Tennis Podcast on Patreon: www.patreon.com/readyplaytennis.   Things are more strange by the day in world of #WhereIsPengShuai. Aldwin and Jason try to help distill the concerning developments. The guys recap the tour finals for the WTA and ATP and Garbine Muguruza and Sascha Zverev take home the year ending championships. Prep for the Australian swing is underway, and soon tennis fans will know the players who are fully vaccinated, as the government of Victoria, host of the Australian Open will require all who partake, including players, to be fully vaccinated. Will Djoko via for his 10th AO and 21st grand slam title, or bow out due because he's unvaccinated?   Connect with us! E: readyplaytennispodcast@gmail.com IG & TikTok: @readyplaytennispodcast

Bruthas on Tennis
BOT 142 - End Of The Road

Bruthas on Tennis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 57:05


At long last we are approaching the end of the 2021 tennis season. We've seen lots of great matches and enough calendar rescheduling to make your head spin. Last week the Next Gen, WTA and ATP all crowned their 2021 season champions. The Bruthas break it all down while starting to focus their "good eye" on the 2022 season. Enjoy all...

The Tennis Podcast
ATP Finals - Zverev's title - what happens next? Peng Shuai latest, and some news from us

The Tennis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 55:28


Alexander Zverev won a second ATP Finals title. He was excellent, and we examine his on-court performances in detail. We also provide an update on the ATP's internal investigation into domestic abuse allegations against him. Plus, there's the doubles final, the latest on Peng Shuai, rule changes for next year, and we introduce Friends of The Tennis Podcast.BECOME A FRIEND OF THE TENNIS PODCASTRather than running another Kickstarter, we will launch a subscription service called Friends of The Tennis Podcast to help us keep the show on the road in 2022. All 'Friends' will receive exclusive access to bonus podcasts throughout the year, as well as helping to keep the weekly podcast and the Grand Slam Dailies free-to-all. To receive details when we go live on December 8th, please put your e-mail in here - http://eepurl.com/gwWILX.DAVIS CUP FINALS 15% OFF TICKET CODEGo to https://www.daviscupfinals.com/ticketing and put in the code TENNISPODCASTNEWSLETTERSign up to get our news, offers, predictions and Matt's Stat - http://eepurl.com/gbmzRXEMAILWe hope that the podcast helps to provide some form of escape during these challenging times. If you ever feel like writing to us, our e-mail is open – info@tennispodcast.netSOCIAL MEDIA Twitter - https://twitter.com/TennisPodcastInstagram - https://www.instagram.com/thetennispodcast/Reddit - https://www.reddit.com/r/thetennispodcast/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Circulation on the Run
Circulation November 23, 2021 Issue

Circulation on the Run

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 24:40


Please join first author Yuan Lu and Guest Editor Jan Staessen as they discuss the article "National Trends and Disparities in Hospitalization for Acute Hypertension Among Medicare Beneficiaries (1999-2019)." Dr. Carolyn Lam: Welcome to Circulation on the Run: your weekly podcast, summary and backstage pass to the journal and it's editors. We're your co-hosts. I'm Dr. Carolyn Lam, associate editor from the National Heart Center and Duke National University of Singapore. Dr. Greg Hundley: And I'm Dr. Greg Hundley, associate editor, and director of Pauley Heart Center at VCU health in Richmond, Virginia. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Greg, today's feature discussion is about the national trends and disparities and hospitalizations for hypertensive emergencies among Medicare beneficiaries. Isn't that interesting? We're going to just dig deep into this issue, but not before we discuss the other papers in today's issue. I'm going to let you go first today while I get a coffee and listen. Dr. Greg Hundley: Oh, thanks so much, Carolyn. My first paper comes to us from the world of preclinical science and it's from professor Christoff Maack from University Clinic Wursburg. Carolyn, I don't have a quiz for you, so I'm going to give a little break this week, but this particular paper is about Barth syndrome. Barth syndrome is caused by mutations of the gene encoding taffazin, which catalyzes maturation of mitochondrial cardiolipin and often manifests with systolic dysfunction during early infancy. Now beyond the first months of life, Barth syndrome cardiomyopathy typically transitions to a phenotype of diastolic dysfunction with preserved ejection fraction, one of your favorites, blunted contractile reserve during exercise and arrhythmic vulnerability. Previous studies traced Barth syndrome cardiomyopathy to mitochondrial formation of reactive oxygen species. Since mitochondrial function and reactive oxygen species formation are regulated by excitation contraction coupling, these authors wanted to use integrated analysis of mechano-energetic coupling to delineate the pathomechanisms of Barth syndrome cardiomyopathy. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Oh, I love the way you explained that so clearly, Greg. Thanks. So what did they find? Dr. Greg Hundley: Right, Carolyn. Well, first defective mitochondrial calcium uptake prevented Krebs cycle activation during beta adrenergic stimulation, abolishing NADH regeneration for ATP production and lowering antioxidative NADPH. Second, Carolyn, mitochondrial calcium deficiency provided the substrate for ventricular arrhythmias and contributed to blunted inotropic reserve during beta adrenergic stimulation. And finally, these changes occurred without any increase of reactive oxygen species formation in or omission from mitochondria. So Carolyn what's the take home here? Well, first beyond the first months of life, when systolic dysfunction dominates, Barth syndrome cardiomyopathy is reminiscent of heart failure with preserved rather than reduced ejection fraction presenting with progressive diastolic and moderate systolic dysfunction without relevant left ventricular dilation. Next, defective mitochondrial calcium uptake contributes to inability of Barth syndrome patients to increase stroke volume during exertion and their vulnerability to ventricular arrhythmias. Lastly, treatment with cardiac glycosides, which could favor mechano-energetic uncoupling should be discouraged in patients with Barth syndrome and left ventricular ejection fractions greater than 40%. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Oh, how interesting. I need to chew over that one a bit more. Wow, thanks. But you know, I've got a paper too. It's also talking about energetic basis in the presence of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, but this time looking at transient pulmonary congestion during exercise, which is recognized as an emerging and important determinant of reduced exercise capacity in HFpEF. These authors, led by Dr. Lewis from University of Oxford center for clinical magnetic resonance research sought to determine if an abnormal cardiac energetic state underpins this process of transient problem congestion in HFpEF. Dr. Carolyn Lam: To investigate this, they designed and conducted a basket trial covering the physiological spectrum of HFpEF severity. They non-invasively assess cardiac energetics in this cohort using phosphorous magnetic resonance spectroscopy and combined real time free breathing volumetric assessment of whole heart mechanics, as well as a novel pulmonary proton density, magnetic resonance imaging sequence to detect lung congestion, both at rest and during submaximal exercise. Now, Greg, I know you had a look at this paper and magnetic resonance imaging, and spectroscopy is your expertise. So no quiz here, but could you maybe just share a little bit about how novel this approach is that they took? Dr. Greg Hundley: You bet. Carolyn, thanks so much for the intro on that and so beautifully described. What's novel here is they were able to combine imaging in real time, so the heart contracting and relaxing, and then simultaneously obtain the metabolic information by bringing in the spectroscopy component. So really just splashing, as they might say in Oxford, just wonderful presentation, and I cannot wait to hear what they found. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Well, they recruited patients across the spectrum of diastolic dysfunction and HFpEF, meaning they had controls. They had nine patients with type two diabetes, 14 patients with HFpEF and nine patients with severe diastolic dysfunction due to cardiac amyloidosis. What they found was that a gradient of myocardial energetic deficit existed across the spectrum of HFpEF. Even at low workload, the energetic deficit was related to a markedly abnormal exercise response in all four cardiac chambers, which was associated with detectable pulmonary congestion. The findings really support an energetic basis for transient pulmonary congestion in HFpEF with the implication that manipulating myocardial energy metabolism may be a promising strategy to improve cardiac function and reduce pulmonary congestion in HFpEF. This is discussed in a beautiful editorial by Drs. Jennifer Hole, Christopher Nguyen and Greg Lewis. Dr. Greg Hundley: Great presentation, Carolyn, and obviously love that MRI/MRS combo. Carolyn, these investigators in this next paper led by Dr. Sara Ranjbarvaziri from Stanford University School of Medicine performed a comprehensive multi-omics profile of the molecular. So transcripts metabolites, complex lipids and ultra structural and functional components of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy energetics using myocardial samples from 27 hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients and 13 controls really is the donor heart. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Wow, it's really all about energetics today, isn't it? So what did they see, Greg? Dr. Greg Hundley: Right, Carolyn. So hypertrophic cardiomyopathy hearts showed evidence of global energetic decompensation manifested by a decrease in high energy phosphate metabolites (ATP, ADP, phosphocreatine) and a reduction in mitochondrial genes involved in the creatine kinase and ATP synthesis. Accompanying these metabolic arrangements, quantitative electron microscopy showed an increased fraction of severely damaged mitochondria with reduced crystal density coinciding with reduced citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial oxidative respiration. These mitochondrial abnormalities were associated with elevated reactive oxygen species and reduced antioxidant defenses. However, despite significant mitochondrial injury, the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy hearts failed to up-regulate mitophagic clearance. Dr. Greg Hundley: So Carolyn, in summary, the findings of this study suggest that perturbed metabolic signaling and mitochondrial dysfunction are common pathogenic mechanisms in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and these results highlight potential new drug targets for attenuation of the clinical disease through improving metabolic function and reducing myocardial injury. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Wow, what an interesting issue of our journal. There's even more. There's an exchange of letters between Drs. Naeije and Claessen about determinants of exercise capacity in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. There's a "Pathways to Discovery" paper: a beautiful interview with Dr. Heinrich Taegtmeyer entitled,"A foot soldier in cardiac metabolism." Dr. Greg Hundley: Right, Carolyn, and I've got a research letter from Professor Marston entitled "The cardiovascular benefit of lowering LDL cholesterol to below 40 milligrams per deciliter." Well, what a great issue, very metabolic, and how about we get onto that feature discussion? Dr. Carolyn Lam: Let's go, Greg. Dr. Greg Hundley: Welcome listeners to our feature discussion today. We have a paper that is going to address some issues pertaining to high blood pressure, or hypertension. With us, we have Dr. Yuan Lu from Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. We also have a guest editor to help us review this paper, Dr. Jan Staessen from University Louvain in Belgium. Welcome to you both and Yuan, will start with you. Could you describe for us some of the background that went into formulating your hypothesis and then state for us the hypothesis that you wanted to address with this research? Dr. Yuan Lu: Sure. Thank you, Greg. We conducted this study because we see that recent data show hypertension control in the US population has not improved in the last decades, and there are widening disparities. Also last year, the surgeon general issued a call to action to make hypertension control a national priority. So, we wanted to better understand whether the country has made any progress in preventing hospitalization for acute hypertension. That is including hypertension emergency, hypertension urgency, and hypertension crisis, which also refers to acute blood pressure elevation that is often associated with target organ damage and requires urgent intervention. We have the data from the Center for Medicare/Medicaid, which allow us to look at the trends of hospitalization for acute hypertension over the last 20 years and we hypothesize we may also see some reverse progress in hospitalization rate for acute hypertension, and there may differences by population subgroups like age, sex, race, and dual eligible status. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. So you've described for us a little bit about perhaps the study population, but maybe clarify a little further: What was the study population and then what was your study design? Dr. Yuan Lu: Yeah, sure. The study population includes all Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries 65 years and older enrolled in the fee-for-service plan for at least one month from January 1999 to December 2019 using the Medicare denominator files. We also study population subgroups by age, sex, race and ethnicity and dual eligible status. Specifically the racial and ethnic subgroups include Asian, blacks, Hispanics, North American native, white, and others. Dual eligible refers to beneficiary eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid. This study design is a serial cross sectional analysis of these Medicare beneficiaries between 1999 and 2019 over the last 20 years. Dr. Greg Hundley: Excellent. Yuan, what did you find? Dr. Yuan Lu: We actually have three major findings. First, we found that in Medicare beneficiaries 65 years and older, hospitalization rate for acute hypertension increased more than double in the last 20 years. Second, we found that there are widening disparities. When we look at all the population subgroups, we found black adults having the highest hospitalization rate in 2019 across age, sex, race, and dual eligible subgroup. And finally, when we look at the outcome among people hospitalized, we found that during the same period, the rate of 30 day and 90 day mortality and readmission among hospitalized beneficiaries improved and decreased significantly. So this is the main findings, and we can also talk about implications of that later. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. And did you find any differences between men and women? Dr. Yuan Lu: Yes. We also looked at the difference between men and women, and we found that actually the hospitalization rate is higher among females compared to men. So more hospitalizations for acute hypertension among women than men. Dr. Greg Hundley: Given this relatively large Medicare/Medicaid database and cross-sectional design, were you able to investigate any relationships between these hospitalizations and perhaps social determinants of health? Dr. Yuan Lu: For this one, we haven't looked into that detail. This is just showing the overall picture, like how the hospitalization rate changed over time in the overall population and by different population subgroups. What you mentioned is an important issue and should definitely be a future study to look at whether social determine have moderated the relationship between the hospitalization. Speaker 3: Excellent. Well, listeners, now we're going to turn to our guest editor and you'll hear us talk a little bit sometimes about associate editors. We have a team that will review many papers, but when we receive a paper that might contain an associate editor or an associate editors institution, we actually at Circulation turn to someone completely outside of the realm of the associate editors and the editor in chief. These are called guest editors. With us today, we have Dr. Jan Staessen from Belgium who served as the guest editor. He's been working in this task for several years. Jan, often you are referred papers from the American Heart Association. What attracted you to this particular paper and how do you put Yuan's results in the context with other studies that have focused on high blood pressure research? Dr. Jan Staessen: Well, I've almost 40 years of research in clinical medicine and in population science, and some of my work has been done in Sub-Saharan Africa. So when I read the summary of the paper, I was immediately struck by the bad results, so to speak, for black people. This triggered my attention and I really thought this message must be made public on a much larger scale because there is a lot of possibility for prevention. Hypertension is a chronic disease, and if you wait until you have an emergency or until you have target organ damage, you have gone in too late. So really this paper cries for better prevention in the US. And I was really also amazed when I compared this US data with what happens in our country. We don't see any, almost no hospitalizations for acute hypertension or for hypertensive emergencies. So there is quite a difference. Dr. Jan Staessen: Going further on that, I was wondering whether there should not be more research on access to primary care in the US because people go to the emergency room, but that's not a place where you treat or manage hypertension. It should be managed in primary care with making people aware of the problem. It's still the silent killer, the main cause of cardiovascular disease, 8 million deaths each year. So this really triggered my attention and I really wanted this paper to be published. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. Jan, I heard you mention the word awareness. How have you observed perhaps differences in healthcare delivery in Belgium that might heighten awareness? You mentioned primary care, but are there any other mechanisms in place that heighten awareness or the importance? Dr. Jan Staessen: I think people in Belgium, the general public, knows that hypertension is a dangerous condition. That it should be well treated. We have a very well built primary care network, so every person can go to a primary care physician. Part of the normal examination in the office of a primary care physician is a blood pressure measurement. That's almost routine in Belgium. And then of course not all patients are treated to go. Certainly keeping in mind the new US guidelines that aim for lower targets, now recently confirmed in the Chinese study, you have to sprint three cells. And then the recent Chinese study that have been published to the New England. So these are issues to be considered. I also have colleagues working in Texas close to the Mexican border at the university place there, and she's telling me how primary care is default in that area. Dr. Jan Staessen: I think this is perhaps part of the social divide in the US. This might have to be addressed. It's not only a problem in the US, it's also a problem in other countries. There is always a social divide and those who have less money, less income. These are the people who fell out in the beginning and then they don't see primary care physicians. Dr. Jan Staessen: Belgium, for instance, all medicines are almost free. Because hypertension is a chronic condition prevention should not only start at age 65. Hypertension prevention should really start at a young age, middle age, whenever this diagnosis of high blood pressure diagnosis is confirmed. Use blood pressure monitoring, which is not so popular in the US, but you can also use home blood pressure monitoring. Then you have to start first telling your patients how to improve their lifestyle. When that is not sufficient, you have to start anti hypertensive drug treatment. We have a wide array of anti hypertensive drugs that can be easily combined. If you find the right combination, then you go to combination tablets because fewer tablets means better patient adherence. Dr. Greg Hundley: Yuan we will turn back to you. In the last minutes here, could you describe some of your thoughts regarding what you think is the next research study that needs to be performed in this sphere of hypertension investigation? Dr. Yuan Lu: Sure. Greg, in order to answer your question, let me step back a little bit, just to talk about the implication of the main message from this paper, and then we can tie it to the next following study. We found that the marked increase in hospitalization rate for acute hypertension actually represented many more people suffering a potential catastrophic event that should be preventable. I truly agree with what Dr. Staessen said, hypertension should be mostly treated in outpatient setting rather than in the hospital. We also find the lack of progress in reducing racial disparity in hospitalization. These findings highlight needs for new approaches to address both the medical and non-medical factors, including the social determinants in health, system racism that can contribute to this disparity. When we look at the outcome, we found the outcome for mortality and remission improved over time. Dr. Yuan Lu: This means progress has been made in improving outcomes once people are hospitalized for an acute illness. The issue is more about prevention of hospitalization. Based on this implication, I think in a future study we need better evidence to understand how we can do a better job in the prevention of acute hypertension admissions. For example, we need the study to understand who is at risk for acute hypertensive admissions, and how can this event be preempted. If we could better understand who these people are, phenotype this patient better and predict their risk of hospitalization for acute hypertension, we may do a better job in preventing this event from happening. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. And Jan, do you have anything to add? Dr. Jan Staessen: Yes. I think every effort should go to prevention in most countries. I looked at the statistics, and more than 90% of the healthcare budget is spent in treating established disease, often irreversible disease like MI or chronic kidney dysfunction. I think then you come in too late. So of the healthcare budget in my mind, much more should go to the preventive issues and probably rolling out an effective primary care because that's the place where hypertension has to be diagnosed and hypertension treatment has to be started. Dr. Greg Hundley: Excellent. Well, listeners, we've heard a wonderful discussion today regarding some of the issues pertaining to hypertension and abrupt admission to emergency rooms for conditions pertaining to hypertension, really getting almost out of control. We want to thank Dr. Yuan Lu from Yale New Haven and also our guest editor, Dr. Jan Staessen from Louvain in Belgium. On behalf of Carolyn and myself, we want to wish you a great week and we will catch you next week on the run. This program is copyright of the American Heart Association, 2021. The opinions express by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association for more visit aha journals.org.

