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Electrophysiological monitoring method to record electrical activity of the brain

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The Sleep Is A Skill Podcast
095: Dr. Andrew Hill, Neuroscience Expert, Founder of Peak Brain Institute: Use Brain Mapping Neurofeedback Technology For Better Sleep & Peak Performance!

The Sleep Is A Skill Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 59:34


GUEST BIO: Dr. Andrew Hill (Cognitive Neuroscience, UCLA) is the founder of Peak Brain Institute, a leading neurofeedback practitioner and biohacking coach for clients worldwide.At Peak Brain, Dr. Hill provides individualized training programs to help you optimize your brain across goals of stress, sleep, attention, brain fog, creativity, and athletic performance.Peak Brain is a virtual and in-person peak performance center for the brain. We serve clients throughout the world (ages 4+) with QEEG brain mapping and neurofeedback. This highly individualized form of biofeedback trains brain waves (EEG) or blood flow (HEG) and is a gentle exercise designed to support changes over time in areas like attention, stress, sleep, mood, head injuries, brain fog, seizures, migraines, alcohol recovery, and peak performance goals, etc. SHOW NOTES: 

High Intensity Health Radio with Mike Mutzel, MS
Brain Coach to Elite Athletes and Execs Shares Top Tips to Improve Cognitive Performance and Memory with Louisa Nicola

High Intensity Health Radio with Mike Mutzel, MS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 65:41


Louisa Nicola is a neurophysiologist and brain coach for many professional athletes and Wall Street execs. She discusses science-based tools and strategies to boost brain health and mental performance. Support your Workout Sessions and Healthy Hydration with this Creatine Electrolyte Combo by MYOXCIENCE Save 15% with code podcast at checkout Link to the Video Interview: https://bit.ly/3R7noel Connect with Louisa: https://www.neuroathletics.com.au Show Notes: 03:10 Louisa was elite triathlete when she realized the impact the brain had on all aspects of performance. She and her fellow athletes were not taught about sleep or nutrition. 04:20 The nervous system must be optimized to optimize performance throughout the body and as a person. 05:35 We used to sleep about 12 hours a day in prehistoric times. Sleep regenerates our brains. 06:20 There are 4 stages of sleep. Stage one is as you are falling asleep. Stage 2 is light sleep. Stage 3 is deep sleep/slow wave sleep/non-REM sleep. Stage 4 is REM sleep. Stages 3 and 4 are the most important stages for our brains. 06:52 During deep sleep, hormones are secreted: testosterone, estrogen, growth hormone. The glymphatic system is your brains sewage system. It cleans toxins, including amyloid beta. A buildup of these toxins can lead to neurodegenerative diseases. 07:50 Your brain is comprised of neurons and others. Glial cells bind neurons together. During deep sleep, glial cells shrink, making way for the cerebral spinal fluid in your brain to wash out the trash. 08:55 A groggy wakeup may be an indication that you are not getting into deep sleep. 30% of your total sleep time should be deep sleep. 20% of total sleep time should be REM sleep. 09:30 REM sleep is where memory consolidation and learning take place. 10:30 The biggest disruptor of sleep is anxiety and stress. This activation of the sympathetic nervous system may prevent you from falling asleep or wake you in the night. 10:55 Alcohol is the biggest inhibitor of REM sleep. Blue light blocking glasses are helpful, but do not block out all light. 12:00 Eating less than 2 hours before bed keeps us awake through digestion and the increase in our core body temperature. Core body temperature must drop at least 2 degrees for us to go to sleep and stay asleep. 15:00 Alcohol inhibits the action of GABA, our calming neurotransmitter. Cortisol peaks with alcohol. Alcohol and marijuana sedate you. It does not elicit sleep stages. 16:15 You are preparing for sleep the minute you wake up. Consistency is key. 17:20 Try to get as much sleep as possible before you get on a plane. It is called Sleep Banking. 18:10 Your prefrontal cortex is the ruler of your brain. It is where cognition happens: attention, reaction time, processing speed. 6 hours of sleep is a sleep deprived state, in the scientific literature. 10:20 As we age, we have a lower efficacy of our frontal lobe. There is a thinning of our cerebral cortex. Thinning in the prefrontal cortex causes a lower decision rate and worsening of our processing speed, inhibition and impulse control. 21:20 We can slow brain ageing through lifestyle interventions, such as sleep, good nutrition and exercise. 21:40 There is an atrophy of our brain white matter, where our myelinated neurons live, as we get older. Our processing speed declines. This can be seen using an EEG. 25:50 Mild cognitive impairment is a predementia state. 27:30 You should be working on your brain. It is the control center of your entire body. 27:50 You can stave off predementia states and the slowing of cognition through exercise. 29:45 Head trauma can cause an accumulation of talc proteins tolC proteins and amyloid beta, which is somewhat comparable to Alzheimer's disease. 30:30 A hard hit may require a month's recovery. Within 24 hours post trauma, decreasing the temperature of the brain, eating a high fat diet, or having exogenous ketones can help heal the brain. 33:40 Ingesting exogenous ketones can help prevent trauma from happening to the brain. 36:00 EPA/DHA are anti-inflammatory. If you have a high omega 3 index of 8% or more, you can increase your life expectancy by 5 years. 37:10 A risk factor for all-cause mortality is a low omega 3 index. 37:40 Quality supplements reduce risk of oxidation and toxicity. EPA/DHA feeds your brain what it is made of. It is made of water and fat. A high omega 3 index helps with cell membrane fluidity. 39:25 A standard omega 3 blood panel does not test the red blood cell. Red blood cell cycle lasts about 120 days. You need to ingest EPA/DHA daily for cardiac, brain and overall health. 41:20 Farm raised seafood does not contain the same amount of nutrients. 41:30 Omega 3 is made of EPA, DHA and ALA. ALA is the plant form found in flax and chia seeds. To get the recommended dose of omega 3 through ALA is a lot of food. ALA gets converted into DHA. 42:20 Your eyes are the only neurologic tissue outside your brain. Vision changes may be a way to indirectly assess brain health. 45:05 Most 2019 deaths were attributable to heart disease and brain diseases. 45:40 A healthy performing brain can make sound decisions, be rational and practice impulse control. 47:00 Your brain fatigues faster if you are not eating well, sleeping well, and exercising. You need brain energy. Stress and an inflamed brain disrupts pathways in the brain. 48:50 People who have type 2 diabetes and obesity have a higher rate of neural inflammation. 49:50 When we exercise there is a release of myokines, muscle-based proteins (peptide hormones). They act on different organs in positive ways. They are water soluble, and some can pass the blood-brain barrier. Binding receptors to myokines are on heart muscle, spleen, liver and more. Once bound, they create a chemical reaction. 51:10 Interleukin 6 myokine, is secreted with the contraction of a muscle. It is pro-inflammatory cytokine… unless it is released from a muscle – where it is released as anti-inflammatory. It affects immunity and different areas of the brain. 52:00 Irisin myokine is a messenger molecule. It crosses the blood-brain barrier to the prefrontal cortex, where it affects cognition, and hippocampus, where it induces BDNF, that induces neurogenesis. 53:56 When you learn something and immediately exercise, you can have greater capacity to remember. If you sleep for 20 minutes after learning something, you will embed everything you learned. 54:30 Irisin release is increased 1 hour after exercise. 54:50 Workouts of 70 to 80% of you one rep max for a robust release of irisin. More of a release is given during resistance training, than aerobic. The more resistance, the more the release. 58:10 You can stave of neurodegenerative diseases and states by 20 years by inducing exercise protocols that impact myokine release. 58:50 50 million people worldwide are affected by Alzheimer's disease. That rate is set to triple by 2050. 59:30 EPA/DHA can clear accumulated proteins in your brain. 00:01:00 Demyelinating diseases, MS, are becoming more prevalent. Chronic stress and chronic cortisol may be the cause.  

NeuroNoodle Neurofeedback and Neuropsychology
How Sleep and Attention Affect Each Other: Dr. Giancarlo Licata

NeuroNoodle Neurofeedback and Neuropsychology

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 71:02


#sleep #adhd #neurofeedbackpodcast #neurofeedbackpodcast Dr. Licata is founder, and Director, of Vital Head and Spine. He Joins Jay Gunkelman the man who has read well over 500,000 Brain Scans and Pete Jansons on the NeuroNoodle Neurofeedback Podcast to discuss Sleep Issues and How Sleep and Attention Affect each other. Other Topics: Concussion Recovery, The 3 sleep Stages, Why We Sleep, Matthew Walker, Andrew Huberman, ADD, Epilepsy, Sleep Spindle, Phenotypes, Sleep and Attention Disorders, The Book "Why We Sleep" By Matthew Walker Hippocampus, Deep Sleep, Learning, Theta Waves, K Complex, EEG, Primary Lambda, Vigilance Awake, Kids are sleeping less than 1999 so much so that the Theta Beta Ratio Test is no longer a sure thing, working memory, Identifying ADD Biomarkers in Kids, Sleep Hygiene, Flushing the toilet of the brain while we sleep, Sleep wake cycle, Sleep Apnea, Barry Sterman, methylphenidate, Sleep Brain Patterns, Elite Athletes and Sleep, Suisun City Summit https://www.vitalheadandspine.com/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/dr-giancarlo-licata-dc-qeeg-d-757ba241/ Dr. Licata Bio: https://www.vitalheadandspine.com/about-us Giancarlo Licata, BA, BS, DC, qEEG-D (candidate), Dr. Licata is founder, and Director, of Vital Head and Spine. His focus is on Applied Neuroscience, Concussion recovery, and Interprofessional Collaboration. Having cared for thousands of patients with chronic pain, migraines, and concussions, Dr Licata deepened his expertise with Andrew Hill, PhD at Peak Brain Institute, and Tiff Thompson, Phd at Neurofield Neurotherapy. He now works closely with world renowned EEG expert Jay Gunkelman to better understand and improve concussion recovery, attention, sleep, and anxiety. His unique combination of evidence-based tools in EEG, qEEG, ERP, and applied neuroscience is used to create one of the leading applied neuroscience centers in the country. Dr Licata speaks nationally on topics including Brain Health, Sleep Science, Performance Science, Concussion Management, and has been featured on ABC, Huffington Post, and national podcast interviews. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/neuronoodle/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/neuronoodle/support

Talking Sleep
Sleep Age with Dr. Mignot

Talking Sleep

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 45:27


In today's episode of Talking Sleep our guest, Dr. Emmanuel Mignot, talks with us about sleep age and the importance of the EEG collected during polysomnography. As the interest in sleep grows, more attention is being paid to how sleep is related to morbidity and mortality. While there is much discussion about obstructive sleep apnea and cardiovascular health, the EEG may also hold clues about our future health.

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 91 – Unstoppable Health Equity and Thought Leader with Sylvia Bartley

