Podcasts about modern world

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Latest podcast episodes about modern world

Podcast from Ptown
The Great Wall of China

Podcast from Ptown

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 33:02


This week we talk about our first Wonder of the Modern World. The Great Wall of China.

AVALON
The Scholastic Collapse (part 1)

AVALON

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 35:31


What happened in the 13th century philosophical world that radically changed the nature of Western European culture (hint we are still dealing with it today)? What did these people believe about the nature of mathematics (and why should you care)? Who was Joseph Pieper (and for that matter Romano Guardini) (and why should you read both of them)? "Scholasticism" by Pieper: https://www.amazon.com/Scholasticism-Personalities-Problems-Medieval-Philosophy/dp/1587317508/ref=sr_1_11?crid=3SRLJVZDEV80P&keywords=scholasticism&qid=1674002053&sprefix=scholastici%2Caps%2C517&sr=8-11 "The End of the Modern World" by Guardini: https://www.amazon.com/End-Modern-World-Romano-Guardini/dp/1882926587/ref=sr_1_1?crid=1CB78O0A5D8UL&keywords=the+end+of+the+modern+world&qid=1674002090&sprefix=the+end+of+the+modern+worl%2Caps%2C133&sr=8-1

What the F**k Happened Podcast
Intuitive Mothering in the Modern World: Postpartum Needs, Co-sleeping & Community with Sienna McGinnis

What the F**k Happened Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 67:15


Sam and Rick are joined by mama and co-founder of Kitts & Co., Sienna McGinnis. Sienna shares all about what it's like to co-own a company, and raise a child, with her partner McKinley. She opens up about her postpartum experience with her partner being away on tour just two weeks after giving birth, and why that actually strengthened their relationship in the long run. Sammy and Sienna also comment on the ways in which the modern world fails postpartum mothers and share their experiences with co-sleeping and the Fertility Awareness Method.In this episode:How Sienna co-founded a full-scale video production company, Kitts & Co. How becoming a parent can heal the “mother-wound”Sienna's postpartum experience with her partner away on tourThe role of our partners' and our families in the postpartum experienceIs co-sleeping safe?Deciding to have a child as an unmarried couple with Fertility Awareness MethodThis show is supported by:Butcher Box | http://rwrd.io/bxy895l?cNuuly | http://fbuy.me/s0MOgSomnifix Mouth Tape | Code ‘SRWELLNESS10' at somnifix.com for 10% off ClearSTEM Skincare  | Code  ‘SRWELLNESS' at clearstemskincare.com for 15% offSocial Tags:Follow Sienna:@siennahelena on Instagram@kittsandco on InstagramFollow Richard Raymond Sniegowski II:@richard_raymond_ii@yourdads_old45s@welcometolimeforestFollow Sammy Conrad:@samantharosewellnesssamantharosewellness.comsamanthaconrad.comFollow What The Fuck Is Happening:instagram.com/wtfh.podcast

Story in the Public Square
Exploring the World of Science Through Story with Alanna Mitchell

Story in the Public Square

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 27:47


In an age of fake news and so called “truthiness,” the world sometimes feels untethered from reality.  Today's guest uses her reporting and storytelling to ground her audience in science, even while her words reconnect us to our shared humanity and our relationship to the natural world.  She's Alanna Mitchell, this week on “Story in the Public Square.” Mitchell is a Canadian journalist, author and playwright who works at intersection of science, art and society.  Her book, “Sea Sick: The Global Ocean in Crisis,” was an international best seller that won the U.S.-based Grantham Prize for excellence in environmental journalism in 2010.  She turned it into a one-woman play in 2014 and has been performing it internationally since then.  The theater adaptation was nominated for a Dora award in Toronto for outstanding Indie play.  Mitchell was a playwright-in-residence at The Theatre Centre while she adapted her book, “Malignant Metaphor: Confronting Cancer Myths: A Memoir” into a play.  The book also won the $10,000 Lane Anderson Award for best Canadian science book written for adults in 2015.  She is also the author of “The Spinning Magnet: The Force that Created the Modern World and Could Destroy It,” about the Earth's magnetic field.  Mitchell's journalism has appeared in the New York Times' science section, CBC's Quirks & Quarks, National Geographic, The Guardian, GQ India, The United Church Observer and Canadian Geographic Magazine.  She has also made radio documentaries for CBC and has given talks on climate change, ocean change, cancer, John Franklin's expedition, evolution, Charles Darwin, neonic pesticides and the earth's magnetic field.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sinica Podcast
Talking China on TikTok with The China Project's Susan St. Denis

Sinica Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 44:54


This week on Sinica, we're proud to introduce you to Susan St. Denis, who joined The China Project full-time recently after running the China Vibe Official TikTok channel for The China Project for the last several months. Kaiser and Susan talk about what people are getting wrong about TikTok, the challenges of presenting complex issues in this medium, and much more!1:01 – Introducing The China Project's official TikTok channel: China Vibe TikTok08:25 – Challenging the assumption that TikTok content is inherently dumbed down12:13 – Why Susan's content was a good fit for The China Project14:30 – Unique challenges of covering China on TikTok19:16 – Providing a balanced account within TikTok's landscape of extreme views on China21:52 – How different generations view China28:35 – How to access Susan's China TikTok content29:39 – How legitimate are the security and privacy concerns surrounding TikTok?A transcript of this podcast is available at TheChinaProject.com.Recommendations – Susan: Eldest Son: Zhou Enlai and the Making of Modern China by Han Suyin; The China America Student Conference (www.iscdc.org)Kaiser: Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World by Jack Weatherford; and an ambivalent endorsement of the Conqueror series by Conn Iggulden.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Beat Your Genes Podcast
298: Depression in the modern world vs. Stone Age

Beat Your Genes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 62:00


In today's episode, Dr. Lisle and Dr. Howk discuss the following question: 1. Given that depression is inherently demotivating (because it is failure feedback that tells you to stop what you're doing), how might one 'bootstrap' oneself into more positive, motivated mood states? I wonder what people in the Stone Age village would have done to bounce back from failure feedback; it makes most of us want to curl into a ball and die. How does depression actually end up benefiting and motivating us?

The Neil Haley Show
Valerie June

The Neil Haley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 13:00


ABOUT VALERIE JUNE Valerie June Hockett is a Grammy-nominated singer, songwriter, and multi- instrumentalist from Tennessee. She's been published in the New York Times, which has also hailed her as one of America's “most intriguing, fully formed new talents.” She has recorded four critically acclaimed, best-selling solo albums and has also written songs for legendary artists such as Mavis Staples and The Blind Boys of Alabama. June has performed on The Tonight Show, The Late Show, Austin City Limits, Rachael Ray, and CBS Saturday Morning, and graced some of the world's most prestigious stages, from Carnegie Hall to the Kennedy Center. She's part of the Turnaround Arts program originally started by First Lady Michelle Obama. Also a poet, her first collection Maps for the Modern World was published in April 2021 by Andrews McMeel Publishing. When she's not touring, June splits her time between Tennessee and New York.    https://amzn.to/3itDlyu  

Podcasts
The Rosicrucian Spiritual Tradition in a Modern World – Imperator Claudio Mazzucco

Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023


“The Rosicrucian Spiritual Tradition in a Modern World,” by Imperator Claudio Mazzucco, from the “Rosicrucian Writers” issue of the Rosicrucian Digest. In this podcast, Imperator Claudio Mazzucco takes a sweeping look back through the history of AMORC to present an argument for the importance of education. Running Time: 38:04 | 36.6 MB Podcast Copyright © […] The post The Rosicrucian Spiritual Tradition in a Modern World – Imperator Claudio Mazzucco appeared first on Podcasts.

The Jim Rutt Show
EP 172 Brendan Graham Dempsey on Emergentism

The Jim Rutt Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 127:48


Jim talks with Brendan Graham Dempsey about his book Emergentism: A Religion of Complexity for the Metamodern World. They discuss the meaning crisis & its symptoms, reciprocal narrowing, the pre-modern & the modern, the emergence of reductionism, the meaning of complexity & emergence, sacralizing the scientific creation narrative, Prigogine's theory of dissipative systems, the universe as a process of endless complexification, marrying Bobby Azarian's Unifying Theory of Reality & Gregg Henriques's Unified Theory of Knowledge, consciousness vs sentience, Integrated Information Theory vs John Searle's biological functionalism, the odds that intelligent life evolved only once in our galaxy, tying complexification to the God concept, making the "religion that is not a religion" accessible through mythopoeia & storytelling, the Omega Point, whether approaching the Omega Point implies pushing for a techno-Singularity, Emergentist ethics & practices, and much more. Episode Transcript Emergentism: A Religion of Complexity for the Modern World, by Brendan Graham Dempsey "Awakening from the Meaning Crisis," by John Vervaeke - YouTube series JRS EP143 - John Vervaeke Part 1: Awakening from the Meaning Crisis The Emergence of Everything: How the World Became Complex, by Harold Morowitz The Romance of Reality: How the Universe Organizes Itself to Create Life, Consciousness, and Cosmic Complexity, by Bobby Azarian JRS EP 159 - Bobby Azarian on the Romance of Reality JRS EP105 - Christof Koch on Consciousness JRS EP 167 - Bruce Damer on the Origins of Life JRS EP 171 - Bruce Damer Part 2: The Origins of Life – Implications JRS EP40 - Eric Smith on the Physics of Living Systems Brendan Graham Dempsey is a writer whose work focuses on the meaning crisis and the nature of spirituality in metamodernity. He is the host of the Metamodern Spirituality podcast and the writer behind the six-volume (and counting) Metamodern Spirituality Series. He earned his BA in Religious Studies from the University of Vermont and his MA in Religion and the Arts from Yale University. He lives in Greensboro Bend, Vermont, where he runs the holistic retreat center Sky Meadow.

The Thrifty Marketer Podcast
Leadership in Action | Strategies for Success in Modern World with Dr. Hope Zoeller

The Thrifty Marketer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 47:28


Join us on this week's episode of the Leadership in Action podcast as we sit down with Dr. Hope Zoeller, CEO of Hope LLC, to discuss strategies for success in the modern world. Dr. Zoeller is a leading expert on leadership and personal development, with over 20 years of experience coaching executives and entrepreneurs to reach their full potential. In this episode, she shares her insights on how to effectively lead and manage teams, navigate change, and cultivate a positive work culture. Whether you're a seasoned leader or just starting out, you won't want to miss this valuable conversation with Dr. Zoeller. Tune in now to learn how to become a more effective leader in today's fast-paced, ever-changing business landscape.Questions Explored:What does the term "Leadership in Action" mean? What are the key qualities that make a great leader in today's modern world?How can leaders effectively navigate and adapt to the constant changes and challenges in today's fast-paced business environment?Specific strategies or techniques that leaders can use to inspire and motivate their teams?How can leaders foster a culture of continuous learning and development within their organization?What are some common mistakes that leaders make and how can they avoid them?And more. Join us as we delve into these important topics and more with some of the world's top leaders and experts. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Paul VanderKlay's Podcast
Loss of Hell Anxiety in the Modern World, Love over the Thinky-Talky. Friday BoM Q/A Jan 6 2023

