Podcasts about Dollywood

theme park in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee

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Latest podcast episodes about Dollywood

Disney Travel for All
Episode 081: My Fabulous Fall Road Trip, Part 1

Disney Travel for All

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 72:04


In this episode… My fabulous fall road trip took me through 8 states, 8 hotels, and 2,500 miles of driving over the course of 16 days. I share the highlights, where I want to go back for a return visit, and what I'd do differently next time.  Resources from this episode In Episode 062, we discussed first visit tips from a Dollywood Insider.   In Episode 077, I shared my top 10 tips to travel solo without feeling lonely.   Visit Buc-ees on your next road trip!   The Biltmore Estate in Asheville, North Carolina is definitely worth a visit!   The Great Smoky Mountains National Park is not to be missed!   Dollywood and Dollywood's DreamMore Resort lived up to my every dream, and I will be back!   Connie Viglietti is offering discounts to Me and the Magic podcast listeners! Book an intuitive healing session with Connie at ConnieViglietti.com.    The Human Condition has a great description of Reiki and long-distance Reiki.    Cruise with Us! In Episode 069, we shared all the details of our first group cruise! We will be sailing on the Disney Fantasy, November 11-18, 2023, for a Very Merrytime 7-night Eastern Caribbean sailing with stops at Tortola (British Virgin Islands), St. Thomas (US Virgin Islands), and Disney's Castaway Cay (Bahamas). Join us for this special cruise! Find all the details at Me and the Magic, and request a free quote.  You must book with the official group to be part of all the group activities (and surprises!). Join Our Community Join the Me and the Magic Facebook community to share your love of solo travel, Disney travel, and more with new friends. Plus, share your thoughts and questions on this episode with the community! Connect with Me Is there a topic you'd like us to discuss? Email Amanda at amanda@meandthemagic.com.   Are you on Instagram? Follow Me and the Magic to see my latest travel escapades.  Podcast Subscribe to this podcast so you will be the first to hear new episodes!  If you are enjoying the podcast, I'd greatly appreciate it if you could rate and review it on Apple Podcasts. The reviews help other people find this podcast.  Online Shop Buy some fun travel and pop culture shirts and more, at our online shop! 

Ride This One Podcast
RTO - EP108 - F@$K KANYE!

Ride This One Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 89:42


Yeezy Have Mercy It's Episode108 of Ride This One Podcast! Join us as we play catch up with all the news. No surprise we missed the Wildcat's Revenge announcement by 1 day! So Sit back and smoke a bowl and come to our Meet Up Nov 11-13 2022 at Dollywood! BIG BEAR MOUNTING! Website - www.RideThisOne.com Call or Text the show! 26-RIDE-THIS (267) 433-8447 Follow The Show! Facebook - Twitter - Subscribe Bitch! Join the Ride This One discord! https://linktr.ee/RideThisOne BUY MERCH! https://www.teepublic.com/user/ridethisone Follow the RTO CREW! @RTOSlater @RTOGoliath @RTOMuscleDaddy 

Nashville Daily
Our First Dollywood Experience | Episode 935

Nashville Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 42:02


Love grilled cheese? Well unfortunately you're not going to like this restaurant closing. Clarksville's downtown is making progress on a major money maker for the city. Plus, we review our first trip to Dollywood.New YouTube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKjWKXfpjtNL0oL2R6MKSxwTake a Tour With Us! Use code NASH for 20% off - https://www.xplrnash.com/toursToday's Sponsors: Brad Reynolds  https://thinkbrad.com/Blessed Day Coffee   https://www.blesseddaycoffee.com/   Use Code "XPLR20" for 20% off at checkoutNash NewsFeeling bleu: Another Grilled Cheeserie location going awayhttps://www.newschannel5.com/news/cheesy-come-cheesy-go-another-location-closing-for-grilled-cheeserieConstruction on Clarksville's F&M Bank Arena to finish in 2023 https://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/news/2022/10/26/f-m-bank-arena-construction-clarksville-predators.htmlOur First Dollywood ExperienceResort - https://www.dollywood.com/resort/Inside - https://www.dollywood.com/resort/about-the-resort/Food - https://www.dollywood.com/resort/dining/Lodge - https://www.dollywood.com/heartsong/Pink Jeep - https://www.dollywood.com/deals/special-offers/dmr-pink-jeep/Park - https://www.dollywood.com/themepark/Rides - https://www.dollywood.com/themepark/rides/Decor/Festivals - https://www.dollywood.com/themepark/festivals/Food - https://www.dollywood.com/themepark/dining/Timesaver Pass - https://www.dollywood.com/themepark/guest-services/timesaver-pass/Nashville Daily Artist of the Day Playlist   https://open.spotify.com/playlist/51eNcUWPg7qtj8KECrbuwx?si=nEfxeOgmTv6rFUyhVUJY9AFollow us @ XPLR NASH   Website -  https://nashvilledailypodcast.com/   YouTube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/c/xplrnash   Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/xplr.nash/   Twitter - https://twitter.com/xplr_nash   NASHVILLE & XPLR MERCH - https://www.xplrnash.com/shopMedia and other inquiries please email hello@xplr.life

Something Shiny: ADHD!
Want to feel more productive?

Something Shiny: ADHD!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 24:07