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 66:10


Our guest this time is Sylvia Bartley. She grew up in England and, after college, entered a career in clinical research. Along the way she joined Medtronic where she held positions in sales and marketing. Later she became interested in deep brain stimulation which lead her to combine past clinical experiences with her sales and marketing knowledge.   You will get to hear Sylvia tell her story including how she moved through several jobs to a place where, as she will tell us, she transitioned more to a social orientation working to help different minority groups and, in fact, all of us to benefit from the medical advances she helped to bring about and introduce socially to the world.   Sylvia left Medtronic earlier this year. She will tell us of her plans and desires. I promise that Sylvia's time with us is inspiring and well worth your hearing. You can even visit her website where you can hear her own podcast. Enjoy Silvia and be inspired.     About the Guest: Sylvia Bartley is a health equity thought leader and influencer widely recognized as a neuroscientist, an advocate, and champion of social change, dedicated to advancing health equity through addressing barriers to care for minoritized communities and by addressing the social determinants of health. Sylvia's work is guided by a greater spiritual purpose rooted in mindfulness and intentionality.   She has dedicated most of her professional career to creating opportunities for individuals living with chronic diseases to receive access to medical technologies. For the last 20 years, Sylvia has worked for Medtronic, the world's leading healthcare technology company, where she has held roles in sales, marketing, physician education, and philanthropy. During this time, Sylvia has led global teams to disseminate best surgical practices, advanced techniques, and products to treat Parkinson's Disease and other movement disorders. Most recently, Sylvia helped Medtronic develop an enterprise-wide health equity strategy aligned with customer interests, challenging disease states, and patient needs.   As part of this work, Sylvia engages healthcare leaders, patients, and other stakeholders to uncover and address barriers patients face in receiving high-quality treatment for chronic illnesses. Her commitment to this effort promises to help transform how minoritized communities work with their healthcare providers to manage their chronic conditions.   Her dedication to reducing healthcare disparities extends to her civic engagement. She provides minoritized communities with information and resources to help them make informed choices about critical conditions linked with social determinants of health (SDOH), including education, housing, economic stability, and environmental factors. She employs multiple platforms to reach and support communities, including board memberships with the African American Leadership Forum, the Association of Black Foundation Executives, and The Johnson Stem Activity Centre. She is also an advisory member for the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering for Georgia Tech and Emory University and a Regent for Augsburg University in MN.   Sylvia took her work to a new platform when she published her first book, “Turning the Tide: Neuroscience, Spirituality, and My Path Toward Emotional Health,” which outlines the links between our brains and our souls while inspiring readers to change the world with that knowledge.   During her spare time, Sylvia hosts a long-standing weekly community public affairs radio show and podcast, The More We Know Community Show. She interviews change-makers who level the playing field for all minorities by breaking barriers in their careers, lives, and communities.   Sylvia has been recognized with numerous awards, including the Top 100 Most Influential and Powerful Black Briton awards, in 2022, 2021, 2020, and 2019. In 2021, she was awarded the Medtronic HR Stewardship Award and earned recognition for her service and commitment to the Twin Cities in 2020 with the African American Leadership Forum Community Award. Women in Business Award in 2017, and Diversity in Business Awards in 2013 from Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal. Sylvia is also a 2014 Bush Fellow and AARP/Pollen's 50 over 50 award recipient.   Sylvia earned a Ph.D. in Neurophysiology from St. Barts and The Royal London School of Medicine and Dentistry and holds a bachelor's degree in Pharmacology from the University of London.       About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:21 Hi, everyone, welcome to unstoppable mindset. Glad to see you wherever you happen to be. I am your host, Mike Hingson. And our guest today is Sylvia Bartley, who is a thought leader or neuroscientist. And I'm not going to tell you any more than that, because we're going to make her tell you her whole story. Sylvia, welcome to unstoppable mindset.   Sylvia Bartley  01:41 Thank you, Michael, it's a pleasure to be here with you today.   Michael Hingson  01:45 Well, I was reading your bio. And there is there is a lot there. I know you've done a lot in dealing with diversity and equity and so on. And we'll talk about inclusion and you are a neuroscientist, which is fascinating in of itself. But why don't we start Tell me a little bit about you maybe growing up just how you started and how you got kind of where you are?   Sylvia Bartley  02:06 Yeah, happy to. So where do I start? I think I grew up in the UK, born and bred. And born to two Caribbean parents, my parents are from St. Lucia and Jamaica. And they came to England in the 50s because of the promise of jobs and great access and opportunities. And so they came across they met and they had four children. And growing up in the UK, it was it was a fairly good experience. I won't say the experience racism, or any such thing directly. I was in a predominantly white neighborhood, I went to a very good Catholic school, where I received an excellent education. And I went on to work in the Royal London School of Medicine and Dentistry, where I became a research technician. And I worked there for 13 years. And during my tenure there, I did lots of research on the somatosensory cortex, looking at brain plasticity, and long term potentiation and memory and learning. And so this was a very new field. For me, this was not something I aspire to do. When I was growing up in school, I was very intrigued and very engaged in that particular area in neurophysiology, and I was surrounded by these phenomenal academics and teachers, that really taught me a lot. And during that time, that's when I got my first degree in applied biology specializing in psychopharmacology and my second degree, my PhD in neurophysiology. And again, my work was on the somatosensory cortex, looking at brain plasticity, in response to our experience, our innocuous experience. And I was very intrigued by that work. I'm very intrigued by the the kind of deep, intrinsic pneus of the brain and the function of the brain and obviously, how it really controls everything that we do. But I knew after I did my PhD that I wanted to do some more work that was more clinical facing. And so I left the academic environment and I entered into the medical device field, where I started off in cells, selling wires and stents, interventional cardiology, in the heart of London to the big cardiac centers. And then I quickly transitioned into Medtronic, the large the largest standalone medical device company in the world, and a solid themselves of intrathecal baclofen for B, and then quickly moved to a Furby called Deep Brain Stimulation. And there I was in heaven because that really married the work I did in kind of basic clinical science and, and medicine to the clinical application. And with this therapy And it was approved to be used for patients with Parkinson's disease dystonia, a central tremor. Now, it's for epilepsy OCD. And there's lots of research not approved yet in clinical depression, and other areas. So very taken up. And my work was literally to go to different hospitals that did deep brain stimulation, and train the neurosurgeons and the neurosurgical teams, how to do the DBS procedure, in particular, how to use the advanced technologies that Medtronic brought to this particular Furby. So it was a really fantastic job, it took me too many hours on it, you know, the fabulous surgeons are great minds out there, doing the work. And in addition to that, I met loads of patients and their families, particularly patients living with Parkinson's disease, and when he got to understand their pathway and their experience, and how this therapy really helped to alleviate their symptoms, so it could improve their quality of lives. And that role took me across the United Kingdom. And then, you know, it expanded to Western Europe. So every day, I'll get up and I'll get on a plane to a different country, a different hospital, a different neurosurgical team and spend the best part of my days in a while during a DBS procedure, working with the neurosurgeon and their teams to make sure we disseminate those best procedural practices using the technology. And one of the things I loved about that particular role is I could use the electrophysiological experience that I had in a medical school, doing the single cell recordings in vitro, and do that literally on patients with Parkinson's disease, to identify the brain structures in order for for the physician to locate the lead in an accurate location.   Michael Hingson  06:54 Well, tell me, tell me a little bit more, if you would about deep brain stimulation, what is it? What what do you do? And just kind of help us understand a little bit more about that, if you would?   Sylvia Bartley  07:05 Yeah, sure. So deep brain stimulation is actually a therapy where you apply an a very fine electrode into deep structures of the brain, and the structures that you implant the electrode, they have to be approved structures. So things under the FDA or the to have approval, and you apply chronic stimulation by a an implantable pulse generator that's implanted under the skin, in in the clavicle area. And it's connected by these electrodes and extension cord into that deep structure of the brain. So it's an internal system, it's a medical device that is in is implanted into the patient, and it stays in there. And basically, you control the device and the amount of current that you apply through the electrodes, through the battery through telemetry. And it's been around now for over 35 years. It's proven, particularly in the area of parkinson disease, as I mentioned earlier, it's using other therapy areas, but it really does alleviate the symptoms of these movement disorders. And these movement disorders, they're kind of de neurodegenerative, ie they get worse over time, primarily, not everybody, but most people. So you have the ability to adjust the settings remotely via to military to make sure you're applying the right stimulation. And it's really important that the lead is placed accurately. And that the stimulation is only stimulating that area, because it's surrounded by these other complicated structures. And if you stimulate those areas, you can get side effects that are not, you know, that makes it very uncomfortable and, you know, almost sometimes unbearable. So you've got to be precise in your location, and in your stimulation of parameters, and it's tailored to the patient. Now, this isn't suitable for every patient, there is a selection criteria, the neurologist, the movement disorder, numerologist plays the role in selecting the patients making sure they meet the selection criteria. And they also play the important role of managing the parameters and the stimulation parameters after the lead is implanted. So you're really kind of connected to this device for the rest of your life. It does improve the quality of your life, it's in the right area of the brain and the stimulation parameters are accurate, and you're a right fit for this particular therapy. And it's done all over the world in in many different countries literally, it's probably got approvals in in most countries. Now what I will say is the regulatory approvals are different in every country. So not every condition is approved. But typically, Parkinson disease dystonia is approved throughout the world.   Michael Hingson  09:59 You If so, when the electrodes and the devices is implanted, and you begin to use it, and I appreciate that, you need to clearly know what you're doing. And you need to be very careful. Other than let's take Parkinson's as an example where you are, the visible signs are that you're, you're changing the amount of improper movements or unwanted movements and so on. What is the patient feel?   Sylvia Bartley  10:31 Well, that's a great question. So clearly, before they come to us, they've reached a certain point in their pathway, where the medication is not working well for them, they probably get an imbalance of complications or side effects as opposed to clinical benefits. So it comes to a point in their journey, depending on how far the condition advances, that there is a surgical intervention. And there's many other surgical intervention like vagal nerve stimulation, but deep brain stimulation is one of them. And at the early stages, it was almost like the the very end like you have to be very advanced. But with all the technology, now it can be done kind of earlier in the pathway, but the patients are kind of in a in a bad way, when they get to the point of having deep brain stimulation. And so during the surgery, typically, not always, typically, because the procedure is done in so many different ways. But typically, the patient is awake, there are local anesthesia, Ebenezer daily, they're awake, and they're awake, because when you put the lead in the brain, during the procedure, then you ologists comes in and does what they call physiological testing. So they can apply stimulation during the surgery to make sure that it's really doing what it's supposed to do alleviate the symptoms, and not without any side effects. So they do a battery or test and application of different stimulation parameters. And the patient can respond directly to say, Well, yeah, you know, you can see if the tremors stop in or if the dystonia is, is been averted, but also the patient can tell you how they're feeling.   Michael Hingson  12:14 So they can say things like, and I don't know that you're anywhere near the part of the brain that does that. But you can say things like, I'm hearing a high pitched tone, or I'm hearing a noise or I'm hearing music, which, as I said, may not be anywhere near where you're talking about. But the point is, and I've heard about that before and read about it before, where many times during operations involving the brain, the neurologists would be asking a patient exactly what they sense because, in part, they're mapping different parts of the brain, but they want to make sure that, that they're either getting the results that they want, or they discover something new, which is always helpful.   Sylvia Bartley  12:52 Yeah, exactly. And they do map the brain. And that's why electrophysiological recordings is a good way of doing it. And now we have advanced technologies, there's multiple electrodes that can apply stimulation in different ways. So it really does advance the way in which we do the procedure. But you're absolutely right, we do them up and they make sure they don't get any side effects. For example, your vision, you're near the areas in the brain that is related to your optic nerve, and you want to make sure that they're not getting any double vision or their eyes are not moving towards their nose and sweating is another one. And you know, dystonia putting up the side of the mouth, it is another one as well. So these are very serious side effects that can impact their quality of life. So the goal is to improve it. So making sure that we get the best optimal outcomes. And that's why it's typically done away. But there's now lots of advancements in medical technology and there's lots of research and people looking into doing the procedure asleep. Because it is uncomfortable for the patient. They've got a stereotactic frame on their head, it looks like age, they've got four pins in their head, you know, someone's drilling a 14 millimeter burr hole in their scar while they're awake. So you know, I go to the dentist and having my teeth drilled under local anesthesia is very uncomfortable. So I can't imagine what it feels like when you're in your worst state because the patient is not on medication, because we want them to have the symptoms of Parkinson's. So when we apply this stimulation, and look at me saying we I am so used to saying I want to say they apply this stimulation, you want to see that it's been alleviated. So the patient is not very, not feeling very well anyway, and then they have to go through this procedure, which can last anything from two hours if it's done asleep and experience hand to seven, eight hours. And so it's a long time for the patient. So you know the but the patient is so relieved, grateful and just kind of elated. When the symptoms are alleviated, and their quality of life has been improved, so if I was to like dystonic patients as well, where they have very severe distortion as muscle contractions, and they're, they're in the most kind of painful positions. And it's almost like a miracle, I used to call it the miracle cure, even though it doesn't cure the illness, but it really does alleviate those horrific symptoms that really does impair their quality of life.   Michael Hingson  15:32 Does it have does it have an effect on longevity? If you're using deep brain stimulation? And if it's working, does it? I know, it's not a cure? But does it have any effect on the person's longevity?   Sylvia Bartley  15:46 To be honest, I'm not sure about the return, if there's any recent findings about this, but to my knowledge, no, it doesn't stop or slow down the progression of the condition, alleviates the symptoms. And I haven't looked recently into any research to see if that is different. But you know, for a very long time, there was no evidence to support that it slows it down just improves the quality of life by alleviating the symptoms.   Michael Hingson  16:13 Yeah, so it's dealing with the symptoms, and certainly not the cause. When the surgery is is occurring, or afterward, I'm assuming may be incorrectly but having gone through one just as part of a test many years ago, I assume that there are differences that show up when the brain is stimulated, that show up on an EEG. What do you mean? Well, so if I'm watching, if I'm watching on an electroencephalograph and watching a person's brain patterns, and so on, are there changes when the brain is being stimulated? Can you tell anything from that or is it strictly by watching the patient and their symptoms disappearing or or going away to a great degree?   Sylvia Bartley  16:58 Yeah, so primarily, it's watching the symptoms disappear by but then secondarily, there are new technologies, where we look at local field potentials. And the electrode is connected to an implantable pulse generator that has the ability to sense and monitor brainwaves during the chronic stimulation. And again, this is called local field potentials and sensing. And the idea there is, hopefully to identify when you can stimulate as opposed to applying chronic stimulation to do many things, one, if you can anticipate or identify a marker in the brain. And if you stimulate to reduce that marker, you can reduce the symptoms. And so it's almost like a closed loop, closed loop system. And that will also have an impact on the battery life. Because one of the challenges with deep brain stimulation is you've got to, obviously, it's driven by battery is an implantable pulse generator, we want to make it as small and as powerful as possible to to have clinical effect. And so battery life and longevity is something that's constantly being looked at. And this is a way of reducing the battery, we have rechargeables now, but still, after a period of time, like nine or 10 years, you still have to replace implantable pulse generator, because the battery, you know, life needs to be replenished or changed in one of the not not replenished. But you need to change the battery, because there's no guarantee that it can recharge at the rate that it could before.   Michael Hingson  18:40 So I asked, I asked a question only basically because being a physics guy, I love quantitative things as opposed to qualitative things. And that's why I was asking if there are ways to see differences in in brain patterns and so on. That may be a totally irrelevant question. But that's why I asked the question.   Sylvia Bartley  18:57 Yeah, no, no, not at all. Like I said, sensing is a thing now that they are monitoring and looking for biomarkers and looking at brain activities. While it's in the patient, and that's very advanced, because that hasn't been done before. So yeah,   Michael Hingson  19:13 yeah, it's definitely cutting edge. I'd use that term. It's bleeding edge technology. Yeah, absolutely. In a lot of ways.   Sylvia Bartley  19:21 Absolutely. But you know, I've been out of DBS now for, let's say, six years. So I may not be as common as I used to be. But that's that's the basis and the premise of it.   Michael Hingson  19:32 Well, people have called you a unicorn. What do you think about that and why? I had to ask.   Sylvia Bartley  19:39 And I love that question. And I think they call Well, what they tell me I'm a unicorn is that I have this very diverse background. There's not many people like me, that can talk about Deep Brain Stimulation at the level that I do and have that technical experience and reputation that I did globally to be there. DBS expert. And then secondly, you know, I am this corporate person that worked a lot in marketing and lived in three different countries, very culturally fluid and diverse, and known as a good leader of people, and definitely, with some strong business acumen, but then I think they call me a unicorn, because I'm very much engaged in community, particularly the black community. And as you know, there are many disparities in the black communities or communities of color. And I'm kind of driven, it's just within me to really work and use the skills and connections that I have to help create conditions that everybody thrives in communities, no matter who they are, the conditions they were born into, and their circumstances. And I really live that out, I really work hard in communities voluntarily, to really advance equity, whether it's education, health, or economic, economic wealth. And I do that very seriously. And I think that's really given me a reputation of being a community leader, particularly in Minnesota in the Twin Cities where I live for nine years. I love Minnesota, I love the community. And I really love working in the Twin Cities community to advance equity, because the Twin Cities has one of the largest disparities when it comes to all of those social determinants of health. And for many years, it was ranked the second worst state in the country, for African Americans to live based on the disparities in those social determinants of health. So there is a knowledge and an awareness and a propensity and willingness of many people from diverse backgrounds, to come together to try and solve that, to make Minnesota a great place for everybody to live, work and play. And so really got engaged in that in that arena. And I think that's what really got me my reputation of being not just a corporate leader, but community lead and very passionate about doing that work. And I've also heard that people find it difficult to do both my job was very demanding, it was a global job. I literally traveled globally, even when I was doing philanthropy, but, but when I came back home, just getting seriously engaged in a community and doing it at a serious level, and being very impactful on it. And that's why I think people call me a unicorn, because I have this passion for community, particularly advancing the minoritized communities together with, you know, being a corporate leader and doing that well. And that's my understanding why people call me a unicorn. But also I think, I don't fit into a box, I, when you look at my resume, you say, well, there's a lot on there, I've done a lot, but they're all very different. You know, I've got this passion for emotional Alpha got this passion for neuroscience, I got a passion for community, I've got a passion for philanthropy. I've done marketing and, and strategy and operations. And so you know, I like to blend all of those together, and do the work to advance equity, particularly, in particular health equity. But that is no cookie cutter cookie cutter role, you know, and so that's why I think I'm very kind of unique and different in that way. Well, it's   Michael Hingson  23:19 interesting, you clearly started out with a very technical background. And you have evolved in a sense, if you will, from that, or you have allowed yourself to diversify and to go into other areas, as you said, into marketing and such as that, how did that come about? And you because you, you clearly had carved out a great niche in a lot of specific technical ways. And you clearly have a great technical knowledge. And I'm a great fan of people who can take knowledge from one arena, and and use the skills that you learn from that elsewhere. Like, from being very technical. My master's degree is in physics. And I started out doing scientific things and then, through circumstances went into sales. So I appreciate where you're coming from. But how did you make that transition? Or how did you add that to what you do maybe is a better way to put it?   Sylvia Bartley  24:19 Yeah, I think I just want to go to path and purpose. I think it was just my path. And I was open unconsciously in following my path because I really did not have like a five or 10 year career goal, to say this is my trajectory. But what I did have was passion and love for certain things. And I love neurophysiology. I love working with physicians. I love being in a clinical setting. And I love working in a business environment as well. And I love teaching. When I was on the in the academic institution. I did a lot of teaching. The roles I did initially in a medical device industry was teaching as they call it a sales rep role, but when you're working with therapies, in medical device, you're teaching people a lot about the firm a lot about your devices, the science behind your devices, and you're bringing people together, you're, you're holding meetings. And in order to be an expert, you're constantly learning. And then you're also teaching. And so what I was doing the kind of technical role, I was also very strategic in that, you know, just imagine I was traveling around, let's just say, Western Europe at this point, different countries, and coming across different challenges in a procedure, and noticing, you know, talking to my colleagues that they had the same challenge, and we will problem solve together. And then every day, there's a new challenge, right? So every day, we went to a different procedure, every day, we learned something new because there was a new challenge or something appeared that didn't happen before. And so, in my mind, I wanted to go from a one on one teaching and improvement to how can I do this more strategically? So really thinking across Western Europe to say, how can we teach all these other folks that are also a specialist in these areas, about what we're learning and how to mitigate those challenges that we're having. So that transition for me having to been very technical, with great experience to being a leader of other technical people, where I put together trainings and programs for both staff that were experts, and also physicians, who were doing deep brain stimulation. So we developed a program in Western Europe that's still alive and well today and scaled significantly with young neurosurgeons on how to do the DBS procedure. And so working with physicians from across Western Europe to develop this curriculum, and execute it really well, that it's, again, serving and and really helping to train hundreds of neurosurgeons. You know, it just went from the doing the technical to the teaching, externally and internally, and then also being very strategic, to say, how can we work to improve all of these challenges that we're seeing, and it came, you know, with me moving to Switzerland, to be the procedure solutions, Senior Product Manager for Western Europe, where I really took on this role, and it was very much more strategic. And that's how I got into marketing. I never did an MBA, you know, I did some really great trainings with the Wharton School marketing fundamentals, etc. But I never did a dedicated like two year MBA, but I just learned through experience in and I and re exposure, great leaders to learn from, and it just evolved from there   Michael Hingson  27:45 in sales. What what specifically were you selling? What product   Sylvia Bartley  27:51 sells, so variety of product wise instance? So interventional interventional cardiology, stent, some wires, and that was that was probably the hardest sell, because it's a stent and a wire and there was many companies out there, are you very competitive? So you know, what differentiates yours from another? So I really cut my teeth on sales, selling that product in the Highlander that was highly competitive.   Michael Hingson  28:18 Did you did you? Did you ever have a situation where you were selling and working with a customer? And and I don't know whether this applies to you and what you sold? But did you ever have a situation where you discovered that your product might not be the best product for them? Or would that come up with what you were selling?   Sylvia Bartley  28:40 Um, I gotta say no, because what we what we were selling? No. So if I think about the whys instead, no, because it's a oneness den and anybody that needed to have that procedure, they needed one guy. Now, clearly, there were differences in sizes, and the type of stent, but our stents were very applicable to most situations as as long as we had the appropriate sizes. This would work in terms of intrathecal, baclofen and kind of capital equipment for deep brain stimulation that was very specific to the customer and their needs. And I will, I will say this on a podcast, I work for the best medical device company in the world, of course. And I still stand by that I believe our products are the best in the business, particularly when it comes to deep brain stimulation. We founded this Virpi alongside Professor Bennett bead in Grenoble, in France. In the 1980s. We were kind of the founders of this Philippian and a product we had a monopoly, but over 25 years, I'm not saying that makes us the best but we got the great experience the know how new technology, and I want to correct myself I keep saying we I no longer work for this company, but I've been there for 20 years. So get out of that same so I just want to be very clear to the audience. This is my past role, and I'm not longer work with with them. But again, it was a long time. And I did DBS for about 15 years. So it's very near and dear to my heart. But I do believe they have the best product still today, and are doing exceptionally well, alleviating those symptoms for those particular therapy.   