Paul VanderKlay's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 126:26


Paul Vander Klay clips channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCX0jIcadtoxELSwehCh5QTg Bridges of Meaning Discord https://discord.gg/g4R8eHVX https://www.meetup.com/sacramento-estuary/ My Substack https://paulvanderklay.substack.com/ Estuary Hub Link https://www.estuaryhub.com/ If you want to schedule a one-on-one conversation check here. https://paulvanderklay.me/2019/08/06/converzations-with-pvk/ There is a video version of this podcast on YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/paulvanderklay To listen to this on ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/paul-vanderklays-podcast/id1394314333  If you need the RSS feed for your podcast player https://paulvanderklay.podbean.com/feed/  All Amazon links here are part of the Amazon Affiliate Program. Amazon pays me a small commission at no additional cost to you if you buy through one of the product links here. This is is one (free to you) way to support my videos.  https://paypal.me/paulvanderklay To support this channel/podcast with Bitcoin (BTC): 37TSN79RXewX8Js7CDMDRzvgMrFftutbPo  To support this channel/podcast with Bitcoin Cash (BCH) qr3amdmj3n2u83eqefsdft9vatnj9na0dqlzhnx80h  To support this channel/podcast with Ethereum (ETH): 0xd3F649C3403a4789466c246F32430036DADf6c62 Blockchain backup on Lbry https://odysee.com/@paulvanderklay https://www.patreon.com/paulvanderklay Paul's Church Content at Living Stones Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCh7bdktIALZ9Nq41oVCvW-A To support Paul's work by supporting his church give here. https://tithe.ly/give?c=2160640

Inside The Vatican
The funeral of Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI

Inside The Vatican

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 42:17


Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI was laid to rest just before noon (Rome time) on Thursday, Jan. 5, 2023, in the grottoes underneath St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican, where the mortal remains of many pontiffs reside.  About 50,000 people came to the Vatican to pay their final respects to Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI—who served the Catholic Church for nearly eight years before his historic retirement in February 2013—the first time in 600 years that a pope had resigned from office. From the time of his resignation until his death, Benedict had led a life of relative quiet and contemplation at a monastery inside the Vatican. This week on “Inside the Vatican,” Ricardo da Silva, S.J., an associate editor at America Media, speaks with Gerard O'Connell, our regular co-host on the show, and David Gibson, the director of the Center on Religion and Culture at Fordham University in New York and the author of The Rule of Benedict: Pope Benedict XVI and His Battle with the Modern World.  In the first part of the show, Ricardo talks with Gerry and David about what made this first-ever funeral of a pope emeritus different from that of a pope who dies while still in office. They also address the criticism that Pope Francis' homily did not sufficiently eulogize and recognize the legacy of the former pope.  In the second half of the show, Ricardo, Gerry and David discuss the legacy of Pope Benedict's nearly eight years as pope and his 24 years as head of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith.  Read more on the life and legacy of Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI at americamagazine.org. Links from the show: A video version of this podcast on America's YouTube channel Pope Francis presides over historic funeral for Benedict XVI What you need to know about the historic funeral of Pope Benedict XVI Eulogy vs. homily: When should you talk about the deceased in a Catholic funeral? Pope Benedict XVI, defender of orthodoxy defined by historic resignation, dies at 95 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Keep Talking
Episode 71: Thomas Moore - Spirituality and Soul in the Modern World

Keep Talking

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 83:36


Thomas Moore is a spiritual teacher, a psychotherapist, and the author of many books, including his bestseller, "Care of the Soul."During our conversation, Thomas talks about his many years as a Catholic monk, his time in academia, and his work as a therapist. He also talks about the ideas and life of Carl Jung and James Hillman, archetypes of the human psyche, and spirituality and religion in the modern world.Thomas is well-known for his writings on the human soul. He discusses his appreciation for historical figures like Emily Dickinson and Henry David Thoreau and details their wisdom and insights. In an increasingly secular age, Thomas has given mystical sustenance to those seeking to better understand their own soul, its needs, and how one might live a life of spirituality and soulfulness.------------Support via VenmoSupport on SubstackSupport on Patreon------------Show notesRate on SpotifyRate on Apple PodcastsSocial media and all episodes

Loudazz_Neighbors Podcast
Hierarchy of Relationship

Loudazz_Neighbors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 94:45


Listen as the neighbors talk with author of The Middle Ground: How To Get Great Dating Outcomes in a Modern World, Glenn Sandifer II, and Barber of Titanium Barbershop Taryn Van Gorp about the book in detail and the different classifications of men and women and more... Please like and Subscribe and Thanks!Support the show

Capitalisn't
Revisiting The Meritocracy Debate With Adrian Wooldridge And Michael Sandel

Capitalisn't

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 54:19 Very Popular


For the beginning of the year, we are revisiting two previous yet timely conversations, with Adrian Wooldridge (author of "The Aristocracy of Talent: How Meritocracy Made the Modern World") and Michael Sandel (author of "The Tyranny of Merit: What's Become of the Common Good").With them, Bethany and Luigi discuss whether meritocracy creates a better world for everyone, or if it creates massive inequality. Wooldridge makes the nuanced case that while meritocracy is generally beneficial, we as a society need to recapture the notion of merit from the elites. Sandel, on the other hand, argues in a nuanced way that essentially the problem with meritocracy is not the failure to live up to the ideal, but the idea itself.Capitalisn't will be back in your feeds with a brand new episode on January 19. Don't forget to rate and review our podcast if you haven't already, and leave us a voicemail at https://www.speakpipe.com/Capitalisnt.

Mortal Science
Separation V: Cartel Structures

Mortal Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 54:05


The structure of the problem is unfolding. Note: this was recorded before the post-COVID labor market, the new wave of labor organizing, and the resurgence of strikes. We like strikes. “The Infrastructure of the Modern World” form “A History of Separation”, Endnotes 4 (2015)

Postmodern Realities Podcast - Christian Research Journal
Postmodern Realities Episode 321 Carl Jung and the Modern World's Wound

Postmodern Realities Podcast - Christian Research Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 62:09


Carl Jung is a controversial figure. This pioneer of psychoanalysis, though beloved by the pop psychology world, has a dark side: he experimented with occult spirit guides, his movement was both an esoteric mystery-cult and a personality cult, and his theology was heretical, his conception of God that of an amoral demiurge beyond good and evil. Jung made theological errors worthy of rejection, but also stunning insights worthy of attention, especially because his psychoanalytic work with patients gave him an inside look into the weaknesses of modern-day Protestantism. Although most of Jung's patients had lost their faith, the healthiest were church-goers still immersed in liturgies thick with participatory symbols and rituals: their sacramental experiences nudged them towards wholeness. “Even in this day and age,” Jung wrote, “the believer has the opportunity, in his church, to live the ‘symbolic life.'” Most people “look to therapy rather than to religious tradition for their soul development,” ethicist Timothy Patitsas writes, but “the great hospital for the soul is liturgy because in liturgy we are invited to fall in love with what is most Beautiful.” But when much of the American church has been reduced to “four bare walls and a sermon,” there is plenty for the conscious mind to think about, but little for the body to do, or for the unconscious to experience. Jung thought every religion has two feet — faith and ritual — but Protestantism hops on one foot more often than not. Jung's ability to alleviate psychological suffering should intrigue iconoclasts: he gave people another leg to stand on. Protestants rejected veneration of the holy departed and the hierarchy of angels and saints whose prayerful assistance built up the Body. Jung compensated with darker principalities — spirit guides and inner gurus. Protestants abandoned confession to a priest and penance for the soul's repair. Jung compensated with the confessional therapist's office. Protestants repudiated iconography and pilgrimages. Jung gave them dream symbolism and archetypes, an inward journey replacing the outward. Protestants exchanged God's “real presence” in the Mass for a memorial. Jung showed them “the Numinous” within, mingling the archetypal Christ with the Self. Protestants exchanged synergistic theosis for passively imputed righteousness. Jung gave them an arduous process of “individuation” that resonated like a call to adventure. What the Reformers amputated re-emerged as a phantom limb in the form of depth psychology. Therapeutic “priests” now provide us with the healing and self-transcendence that was once the province of church sacraments, spiritual practices, and the heavenly hierarchy. The body and the unconscious (which are so deeply connected) must play their part in the faith. Exclude them, and who knows what will rush in to meet the ineradicable needs of human nature? Icons, rituals, liturgies, hymns, chanting, sacred spaces, fasts and feasts, pilgrimages, and sacraments — these are symbolic (“joining/uniting”) modes of participation indigenous to Christianity that psychology can only imitate, and they function fractally, healing not only the individual (psychotherapy's aim), but also facilitating a broader communion of persons. Because Christ joins together all the opposites (Col. 1:17, 21), Eucharistic communion creates communion. In Him, all things hold together; without Him, things fall apart.​This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with JOURNAL author Alisa Ruddell about her online-exclusive article, “Carl Jung and the Modern World's Wound”. https://www.equip.org/articles/carl-jung-and-the-modern-worlds-wound/Locked articles are online exclusive content that are only available to subscribers. There are three subscription options to access our online exclusive content.1. Subscribe ($33.50) to the print edition of the Christian Research Journal which includes all online exclusive content.2. Pay a monthly fee ($4.99) for Christian Research Journal online exclusive content. This does not include online versions of current print edition articles or receiving the print issues.3. Pay an annual fee ($24.99) for Christian Research Journal online exclusive content. This does not include online versions of current print edition articles or receiving the print issues.For more information and to subscribe please click here.Note online-exclusives are eventually made available to the public at regular intervals but to gain access to read it when it's originally posted subscribing at the link above is the best option.When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our ever growing database of over 1,500 articles, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support our online articles is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3, $5, or $10 which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click hereOther podcasts and articles featuring this author: Episode 307 Raised by Wolves: The Temptation and Trauma of an Android EveRaised by Wolves: The Temptation and Trauma of an Android Eve

Intuitive Eating for Christian Women
48 - All Bodies Are Good Bodies with Amanda Martinez Beck

Intuitive Eating for Christian Women

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 90:21


Today on the Intuitive Eating for Christian Women podcast our guest Amanda Martinez Beck shares her story of learning to embrace the body God gave her and she helps us understand why all bodies are good bodies. In this episode we dig into: - How our appetites are meant to draw us to Jesus - Reframing our body weaknesses in light of the gospel - The purpose of bodies and what makes a body good - Her first book Lovely: How I Learned to Embrace the Body God Gave Me - Understanding how offering your body as a living sacrifice calls us to embody mercy - Recognizing the harm in Diet culture's version of fasting and discovering a better way to fast - Her second book: More of You: The Fat Girl's Field Guide to the Modern World - 4 levels of fat activism and fat allyship - The flaw of using BMI as a health marker - How to talk to your doctor and demand weight-neutral care - Seeing your body as a storyteller - The intersection of physical and spiritual health RESOURCES FOR EPISODE 48 - All Bodies Are Good Bodies with Amanda Martinez Beck Access the Show Notes on the Intuitive Eating for Christian Women website: https://intuitiveeatingforchristianwomen.com/episodes/ MORE RESOURCES FOR INTUITIVE EATING FOR CHRISTIAN WOMEN If you're ready to take your own faith-based intuitive eating journey, start here: STEP 1: Listen to Season 1 with our $7 Podcast Workbook to learn the basics https://intuitivewellnessprograms.mykajabi.com/IEforChristianWomenCourse STEP 2: Get in community! Join our FREE Facebook Community or Paid Membership Program Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/intuitiveeatingforchristianwomen/ Membership: https://intuitivewellnessprograms.mykajabi.com/ie4cw-membership STEP 3: Go deeper in your journey with an Online Course. https://intuitiveeatingforchristianwomen.com/online-courses/ Find out more about Char-Lee Cassel: https://charleecassel.com/ Find out more about Erin Todd: https://erinltodd.com/ Get Erin's Free Guide: Intuitive Eating Starter Kit for Christian Women Get Char-Lee's Free Study: 10 day Intuitive Eating Bible Study For a chance to have your question answered, or if we said something that needs correcting, you can email us at: info@intuitiveeatingforchristianwomen.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/intuitiveeating/message

Interior Integration for Catholics
103 Your Anger, Your Body and You

Interior Integration for Catholics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 90:44