Pilot Briefing
Season 3 Episode 47: Pilot Briefing - Week of Nov. 22, 2021

Pilot Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 4:09


Thanks so much for tuning into the Pilot Briefing Podcast for the week of Nov 22, 2021. In this episode you will learn more about: Why pilot hiring is increasing exponentially, a final rule that eases the single-engine ATP path, older pilots continue to report negative treatment from insurance companies, avionics market trends are up, and 5 tips to avoid air travel delays during the holidays.

American Toffee Podcast
MAN CITY POST-MATCH: Winless in Last 6

American Toffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 41:12


Alex & James discuss the disappointing, yet expected 3-0 loss to Manchester City at the Etihad. Based on the loss today, Everton have only taken 2 points out of the last possible 18 making the Blues the worst in-form team in the PL. ATP breaks down player selection and tactical setup, key events throughout the match, individual and team statistics, as well as listener comments. How much is Rafa to blame for the current form? How much will Gray's injury affect us?  LINKS: https://linktr.ee/usatoffeepod Intro: Steve Barkwill Outro: Kenboib

Hold On to Your Racket with Josefina Gurevich and Shravya Pant

The focus of this episode first and foremost is to discuss the story of Peng Shuai, the Chinese tennis star who came out with allegations of sexual assault against former Vice Premier Zhang Gaoli last week and is now missing. This story has garnered attention beyond just the tennis world, with the WTA, fellow tennis players, politicians, and the media speaking out. Peng Shuai's disappearance also represents a lot about the state of #MeToo and censorship in China. We hope and pray for her safety, so please take the time to listen to and read about her story. We also discuss some ATP and WTA tennis that went down this week, including a celebration of Mugu's Guadalajara success and other takeaways from the WTA Finals, heartbreaking injuries and debut alternates at the ATP Finals, Federer's 2022 season doubts, and our usual analysis and giggles. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/holdontoyourracket/message

Ask The Professor
Episode # 2211

Ask The Professor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 29:45


Air date: 11/21/21 [00:28:46] With Professors Matt Mio, Mara Livezey, Stephen Manning, Heather Hill, Beth Oljar and Dave Chow. Download a transcript for this week’s episode – ATP transcript 2211_otter_ai

DIE TENNISPROLETEN
#whereispengshuai

DIE TENNISPROLETEN

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 36:29


Peng Shuai wird nach der Veröffentlichung gegen ein ehemaliges chinesisches Regierungsmitglied vermisst. Der Fall zeigt klar auf, dass der Grat zwischen Marktstrategie des Sports und politischer Verantwortung sehr schmal sein kann. Die WTA positioniert sich deutlich und droht mit dem Rückzug aus China, sollte es keine neuen Erkenntnisse über Verbleib und Zustand von Peng Shuai geben. Doch welche weiteren Konsequenzen hätte so ein Vorgehen für die WTA selbst, die ATP und andere Verbände? Natürlich gibt es auch einen Blick auf die Finals von WTA und ATP, die auf Grund der Thematik aber hinten anstehen.

No Challenges Remaining
Episode 317: Peng Shuai, China, and the End of WTAsia?

No Challenges Remaining

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 69:05


Ben is joined by The Guardian's Tumaini Carayol to discuss the fallout of the accusations made by Chinese tennis player Peng Shuai against a senior government official, the WTA's strong stance, and the impact on tennis in China going forward. Was the WTA's partnership with China always doomed to fail, as Tumaini predicted in 2019? And what would a reset of the tour without China look like for the future of women's tennis? Plus, the new-look WTA year-end championship event in Guadalajara and the same-look-new-venue event for the ATP in Turin. Thank you again for the incredible support for NCR we've received on the NCR Patreon which has powered us into our TENTH(!) ad-free season! Please consider joining in as we bring you the best shows we can this year! And thank you to the many listeners who have already given their support! (And thank you to G.O.A.T. backers J O'D, Pam Shriver, and Nicole Copeland!)

American Toffee Podcast
INT'L BREAK CHECKPOINT: 11 Games In

American Toffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 49:40


ATP is back with a look at Everton's year over year performance after 11 games.  Despite James suffering through COVID, the power trio stays intact over the international break to take a look at a breakdown of goals for and against in various scenarios.  They debate to what extent the dramatic differences in open play vs. set piece performance can be attributed to the summer window, injuries, change in system, poor player utilization, and even individual maturity and challenges.  The ATP boys also uncover some interesting facts and figures about year over year performance including deeper analysis of both Allan and Ben Godfrey.  Is Allan better suited to a 3-man midfield?  Did the fan base overrate Ben Godfrey last year?  Tune in to find out! LINKS: https://linktr.ee/usatoffeepod Intro: Steve Barkwill Production: James Harper Outro: Kenboib

Accidental Tech Podcast
457: The World's Greatest Conference Call

Accidental Tech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 128:56


Pre-show: Watching shows on Apple Some ATP membership bookkeeping Follow-up: Xcode build times (via Abel Demoz) defaults write com.apple.dt.Xcode ShowBuildOperationDuration YES Monterey’s Mouse Pointer Memory Leak Bug Marco has [Original] HomePod Problems Belkin Soundform Connect Marco replaces Weather Line with Carrot Weather Weather Line acquisition App Store feature on Brian Mueller of Carrot Weather Weather Strip Seller risks on eBay Swappa Facebook and Meta Stratechery Interview with Mark Zuckerberg Oculus Quest 2 Ping World of Warcraft SecondLife IRC MUD MUSH HoloLens 2 Chatroulette Knowledge Navigator Idiocracy Post-show: Casey broke two car keys in the span of 10 minutes Volvo XC90 Example replacement video Sponsored by: Linode: Instantly deploy and manage an SSD server in the Linode Cloud. New accounts get a $100 credit. Mack Weldon: Radically-efficient wardrobing. Use code atppodcast for 20% off your first order. Squarespace: Make your next move. Use code ATP for 10% off your first order. Become a member for ad-free episodes and our early-release, unedited “bootleg” feed!