Michael Hingson  30:15 You raise a good point, though, but habits are sometimes not easy to break. It's been 21 years since I worked well, 20 years since I worked for Quantum. And I still say we so it's okay. Thank you, we understand. And I asked the question, because we had products that I sold, that were similar to products from other companies. But there were differences. And sometimes our products might not meet a customer's need. Whereas other products had differences that made them a better fit. And I was just curious to see if you really found that and it sounds like you didn't really have that kind of an issue. And so you had to sell in part based on other things like the reputation of the company, the quality of the company, and other things like that, which, which is perfectly reasonable and makes perfect sense.   Sylvia Bartley  31:09 Yeah, I mean, there's also the kind of referral side of this. And that's where that's where the work is. And the decisions almost have been done, where you have to identify the right patient for the therapy. And then once that is done, and the patient is selected, then it's which device, you know. And at that point, our devices is suitable for all patients that knee deep brain stimulation.   Michael Hingson  31:31 Yeah. So you're, you're going at it in a different way, you need to find the people who had fits in that makes perfect sense. Well, what really caused you to have that? Well, let me ask you something else. First, I, well, I'll ask this, I started and I'll finish it, what would cause you to have the drive and the passion that you have now for more of a social kind of connection and moving into more dealing with social issues, as it were?   Sylvia Bartley  32:00 Well, you know, as a well, let me put it this way. When I was working, doing all of this therapy, traveling the world   Sylvia Bartley  32:12 1000s of DBS procedures, and working with lots of people, I didn't come across many people of color that were receiving these therapies, for whatever reason, and it kind of strikes me as odd. Because it, it shouldn't be a phobia for the privilege, it should be a phobia for everybody. And, you know, United States insurance, and access has a lot to do with that, and outside the United States. You know, I still didn't see it. So anybody, actually, I think I probably saw two black people receiving this burpee. So I've always been mindful of things like that. And obviously, as a black person, I'm very mindful and aware of disparities and discrimination. And I've always had a heart to address discrimination, or not discrimination, equity, as I mentioned earlier on in a discussion. So I've always looked at the world through that lens, in everything that I do. And I always try and do whatever I can, to to help or advance equity. It's just something that will never leave me. And so you know, even at the tender age of 27, when I was a single parent of two children, I got engaged in community, I became the Chair of a large nonprofit that provided subsidized childcare for lone parents. And I did that because there was discrimination in their practices against people of color. And I really wanted to help advance that work by helping to develop policies and programs and a culture, you know, was for everybody. And I worked with the NHS, the non executive team voluntarily, I was a lay chair for the independent review panel, looking at cases where people complained against the NHS for lots of things, including discrimination. But that wasn't the only kind of topic. And it's just work that I continue to do. And when I moved to United States, I just got deeply involved in that as well. So it came to the point after 15 years in in one kind of area of expertise, where I had my foot in both camps of foot in the community, working lots of nonprofits voluntarily to doing the work in a corporation. And really, you know, always wondering how I can marry the two or should I cross over and go deeply into community work. And five years later, here I am, I've left the corporation and I'm taking a little bit of a break, but I really want to get back into working for a nonprofit, close to community Either he's advancing equity, hopefully in health, or around those social determinants of health. So it's just something that's been a red thread throughout my career in life. And I really want to double down on it now, at this point in my career, this point in the world where everything is super crazy, and polarize, and really do whatever I can, and leverage my experience, in healthcare, in community in philanthropy, to advance equity for everybody.   Michael Hingson  35:29 So you mentioned NHS and NHS is what   Sylvia Bartley  35:32 I'm sorry, NHS is a national health service in the UK, it's valuable for data that provides a health service where you pay a nominal amount if you're working. I forget what the percentage is, but you pay a very tiny amount that comes out of your salary, you don't even notice it. And everyone has access to health care.   Michael Hingson  35:51 Got it? So when did you leave med tech?   Sylvia Bartley  35:54 I left my tech at the end of June this year to only recent, this recent Yeah. Hi, gosh.   Michael Hingson  36:03 So what are you doing now? Or are you are working for anyone or you just took a break for a little while to recoup and reassess?   Sylvia Bartley  36:11 Yeah, I've taken a little bit of a break. It's amazing how tired I've been I you know, I've been working really hard globally for the last God knows how many years 3030 plus years. So just welcomed a little bit of a break. Yes, I am looking for other opportunities again, in primarily in a nonprofit space to do the community poster community where wherever I apologize with advancing equity minoritized communities that hopefully, health equity. So I'm looking at doing that. And yeah, we'll just see what happens. But at the moment, I am volunteering at a fabulous nonprofit organization here in Atlanta, called the Johnson stem activity center. It's an organization that was founded by Dr. Lonnie Johnson. He's an inventor of the Super Soaker. And they run some phenomenal programs, robotic programs, computing, computer programs, egaming, coding, virtual reality for students, but particularly for minoritized communities. In this particular center, they give them access to equipment and resources and teams to really get engaged in STEM through these programs. And I just love working. Now unfortunately, I don't live too far away. I go there during the week, and I work with Dr. Johnson and Linda Moore, who oversee this organization together with other entities, and is really taken aback because it's a heart of Atlanta, it's very community driven. And they're doing some excellent work. And to see the young students, particularly those from minoritized communities, build robots and their eyes light up when they're talking about STEM, and what they want to be like an astronaut or cybersecurity, you know, it's just, it's just amazing. So that takes up a lot of my time together with networking, and, you know, socializing. So, and that's what I'm doing right now.   Michael Hingson  38:08 So are you in Atlanta or Minneapolis? Now, Minneapolis?   Sylvia Bartley  38:12 I've been here two years. Yes. Okay.   Michael Hingson  38:15 So you don't get to have as many snowball fights in Atlanta, as you did in Minneapolis. St. Paul?   Sylvia Bartley  38:20 Yeah. No. And it was too cold to have snowball fights. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  38:29 Well, you know, it's, it's one of those subjects worth exploring? Well, I have to ask this just because I'm, I'm curious and as you know, from looking at me a little bit, dealing a lot with with disabilities, and so on. So with the with the organization that you're you're volunteering with, and as they're creating games and so on, do they do anything to make the things that they do inclusive, accessible, safe for people who happen to be blind or low vision or have other disabilities? Has that been something that they've thought about or might be interested in thinking about? Because clearly, if we're really going to talk about inclusion, that's an area where we tend to generally as a society missed the mark.   Sylvia Bartley  39:14 Yeah, absolutely. Inclusion, you know, includes people with disabilities. It sure. Yeah, absolutely. So I think we are set up for that. I don't know we have any students that fall into that category, to be honest, because there's anything from 5000 to 10,000 students that pass through that center per year, but it's definitely something I will go back and ask them about, but I know the facilities itself is is accessible for everybody. So   Michael Hingson  39:48 well. Accessibility from a physical standpoint is part of it. Yeah, but but then you've got the other issues like documentation and other things for a blind person for example to read but the the reason And I'm bringing up the question is, a lot of times, and I'm not saying in any way that that's what you're experiencing, but a lot of times I hear when I talk to people about whether what they do is inclusive. Well, we've never had blind students, or we've never had a person with this disability or that disability. And the problem is, that's true. But you know, which comes first the chicken or the egg? Do you need to have the students before you make the inclusion happen? Or do you make the inclusion happen, and then tell people so that they will come because so often, most of us just don't pay attention to or even think about trying to pay attention to things where there isn't access, because we're just working hard to deal with what we can get some inclusion and accessibility out. Oh, so the other things never really get our focus. And it has to start somewhere. And typically, from my experience, it really happens best when somebody starts the process of making sure that there is inclusion, accessiBe that I worked for, that makes products that helped make websites more inclusive and available to persons with disabilities started, because it's an Israeli company where the law said you got to make websites accessible. And the guys who started it, actually, first work for a company well started a company that made websites. And then two years after they formed the company, Israel came along and said, You got to make our websites accessible. So then they started doing it. And the the population of customers for accessiBe has grown tremendously, because people recognize the value of doing it. And it's not mostly overly expensive to do. But it really starts better there than waiting for the demand. Because it should be part of the cost of doing business.   Sylvia Bartley  42:03 Yeah, absolutely. I agree with you. And JSOC, it's a it's a special place. Typically, people contact JSOC. And they say we want to bring our students here or run the programs in the facility. And so that's typically how kind of that kind of their programming works. You know, the programs are developed based on the partnerships. It is a smaller nonprofit. And we're trying to, you know, we're currently going to go into a capital campaign, so we can raise money to have staff, there's no staff there right now, it is all done by volunteers. And so you know, we really want to build the organization to have staff, so we can do better programming, we can scale and we can do more things that makes us more inclusive. Yeah. So yes, that's a really good point.   Michael Hingson  42:52 And volunteers are the heart and souls of nonprofits, and often really do shape the mission. And then it's, some of them become staff, of course, but it's up to the volunteers and the people to really shape the mission going forward. And then that's an important thing to do. So I'm with you.   Sylvia Bartley  43:13 Absolutely.   Michael Hingson  43:15 So where where is next for you? Do you have any notion yet? Or are you just enjoying what you're doing, and you're not yet overly concerned about some sort of way to get paid for what you do?   Sylvia Bartley  43:29 Right now, you know, there's a couple of irons in the fire was leave it at that, we'll see what pans out. I'm all about path and purpose and the universe, doing its thing. So we will see what happened there. But in the meantime, I'm continuing to do what I love, which is really getting involved volunteer, and, you know, network and do my podcast to go out to have a podcast. And that gives me more time to focus on that, because I'm purely doing that by myself. And making sure I get good guests and good topics and, you know, really providing information that can help our listeners make good decisions about their lifestyle. will tell us   Michael Hingson  44:08 more about the podcast about podcasts, because obviously we're on one now. So I'd love to love to learn more.   Sylvia Bartley  44:17 You know, podcasts is a way of getting information out there to to our listeners in a different way. Right? I think people are getting very tired or the traditional media outlets and podcasts is taken off. And my podcast is called the more we know, community show. Conversations cultivating change. And really again, it's focusing on addressing the social determinants of health by primarily for the black community. And I do that through storytelling, really having great guests that are changemakers leaders, really driving change either through their story of what they do, or you know, working with a nonprofit and also talking about equity and providing infant ation around health equity and what people need to know, in order to make good decisions about their health and their lifestyle. And it's all about information. And it's data driven information as well. And my guest often nominal third is, again, changemakers in their own right, and just very inspiring. And so I use this platform to tell them stories to tell their truths, to provide information. It's also a radio show in Minnesota on camo J, a 9.9 FM every Sunday at 12, noon, central time. So I got to produce this thing on a weekly basis. So that takes a lot as well. So now that I am not working full time, I've got time to focus on that and to develop it as well. So yeah, that's what I'm doing my podcast.   Michael Hingson  45:48 Well, that's pretty cool. And you're having fun producing it and learning to be an audio editor and all those things.   Sylvia Bartley  45:54 Well, I have something for me, I'm not going to attempt to do that. But I have to find my guest. And obviously, the content, and I review the edit in and I do the little marketing for it. So it's quite a lot, as you know, and I do it on a weekly basis. After the knock it out. Sometimes I do replays, but I gotta knock it out. And so I'm looking here to get some sponsorship, hopefully, so I can hire folks to do it, to do it for me, and, you know, do a better job on my social media. I'm not very good at that. It takes a lot of time. And I don't have the time to do all of that. So   Michael Hingson  46:31 it doesn't I used to put out a newsletter on a regular basis. And, and don't anymore just because the time gets away. Time flies, and social media is a great time sponge. So it's, it's easy to spend a lot of time doing social media, and there are only so many hours in the day.   Sylvia Bartley  46:49 Exactly, exactly. And there's so many talented people out there doing social media. I can't even even if I tried, you know?   Michael Hingson  46:56 Yeah. Yeah, some of us just have different gifts. Who are some of your favorite guests for your podcast?   Sylvia Bartley  47:05 You know, I've had so many gays I started doing this in 2015 under a different brand called the black leadership redefined. And primarily based in Minnesota. And so my guess had been anybody from Senator Tina Smith to Chief of Police, Rondo, Redondo to the Attorney General Keith Ellison, to nickimja levy Armstrong, who's a civil rights activist in the Twin Cities, to all of these phenomenal African American female coaches and leaders and ministers. I've had some deep, meaningful, moving conversations with people. But I think the ones that moved me the most are those that are telling their stories that kind of break your heart. And it doesn't move, make it it breaks your heart, but it moves me because they took their pain. And they transform that to something impactful, that really impacts and change the lives of many. And typically there are people whose spouses or, or siblings or loved ones has been murdered through to sex trafficking or at the hands of the police or at the hands of, obviously criminals. And what they did with that to really start nonprofits and provide refuge and help and support for other people. Those stories really touched me the most, you know,   Michael Hingson  48:33 yeah. You have written a book, or how many books have you written? I've just written one, just one so far. So far. That's enough.   Sylvia Bartley  48:42 That one's brewing at some point.   Michael Hingson  48:45 Well, Tom, tell me about your book, if you would.   Sylvia Bartley  48:47 Yeah, my book is called turn aside. Using spirituality and my path to emotional health. And the book I wrote, really, because on my interest in science, the brain neurophysiology and spirituality, and emotional health, and recognizing that the areas in the brain that are associated with all fear, those are areas that intersect at some point, or are the same areas. So that got me and then with my experience, working in the field of Parkinson's and movement disorders, we have all these wonderful experts from around the world and what I learned in their presence and by taking seminars, I recognized that there was a intersectionality between these three, and then I took my own experience, and wondered how I can use this information for the better right to help heal myself, someone living with depression, as well as helping giving back to community. And so I, you know, start the book off by doing a part by biography so the audience could connect with me and understand where I'm coming from, but then going deep into not really deep but going into the side Science, and making that connection, and how we can use that to really help improve our lives or the lives of others. And there's a lot in there about volunteering and giving back to my community. Because when I think about my living with my depression, at the time, it was pretty bad when I wrote the book. And, you know, I even wrote in a book that I saw it as a gift, because it really does help me to go deep internally, to connect to, you know, my spiritual path to really understand why I'm suffering like this emotionally. What am I supposed to do with it? And, you know, how do I help other people, and it kept me, I was like, getting me grounded. But it really did really get me to ask those deep spiritual questions, which has really helped me to evolve as a person, spiritually, emotionally and physically. And so, you know, the book really centered around that, and how we can use that knowledge, about intersectionality will free to really help other people's lives as well. And then not to mention talking, talking about depression is something that many people do, particularly those who are very visible and in senior leadership positions. But it was important for me to do so because I want to help normalize it. I want to get to a point where we can talk about depression, and people stop saying that you're brave, and you're being vulnerable. And you're being very courageous, because it, there's a high percentage of people that have depression, and not many people want to talk about it, because of the stigma, and the shame that unfortunately, is still associated with emotional health and mental wellness. So you know, I'm doing my liberal part to help break that stigma, and to get people to talk about it. Because once you talk about it, and you acknowledge it in my situation, it was a first step towards healing. And I lived with depression, undiagnosed for most of my life, being diagnosed in 2017, when I published my book, was just very cathartic. And it was a big weight off my shoulder because I didn't have to hide it. I didn't have to battle it behind closed doors, and for the first time, I got help, and then I could address it in a very mindful, holistic way that really has helped me. And I can proudly say, today, I feel the best I've ever felt in my whole entire life, emotionally, physically, and spiritually,   Michael Hingson  52:25 is depression, more of a physical or mental and emotional thing?   Sylvia Bartley  52:31 Well, it is a physiological it can be I mean, depression comes in many forms, and it's different for everybody. But there's absolutely a physiological component to some kind of depression with as a chemical imbalance, due to some over activity under activity, or certain areas in our brain, particularly the basal ganglia, which is your kind of seed of emotion. And so, you know, that's, that's definitely one of the causes, but not many people know, what are the like real cause of people's depression, because it's different for everybody. And sometimes it could be experiential, it could be any reaction to something very traumatic. And then hopefully, those situations it doesn't kind of last long. But if it is, neurochemical, then definitely people you know, need to get professional help for that outside of talk therapy.   Michael Hingson  53:26 Right. Well, in terms in terms of spirituality, how does that enter into and when you talk about spirituality? What do you mean by that?   Sylvia Bartley  53:38 So what I mean about that is I mean, looking inwards and looking like at the wider plan, knowing that I call it the universe, right? People will say, call it God, or, and I do believe in God, and I pray to God, right talk about universal timing and the power of the universal. And knowing that there is a bigger plan, greater than us, there was a life here before us, I believe, we chose up I believe we choose our parents, I believe, we come here with an assignment, everybody comes with an assignment. And I believe that by saying that, I believe we will have our path and our purpose. And my goal is to align with my path and my purpose so I can really live to my full potential in this lifetime. And that's what I mean about spirituality. So it's less about the external factors, less about striving to externally achieved but more to internally achieved, and that achievement is alignment with my spiritual path and purpose. And I believe once I do that, and when I achieve that, everything will fall into place, and I'll be at peace, and I will kind of live my full life and I'm and again, I don't know if I'll ever be fully on my path and purpose. I'm always seeking. I call myself a seeker. I'm always seeking I'm asking a question, but I feel I'm pretty much on the on track and it feels Good. And I know when I'm off track because it doesn't feel good when I'm doing things that doesn't sit right with me. And, you know, it's not it's very difficult for me to do and it's not what I'm supposed to be doing. And so I'm aware enough now to say, well, I'm going to submit that to the universe. And I'm just going to, you know, reset and redirect myself to make sure that I am on path so I can do it on put on this earth to do and as well. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  55:27 Whether you call it the universe, or God, do you believe that God talks to us,   Sylvia Bartley  55:33 I believe God talks us in many ways. Now, you know, you're not going to hear a voice or you're not going to see a burning bush either. But you're going to have signs some people do. That's not me. But you'll have signs you will have feelings. And you will hear stuff, it's not going to be a voice again, but you will hear messages. And and that will come maybe in your dreams, maybe through another person that you're talking to. But the important thing is, one has got to be in a place to be able to hear and receive, I believe this is of   Michael Hingson  56:04 everybody. And there's the reality of   Sylvia Bartley  56:07 it still. And this is where the mindfulness and the spirituality comes into it. Being sterile. Whether you're meditating or just being still and tapping into silence, this is when you're in a best place to receive and understand what it is that your assignment and your purposes, this is, when you're in your best place to receive those messages that you're so desperately seeking that you know, and to receive that guidance. And that's a big part of spirituality, together with doing things that prepares your vessel because we are physical matter, right. And our spirits live within us, we house our spirit, and we house our soul. And, you know, I focus on trying to keep my vessel as healthy as possible. So it's in a good strong place to house my spirit, and my soul is all intertwined. You know, it's very complicated, very deep. But that is a big part of it. So we are, you know, it, we're in a flamed body, we have inflammation due to the fact that we're eating foods that are inflammatory, and we have inflamed guts, and we're having, you know, inflamed neurons in our brain, because we're in flames that got inflamed the brain to I believe, and we're having a chronic illness, it's very difficult for us to do what we're supposed to do on this earth. And so, you know, our physical being, and health is obviously very important. And it ties closely with our emotional health, as well,   Michael Hingson  57:36 I think it is possible to hear a voice. But again, I think it all comes down to exactly what you said, we get messages in many ways, because God or the universe is is always trying to talk to people. And I think we have, oftentimes, selectively and collectively chosen to ignore it, because we think we know all the answers. And if there's one thing I've learned in 72 years, we don't necessarily know the answers, but the answers are available if we look for them. And I think that's really what you're saying, which goes back to being calm, being quiet, taking time to, to analyze, we're in the process of writing a book. Finally, for the moment, called a guide dogs Guide to Being brave, which is all about learning to control fear and learning that fear does not need to be blinding as I describe it, or paralyzing or whatever you want to call it. But that it can be an absolutely helpful thing in teaching you to make decisions, but you need to learn to control it. And you need to learn to recognize its value, just like we need to learn to recognize the value of pain or anything else in our lives. And, in fact, if we do that, and we we recognize what fear can really do for us by slowing down by analyzing by internalizing, we will be much stronger for it. And we're more apt to hear that voice that oftentimes people just call that quiet voice that we may not hear.   Sylvia Bartley  59:14 Mm hmm. Absolutely agree.   Michael Hingson  59:18 So it's, it's, it is a challenge because we're not used to doing that. We don't like giving up control, if you will. Yep,   Sylvia Bartley  59:26 yep. But once you know, and everyone will get there once we, for me, once I got there is a journey doesn't happen overnight. It can take years to get to that place. But you know, once you get there, it's so enlightening. And you just feel like it's funny, there's not there's not often a feel like I might directly on path and purpose. And I get a glimpse of it once in a while. And it feels so different. It feels so light, it feels so right. And that's where I want to be for, you know, a majority of my time that I have left in his lifetime, I want to feel that by the time so that is my, that is my goal.   Michael Hingson  1:00:05 And the more you seek it, the more of it you'll find. Yeah, hopefully, you will. It's it's all a matter of realizing it's there if we look for it, and it may not show up exactly the way we expected. But so the issue is really that it shows up, right?   Sylvia Bartley  1:00:24 It is. And yeah, I read somewhere that says, you know, just be open, just really try your best show up. Because people say, How do you know your own path and purpose? How do you know this is right for me, you know, you got to show up, you got to do your best. And you got to give it all you've got, and you got to let it go. Let it go to the universe and have no expectation for the outcome. But just be open to all kinds of possibilities and where that will lead you. Very hard to do. Yeah. And it's   Michael Hingson  1:00:53 always appropriate to ask the question, Did I do my best? Did I did I get the message? Am I missing something? And look for the answer? Yes, Sylvia, this has been a lot of fun. We have spent an hour and we didn't even have a snowball fight Darn. too hot for that. It's it's gonna be over 90. We're cooling down out here right now. We were over 100 for the last 10 days. So it's hot here in California. But I really enjoyed having you. How can people reach out to you or learn more about you?   Sylvia Bartley  1:01:30 Excellent. Thank you for asking that question. I think if you go to my website, I have a little website here. And it's sylvia-bartley.com. That is S Y L V I A hyphen, B A R T L E Y.com. And you can you know, just tell you a bit more about me. You can see my podcasts, my books, and there's a method of getting in touch with me if you want to.   Michael Hingson  1:01:57 Is the podcast available in a variety of different places? Or is the best website?   Sylvia Bartley  1:02:04 It's available on multiple platforms? Apple, Google, Spotify. And what's the community show with Dr. Sylvia? Conversations cultivating change? Do the   Michael Hingson  1:02:17 first part again. The more we know Community, the more we know. Okay.   Sylvia Bartley  1:02:22 Community show with Dr. Sylvia. Conversations cultivating change.   Michael Hingson  1:02:28 And I hope that people will seek you out. This has been for me very fascinating. I love learning new things and getting a chance to meet fascinating people. And I'll buy into the fact that you're a unicorn, it works for me.   Sylvia Bartley  1:02:46 Well, I'm just me, you know, but I appreciate the invite to be on your podcast, Michael. And thank you very much for providing this platform to share stories and information with your listeners too.   Michael Hingson  1:02:59 Thank you and we love stories and if people would love to comment, I really appreciate it if you would. I'd love to hear from you about this. You can reach out to me at Mic