The first thing David wants to talk about how amazing Dolly Parton is, how he's heard more amazing things that she's done in the last six months and it blows his mind.. Isabelle references the podcast Dolly Parton's America, about how Jad Abumrad's (of Radiolab's) dad befriended Dolly Parton, and just how beloved she is and why that might be. David names Imagination Library, which gives free books to kids 5 and under every month to encourage literacy, because her own dad never had a chance to learn how to learn how to read. Isabelle really wants to go to Dollywood, and David's partner Robin went, and it was amazing and is like Orlando in the Smokies. The other thing David wants to talk about is norepinephrine, a neurotransmitter that plays a key role in ADHD and it's almost a crime we haven't mentioned it before, focusing so much on dopamine. Dopamine is still really important, but both are. Imagine that neurotransmitters are like a light switch, they are on or off (whereas hormones are like a thermostat, you change the temperature and then it slowly brings the body back up to it). Dopamine is the reward or satisfaction feeling, it's sex drugs and rock n' roll, it's raising the stakes and feeling the risk and then doing the thing anyway. For example, as you procrastinate and then do the task, you feel dopamine as you inch closer to getting your task done, because it's giving you the feeling of achievement, but as soon as you're done, the dopamine is gone. As folx with ADHD, we are dopamine deficient, so we're kind of starving for it, it's a little bump we're getting as opposed to a full high of dopamine. David uses the example of researching a knife, and he went down this massive research wormhole, and he buys the knife, and the moment it came, it was like “Yay, it's here.” (Crickets chirping). The shine and newness goes away, and he still likes the life, the handoff in that moment is from dopamine being the lead thing, and then norepinephrine comes in. So if we're hunter-gatherers, the dopamine comes in when you're hunting, as Isabelle points out, it'd be evolutionarily beneficial to have the process be rewarding, and the moment you hunt and then you feel productive, that's norepinephrine kicking in, that feeling of being productive. It connects to motivation, and the thoughts that you have, how you think about things, and Nora, as David calls norepinephrine, is amazing, she is involved with the self-talk in your head, and when there's too much, there is negative self-talk cycles we can get into. Motivation isn't always pleasant, because we can shame ourselves or beat ourselves up. Isabelle names that she thought the I did it feeling is dopamine. It can be hard to get things started or finish them, using the gatherer metaphor, it can be rough getting out to find the berry bush, but then you get the dopamine once you found the bush and are picking the berries, and then again the let down once you've found them all—Isabelle wonders if it's a pleasant feeling, having this norepinephrine trade off? David names it can easily be manipulated by how you think about things. If you feel like you did nothing but brush your teeth today, then that's how you feel. But if you brushed your teeth after just breaking a leg and having food poisoning, you'd feel differently about it, you'd feel so grateful you did the thing—you get the burst from feeling validated. Isabelle keeps clarifying dopamine is the thrill of the hunt or the chase or the online shopping cart building, or researching cutting boards (which synchronicitously with David's knife-researching example, Isabelle is now doing), ends once you order it, is norepinephrine the moment when you've ordered the thing. The dopamine goes down once you've finished the task, it goes away because it makes you want the next thing (it pushes you to seek that reward again), like David ordering all the video games, and only playing with two of the games. Isabelle is still confused: is it the feeling that comes after the thing happens that forces us to pause and reflect on what just happened. It's more complicated than this, so David is being purposefully vague, but it's connected to our perception of productivity, worth, and work. If dopamine is what helped you get through the day, norepinephrine is how do you feel about the day you just did, it's around wins and accomplishments. If dopamine is the lights, norepinephrine is evaluating the light show. David thinks about it in his life, there are some days where he mowed the lawn, went to hardware store, saw a friend, did laundry, “what a productive day!” And then he feels the WOOO that's norepinephrine. Dopamine is really connected with being distracted by auditory outside things, whereas too much norepinephrine, you are distracted by internal judgments. If you're ruminating a lot, or evaluating what you just said to the friend, replaying your day a lot, that's norepinephrine, and if you have too much it can get you caught in that. Our brains have a solid negativity bias, we pay more attention to doubt, fear, uncertainty, and if we're ruminating and analyzing a lot, it would be a set up to be negative. Norepinephrine is what we practice: if we're very practiced in feeling anxiety, we would be reinforced to anxiously review the things. The practice when you don't need it for it to actually happen when you do, you have to make it a reflex, it would be take too much energy. David uses the example when driving, he sees a car swerving in front of him, he practices thinking they have to go to the bathroom, or they have an emergency, that's why they're driving so wildly, as opposed to thinking they are awful people, because he truly does not have data in either direction.All the Dolly Parton thingsJad Abumrad and Shima Oliaee's podcast: Dolly Parton's AmericaDolly Parton's ties to Moderna Vaccine (she gave $1M to Vanderbilt, which helped fund three pandemic-related research projects including the one that helped develop the Moderna vaccine; source NPR)  Dolly Parton's Imagination LibraryDollywoodOur brain's negativity bias and interview with one of the people who researches this and wrote a book on it (article from Berkeley's Greater Good magazine)DAVID'S DEFINITIONS Dopamine deficiency? ADHD is often understood as neurobiological (brain) difference, that includes lower levels of dopamine, the neurotransmitter (messenger chemical) in our brain that gives us feelings of satisfaction and reward—the feeling of YOU ARE DOING IT… Another way of viewing it is a neurotypical person has a shot-glass-sized need for dopamine and so little bits of dopamine fill it up enough to feel that satiation, whereas a person with ADHD has a pint-glass-sized need for dopamine. At times, you need a lot more dopamine and are starving for it, but at other times, you have so much dopamine it is so rewarding (and perhaps the reward feeling while eating that doughnut is actually that much greater), but it also makes it even harder to pull away or transition from getting that dopamine to not (imagine how hard it is to not keep watching a show you love or how it would feel if someone suddenly unplugged the tv). Keep in mind that dopamine is just one of the neurotransmitters doing some fun other stuff where ADHD is concerned.Neurotransmitters: a messenger chemical in the brain, there are tons of them, most currently talked about include serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine, that work like a lightswitch, they are either on or off.  Dopamine: gives you feelings of satisfaction and reward (the feeling of YOU'RE DOING IT!), sex, drugs, rock n' roll, raising the stakes and making things riskier can release dopamine as you do the task anyway (like as you procrastinate and feel the relief of getting the thing you've procrastinated done). As soon as you finish the task, dopamine is done: the dopamine is generated in doing the task and anticipating the task.  It's the lights. Norepinephrine: Once a task is done, this kicks in with that “I was productive” or “not” feeling. It connects to motivation, the sense you DID the thing. It can be easily manipulated by the way you think about things, so it's not inherently a pleasant or unpleasant feeling, it's just coming in to help you pause and slow down and evaluate (and it is more complicated than that) and how you use it can be up to you a bit. Our perception of productivity, worth, and work.  It's evaluating the light show. -----Cover Art by: Sol VázquezTechnical Support by: Bobby Richards—————