The Mini-Break
The Theme Remains the Same…

The Mini-Break

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 72:55


Welcome to the Mini-Break podcast powered by Tennis Point. This is your daily podcast for the biggest storylines, results, and controversies from the tennis world. Cracked Racquets Editor-in-Chief Alex Gruskin offers his thoughts on last week's ATP action. He contextualizes the early career success of Carlos Alcatraz, shares his takeaways from the 2021 NextGenATP Finals, discusses Tommy Paul's maiden title in Stockholm, and so much more!! Don't forget to give a 5 star review on your favorite podcast app! In addition, add your twitter/instagram handle to the review for a chance to win some FREE CR gear!! This episode brought to you by: Tennis Point Discounted Tennis Apparel, Tennis Racquets, Tennis Shoes & Equipment from Nike, adidas, Babolat, Wilson & More! Visit their store today and use the code "CR15" at checkout to save 15% off Sale items. Some Exclusions (MAP Exceptions) apply and code will not work on those items. This code will add 1 FREE CAN of WILSON Balls to the cart at checkout.  Lucky Racket The hub for tennis fans, based out of Dayton, OH. Our mission is to make everyone smile when they see our products on and off the tennis courts! Get 15% OFF by using our promo code "Cracked15" at luckyracquet.com. Tennis Channel Podcast Network Visit https://www.tennis.com/pro-game/podcasts/ to stay current on the latest tennis news and trends and enjoy in-depth analysis and dynamic debates. Find Cracked Racquets Website: https://www.crackedracquets.com Instagram: https://instagram.com/crackedracquets Twitter: https://twitter.com/crackedracquets Facebook: https://Facebook.com/crackedracquets YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC12ZE3jU0n52JkeWV1TB21A Email Newsletter: https://www.crackedracquets.comDon't forget to give a 5 star review with your twitter/instagram handle for a chance to win some FREE CR gear!! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

大紀元新聞
美網和男網加入聲援 籲調查彭帥控張高麗案 | 大紀元 | 大纪元

大紀元新聞

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 5:08


週一(11月15日),男子網球國際管理機構(ATP巡迴賽,ATP Tour)支持國際女子網球協會(WTA)的呼籲,WTA要求對中國網球名將彭帥指控中共前副總理張高麗性侵案進行全面公正調查。 更多內容請見:https://www.epochtimes.com/b5/21/11/15/n13377589.htm 大纪元,大纪元新闻,大紀元,大紀元新聞,彭帥, 張高麗, ATP巡迴賽, 女網, 男網, 性侵 Support this podcast

The Autoimmune Doc Podcast w/ Dr. Taylor Krick
027 - Mold, Mycotoxins and Autoimmunity

The Autoimmune Doc Podcast w/ Dr. Taylor Krick

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 34:11


Youtube Video: Mold Toxicity and Mycotoxin IllnessYoutube Video: Research Review - Neural Antibodies in Patients with Symptoms and Histories of Mold/Chemical ExposuresYoutube Video: Research Review - Mycotoxins Induce NeurotoxicityI say this all the time, but mold toxicity is crazy. Indoor molds such as Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Stachybotrys produce mycotoxins, which are also crazy. Mold and mycotoxins can both disrupt the immune system in a myriad of different ways, which is why they are associated with autoimmunity in many ways.In this podcast, I didn't want to just read stats or research, I wanted to talk about the mechanisms by which molds and mycotoxins can affect the immune system, which are varied and complex. The research is out there on mold, but it can be hard to find because mold toxicity goes by several names - Sick Building Syndrome, Dampness and Mold Hypersensitivity Syndrome, Chronic Inflammatory Response Syndrome, Mixed Mold Mycotoxicosis, Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis to name a few - and there are many different molds, and many mycotoxins. When you work with patients and you are aware of these mechanisms, mold is an incredibly common problem. It never ceases to amaze me how many people I see whose symptoms or disease timeline correlate with a prolonged exposure to water damage, a damp or moldy environment, or a history of repeated mold exposures!Mold is ubiquitous, so your body tries really hard immunologically to tolerate it, and sometimes it tolerates it for a looong time - until one day it stops tolerating it. Mycotoxins from mold can remain indefinitely in tissues, and many have an affinity for the brain, where they disrupt mitochondrial ATP production. Some molds and mycotoxins suppress the immune system, some activate the immune system, some suppress innate immune function and increase adaptive, some do the opposite. Some people have several mycotoxins present at once, doing several different things, along with other pathogens and toxins accumulating faster due to the effects of mold. You can see how mold exposure and toxicity can quickly become quite complex immunologically! Molds and mycotoxins can cause leaky gut, leaky sinus, leaky lung, leaky brain, they can deplete glutathione, impact the microbiome, increase pathogen burdens like EBV and CMV, disrupt Th1/Th2 balance, and turn on vicious cycles of inflammation (NFkB, iNOS, NO-ONOO, Th17) - - all of which are underlying mechanisms of autoimmunity. When you hear all these various mechanisms, you begin to understand why molds and mycotoxins can contribute to autoimmunity, cancer, chronic infection, and even death, not to mention the most common symptoms of fatigue, anxiety, depression, brain fog, ENT symptoms, pituitary/thryoid/adrenal/reproductive imbalances, headaches, insomnia. There are a lot of mechanisms, and there are a lot of other variables, including genetics, history, exposure, and everything else in your bucket, but MOLD AND MYCOTOXINS are one of the scariest things on the planet!