Empowered Relationship Podcast: Your Relationship Resource And Guide
ERP 354: How Trauma Affects The Brain & Relationships — An Interview With Ana Gabriel Mann

Empowered Relationship Podcast: Your Relationship Resource And Guide

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 54:49


Our personal history can shape the way we perceive and react to the behavior of others and the types of relationships we form. If we have experienced neglect or abuse in the past, it may be more difficult for us to trust others and form close relationships. We may also be more prone to anxiety or depression. On the other hand, if we had a supportive and nurturing upbringing, we may be more confident and able to form healthy, positive relationships. In this episode, Ana Gabriel Mann discusses the use of neurofeedback as a treatment for trauma and other issues such as PTSD, brain injury, and processing disorders. They describe the process of neurofeedback and how it can be used to specifically target and address specific areas of the brain that may be over or understimulated. She also emphasizes the importance of self-care and the role it plays in healing and personal growth. Ana Gabriel Mann earned her Master's degree in clinical psychology before going on to serve as an educator, therapist, and corporate trainer. She currently coaches Go-Giver Marriage clients and leads the Go-Giver Marriage Coaches Training Program. Check out the transcript of this episode on Dr. Jessica Higgin's website. In this episode 6:45 Exploring the use of authentic movement in processing and healing trauma. 11:57 The importance of boundaries in therapy, particularly in couples therapy.  22:47 Understanding and managing flooding and multigenerational PTSD with EEG neurofeedback therapy.  29:03  The Benefits of Neurofeedback Therapy for Managing Trauma and Overaroused Nervous Systems. 37:12 Neurofeedback for trauma, brain injury, and processing disorders: How EEG therapy can help regulate brain function and promote healing. 48:46 The importance of prioritizing self-care in trauma healing and personal growth. 51:42 How they're helping individuals and couples. Mentioned The Go-Giver Marriage: A Little Story About the Five Secrets to Lasting Love (*Amazon Affiliate link) (book) Sharing Resources (*Google form) ERP 270: How to Resolve Relational Trauma in the Body through Dance & Movement – An Interview with Orit Krug Connect with Ana Gabriel Mann Websites: gogivermarriage.com Facebook: facebook.com/anagabrielmann Twitter: twitter.com/AnaGabrielMann Instagram: instagram.com/AnaGabrielMann Connect with Dr. Jessica Higgins Facebook: facebook.com/EmpoweredRelationship  Instagram: instagram.com/drjessicahiggins  Podcast: drjessicahiggins.com/podcasts/ Pinterest: pinterest.com/EmpowerRelation  LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/drjessicahiggins  Twitter: @DrJessHiggins  Website: drjessicahiggins.com   Email: jessica@drjessicahiggins.com If you have a topic you would like me to discuss, please contact me by clicking on the “Ask Dr. Jessica Higgins” button here.  Thank you so much for your interest in improving your relationship.  Also, I would so appreciate your honest rating and review. Please leave a review by clicking here.  Thank you!   *With Amazon Affiliate Links, I may earn a few cents from Amazon, if you purchase the book from this link.  

PaperPlayer biorxiv neuroscience
A Convolutional Autoencoder-based Explainable Clustering Approach for Resting-State EEG Analysis

PaperPlayer biorxiv neuroscience

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023


Link to bioRxiv paper: http://biorxiv.org/cgi/content/short/2023.01.04.522805v1?rss=1 Authors: Ellis, C. A., Miller, R., Calhoun, V. Abstract: Machine learning methods have frequently been applied to electroencephalography (EEG) data. However, while supervised EEG classification is well-developed, relatively few studies have clustered EEG, which is problematic given the potential for clustering EEG to identify novel subtypes or patterns of dynamics that could improve our understanding of neuropsychiatric disorders. There are established methods for clustering EEG using manually extracted features that reduce the richness of the feature space for clustering, but only a couple studies have sought to use deep learning-based approaches with automated feature learning to cluster EEG. Those studies involve separately training an autoencoder and then performing clustering on the extracted features, and the separation of those steps can lead to poor quality clustering. In this study, we propose an explainable convolutional autoencoder-based approach that combines model training with clustering to yield high quality clusters. We apply the approach within the context of schizophrenia (SZ), identifying 8 EEG states characterized by varying levels of {delta} activity. We also find that individuals who spend more time outside of the dominant state tend to have increased negative symptom severity. Our approach represents a significant step forward for clustering resting-state EEG data and has the potential to lead to novel findings across a variety of neurological and neuropsychological disorders in future years. Copy rights belong to original authors. Visit the link for more info Podcast created by Paper Player, LLC

PaperPlayer biorxiv neuroscience
Personalized alpha-tACS targeting left posterior parietal cortex modulates visuo-spatial attention and posterior evoked EEG activity

PaperPlayer biorxiv neuroscience

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023


Link to bioRxiv paper: http://biorxiv.org/cgi/content/short/2023.01.04.522700v1?rss=1 Authors: Radecke, J.-O., Fiene, M., Misselhorn, J., Herrmann, C. S., Engel, A. K., Wolters, C. H., Schneider, T. R. Abstract: Background: Covert visuo-spatial attention is marked by the anticipatory lateralization of neuronal alpha activity in the posterior parietal cortex. Previous applications of transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) at the alpha frequency, however, were inconclusive regarding the causal contribution of oscillatory activity during visuo-spatial attention. Objective: Attentional shifts of behavior and electroencephalography (EEG) after-effects were assessed in a cued visuo-spatial attention paradigm. We hypothesized that parietal alpha-tACS facilitates attention in the ipsilateral visual hemifield. Furthermore, we assumed that modulations of behavior and neurophysiology are related to individual electric field simulations. Methods: We applied personalized tACS at alpha and gamma frequencies to elucidate the role of oscillatory neuronal activity for visuo-spatial attention. Personalized tACS montages were algorithmically optimized to target individual left and right parietal regions that were defined by an EEG localizer. Results: Behavioral performance in the left hemifield was specifically increased by alpha-tACS compared to gamma-tACS targeting the left parietal cortex. This hemisphere-specific effect was observed despite the symmetry of simulated electric fields. In addition, visual event-related potential (ERP) amplitudes showed a reduced lateralization over posterior sites induced by left alpha-tACS. Neuronal sources of this effect were localized in the left premotor cortex. Interestingly, accuracy modulations induced by left parietal alpha-tACS were directly related to electric field magnitudes in the left premotor cortex. Conclusion: Overall, results corroborate the notion that alpha lateralization plays a causal role in covert visuo-spatial attention and indicate an increased susceptibility of parietal and premotor brain regions of the left dorsal attention network to subtle tACS-neuromodulation. Copy rights belong to original authors. Visit the link for more info Podcast created by Paper Player, LLC

Biohacking Beauty
Ben Azadi: How to Stress Your Body for Greater Longevity

Biohacking Beauty

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 56:00


Welcome to another episode of the Biohacking Beauty podcast brought to you by Young Goose Skincare! In this episode, host Amitay Eshel, the CEO of Young Goose, is joined by Ben Azadi. Ben is the author of four best-selling books, Keto Flex, The Perfect Health Booklet, The Intermittent Fasting Cheat Sheet, and The Power of Sleep. Ben has been the go-to source for intermittent fasting and the ketogenic diet. He is known as ‘The Health Detective' because he investigates dysfunction, and he educates, not medicates, to bring the body back to normal function. Ben is the founder of Keto Kamp; a global brand bringing awareness to ancient healing strategies such as the keto diet and fasting. Ben is the host of a top 15 podcast, The Keto Kamp Podcast which won Keto Podcast of The Year (2022) by The Metabolic Health Summit. Ben has the fast growing Keto Kamp YouTube channel with over 150,000 subscribers, and TikTok channel with over 285,000 subscribers and over 46 million video downloads.Key Takeaways:Contrary to popular belief, you need to expose your body to stressors regularly if you want to optimize your health. This is because by exposing your body to stress, it adapts itself to it in a way where it becomes stronger and more resilient over time.When it comes to achieving optimal health and longevity, the foundations are important because you need to have that strong foundation to build a strong house.What you think is what you attract — and the RAS is responsible for it.The reticular activating system (RAS) is a network of neurons located in the brain stem that project anteriorly to the hypothalamus to mediate behavior, as well as both posteriorly to the thalamus and directly to the cortex for activation of awake, desynchronized cortical EEG patterns.Because you could be purchasing the best supplements in the world and following the best exercise routines, but if your foundations are weak, that house of yours will fall apart.While it's difficult to restrict your calories by eating less - and dangerous for your health if incorrectly done - there are some different techniques you can tap into to mimic those survival mechanisms that take place during caloric restriction. According to Ben, intermittent fasting is the best way as it has similar benefits without the drawbacks if you do it right.Fine more from Ben:Website: https://www.benazadi.com/Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-keto-kamp-podcast-with-ben-azadi/id1470779784Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thebenazadi/Find more from Young Goose:Website: https://www.younggoose.com/Instagram: @young_goose_skincareGet 20% off your first purchase by using code PODCAST20 at www.younggoose.com

PaperPlayer biorxiv neuroscience
Facial representation comparisons between human brain and deep convolutional neural network reveal a fatigue repetition suppression mechanism

PaperPlayer biorxiv neuroscience

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023


Link to bioRxiv paper: http://biorxiv.org/cgi/content/short/2023.01.02.522298v1?rss=1 Authors: Lu, Z., Ku, Y. Abstract: Repetition suppression for faces, a phenomenon that neural responses are reduced to repeated faces in the visual cortex, have long been studied. However, the underlying primary neural mechanism of repetition suppression remains debated. In recent years, artificial neural networks can achieve the performance of face recognition at human level. In our current study, we combined human electroencephalogram (EEG) and the deep convolutional neural network (DCNN) and applied reverse engineering to provide a novel way to investigate the neural mechanisms of facial repetition suppression. First, we used brain decoding approach to explore the representations of faces and demonstrates its repetition suppression effect in human brains. Then we constructed two repetition suppression models, Fatigue and Sharpening models, to modify the activation of DCNNs and conducted cross-modal representational similarity analysis (RSA) comparisons between human EEG signals and activations in two modified DCNNs, respectively. We found that representations of human brains were more similar to representations of Fatigue-modified DCNN instead of Sharpening modified DCNN. Our results suggests that the facial repetition suppression effect in face perception is more likely caused by the fatigue mechanism suggesting that the activation of neurons with stronger responses to face stimulus would be attenuated more. Therefore, the current study supports the fatigue mechanism as a more plausible neural mechanism of facial repetition suppression. The comparison between representations in the human brain and DCNN provides a promising tool to simulate and infer the brain mechanism underlying human behaviors. Copy rights belong to original authors. Visit the link for more info Podcast created by Paper Player, LLC

PaperPlayer biorxiv neuroscience
Incorporating models of subcortical processing improves the ability to predict EEG responses to natural speech

PaperPlayer biorxiv neuroscience

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023


Link to bioRxiv paper: http://biorxiv.org/cgi/content/short/2023.01.02.522438v1?rss=1 Authors: Lindboom, E., Nidiffer, A., Carney, L. H., Lalor, E. C. Abstract: The goal of describing how the human brain responds to complex acoustic stimuli has driven auditory neuroscience research for decades. Often, a systems-based approach has been taken, in which neurophysiological responses are modeled based on features of the presented stimulus. This includes a wealth of work modeling electroencephalogram (EEG) responses to complex acoustic stimuli such as speech. Examples of the acoustic features used in such modeling include the amplitude envelope and spectrogram of speech. These models implicitly assume a direct mapping from stimulus representation to cortical activity. However, in reality, the representation of sound is transformed as it passes through early stages of the auditory pathway, such that inputs to the cortex are fundamentally different from the raw audio signal that was presented. Thus, it could be valuable to account for the transformations taking place in lower-order auditory areas, such as the auditory nerve, cochlear nucleus, and inferior colliculus (IC) when predicting cortical responses to complex sounds. Specifically, because IC responses are more similar to cortical inputs than acoustic features derived directly from the audio signal, we hypothesized that linear mappings (temporal response functions; TRFs) fit to the outputs of an IC model would better predict EEG responses to speech stimuli. To this end, we modeled responses to the acoustic stimuli as they passed through the auditory nerve, cochlear nucleus, and inferior colliculus before fitting a TRF to the output of the modeled IC responses. Results showed that using model-IC responses in traditional systems analyses resulted in better predictions of EEG activity than using the envelope or spectrogram of a speech stimulus. Further, it was revealed that model-IC derived TRFs predict different aspects of the EEG than acoustic-feature TRFs, and combining both types of TRF models provides a more accurate prediction of the EEG response. Copy rights belong to original authors. Visit the link for more info Podcast created by Paper Player, LLC

PaperPlayer biorxiv neuroscience
Garments that measure EEG: Evaluation of an EEG sensor layer fully implemented with smart textiles

PaperPlayer biorxiv neuroscience

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023


Link to bioRxiv paper: http://biorxiv.org/cgi/content/short/2022.12.31.522227v1?rss=1 Authors: Lopez-Larraz, E., Escolano, C., Robledo, A., Morlas, L., Alda, A., Minguez, J. Abstract: This paper presents the first garment capable of measuring EEG activity with accuracy comparable to state-of-the art dry EEG systems. The main innovation is an EEG sensor layer (i.e., the electrodes, the signal transmission, and the cap support) fully implemented as a garment, using threads, fabrics and smart textiles, without relying on any metal or plastic materials. The garment is interfaced via a connector to a mobile EEG amplifier to complete the measurement system. The new EEG system (Garment-EEG) has been characterized with respect to a state-of-the-art Ag/AgCl dry-EEG system (Dry-EEG) over the forehead area of healthy participants in terms of: (1) skin-electrode impedance; (2) electrophysiological measurements (spontaneous and evoked EEG activity); (3) artifacts; and (4) user ergonomics and comfort. The results show that the Garment-EEG system provides comparable recordings to Dry-EEG, but it is more prone to getting affected by artifacts in adverse recording conditions due to poorer contact impedances. Ergonomics and comfort favor the textile-based sensor layer with respect to its metal-based counterpart. User acceptance is the main obstacle for EEG systems to democratize neurotechnology and non-invasive brain-computer interfaces. EEG sensor layers encapsulated in wearables have the potential to enable neurotechnology that is naturally accepted by people in their daily lives. Furthermore, by supporting the EEG implementation in the textile industry it is manufactured with lower cost and much less pollution compared to the metal and plastic industries. Copy rights belong to original authors. Visit the link for more info Podcast created by Paper Player, LLC