Cadillac Jack - My Second Act
Olivia Wilde, Dolly Parton and why we may lose the podcast

Cadillac Jack - My Second Act

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 48:06


Do you fool around? If so, you'll want to listen closely to this episode of Cadillac Jack: My Second Act.   Is she blonde? Or newly blonde? You ever see a haircut that just makes you go… silent? Well, it happened to Donna on a trip this weekend. We cover how to react in those situations and end up in Dollywood. No, really.   Then we spend a few minutes on the Jason Sudeikis, Olivia Wilde and Harry Styles. What's worse: serving someone papers outside church on Easter? Or while their performing on stage? Olivia Wilde, Cadillac and Donna Jack swap stories and compare. It also includes some importance guidance for those who like to fool around while wearing Apple Watches. We just have one thing to say: be careful.   The show does return to Beauty and the Beast for a bit of trivia to fulfil our designation as a semi-musical podcast. (See what I did there?) And to really end the quota we take a look at Breaker Breaker One-Nine and what really gets one co-host going. It's the segment that really might kick the podcast off the airwaves. (As if- remember Episode 70?)   We do give a ring to General Lee John and return his message. It's not 23 years, it's 23 seasons. Capeesh? Don't shoot your musket this way General John. We know you're listening. Now go back to bed!   That's all we've got. Trust your hair. Hold it tight. Then give us a call. 7704646024.

Where's My Invite?
Ep. 78 - Dollywood Retrospective

Where's My Invite?

Play Episode Play 15 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 66:04


This week's episode is a hot one. The boys are back from their trip  to Dollywood and we discuss. As always we end on some quickies, but there's a twist. Also, spoilers for Smile. :)Intro/Outro:Last Summer by Ikson: http://www.soundcloud.com/ikson Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/n2oTA5JSk80Time stamps:00:00 - Intro00:31 - The Dollywood Trip27:58 - Autumn's Favorite Moment(s)38:33 - Trey's Favorite Moment(s)52:35 - Josh's Favorite Moment(s)

Visit My Smokies
Dollywood Wins Again: All The Details About Dollywood's 3 New Golden Ticket Awards

Visit My Smokies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


Have you heard the news!? Dollywood has just been awarded 3 more awards on top of being named America's best theme park back in June of 2022. That is 4 awards this year let alone! This is fantastic news for celebration not only for Dollywood, but the Smoky Mountains in general! Dollywood's future is looking bright! Here are all the details about Dollywood's 3 new Golden Ticket Awards: Best Guest Experience Award The Golden Ticket Awards have been around since 1998 and were established by Amusement Today to The post Dollywood Wins Again: All The Details About Dollywood's 3 New Golden Ticket Awards appeared first on Visit My Smokies.

I Said No Gifts!
Rob Huebel Disobeys Bridger

I Said No Gifts!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 97:22 Very Popular


Bridger is easy breezy despite Rob Huebel (Big Mouth, Medical Police) surprising him with a gift. The two discuss Dollywood, choosing an outfit during a house fire, and Mormon superstardom. Follow the show and play Gift or a Curse -Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/isaidnogifts/Twitter - https://twitter.com/isaidnogifts See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Ranking The Beatles
#135 - Getting Better with guest Debbie Davis (singer, musician)

Ranking The Beatles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 74:20 Very Popular


The yin and yang of Lennon and McCartney are rarely so perfectly on display as they are in the chorus of "Getting Better." Paul's eternal optimist, "I've got to admit it's getting better, a little better all the time" runs right up against the sardonic side of John: "It can't get no worse." On this Sgt. Pepper tune, they find meld an upbeat, bouncy melody with darker, quite self-aware lyrics about the worst parts of one's personality, and the human want to better one's self when love is involved. Sometimes we forget these guys are actually human, and made mistakes just like all of us. Though it maybe doesn't add much to the "concept" theme of Pepper, it's certainly a great and catchy song, and a band moment on a record where those full band moments start to become less frequent. We're thrilled to have our friend Debbie Davis back this week! One of the most revered singers in New Orleans, and now part of a touring bluegrass 80s cover band (how wild is that?), Debbie's knowledge of music and what makes things tick is always a pleasure to get to enjoy. We discuss all matter of issues, from traumatizing kid movies, the worst places to accidentally dose yourself, Jerry Garcia neckties, the lads' self-awareness, and Julia FINALLY gets with the porridge train! Be sure to follow Debbie's new band, Frankie Goes to Dollywood to see when they're headed your way! What do you think? Too high? Too low? Just right? Let us know in the comments on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/rankingthebeatles, Instagram @rankingthebeatles, or Twitter @rankingbeatles! Be sure to check out RTB's official website, www.rankingthebeatles.com and our brand new webstore!! RANK YOUR OWN BEATLES with our new RTB poster! Pick up a tshirt, coffee cup, tote bag, and more! Enjoying the show, and wanna show your support? Buy Us A Coffee! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rankingthebeatles/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rankingthebeatles/support

WELD™ by Weld.com
EP 71: Metal Sculptures PT 1

WELD™ by Weld.com

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 34:29


In this 2 part series, Beau sits down with Kevin Stone, A Metal Sculptor from British Colombia. In part one, we follow with a wild ride full of ups and downs through his journey into doing massive metal sculptures. Kevin talks about working with investors, transportation mishaps, and getting commissions including an eagle at Dollywood and a Game of Thrones dragon replica. Check out his excellent work on Instagram @metal_sculptor_kevin_stone --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/welddotcom/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/welddotcom/support

The State of Games
The One About Catching Up

The State of Games

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 129:54


In this episode, Chris, Darrell, and TC sit down and tell tales of everything they've been up to during the long hiatus, including a GenCon recap, a trip to Dollywood, Covid, and a complete computer meltdown. All this, plus impressions of the hottest roll-and-write in town  - Twilight Inscription - chasing tornadoes, a relaunch of the Dice Hate Me Games store, counting sheep, NASCAR racing, the king of Ireland, favorite spooky games, and more!