Circulation on the Run
Circulation November 16, 2021 Issue

Circulation on the Run

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 32:01


Please join authors Babken Asatryan and Anwar Chahal, and Associate Editor Ntobeko Ntusi as they discuss the Primer article "Inflammation and Immune Response in Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy: State-of-the-Art Review." Dr. Carolyn Lam: Welcome to Circulation on the Run, your weekly podcast summary and backstage pass to the journal and its editors. We're your co-hosts, I'm Dr. Carolyn Lam, associate editor from the National Heart Center and Duke National University of Singapore. Dr. Greg Hundley: And I'm Dr. Greg Hundley, associate editor, director of the Pauley Heart Center at VCU Health at Richmond, Virginia. Well, Carolyn this week, our feature discussion, we're not going to go with one of our original articles, but we are going to feature a primer and a primer is a state of the art review article. The topic is going to be on arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy and we'll be looking at the role of inflammation and the immune response in arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy. But before we get to that feature, how about we grab a cup of coffee and talk about some of the other articles in the issue? Would you like to go first? Dr. Carolyn Lam: I would, because guess what? I'm going to be talking about prescription opioids. We know these are a major contributor to the ongoing epidemic of persistent opioid use. What do you think is the incidence after cardiac implantable electronic device procedures? Greg, let's start with a Greg Hundley quiz. I'll give you multiple choice, how about that? Do you think it is 1%, 10%, 25%. 50%? Dr. Greg Hundley: All right, Carolyn, I'm going to guess here. I'm going to go 10%. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Smart. Well, guess what? Today's paper actually gives us insight into that question, it's from Dr. Frankel from the hospital of the university of Pennsylvania and his colleagues, and these authors performed a retrospective cohort study using data from a national Administrative Claims Database from 2004 to 2018 of patients undergoing cardiac implantable electronic device procedures. Adult patients were included if they were opioid naive during the 180 day period before the procedure and did not undergo another procedure with anesthesia in the following 180 days. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Persistent opioid use, which is what we're interested in, was defined by filling an additional opioid prescription more than 30 days following the procedure. So, here's your answer. Of the more than 143,000 patients meeting these inclusion criteria, 11%, so you were right Greg, 11% filled an opioid prescription within 14 days of surgery. Among these patients, persistent opioid use occurred in 12.4% of patients, 30 to 180 days after surgery. The likelihood for developing persistent opioid use was increased for patients who had a history of drug abuse, pre-operative muscle relaxant or benzodiazepine use or opioid use in the prior five years. Also, patients who have prescribed more than 135 milligrams of oral morphine equivalence had a significantly increased risk of persistent opioid use. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Now, this is important because all physicians who perform cardiac implantable electronic device procedures and care for these patients should be aware of the risk of persistent opioid use. This is discussing in editorial by Dr. Kandil from UT Southwestern. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very interesting Carolyn, so connecting sometimes the prescription use of opioids after cardiac implantable electronic devices. Great presentation. Well, my first paper comes to us from the world of preclinical science and it's from our prior editor in chief Dr. Joseph Loscalzo from Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Harvard Medical School. So Carolyn, interferon gamma, producing CD4 positive and CD8 positive T-lymphocytes, have been identified as the predominant pathological cell subsets in human atherosclerotic plaques. Dr. Greg Hundley: While the immunological consequences of these cells have been extensively evaluated, their interferon gamma mediated metabolic effects on endothelial cells remains unknown. So Carolyn, the purpose of this study was to determine the metabolic consequences of the T-lymphocyte cytokine interferon gamma on human coronary artery endothelial cells. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Interesting. So what did Dr. Loscalzo and colleagues find? Dr. Greg Hundley: Right, Carolyn. So, the authors found that interferon gamma impairs endothelial glucose metabolism via altered tryptophan metabolism while depleting NAD plus, which results in a metabolic shift toward increased fatty acid oxidation, and therefore, Carolyn, this work suggests a novel mechanistic basis for pathologic T-lymphocyte endothelial interactions in atherosclerosis, mediated by interferon gamma, linking endothelial glucose, tryptophan, and fatty acid metabolism with NADH and ATP generation and their adverse endothelial functional consequences. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Oh, very nice, Greg. Thank you. The next paper describes a comprehensive characterization of cardiomyopathy caused by filament C truncating variance. Dr. Greg Hundley: Whoa. Okay, Carolyn. Now what is filamin-C? Dr. Carolyn Lam: I thought you may ask and I wasn't going to quiz you, see Greg? The filamin-C gene can cause a striated muscle protein that crosslinks actin and anchors cell membrane proteins to the cytoskeleton, sarcolemmal and sarcomere Z-disc. So, the co-corresponding authors of today's paper Drs. Mestroni and Taylor from University of Colorado, Denver Anschutz Medical Campus, analyzed longitudinal clinical data from an international multicenter cohort of 85 carriers of this filamin-C truncating variants. And this is what they found. Dr. Carolyn Lam: First, the cardiomyopathy associated with filimin-C truncating variants appeared to be a disease with heterogeneous phenotypic presentation, ranging from typical dilated cardiomyopathy to arrhythmogenic, right ventricular cardiomyopathy, and with frequently overlapping forms. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Number two, left ventricular ejection fraction was associated with the risk of death, either all cause or non-arrhythmic, heart transplantation, or LVAD, but not with the risk of sudden cardiac death or major ventricular arrhythmias, highlighting the need for alternative strategies of stratification of the arrhythmic risk in these patients with the filimin-C truncating variant cardiomyopathy. Dr. Carolyn Lam: And number three, this cardiomyopathy was associated with a high risk of ventricular arrhythmias with frequencies of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias, not significantly different from things like Lamin and desmoplakin cardiomyopathy. Dr. Greg Hundley: Well, Carolyn, just fantastic. My next paper comes to us from Professor Lena Claesson-Welsh from Uppsala University and Carolyn, palmdelphin belongs to the family of paralemmin proteins implicated in cytoskeletal regulation and single nuclide polymorphisms in the palmdelphin locus that result in reduced expression are strong risk factors for development of calcific aortic valve stenosis, and predict the severity of the disease. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Wow, interesting. Palmdelphin, great. So tell us, what did they find and what are the clinical implications please? Dr. Greg Hundley: Right, Carolyn, great question. So first, calcific aortic valves stenosis patients with the single nucleotide polymorphism RS754 3130 express reduce palmdelphin levels in valve endothelial cells, which shows hallmarks of palmdelphin deficiency, such as loss of cytoplasmic RanGAP1, altered nuclear morphology and nuclear rest of P53 of P21. Carolyn, second, gene-regulatory changes affecting actin reorganization, are detected in seemingly healthy regions of calcifying bowels, in agreement with disturbed actin-dependent processes, being an early event, instigating the calcific process. And so Carolyn, the take home message is that palmdelphin is prominently expressed in endothelial cells and the presence of the palmdelphin single nucleotide polymorphism correlated both with a Barrett endothelium and calcific aortic valve stenosis suggesting that endothelial cell dysfunction is essential in development of calcific aortic valve disease. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Oh, wow, wow. Thank you for translating that into the clinical implication. Thanks Greg. Let's maybe discuss what else is in today's issue. There's a prospective piece by Dr. Kirchof entitled “In Patients With Recently Diagnosed Atrial Fibrillation, Think Anticoagulation And Rhythm Control.” There's an exchange of letters between Drs. Liao and Hakala regarding the article Cardiovascular Risk Factor Trajectory Since Childhood And Cognitive Performance In Midlife, The Cardiovascular Risk In Young Finns, study. Dr. Greg Hundley: And Carolyn, I've got a research letter from Professor Ramin entitled “Association Between Sarcomeric Variants In Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy In Myocardial Oxygenation, Insights From A Novel Oxygen-Sensitive CMR Approach.” Well, how about now we get onto that primer feature discussion relating to arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy? Dr. Carolyn Lam: Yay. All right, let's go, Greg. Dr. Greg Hundley: Well, listeners, we are now onto our feature discussion and this week we've got a different aspect to the feature discussions. We're going to work through a review article and what we call as a primer. It's one of our state-of-the-art family of publications, where we take a topic and perform a review on a new evolutionary concept that might be occurring in a particular field. This week, we are going to discuss arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy and we have with us two of the authors of this primer, Dr. Babken Asatryan from Bern, Switzerland and also Dr. Anwar Chahal from Lancaster, Pennsylvania. And of course, as always, we invite one of our associate editors and we have with us this week Ntobeko Ntusi from South Africa. Welcome gentlemen and Babken, let's start with you. Can you give us just a little bit of review regarding arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy? We hear that term as opposed to arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, and then maybe also, what are the underlying fundamental histopathologic and pathophysiologic findings associated with this disease? Dr. Babken Asatryan: Thank you, Greg. It's really an absolute pressure being here and thank you for your invitation again. So arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathic is genetically-determined heart disease and the common cause of sudden cardiac death in individuals younger than 40 years of age, it's characterized pathologically by fibrosis and/or fibro fatty infiltration of the myocardium. This infiltration provides a substrate for electrical and stability and leads to ventricular arrhythmias ranging from isolated premature ventricular contractions to sustain ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. Live ventricular arrhythmias are cardio manifestations of the orthogenic cardiomyopathy, and they typically occur at early stages of the disease, preceding pathological and functional abnormalities. We call that a concealed stage of the disease. Dr. Babken Asatryan: The typical form for arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy, which has been previously termed as arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, primarily affects the right ventricle and has been recognized for decades. Following implementation of postmortem autopsy, increased use of contrast, enhanced cardiac MRI, and improved understanding of the genotype phenotype correlations, more recently cases with more pronounced left ventricular involvement have been discovered as well as cases with biventricular involvement of the disease. Dr. Babken Asatryan: Nowadays, we believe that around 60% of cases have also left ventricular involvement, even if they're diagnosed based on the 2010 task force criteria for arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy. Causative variants in desmosomal genes are identified in about 60% of patients with typical arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. Dr. Babken Asatryan: Recently, there have been studies reporting non-desmosomal gene variants in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, as well as in those left ventricular and biventricular forms of the disease. But the left ventricular form is quite new to us, so we are learning a lot every day about this disease. Dr. Babken Asatryan: The pathogenesis of this condition appears to be quite complex. We know that these pathogenic variant in desmosomal genes can initiate several pathways and these could be gene dependent. What we do know, that these eventually lead to fibrosis and fibro fatty infiltration of the myocardium, which is the hallmark feature of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy. Dr. Greg Hundley: And patients present generally when, in terms of lifespan? Dr. Babken Asatryan: So, patients present in between 30 to 40 years of age, there's a typical presentation for arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies but young presentations are also common nowadays, particularly. So, programs in families, they usually present 30 to 40 years of age. But in families, we do discover patients who have typical arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or left and right ventricular involvement were younger at age, but they still need the criteria. Dr. Greg Hundley: And then when we diagnose this condition, do we also need to think about, at least clinically, looking for other affected individuals within a family? Dr. Babken Asatryan: Absolutely. So most of the arrhythmogenic biventricular cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic left ventricular cardiomyopathy cases are autosomal dominant diseases. So, this means if an individual carries a pathogenic variant in one of the genes responsible for the condition, the likelihood that the first degree family members will carry the same variant is about 50%. The disease however, presents with reduced penetrance and variable expressivity. Some of the family members may have just arrhythmias and others may develop arrhythmias and structural heart disease. And some of the individuals who carry pathogen occurrence in desmosomal are the genes responsible for the condition may not show phenotype at all. So, that makes the decision-making in families quite challenging. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. Well, thank you so much Babken and now, we're going to turn to one of your co-authors, Anwar and Anwar, in this primer, you start to present a new sort of theme, that inflammation actually may play a role in this disease, at least in terms of adverse events. Can you describe a little bit what your team was thinking here and what took you in this direction and what are some of the research that you've revered here that supports this new line of thinking?   Dr. Anwar Chahal: Thanks, Greg and Ntobeko, for first, the kind invitation to come on this podcast. I must add that I normally listen to the podcast and very much enjoy it, so it's a great honor and privilege for us. Dr. Anwar Chahal: Let me contextualize it, I think it's important to think about what are problems are when we evaluate cases, whether that's the program or the family members, and try to determine what's actually going on. There's been a number of changes over the last 15 years that really evolve around a better understanding and the availability of multimodality imaging, which has altered the way we evaluate these cases. If you look at the 2010 taskforce criteria, for example, they talk about volumetric changes and injection fractions by echo or MRI, and even ventriculogram synapse on fluoroscopy, which I don't think many people do anymore, but they don't mention gadolinium enhancement, and there is an updated version that will come out and talk about that, and the advantages of MRI and even contrast-enhanced CT, and now 18F-FDG, CT PET imaging. Dr. Anwar Chahal: So, the patient journey and the problem that we face is that actually some people present with very unusual features, chest pain, troponin rise, undergo coronary angiography, normal coronary arteries, or unobstructed coronary arteries. We put them through MRI scanners and we see a little bit of gadolinium enhancement. We follow them over the next five years or so, and it develops into taskforce criteria, positive ARVC. So, that's the sort of clinical angle where we've started to see this. Dr. Anwar Chahal: As we put people through scanners, we see the hearts lights up on PET scanners, pretty reproducibly and reliably, that tells us that there's some inflammation there. We look back into the literature and actually very, very early work that was done, autopsy-based, some of it endomyocardial biopsy-based describing lymphocytic infiltrates. Usually that's dry, as you say, or sterile, but there have been reports of even viral pathogens. Dr. Anwar Chahal: That's where it stirred this debate up for us about whether there's this signal that we're seeing there, what is it? What's actually going on? It raises a question, we recognize the other mechanisms, the fiber fatty replacement, the apoptotic pathways, that contribute to that. But there's such variable expressivity with this disease. It's a difficult disease to pin down and it raises a question. What are these other effect modifiers? Is there something else that we do not recognize? And that's really what's driven this. Dr. Anwar Chahal: Our group of co-authors are leaders in the field. Some of them are colleagues in veterinary medicine, Dr. Anna Geltser, and we work together on boxer dog patients. So, she is a practicing vet and a scientist, and has lots of boxer dogs with arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy. We've been looking at how we could utilize that as a model to test some of the findings that we have in humans and pioneering work really by Bob Hamilton in Toronto, in this paper where they described anti-DSG2 antibodies, which were found not only in humans, whatever the underlying genotype, but also in boxer dogs with arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy. And that's been followed up with work from Europe, describing anti-heart antibodies, anti-intercalated disk antibodies. Dr. Anwar Chahal: It doesn't really matter what the genotype is, but we're seeing these antibodies there and we're seeing these positive scans indicating inflammation. So the big question is, is this inflammation of primary insult or is it secondary? Is it that the heart in somebody with a genetic cardiomyopathy is predisposed, maybe the remodeling is affected. Bob Hamilton thinks this is probably the best explanation to explain why, whatever the genotype, that these antibodies were positive, that actually that myocardium becomes exposed. The epitope of DSG is now exposed to the immune system, which mounts an antibody response, and hence you see the rise in these antibodies, but it's possible it could it be primary as well. With COVID, and this is a bit of a stretch, so just bear with me there, with COVID we've been recognizing that there's myocardial injury. Dr. Anwar Chahal: There's not as much myocarditis as we expected, but there's been, with virus SARS-CoV-2, we know regular human coronavirus is a recognized cause of viral myocarditis. So, the question really arose are we going to see a lot more of this myocarditis? In our lab discussion, it was, "Well, do you think we're going to see something similar in that we've seen with arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy, these genetically predisposed individuals are more likely to get invaded? Now, we haven't really seen that with COVID and I won't delve too much into it, but going back to the classical viral infections that we see with myocarditis, here's a really, really interesting biological link. Most of them invade through the desmosome, so with SARS-CoV-2, we see the ACE2 receptors as the way the virus really invades. But with these regular coxsackie virus, for example, parvovirus, a lot of them invade through the desmosome, and that's where we thought, here's a link. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. Ntobeko, you see a lot of papers come across your desk. What attracted you to this group of investigators and this particular review article? Dr. Ntobeko Ntusi: Thank you very much, Greg. I want to start by congratulating Babken, and Anwar for a really fantastic submission, which as an associate editor, was an absolute pleasure to handle. There really are six things that stood out for me about this article. The first one really relates to the question that you ask Babken, which relates to the nomenclature and people have traditionally thought of this is a disease of the right ventricle. I think it's now timely to consider a clear change in nomenclature, that recognizes not only right ventricular involvement, but also left ventricular involvement. And the common finding of biventricular disease in patients with ACM. Dr. Ntobeko Ntusi: The second really important contribution for me from this primer was that we've always thought of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies as a genetic disorder with abnormalities in the genes, encoding components of the desmosome. Many groups recently, including our own group that described novel mutations for arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy in adhering to poultry and other genes outside of the desmosome are showing that the genetic underpinnings are much wider. But the key contribution here is really the consideration of the centrality of inflammation to the pathogenesis of this disease. Anwar has spoken to some length about that, so I won't rehash those comments, but for me, what is key for future work in this area is really to clarify whether the inflammation, as in with many other forms of cardiovascular disease, is merely an epiphenomenon, or whether it plays a critical role in the causal pathway for the phenotypes that we see. Dr. Ntobeko Ntusi: The next important feature for me was the review of the literature and evidence in the association with myocarditis. So, we've seen lots of case reports and small case series showing young people presenting with myocarditis and meeting either the Dallas criteria histologically, or the Lake Louise criteria on imaging, and then subsequent genetic testing confirming the diagnosis of an arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy. I thought for the first time with quite a compelling review of the link between these two. Dr. Ntobeko Ntusi: The fourth important contribution relates really to the contribution of imaging modalities, both in diagnostics, but critically in risk stratification for this clinical entity. And for me, the importance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance, either with planimetric mapping or late gadolinium enhancement to really add to our ability to predict future events. Dr. Ntobeko Ntusi: Then there's been quite a number of publications in the last five years that have clarified our understanding of the at risk patient with arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy who's likely to suffer a sudden cardiac death event. This tends to be somebody who was young, who was male, who has a history of documented non-sustained ventricular tachycardia or a history of syncope and on ECG, quite extensive T wave inversion. So again, this is nicely reviewed, and we think about those as candidates who'll benefit from implantation of an ICD. Dr. Ntobeko Ntusi: Then I thought for me, the last really nice contribution from this piece was the review of advancing our understanding of the hot phase. So in all forms of heart muscle disease, we speak of the presentation of patients with the chest pain syndrome, with a troponin leak, but unobstructed coronaries. On further investigation, we don't really find any other evidence of an inflammatory event. We call this a hot phase. And in some case reports in small case series, endomyocardial biopsy has revealed the association of these, whether in TCM, HCM, or arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy with lymphocytic infiltration. I thought this was all very nicely reviewed. Dr. Ntobeko Ntusi: So, the question that really left me with having read this review, was whether in the future, we may actually need to consider targeting inflammatory pathways as a therapeutic target in this heart muscle disorder. Thanks Greg. Dr. Greg Hundley: Yes. Thanks so much in Ntobeko. You've really led us to the next question that I'm going to ask both Babken and Anwar, you've discussed where do you feel this field is moving and what is the next study or series of studies we need to perform. Babken, first you, and then Anwar. Babken, what do you think is the next study to be performed in this space? Dr. Babken Asatryan: I so much agree with Ntobeko, that perhaps understanding better what can be targeted in these patients, in order to prevent development of phenotype or least to prevent cardiac events, is perhaps the most important next step. In our first figure, we have summarized this potential mechanisms, involving inflammation leading to with arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy in these patients. We have also highlighted the potential mechanisms that perhaps in the future can be targeted. This could include both targeting the inflammatory cytokines, as well as the primary agents that cause the myocardial inflammation in patients, depending on the results that we will receive over the next years and perhaps animal models should be the next step to better understand how similar arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy phenotype, where inflammatory contributors to the phenotype are important. And then we can understand whether this can be the same in humans as well. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. And Anwar, do you have anything to add? Dr. Anwar Chahal: Yes. So, agree with that. I guess I would add what are we doing to try to help decipher this? So some of the work that we're doing, I mentioned earlier with the boxer dog patients, who have arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy. So some of the aspects that we're actually looking at is taking swab cells to see if we can phenotype as a alternative tender myocardial biopsy. And one of the co-authors, Angeliki Asimaki, really pioneered that as a alternative tool because the desmosis are ubiquitous and this may help us phenotype patients better. But also, we want to look at using that as a tool in the pheno copies of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy. So we would advocate, re-phenotyping people as well as possible and trying to use some of these techniques. Dr. Anwar Chahal: The next thing we're really looking at is antibody based tools, either working with collaborators, who've already described these antibodies such as anti-DSG2, anti-heart antibody, and anti-skeletal disc to see if we can develop those and perhaps identify others in both human and ox models. And that will then hopefully open the way for us to develop therapeutics that may be able to target those and address that, and maybe use these antibodies as markers to see disease progression, or halting of disease. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. Well listeners, we want to thank Dr. Babken Asatran from Bern, Switzerland, Anwar Chalal from Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and our own associate editor, Ntobeko Ntusi from South Africa, really helping us see this new scientific consideration regarding the potential role of inflammation in causal pathways of adverse manifestations of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy. Well, on behalf of Carolyn and myself, we want to wish you a great week and we will catch you next week on the run. This program is copyright of the American Heart Association, 2021. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more visit ahajournals.org.