SOUNDWAVE
Joshua Bruner

SOUNDWAVE

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 51:33


Today's guest deejay is Joshua Bruner. I had the good fortune of meeting Joshua through Nick Turner, AKA Tyresta, when I asked him who he thought would share a mix on Soundwave. Nick's music and his mix for Soundwave are lovely. When Nick suggested Joshua, I was immediately on board. I ask every guest deejay on Soundwave who would share a mix on the show. It's a simple thing, but over the last few years, it has led to meeting some extremely talented people and turned me on to fantastic music that I am confident I would've never discovered on my own, let alone singular mixes curated by each guest deejay. Joshua's mix is yet another example. I don't know any of the musicians he included in his playlist. That's no slight to them. They're all fantastic. There's just too much music to listen to. Joshua has selected breathtaking tracks for his mix. I'm listening to it as I write this. His mix seamlessly blends with my night of rain pattering on my roof and the whoosh of jets flying to a nearby airport. It's quite the experience, which is why I'm always asking who should guest deejay on Soundwave. Joshua has some words about his mix below. Join us next week when our guest deejay will be Enrico Coniglio. See you then. This episode will be released just a few days before my 43rd birthday! Sometime in January or February, I expect to release an album on vinyl in collaboration with Alyssa Miserendino, someone I would highly recommend for a future mix. I'm excited about this record because it includes field recordings she captured in South America with Gordon Hempton, aka The Sound Tracker. I used a brainwave sonification technique using an EEG to trigger selected samples from their recordings of a unique bird called the Oropendola. David Behrman “Music with Melody-Driven Electronics” Gordon Hempton “Om Telephone Wire” Klaus Wiese “Mystic Landscapes II” Alvin Lucier “B. 2” Gordon Hempton “Back of the Cave” David Behrman “Music with Melody-Driven Electronics" --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/soundwavemix/message

Priorité santé
L'électroencéphalogramme: enregistrer l'activité électrique du cerveau

Priorité santé

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 48:30


L'électroencéphalogramme (EEG) est un examen qui permet de mesurer et d'enregistrer l'activité électrique du cerveau. L'EEG est utile dans le bilan des malaises, le diagnostic et le suivi de l'épilepsie, mais également pour d'autres pathologies neurologiques : origine de certains comas, et chez le nouveau-né dans tous les cas de souffrance cérébrale. Cet examen n'engendre aucune douleur. En quoi consiste l'interprétation d'un EEG ?  Comment se passe un EEG de sommeil ?  Dans quel cas cet examen est-il prescrit ? Dr Gilles Huberfeld, neurologue et épileptologue à la Fondation Rothschild, à Paris et chercheur au Collège de France Pr Fodé Cissé, chef de service de Neurologie au CHU Ignace Deen de Conakry en Guinée Coline Gagne, assistante à domicile auprès de personnes âgées handicapées ; et déléguée suppléante de la délégation Épilepsie France du département du Lot-et-Garonne. (Rediffusion)

Priorité santé
L'électroencéphalogramme: enregistrer l'activité électrique du cerveau

Priorité santé

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 48:30


L'électroencéphalogramme (EEG) est un examen qui permet de mesurer et d'enregistrer l'activité électrique du cerveau. L'EEG est utile dans le bilan des malaises, le diagnostic et le suivi de l'épilepsie, mais également pour d'autres pathologies neurologiques : origine de certains comas, et chez le nouveau-né dans tous les cas de souffrance cérébrale. Cet examen n'engendre aucune douleur. En quoi consiste l'interprétation d'un EEG ?  Comment se passe un EEG de sommeil ?  Dans quel cas cet examen est-il prescrit ? Dr Gilles Huberfeld, neurologue et épileptologue à la Fondation Rothschild, à Paris et chercheur au Collège de France Pr Fodé Cissé, chef de service de Neurologie au CHU Ignace Deen de Conakry en Guinée Coline Gagne, assistante à domicile auprès de personnes âgées handicapées ; et déléguée suppléante de la délégation Épilepsie France du département du Lot-et-Garonne. (Rediffusion)

OHBM Neurosalience
S3E8: Arno Villringer - Pioneer in susceptibility contrast and NIRS and exploring the edges of neurology

OHBM Neurosalience

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 99:16


In this discussion, we start with his pioneering work on developing susceptibility contrast for imaging perfusion while at MGH, and then his pioneering work on developing Near Infrared Spectroscopy, and using this approach to help validate fMRI contrast and shed some light on it. After this we discuss a wide range of topics that his group has been working on - falling into the categories of either methods development or mind-body interactions. He has played a major role in many insightful studies that include those using simultaneous EEG and fMRI, and looking at neuromodulation, brain plasticity, subliminal stimulation and processing, and resting state fMRI. He has been perfectly positioned and extremely active over the years to not only add to cutting edge methods and understanding of the brain, but to carry these over into eventual clinical practice. Guest: Arno Villringer, M.D. is the Director of the Department of Neurology at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig. He is also the Director of the Department of Cognitive Neurology at Leipzig University Hospital, and Professor of Cognitive Neurology, Leipzig University. In addition he's Director of the MindBrainInstitute Berlin School of Mind and Brain. Arno received his MD in 1984 from Albert Ludwig University Freiburg in Germany and did a short but highly impactful fellowship at the MGH NMR Center in Boston. From 1986 to 1993, he was in Munich at the Ludwig Maximilian University department of Neurology. From 1993 to 2007 he was at Charité University Medicine in Berlin in the Department of Neurology, working up to Vice Chairman. Finally in 2007 he took on his primary role as Director of the Department of Neurology at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig.

Gwatney Unplugged
Author Larry Flaxman

Gwatney Unplugged

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 21:47


Larry Flaxman is a best-selling author and researcher on a mission to inform, empower, and entertain anyone interested in the paranormal and “fringe” science! His books include “11:11 – The Time Prompt Phenomenon: The Meaning Behind Mysterious Signs, Sequences and Synchronicities,” “The Grid: Exploring the Hidden Infrastructure of Reality,” and “Viral Mythology: How the Truth of the Ancients was Encoded and Passed Down through Legend, Art, and Architecture,” Flaxman continues to write ground-breaking books on cutting-edge research that leave readers, researchers, and reviewers open-mouthed in disbelief. Flaxman has been involved in paranormal research and field investigation for over two decades, with a focus on seeking to apply the scientific approach to unexplained events. With his experience in integrating quantum physics (particularly entanglement and the observer effect) to human consciousness via “real-time” EEG monitoring of the experiencer, Flaxman is revolutionizing the area of paranormal research. He is the President and Senior Researcher of the Arkansas Paranormal and Anomalous Studies Team (ARPAST), which has grown to be one of the most prestigious paranormal research groups in the country. Widely respected for his advances in the field, Flaxman has appeared on the History Channel's popular show “Ancient Aliens”, the Travel Channel show “Portals to Hell”, Discovery Channel's “Ghost Lab” as well as the History Channel special expose “Time Beings: Extreme Time Travel Conspiracies.”

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 12.20.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 62:38 Very Popular


Videos : The Covid Redemption with Tim Robbins – #048 – Stay Free with Russell Brand MP calls for complete suspension of mRNA jab in extraordinary British Parliamentary speech Turmeric studied for its ability to seek out and destroy cancer stem cells, the source of all tumors Montclair State University, December 13, 202 Turmeric has gained immense popularity over the years not just for the unique flavor it adds to dishes like curries, but also for its various health benefits. One of its most promising therapeutic applications is as a natural remedy for cancer. Although the anticancer potential of turmeric isn't new, a recent study published in Cancer Letters further proved the importance of this golden spice in understanding and treating cancer. The team of American researchers evaluated the ability of curcumin, which is a polyphenol in turmeric, to target cancer stem cells that are assumed to be the primary cause of cancer tumor formation and malignancy. Unlike conventional cancer models used in previous studies, the cancer stem cell model suggests that only a small population of cancer cells drive the initiation, maintenance, and growth of tumors. These stem cells regularly undergo renewal and differentiation into other cancer cells, which no longer have the ability to regenerate themselves. Therefore, in this model, cancer stem cells that are not killed by treatments lead to the formation of more invasive and treatment-resistant tumors. In this study, the researchers found that curcumin is more effective in eradicating cancer since unlike conventional treatments, this polyphenol also targets cancer stem cells. It can do so through various mechanisms of action, which include the following. Regulation of cancer stem cell self-renewal pathway — There are different pathways involved in the self-renewal of cancer stem cells. These include the Wnt/beta-catenin, sonic hedgehog 89 (SHH), and Notch pathways. The researchers found that curcumin can directly or indirectly interfere with these pathways in 12 different cancer cell lines Modulation of microRNA — The body contains microRNAs, which are short RNA sequences that don't encode for anything. These microRNAs regulate more than 33 percent of protein-coding genes by targeting and binding to their corresponding messenger RNAs so that these won't be expressed. In this study, the authors observed that curcumin altered microRNA expression in cancer stem cells so that they can't produce everything that they need for tumor formation and growth. Direct anti-cancer activity — Curcumin selectively targets cancer cells and programs their death. When used in conjunction with conventional anticancer agents, this effect becomes more evident and the damage typically caused by chemotherapy is no longer observed. Overall, the results of this study show that for cancer treatments to be effective, they have to target and kill cancer stem cells just like turmeric does. Otherwise, these cancer stem cells will pave the way for the formation of more invasive and treatment-resistant tumors. (NEXT) Chiropractic spinal manipulation associated with reduction in low back surgery University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, December 19, 2022 A recent study from University Hospitals (UH) Connor Whole Health has found that adults who initially visit a chiropractor to receive spinal manipulation for low back pain caused by disc herniation or radiculopathy (i.e., sciatica) are less likely to undergo discectomy (i.e., disc surgery) over the subsequent two years. This study was recently published in the journal BMJ Open. In this retrospective cohort study, the authors selected adult patients, age 18 to 49, from a 101 million patient United States health records network (TriNetX, Cambridge, MA, U.S.). Patients with serious pathology or urgent indications for surgery were excluded from the study. Ultimately, the authors identified 5,785 patients who initially received chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy, and the same number of patients who received other forms of medical care for their low back pain. The authors used a statistical technique called propensity score matching to control for variables that could influence the likelihood that patients would undergo discectomy. In this process, they matched patients in both cohorts according to several such as age, sex, obesity, smoking, previous injections, and medications. The authors found that patients who initially received chiropractic spinal manipulation for their low back pain were significantly less likely to undergo lumbar discectomy through two years' follow-up. At one year follow-up, 1.5% of the patients in the chiropractic cohort had undergone discectomy, compared to 2.2% of patients in the cohort receiving other care At two years' follow-up, 1.9% of the patients in the chiropractic cohort had undergone discectomy, compared to 2.4% of patients in the cohort receiving other care This study represents the first study to examine whether chiropractic care is associated with a reduction in likelihood of discectomy. (NEXT) High-intensity exercise delays Parkinson's progression Northwestern Medicine and University of Denver, December 11, 2022 High-intensity exercise three times a week is safe for individuals with early-stage Parkinson's disease and decreases worsening of motor symptoms, according to a new phase 2, multi-site trial led by Northwestern Medicine and University of Denver scientists. This is the first time scientists have tested the effects of high-intensity exercise on patients with Parkinson's disease, the second most common neurodegenerative disorder and the most common movement disorder, affecting more than a million people in the United States. It previously had been thought high-intensity exercise was too physically stressful for individuals with Parkinson's disease. “If you have Parkinson's disease and you want to delay the progression of your symptoms, you should exercise three times a week with your heart rate between 80 to 85 percent maximum. Because medications for Parkinson's have adverse side effects and reduced effectiveness over time, new treatments are needed. The randomized clinical trial included 128 participants ages 40 to 80 years old from Northwestern University, Rush University Medical Center, the University of Colorado and the University of Pittsburgh. Participants enrolled in the Study in Parkinson Disease of Exercise (SPARX) were at an early stage of the disease and not taking Parkinson's medication, ensuring the results of the study were related to the exercise and not affected by medication. “The earlier in the disease you intervene, the more likely it is you can prevent the progression of the disease,” Corcos said. “We delayed worsening of symptoms for six months; whether we can prevent progression any longer than six months will require further study.” Scientists examined the safety and effects of exercise three times weekly for six months at high intensity, 80 to 85 percent of maximum heart rate, and moderate intensity, 60 to 65 percent of maximum heart rate. They compared the results to a control group who did not exercise. After six months, participants were rated by clinicians on a Parkinson's disease scale ranging from 0 to 108. The higher the number, the more severe the symptoms. Participants in the study had a score of about 20 before exercise. Those in the high intensity group stayed at 20. The group with moderate exercise got worse by 1.5 points. The group that did not exercise worsened by three points. Three points out of a score of 20 points is a 15 percent change in the primary signs of the disease and considered clinically important to patients. It makes a difference in their quality of life. (NEXT) Meditation adapts the brain to respond better to feedback University of Surrey UK, December 11, 2022 In a study in the Journal of Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience researchers from the University of Surrey have discovered a link between meditation and how individuals respond to feedback. Participants in the study, a mixture of experienced, novice and non-meditators, were trained to select images associated with a reward. Each pair of images had varying probabilities of a reward e.g. images that result in a reward 80 per cent of the time versus those that result in a reward 20 per cent of the time. Participants eventually learnt to select the pairing with the higher outcome. Researchers found that participants who meditated were more successful in selecting high-probability pairings indicating a tendency to learn from positive outcomes, compared to non – meditators who learned the pattern via low-probability pairings suggesting a tendency to learn from negative outcomes. During the study participants were connected to an EEG, a non-invasive method that records electrical patterns in the brain. Results from the EEG found that while all three groups responded similarly to positive feedback, the neurological response to negative feedback was highest in the non-meditation group, followed by the novice group and then by the experienced meditation group. These results indicate that the brains of meditators are less affected by negative feedback, and that this may be a result of altered dopamine levels caused by meditation. Paul Knytl, lead author and PhD candidate in psychology at the University of Surrey, said: “Humans have been meditating for over 2000 years, but the neural mechanisms of this practice are still relatively unknown. These findings demonstrate that, on a deep level, meditators respond to feedback in a more even-handed way than non-meditators, which may help to explain some of the psychological benefits they experience from the practice.” (NEXT) Caution to pregnant women on red meat diabetes link University of Adelaide (Australia) December 12, 2022 Pregnant women and women planning to become pregnant can make use of the holiday season to adjust their diets and reduce the risk of gestational diabetes, according to researchers at the University of Adelaide's Robinson Institute. The recommendation comes at a time when there is increasing evidence to suggest that red meat is linked with a higher rate of gestational diabetes in pregnant women, which poses risks to the health of both the mother and the baby. In a commentary published in the jjournal Evidence-Based Nursing, author Philippa Middleton says the latest international research shows that women who eat a lot of red and processed meats even before they become pregnant have a significant risk of developing gestational diabetes. “There have been several reports linking red meat with increased risk of type 2 diabetes, and now the work of a number of research teams worldwide is showing this link for diabetes during pregnancy,” says Ms Middleton, who is one of the Robinson Institute's research leaders. “While this news is alarming, there are also some positives. The latest research from the United States has shown that eating fish and poultry does not increase the risk of gestational diabetes, and consuming more vegetable and non-meat protein is associated with a reduction in risk. “For example, just over half a serving of nuts per day can reduce the risk of gestational diabetes by 40%.” “Based on current evidence, pregnant women or women planning to become pregnant should consider eating more vegetable protein, and nuts, and replacing some red meat with fish and poultry. (NEXT) Treatment for lupus may depend on restoring proteins in patients' blood Singapore General Hospital, December 19, 2022 Restoring protein balance in the blood may be key to developing an effective treatment for lupus. The incurable autoimmune disease reportedly affects about 100 in every 100,000 people worldwide, and disproportionally affects women between 15 and 45 years-old and Asians. Lupus causes the body's immune system to attack itself, which can inflame several vital organs like the kidneys, brain, heart, and lungs. The aggressive nature of the disease is what makes it life-threatening for many who have it, especially since current treatments don't help that much. “We are excited about the possibility of a new treatment option for lupus as 30 to 60 percent of patients do not respond to conventional medications despite aggressive regimens. In the past 65 years, only three drugs for lupus have been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration but these drugs have modest efficacy. There is therefore a real and urgent need for better therapies, particularly for the more severe spectrum of lupus that we see in Asia,” says senior author Andrea Low, the Head and Senior Consultant in the Department of Rheumatology & Immunology at Singapore General Hospital (SGH), in a media release. To reach their findings, Low and her team studied CXCL5, a protein that helps to regulate the immune system through neutrophils, which are a type of white blood cell. They revealed that lupus patients had considerably lower levels of the protein in their blood compared to healthy people, thus suggesting that it may have a connection to the disease. They also discovered that mice with severe lupus injected weekly with CXCL5 displayed restored protein balance. Moreover, their survival outcomes increased from 25 percent to over 75 percent after 10 weeks. Not only did the injections reduce mortality risk, but they didn't cause any adverse side-effects, study authors report. “Our study has shown CXCL5 to be safe. There was no liver or kidney toxicity or cancer inducing effects. Major components of the immune system were also not compromised,” reports principal investigator Dr Fan Xiubo, Senior Research Fellow, Department of Clinical Translational Research, SGH. The entire team is hopeful that they can continue to build on their research to better the lives of patient's suffering from this debilitating disease. “To be in the forefront of medicine means we have to constantly further our understanding of diseases and offer patients better treatment options through rigorous scientific research. I'm heartened that the team has shed new light on lupus and the possibility of a more efficacious therapy for patients some years down the road,” says Professor Fong Kok Yong, Deputy Group CEO (Medical and Clinical Services), SingHealth, and Senior Consultant, Department Rheumatology & Immunology, SGH