Haunted Attraction Network
BONUS: Haunted Attraction Industry News for Sept 28

Haunted Attraction Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 17:53


The ScareHouse opens at a new location, offering more room for scares; Three individuals were treated for injuries after a shooting at Kennywood Park's Phantom Fall Fest; Halloween Horror Nights - Universal Orlando unveils NFTs; Dollywood's Harvest Festival returns with new Hoot Owl Hollow as part of the Great Pumpkin LumiNights; Frightworld America's Screampark celebrates 20 Years of Fear with easter eggs from past years; Survive the zombie apocalypse with the new Nightmare at The Shops at Dos Lagos ; Haunter Night at The Dent Schoolhouse is scheduled for Thursday, September 29th; Cricklewood Immersive presents Boston Bar Bloodsuckers murder mystery; 13th Floor Haunted House Chicago celebrates its 9th season with two new attractions; The Old Joliet Haunted Prison returns select nights through November 5th; 13th Floor Haunted House Jacksonville celebrates 5 years of fear; Nashville Nightmare Haunted House opens with three new immersive attractions; 13th Floor Haunted House Phoenix features two new attractions; More than 1,000 strangers came together to throw an early Halloween celebration for a 5 year-old boy with terminal cancer; Tickets are now on sale for Season's Screamings by Midsummer Scream. Read more: https://mailchi.mp/hauntedattractionnetwork.com/haunt-news-scarehouse-moves-shooting-at-kennywood

Frommer's Day by Day Audio Walking Tours
Howdy, Dolly Parton Fans! Now You Can Book a Stay on Her Retired Tour Bus

Frommer's Day by Day Audio Walking Tours

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022


Dolly Parton's retired tour bus has been converted to a hotel suite at Dollywood's DreamMore Resort and Spa in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee. | Frommer's