Summary  In this episode, Dr. Peter reviews the limitations of current Catholic resources on anger, and then reviews secular resources, including interpersonal neurobiology and the structural theory of dissociation.  We examine the role of the body in anger responses, and discuss more wholistic ways of working constructive with parts that experience anger, rather than trying to dismiss anger, suppress it or distract from it.   Lead-in William Blake, A Poison Tree: I was angry with my friends; I told my wrath, my wrath did end. I was angry with my foe: I told it not, my wrath did grow.  We've all experienced anger and we've all experienced angry people  We know it's a problem.  And global data suggest that it's getting worse.   Gallup world poll from 2021: 140 countries  Did you experience the following feelings during a lot of the day yesterday? How about anger?  17% of US respondents agreed 26% of women worldwide up from 20% from 10 years ago  20% of men -- flat from 10 years ago.   Harm can come from anger Mark Twain “Anger is an acid that can do more harm to the vessel in which it is stored than to anything on which it is poured.”  CCC 2302  By recalling the commandment, "You shall not kill," our Lord asked for peace of heart and denounced murderous anger and hatred as immoral. Anger is a desire for revenge. "To desire vengeance in order to do evil to someone who should be punished is illicit," but it is praiseworthy to impose restitution "to correct vices and maintain justice." If anger reaches the point of a deliberate desire to kill or seriously wound a neighbor, it is gravely against charity; it is a mortal sin. The Lord says, "Everyone who is angry with his brother shall be liable to judgment."   "Everyone who is angry with his brother shall be liable to judgment."  And who hasn't been angry -- including Jesus himself?.  We have got to unpack this There is so much misunderstanding about anger in the Catholic world, so much of the way that Catholics have approached anger has been limited, misinformed, and misguided When I think about why the Catholic Church in the US, in Canada, in Europe and Australia, in the entire Western World, there are many factors.   Brandon Vogt  New Stats on Why Young People Leave the Church  based on his book Return:  How to Draw Your Child Back to the Church One critical factor is that cradle Catholics, especially young Catholics do not believe that the Church can help them with their problems.  Diocese of Springfield Exit Surveys (2014)  68% – Spiritual needs not met67% – Lost interest over time Only 7% of Millennials raised Catholic still actively practice their faith today (weekly Mass, pray a few times each week, say their faith is “extremely” or “very” important) 6.5 people leave the Catholic Church for every one that joins 66% of “nones” agree that “religion causes more problems than it solves” That's why so many fall away from the Faith.  The Church doesn't seem relevant to them because she doesn't seem like she has the answers to the real issues they face. 10% of American adults are former Catholics Nearly half of those who fall away from the Church become "nones"  And another quarter become Evangelical Christians.   79% of former Catholics leave the Church before age 23.   50% of Millennials raised Catholic no longer identify as Catholic today  And it's about topics like anger -- we are not doing a good job meeting the needs that Catholics have today, human formation needs.   Intro I am Dr. Peter Malinoski, a.k.a. Dr. Peter, clinical psychologist, trauma therapist, podcaster, blogger, cofounder and president of Souls and Hearts -- but most of all I am a beloved little son of God, a passionate Catholic who wants to help you to taste and see the height and depth and breadth and warmth and the light of the love of God, especially God the Father and  Mary our Mother, our spiritual parents, our primary parents.  To really absorb your identity as a little child of God and Mary.   I want you to enter much more deeply into an intimate, personal, loving relationship with the three Persons of the Trinity and with our Lady. That is what this Interior Integration for Catholics podcast is all about, that is what Souls and Hearts is all about – all about shoring up the natural foundation for the spiritual life of intimacy with God, all about overcoming the natural human formation deficits and obstacles to contemplative union with God our Father and our Lady, our Mother  We are on an adventure of love together. And one thing, one major, big, huge thing that gets in the way of being loved by God and Mary and loving in return is anger.  Anger.   This is Episode 103 of Interior Integration for Catholics.  Interior Integration for Catholics is part of Souls and Hearts, our online outreach, check us out at soulsandhearts.com.   Anger: one of the seven deadly sins, one the lethal vices that can kill your soul.  Anger.   So much confusion about anger.  The Burden of Anger:  June 10, 2021 Catholic-daily-reflections.com The first level of sin is simply to be “angry” interiorly. The sin of anger is an interior attitude of disgust toward another. Jesus says that the consequence of having anger toward another is that you will be “liable to judgment.” Humility.  I could be wrong.    The offerings from Five Catholic writers on anger are a case in point.   The most popular book Fr. T.G. Morrow, Overcoming Sinful Anger  303 Amazon Review, mostly positive, #16  on the list of bestsellers in Catholic Theology, put out by Sophia Press in 2015 And it's not very good.  I can't recommend it.   First off, Fr. Morrow admits that he doesn't understand why people get angry We've all encountered people who explode when they feel angry. It baffles me how often the sort of anger rears its ugly head in marriages – even in allegedly Christian marriages. (p. 9).   I am often surprised to discover Christians who pray ardently, receive the sacraments regularly, we've and attend Mass daily, and yet have an anger problem. (p. 10) Presumes a homogeneous, single personality.   Easy to explain with part.   Why do people explode in anger? There are many reasons, but I think the top three are power and control, a refusal to take responsibility, and habit. (p. 13). Very simplistic view of psychology, and no consideration of neurology, traumatology,  Confusion about the causal chain in anger.  Where anger fits in a sequence of events  Little genuine interest in anger.  Anger is something to essentially get rid of.   Not much consideration of the unconscious and unconscious anger.  Acknowledges that suppressing anger is problematic, but there still is an assumption that if I'm not feeling anger, it's not there.  Disconnect.   "Irrational anger"   Very focused on the will and will training -- naïve assumptions about sympathetic arousal. Nike Spirituality -- Just do it.   Romans 7:15:  I do not understand my own actions. For I do not do what I want, but I do the very thing I hate.   Spiritual Bypassing  Definitions John Welwood: American clinical psychologist, psychotherapist, teacher, and author, known for integrating psychological and spiritual concepts  Using “spiritual ideas, words and practices to sidestep or avoid personal, emotional ‘unfinished business,' to shore up a shaky sense of self, or to belittle basic needs, feelings, psychological wounds and developmental tasks.”  Blogger Rose Hahn:  Spiritual Bypassing: What It Is & How To Avoid It  Bypassing occurs when spiritual ideals get elevated to the realm of absolute truth in such a way that our real, lived experience is somehow denied. Rather than doing the work of healing deep wounds, we may use these ideals to deny, devalue, or avoid meeting our more human needs – such as emotional bonding, love, and esteem. In other words, rather than risk opening ourselves to real human connection, and possibly get hurt, we adopt a more enlightened, spiritual way of relating to the world that doesn't rely on human relationship.  Not a lot from a specifically Catholic perspective, but this is from Katharina, who styles herself "The Bohemian Catholic" We are supposed to uplift each other, and treat each other with love and respect - like icons of Christ, as God's creation… BUT if you find yourself trying to tell someone that their faith should keep them "happy" all the time, then you aren't helping them.  Using spiritual words, spiritual means, spiritual concepts -- all to whitewash or put a Band-Aid on significant psychological or emotional problems in the natural realm  Bypassing the natural realm and going to the spiritual realm.   Essentially saying -- You should not feel this way.  Which is what Fr. Morrow is saying.  He promises to "I will offer some ideas, which I consider quite novel, on how to avoid angry explosions." (p.4) Tips So, as a first step in overcoming passive-aggressive anger keep reminding yourself that you want to be a Christian, and therefore you can't take revenge anymore. (p. 9).  First, take the time to calm down and figure out why you're angry…. One of the tactics often recommended is to count to ten before deciding what to do. (p. 20).  Better still, say a short prayer before acting. The next step is to ask yourself if your angry feeling is been caused by something significant. Most angry fights in marriage are caused by trifling things. (p. 20).  Or perhaps use humor to make your point.(p. 20).  Offering your angry feeling as a sacrifice is not suppressing it but doing something with it. It is making a bad situation into a beneficial one. That is what it means to embrace the cross. (p. 23-24).  If we can forgive others, we can pull the rug out from beneath our anger most of the time. Unforgiveness is the main culprit behind anger. (p. 25).  … Refocus your thoughts away from the things that made you angry to some very positive thoughts. For example, thank God for the beautiful weather for the ability to read or buy things you need. (p. 30).  I often encourage people with an anger problem to daily for humility. It works. (p. 36).  Chapter 7: Thanking God, praising God  Consider your future. One key way to change her behaviors to work on in your mind just what your life will be like if you don't change your angry behavior. (pp. 72-73)  If you struggle with an anger problem write on an index card all the negatives of continuing your anger and read that list several times a day. (p. 74).   Fr. Joseph Esper, Saintly Solutions to Life's Common Problems  99 reviews on amazon.  #138 in Roman Catholicism.  2001 Book -- First Chapter is on anger.   St. Thomas of Villanova: "Dismiss all anger and look into yourself a little." (p. 7) "St. Francis de Sales advises that, to avoid the sin of anger, you must quickly ask God to give peace to your heart when you're angered and then turn your thoughts to something else. Don't discuss the matter at hand or make decisions or correct other person while you're angry. When a person angers you, St. Francis advises, consider the person's good qualities rather than the words or actions you find objectionable." (p. 7) When we have to speak to someone with whom we are angry, we should first pray for the Lord's guidance and help. It's often more effective to speak in terms of asking favors, rather than making demands or giving orders…" (p. 5-6) ...rehearse possible responses and evaluate which ones which might help you. (p. 7) Tommy Tighe St. Dymphna's Playbook: A Catholic Guide to Finding Mental and Emotional Well-Being 2021 book,  #57 in Christian Pastoral Counseling, 66 reviews, mostly positive.   Doesn't discuss anger.  Discusses irritability as a symptom of depression and resentment as a problem in relationships "However, the more I have experienced depression in my own life and in my work as a clinician, the more I have seen the symptoms of irritability and anger is predominant features of depression." (p. 13).  That's one way, not the only way.   So often depression results from  Recommendations "…go for a walk, take some time to meditate, watch or read something that lightens our mood. (p. 13)  "Keeping a diary of our emotions and reactions to those emotions is a great place to start… Look back on a situation, slow it down, and examine what exactly happened….We might ask ourselves: What is it that has led to my irritability? Is it because I'm depressed and trying to stuff that feeling down rather than address it? What am I thinking in that situation? (p. 15).  "We draw this all out on paper, examine what was really behind our emotional response, and then explore ways of thinking that will restructure our reactions and response. And we write these down! Simply thinking about these things isn't going to help. The whole point is to get them out of our head and onto paper so that we can work them out. Consider it an emotional "show your work" kind of exercise." (p. 15).  Then, after a really brief introspective process, we can catch that the real reason for our irritability is our depressed mood, and we can interject coping skills for depression to stave off our irritability. (p. 16).  Changing the focus of our thinking is key when we try to battle against depression and irritability that inevitably rears its ugly head. You've probably heard people suggest keeping a gratitude list to help you feel more positive, much along the same lines as St. Paul's advice. It works. (p. 18).   Steps in the process Visualize yourself from the perspective of compassionate observer.  Notice from the outside whole feelings xare upsetting you and how they are reflected in your appearance.  Try to let the warm feeling of compassion and desire to help arise within you.  Say to yourself: "It is understandable that you feel that way. You are experiencing a natural response to depressing thoughts. But I'm going to help you."  Visualize putting your hand on your shoulder or hugging yourself to soothe and comfort yourself. Give yourself a friendly smile.  Think about if there are other things you want to tell yourself that would energize and encourage you to cheer up.  Taking time to say those things. When you feel it is appropriate, begin saying goodbye to yourself and remind yourself that you come back anytime you want. (p. 16-17). For resentment: Active listening  Tommy Tighe: to fend off resentment, we have to communicate with things are important to us and why. We can't expect our partner to read her mind. We have to tell them the things we value, what things we have grown to expect in relationships because of our past experiences and we have to tell them why. (p 113)   Rhonda Chevrin Taming the Lion Within: 5 Steps from Anger to Peace 2017  16 ratings  is a Catholic author, international speaker and Professor of Philosophy. She is the author of over 60 books concerning the matters of Catholic thought, practice and spirituality,  Take a secure thought -- use your imagination to think of ways out of annoying or enraging situations   Avoid exceptionality.  Accept the averageMove your musclesHumor is your best friendF.I.S.T.  Feelings, Impulses, Sensations, Thoughts:  What it signifies is that we can control our immediate impulses and sensations when hurt or frustrated, but if we control our thoughts we can control her impulses.Put your mental health firstPeace over power:  Many times you can't win, and it doesn't matter if you lose.  It's not worth the effort to put up a fight.  They are not doing it to you; they're just doing it! – Much is not done on purposeNot a 911  Not everything is an emergency,.Be Group minded Anger at GodForgiveness  Fr. Spitzer Angry with God? Here's Fr. Spitzer's Advice on How to Overcome Anger God understands your anger.  Don't dwell on it.  Don't go there.   Choose instead to: Three step process in the YouTube clip Angry with God:   Stop comparing to the way you once were.   Stop comparing yourself to others.   Stop having expectations for your suffering.   Offer it up.  Stop the questioning.   Saints' behaviors  Meg Hunter-Kilmer - published on 09/28/17Aleteia September 28, 2017, What We Probably Don't Know about St. Jerome Is Just What We Need to Know St. Jerome was known to carry around a stone that he would hit himself with every time he lost his temper.     