Sleep4Performance Radio
Season 8, Episode 2 w Melanie Furrer on Sleep in Reindeer, a Christmas Special

Sleep4Performance Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 28:09


Changes in reindeer sleep regulation across the year: a central role for rumination? In this episode, I am joined by Melanie Furrer, who recently presented her study on sleep in reindeer. Most non-hibernating animals maintain daily “circadian ”rhythms of sleep across the year, as well as “homeostatic” sleep-wake patterns in which increasing time awake is followed by increased sleep amount or intensity. Strikingly, ruminant reindeer in the Arctic show 24-h rhythmicity at the equinoxes but none at either solstice; summertime activity greatly exceeds wintertime activity. So far, nothing is known about their sleep or how it might be seasonally modulated. Methods: We simultaneously recorded non-invasive electroencephalography EEG in four adult female reindeer for four days at The Arctic University of Norway in Tromsø, Norway in July, September, and December. Rapid eye movement, REM sleep, non-REM NREM sleep, and rumination were visually identified from the EEG, and slow-wave activity SWA, EEG power 1–18 4.5 Hz during NREM sleep, the classic marker for homeostatic changes in sleep pressure, was calculated. Results: Although sleep in reindeer generally resembled that of other mammals, key novel adaptations were observed in July/September: n=4, December: n=3. Like most species, sleep-wake distribution paralleled daily activity during seasonally changing light-dark conditions and SWA during NREM sleep increased after prolonged wake periods. Surprisingly, total sleep duration was roughly equal across seasons, and prolonged waking produced a lower SWA response in summer than in winter. As reported for some domestic ruminants, EEG during rumination showed typical characteristics of NREM sleep. Furthermore, rumination appeared to substitute for sleep under all observed conditions. Accordingly, SWA decreased across rumination, and total rumination and NREM sleep durations were negatively correlated. Homeostatic modelling of SWA further suggested that rumination was equivalent to sleep. Conclusions: We suggest that less pronounced SWA increases across waking in summer might indicate higher baseline sleep pressure during this season, possibly resulting from increased activity, food intake and light exposure. Within this context, rumination might partially substitute conventional sleep, permitting near-constant feeding in the arctic summer while compensating for increased sleep pressure. Contact or follow Melanie https://www.kispi.uzh.ch/forschungszentrum/person/furrer-melanie. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Melanie-Furrer-2   Contact me at iandunican@sleep4performance.com.au or www.sleep4performance.com.au and check out the YouTube channel. Check out our sponsor LMNT. Click on the link to order and get a free LMNT Sample Pack when you order through the custom link below. Key details: • The LMNT Sample Pack includes 1 packet of every flavour. This is the perfect offer for anyone interested in trying all of our flavours or who wants to introduce a friend to LMNT. • This offer is exclusively available through VIP LMNT Partners – you won't find this offer publicly available. • This offer is available for new and returning customers • They offer refunds on all orders with no questions – you don't even have to send it back! DrinkLMNT.com/sleep4performance

The Guiding Voice
Entrepreneurial journey of a Physician | Kazutaka Yoshinaga | #TGV289

The Guiding Voice

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 21:32


Entrepreneurship journey of a medical doctor | Kazutaka Yoshinaga | #TGV289“Instead of freaking out about these constraints, embrace them. Let them guide you. Constraints drive innovation and force focus. Instead of trying to remove them, use them to your advantage”~37 SignalsTune into #TGV289 to get clarity on the above topic. Here are the timestamp-based pointers from Kazutaka Yoshinaga's conversation with Naveen Samala0:00:00 INTRODUCTION AND CONTEXT SETTING 0:02:00 Kazu's PROFESSIONAL JOURNEY, Success Mantra, AND THE TOP 3 THINGS THAT HELPED IN His SUCCESS0:04:45 Why Kazu got into entrepreneurship?0:06:15 Ideas he explored before launching MELP0:08:00 Toughest lessons learned in his entrepreneurship journey0:11:30 How Kazu sold his first company?0:13:00 How Kazu is approaching his next venture and resource requirements at his company0:16:00 About Japanese culture etc.0:18:00 WITTY ANSWERS TO THE RAPID-FIRE QUESTIONS0:19:30 ONE PIECE OF ADVICE TO THOSE ASPIRING TO MAKE BIG IN THEIR CAREERS 0:20:30 TRIVIA ABOUT Japan's transit Pushers ABOUT THE GUEST:Kazutaka ​​Yoshinaga is currently running his own healthcare company Melp (a chat-based online medical questionnaire), and also working as a physician. He likes to launch 0→1 services and computer programming. He would like to develop an ear-EEG platform for his next startup,. If you are curious about ear-EEG, please feel free to contact him.Connect with Kazu on LinkedIn:https://www.linkedin.com/in/kazu098/CONNECT WITH THE HOST ON LINKEDIN:Naveen Samala: https://www.linkedin.com/in/naveensamalahttp://www.naveensamala.comIf you wish to become a productivity monk: enroll for this course: https://www.udemy.com/course/productivitymonk/#productivitymonk #productivity #operationalexcellenceFOLLOW ON TWITTER:@guidingvoice@naveensamala Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Neural Implant podcast - the people behind Brain-Machine Interface revolutions
Lothar Krinke on adaptive Deep Brain Stimulation at Newronika

Neural Implant podcast - the people behind Brain-Machine Interface revolutions

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 35:07


Lothar Krinke is the CEO and Board Member of Newronika which is an adaptive Deep Brain Stimulator company looking to improve patient outcomes in things like Parkinson's and Essential Tremor. ***This podcast is sponsored by Iris Biomedical, check out their Neurotech Startup Services here*** Top 3 Takeaways: "the one thing we do need to address is really the cost. The cost driver of Deep Brain Stimulation isn't the manufacturing of the system. Now, that's not cheap either it's certainly less than $10,000. How expensive is brain surgery, particularly functional brain surgery? How expensive is it to have all the pre-operation preparation? So I think the field needs to think about how we can lower the cost of Deep Brain Stimulation to make it available to not hundreds of thousands of patients, but literally millions of patients." "I don't think AI or even machine learning has been sufficiently applied in our space. People do it and they talk about it, but if you look at other fields, even EEG, use of AI or machine learning are much more penetrated." "In my mind it is almost unconscionable that only 15% of patients that could benefit from Parkinsons, from DBS do. So somehow we need to have a battle cry. We need to have the responsibility to make this therapy available to more people. And the way to do that is less invasive more automation and lower cost" 0:45 Do you want to introduce yourself better than I just did? 2:15 "Why is Deep Brain Simulation so exciting for you?" 3:15 "Can explain what Deep Brain Stimulation is and what it's a treatment for?" 5:30 "How did you get into the field?" 6:30 Iris Biomedical ad sponsorship 7:15 You thought earlier that DBS was too invasive but now changed your mind, why? 8:15 What are the biggest impediments to DBS? 12:15 Why is the Newronika DBS better than the alternatives? 14:30 Why is adaptive DBS better? 16:30 "What are some of the biggest challenges right now at Newronika?" 20:30 You are in Minneapolis, West Virginia, and Milan, how are you able to travel so much? 21:30 "Why aren't you in Gainesville? I was surprised how big the DBS field is here." 22:15 "For people starting out in the field, do you have any advice?" 25:30 " What's a big mistake or wrong direction that you see researchers or people on your field going down?" 27:45 "Could you explain the beta and gamma waves?" 32:45 "Is there anything that we didn't talk about that you wanted to mention?"

Mind Body Peak Performance
Principles of Bioharmony for Health, Performance, & Quality of Life | Nick Urban @Outliyr

Mind Body Peak Performance

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 54:24


I called myself a “biohacker” for over a decade. Over the last few years, I started feeling uneasy about the term and where the industry is going. From my studies of effective ancient cultures and modern medical systems yielding the greatest results, I coined a new movement I call “bioharmony”. Thank you to our partners Outliyr Peak Performance Shop: get exclusive discounts on cutting-edge health, wellness, & performance gear Upgrade your brain with the FREE Outliyr Nootropics Mini-Course Key takeaways Bioharmonization is the more effective and safer alternative to biohacking Amplifying—rather than opposing—the body's functions, processes, and systems improves your quality of life over the long-term We can rule out placebo effects via self-quantification (HRV biofeedback, EEG brain wave sensing, kinsiotesting, etc) or by testing forms of life more immune to placebo (babies, plants, animals) Links Watch it on YouTube: https://youtu.be/GeFqf5-UlzA Full episode show notes: mindbodypeak.com/81 Connect with Nick on social media Instagram Twitter YouTube LinkedIn Easy ways to support Subscribe Leave an Apple Podcast review Suggest a guest Do you have questions, thoughts, or feedback for us? Let me know at mindbodypeak.com/81 and one of us will get back to you! Be an Outliyr, Nick

Pass ACLS Tip of the Day
Post-Cardiac Arrest Care & Targeted Temperature Management

Pass ACLS Tip of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 4:38


The goal of CPR is to keep the brain and vital organs perfused until return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) is achieved. Post-arrest care and recovery are the final two links in the chain of survival.Identification of ROSC during CPR. Initial patient management goals after identifying ROSC. The patient's GCS/LOC should be evaluated to determine if targeted temperature management (TTM) is indicated. Patients that cannot obey simple commands should receive TTM for at least 24 hours. Why we should cool unresponsive post-arrest patients.Patients can undergo EEG, CT, MRI, & PCI while receiving TTM.Connect with me:Website: https://passacls.com@PassACLS on Twitter@Pass-ACLS-Podcast on LinkedInGood luck with your ACLS class!

Neurocareers: How to be successful in STEM?
The power of networking to promote Cognitive Neuroscience with Manvi Jain

Neurocareers: How to be successful in STEM?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 49:25


What can you do to make a difference in this world? Meet and greet Manvi Jain, a young Cognitive Neuroscience researcher from India who uses networking to promote Cognitive Neuroscience in her home country and globally! Manvi just graduated from a Cognitive Neuroscience program and is working towards improving people's lives using neuroscience research. About the podcast guest: Webpage: https://csrg-dei.blogspot.com LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/cognitivemanvi/ YoutTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCaq7MguAbxrQPIR3nv7HdqA Email: manvijain65@gmail.com About the podcast host: The Neurocareers podcast is brought to you by The Institute of Neuroapproaches and its founder - Milena Korostenskaja, Ph.D. (Dr. K) - a neuroscience educator, neuroscience research consultant, and career coach for students and recent graduates in neuroscience and neurotechnologies. You can always schedule a free consultation coaching/consulting session with Dr. K at: https://www.neuroapproaches.org/  

The Convergence - An Army Mad Scientist Podcast
69. Making Quick Decisions, Quicker with Jason Sherwin

The Convergence - An Army Mad Scientist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 62:36


[Editor’s Note: Army Mad Scientist is pleased to present our latest episode of The Convergence podcast, featuring our interview with proclaimed Mad Scientist Jason Sherwin, CEO and Co-Founder of deCervo, discussing the science of quick decision making, how deCervo blends gaming with science to help individuals make the best decisions in high stakes and complex environments, how these technologies have enhanced professional athletes’ performance, and these technologies’ potential for enhancing Soldiers’ performance — Enjoy!] Jason Sherwin, Ph.D., is a founder and currently serves as CEO of deCervo, a neuroscience tech company he founded with his research partner, Jordan Muraskin, Ph.D. Since starting in 2014, deCervo has provided cognitive training programs using neuroimaging and customized phone apps to over 15 Major League Baseball organizations, over 60,000 baseball and softball players worldwide, the umpires of the Major Leagues, and the officials of the National Hockey League. deCervo has been an Army research grant recipient since 2017 and Sherwin himself has done contract research for the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command Army Research Laboratory going back to 2011. Continuing to apply its novel approach to decision training, deCervo is currently launching apps in law enforcement and tennis training to complement its suite of five other apps for decision training. Analyzing quick decision-making is done by providing simple stimuli to people, imaging their response and its speed, and identifying how their brain reacts to different inputs. This can be accomplished by having a subject listen to a song with an unexpected, abrupt key change; not only do brains show a reaction to that unexpected change, but trained musicians’ brains produce a stronger response, as captured via electro-encephalogram (EEG), than a non-musician’s brain. deCervo’s apps for baseball players use accuracy measurements to estimate how well the user discriminates between different kinds of pitches. This approach is an evolution from using EEGs, and shows that non-invasive methods can be just as effective in measuring responses. Improving athletic prowess on the playing field has direct implications for improving warfighting prowesson the modern battlefield. Emotion impacts all decision making, but deliberate decisions are more susceptible to influence from emotionand often require simulations generated by video or AI to produce environments that are closer to real life. For Soldiers, decisions often need to be deliberate while dealing with fear and strong emotion in dynamic, austere, and potentially lethal environments; training for this kind of decision making requires teaching people how to respond quickly and correctly, despite emotional impacts or inhibition. Military decision making can involve simple decisions like target detection, but more often requires the ability to make complex, deliberate decisi

Psychedelics Today
PT375 – James Fadiman, Ph.D., Adam Bramlage, & Conor Murray, Ph.D. – Microdosing & Citizen Science: Introducing the World's First Take-Home EEG Microdosing Study

Psychedelics Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 61:22


In this episode, Victoria interviews James Fadiman, Ph.D., Adam Bramlage, and Conor Murray, Ph.D, who discuss the benefits of microdosing and the first-ever take-home wireless EEG microdosing study (which you can be a part of).  www.psychedelicstoday.com

Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning
A Deep Dive with Andrea Samadi into ”Applying the Silva Method: For Improved Intuition, Creativity and Focus” PART 1

Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 26:54


“Once we learn to use our mind to train it, it will do some astounding things for us, as you will soon see.” Jose Silva (August 11, 1914-February 7, 1999) author of The Silva Mind Control Method. Welcome back to The Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast I'm Andrea Samadi and like many of you listening,  have been fascinated with learning and understanding the science behind high performance strategies to increase our results in our schools, sports, and modern workplaces. As we are in the midst of holiday season here with Thanksgiving this past week in the US, and Christmas fast approaching, we will be narrowing our focus here on the podcast and resuming interviews in the New Year.  Until then, this episode will launch a series where I'll be taking us on a deep dive into the benefits of developing a meditation practice. While I'm sure those who tune into this podcast already have a practice in place, I wanted to cover a meditation method that I came across years ago, that our last interview, with Dr. Hasan Ibne Akram reminded me about. The goal of this series is to help all of us to reduce stress with this practice, but also to see if we can learn something new, and refine our practice for those who work in our schools to improve learning, in our sports environments for improved focus and concentration towards a specific goal, and in the corporate workplace for ideas to improve creativity and focus. We will begin this series reviewing Jose Silva and Philip Miele's The Silva Mind Control Method[i] that's based on the Revolutionary Program by the Founder of the World's Most Famous Mind Control Course. Ch 1: Using Our Mind in Special Ways This course is something I came across while working in the seminar industry, and while interviewing Dr. Hasan Ibne Akram, on our last EPISODE #260[ii], he reminded me of Jose Silva's program, that helped him with his self-esteem as a teenager, in addition to his studies, and a few other areas of his life, and this reminded me that I had come across Jose Silva's work years ago. I'd actually forgotten about this book, and many of the techniques we learned that were adaptations of Silva's work, and I thought that since meditation is helping so many people around the world, and it's now mainstream in our schools, with athletes, and in the corporate world, it would be fascinating to look closer at Jose Silva's Method, to see if it could help all of us to enhance our current meditation practice, myself included. Then I dove into The Silva Method, and realized his work is going to need to be broken up over a few episodes, like we did with The Think and Grow Rich[iii] book review, just to make it applicable for all of us, and give each chapter careful consideration as we look to see what parts of The Silva Method, could help us to improve our own lives.  I wanted to release this episode last Friday, but in order to cover this topic properly, I knew I had to review the Silva Method thoroughly myself, do exactly what he instructs us to do, and not cut any corners. So this weekend, instead of recording, I reviewed and practiced the strategies in the first three chapters of this book, making more connections to past episodes, and increasing my learning and understanding before sharing these ideas with you. If you listened to our episode #258 with Friederike Fabritius, on her new book, The Brain-Friendly Workplace, I asked her what science has to say about those flashes of insight that we ALL have access to for improved creativity and performance, and she explained that “when you are relaxed, your brain waves slow down to the alpha state.” Friederike further explained that we can measure these brain waves with EEG scans and that at moments of insight, or those AHA Moments, the brain has “gamma oscillations” that can be trained and measured that she called “The Gamma Insight Effect.” After speaking with Friederike, I wondered HOW we could ALL train our brain to reach these levels to gain those flashes of insight on demand, or at least more often, to help us with our lives and work? Whenever I've had a flash of insight about something, it's often during times where I'm relaxed (during a massage, in the shower, or during meditation) but they happen when I'm not expecting them, so I've learned to write them down, to see I can learn the meaning behind them, and determines if the insight is useful. Have you had flashes of insight? When do they happen for you? How do you make use of what you are seeing? Next, I remembered our interview #148[iv] with Dr. James Hardt and his Biocybernaut Alpha One Training that helped people (like Tony Robbins)  to access the zone, or peak performance, on demand, and increase those heightened levels of awareness for reduced stress and increased productivity. I wondered if there was a way we could do this ourselves, without having to pay the money to attend a training somewhere. Dr. Hasan spoke about attending Dave Asprey's 5 Day 40 Years of Zen Training[v], that was life-changing, but he also mentioned The Silva Method on EPISODE #260, that's designed specifically to help us to tap into the Alpha (deeply relaxed brain state) with other parts of the program that could train us to reach the Theta State (relaxed consciousness, deep meditation, light sleep, REM state) and the Delta State where we are in a deep sleep. Dr. Hasan Ibne Akram, who has successfully built 7 companies, believes that the Silva Method launched his mind to a whole new way of thinking and spoke about how Einstein and Edison would gain flashes of insight from relaxing their minds in a certain way, something that we ALL have access to do. Dr. Hasan is a huge believer in The Silva Method, that shows us how to access these creative brain states, and then give us some ideas of what to do with them once we are there. Jose Silva himself believed that once we learn how to use the tools in his program, that we all have the ability to become geniuses. Napoleon Hill even wrote about this in his best-selling book, Think and Grow Rich, when he said that a better definition of genius “is a man who had discovered how to increase the intensity of thought to a point where he can communicate with sources of knowledge not available through the ordinary rate of thought.” Read that quote a few times and keep thinking. How could YOU benefit from diving a bit deeper into your meditation practice? We have covered meditation on this podcast, beginning with Dr. Dan Siegel all the way back to EPISODE #28[vi] where we spoke with Dr. Siegel about something he calls Mindsight, or seeing the mind in another person, and he says this is the “basis for social and emotional intelligence.” Then on EPISODE #60[vii], we dove deeper into his Wheel of Awareness Meditation, and the science behind a meditation practice, which is evident to anyone who goes to www.pubmed.gov and types in the word “meditation” as they will see over 9,000 results showing that mindfulness and meditation clearly improves our health and wellness. Dr. Dan Siegel has mentioned the research often with his Wheel of Awareness Meditation, that “integrates the structure and function of the brain.” By integration, he meant moving towards well-being. But with ALL of these episodes, we've focused on WHAT meditation does (improves mental and physical health and well-being) but I've never covered exactly HOW to access these altered states of consciousness, or what to do when we get there, mostly because until I read Jose Silva's book, I had no idea what I was doing when I was meditating. I'd been doing many of the exercises in Silva's Program, that I had learned from different seminars and sources over the years, without fully understanding exactly what I was doing, and noticed I could use some improvement with my own practice. When Friederike Fabritius said that accessing these different brain states could be trained, and then suddenly Dr. Hasan mentioned HOW he trained his brain all those years ago, I thought it was time to take a closer look at our brain states. My goal with this episode is to help me to be more intentional with my meditation practice, and then share what I learn with you here. Just keep an open mind. As I share my insights with you from each chapter, see how the ideas could help you to improve YOUR practice, and perhaps give you some new insights along the way. On PART 1 of this book review we will cover: ✔ CH 1- Using More of Our Mind in Special Ways: An Introduction to the Silva Mind Control Method ✔ What this program has done for others. ✔ Ch 2- Meet Jose ✔ Ch 3- How to Meditate: A review of the brain states (BETA,ALPHA,THETA,DELTA). ✔ How to quickly access the ALPHA STATE to improve creativity, and intuition. ✔ Using A Mental Screen in Your Mind for Heightened Visualization ✔ How to Help Yourself and Others With this Practice   What This Program Has Done for Others: For this episode, #261, we will begin our DEEP DIVE into Jose Silva's Mind Control Method, used by over 10 million students around the world, to see if we can all use his work, that's based on accessing altered states of consciousness, to train our brain in ways where school just never taught us. The only reason I had heard about Jose Silva's Method, was that when I sold seminars for Bob Proctor, back in the late 1990s, many of the seminar attendees asked me if I had heard of Silva's Training. Over the years, I learned that parts of Silva's Methods were used in many of the seminars I had attended in the personal development industry, but I had never looked at the entire program as Jose Silva had written it. Much like I had only read parts of Napoleon Hill's Think and Grow Rich book, until I decided to review it myself on this podcast earlier this year. We will be going through the chapters together, and see what resonates with our current practice enough to dive deeper into. Now, there are two ways you could learn about these concepts. You can either learn with me here on the podcast, or, if you want to go deeper, you could pay to do one of the trainings like Dr. Hasan Akram did (with Dave Asprey), or what Tony Robbins did, with Dr. James Hardt and his Biocybernaut Alpha One Training, or even dive deeper into The Silva Method as this Method is now called The UltraMind System[viii] that you can purchase through Mind Valley which is where the program exists today.  It's here that the CEO of Mind Valley, a New York Times Best-Selling author himself, Vishen Lakhiani[ix] was asked to be the face of Jose Silva's work, just a few years after he passed away. PART 1 of My Review of the Silva Method: Remember when Dr. Hasan held up his copy of Jose Silva's book, from our last episode? The book is actually written as a book within a book, as the outside chapters 1 and 2, and 17-20 were written by Philipe Miele, who orients us to Jose Silva, and the millions of graduates who have benefitted from the program, while the inside of the book consists of the techniques we will learn, written by Jose Silva. We will learn more about the type of man Jose Silva was, but I have to clarify the title of the program, that is based solely on learning to control our mind for “the betterment of mankind.” (Page 6, The Silva Mind Control Method). The program cannot be used in any other way and is not meant to be used to “control” anyone, other than our own minds. As we saw with the quote we opened up with, once we can learn how to use our mind, it will do some astounding things. Throughout this series, we will see how it can be used to improve our own intuitive and creativity skills, solve large and small problems that we might have in business and in life, and will even uncover ways we can use the tools to improve our own health, or the health of others. Just keep an open mind as we go through the chapters, and I'll show you how I've either used the tools myself, or have seen them being used by others for results that cannot be denied. What This Program Has done for Others Now, don't just take my word for the deep work we will uncover in the next few episodes, here's what some of the leading experts have said about Jose Silva's Method as well as what Jose Silva himself has said that his program has done for others. ✔ A marketing company used it to create 18 new products. ✔ 14 Chicago White Socks players used it to boost their scores. ✔  Celebrities have used it and credit Jose Silva for improving their focus and creativity. ✔  Colleges and universities have used it to help students study less, but learn more. To access the research[x] that has been done on this program to date, I'll link it in the show notes. The late Dr. Wayne Dyer has said that “anything with the name Jose Silva as the author has my vote before I open to page one. Read it with a pen for underlining.” The Founder of Precious Moments, Jon Butler said that “Any CEO who is not using altered states of mind is at a competitive disadvantage.” (from Vishen Lakiani's Masterclass).[xi] As you go through this book review with me, think of where The Silva Program could help you. There will be some areas that will resonate with you, that you can practice and refine, and others that you can set aside for a later time. At the end of each of these review episodes, I'll have a section for you to put the ideas into action with clear examples of how I have used these exercises. REMEMBER: “When a person learns to function mentally at this deeper level, creativity is enhanced. Memory is improved and a person is better able to solve problems.” (Jose Silva). Ch 2- Meet Jose Silva What's crazy for me to see, looking back at Silva's work, is that he began The Silva Method, with his children while he was working on a way to improve learning. Like any parent, he wanted the best for his own children and their academics. But Jose Silva went above and beyond what most of would do for this to occur. He took his knowledge of working with radios and electronic circuitry, (what he did for his work that he excelled at) and combined this knowledge with the fact that we know that the mind generates energy, and developed a program that he hoped would help the brain to work more efficiently. He tested his ideas on his children.  Imagine Jose Silva, as a young man, with young children, who would work his job in radio repair until 9pm every night, come home, eat dinner, help put his children to bed, and then when his house was quiet, he would go on to study until midnight. He would learn the ideas that would eventually help his own children improve their grades, extending the course to other children, who achieved even better results with his program, as he refined and improved it along the way, and then within 3 years, developed the course that we know today. This is where The Silva Method began, that has now been validated by over 500,000 experiments, providing the results that no one could ignore. Ch 3- How to Meditate: A review of the brain states (BETA,ALPHA,THETA,DELTA). A Review of the Brain States: Beta Brain States: are where most of us spend our waking time, in normal and alert consciousness with brain waves at 15-30 cycles/second. It's here that we can feel the stress and anxiousness of daily life, so finding ways to offset this stress can be helpful. ***Alpha Brain State: where our brain slows down and we begin to feel healing, a sense of relaxation, or bliss, at around 9-14 cycles/second with our brain waves. This brain state is where most of Jose Silva's Programs are centered around. Theta Brain State: involves deeper relaxation with access to problem solving while these waves slow down to 4-8 cycles/second. If we can train our brain to stay awake here, we will be able to access heightened levels of creativity and intuition for solving problems. In chapter 7 of the book, Jose Silva covers Creative Sleep. He says “Understand a Man's Dreams, and You Understand the Man”   Delta State: our brain waves slow to 1-3 cycles/second while we are in deep dreamless sleep. How Do We Use the Silva Method to Access the Alpha State Where All the Magic Begins? STEP 1: HOW TO ACCESS THE ALPHA STATE: YOU CAN ACCES THE ALPHA STATE WHEN YOU FIRST WAKE UP, BEFORE BED, and ANY OTHER TIME YOU HAVE 15 MINUTES TO RELAX YOUR MIND. The Alpha State is the easiest state to access as we will already be in this state the first 5 minutes after we wake up. Jose Silva suggests: Jose Silva suggests the 40 Day Technique to guarantee you are at the Alpha Level where you begin by counting backwards from 100 to 1 for 10 mornings, then you can count from 50-1 for the next 10 mornings, then from 20-1 for 10 mornings, and then 10-1 until you get to 5 to 1. I'm currently in the first 10 days of counting backwards from 100-1 to allow myself to drift deeper into Alpha in the morning as well as before I go to sleep at night. I noticed that I'm more focused on my morning meditation, whereas before, I was just sitting there, not as focused as I know I could have been. I practice Dan Siegel's Wheel of Awareness Meditation each morning, and going into the Alpha State FIRST, has deepened my brain state into the Alpha level, where I no longer drift off when I hear a noise or something. PUT THIS INTO PRACTICE: Begin using the 100-1 countdown to at night, in the morning, or whenever you plan to access the alpha level to begin to improve your current practice. I'm in my first few days of practicing this method before sleep, and the first couple of nights, fell asleep before I could get to 1. I'll keep trying, as I'd like to get to the point where I can just count from 5-1 to access the Alpha State, like Jose Silva suggests. If you are as serious about accessing this level as I am, I suggest keeping a note card next to your work place to check off where you are in this process. After 10 days, you can progress to the next step, until you are able to access the alpha state from counting from 5-1. STEP 2: ONCE YOU REACH THE ALPHA STATE, THEN WHAT? Next, You will learn to use a Mental Screen for Heightened Visualization Once you have accessed the Alpha State, Silva reminds us:       Central to Jose's Silva Method of Mind Control is with the power of visualization, and he says “right from the beginning, from the very moment you reach your meditative level (what he calls accessing the Alpha State), you must learn to practice visualization. The better you learn to visualize, the more powerful will be your experience with Mind Control.” He also believes that his process goes far beyond what many of us have come across with other meditation programs, and as I go through each chapter, I'll leave it to you to pick and choose which parts of his program resonate with you to use and practice, but this part is important to master for EVERYTHING else we will be learning. PUT THIS INTO PRACTICE: When you close your eyes, what do you see? Raise your eyes up a bit (about 20% upwards above the horizon of what you see). Is it black, or can you use your mind to create things? Begin with simple things like an orange or an apple. This takes time and practice. This mental screen will help you in many ways as we move through different lessons, and is important, but don't be tied to what you think you should see. We are all at different stages of learning. I started seeing things on the screen of my mind starting in my late 20s, and things would flash sometimes when I was relaxed. I never did have control over what I was seeing. It just happened, and I would either know what I was seeing, or be wondering “what on the earth is that” so I'm hoping that with time, effort and practice, I will gain better control over what I'm able to visualize, so I can put it to better use. STEP 3: Now Utilize This Power With time and practice, it will be this screen that you will learn how to help yourself and others. You begin with creating simple things, until you are ready to solve small problems in your daily life, from work, to health, and improve learning/creativity. PUT THIS INTO PRACTICE: Just begin here with playing around with what you can create on the screen of your mind in the Alpha State. If you do nothing else, other than these 3 steps, you will experience what William Wordsworth called “a happy stillness of mind.” (Page 27, The Silva Method). Think of this as a journey within your mind. Each day you will be getting better and better, mentally stronger and stronger, and remember the quote we opened this episode with? “Once we learn to use our mind to train it, it will do some astounding things for us, you will soon see.” (Jose Silva) TO REVIEW PART 1 of THE SILVA METHOD: We covered: ✔ CH 1- Using More of Our Mind in Special Ways: An Introduction to the Silva Mind Control Method ✔ What this program has done for others. ✔ Ch 2- Meet Jose Silva and learned about his passion for helping others to improve their ability to learn. ✔ Ch 3- How to Meditate: A review of the brain states (BETA,ALPHA,THETA,DELTA). ✔ How to quickly access the ALPHA STATE to improve creativity, and intuition  using the countdown Method. ✔ Using A Mental Screen in Your Mind for Heightened Visualization ✔ It Will Be This Screen That We Will Use to Help Yourself and Others in Future Chapters.   SOME FINAL THOUGHTS: As we close out this episode, I wanted to share that while there are many programs out there, and I'm not here to say that one is better than the next.  If you have studied the father of mindfulness, Jon Kabat-Zinn, you'll recall that he reminds us that we are already perfect, and that mindfulness is not about “attaining a certain state, (that brings us to this new level of perfection) but that we are already whole and perfect.” Whatever program you are doing now, see if there's anything we cover that interests you to dive deeper into to further enhance what you are already doing. And with that, I'll post the topics in upcoming episodes on the show notes, and I'll see you in a few days, with EPISODE #162 on Dynamic Meditation and Improving Our Memory. COMING NEXT: Episode #162 we will cover ✔ Ch 4- Dynamic Meditation ✔ Ch 5- Improving Memory   Episode #163 ✔ Ch 6-Speed Learning ✔ Ch 7-Creative Sleep   Episode #164 ✔ Ch 8-Your Words Have Power ✔ Ch 9-The Power of Imagination ✔ Ch 10-Using Your Mind to Improve Your Health   Episode #165 ✔ Ch 12- You Can Practice ESP ✔ Ch 13- Form Your Own Practice Group ✔ Ch 14- How to Help Others Episode #166 ✔ Ch 16- A Checklist ✔ Ch 17- A Psychiatrist Works with The Silva Program ✔ Ch 18- Your Self-Esteem Will Soar ✔ Ch 19- Mind Control in the Business World ✔ Ch 20- Where Do We Go from Here?   REFERENCES: [i] The Silva Mind Control Method https://silvamethod.com/ [ii] Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast EPISODE #260 with Dr. Hasan Ibne Akram on “Breaking Down the Mindset of the Million Dollar Monk” https://andreasamadi.podbean.com/e/serial-entrepreneur-and-computer-scientist-hasan-ibne-akram-pd-d-on-breaking-down-the-mindset-of-the-million-dollar-monk/ [iii] Think and Grow Rich Book Review with Andrea Samadi  Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast EPISODE #190 PART 1 “Making 2022 Your Best Year Ever”  https://andreasamadi.podbean.com/e/think-and-grow-rich-book-review-part-1-how-to-make-2022-your-best-year-ever/ Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast EPISODE #191 PART 2 on “Thinking Differently and Choosing Faith Over Fear”  https://andreasamadi.podbean.com/e/think-and-grow-rich-book-review-part-2-how-to-make-2022-your-best-year-ever-by-thinking-differently-and-choosing-faith-over-fear/ Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast EPISODE #193 PART 3 on “Putting Our Goals on Autopilot with Autosuggestion and Our Imagination”   https://andreasamadi.podbean.com/e/think-and-grow-rich-book-review-part-3-using-autosuggestion-and-your-imagination-to-put-your-goals-on-autopilot/ Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast EPISODE #194 PART 4 on “Perfecting the Skills of Organized Planning, Decision-Making, and Persistence” https://andreasamadi.podbean.com/e/think-and-grow-rich-book-review-part-4-on-perfecting-the-skills-of-organized-planning-decision-making-and-persistence/ Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast EPISODE #195 PART 5 on “The Power of the Mastermind, Taking the Mystery Out of Sex Transmutation, and Linking all Parts of Our Mind” https://andreasamadi.podbean.com/e/think-and-grow-rich-book-review-part-5-on-the-power-of-the-mastermind-taking-the-mystery-out-of-sex-transmutation-and-linking-all-parts-of-our-mind/ Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast EPISODE #196 PART 6 in Memory of Bob Proctor on “The 15 Principles Behind Napoleon Hill's Think and Grow Rich Book” https://andreasamadi.podbean.com/e/the-neuroscience-behind-the-15-success-principles-of-napoleon-hill-s-classic-boo-think-and-grow-rich/   [iv] Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast EPISODE #148 with Dr. James Hardt on his “Biocybernaut Alpha Training” https://andreasamadi.podbean.com/e/dr-james-hardt-of-biocybernaut-alpha-training-on-change-your-brain-waves-change-your-life/ [v] https://40yearsofzen.com/dave/ [vi] Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast EPISODE #28 with Dr. Daniel Siegel on “Mindsight, the Basis for Social and Emotional Intelligence” https://andreasamadi.podbean.com/e/clinical-professor-of-psychiatry-at-the-ucla-school-of-medicine-dr-daniel-siegel-on-mindsight-the-basis-for-social-and-emotional-intelligence/ [vii]Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast EPISODE #60 on “The Science Behind a Meditation Practice with a Deep Dive into Dr. Daniel Siegel's Wheel of Awareness Meditation https://andreasamadi.podbean.com/e/the-science-behind-a-meditation-practice-with-a-deep-dive-into-dr-dan-siegel-s-wheel-of-awareness/ [viii] Mind Valley The Silva UltraMind System https://www.mindvalley.com/ultramind/sales?utm_source=google-paid&utm_medium=ocpm&otag=%5Bgg-ads%5D-%5Bvsl%5D-%5B17753276300%5D-%5B%5D-%5B%5D-%5Bsums%5D&gclid=Cj0KCQiAsoycBhC6ARIsAPPbeLvitYEzBdYZUiIjVD6DfQhvBjckA4peckfGlr0NpnXnvs0dK2jXTLEaAiZoEALw_wcB [ix] Mind Valley The Silva UltraMind System https://www.mindvalley.com/ultramind/sales?utm_source=google-paid&utm_medium=ocpm&otag=%5Bgg-ads%5D-%5Bvsl%5D-%5B17753276300%5D-%5B%5D-%5B%5D-%5Bsums%5D&gclid=Cj0KCQiAsoycBhC6ARIsAPPbeLvitYEzBdYZUiIjVD6DfQhvBjckA4peckfGlr0NpnXnvs0dK2jXTLEaAiZoEALw_wcB [x] Research on The Silva Method https://silvamethod.com/research [xi] Vishen Lakiani's Masterclass on The Silva Method https://www.mindvalley.com/ultramind?itm_source=storefront_w2.0&itm_campaign=sums_evergreen_evergreen_sums&otag=storefront_sums&itm_medium=email&itm_content=%5Bwatch_later%5D  