I Survived Theatre School
Cullen Douglas

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 75:37


Intro: Even our lungs need a sense of purpose. Let Me Run This By You: Boz is buying a house!Interview: We talk to actor and documentary filmmaker Cullen Douglas about AMDA, Florida School of the Arts, Southeastern Theatre Conference, Tyne Daly, character actors, Jason Priestly, Patricia Crotty, Our Town, Lenny Bruce, Dick Van Dyke, investigative journalism, reusing caskets, David Carr,  Deadwood, playing Bilbo Baggins, being pen pals with Andrea McCardle, singing If I Were A Rich Man,  The Pirates of Penzance, Bye Bye Birdie, Robert Sean Leonard,  Billy Flanigan: The Happiest Man on Earth, Shonda Rhimes, Twin Peaks,  Grey's Anatomy ,  Barry, Bill Hader,  documentary filmmaking, The Humanitas Prize,  Private Practice.FULL TRANSCRIPT (Unedited): 1 (8s):I'm Jen Bosworth Ruez.2 (10s):And I'm Gina Paci.1 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it.2 (15s):20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of1 (20s):It all. We survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet?3 (33s):TikTok and I started looking at the videos and I was like, Ooh, I don't know about this. I think I need to start wearing wake up. So thank you. You1 (43s):Look gorgeous. How are3 (43s):You doing?1 (44s):Yeah, hi. I'm finally, Many things are happening. Many things are happening. So I finally, even though I'm coughing still little, I finally feel like I am, I like kicked the pneumonia bronchitis situation and little mostly thank you. I, yeah, I, we went away and then to Ventura and I slash Ojai and I really rested and I really, there was one day I worked, but I really mostly rested and I just really was like, okay, I need actual ass downtime. And yeah.1 (1m 25s):And then I started to heal and I was also on praise God for antibiotics. And then the thing that really helped me really kick it was I hadn't exercised my lungs in a really long time at all because I was so sick that I just was like, Who wants to like walk or, and, and it was 107 degrees, so it's like, who wants to exercise in that? So my cousin, my sister came in town, I, that's like a big eyebrow raise for, to drop my niece off to college. And we went on a hike to Griffith, but like a sloping hike, not a crazy hike. And I was like, I don't think I'm gonna be able to do it.1 (2m 5s):And it actually helped my lungs to like feel like they were contributing to fucking something and me like Forgot I3 (2m 16s):Like a sense of purpose. Right,1 (2m 17s):Right. And also like to, yeah, to have a job. And they were like, like to be exercised and I was like, Oh, I forgot that. Like the lungs. And, and it's interesting in this whole covid situation, like the lungs need to work too. And I never understood in hospitals, cuz I spent quite a long time in them, why they have those breathing like tube things that you blow the ball and the ball floats up. You have to, I thought that was so dumb until I had bronchitis and pneumonia and I was like, Oh, they have to work. Like they have to be expanded. If you don't use them and work them, they get, it's not good when,3 (2m 58s):When my dad, you know, my dad had this really bad car accident when I was like nine years old and yeah, he rolled 40 times and he wasn't wearing a seatbelt, which saved his life because he was in a convertible. But of course the reason he got into the accident was because he was drinking anyway. He broke everything. Like he broke six ribs and he had one of, he had to spend one year lying on an egg crate mattress on the floor one year. And for the rest of his life, every time he sneezed or coughed it hurt his ribs. But he,1 (3m 34s):Oh, and he3 (3m 36s):Had one of of those things like you're talking about. And as a child I could not get it to the height that I was supposed to go. I shuder to think what it would be like right now. Yes. So you're, that was a good reminder to exercise our lungs. I make sure my breathing capacity is good1 (3m 54s):And, and, and even wait and, and it's like, I always literally thought, oh, you exercise to be skinny. That is the only, only reason no other, like, if you had asked me, I'd say, Oh, there's no other reason. What are you talking about? But now I'm like, oh, these parts of us need actual exercising. Literally lie. I just, it blew my mind.3 (4m 19s):I was lies1 (4m 21s):The lies.3 (4m 22s):It's endless. Yes.1 (4m 27s):Hey, let me run this by you. Oh, I think we're buying a house. What? This is the craziest Oh my not in, Yeah. Okay. This is what went down. So this is so crazy. Miles' job stuff has evened out in terms of like, there's just so much going on that I can't talk about, but which is makes for terrible radio, but podcasting. But anyway, the point is we're we're a little stable, so we went to Ventura and I was like, I fucking love this town. I love Ventura. It's an hour away. It's a weird like, think lost boys, right? Like Lost Boys. The movie is, is really Santa Cruzi, but like, that's what this town reminded of.1 (5m 9s):It's not, so it's Adventurer county, so it's like an hour northwest. It's on the beach. And I was like, I love this town. I I I love it here. There's so many brown folk. It's heavily, heavily you Latina. And it's like, so anyway, I was like, I love it, but I bet I can't afford it like anywhere in California. Well it turns out that Ventura is about 500,000 less on a house than la. So I was like, wait, what? So we saw this darling house that was, that is was small but like beautiful craftsman and you know, I'll just say I'll be totally transparent with $729,000, which is still a shit ton of money.1 (5m 49s):But I looked at the same exact property almost in, in, in Pasadena for 1.3 million for two bedroom, one bath. Yeah. Two bedroom, one bath got preapproved. I've never been preapproved for anything in my goddamn light. We got preapproved for a mortgage. I couldn't, Gina, I couldn't. But when we got the preapproval letter, like I literally, speaking of lies, I was like, okay, well just expect him to come back and say we can't do anything for you.3 (6m 17s):Yeah, right.1 (6m 19s):Just really know it's not gonna work. And he wrote back and was like, Here's what we can do on this house the mortgage wise and it's comparable. It's in the ballpark of what we're paying in rent. And I was like, I don't wanna be going into my middle aged and later years in no space.3 (6m 39s):It really takes a toll. It really takes a toll on your psyche in a way that you can't really account for until you go from no space to having space. And then you go, oh my gosh, there's these three specific muscles in my shoulders that have been tense for the entire time I've been living in a city, you know, decades in some1 (6m 56s):Cases. So it's a whole different, I could build a little studio, like all the things. So yeah. So I'm grateful. Never would occur to me, never would have occurred to me. Never.3 (7m 6s):Do you care to say anything about your sister's visit?1 (7m 10s):Well, you know what is yes. And what is so comforting to me again, you know, if you listen to this podcast you're like, Oh my god, Jen, shut up. But about the truth. Okay. The truth is the fucking truth of, and even, even if it changes from person to person, that person's truth is the truth. And my truth is, I feel, So she came and she stayed not with me because I just, that what we were outta town. And then she stayed in my house while we were gone, which was fine with her, with my niece for one night. And then I saw her one day and that was, that was fine. And then she stayed with my cousin and it was, let's just say it was very, the, for me, my experience was, oh, someone else besides me sees the challenges.1 (7m 60s):And that's what I will say about that. There is something about being witnessed and having someone else go. I see, I feel what you're talking about.3 (8m 11s):Yes. Oh, I, I relate very deeply to that because people who are good at1 (8m 19s):Image image management,3 (8m 22s):At image management, a term I like is apparent competent.1 (8m 26s):Oh yes. Oh yes. I love that. I've never heard that. Apparent, competent. That is it.3 (8m 30s):Yes. Many, many people in life are apparently competent because all of their energy and effort goes into projecting very much just that idea and to be at home with them is a completely different thing. And I'm not saying like, Oh, you should always be competent in all areas of life or that I'm competent in all areas of life. I'm just saying like, yeah, there, there are some, some forms of personality disorders and just like, not