The Passing Shot Tennis Podcast
The Tour Catch-Up: Badosa + Muguruza set Spanish semi in Mexico; Kontaveit cruise control; Turin calling ATP Finals; Djokovic rules Ruud; Berrettini heartbreak; Alcaraz wins Next Gen crown in Milan; #WhereisPengShuai?

The Passing Shot Tennis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 64:26


In the latest episode of The Passing Shot, the tennis podcast by fans, Joel and Kim catch up on the plethora of Finals events from the ATP and WTA Tour, with the WTA Finals in Guadalajara, the ATP Finals in Turin and the ATP Next Gen Finals in Milan all happening.With a semi final set in Guadalajara between Muguruza and Badosa and Carlos Alcaraz storming to victory in Milan, it's been a good week for Spanish tennis. Joel and Kim delve into the key results from both tournaments, as well as reviewing the opening matches of the ATP Finals in Turin, where it's looking likely for a Djokovic or Medvedev title win.With Alison Riske winning her third career singles title in Linz and Tommy Paul claiming his first in Stockholm, Joel and Kim also round up and reflect on the last events of the season, as well as touching upon the disturbing sexual abuse allegations voiced earlier this month by Chinese player Peng Shuai.Share your fan thoughts on the week with the #passingshotpod on social media.______________DOWNLOADTENNIS.COMTo stay up to date on all tennis around the world including ATP, WTA and Challenger tours, download TNNS Live Scores.Download on Apple PodcastsDownload on Google PlayFollow  TNNS Live Scores on TwitterAnd check out the TNNS Lives Scores website at www.downloadtennis.com______________SOCIAL MEDIAShare your fan thoughts on the week with the #passingshotpod on social media.Twitter: @passingshotpodInstagram: @passingshotpodWebsite: thepassingshot.co.ukWritten, presented and produced by Joel Girling and Kim MackenzieCrowdfunded by our listeners.Recorded on 15th November 2021

The Court Jesters
Sal walks out

The Court Jesters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 71:37


This week the boys have a more casual chat about life. Mitch is fresh off a stint from legends week at Newks, Nelson is finally out of lockdown and Sal apparently has more important things to do as he walks out before the show is complete. Enjoy the boys at their best 

Hold On to Your Racket with Josefina Gurevich and Shravya Pant

Hold on to your rackets, folks, because it's WTA FINALS TIME, BABY! If you couldn't tell, we are beyond excited. We're back with consistent episodes?? YUP! Luckily the focus of this episode is the WTA (insert heart eyes emoji)!! So we start it out with some recap of recent tennis like the RTF triumph at BJK Cup and Djoko's revenge at the Paris Masters. Then we check-in on some current tournaments like Stockholm, where Sir Andy took out our favorite ATP ginger, and the Linz defeat of Emma (we discuss her hype and the fact that she deserves some leniency, people (!!), as well as her new coach). Then we finally talk about some Finals action (ATP NextGen); our boy Sebi is lowkey goating. FINALLY WTA!! It's still pretty early in the tournament so it's tough to discuss what'll end up happening but we give you the preview and we give it good (well?). We give you the rundown of the groups and our picks to win, so tune in to hear us blab about our favorite ladies!! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/holdontoyourracket/message

Time in Flight
Episode 32: Audrey Menezes - A Woman Pilot, Originally from Mumbai, Discusses Flight Training, Regional Airlines and Flying Part 135

Time in Flight

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 48:56


Born in Mumbai, India. Moved to New York when she was a little girl. Her first love was music and she can play 7 instruments. Audrey fell in love with aviation at 16 and started going to Embry Riddle to be an aerospace engineer. That's where she learned she actually wanted to fly and left Embry Riddle to pursue her flying career. She did her Private and Instrument training in Cirrus SR-22. It took her about 3 years to get the 1500 hours she needed to get to ATP and around age 22 she joined a regional airline. At age 25, she then decided to transition to Part 135 flying and went from a large regional jet to a turboprop King-Air and is now a New Hire at the largest fractional ownership/part 135 operator in the country. With her passion for music, she's seen being a pilot as being akin to a conductor of a symphony in how everything is orchestrated together.

Ask The Professor
Episode # 2210

Ask The Professor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 29:38


Air date: 11/14/21 [00:28:40] Download the transcript for this week’s episode – ATP 2210 transcript_otter_ai

Tennis Channel Inside-In
Tennis Channel Inside-In 11/11/21: Nick Monroe on Murray's Heart, Tiafoe's Rise, the WTA Finals, & More

Tennis Channel Inside-In

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 31:52


This week's episode of Tennis Channel Inside-In features commentator & doubles player Nick Monroe. The dual-threat gives his thoughts on Andy Murray notching another top ten win, his friend Frances Tiafoe playing the best tennis of his young career, & more analysis from the ATP event in Stockholm. Monroe also shares his opinions on the Next-Gen Finals in Milan, the WTA Finals in Guadalajara, & Novak Djokovic's return to title town. Hosted by Mitch Michals. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Accidental Tech Podcast
456: The Monitor Situation

Accidental Tech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 113:25


The ATP Store IS BACK! Grab your fancy new M1 Pro or Max shirts, winter hats, or classic merch until the end of the day THIS FRIDAY! Remember, ATP Members get 15% off on time-limited sales like this one! Follow-up: iMessage in iCloud Security Overview Apple’s T2 Macs and Monterey Avoiding the notch using RDM (via Roberto Jung Drebes) Casey’s MacBook Pro Updates Magic Keyboard with Touch ID and Numeric Keypad for Mac models with Apple silicon - US English ($180) Magic Keyboard with Touch ID for Mac models with Apple silicon - US English ($150) Magic Trackpad ($130) LG UltraFine 5K Starport 75 Podcast Casey’s iMac Stand Marco reviews iPhone 13 Pro cases Apple Silicone Nudient Thin v3 Peel Clear White Totallee Pearl White Totallee Clear Soft Caudabe Sheath Pitaka MagEZ Case 2 (not tested) Bullstrap (not tested) How Could One Improve the MacBook Pros? SD Card CFexpress HDMI 2.1 A None-Too-Brief Aside About Apple External Monitors ASUS ProArt Display PA32UCG-K 32” 16:9 FreeSync2 4K 120 Hz HDR Mini-LED IPS Monitor Post-show #askatp: Why don’t we talk about processor clock speed anymore? (via Yossi Kanner) Would we rather use a previous-gen MacBook Pro with an M1 Max, or the new MacBook Pro with an Intel CPU? (via Joel Short) Sponsored by: Lutron Caseta: Smart dimmers and lighting control. RevenueCat: In-app subscriptions and payments made easy. Connection: An Apple US Corporate Reseller, Higher-Education Reseller, and Apple Service Provider. Become a member for ad-free episodes and our early-release, unedited “bootleg” feed! Check out our store to get some sweet //////ATP merchandise!

Podcast for Healing Neurology
#54 Alan Cash: Using Oxaloacetate (Benagene) to support failing mitochondrial energy pathways & scavenge glutamate

Podcast for Healing Neurology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 61:06


Alan Cash got curious about why our energy pathways fail us. Armed with an MS in physics, he's found himself innovating commercial production methods for oxaloacetate, a metabolite in the citric acid cycle that sits squarely within our mitochondria and are fundamental in producing the ATP that fuel every energy-requiring process in the body. In this episode, we review the nitty gritty details of energy production from the perspective of how oxaloacetate (brand names Benagene and Jubilance) can impact us from the systemic perspective. We don't typically discuss one commercial product on our show, but we have many patients using oxaloacetate and wanted to give a much more complete picture than we can in a clinic visit. Taking oxaloacetate has been shown to decrease NF-kB activation, reduce fasting glucose by ~25% (research from the late 1960's), increase NAD to NADH ratios, increase AMPK, decrease emotional symptoms of PMS (as the product Jubilance) and favorably shift cellular redox. Preliminary data from Mr Cash's current research is showing reduction in fatigue for CFS/ME patients. Remarkably, oral oxaloacetate seems to be able to cross the blood brain barrier (it's a very small molecule!) and can decrease brain glutamate levels. Most remarkably, taking exogenous oxaloacetate can mimic caloric restriction and has increased the lifespan of laboratory animals. It's been used in doses ranging from 100 to 6000mg daily (like for glioblastoma) and has been well-tolerated even at high doses. It's important to know that the commercial products Benagene and Jubilance contain the same ingredients: 100mg of oxaloacetate stabilized by 150mg of vitamin C. To answer another common question, there's no mechanism to turn oxaloacetate into the undesirable 'oxalate' compound in the human body. This tiny molecule really can pack a molecular and anti-inflammatory punch- listen in to find out more! Resources: https://benagene.com/ https://jubilance.com/ Oxaloacetate to reduce emotional symptoms in PMS: placebo-controlled, cross-over clinical trial with 48 women (2020): https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7073356/ Safety and target engagement profile of two oxaloacetate doses (500mg & 1000mg twice daily) in 15 Alzheimer's patients (2021) showed the higher dose increased frontal & frontoparietal brain glucose & glutathione per FDG PET scanning despite no changes in serum levels or cognitive scoring. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32715609/ Oxaloacetate activates brain mitochondrial biogenesis, enhances the insulin pathway, reduces inflammation & stimulates neurogenesis (2014) in mice injected with 1-2g/kg once daily dosing x 1-2 weeks. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25027327/ Oxaloacetate supplementation increases lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans (roundworms) by 25% median & 13% maximal lifespan through an AMPK/FOXO-dependent pathway (2009). https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1474-9726.2009.00527.x Oxaloacetate: A novel neuroprotective for acute ischemic stroke (2012) via modulation of the glutamate pathway which would also be applicable for other types of brain injury, like TBI (traumatic brain injury). https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22085530/ Neuroprotective effect of oxaloacetate in a focal brain ischemic model in the rat (2015) through pathways of glutamate scavenging. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24807461/ Neuroprotective effects of oxaloacetate in closed head injury in rats is mediated by its blood glutatmate scavenging activity (2009). https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19543002/ Effect of alpha-ketoglutarate & oxaloacetate on brain mito DNA damage & seizures (2003). https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12749815/ Oxaloacetate acid supplementation as a mimic of caloric restriction: https://benthamopen.com/contents/pdf/TOLSJ/TOLSJ-3-22.pdf

ParentingAces - The Junior Tennis and College Tennis Podcast

Welcome to Season 10, Episode 46, of the ParentingAces Podcast, a proud member of the Tennis Channel Podcast Network. In this week's episode, Lisa talks with former ATP professional player and current ATP/Junior coach, Daniel Yoo, about how he uses his tour experience to help today's players reach their potential. Daniel Yoo is a South Korean tennis player who made his way to the US to train and eventually coach. Yoo reached a career high ATP singles ranking of 326 and a career high ATP doubles ranking of 425 before retiring from the professional tour. He is now living and working in South Florida, currently training and traveling with South Korean up-and-coming pro Soonwoo Kwon as well as assisting with junior development with coaches Todd Widom and Pierre Arnold at Todd Widom Tennis. Daniel is a firm believer in building trust with his players and feels that is an absolute precursor to success on and off the tennis court. He shares how he builds that trust with his players and their families and what may be missing from other player-coach relationships. He also discusses how his mandatory time serving in the Korean military shaped his approach to working with young players to develop the necessary skills for success. To reach Daniel, you can find him on Facebook here and on Instagram here. You can also email him directly at yootennis@gmail.com. As always, a big thank you to Morgan Stone, aka STØNE, for our intro and outro music this season. You can find more of his music at SoundCloud.com/stonemuzic. If you're interested in House Music, please be sure to check out his social media channels on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. If you're so inclined, please share this – and all our episodes! – with your tennis community. You can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes or via your favorite podcast app. If you haven't already, be sure to become a Member of ParentingAces by clicking here. And check out our logo'd merch in our online shop (Premium Members received FREE SHIPPING every day!). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Passing Shot Tennis Podcast
The Tour Catch-Up: Novak notches No.1 year end ranking (again); Russia rules BJK Cup; Murray's Parisian heartbreaker; Timed toilet breaks (!) at Next Gen. Finals; Raducanu ready for Linz; Stockholm Sinnerdrome

The Passing Shot Tennis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 60:36