If these are helpful to you, great.  I don't want to put up roadblocks.  Might be helpful to many people.   As a Catholic psychologist, I am not comfortable recommending any of these Catholic sources Very simplistic view of psychology, and no consideration of neurology, traumatology,  Confusion about the causal chain in anger.  Where anger fits in a sequence of events  Little genuine interest in anger.  Anger is something to essentially get rid of.   Very focused on the will and will training -- naïve assumptions about sympathetic arousal.  And they don't get that anger has a protective function -- to protect us against shame.  Not one of those sources connects anger to shame.  And that's the primary connection we need to understand if we want to resolve anger, not just try to shoo it away.   What are we talking about when we discuss anger -- let's get into definitions of Anger Focused on vengeance secondary to a desire -- more than an emotion.   Written discussions of anger in the western canon go back as far as fourth-century BC in Greece when the philosopher Aristotle (384-322 B.C.) argued that anger is a rational and natural reaction to being offended and thus is closely associated with reason. In the Rhetoric (1991, p. 1380) he defined anger as “a belief that we, or our friends, have been unfairly slighted, which causes in us both painful feelings and a desire or impulse for revenge.” 1907 Catholic Encyclopedia:  Anger:  The desire of vengeance. Its ethical rating depends upon the quality of the vengeance and the quantity of the passion. When these are in conformity with the prescriptions of balanced reason, anger is not a sin. It is rather a praiseworthy thing and justifiable with a proper zeal. It becomes sinful when it is sought to wreak vengeance upon one who has not deserved it, or to a greater extent than it has been deserved, or in conflict with the dispositions of law, or from an improper motive. The sin is then in a general sense mortal as being opposed to justice and charity. It may, however, be venial because the punishment aimed at is but a trifling one or because of lack of full deliberation.  Likewise, anger is sinful when there is an undue vehemence in the passion itself, whether inwardly or outwardly. Ordinarily it is then accounted a venial sin unless the excess be so great as to go counter seriously to the love of God or of one's neighbor.   CCC 2302  By recalling the commandment, "You shall not kill," our Lord asked for peace of heart and denounced murderous anger and hatred as immoral. Anger is a desire for revenge. "To desire vengeance in order to do evil to someone who should be punished is illicit," but it is praiseworthy to impose restitution "to correct vices and maintain justice." If anger reaches the point of a deliberate desire to kill or seriously wound a neighbor, it is gravely against charity; it is a mortal sin. The Lord says, "Everyone who is angry with his brother shall be liable to judgment."  Contradiction that aggression (or vengeance) and anger have to go together  Lot of research to tease about anger and aggression: Ephesians 4:26:  Be angry but do not sin; do not let the sun go down on your anger   APA Dictionary of Psychology: an emotion characterized by tension and hostility arising from frustration, real or imagined injury by another, or perceived injustice. It can manifest itself in behaviors designed to remove the object of the anger (e.g., determined action) or behaviors designed merely to express the emotion (e.g., swearing). Anger is distinct from, but a significant activator of, aggression, which is behavior intended to harm someone or something. Despite their mutually influential relationship, anger is neither necessary nor sufficient for aggression to occur.  Psychologist Paul Ekman. (1999). Basic emotions. In T. Dalgleish & M. J. Power (Eds.), Handbook of cognition and emotion (pp. 45–60). John Wiley & Sons Ltd  Due to its distinct and widely recognizable pattern of face expression, anger has always been included in the repertoire of basic emotions.   Benefits of Anger  Farzaneh Pahlavan Multiple Facets of Anger: Getting Mad or Restoring Justice?  Chapter 3:  The Neurobiology of RAGE and Anger & Psychiatric Implications with a Focus on Depression Daniel J. Guerra1, Valentina Colonnello and Jaak Panksepp As a basic emotion, anger emerges early in life and has a unique adaptive function in motivating, organizing, and regulating behavior. No other emotion can match the consistency and vigor of anger in mobilizing high-level energy and sustaining goal-directed activity. Anger serves a variety of regulatory functions in physiological and psychological processes related to self-defense as well as to interpersonal and societal behaviors. Through socialization processes, it plays an important role in the development of personality and individual differences in responding to environmental challenges, which can be more or less adaptive.  (p. v).   Aristotle:  Aristotle: Nichomachean Ethics: It is easy to fly into a passion – anybody can do that – but to be angry with the right person into the right extent and at the right time and with the right object in the right way – that is not easy, and it is not everyone who can do it  In themselves passions are neither good nor evil. They are morally qualified only to the extent that they effectively engage reason and will….It belongs to the perfection of the moral or human good that the passions be governed by reason. CCC 1767  CCMMP: Catholic-Christian Meta-Model of the Person  DMU Paul Vitz, William Nordling, Paul Craig Titus.    p. (294)  to remain in the virtuous middle ground requires being disposed to a righteous anger that will stand up to injustice, and use a good measure of anger in ways that are corrective of the evil, preventive of further injustice, and indicative of a balance to mean between extremes. Emotions are good when, as reactions antecedent to reasoning, they make us conscious of reality and prepare us for a more complete reaction and moral action. Emotion and choice then serve moral flourishing (e.g., when we have an appropriate spontaneous reaction of anger at injustice). Second, emotions are good as felt reactions that also follow the intellectual evaluation of the situation. Emotions can be expressive of rational decisions. Emotions can thus participate in our life of reason and will (Gondreau, 2013). For example, when we choose to rectify and injustice, a balanced expression of anger can help us to act decisively will being restrained enough that we do not overreact. Through a righteous or just expression of anger, we entered rectify injustice, will finding a just and rational mean between excessively weak or exceedingly strong emotional displays. (p. 650). Emotions are viewed as informing people about their cares and concerns. To prepare the body for action, directing our thoughts to ways that will appropriately address the issues at hand. They can signal and manipulate other people in ways that suit the person's emotional needs (Parrott, 2001). Being disconnected from emotional experience, therefore, means being cut off from adaptive information (Pos et al., 2003). (pp. 650-651). Digression into justification of secular sources Question may arise, "OK, Dr. Peter, as you already noted, anger has been recognized for a long time, going all the way back to Aristotle and way before that in Sacred Scripture.  You emphasize that you are a Catholic psychologist, so why are you even looking at these secular sources like the American Psychological Association? There is a lot about anger in Scripture, in the Church Fathers and the saints about anger in the spiritual life.   Discalced Carmelite Abbott Marc Foley in his excellent book The Context of Holiness: Psychological and Spiritual Reflections on the Life of St. Therese of Lisieux "One…misconception is that the spiritual life is an encapsulated sphere, cloistered from the realities of daily living….we have only one life composed of various dimensions.  Our emotional life, intellectual life, social life, work life, sex life, spiritual life are simple ways of speaking of the different facets of our one life.  (p. 1).  We have one life.  One life.  We don't have a spiritual life that is separate from our emotional life.  We have one life.  If we are angry, that affects our whole life.   The Church herself encourages us to look to all branches of knowledge and glean what is best from them in order to live our one life better.  From the CCC, paragraph 159  "Though faith is above reason, there can never be any real discrepancy between faith and reason. Since the same God who reveals mysteries and infuses faith has bestowed the light of reason on the human mind, God cannot deny himself, nor can truth ever contradict truth." "Consequently, methodical research in all branches of knowledge, provided it is carried out in a truly scientific manner and does not override moral laws, can never conflict with the faith, because the things of the world and the things of faith derive from the same God. The humble and persevering investigator of the secrets of nature is being led, as it were, by the hand of God in spite of himself, for it is God, the conserver of all things, who made them what they are." And from the Vatican II document, the Pastoral Constitution of the Church in the Modern World, paragraph 62 reads:  In pastoral care, sufficient use must be made not only of theological principles, but also of the findings of the secular sciences, especially of psychology and sociology, so that the faithful may be brought to a more adequate and mature life of faith. Remember that we are embodied beings -- we are composites of a soul and a body. The 17th Century Philosopher Rene Descartes' popularized what is called mind-body dualism.  Mind-body dualism is the idea that the body and the mind operate in separate spheres, and neither can be assimilated into the other.  And that is false.  Demonstrably false in a lot of ways, be we so often assume it to be true.  We have one life.   In the last several years we are realizing just how much of our mental life and our psychological well-being is linked in various ways to our neurobiology -- the ways that our nervous systems function.  And the relationship between our embodied brain and our minds is reciprocal -- each affects the other in complex ways that we are just beginning to understand.  In other words, brain chemistry affects our emotional states.  And our emotional states and our behaviors affect brain chemistry.  It's not just our minds and it's not just our bodies and it's not just our souls -- it's all of those, all of what makes me who I am, body, mind, soul, spirit, all of it.   And since Scripture, the Early Church Fathers, the Catechism and so on are silent on neurobiology, neurochemistry, neurophysiology and so many other areas that impact our minds and our well-being, as a Catholic psychologist I am going to look elsewhere, I'm going to look into secular sources.  I just don't think it's reasonable to expect the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops or the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith in the Vatican to be experts in these areas -- it's not their calling, it's not their expertise.  St. John of the Cross in his  Prologue of Ascent of Mt. Carmel: "I will not rely on experience or science…[but] I will not neglect whatever possible use I can make of them.  Fr. Marc Foley, OCD : The Context of Holiness:  As St. Thomas wrote of St. Augustine's use of Platonic philosophy in the Summa: "whenever Augustine, who was imbued with the doctrines of the Platonists, found in their teaching anything consistent with the faith, he adopted it and those things which he found contrary to the faith he amended." (ST I, q. 84,a. 5) p.4 And St. Thomas himself drew on so much of Aristotle's thought in his writings, bringing it into his body of work.   Abbot Marc Foley.  In short, we should never swallow the school of thought whole; we should sift the wheat from the chaff, separate truth from falsehood. p.4 We want the best from all sources.   Emphasis on biological processes:   From Heidi Crockett Anger Management with Interpersonal Neurobiology  Discussed Interpersonal Neurobiology at length in  Episode 92 of this podcast Understanding and Healing your Mind through IPNB In interpersonal neurobiology, anger as an emotion is viewed from the perspective of cognitive neuroscience. And cognitive neuroscience states that cognition and emotion are dynamically combined with physical arousal. When anger is induced as an emotion in humans, it can unconsciously affect physiological and neural resources. Affective states of anger are subsequently expressed in the brain as well as the body, and these neural and physiological changes can influence the cognitive processes. Many studies and resources have been expended on studying the emotions of happiness, sadness, and fear, which align with psychopathological states of hypomania, depression, and anxiety. Kathy Steele, Suzette Boon, Onno van der Hart:  Treating Trauma-Related Dissociation: A Practical, Integrative Approach:  Anger is an affect to derived from activation of the sympathetic nervous system, geared to energize the body for maximum effort to fend off perceived danger. Psychologically, it protects from awareness of vulnerability and lack of control, and therefore from shame. And fight mode, we are all primed to perceive cues of danger rather than cues of safety and relational connection. In such a heightened state of arousal, it is easy to misunderstand the intentions of others. (p.332). Polyvagal theory and anger  A critical period for experience-dependent development of the feelings of safety during early infancy: A polyvagal perspective on anger and psychometric tools to assess perceived safety  Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience July 2022 article   Andrea Poli, Angelo Gemignani, Carlo Chiorri and Mario Miccoli Brief primer here on some neurology.  Don't worry.  I will keep it simple.   Neurons are specialized cells that receive and send signals to other cells through fragile and thin cellular extensions called axons. Myelination:   a membrane or a sheath around the axons on neurons.   Myelinated axons often have a larger diameter Myelinated axons are insulated Myelination allows for much faster transmission of electric impulses Presence of safety during the critical period (first year of life).   Decreased unmyelinated/myelinated cardioinhibitory fibers ratio in adulthood Ventral Vagal complex is able to have a greater impact on reducing the Sympathetic Nervous System arousal -- decreasing anger  VVC is able to have a greater impact on reducing Dorsal Vagal Complex fear and shutdown responses -- the freeze response.   Greater capacity for self-regulation.   Absence of safety during the critical period  Increased unmyelinated/myelinated cardioinhibitory fibers ratio in adulthood Ventral Vagal complex has a lesser impact on reducing the Sympathetic Nervous System arousal -- less able to decrease sympathetic arousal, including anger  VVC has a lesser impact on reducing Dorsal Vagal Complex fear and shutdown responses -- less able to reduce the freeze response.   Less capacity for self-regulation.   Dampened VVC activity reduces the capacity of adaptive inhibition of SNS and DVC (Dorsal Vagal Complex), and emotional self-regulation. Hence, environmental detection of unsafety cues may preferentially trigger SNS-mediated anger in order to avoid DVC-mediated immobilization with fear. Young children exposed to five or more significant adverse experiences in the first three years of childhood face a 76% likelihood of having one or more delays in their language, emotional or brain development. (6) As the number of traumatic events experienced during childhood increases, the risk for the following health problems in adulthood increases: depression; alcoholism; drug abuse; suicide attempts; heart and liver diseases; pregnancy problems; high stress; uncontrollable anger; and family, financial, and job problems. (6) 7 ways childhood adversity changes a child's brain Donna Jackson Nakazawa Acestoohigh.com website September 8, 2016 Epigenetic Shifts  gene methylation, in which small chemical markers, or methyl groups, adhere to the genes involved in regulating our stress response, and prevent these genes from doing their jobs.  