even that, but just interpersonal problems are so kind of covert. And they're so, because I feel like people say, I feel like people are always trying to look for like the most broad, you know, big actions to determine whether somebody is1 (9m 13s):Whatever, nurse, whatever. They haven't been hospitalized, they've never been in rehab, they still have a house. You're like,3 (9m 20s):What? It's the same kind of mentality that says if you're not like in the gutter with a, with a mad dog in a paper bag that you're not an alcoholic, you know, it completely ignores probably what 85% of alcoholic for, which is highly functioning Correct. People who don't miss work and Correct. You know, maybe even people in their lives would never, ever know that they had a drinking problem. So yeah. So that is validating. I'm happy that for you, that you had that experience and sometimes it takes like 20, 30 years to get that validation. But the truth always, I mean, you know, it's true. That's the thing. It comes to the surface eventually.1 (9m 56s):Well, and the other thing is, I now as where I used to be so afraid of the truth and I still am, look, I I don't like getting, we know this about me, my feedback is hard for me. I'm scared of all the things, but I used to run from the truth like nobody's business in my own ways. Now I sort of clinging to it as, wait a second, wait a second, what is the truth of the matter? Like what are the facts here? Because I feel like that is the only way for me to not get kaka go, go crazy. And it is comforting. I am comforted in knowing that. Like, it was interesting. So I also am taking a solo show, writing class, I'm writing a new solo show, my third one.1 (10m 41s):And I'm just started and I thought, let me take a class with the woman who I taught. I did the first one in oh four in LA with, anyway, but I was saying on Facebook, like I, I, I'm taking this class with Terry and she's magic and I'm so glad I'm doing it and da da da. And she was like, Hey, I have a question for you. Can I quote you? And I was like, Yes. Because in her, in her like, for a and I said, of course it's all true. Like I didn't have to worry that my quote was somehow dirty or misleading or like, not really what I felt like I've done that so much in my life in the past where I've been like, oh shit, I told them I loved them or I loved their stuff, or I loved and I feel inside totally incongruent with that kind of thing.1 (11m 30s):No, I was like, no, these are what, these are my words now. I try to, it doesn't always work, but I try to just be like, okay, like what is the truth? And if someone had to quote me, would I be okay? And I, and I am a lot of the time I was like, of course you can. It's what I, I'm thanking for asking, but also it's what I feel in my bones about that, that you, that you have a magic when it comes to solo show teaching. That's it, it that is the truth. That my,3 (11m 55s):That is so cool. It's cool that you're doing that and I'll, that it, that gave me a reminder I had wanted to say on this podcast because you know, we had Jeremy Owens on the podcast. Yes. And he recently put on his social that he, he was doing it kind of as a joke, but I think he's actually doing it now, which is doing another solo show. And I had messaged him to say, you know, I meant what I said when I told you that you should do this and that I would help you and that goes for anybody cuz I said, I've said that to a lot of people on this podcast. Like, if you need help, you know, if this conversation has reinspired in you, a desire to go and do this other creative thing, please, I'm not saying like, I'm gonna co-write it with you.3 (12m 37s):I'm saying like, let me know if there's something I can do, if I can read it or, or, or bounce it off of you so that that stands for any of our previous guests. But tell us more about what, what's it gonna be about, what are you gonna be talking about? Well,1 (12m 51s):I don't entirely know, but where I'm leading is, it was interesting in this, See the thing I forgot means is that I like writing exercises. I never do them on my own. I never do. So this, she does writing exercises and a meditation before and I really longed and craved that because I spend so much of my hustle these days. How can I bring in income? How can I advance my career in Hollywood? And that is really shuts down the play aspect of all things. And I'm not saying, you know, I'm not saying that you, that I I'm not saying it's bad. All I'm saying is it totally eliminates for me the create like the really raw fun play creativity.1 (13m 37s):Okay? So in this, in this class, I just took it like, I just took the class. I was like, I'll do it. It's a masterclass in solo work, I'll do it. I like her. She called me, I was on the freeway and I was like, I'll do it. So right now the working title is, and also a solo show more or less. And I don't know if that's gonna change, but it is. Like I, and, and then in the exercise we did, we had our first class Sunday, it was all about, I realized that this solo show needs to be for me more of a call to action that that we, the, and it really comes from something you said, which is, I'm paraphrasing, but it's like we are our only hope, which is the good news and the bad news.1 (14m 25s):So like you said, we are the problem, I am the problem. Which is great. And also the, you know, terrible. So that is sort of this solo show is more gonna be about, it's like more activism based, but in a like creative arts activism way and, and not just a funny antidotes about my wacky family. And I mean, I would argue we could argue that like that my last solo show did have that underneath. But I think there needs to be a more like call to action for artists and people like us to start doing the things in the arts world that are gonna like help save the planet. And I don't know what that means yet, but she was like, oh this is like more of an activism piece based on what you're like it has that component to it.1 (15m 11s):And I was like, yeah. And then she said, if there was a banner, we did these cool exercise, she said, there's a banner all over town, whatever town you're in advertising your show, what would it say? And what came to mind in the meditation was it would be a red banner and it would just say, and it would say hope. And then in parentheses it would say sort of, So what I realized is I'm obsessed with the parentheses, like that's where I live. So I live in the world of I love my life parentheses, it's a fucking nightmare. So I love that kind of thing in my writing. And so I was like, okay, I'm really gonna embrace that. So it's like, it's like that, that stuff, I don't know where it's gonna go. I don't know what it's gonna happen.3 (15m 52s):Well two things. One is you have actually thrown out quite a few excellent titles for show, for solo shows. You'll periodically be like, that's the title of my new book or that's the title of my next, my next solo show. Yeah. So you might have to give a little re-listen to some episodes. I wish I could tell you which1 (16m 11s):I will.3 (16m 12s):Okay. The other thing is something that just came up for me when you said about the parenthesis, which I know exactly what you're talking about. I was saying like, oh yeah, she wants to show the good, the bad and the ugly. Oh. And something that occurred to me was like this concept of underbelly. Like you're showing yes, your soft underbelly. We are, I mean when I think when a person is maturing into themselves, that's what, that's the goal is to get to first accepting your own soft underbelly and then also contending with it and then representing it to the world. Because the thing that I've been on recently is like I have done myself and nobody else any favors for the amount of time I've spent misrepresenting myself because my misrepresenting myself has all been based on the lie that I thought there is a person that you are supposed to be, and your job is to be that person and you know, instead of like figure out the person that you are.3 (17m 10s):So, you know, coming into your own power is, is is a lot what we spend, what I spent my thirties about, like coming into your own power and not say that I arrived at it, but that No,1 (17m 23s):But3 (17m 24s):You about that. And then I think my forties are more about coming into my own vulnerability and that both of those things are really two sides of the same coin. Your power and your vulnerability, right? Because you can't have any power unless you're being honest about, you know, what the situation is. Today we are talking to Colin