In the latest episode of The Passing Shot, the tennis podcast by fans, Joel and Kim catch up on all the latest happenings from the ATP and WTA Tours, including the Paris Masters and the Billie Jean King Cup Finals.With Novak Djokovic back to winning ways and the Russian Tennis Federation winning their first team title in 13 years, Joel and Kim dissect all the main talking points from the past week on tour, including Andy Murray's crushing defeat to Dominik Koepfer and the battle for the final places at the ATP Tour Finals.With the ATP Next Gen Finals around the corner along with some intriguing new rules, the WTA Tour Finals getting underway in Guadalajara and Linz and Stockholm on the agenda, they also preview what is in store for the week ahead, whilst debating their fan instrument of choice and guessing another Mysterious Player.Share your fan thoughts on the week with the #passingshotpod on social media.______________DOWNLOADTENNIS.COMTo stay up to date on all tennis around the world including ATP, WTA and Challenger tours, download TNNS Live Scores.Download on Apple PodcastsDownload on Google PlayFollow  TNNS Live Scores on TwitterAnd check out the TNNS Lives Scores website at www.downloadtennis.com______________SOCIAL MEDIAShare your fan thoughts on the week with the #passingshotpod on social media.Twitter: @passingshotpodInstagram: @passingshotpodWebsite: thepassingshot.co.ukWritten, presented and produced by Joel Girling and Kim MackenzieCrowdfunded by our listeners.Recorded on 8th November 2021

American Toffee Podcast
SPURS POST-MATCH: Bizarre Draw at Goodison

American Toffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 56:47


Everton provided the ATP with plenty of drama in the 0-0 draw today at Goodison with Spurs.  Alex, James, and Ryan hit both the highlights – better defensive shape, spirit, commitment, and organization – and the lowlights – lack of attack, players out of position, questionable substitutes, and substandard officiating. The power trio takes a deeper look at the system change employed by Rafa Benitez and give their take on some of the strange events of the match with lots of listener comments to help them on their way. LINKS: https://linktr.ee/usatoffeepod Intro: Steve Barkwill Outro: Kenboib

The Passing Shot Tennis Podcast
Passing Shot Diaries - BJK Cup Day #4 - Aussies semi-final surprise, Czechked out of Prague

The Passing Shot Tennis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 14:00


Join Joel & Chris for the inaugural Passing Shot Diaries at the Billie Jean King Cup in Prague as they discuss all the drama from the group stage ties inside the O2 Arena in Prague.In this entry, they talk about all the action from Day 4 including Belinda Bencic demonstrating her singles and doubles prowess and Marketa Vondrousova's slow start but fast finish.Share your fan thoughts on the week with the #passingshotpod on social media.______________DOWNLOADTENNIS.COMTo stay up to date on all tennis around the world including ATP, WTA and Challenger tours, download TNNS Live Scores.Download on Apple PodcastsDownload on Google PlayFollow  TNNS Live Scores on TwitterAnd check out the TNNS Lives Scores website at www.downloadtennis.com______________SOCIAL MEDIAShare your fan thoughts on the week with the #passingshotpod on social media.Twitter: @passingshotpodInstagram: @passingshotpodWebsite: thepassingshot.co.ukWritten, presented and produced by Joel Girling and Kim MackenzieCrowdfunded by our listeners.Recorded on 4th November 2021

The Passing Shot Tennis Podcast
Passing Shot Diaries - BJK Cup Day #3 - Russia rumbles through, USA bounce back

The Passing Shot Tennis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 18:44


Join Joel & Chris for the inaugural Passing Shot Diaries at the Billie Jean King Cup in Prague as they discuss all the drama from the group stage ties inside the O2 Arena in Prague.In this entry, they talk about all the action from Day 3 including a Cornet-Pavyluchenkova match gem and Danielle Collins near perfect performance to take out Sara Sorribes Tormo.Share your fan thoughts on the week with the #passingshotpod on social media.______________DOWNLOADTENNIS.COMTo stay up to date on all tennis around the world including ATP, WTA and Challenger tours, download TNNS Live Scores.Download on Apple PodcastsDownload on Google PlayFollow  TNNS Live Scores on TwitterAnd check out the TNNS Lives Scores website at www.downloadtennis.com______________SOCIAL MEDIAShare your fan thoughts on the week with the #passingshotpod on social media.Twitter: @passingshotpodInstagram: @passingshotpodWebsite: thepassingshot.co.ukWritten, presented and produced by Joel Girling and Kim MackenzieCrowdfunded by our listeners.Recorded on 3rd November 2021

The Passing Shot Tennis Podcast
Passing Shot Diaries - BJK Cup Day #1 - France falter, Czech's battle through

The Passing Shot Tennis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 19:37


Join Joel & Chris for the inaugural Passing Shot Diaries at the Billie Jean King Cup in Prague as they discuss all the drama from the group stage ties inside the O2 Arena in Prague.In this entry, they talk about all the action from Day 1 including an upset win for Canada and Czech Republic going the distance to win against Germany despite Angelique Kerber putting on a show of her own.Share your fan thoughts on the week with the #passingshotpod on social media.______________DOWNLOADTENNIS.COMTo stay up to date on all tennis around the world including ATP, WTA and Challenger tours, download TNNS Live Scores.Download on Apple PodcastsDownload on Google PlayFollow  TNNS Live Scores on TwitterAnd check out the TNNS Lives Scores website at www.downloadtennis.com______________SOCIAL MEDIAShare your fan thoughts on the week with the #passingshotpod on social media.Twitter: @passingshotpodInstagram: @passingshotpodWebsite: thepassingshot.co.ukWritten, presented and produced by Joel Girling and Kim MackenzieCrowdfunded by our listeners.Recorded on 1st November 2021

The Passing Shot Tennis Podcast
Passing Shot Diaries - BJK Cup Day #2 - Australia bring the Storm, USA slump to Slovakia

The Passing Shot Tennis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 20:51


Join Joel & Chris for the inaugural Passing Shot Diaries at the Billie Jean King Cup in Prague as they discuss all the drama from the group stage ties inside the O2 Arena in Prague.In this entry, they talk about all the action from Day 2 including Storm Sanders and Daria Gavrilova stunning singles victories against France and how unfancied underdogs Slovakia shocked Team USA.Share your fan thoughts on the week with the #passingshotpod on social media.______________DOWNLOADTENNIS.COMTo stay up to date on all tennis around the world including ATP, WTA and Challenger tours, download TNNS Live Scores.Download on Apple PodcastsDownload on Google PlayFollow  TNNS Live Scores on TwitterAnd check out the TNNS Lives Scores website at www.downloadtennis.com______________SOCIAL MEDIAShare your fan thoughts on the week with the #passingshotpod on social media.Twitter: @passingshotpodInstagram: @passingshotpodWebsite: thepassingshot.co.ukWritten, presented and produced by Joel Girling and Kim MackenzieCrowdfunded by our listeners.Recorded on 2nd November 2021

Ask The Professor
Episode # 2209

Ask The Professor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 29:33


Air date: 11/7/21 [00:28:34] Download a transcript of this week’s episode – ATP 2209 transcript_otter_ai

Monday Match Analysis
Andy Murray is Getting Closer Again | Monday Match Analysis

Monday Match Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 38:28


Andy Murray uttered the tearful phrase, "I'm getting closer," after losing the Wimbledon final in 2012 to Roger Federer. He'd win it the very next year, achieving his most important goal to date. Now in 2021, Murray is getting closer again, this time battling back from hip resurfacing surgery. Although he's only 13-13 ATP on the year, it feels like he's just a few adjustments away from making the next leap. Gill discusses what some of those adjustments may be, and brings on Amy Lundy for more perspective. 00:00 Intro 03:15 Big Point Decisions 11:30 Offense & Equipment 18:30 Amy Lundy --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/monday-match-analysis/support

Accidental Tech Podcast
455: Your Yanking Force

Accidental Tech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 137:33


The ATP Store IS BACK! Grab your fancy new M1 Pro or Max shirts, winter hats, or classic merch until the end of the day on 12 November! Remember, ATP Members get 15% off on time-limited sales like this one! Pre-show: Setup Woes Audition Homebrew Bundle Casey’s Post on Homebrew Bundle Casey’s bundle file Follow-up: What does Marco use for a Thunderbolt dock? (via César Cavazos) OWC Thunderbolt Dock Caldigit TS3+ Hub Caldigit Element Hub John’s AirPods 3 updates Monterey Status Report SuperDuper The Verge’s MacBook Pro review MacBook Pro Charging via USB-C Thunderbolt PDF PC Magazine ADC MacBook Pro “Compatibility Mode” Scale to fit below built-in camera Tweet with video Notch codename was Daisy? 120 Hz scrolling on new MacBook Pros Chrome shenanigans Marco’s Mystery Terabyte update Disk Utility → View → Show APFS Snapshots Purging files on iOS Marco’s experience with Lutron Caséta Waveform Lighting Eve Motion Caséta Motion Sensor (scroll down) Quinn’s Smart Home Video [More] MacBook Pro impressions Upgrade #379: They Feed on Memory MagSafe 1/2/3 side-by-side Luna Display Post-show: How does Marco unload old computers? Sponsored by: Linode: Instantly deploy and manage an SSD server in the Linode Cloud. New accounts get a $100 credit. Stripe: Learn more about how Stripe can support your business. Squarespace: Make your next move. Use code ATP for 10% off your first order. Become a member for ad-free episodes and our early-release, unedited “bootleg” feed! Check out our store to get some sweet //////ATP merchandise!

Double Density
Episode 178: #caseywasright w/Casey Liss

Double Density

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 117:55


Casey Liss returns to Double Density to talk about all of the important topics of the day: He updates the world on his thoughts about the best regional bagel, discusses the torture and delight of ordering a new Mac, and highlights his history with audiophiles. The three then go in deep about the science surrounding COVID, and then a deep dive into music-listening habits. Special Guest: Casey Liss.

Control the Controllables
Episode 140: Rajeev Ram - Multiple Grand Slam Champion

Control the Controllables

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 58:52


Rajeev Ram is a multiple Grand Slam Champion and the current World number 4 mens doubles player. The 37-year-old American has won the Australian Open mixed doubles twice with Barbora Krejčíková. He´s reached 3 Grand Slam mens doubles finals with GB´s Joe Salisbury, winning the 2020 Australian Open and 2021 US Open titles. Rajeev was a successful junior, and reached a career high of 56 in the world in singles in 2016, before deciding to focus on doubles. Rajeev has reached the final of 40 ATP doubles events during his career, and next month will make his Davis Cup debut for the USA. In this episode, listen to Rajeev Ram talk to CTC Host Dan Kiernan about:- How tennis started for him as a fun Father/Son activity. His decision to go to US College and winning a NCAA Championship. Why he regrets leaving the University of Illinois after just 1 season. How going back to playing his own game style helped him break into the top 100. Coping with the losses and how he still enjoys learning and improving from them. His successful partnership with GB´s Joe Salisbury. Do they plan on playing together in 2022?

Whole Mamas Podcast: Motherhood from a Whole30 Perspective

Steph and Dr. Elana highlight key takeaways and action steps from the interviews in season 4. They share their own parenting struggles and successes including how to stay calm, confident, and competent during challenging times, like decisions on schooling and medical emergencies. They provide honest insights into common, real life scenarios parents experience and offer resources to navigate them. You'll learn how to improve your relationship with your partner after baby, learn how to accept help postpartum, and set realistic expectations with your little ones. You'll also get a sneak peek into Elana's new membership program! You'll walk away with things to consider and tangible things to do, today, as a “Doctor Mom”. Topics Discussed: Key takeaways from Season 4 How to navigate relationship challenges postpartum Options for non-traditional schooling How to set realistic expectations for child development Tips for staying calm, competent, and confident with emergencies Dr. Elana's new membership program Steph's Postpartum Reset program updates Show Notes: Listen to today's episode on our website This Episode's Sponsors  Enjoy the health benefits of PaleoValley's products such as their supplements, superfood bars and meat sticks.  Receive 15% off your purchase by using code DOCTORMOM at checkout or head to paleovalley.com/doctormom  Discover for yourself why Needed is trusted by women's health practitioners and mamas alike to support optimal pregnancy outcomes. Try their 4 Part Complete Nutrition plan which includes a Prenatal Multi, Omega-3, Collagen Protein, and Pre/Probiotic. To get started, head to thisisneeded.com, and use code DOCTORMOM50 for $50 off Needed's Complete Plan! Light therapy is a rare treatment that really is one-size-fits-all. Busy moms can benefit from more healthy light in their lives. Light Therapy provides many health benefits like enhanced cellular function and ATP energy production, better skin, increased blood flow, better sleep and faster recovery after workouts. Visit joovv.com/doctormom and use code DOCTORMOM for $50 off your first purchase. INTRODUCE YOURSELF to Steph and Dr. Elana on Instagram. They can't wait to meet you! @stephgreunke @drelanaroumell Please remember that the views and ideas presented on this podcast are for informational purposes only.  All information presented on this podcast is for informational purposes and not intended to serve as a substitute for the consultation, diagnosis, and/or medical treatment of a healthcare provider. Consult with your healthcare provider before starting any diet, supplement regimen, or to determine the appropriateness of the information shared on this podcast, or if you have any questions regarding your treatment plan.