Size and Shape of the Brain stress releases a hormone that actually shrinks the size of the hippocampus, an area of our brain responsible for processing emotion and memory and managing stress.  Chronic neuroinflammation can lead to changes that reset the tone of the brain for life   Brain connectivity:  Dr. Ryan Herringa, neuropsychiatrist and assistant professor of child and adolescent psychiatry at the University of Wisconsin, found that children and teens who'd experienced chronic childhood adversity showed weaker neural connections between the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus. Girls also displayed weaker connections between the prefrontal cortex and the amygdala. The prefrontal-cortex-amygdala relationship plays an essential role in determining how emotionally reactive we're likely to be to the things that happen to us in our day-to-day life, and how likely we are to perceive these events as stressful or dangerous. Including anger.   Wiring of the brain and nervous system matter -- they matter a lot Brain activation in anger  Distinct Brain Areas involved in Anger versus Punishment during Social Interactions  Olga M. Klimecki, David Sander & Patrik Vuilleumier Scientific Reports 2018. 25 men fMRI study anger induced in an in inequality game designed to be unfair.   In the present study, we found that the intensity of experienced anger when seeing the face of the unfair other was parametrically related to activations in amygdala, STS (superior temporal sulcus), and fusiform gyrus (related to facial recognition). The STS has been shown to produce strong responses when subjects perceive stimuli in research areas that facial recognition   Farzaneh Pahlavan Multiple Facets of Anger: Getting Mad or Restoring Justice?  Chapter 3:  The Neurobiology of RAGE and Anger & Psychiatric Implications with a Focus on Depression Daniel J. Guerra1, Valentina Colonnello and Jaak Panksepp Rage emerges when specific environmental stimuli arouse the neural circuitry of the RAGE system. Even if the anger-thoughts and the related expression are modulated and regulated by higher cortico-cognitive areas, the human basic circuitry of anger is still subcortical. Since the early description of rage in decorticated cats (Dusser De Barenne, 1920) and dogs (Rothmann, 1923) and their responses to inoffensive stimuli, it was clear that the rage expression is i) dependent on subcortical areas, i.e. the ancient regions play a crucial role more than the higher neocortical regions; ii) independent of an intact cortex. p. 11  Among the higher limbic regions of this network, the medial nucleus, the basal complex, and central and lateral nuclei of the amygdala play a key role in the modulation of RAGE.  p. 1   All this happens far away from the frontal cortex in the limbic system of your brain.   Kathy Steele, Suzette Boon, Onno van der Hart:  Treating Trauma-Related Dissociation: A Practical, Integrative Approach   Why of Chronic anger.   Anger is the primary emotion of the "fight" defense.  When (parts of) the patient become stuck in this defense, anger becomes chronic.  Thus, the first intervention is safety.  332 As long as a fight reaction remains unresolved, anger will remain chronic. (p.332).  Almost no one seems to understands that anger is a defense against fear and shame.  It's a way of trying to protect oneself.   There are several reasons that anger and hostility become chronic in dissociative patients. First, patients typically have been severely invalidated, ignored, heard, betrayed, and sometimes even tortured over extended periods of time, while helpless to stop it. In itself, this is enough to generate enormous rage in anyone as part of the naturally occurring fight defense. Second, as children, patients often had little to no help in learning how to regulate and appropriately express normal anger, much less how to cope with it. Often it was unacceptable for many patients to express any kind of anger as children, while the adults around them were uncontained and highly destructive with their anger. Others had no limit set on their angry behaviors. (p. 330). Angry dissociative parts are feared and avoided internally by most other parts, particularly those that function in daily life. After all, angry behaviors toward self and others may interfere with functioning in a variety of personal and social ways. An ongoing vicious cycle of rage and shame ensues internally: the more patients avoid their angry and destructive dissociative parts, the angry these parts become, and the more they shame other parts and are shamed by them. (p. 331). … Angry parts have a deep shame and are highly defended against the strong belief that they are very bad. Their defense is reinforced by the shame of patients that such parts of themselves even exist. These parts of the patient are terrified of attachment to the therapist and you the relationship is dangerous, mainly because they are afraid that the therapist will never accept them. (p. 331-332). Whether the anger is part of a fight response or not, it is often a secondary emotion that protects the patient from feelings of sadness, extreme powerlessness, shame, guilt, and loss. (p. 333).  (add grief) Parts of the patient that developed  controlling-punitive strategies will be angry with others to get what they need,  while those that have controlling-caregiving strategies will punish themselves for being angry or having needs. (p. 333).  This is often the case in hostile parts such as those of self-injure or encourage other parts to self-harm, prostitute themselves, abuse drugs or alcohol, or engage in other self-destructive behaviors. They are often stuck in destructive and harmful behaviors that are an "attack self" defense against shame. (p.333). Finally, the rage of the perpetrator is often an embodied experience from which patients cannot yet escape without sufficient realization and further integration. Some dissociative parts imitate perpetrators internally, repeating the family dynamics from the past with other parts in a rather literal way. (p.333). "Getting the anger out" is not really useful, as the problem is that the patient needs to learn how to effectively express anger verbally rather than physically, and in socially appropriate and contained ways, so the patient can be heard by others. It is less the fact that patients express anger, but how they do so and whether that expression allows him to remain grounded in the present, to retain important relationships, and to avoid being self-destructive. (p. 334). Expression of anger is not necessarily therapeutic in itself. It is how (parts of) the patient experience and express it that is important; whether it is within a window of tolerancex in a socially appropriate and safe. Therapist must learn when expression of anger is therapeutic and when containment of anger is more helpful. (p. 334). Working with anger an angry parts (p.335). Take the time to educate the patient as a whole about the functions of anger and angry parts. Although they may seem like "troublemakers," they can be understood as attempting to solve problems with ineffective or insufficient tools.  Encourage all parts of the patient understand, accept, and listen to angry parts, instead of avoiding them.  Make efforts to understand what provokes angry parts. There are many potential triggers.   Not direct quotes Do all parts feel the same way as the angry part?  If not, can those parts listen to and accept angry parts perspective?  Would the angry part be willing to listen to the other internal perspectives?  Invite other parts to watch and listen if possible.  Can set limits with the angry part  the angry part and all parts need to learn that healthy relationships do not include punishment, humiliation, or force  Use titration, helping the person experienced as a small amount of anger will remain grounded in the present   Parts and imitate a perpetrator often literally experience themselves in our experienced by other parts as the actual perpetrator. Thus they understandably induce fear and shame within a patient as a whole, and sometimes fearing the therapist. (p. 345). The functions of perpetrator-imitating parts are (1) protect the patient against threats of the perpetrator, which continue to be experienced as real in the present; (2) defend the patient against unbearable realizations of being helpless and powerless as a child, (3) re-enact traumatic memories from the perspective of the perpetrator, as mentalize by the child; (4) serve as a defense against shame through attacking the patient and avoiding inner experiences of shame; (5) provide an outlet for the patient's disowned sadistic and punitive tendencies; and (6) hold unbearable traumatic memories. (p. 346). Suzette Boon, Kathy Steele, Onno van der Hart 2011 book  Coping with Trauma-Related Dissociation: Skills Training for Patients and Therapists Destructive expressions of anger include persistent revenge fantasies or actions, hurting self or others, "taking it out" on innocent people (or animals), or destruction of property. (p. 265).  Dissociative parts of a person that are stuck in anger may experience this feeling as vehement and overwhelming, often without words. They may have irresistible urges to act aggressively and have great difficulty thinking and reflecting on their feelings before acting. Angry parts have not learned how to experience or express anger and helpful ways. There are two types of anger dissociative parts. The first are parts that are stuck in a defensive fight mode, ready to protect you. Their anger at original injustices may be legitimate and naturally accompanies a tendency to strike out and fight, which is an essential survival strategy. However, such parts have become stuck in anger, unable to experience much else. They rigidly perceived threat and ill-will everywhere and they react with anger and aggression as their only option of response. Although these parts of you may not yet realize it, anger is often a protection against vulnerable feelings of shame, fear, hurt, despair, powerlessness, and loss. The second type of angry part may seem very much like the original perpetrator. They imitate those who hurt them in the past, and they can be experienced internally as the actual perpetrator. This experience can be particularly frightening, disorienting, and shameful. But be assured this is a very common way of dealing with being traumatized. In fact, although these parts may have some similarities to those who hurt you, they also significant differences: they are parts of you as a whole person, who is trying to cope with unresolved traumatic experiences. (p. 267)   Tips for coping with anger (p, 269 to 271) recognize how to make distinctions among the many gradations of anger, from mild irritation to rage, so that you can intervene more rapidly.  Understand your tells around anger, which may include a tight or tense feeling in your body, clenched jaw's or fists, feeling flushed or shaky, breathing heavily, heart racing, a feeling of heat, a surge of energy.  Empathize with her angry parts, recognizing they have very limited coping skills, and very limited vision. They've been shunned by other parts, left alone with their hurt, fear, shame, in isolation. This does not mean you have to accept their impulses toward inappropriate behavior  Once you start feeling some compassion toward these parts you can begin to communicate with them, listening with an intention, with curiosity to understand what lies underneath the anger  Angry parts have a strength, that they could transferred to use and more positive ways  Become more curious about why anger is happening.  Try creative and healthy nonverbal ways of expressing your anger, such as writing, drawing, painting, making a collage  Physical exercise may help as an outlet for the physical energy generated by the physiology of anger  Work on understanding your anger, by reflecting on it, rather than just experiencing it, being immersed in it. You might imagine observing yourself from a distance, and getting curious about why you feel the way you do.  Give yourself a time-out, that is, walk away from the situation if you're getting too angry. Counseling to 10, or even 200 before you say or do something you might regret later.  Calm breathing may help  Listen to each part of you, about what might help that part with anger. You can have in her conversations with parts of yourself about anger and how to express it. Small and safe ways to express anger can be negotiated that are agreeable to all parts of you  Watch safe people in your life and seal they handle their own anger. Do they accept being angry? Are they are respectful and appropriate with her anger? Are there particular strategies that they use that you could practice for yourself?  Healthy anger can get positive strength and energy. It can help you be appropriately assertive, set clear boundaries, and confront wrongs in the world. Anger can pave the way to other emotions, leading to the resolution relational conflicts.  We learn the most common triggers of your anger. Once you learn these triggers, you can be more aware when they occur and more able to prevent an automatic reaction of anger. Establish intercommunication among parts of yourself to recognize triggers and negotiate possible helpful strategies to cope with them rather than just reacting.  You can try allowing yourself to experience just a small amount of anger from another part of yourself: a drop, a teaspoon, 1% or 2%. In exchange you can share with angry parts feelings of calm and safety.  Inner safe spaces can be very helpful for childlike parts that feel terrified   My parts Feisty Part-- defends against shame -- Melancholio.   Good Boy  Challenger  Creative-distracting me.   Closing Mark your calendars.  Next Live Experience of the IIC podcast will be on Friday, January 13, 2023 from 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM Eastern time on Zoom (repeat) -- All about Anger -- dealing with your anger.  Going beyond what books can do.  Experiential exercise.  Links to register have gone out in our emailed Wednesday Reflections.  Can get the link on the IIC landing page as well, SoulsandHearts.com/iic  December 28, 2022  Reflection at soulsandhearts.com/blog  From Rejecting to Embracing Aging Reach out to me Crisis@soulsandhearts.com  Conversation hours:  cell is 317.567.9594 conversation hours 4:30 PM to 5:30 PM Eastern Time Every Tuesday and Thursday.   Resilient Catholic Community -- you do not have to be alone.   Why a deep intimate personal relationship with God our Father, Mary our Mother -- spiritual parents   By claiming our identity as beloved daughters and sons of God the Father and Mary our Mother. Identity is freely given.   How By dealing with the natural level issues we have, the human formation issues we have that have spiritual consequences.  Grace perfects nature  So many spiritual problems have their roots in the natural realm, in human formation.   If this kind of exercise is helpful to you, we have nearly 100 of them in the Resilient Catholics Community.   120 Catholics like you already on board, already on the pilgrimage -- just had 47 apply for the December 2022 cohort, excited to get to know our new applicants.   Closed December 31 -- wait list should be up soon for the June 2023 Cohort.   Get to know your own parts Get to love your own parts If interested, contact me.   Crisis@soulsandhearts.com 317.567.9594 conversation hours 4:30 PM to 5:30 PM Eastern Time Every Tuesday and Thursday.    