Douglas. Colin Douglas is an actor, writer, director, and documentary filmmaker who has been on absolutely everything. Most recently you've seen him on Barry and I love that for you.3 (18m 4s):But he's been, I joke in the, in our interview that he's been an absolutely every television show ever made. And that's only a slight exaggeration. He's been on Grey's Anatomy and Private Practice and the 2017 revival of Twin Peaks Agents of Shield, Pure genius. He's just been on everything Deadwood. So he's very experienced, he's very wise and he's very warm. So I hope you enjoy our conversation with Colin Douglas.0 (18m 34s):Great.3 (18m 36s):So congratulations Colin Douglas, you survived theater school. You survived4 (18m 42s):Two3 (18m 42s):Theater schools as a matter of fact.4 (18m 45s):I did. I was a glut for punishment actually. Yes. I I couldn't get enough of it.3 (18m 50s):So it was a BFA and MFA both in acting?4 (18m 54s):No, you know what, it was a zero degree. I, I am still just kind of riding by the seat of my pants. I actually, when I attended amda, it was not a degree program yet. Now it is. But back in the day it was basically they just kind of said, okay, go audition. And then when I went to Florida School, the arts, it only had an AA degree and I literally am still to this day two credit shy of my degree because I had booked a job out of Sctc and it was gonna be starting and I was like, I'm not sitting around and getting my degree just so that I can go get a job.4 (19m 42s):So I went, I took the job and I never looked back.1 (19m 45s):I mean that is, here's, I was just talking to someone who went to the theater school last night, my friend Lindsay. And we were talking about how conservatory I wish, I wish that I had done things differently, but it is what it is. But what you are reminding me of just go and audition is like the most valuable piece of advice anyone could have given us, which we never got. Which was now you, the piece of paper that says you have a BFA is not for not, but it's also not, it doesn't directly correlate to getting jobs. Like, it just doesn't. So you, you got a job while you were in school and said, I'm going, you didn't even think about staying or how did that work in your brain?4 (20m 30s):Well it was, it was because I was literally just the two credit shy kind of thing. And actually the class was, it was sort of a lab where I, you know, I had to help strike sets, but I was so busy with doing shows that I never had time to go help out with strike. So it was one of those things, oh okay, I'll, I'll require, I'll get that when I can get it when I have the time. And I never did. And then the tour was starting before the fall session started and I was like, you know what? My only regret honestly was the fact that I felt like, and, and again, it's not, you know, if somebody were to ask me today, you know, should you go to theater school?4 (21m 16s):I would say yes, if that's what really where you wanna hone your craft if you wanna, you know, build your community, but don't, if you're gonna do something like that, go to a program that has an established alumni because that's where your connections are being made when you get out of school is that support network that you have at amda at the time, there really wasn't, you know, when I was there, the biggest sort of claim to fame at the time was Time Daily. She was a graduate of, of Amda. And so it was, it wasn't as if I could reach out to Time Daily all of a sudden.4 (21m 59s):And then Florida School, the arts was, and still is such a small arts school that there really wasn't anybody for me to reach out to. Had I gone to Northwestern, had I gone to Juilliard or Yale or, or or Tish, that I would've had a built-in network of working professionals on the outside. So that was my only regret in that, that if I had perhaps gone to a different theater school, maybe I would've had those connections. But I certainly got the education I felt I needed.3 (22m 34s):Well and also you got the connections while getting paid instead of having to pay, which is was just definitely preferable. And by and speak about, you know, work experience and getting connections. You have been on every television show that has ever existed and tons of films too. So was your experience that as soon as you started working, you were just off to the races? I mean, I'm not suggesting that it's easy because no life of an actor is easy, but have, has it been pretty consistent for you would you say for your career?4 (23m 10s):It's been consistently inconsistent in that,1 (23m 16s):Wait, I just have to say that has to be the name of your book. Okay. I, we were talking about earlier before you got on about titles of shows and books, your book could be consistently inconsistent. The Culin Douglas story, I'm just, I'm just putting it out there. Thank you. Please send me 10% check to my office.4 (23m 32s):Yeah, thanks. No, it really, it was one of those things that I, I had a very dear professor at Florida School of the the Arts, Patricia Kadi, she was the acting instructor there and I was doing all of the plays, I was in all of the productions there and I had kind of become the top dog in the school, so to speak. And she pulled me aside one day and she said, you know, the one thing you're gonna have to realize is you're probably not gonna start working professionally until you're in your thirties.4 (24m 13s):And I, and I didn't really understand what she was saying there. What she was basically commenting on was that I was a young character actor and I didn't look like Jason Priestly, I didn't look and yet I hadn't grown into my framer look either. So I was gonna be in this really sort of, where do we cast him? He's talented but we don't know where to put him. And so I did a lot of theater for a lot of years and then in my thirties is when I was able to transfer into television and film. So what, cause I finally had kind of caught up to my look.1 (24m 45s):Yeah. So what I appreciative aid about that is it sounds like she said it so she said it in a way that wasn't like being a jerk, right? Like my experience was feeling that way except having it told like there is something deficient in you so that you cannot be an ingenue cuz you're too fat, you're too this. So instead of, hey, go do some theater, do all the things and then you'll grow into your look, do not fret. This is like part of the technical side of the business of how a camera sees you and not about your talent. It would've been so much different. Instead it comes down to, I think a lot of people we've talked to from the DePauls, from the Northwestern say, nobody told me that in a way which was, I could make a plan about it.1 (25m 35s):It was always just, well you're never gonna be cast. So by, and instead of hey maybe you could do theater, maybe you could write, maybe you could do something else until Hollywood catches up to the character of you.4 (25m 50s):Exactly.1 (25m 51s):It good, Patricia. Good. Is Patricia still around?4 (25m 54s):She is. And she literally just announced today that she's retiring from teaching. Well1 (25m 60s):Patricia, you did good work and you she did fantastic. You made it so call in part of it sounds like she encouraged you cuz you started with that story of her encouraged you to know that maybe later it would be your time to be on every single television show ever written. But for the twenties and the, you know, you were gonna do some theater and, and get your training right man, and,4 (26m 23s):And I honestly, I didn't completely understand everything she was saying in that little sound bite because, you know, I was, I was sort of standing there saying, Patty, look at all these job offers. I just got out of CTCs, you know, I'm gonna be working like crazy. And she said, No, no, no, don't get me wrong that the work is going to be there. But as far as what you're seeing in your mind's eye of, you know, Helen Douglas tonight on The Tonight Show, that's not gonna happen until you can kind of get into that other stream as it were. How3 (27m 0s):So did that match up? I mean, was that a surprise to you or did that match up with what you already thought about yourself? I don't think any 17 year old, 18 year old necessarily thinks of themselves as a character actor. Although it may just be because it never gets put to you that that's an option when you're a teenager. You know, the option is like, as Bos mentioned, Ingenu or not Ingenu, but they never really say like, Well, but you, you know, you're gonna fit into this different mold. So how did that butt up against what