The Authors Unite Show
Dr. Andrew Hill: How To Increase Your Brain Power

The Authors Unite Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 57:04


Dr. Hill is one of the top peak performance coaches in the country. He holds a Ph.D. in Cognitive Neuroscience from UCLA's Department of Psychology and continues to do research on attention and cognition. Research methodology includes EEG, QEEG, and ERP. He has been practicing neurofeedback since 2003. In addition to founding Peak Brain Institute, Dr. Hill is the host of the Head First Podcast with Dr. Hill and lectures at UCLA, teaching courses in psychology, neuroscience, and gerontology. Have questions? Send Dr. Hill a message via our contact page, or check out his many podcast and media appearances. This episode is brought to you by Authors Unite. Authors Unite provides you with all the resources you need to become a successful author. You can learn more about Authors Unite here: https://authorsunite.com/​​​​​​​​ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/authorsunite/support

University of California Audio Podcasts (Audio)
Autism and Gene Therapy with Alysson Muotri - Autism Tree Global Neuroscience Conference 2022

University of California Audio Podcasts (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 58:28


What is gene therapy and how does it relate to autism? Alysson Muotri, Ph.D., contextualizes the autism spectrum, defines gene therapy, shares how human stem cells can contribute to research, and lays out how gene therapy could be used in the future. Series: "Autism Tree Project Annual Neuroscience Conference" [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 38387]

Science (Audio)
Autism and Gene Therapy with Alysson Muotri - Autism Tree Global Neuroscience Conference 2022

Science (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 58:28


What is gene therapy and how does it relate to autism? Alysson Muotri, Ph.D., contextualizes the autism spectrum, defines gene therapy, shares how human stem cells can contribute to research, and lays out how gene therapy could be used in the future. Series: "Autism Tree Project Annual Neuroscience Conference" [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 38387]

Health and Medicine (Audio)
Autism and Gene Therapy with Alysson Muotri - Autism Tree Global Neuroscience Conference 2022

Health and Medicine (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 58:28


What is gene therapy and how does it relate to autism? Alysson Muotri, Ph.D., contextualizes the autism spectrum, defines gene therapy, shares how human stem cells can contribute to research, and lays out how gene therapy could be used in the future. Series: "Autism Tree Project Annual Neuroscience Conference" [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 38387]

Autism (Audio)
Autism and Gene Therapy with Alysson Muotri - Autism Tree Global Neuroscience Conference 2022

Autism (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 58:28


What is gene therapy and how does it relate to autism? Alysson Muotri, Ph.D., contextualizes the autism spectrum, defines gene therapy, shares how human stem cells can contribute to research, and lays out how gene therapy could be used in the future. Series: "Autism Tree Project Annual Neuroscience Conference" [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 38387]

Science (Video)
Autism and Gene Therapy with Alysson Muotri - Autism Tree Global Neuroscience Conference 2022

Science (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 58:28


What is gene therapy and how does it relate to autism? Alysson Muotri, Ph.D., contextualizes the autism spectrum, defines gene therapy, shares how human stem cells can contribute to research, and lays out how gene therapy could be used in the future. Series: "Autism Tree Project Annual Neuroscience Conference" [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 38387]

Health and Medicine (Video)
Autism and Gene Therapy with Alysson Muotri - Autism Tree Global Neuroscience Conference 2022

Health and Medicine (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 58:28


What is gene therapy and how does it relate to autism? Alysson Muotri, Ph.D., contextualizes the autism spectrum, defines gene therapy, shares how human stem cells can contribute to research, and lays out how gene therapy could be used in the future. Series: "Autism Tree Project Annual Neuroscience Conference" [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 38387]

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.22.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 60:17


Videos: Heather Mac Donald On How The Delusion of Diversity Destroys Our Common Humanity(11:02) This intense AI anger is exactly what experts warned of, w Elon Musk. (15:50) The FTX corruption is even worse than we thought | Redacted with Clayton Morris (13:00)   Almonds can help you cut calories University of South Australia, November 20, 2022 Weight loss is never an easy nut to crack, but a handful of almonds could keep extra kilos at bay according to new research from the University of South Australia. Examining how almonds can affect appetite, researchers found that a snack of 30-50 grams of almonds could help people cut back on the number of kilojoules they consume each day. Published in the European Journal of Nutrition, the study found that people who consumed almonds – as opposed to an energy-equivalent carbohydrate snack – lowered their energy intake by 300 kilojoules (most of which came from junk food) at the subsequent meal. “Our research examined the hormones that regulate appetite, and how nuts – specifically almonds – might contribute to appetite control. We found that people who ate almonds experienced changes in their appetite-regulating hormones, and that these may have contributed to reduced food intake (by 300kJ).” The study found that people who ate almonds had 47 per cent lower C-peptide responses (which can improve insulin sensitivity and reduce the risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease); and higher levels of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (18 per cent higher), glucagon (39 per cent higher), and pancreatic polypeptide responses (44 per cent higher). Glucagon sends satiety signals to the brain, while pancreatic polypeptide slows digestion which may reduce food intake, both encouraging weight loss. “Almonds are high in protein, fibre, and unsaturated fatty acids, which may contribute to their satiating properties and help explain why fewer kilojoules were consumed.” The findings of this study show that eating almonds produce small changes to people's energy intake, Dr Carter says this may have clinical effects in the long term. Probiotics help maintain a healthy microbiome when taken with antibiotics Texas Christian University, November 18 2022.  A systematic review published in the Journal of Medical Microbiology helps answer the question concerning whether probiotics should be taken along with antibiotics to support gut health.  Although probiotics decrease the adverse gastrointestinal effects caused by antibiotics, their ability to preserve intestinal microbial composition that is negatively impacted by antibiotic therapy is not well understood.  “Like in a human community, we need people that have different professions because we don't all know how to do every single job,” she explained. “And so, the same happens with bacteria. We need lots of different gut bacteria that know how to do different things.” While it is well known that antibiotics destroy some beneficial intestinal microorganisms, some healthcare professionals have expressed a concern that administering probiotics to antibiotic-treated patients could further alter the established gut microbe balance. The review included 29 studies published during a 7-year period. The authors concluded that consuming probiotics with antibiotics can prevent or reduce some changes caused by antibiotics to the microbiome. “When participants take antibiotics, we see several consistent changes in some bacterial species,” Dr Marroquin observed. “But when treatment was combined with probiotics, the majority of those changes were less pronounced and some changes were completely prevented.” New study shows repeated stress accelerates aging of the eye University of California, Irvine, November 21, 2022 New research from the University of California, Irvine, suggests aging is an important component of retinal ganglion cell death in glaucoma, and that novel pathways can be targeted when designing new treatments for glaucoma patients. The study was published today in Aging Cell. Along with her colleagues, Dorota Skowronska‐Krawczyk, Ph.D., at the UCI School of Medicine, describes the transcriptional and epigenetic changes happening in aging retina.  The team shows how stress, such as intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation in the eye, causes retinal tissue to undergo epigenetic and transcriptional changes similar to natural aging. And, how in young retinal tissue, repetitive stress induces features of accelerated aging including the accelerated epigenetic age. Aging is a universal process that affects all cells in an organism. In the eye, it is a major risk factor for a group of neuropathies called glaucoma. Because of the increase in aging populations worldwide, current estimates show that the number of people with glaucoma (aged 40-80) will increase to over 110 million in 2040. In humans, IOP has a circadian rhythm. In healthy individuals, it oscillates typically in the 12-21 mmHg range and tends to be highest in approximately two thirds of individuals during the nocturnal period. Due to IOP fluctuations, a single IOP measurement is often insufficient to characterize the real pathology and risk of disease progression in glaucoma patients.  Long-term IOP fluctuation has been reported to be a strong predictor for glaucoma progression. This new study suggests that the cumulative impact of the fluctuations of IOP is directly responsible for the aging of the tissue. Researchers now have a new tool to estimate the impact of stress and treatment on the aging status of retinal tissue, which has made these new discoveries possible. In collaboration with the Clock Foundation and Steve Horvath, Ph.D., from Altos Labs, who pioneered the development of epigenetic clocks that can measure age based on methylation changes in the DNA of tissues, it was possible for researchers to show that repetitive, mild IOP elevation can accelerate epigenetic age of the tissues. What do people experience at the border between life and death? University of London & New York University, November 20, 2022 A new study on near-death experiences featured 567 men and women whose hearts stopped while hospitalized in the United States and the United Kingdom. Out of 28 survivors of cardiac arrest interviewed as part of the study, 11 recalled memories suggesting consciousness while undergoing CPR.  Additional cardiac arrest survivors provided self-reports about what they experienced while their hearts stopped. Reports included perceiving separating from their bodies and meaningful examinations of their lives.  Researchers discovered spikes of brain activity up to an hour into CPR.  Dr. Parnia, who served as lead investigator of the study, explained that he and the other researchers undertook this research in an attempt to scientifically explore something that health professionals have discussed anecdotally for decades: The similar stories people revived by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) often tell about the time when their hearts stopped. “For decades now, millions of people who've gone through this have reported having lucid heightened consciousness, even though from the perspective of their doctors they were not conscious and they were in death,” Dr. Parnia told MNT. The study centered around 567 men and women who received CPR after their hearts stopped beating while at one of 25 participating hospitals in the United States and the United Kingdom.  When health practitioners began CPR on a patient whose heart stopped, researchers rushed to the scene, bringing along a portable electroencephalogram, or EEG, to monitor electrical activity in different parts of the brain, and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to measure oxygen saturation of superficial brain cortex regions. Taking care not to get in the way of health practitioners performing CPR, researchers also clamped a tablet computer above the patient's head. The tablet was connected to Bluetooth headphones which were placed on the patient's ears. Of 567 subjects, 213 or about 38% experienced sustained return of spontaneous circulation, meaning their pulse was restored for 20 minutes or longer. Only 53, or fewer than 10% of the participants, lived to be discharged from the hospital. Of those 53, 25 were unable to be interviewed by researchers due to poor health. The remaining 28 participants were interviewed 2 to 4 weeks after cardiac arrest depending on their recovery.  Of the 28 participants interviewed, 11 — or 39% — reported having memories during cardiac arrest. Two of the 28 participants could hear the medical staff working while receiving CPR. One participant recalled seeing the medical staff working and could feel someone rubbing his chest.  Using the near-death scale, six participants had transcendent experiences. Three participants reported dream-like experiences, which included a singing fisherman.  Six of the 28 participants interviewed remembered the experience of dying. These recollections included one person who heard a deceased grandmother telling her to return to her body.  “We characterize the testimonies that people had and were able to identify that there is a unique recalled experience of death that is different to other experiences that people may have in the hospital or elsewhere,” Dr. Parnia said, “and that these are not hallucinations, they are not illusions, they are not delusions, they are real experiences that emerge when you die.” Fifty-three participants had interpretable EEG data. Researchers discovered spikes of brain activity, including so-called gamma, delta, theta, alpha, and beta waves emerging up to 60 minutes into CPR. Some of these brain waves normally occur when people are conscious and performing functions like memory retrieval and thinking. According to the researchers, this is the first time such biomarkers of consciousness have been identified during CPR for cardiac arrest.  “We found the brain electrical markers of heightened […] lucid consciousness, the same markers as you get in people who are having memory retrievals who are having […] high order cognitive processes, except that this was occurring when the brain had shut down. Research suggests agmatine can boost brain health and uplift your mood naturally Yonsei University College of Medicine (S Korea), October 28, 2022. Athletes and bodybuilders are always eager to learn more about new products that can help enhance their workouts by promoting strength and stamina. Agmatine, a natural compound, is often used by health enthusiasts as a pre-workout supplement. According to research, agmatine can also potentially be used to boost brain health and improve mood. In one scientific review, researchers suggest that the compound can help prevent neurodegenerative diseases and assist in the recovery of brain injury patients. Agmatine or 4-aminobutyl-guanidine is produced in your body from arginine, an amino acid found in foods like chickpeas, lentils, pork and poultry. When used as a pre-workout supplement, experts recommend not taking it with protein since dietary protein can slow the absorption of agmatine. This then diminishes its benefits. Agmatine is often listed on supplement labels as agmatine sulfate. Dosages range between 250 mg to 1,000 mg per scoop, with intake recommendations between one to two grams per day. Agmatine has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects and can scavenge harmful free radicals that cause oxidative damage to your organs and tissues. Some people believe agmatine can help enhance workouts by increasing levels of beneficial nitric oxide. This then dilates blood vessels and promotes healthy circulation. Data also suggests that agmatine may help activate the release of pain-killing, mood-lifting endorphins, which can boost motivation and mood. This suggests taking agmatine can help make you feel more inclined to exercise. The compound may also help block aged glycation end products. Your body produces these potentially carcinogenic compounds after you eat charcoal-broiled or well-done meats. Agmatine may also help down-regulate matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which are tissue-degrading enzymes that can facilitate the spread of malignant tumors.  Studies show that agmatine works against the glutamate receptors that affect pain perception. Data from preliminary studies have supported agmatine's ability to reduce pain and strengthen the pain-killing effects of prescription opioids. Experts hope that agmatine can be used to help reduce the amount of medications needed and decrease the possibility of addiction to opioids. Supplementation with agmatine may help activate serotonin, the “feel good” chemical in your body while also decreasing levels of cortisol, the “stress” hormone that builds up when you are under duress. In a review published in the European Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, scientists suggest that agmatine has antidepressant effects. According to a 2018 study published in the journal Human and Experimental Toxicology, agmatine can help protect brain cells from oxidative stress and inflammation caused by laboratory-induced Parkinson's. Prenatal phthalate exposure can significantly impact infant behavior and cognition, says study University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, November 16, 2022 Prenatal exposure to phthalates, a set of chemicals commonly found in plastics and personal care products, has been shown to significantly impact aspects of behavior and cognition in infants, according to a team of researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. “Phthalates are widespread, and several well-known studies have reported that 100% of pregnant individuals had detectable levels of phthalates in their bodies,” said developmental neurotoxicologist Jenna Sprowles, a former postdoctoral research associate at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology. Children's toys, cosmetics, and constructional materials are all potential sources of phthalate exposure, as are other materials made from polyvinyl chloride. When individuals who are pregnant are exposed to phthalates, the chemical compound crosses the placental barrier to interact directly with the fetus. Phthalates can also be transferred to a newborn through breast milk. Their study, reported in the journal Neurotoxicology and Teratology, investigated the neurobehavioral impacts of prenatal phthalate exposure in infants aged 4.5 and 7.5 months. Since many existing studies focus on individuals in early and middle childhood, providing attention to this age group is especially important. “Phthalates are endocrine-disrupting chemicals, meaning they interact with and alter how hormones typically act in the body. Hormones play crucial roles in brain development, so when the activities of hormones are altered by chemicals like phthalates, adverse functional effects are possible,” Sprowles said. “While we do know that different phthalates can affect different hormone systems, we don't yet know exactly how particular phthalates exert their specific effects.” The researchers found that the impact of prenatal phthalate exposure was specific to each phthalate's particular properties. For example, higher prenatal concentrations of a phthalate called MEP, which is commonly found in personal care products, were associated with lower ASQ scores (indicating below-average development) in certain domains. Their results align with existing studies, some of which have been carried out in animal models, which indicate that both prenatal and neonatal exposure to phthalates alters neural structure and function, resulting in impaired cognition and altered behavior.

Chicago Psychology Podcast
Encore Episode: Hypnosis, Neurology, and Reveri with David Spiegel, MD

Chicago Psychology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 54:17


Dr. David Spiegel is Willson Professor and Associate Chair of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Director of the Center on Stress and Health, and Medical Director of the Center for Integrative Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine, where he has been a member of the academic faculty since 1975, and was Chair of the Stanford University Faculty Senate from 2010-2011. Dr. Spiegel has more than 40 years of clinical and research experience studying psycho-oncology, stress and health, pain control, psychoneuroendocrinology, sleep, hypnosis, and conducting randomized clinical trials involving psychotherapy for cancer patients. On this encore episode of the Psychology Talk Podcast, Dr. Spiegel discusses a new, interactive hypnosis application, Reveri. Reveri is unique in that, unlike many meditation and hypnosis applications available to consumers, it allows you to interact with it, and adjust accordingly to your needs. Dr. Spiegel and Dr. Hoye discuss, among other things: •Neurological correlates of hypnosis•The development of the Hypnotic Induction Profile by Dr. Spiegel's father, Herbert Spiegel•Aspects of hypnotizability •The role of absorption in hypnosis. •Dr. Spiegel's research Listen in to expand your mind, and change your perspective on mind-body medicine!Explore the Reveri App:https://www.reveri.comThe Psychology Talk Podcast is a unique conversation about psychology around the globe.