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Books for Breakfast
54: New Year's Eve 2022 Special

Books for Breakfast

Play Episode Play 60 sec Highlight Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 51:15


Some of the highlights of this year's Books for Breakfast, featuring contributions by Gabriel Byrne, Thomas McCarthy, Wendy Erskine, Colm Tóibín, Brian Leyden, Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin, Leland Bardwell, Kevin Power, John McAuliffe, Kelly Michels, Mark Granier, Judith Mok and Mark Roper.Enda and Peter also discuss some of the books on their desks at the moment: The Horse, the Wheel, and Language: How Bronze-Age Riders from the Eurasian Steppes Shaped the Modern World by  David W. Anthony; Winters in the World: A Journey through the Anglo-Saxon Year by Eleanor Parker; The Magpie and the Child by Catriona Clutterbuck; Stretto by David Wheatley; My Phantoms by Gwendoline Riley; Crooked Love/Grá fiar by Louis de Paor; Mrs Bridge by Evan S. Connell and Earth's Black Chute by Cian Ferriter. Extract from Lá dá raibh/One Day courtesy of Rockfinch Ltd.Intro/outro music: Colm Mac Con Iomaire, ‘Thou Shalt Not Carry' from The Hare's Corner, 2008, with thanks to Colm for permission to use it. Incidental music from Audio Library Plus. Artwork by Freya SirrTo subscribe to Books for Breakfast go to your podcast provider of choice (Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google etc) and search for the podcast then hit subscribe or follow, or simply click the appropriate button above. Support the show

Hermitix
The Apocalyptic Imagination and the Making of the Modern World with John Jeffries Martin

Hermitix

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 55:36


John Jeffries Martin is a historian of early modern Europe, with particular interests in the social, cultural, and intellectual history of Italy in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. In this episode we discuss his book A Beautiful Ending - The Apocalyptic Imagination and the Making of the Modern World. Book link: https://yalebooks.yale.edu/book/9780300247329/a-beautiful-ending/ --- Become part of the Hermitix community: Hermitix Twitter - https://twitter.com/Hermitixpodcast Support Hermitix: Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/hermitix Donations: - https://www.paypal.me/hermitixpod Hermitix Merchandise - http://teespring.com/stores/hermitix-2 Bitcoin Donation Address: 3LAGEKBXEuE2pgc4oubExGTWtrKPuXDDLK Ethereum Donation Address: 0x31e2a4a31B8563B8d238eC086daE9B75a00D9E74

The Real Witches of the End Times
79. Pennsylvania Dutch Folk Magic with MaryEllen Rose

The Real Witches of the End Times

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 86:47


Esoteric silversmith and PA Dutch folk practitioner: MaryEllen Rose of Wayward Silver joins the pod this week! Tune in to hear about Pennsylvania Dutch history and folk magic tradition, hex signs, and a legendary tale of murder and magic. Books Mentioned: "The Long Lost Friend" by John George Hohman, edited by Daniel Harms (get the addition that is blue) "Hex and Spellwork" by Karl Herr "Powwowing Among the Pennsylvania Dutch: A Traditional Medical Practice in the Modern World" by David W Kriebel Find MaryEllen: www.waywardsilver.com instagram.com/waywardsilver Find Mana: www.mothmana.com

Gunfighter Life.  Be Strong & Courageous
Truck Guns, Trunk Guns Vehicle Survival and Combat Arms for the Modern World Ar-15s Ak-47s Pistol Caliber Carbines pcc Best Defense Options

Gunfighter Life. Be Strong & Courageous

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 61:04


Brave New World -- hosted by Vasant Dhar
Ep 52: Neeti Bhalla Johnson on Risk in Our Modern World

Brave New World -- hosted by Vasant Dhar

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 55:07


Has the world become more or less safe over the years? How do we measure risk in these times of crazy change? Neeti Bhalla Johnson joins Vasant Dhar in episode 52 of Brave New World to share her thoughts on how professionals do it! Useful resources: 1. Neeti Bhalla Johnson on LinkedIn and Liberty Mutual. 2. Daniel Kahneman on How Noise Hampers Judgement -- Episode 21 of Brave New World. 3. Noise: A Flaw in Human Judgement — Daniel Kahneman, Olivier Sibony and Cass Sunstein. 4. Thinking, Fast and Slow — Daniel Kahneman. 5. Dissecting “Noise” — Vasant Dhar. 6. Factfulness -- Hans Rosling. 7. Global Deaths in Conflicts Since the Year 1400 -- Chart by Max Roser. 8. War and Peace -- Max Roser, Joe Hasell, Bastian Herre and Bobbie Macdonald. 8. Destined for War.-- Graham Allison. 9. The Technology Wars — Episode 1 of Brave New World (w Arun Sundararajan). 10. The Fifth Risk: Undoing Democracy -- Michael Lewis. Check out Vasant Dhar's newsletter on Substack. Subscription is free!

How Soccer Explains Leadership Podcast
World Cup Review, 2022 Highlights, and Season 7 Post-Match Show

How Soccer Explains Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 56:18


In Episode 109, Paul and Phil cover their favorite moments from the second half of Season 7, their highlights from the incredible guests we've had on HSEL throughout 2022, their top 2022 recommendations, and a review of the incredible World Cup we just experienced over the past month, including their favorite goals, plays, and teams throughout the tournament. It's a great way to top off a great year of football, soccer, or whatever you call it! Resources and Links from this Episode Uncut Video of the Episode HSEL Facebook Group Warrior Way Soccer Providence World website Coaching the Bigger Game Program Phil's email for DISC Training The Ruthless Elimination of Hurry: How to Stay Emotionally Healthy and Spiritually Alive in the Chaos of the Modern World, by John Mark Comer The Stupid Footballer is Dead, by Paul McVeigh More than That, by Mike Buchanan Survival of the Fit: How Physical Education Ensures Academic Achievement and a Healthy Life, by Daniel O'Neill The History of Men's Soccer at Colorado College, 1950-2015, by Horst and Helen Richardson “FIFA Uncovered” (Netflix) Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World, by David Epstein The Marriage Devotional: 52 Days to Strengthen the Soul of Your Marriage, by Levi and Jennie Lusko All or Nothing: Arsenal (Amazon Prime) Welcome to Wrexham (Hulu) Sunderland ‘Til I Die (Netflix) Class of '92: Out of Their League (Netflix) Rise & Shine: The Jay DeMerit Story (YouTube) United Soccer Coaches Convention Registration Page

Vision For Life
Episode 112 | Best Reads Of 2022

Vision For Life

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 52:24


Resources mentioned in this episode:Spiritual Life"A Model of Christian Maturity" by D.A. Carson (https://amazon.com/dp/0801093953)"Keeping Place" by Jen Pollock Michel (https://amazon.com/dp/B0722P5FR9)Biography and History"Dominion" by Tom Holland (https://amazon.com/dp/B07NCY9RG9)"Out of our Past" by Carl N. Degler (https://amazon.com/dp/0061319856)"Martin Luther, Vol 2" by Martin Brecht (https://amazon.com/dp/0800628144)"Martin Luther's Basic Theological Writings" by William. R. Russell (https://amazon.com/dp/0800698835)"River of the Gods" by Candice Millard (https://amazon.com/dp/B09BTJNJCX)Theology and Bible"The Desire of the Nations" by Oliver O'Donovan (https://amazon.com/dp/0521665167)"Christian Mission in the Modern World" by John Stott (https://amazon.com/dp/0830844392)""Fundamentalism" and the Word of God" by J.I. Packer (https://amazon.com/dp/0802811477)General Interest"A Time to Build" by Yuval Levin (https://amazon.com/dp/1541699270)"Art of the Commonplace" by Wendell Berry (https://amazon.com/dp/1593760078)"Surrender" by Bono (https://amazon.com/dp/B09ZHK2N71)Fiction and Literature "The Legend of the Poinsettia" by Tomie dePaola (https://amazon.com/dp/0698115678)"The Ambassadors" by Henry James (https://amazon.com/dpB00JDN27Q0)"Everything Sad is Untrue" by Daniel Nayeri (https://amazon.com/dp/B08BR2HFWJ)"The Prisoner" by Marcel Proust (https://amazon.com/dp/0143133594)"The Fugitive" by Marcel Proust (https://amazon.com/dp/0143133705)