American Toffee Podcast
WOLVES POST-MATCH: Kill the Gap

American Toffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 57:27


Alex, James, and Ryan discuss the 2-1 loss away at the Molineux to make it three losses in a row for the Blues. Jean-Philippe Gbamin makes a rare starting appearance while Iwobi replaces Gordon in the starting XI. ATP dives into key issues surrounding the performance and the stark difference in play after a tactical change. The boys wrap it up by discussing Rafa Benitez's interesting post-match comments. LINKS: https://linktr.ee/usatoffeepod Intro: Steve Barkwill Outro: Kenboib

The Passing Shot Tennis Podcast
The Tour Catch-Up: Tiafoe and Zverev light up Vienna; Kontaveit meets Halep with Guadalajara on the line; Fiery Fritz ready for Cilic test in St. Petersburg; Paris Masters + BJK Cup previews; Should the WTA have a NextGen finals?

The Passing Shot Tennis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 54:45


In the latest episode of The Passing Shot, the tennis podcast by fans, Joel and Kim catch up on the latest action from the ATP and WTA Tours and look ahead to the Paris Masters and the Billie Jean King Cup.With a tantalising encounter between home favourite Simona Halep and in form Anett Kontaveit set at the Transylvania Open, and Frances Tiafoe going for his second career title against Sacha Zverev in Vienna, Joel and Kim delve back into the past week on tour. They talk Andy Murray getting his first top 10 win in over a year, Emma Raducanu's week in Cluj and why there should be a Next Gen Finals for the WTA Tour.Joel is off to Prague for the Billie Jean King Cup, so they preview the week's event and predict which team will be lifting the title come next weekend, as well as assessing the return of Novak Djokovic at the Paris Masters.Share your fan thoughts on the week with the #passingshotpod on social media.______________DOWNLOADTENNIS.COMTo stay up to date on all tennis around the world including ATP, WTA and Challenger tours, download TNNS Live Scores.Download on Apple PodcastsDownload on Google PlayFollow  TNNS Live Scores on TwitterAnd check out the TNNS Lives Scores website at www.downloadtennis.com______________SOCIAL MEDIAShare your fan thoughts on the week with the #passingshotpod on social media.Twitter: @passingshotpodInstagram: @passingshotpodWebsite: thepassingshot.co.ukWritten, presented and produced by Joel Girling and Kim MackenzieCrowdfunded by our listeners.Recorded on 31st October 2021

Diet Science
Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) for Energy, Diabetes, Fertility, Heart Disease and More

Diet Science

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 15:49


Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a vitamin-like fat-soluble compound made within the body. It is a crucial component in the production of ATP (our body's main source of energy), and also serves as a powerful antioxidant. However, CoQ10 production in the body declines with age, and there are a number of circumstances that require higher amounts of CoQ10 than what our body can make on its own. Listen in this week as Dee discusses the conditions that can benefit from increased amounts of CoQ10, and the best forms of supplemental CoQ10.Link to CoQ10: https://amzn.to/3nE3vwM

Reconcilable Differences
168: The Robes of Science

Reconcilable Differences

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 99:21


Your hosts did their first pre-flight, and it went pretty well. Next up, in direct contravention to the dictates governing the uneasy peace with ATP, there is some *computer talk*. Specifically, Merlin wants to know if John really didn't do any research, and John wants to hear Merlin's reactions to Apple's recent announcements. (Editor's Note: At one point, John accidentally/casually reveals the existence of a *queue*, and, of course, it's all Merlin can do not to stop the program, start over, and spend three hours interrogating John about this previously undisclosed queue. If John thinks he's off the hook for discussing this in the future, he is super wrong.) Then, despite putting it off for as long as they could, your hosts finally return to the concept of _grit_. Merlin confesses to being more frustrated with the fans than the concept, and John has some thoughts about oat bran. Also, Merlin is obviously more frustrated with the actual concept than he's comfortable admitting. Can we reliably reverse-engineer grit from success? And how do we account for the grit it takes many folks just to survive day-to-day? John admits to being skeptical about any skeleton key, and Merlin thinks parents get way too attached to stuff that makes them feel smart. (*Episode recorded Tuesday, October 19, 2021*)

Relay FM Master Feed
Reconcilable Differences 168: The Robes of Science

Relay FM Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 99:21


Your hosts did their first pre-flight, and it went pretty well. Next up, in direct contravention to the dictates governing the uneasy peace with ATP, there is some *computer talk*. Specifically, Merlin wants to know if John really didn't do any research, and John wants to hear Merlin's reactions to Apple's recent announcements. (Editor's Note: At one point, John accidentally/casually reveals the existence of a *queue*, and, of course, it's all Merlin can do not to stop the program, start over, and spend three hours interrogating John about this previously undisclosed queue. If John thinks he's off the hook for discussing this in the future, he is super wrong.) Then, despite putting it off for as long as they could, your hosts finally return to the concept of _grit_. Merlin confesses to being more frustrated with the fans than the concept, and John has some thoughts about oat bran. Also, Merlin is obviously more frustrated with the actual concept than he's comfortable admitting. Can we reliably reverse-engineer grit from success? And how do we account for the grit it takes many folks just to survive day-to-day? John admits to being skeptical about any skeleton key, and Merlin thinks parents get way too attached to stuff that makes them feel smart. (*Episode recorded Tuesday, October 19, 2021*)

Accidental Tech Podcast
454: The Notch is Young

Accidental Tech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 124:36


The ATP Store IS BACK! Grab your fancy new M1 Pro or Max shirts, winter hats, or classic merch until the end of the day on 12 November! Remember, ATP Members get 15% off on time-limited sales like this one! Pre-show: Marco’s acquisition adventure IceMule Cooler Backpack (size Xlarge) Veblen good Follow-up: APFS fast directory sizing Chris’ answer on StackExchange APFS File System Reference INODE_MAINTAIN_DIR_STATS Anandtech on the M1 Pro & Max performance Dom’s question SPECfp Gruber’s summary of the Affinity team’s findings The only benchmark that matters Johnathan Dietz Jr on Pro Display XDR @ 120Hz What about Memory Pressure? Marco’s Kühl’s pants John’s AirPods 3 impressions MacBook Pro impressions Casey’s very sad y’all Under the Radar #229: Money, Time, and M1 Max Macs In-Store configuration options Space Gremlin Grand Perspective Quinn Nelson on notch inconsistencies Apps Bartender Vanilla Denotchifier Top Notch Post-show: Marco watches sports XKCD #1053: Ten Thousand FoxTrax First down line CTE Sponsored by: Earnest: Freedom of choice meets student loans Lutron Caséta: Smart dimmers and lighting control. Memberful: Monetize your passion with membership. Start your free trial today. Become a member for ad-free episodes and our early-release, unedited “bootleg” feed! Check out our store to get some sweet ///ATP merchandise!

Ready For Takeoff - Turn Your Aviation Passion Into A Career

Colgan Air Flight 3407 (9L/CJC 3407) was marketed as Continental Connection Flight 3407. It was delayed two hours, departing at 9:18 pm Eastern Standard Time (02:18 UTC), en route from Newark Liberty International Airport to Buffalo Niagara International Airport. The twin-engine turboprop Bombardier Q400, FAA registry N200WQ, was manufactured in 2008 for delivery to Colgan. It was delivered to Colgan on April 16, 2008. This was the first fatal accident for a Colgan Air passenger flight since the company was founded in 1991. One previous repositioning flight, with no passengers, crashed offshore of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, in August 2003, killing both of the crew on board. The only prior accident involving a Colgan Air passenger flight occurred at LaGuardia Airport, when another plane collided with the Colgan aircraft while taxiing, resulting in minor injuries to a flight attendant. Captain Marvin Renslow, 47, of Lutz, Florida, was the pilot in command, and Rebecca Lynne Shaw, 24, of Maple Valley, Washington, served as the first officer. The cabin crew consisted of two flight attendants. Captain Renslow was hired in September 2005 and had accumulated 3,379 total flight hours, with 111 hours as captain on the Q400. First Officer Shaw was hired in January 2008, and had 2,244 hours, 774 of them in turbine aircraft, including the Q400. Two Canadian passengers, one Chinese passenger, and one Israeli passenger were on board. The remaining 41 passengers, as well as the crew members, were American. Shortly after the flight was cleared for an instrument landing system approach to runway 23 at Buffalo Niagara International Airport, it disappeared from radar. The weather consisted of light snow and fog with wind of 15 knots (28 km/h; 17 mph). The deicing system had been turned on 11 minutes after takeoff. Shortly before the crash, the pilots discussed significant ice buildup on the aircraft's wings and windshield. Two other aircraft reported icing conditions around the time of the crash. The last radio transmission from the flight occurred when the first officer acknowledged a routine instruction to change to tower radio frequency. The plane was 3.0 mi (4.8 km) northeast of the radio beacon KLUMP (see diagram) at that time. The crash occurred 41 seconds after that last transmission. Since ATC approach control was unable to get any further response from the flight, the assistance of Delta Air Lines Flight 1998 and US Airways Flight 1452 was requested. Neither was able to spot the missing plane. Following the clearance for final approach, landing gear and flaps (5°) were extended. The flight data recorder (FDR) indicated the airspeed had slowed to 145 knots (269 km/h; 167 mph). The captain then called for the flaps to be increased to 15°. The airspeed continued to slow to 135 knots (250 km/h; 155 mph). Six seconds later, the aircraft's stick shaker activated, warning of an impending stall, as the speed continued to slow to 131 knots (243 km/h; 151 mph). The captain responded by abruptly pulling back on the control column, followed by increasing thrust to 75% power, instead of lowering the nose and applying full power, which was the proper stall-recovery technique. That improper action pitched the nose up even further, increasing both the g-load and the stall speed. The stick pusher activated (The Q400 stick pusher applies an airplane-nose-down control column input to decrease the wing's angle of attack (AOA) after an aerodynamic stall), but the captain overrode the stick pusher and continued pulling back on the control column. The first officer retracted the flaps without consulting the captain, making recovery even more difficult. In its final moments, the aircraft pitched up 31°, then pitched down 25°, then rolled left 46° and snapped back to the right at 105°. Occupants aboard experienced g-forces estimated at nearly 2 G. The crew made no emergency declaration, as they rapidly lost altitude and crashed into a private home at 6038 Long Street, about 5 mi (8.0 km) from the end of the runway, with the nose pointed away from the airport. The aircraft burst into flames, as the fuel tanks ruptured on impact, destroying the house of Douglas and Karen Wielinski, and most of the plane. Douglas was killed; his wife Karen and their daughter Jill managed to escape with minor injuries. Very little damage occurred to surrounding homes, though the lots in that area are only 60 ft (18.3 m) wide. The home was close to the Clarence Center Fire Company, so emergency personnel were able to respond quickly. Two firefighters were injured; 12 nearby houses were evacuated. The autopilot was in control until it automatically disconnected when the stall-warning stick shaker activated. The NTSB found no evidence of severe icing conditions, which would have required the pilots to fly manually. Colgan recommended its pilots to fly manually in icing conditions, and required them to do so in severe icing conditions. In December 2008, the NTSB issued a safety bulletin about the danger of keeping the autopilot engaged during icing conditions. Flying the plane manually was essential to ensure pilots would be able to detect changes in the handling characteristics of the airplane, which are warning signs of ice accumulation. After the captain reacted inappropriately to the stick shaker, the stick pusher activated. As designed, it pushed the nose down when it sensed a stall was imminent, but the captain again reacted improperly and overrode that additional safety device by pulling back again on the control column, causing the plane to stall and crash. Bill Voss, president of Flight Safety Foundation, told USA Today that it sounded like the plane was in "a deep stall situation". On May 11, 2009, information was released about Captain Renslow's training record. According to an article in The Wall Street Journal, before joining Colgan, he had failed three "check rides", including some at Gulfstream International's training program, and "people close to the investigation" suggested that he might not have been adequately trained to respond to the emergency that led to the airplane's fatal descent. Investigators examined possible crew fatigue. The captain appeared to have been at Newark airport overnight, prior to the day of the 9:18 pm departure of the accident flight. The first officer commuted from Seattle to Newark on an overnight flight. These findings during the investigation led the FAA to issue a "Call to Action" for improvements in the practices of regional carriers. Another press report said that the pilot had failed five prior tests, and also alleged "flirtatious" conversation in the cockpit between the pilot and the much younger first officer. On February 2, 2010, the NTSB issued its final report, describing the details of its investigation that led to 46 specific conclusions. One conclusion determined that both the captain and the first officer were fatigued at the time of the accident, but the NTSB could not determine how much it degraded their performance. The pilots' performance was likely impaired because of fatigue, but the extent of their impairment and the degree to which it contributed to the performance deficiencies that occurred during the flight cannot be conclusively determined. Among those conclusions were the fact that both the captain and the first officer responded to the stall warning in a manner contrary to their training. The NTSB could not explain why the first officer retracted the flaps and suggested that the landing gear should also be retracted, though it did find that the current approach-stall training was not adequate: The current air carrier approach-to-stall training did not fully prepare the flight crew for an unexpected stall in the Q400 and did not address the actions that are needed to recover from a fully developed stall. Those findings were immediately followed by the board's "Probable Cause" statement: The captain's inappropriate response to the activation of the stick shaker, which led to an aerodynamic stall from which the airplane did not recover. Contributing to the accident were (1) the flight crew's failure to monitor airspeed in relation to the rising position of the low-speed cue, (2) the flight crew's failure to adhere to sterile cockpit procedures, (3) the captain's failure to effectively manage the flight, and (4) Colgan Air's inadequate procedures for airspeed selection and management during approaches in icing conditions. NTSB Chairman Deborah Hersman, while concurring, made it clear that she considered fatigue to be a contributing factor. She compared the 20 years that fatigue had remained on the NTSB's Most Wanted List of transportation safety improvements, during which no meaningful action was taken by regulators in response, to the changes in tolerance for alcohol over the same period, noting that the impact on performance from fatigue and alcohol were similar. However, Vice Chairman Christopher A. Hart and Board Member Robert L. Sumwalt III dissented on the inclusion of fatigue as a contributing factor, on the grounds that evidence was insufficient to support such a conclusion. Notably, the same kind of pilot errors and standard operating procedure violations had been found in other accidents where fatigue was not a factor. The FAA has proposed or implemented several rule changes as a result of the Flight 3407 accident, in areas ranging from pilot fatigue to Airline Transport Pilot (ATP) certificate qualifications of up to 1,500 hours of flight experience for both pilot and copilot. One of the most significant changes has already taken effect, changing the way examiners grade checkrides in flight simulators during stalls. From WGRZ: A new rule from the Federal Aviation Administration will make it easy for airlines to share information regarding their pilots with each other. It's the latest step to improve air safety as a result of the crash of Colgan Air Flight 3407 in Clarence Center 12 years ago. The Pilot Records Database will be maintained by the F.A.A., and will require the airlines to report their pilots' employment history, training and qualifications. The information can now be shared between air carriers, which will also be required to review records in the database before hiring pilots. The database will include the following information: FAA pilot certificate information, such as certificates and ratings FAA summaries of unsatisfactory pilot applications for new certificates or ratings FAA records of accidents, incidents, and enforcement actions Records from employers on pilot training, qualification, and proficiency Pilot drug and alcohol records Employers' final disciplinary action records Pilot records concerning separation of employment Verification of pilot motor vehicle driving record. This measure was part of the push made by the families of the 49 passengers and crew who died, along with another person on the ground, when the crash occurred in February of 2009. "I've said this before that in New York State, if you want to drive a school bus, they check their records all the way to when you got your driver's license," said John Kausner, who along with his wife Marilyn, lost their 24 year old daughter in the crash later blamed on pilot error. "He was not qualified to fly that plane... he had failed five check rides prior to that and the airline didn't know it," John Kausner said. "And they testified at the NTSB hearing that had they known it, they wouldn't have hired him." But while it's taken 12 years to get to this point airlines will have more than three years more to fully comply with the new rules. "Welcome to the federal government," John Kausner said. "Yes, they have to come into compliance in 36 months. I think they have all the data collected, so why it can't be next month is beyond me but that's where we're at." Flight 3407 families are heralding the news, however, as an important and final piece of a puzzle toward safer skies, which follows their previously successful efforts to lobby for increased and more rigorous pilot training and for mandatory rest periods between flights for air crews. "It's a proud moment for us and we believe that the greatest legacy to our loved ones are all the lives that have been saved because they inspired us and we feel like we finished the race," Marilyn Kausner said. Added her husband, "A lot of people don't realize that we haven't had an airline crash in the United States in 12 years. In the 20 years preceding that there was more than one crash per year on average in the United States. That was the record before the 3407 crash, and in the 12 years since there have been zero. And that's not just due to our efforts, but also due to the efforts of our congressional delegation and media which has kept these issues in the public eye."