Homeschooling Families by Teach Them Diligently
Biblical Worldview in a Modern World | 178

Homeschooling Families by Teach Them Diligently

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 39:55


Many worldviews exist in our culture and none of them are neutral. SO, it is the responsibility of every Christian parent to train their children's worldview to be centered in Jesus Christ. With that in mind, we are excited to welcome Davy Liu to the podcast today. Davy has an incredibly interesting testimony about how God used his incredible artistic talent at Disney and then how He led Davy away to create content with a distinctly Christian message.  Meet the Guest:Growing up, Davy struggled with his academic studies in Taiwan. The idea that “you are nobody unless you become like the perfect kid next door” led him to be consumed by the darkness of low self-esteem. During his first year in the United States, he found his life calling: not in making straight A's but in drawing straight lines. His artistic talent quickly led him to work for Walt Disney Animation on classic films such as Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, The Lion King, Mulan and Star Wars franchise. Davy Liu is the president of Kendu Films in Los Angeles. Davy is an innovative creator who brings stories of faith and hope to the world—a pioneer in bringing imaginative storytelling to the corporate world with story-driven products and services, creating timeless content and IP to inspire individuals, families, and businesses.Podcast Sponsor: Cedarville University is home to more than 4,700 students in southwest Ohio. Students spend approximately 1,000 days in college, no matter where they go. Cedarville is committed to helping students make the most of every one of those days with a mission to transform lives through excellent academics and intentional discipleship in submission to biblical authority. Students graduate from Cedarville ready to make a Kingdom impact in their careers, their churches, and their communities. They leave bolder, wiser, and closer to Christ. Learn more at teachthemdiligently.net/cedarville Homeschooling for the Heart, How Amazing Parents Become Excellent Home Educators. It's available now in digital form for only $5, and I sincerely believe it will be a great help and encouragement to you as you homeschool and parent your precious children. Go to TeachThemDiligently.net/book to learn more and download your copy today. I've been overwhelmed by and grateful for the feedback I've already received from those who have read it, and I'm eager to hear your thoughts as well. Additional Resources:Find out more about Kendu Kids by clicking HERE Watch about Davy's testimony "Lion King to the King of Kings" HERE

AmerikanskaNyhetsanalyser
Av1755: Västvärlden - en civilisation värd att försvaras också 2022

AmerikanskaNyhetsanalyser

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 59:58


Ronie Berggren och John Gustavsson samtalar i denna repris från 2015 om vad Västvärlden är och varför Västvärlden är värd att försvaras. Det görs utifrån tre böcker: Den brittisk-amerikanske historikern Niall Fergusons bok "Civilization: The West and the Rest", den konservativa brittiske EU-parlamentarikern Daniel Hannans bok "Inventing Freedom: How the English-Speaking Peoples Made the Modern World", och den konservativa amerikanske historikern Robert Kagans bok "The World America Made". I en tid, med den ryska invasionen av Ukraina, ett Kina som vill utmana USA i bortre Asien och en snabbt växande islamisk dominanskultur som vill härska över det västerländska, är det av yttersta vikt att västerlänningar lär sig förstå sitt eget arv, vilket beskrivs i detta avsnitt. ------- STÖD AMERIKANSKA NYHETSANALYSER: http://usapol.blogspot.com/p/stod-oss-support-us.html

Guidelines For Living Devotional
Finding Jesus In The Modern World

Guidelines For Living Devotional

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 4:50


For a few well-deserved minutes, sit back and relax, and ponder how different things might have been if Jesus Christ had been born in today's world instead of the first century Palestine. Naturally, any event today of even minimal importance is a media happening; and who would deny that the best way to get sensational coverage is to claim something is supernatural, out of the ordinary, perhaps even bizarre, and what would be more "news worthy" than the allegation that God has actually become man, to say nothing of the interesting angle that a baby is born without a human father.

Compass Evangelical Free Church
Christmas Podcast Ep. 4 - Mary's Magnificat for a Modern World, ft. Corey Webel

Compass Evangelical Free Church

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 7:11


Listen in as Corey Webel reflects on Mary's Magnificat and how we can cultivate joy in this Christmas season.

The Salt Lake Tribune's Mormon Land
How a ‘radiant' faith can change the world through giving | Episode 265

The Salt Lake Tribune's Mormon Land

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 34:55


From Mormonism's beginnings in the 19th century, founder Joseph Smith felt a strong responsibility to care for his burgeoning flock of mostly poor farmers and religious seekers. Waves of immigrant converts came from parts of the East Coast and Europe to form what they hoped would be a new Zion society. More than a quarter of what Smith said were divine revelations contained in the faith's Doctrine and Covenants relate to economics, according to Warner Woodworth, emeritus professor of organizational behavior at Brigham Young University. And they were all about communitarian economics — equality and care for those in need. Woodworth has spent his decadeslong career urging members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to “follow the prophet” on his drive toward utopian communities. It is what he argued in his first book, “Working Toward Zion: Principles of the United Order in the Modern World” and is central to his just published, “Radiant Mormonism: Using Our Faith in Christ to Power World-Changing Service.” On this week's show, Woodworth talks about his book, these principles, how they changed his approach to Christmas and why it truly is “more blessed to give than to receive.”

The Meaning of Catholic
The Roman Catechism Explained for the Modern World

The Meaning of Catholic

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022


Join the MOC Guild family to access Guild content and communityOR donate Watch The Kennedy Report Paleocrat Patreon Terror of Demons: Reclaiming Traditional Catholic Masculinity City of God vs. City of Man (the Manifesto of this Apostolate)

Catholic Family News's Podcast
Special Report: Roman Catechism Explained

Catholic Family News's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 30:36


Mr. Matthew Plese joins Brian McCall to discuss his new book project, The Roman Catechism Explained for the Modern World (available at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0BNV4RSYD?&linkCode=sl1&tag=acatlif-20&linkId=5f5be5f29d11b576b1befc644bafde59&language=en_US&ref_=as_li_ss_tl) They discuss the history of the Roman Catechism and answer the question why it needs to be explained for the modern world.  

Rádio Escafandro
82: O homem que quase destruiu o mundo (duas vezes)

Rádio Escafandro

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 63:49


No começo do século passado, um homem chamado Thomas Midgley revolucionou a indústria automotiva. Na época, ele trabalhava para uma empresa de engenharia que prestava serviço para a General Motors. Midgley descobriu que, ao adicionar uma pequena quantidade de chumbo na gasolina, os motores ganhavam muito em potência e em eficiência, e quebravam menos. A descoberta permitiu carros maiores e mais confortáveis. Ajudou a criar os Estados Unidos das autoestradas e a moldar o fascínio do mundo inteiro pelos automóveis. Mas, ao mesmo tempo, envenenou o planeta com um metal pesado e nocivo à saúde humana. Anos mais tarde, ainda trabalhando para a GM, Midgley fez outra descoberta que revolucionaria a indústria. Ele foi o primeiro a usar o gás clorofluorcarbono na refrigeração. Os carros ganharam aparelhos de ar-condicionado, as casas ganharam geladeiras mais seguras e a humanidade ganhou latinhas de aerosol. Como consequência, o céu sobre a Antártica ganhou um buraco na camada de ozônio que tornou o câncer de pele e outras doenças mais comuns. A partir das invenções de Thomas Midgley, este episódio reflete sobre o impacto muitas vezes nocivo que nossas invenções causam no planeta. E sobre a postura da humanidade diante de questões atuais, como as mudanças climáticas provocadas pelo aquecimento global. Mergulhe mais fundo Breve história de quase tudo Prometheans in the Lab: Chemistry and the Making of the Modern World (em inglês) Cautionary Tales – The inventor who almost ended the world (podcast em inglês) Radiolab - Heavy Metal (podcast em inglês) Ozone Crisis: The 15-Year Evolution of a Sudden Global Emergency (em inglês) Joe Farman (1930–2013) Susan Solomon and Stephen Andersen on Saving the Ozone Layer (podcast em inglês) Episódios relacionados 08: Bem-vindo ao churrasco do apocalipse 29: E se a gente fosse índio? Entrevistados do episódio Alberto Setzer Graduado em engenharia mecânica pela Escola de Engenharia Mauá, com mestrado em engenharia ambiental - Technion Institute of Technology, doutorado em engenharia ambiental - Purdue University (1982) e pós-doutorado no Joint Research Center/EEC. Pesquisador do INPE, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais. Giovana Girardi Jornalista de ambiente e ciência. Repórter e apresentadora do podcast Tempo Quente. Ficha técnica Trilha sonora tema: Paulo Gama, Mixagem: João Victor Coura Design das capas: Cláudia Furnari Concepção, produção, roteiro, edição e apresentação: Tomás Chiaverini Trilha incidental: Blue Dot

The Mikhaila Peterson Podcast
Christianity In The Modern World | Whaddo You Meme? EP 173

The Mikhaila Peterson Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 61:44


In this episode, I spoke with Jon McCray from the Youtube Channel called “Whaddo You Meme??”, where he discusses and comments on Christianity and culture. Jon uses his channel to explain, spread and promote the Christian faith while answering common questions about how it intersects with people and current events. We covered how Jon became a Christian YouTuber, why he became Christian and common questions about Christianity. I share my experience with Christianity, attending church, and what led me there. We also spoke about “Woke Churches'' and what is happening with Christianity in the modern world. If you enjoyed this conversation, please consider subscribing :) –Follow Jon– Whaddo You Meme?? Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/@whaddoyoumeme Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/whaddoyoumeme/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/whaddoyoumeme/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/WhaddoYouMeme? –Follow Me– Audio - https://linktr.ee/mikhailapeterson Twitter - https://twitter.com/MikhailaFuller​​ Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/mikhailapeterson Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/mikhailapetersonpodcast Lion Diet - https://linktr.ee/liondiet Telegram - https://t.me/mikhailapeterson #Mikhailapetersonpodcast #Whaddoyoumeme #JonMccray #Christianity #Christianquestions

Historically Thinking: Conversations about historical knowledge and how we achieve it

If the Parthian Empire is known at all, it's by students of Roman history who see it pop up from time to time, before disappearing once again. Marcus Licinius Crassus, a member of the first triumvirate– consisting of himself, Pompey, and  Julius Caesar– died in battle against the Parthians. At the moment of his assasination, Caesar was preparing for a campaign against Parthia; and  Mark Anthony, of the second triumvirate, was defeated by the Parthians when he attempted to realize Caesar's dream. The Emperor Trajan some 150 years later finally achieved victories against Parthia, making his way as far as the shore of the Persian Gulf. But who were the Parthians, on their own terms, not just as antagonists of the Romans? Where did they come from? How did they come to power? What was the extent of their Empire? And how were they integrated with the world around them, apart from their seemingly continual warfare with the ever-growing Roman Empire? With me to answer these questions is Nicholas Overtoom, Assistant Professor of History at Washington State University, and author of Reign of Arrows: The Rise of the Parthian Empire in the Hellenistic Middle East. For Further Investigation Think of this as the second in a series of conversations on the powers and principalities that occupied the territory of Iran. The first of these was with Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones, about the Achaemenid Persian Empire. Some time in the next six months we'll get to the Sassanids, who overthrew the Parthians. For more on the importance of nomads, see my conversation with Pamela Crossley in Episode 185; her book on the importance of nomadic thought and culture for all of Eurasia is Hammer and Anvil: Nomad Rulers at the Forge of the Modern World.

OnePeterFive Podcast
The Roman Catechism Explained for the Modern World

OnePeterFive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 57:03


PRINT: https://www.amazon.com/Roman-Catechism-Explained-Modern-World-ebook/dp/B0BNSZBX2T/ref=sr_1_2?crid=WGDU4S6Y1N9K&keywords=matthew+plese&qid=1670518499&sprefix=matthew+plese%2Caps%2C129&sr=8-2

Couples Synergy: Real Couples, Real Stories
241: Dating in a Modern World - feat. author Glen Sandifer

Couples Synergy: Real Couples, Real Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 56:44


THE MIDDLE GROUND: a podcast about love, marriage & relationships by relationship experts Dr. Ray & Jean offering relationship advice for couples, we talk author, Glen Sandifer about how to get great dating outcomes in a modern world To learn more about Glen and his book, visit: https://www.themiddlegroundbook.com/ Please subscribe to our podcast and leave us a comment and review. If you have questions, topic suggestions or would like to be considered as guests, email us at contact@couplessynergy.com. For more information about Couples Synergy, look us up online at Couplessynergy.com

KQED’s Forum
To the Moon, Stars and Beyond with Musician Valerie June

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 55:35


Singer and songwriter Valerie June defies genre – she can be a little country and a little rock and roll and there's also folk, blues, soul, Appalachian and a sound that's downright ethereal. But her music is all her own, she's called it, "organic moonshine roots music," and it's beautiful. She joins us to play a few songs on her banjolele and to talk about her latest album "The Moon and Stars: Prescriptions for Dreamers," her West Tennessee roots, her poems and her new children's book, "Somebody to Love." Guests: Valerie June, singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist; author of the new children's book "Somebody to Love" - and a recent book of poetry, "Maps for the Modern World"

The Womb Room Podcast
Ancient Bodies, Modern World: Tending to Mold Toxicity with Ciera Tavana

The Womb Room Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 97:48


From bloating to brain fog, menstrual pain and even dementia…could mold be an invisible factor? This week we have my friend, Womb Room member, artist and wellness guide Ciera Tavana sharing her personal story of mold exposure, and her autonomous process of investigation that led her down the path of healing and integration. In our conversation: Ciera's personal health journey and how she became curious about mold as a cause Navigating bloating, fatigue, brain fog and other symptoms How she went through a healing process, even without ever doing testing The histamine process that is related to mold reactions, and the function of mast cells Aan ancestral and spiritual orientation to tending and preventing mold Why tending the nervous system is important in healing histamine responses Ciera's work MUSE, and her upcoming program Connect with Ciera and MUSE on Instagram, and check out her small-group, personalized support in the winter Ancestral Wellness program -- enrolling now! It seems that mold toxicity has become far more common in recent years, and as I navigate the effects with my own family, I'm so grateful to find great resources. A couple of them are: Book - Toxic: Heal Your Body from Mold Toxicity, Lyme Disease, Multiple Chemical Sensitivities, and Chronic Environmental Illness Instagram: Dr. Angela Lucterhand has good mold resources in her highlights section I used Great Plains Lab for a home mycotoxin test (a bit pricey but it was worth it because my dad didn't believe me until he got the results!) A cheap way to test if mycotoxins are impacting your brain with an online visual test -- I'm still understanding how this works, but so far it has been accurate in my experience   Join The Womb Room Community Membership for a deeper dive into body literacy and womb-centered living SOVEREIGN WOMBAN is my year-long foundational program for radical female health and energetic sovereignty.

Just and Sinner Podcast
Roland Barthes (Makers of the Modern World)

Just and Sinner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 64:39


This continuation of the Makers of the Modern World series centers on Roland Barthes and the death of the author.

The John Batchelor Show
5/8: About those MIT and Stanford crypto currency talents: 5/8: The Aristocracy of Talent: How Meritocracy Made the Modern World, by Adrian Wooldridge Hardcover – June 3, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 11:34


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 5/8: About those MIT and Stanford crypto currency talents: 5/8:  The Aristocracy of Talent: How Meritocracy Made the Modern World, by  Adrian Wooldridge  Hardcover – June 3, 2021  The Times (UK) book of the year! Meritocracy: the idea that people should be advanced according to their talents rather than their birth. While this initially seemed like a novel concept, by the end of the twentieth century it had become the world's ruling ideology. How did this happen, and why is meritocracy now under attack from both right and left? In The Aristocracy of Talent, esteemed journalist and historian Adrian Wooldridge traces the history of meritocracy forged by the politicians and officials who introduced the revolutionary principle of open competition, the psychologists who devised methods for measuring natural mental abilities, and the educationalists who built ladders of educational opportunity. He looks outside western cultures and shows what transformative effects it has had everywhere it has been adopted, especially once women were brought into the meritocratic system. Wooldridge also shows how meritocracy has now become corrupted and argues that the recent stalling of social mobility is the result of failure to complete the meritocratic revolution. Rather than abandoning meritocracy, he says, we should call for its renewa

The John Batchelor Show
7/8: About those MIT and Stanford crypto currency talents: 7/8: The Aristocracy of Talent: How Meritocracy Made the Modern World, by Adrian Wooldridge Hardcover – June 3, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 7:24


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 7/8: About those MIT and Stanford crypto currency talents: 7/8:  The Aristocracy of Talent: How Meritocracy Made the Modern World, by  Adrian Wooldridge  Hardcover – June 3, 2021  The Times (UK) book of the year! Meritocracy: the idea that people should be advanced according to their talents rather than their birth. While this initially seemed like a novel concept, by the end of the twentieth century it had become the world's ruling ideology. How did this happen, and why is meritocracy now under attack from both right and left? In The Aristocracy of Talent, esteemed journalist and historian Adrian Wooldridge traces the history of meritocracy forged by the politicians and officials who introduced the revolutionary principle of open competition, the psychologists who devised methods for measuring natural mental abilities, and the educationalists who built ladders of educational opportunity. He looks outside western cultures and shows what transformative effects it has had everywhere it has been adopted, especially once women were brought into the meritocratic system. Wooldridge also shows how meritocracy has now become corrupted and argues that the recent stalling of social mobility is the result of failure to complete the meritocratic revolution. Rather than abandoning meritocracy, he says, we should call for its renewa

The John Batchelor Show
6/8: About those MIT and Stanford crypto currency talents: 6/8: The Aristocracy of Talent: How Meritocracy Made the Modern World, by Adrian Wooldridge Hardcover – June 3, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 10:28


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 6/8: About those MIT and Stanford crypto currency talents: 6/8:  The Aristocracy of Talent: How Meritocracy Made the Modern World, by  Adrian Wooldridge  Hardcover – June 3, 2021  The Times (UK) book of the year! Meritocracy: the idea that people should be advanced according to their talents rather than their birth. While this initially seemed like a novel concept, by the end of the twentieth century it had become the world's ruling ideology. How did this happen, and why is meritocracy now under attack from both right and left? In The Aristocracy of Talent, esteemed journalist and historian Adrian Wooldridge traces the history of meritocracy forged by the politicians and officials who introduced the revolutionary principle of open competition, the psychologists who devised methods for measuring natural mental abilities, and the educationalists who built ladders of educational opportunity. He looks outside western cultures and shows what transformative effects it has had everywhere it has been adopted, especially once women were brought into the meritocratic system. Wooldridge also shows how meritocracy has now become corrupted and argues that the recent stalling of social mobility is the result of failure to complete the meritocratic revolution. Rather than abandoning meritocracy, he says, we should call for its renewa

The John Batchelor Show
8/8: About those MIT and Stanford crypto currency talents: 8/8: The Aristocracy of Talent: How Meritocracy Made the Modern World, by Adrian Wooldridge Hardcover – June 3, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 13:14


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 8/8: About those MIT and Stanford crypto currency talents: 8/8:  The Aristocracy of Talent: How Meritocracy Made the Modern World, by  Adrian Wooldridge  Hardcover – June 3, 2021  The Times (UK) book of the year! Meritocracy: the idea that people should be advanced according to their talents rather than their birth. While this initially seemed like a novel concept, by the end of the twentieth century it had become the world's ruling ideology. How did this happen, and why is meritocracy now under attack from both right and left? In The Aristocracy of Talent, esteemed journalist and historian Adrian Wooldridge traces the history of meritocracy forged by the politicians and officials who introduced the revolutionary principle of open competition, the psychologists who devised methods for measuring natural mental abilities, and the educationalists who built ladders of educational opportunity. He looks outside western cultures and shows what transformative effects it has had everywhere it has been adopted, especially once women were brought into the meritocratic system. Wooldridge also shows how meritocracy has now become corrupted and argues that the recent stalling of social mobility is the result of failure to complete the meritocratic revolution. Rather than abandoning meritocracy, he says, we should call for its renewa

The John Batchelor Show
4/8: About those MIT and Stanford crypto currency talents: 4/8: The Aristocracy of Talent: How Meritocracy Made the Modern World, by Adrian Wooldridge Hardcover – June 3, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 8:59


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 4/8: About those MIT and Stanford crypto currency talents: 4/8:  The Aristocracy of Talent: How Meritocracy Made the Modern World, by  Adrian Wooldridge  Hardcover – June 3, 2021  The Times (UK) book of the year! Meritocracy: the idea that people should be advanced according to their talents rather than their birth. While this initially seemed like a novel concept, by the end of the twentieth century it had become the world's ruling ideology. How did this happen, and why is meritocracy now under attack from both right and left? In The Aristocracy of Talent, esteemed journalist and historian Adrian Wooldridge traces the history of meritocracy forged by the politicians and officials who introduced the revolutionary principle of open competition, the psychologists who devised methods for measuring natural mental abilities, and the educationalists who built ladders of educational opportunity. He looks outside western cultures and shows what transformative effects it has had everywhere it has been adopted, especially once women were brought into the meritocratic system. Wooldridge also shows how meritocracy has now become corrupted and argues that the recent stalling of social mobility is the result of failure to complete the meritocratic revolution. Rather than abandoning meritocracy, he says, we should call for its renewa

The John Batchelor Show
3/8: About those MIT and Stanford crypto currency talents: 3/8: The Aristocracy of Talent: How Meritocracy Made the Modern World, by Adrian Wooldridge Hardcover – June 3, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 11:23


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 3/8: About those MIT and Stanford crypto currency talents: 3/8:  The Aristocracy of Talent: How Meritocracy Made the Modern World, by  Adrian Wooldridge  Hardcover – June 3, 2021  The Times (UK) book of the year! Meritocracy: the idea that people should be advanced according to their talents rather than their birth. While this initially seemed like a novel concept, by the end of the twentieth century it had become the world's ruling ideology. How did this happen, and why is meritocracy now under attack from both right and left? In The Aristocracy of Talent, esteemed journalist and historian Adrian Wooldridge traces the history of meritocracy forged by the politicians and officials who introduced the revolutionary principle of open competition, the psychologists who devised methods for measuring natural mental abilities, and the educationalists who built ladders of educational opportunity. He looks outside western cultures and shows what transformative effects it has had everywhere it has been adopted, especially once women were brought into the meritocratic system. Wooldridge also shows how meritocracy has now become corrupted and argues that the recent stalling of social mobility is the result of failure to complete the meritocratic revolution. Rather than abandoning meritocracy, he says, we should call for its renewa