The Mini-Break
You Know It When You See It

The Mini-Break

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 70:26


Welcome to the Mini-Break podcast powered by Tennis Point. This is your daily podcast for the biggest storylines, results, and controversies from the tennis world. Cracked Racquets Editor-in-Chief Alex Gruskin offers his thoughts on the many standout performers from last weekend's ATP and WTA action. He contextualizes the early success of #NextGenATP Star Jannik Sinner, shares why Ann Li may just be his favorite young American woman on tour, discusses title runs from Kontaveit and Karatsev, and so much more!! Don't forget to give a 5 star review on your favorite podcast app! In addition, add your twitter/instagram handle to the review for a chance to win some FREE CR gear!! This episode brought to you by: Tennis Point Discounted Tennis Apparel, Tennis Racquets, Tennis Shoes & Equipment from Nike, adidas, Babolat, Wilson & More! Visit their store today and use the code "CR15" at checkout to save 15% off Sale items. Some Exclusions (MAP Exceptions) apply and code will not work on those items. This code will add 1 FREE CAN of WILSON Balls to the cart at checkout.  Lucky Racket The hub for tennis fans, based out of Dayton, OH. Our mission is to make everyone smile when they see our products on and off the tennis courts! Get 15% OFF by using our promo code "Cracked15" at luckyracquet.com. Tennis Channel Podcast Network Visit https://www.tennis.com/pro-game/podcasts/ to stay current on the latest tennis news and trends and enjoy in-depth analysis and dynamic debates. Find Cracked Racquets Website: https://www.crackedracquets.com Instagram: https://instagram.com/crackedracquets Twitter: https://twitter.com/crackedracquets Facebook: https://Facebook.com/crackedracquets YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC12ZE3jU0n52JkeWV1TB21A Email Newsletter: https://www.crackedracquets.comDon't forget to give a 5 star review with your twitter/instagram handle for a chance to win some FREE CR gear!! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Control the Controllables
Episode 139: Jimmy Arias - The forehand that changed tennis

Control the Controllables

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 67:28


Jimmy Arias is a former world number 5. At the age of 15, he became the youngest person to achieve a world ranking, and went onto win 5 ATP singles titles and the 1981 French Open Mixed Doubles. During his career he has had wins over Andre Agassi, John McEnroe, Boris Becker, Jim Courier, Mats Wilander, Pat Cash and Goran Ivanisevic. Jimmy Arias´name is synonymous with the Nick Bollettieri Tennis Academy, now known as the IMG Academy. He was one of the original students at the academy in 1978, and in 2018 he became Director of Tennis. He has been a commentator for ESPN and the Tennis Channel, and as you will find out in this episode, he is a great storyteller! Episode Highlights include:- How his relationship with his father shaped his tennis career. How the famous Arias forehand came about. Why he made the decision to work with Nick Bollettieri His time as an ¨original¨ at the IMG Academy. His inner belief from a young age. How he changed his game after being diagnosed with Mono. Find out which tennis legends he found the most difficult to play! What frustrates him about the current game, and what has changed since his era. An entertaining episode, enjoy! Connect with Jimmy Arias:- Twitter: @ariastennis Instragram: @jimmyariastennis Website: www.jimmyarias.com

Whole Mamas Podcast: Motherhood from a Whole30 Perspective
#244: Baby's First Year Milestones You Want To Know About with Brooke Weiss

Whole Mamas Podcast: Motherhood from a Whole30 Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 49:23


Dr. Elana interviews pediatric nurse practitioner, Brooke Weiss, creator of the Instagram page @simplywellbaby with over 100K followers. Her mission is to empower mothers with what to expect with the first year of their baby's lives. Understanding your baby's developmental milestones and knowing how to support them to optimally thrive is right in line with being a proactive “Doctor Mom!”  So in this episode we answer common concerns and help empower you with tools so you can feel calm and confident in your baby's precious first year of life!  Topics Discussed: Ways to predict your baby's next milestone Why well-checks can increase your confidence as a mom Tummy time options and benefits Why sleep is disrupted during developmental milestones How long to expect sleep interruptions to last What to do if your child is showing delays How to encourage crawling How to accurately assess number of words And more! Show Notes: https://simplywellfamily.com https://instagram.com/simplywell.baby  https://www.facebook.com/simplywellfamily Listen to today's episode on our website Brooke is a certified Pediatric Nurse Practitioner with over 19 years of nursing experience in pediatrics and postpartum. As the mother of three children, she is passionate about supporting parents on their journey of raising happy and healthy families. As the founder of the Simply Well Baby she empowers parents through education on her website, social media pages, and online courses. This Episode's Sponsors  Enjoy the health benefits of PaleoValley's products such as their supplements, superfood bars and meat sticks.  Receive 15% off your purchase by using code DOCTORMOM at checkout or head to paleovalley.com/doctormom  Discover for yourself why Needed is trusted by women's health practitioners and mamas alike to support optimal pregnancy outcomes. Try their 4 Part Complete Nutrition plan which includes a Prenatal Multi, Omega-3, Collagen Protein, and Pre/Probiotic. To get started, head to thisisneeded.com, and use code DOCTORMOM50 for $50 off Needed's Complete Plan! Light therapy is a rare treatment that really is one-size-fits-all. Busy moms can benefit from more healthy light in their lives. Light Therapy provides many health benefits like enhanced cellular function and ATP energy production, better skin, increased blood flow, better sleep and faster recovery after workouts. Visit joovv.com/doctormom and use code DOCTORMOM for $50 off your first purchase. INTRODUCE YOURSELF to Steph and Dr. Elana on Instagram. They can't wait to meet you! @stephgreunke @drelanaroumell Please remember that the views and ideas presented on this podcast are for informational purposes only.  All information presented on this podcast is for informational purposes and not intended to serve as a substitute for the consultation, diagnosis, and/or medical treatment of a healthcare provider. Consult with your healthcare provider before starting any diet, supplement regimen, or to determine the appropriateness of the information shared on this podcast, or if you have any questions regarding your treatment plan.

The Solid Verbal
Chaos Scenarios + AAC Expansion + Bill Connelly from ESPN

The Solid Verbal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 45:55


Ty and Dan welcome back Bill Connelly from ESPN.com to discuss the AAC's addition of six new teams, how his SP+ rankings view teams like Clemson and Michigan, how 2021 stacks up to the chaos-filled year of 2007, and a quick breakdown of two prominent programs in the Lonestar State. Plus, random ATP and USMNT talk to add further nerdiness to the conversation.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Accidental Tech Podcast
453: As the Prophecy Foretold

Accidental Tech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 165:43


Apple’s “Unleashed.” Event Start Up John’s Tweet Apple ✔️s (scroll way down) Monterey quick hits Monday, 25 October Tabs that look like tabs!! Snell’s coverage M1 Pro & M1 Max John’s “City of Chips” tweet John’s Self-FU John’s “City of Chips” diagram Anandtech’s Coverage M1 floorplan comparisons M1 Pro Floorplan M1 Max floorplan WildCrack’s tweet Mike Goldsmith’s tweet Six Colors’ coverage of M1 Pro/Max variants Scott Perry on DRAM Josh Rogers on GPU comparisons Review of MSI GE76 Raider New MacBook Pros PORTS (courtesy chatroom user rmorey) Snell on charging quirks Jeff Nadeau’s tweet David Schaub’s Nostradamus Moment Linda Dong’s Twitter thread HIG documentation Full-Screen Mode Menu Bar Menus Our orders Marco 14”, M1 Pro, 16-core GPU 16GB RAM 1TB SSD Casey 14”, M1 Max, 24-core GPU 64GB RAM 4TB SSD John …AirPods. Post-show: Rumor round-up 9to5Mac on the ransomware leak Bloomberg/Gurman’s Roundup Which Intel Macs remain? Mac mini 27” iMac 21.5” iMac Mac Pro Sponsored by: Squarespace: Make your next move. Use code ATP for 10% off your first order. Stripe: Learn more about how Stripe can support your business. Linode: Instantly deploy and manage an SSD server in the Linode Cloud. New accounts get a $100 credit. Become a member for ad-free episodes and our early-release, unedited “bootleg” feed! Check out our store to get some sweet //////ATP merchandise!