you already thought about yourself?4 (27m 32s):It actually kind of lined up okay with me in, in a weird way because at Florida School, the arts in particular, they were so gracious in the fact that when they picked their seasons, they picked shows that it made sense for me to be the lead in, in that I, I'm giving you an example, we did a production of Our Town and I was the stage manager and, you know, as opposed to being cast as the one of the young, you know, lead ingenue kind of a things. And then we did Bye by Birdie and I was cast in the Dick Van Dyke role.4 (28m 12s):And so they did it in such a way that, you know, or when we did Barefoot in the Park, I was Victor Velasco the old man who lived upstairs. So I was already sort of being primed that I was this character actor and would be gonna be doing that kind of stuff. And then quite honestly, as that look started to emerge, I mean in college I had sort of a flock of seagulls kind of hairdo thing going on, you know, and then it quickly all went away. And I had been playing about 20 years older in film and television and in theater than I've actually always been, you know, I was playing guys in my, when I was in my, you know, thirties, I was playing guys in my fifties.4 (28m 59s):Now I'm in my fifties and I'm playing guys in my in1 (29m 1s):In seventies. And I think that calling, the thing that I'm noticing too is like maybe for men it's a little different too, right? Like there's something about being, like, there's just, and it's a societal thing where like women who are play, like, it's, it's a insult for women when they're like, Oh, we're sending you in for a 50 year old and you're 30. But, and I think maybe if you have a certain kind of ego for a man as well, and we all have egos, I mean, it says, but, and I, I love the fact that you didn't, it doesn't sound like anyway, and you can tell me if I'm wrong, you took it as an insult that they were, that you were going out for roles that were for like the Victor Velasco of the world. You were able to embrace it as you were working.1 (29m 43s):Like that's, so I say this all to say, because I remember in our last class with Jim Ooff, who people call hostile prof and he said to me, You know who you are. And I was like, dying to hear you are Michelle Pfeiffer. That was never gonna happen. But I was dying to hear, he was like, That's who you, he's like, you are the next. And I'm waiting and, and I'm waiting. He goes, Lenny Bruce. And I was like, what the actual fuck is going on? What are you telling me?3 (30m 13s):No idea. What a great compliment that was.1 (30m 15s):I was devastated, devastated. I wanted to quit. I was suicide. Like it was just, But anyway, so what I'm saying is you didn't take that and run with it in a way that was like, I am not Jason Priestly and therefore my life is over. You were able to work and, and embrace the roles. It sounds like4 (30m 34s):I was able to embrace the roles and, and I was getting, okay, you are a young dick fan dyke, you're a young, this kind of a guy. So I was able to kind of make that connection. I honestly were being completely honest here. I think, how do I put this, that it does not sound completely like an asshole. It1 (30m 54s):Doesn't matter. We always sound like assholes here. Go ahead.4 (30m 57s):But at Florida school, the arts, I was one of, I was one of the only straight men at school and therefore undated a lot. So I was not, the fact that I wasn't looking like the young hot stud,1 (31m 22s):You were still getting it4 (31m 23s):Right? I was still getting it. So that didn't it, had it not been like that situation, I think I probably would've started to hyperventilate thinking, well hold it, I'm in my twenties, why are they making me play these old men? And this is affecting, you know, cus group. But that wasn't the case. And so I, I had sort of a, a false sense of ego I guess a little bit. But it was supporting the work that I was doing.3 (31m 50s):Yeah, absolutely. So did you grow up always knowing that you wanted to be an actor? Did you think, did you try any other paths first? Or were you, were you dead set on this?4 (32m 2s):I was dead set when the story goes, that when I was four I asked Santa for a tuxedo to wear to the Emmys and Santa delivered gave me a, a white dinner jacket and spats and stuff like that. So I was, I was ready to go.1 (32m 18s):Oh my god, do you have that picture? Can you please send us that?4 (32m 22s):Oh no, we have moved so many times. When I was growing up, my dad, when I was growing up was an undercover investigative reporter. And so wherever he was basically undercover was where we were living. Wait1 (32m 36s):A minute, wait a minute. Wait a minute, wait. Okay. This is fantastic because I do a lot of crime writing and so does Gina writes and undercover crime reporter father now, right there is sort of burying the lead. What in the hell? He was an undercover, What does that even mean? An undercover, He's not a police officer, but he's an undercover reporter.4 (32m 57s):He was an undercover investigative reporter. Well, what that for a period of time, So I'll give you an ex, there was a senator at one time back in the early seventies who was receiving kickbacks from his employees or hiring people on the books. And those people weren't actually having jobs. And so they would then send him the money. He was getting all of the money.1 (33m 24s):Sure. Like Chicago was like living in Chicago all time.4 (33m 28s):So the, somebody tipped my father off that this was happening. And so he went undercover and, and worked as sort of like an aid and things like that. Or there was a time where he, he worked at a meat packing place or he worked at a funeral parlor that was selling caskets with fake bottoms. And so people would buy these incredibly expensive things and then they would drop them and then they'd open up the hatch and the body would just drop into a pine box and then they would reuse the, the casket.1 (34m 8s):So this is the single greatest thing I've ever heard in my life, and I'm gonna write a pilot about it immediately called Fake Bottom. And it's4 (34m 14s):Gonna see, I've already wrote that was, I actually wrote a spec pilot. That's how I landed my lid agent. Oh, it was because what ended up happening is my dad, much to my mom's chagrin, used me in two of his undercover stings when I was a kid. One time, there was a situation where firemen had been hired and they weren't actually properly trained. It was another one of those kind of kickback situations. So it was a training session and they, I was supposedly, it was a staged event where they were gonna try to test the skills of the firemen or whatever.4 (34m 55s):And so I was gonna, I I practiced with a real fireman being fireman carried up and down a ladder from a second story kind of a thing. But once the word was out that it was an internal sting, they put me into one of those crane baskets. And so I was sort of floating over midtown in, in the basket kind of a thing. And then another time actually, there was a talent agent who was running a kitty porn ring. And so I was sort of used to expose, so to speak, this this person that was actually trying to take advantage of, of kids and parents.3 (35m 38s):Oh my God. Well, two things occur to me about that. One is your family was already full of drama before you came along. I mean, anybody who wants to, right, who wants to do this investigative journalism, Like that's, that's a dramatic person. I love David Carr. I love that kind of personality of per, you know, the person who wants to like really get in there, investigate and just as an aside, like, I'm sorry for the families who paid for those coffins, but at the same time, you know, good, good on them because it's such a waste. So much, many people spent putting mahogany boxes into the ground to to, to, to decompose over time. Okay. So did your parents like that you wanted to be an actor or did they have a different idea for plan for you?4 (36m 19s):Oh, they, they were 100% supportive. The very, very much so from day one, I think, because it was my mom who really sort of stepped in and said, Hey, let's figure out how we can get this new kid who's always the new kid to find his people. And so she took me when I was 11 years old to a local community theater, children's community theater. And they were doing a production, a musical version of The Hobbit. And you know, the intention was that I was just gonna audition and be, you know, number 40 in the background kind of a thing.4 (37m 0s):Third,3 (37m 1s):Third habit from the left,4 (37m 3s):Third habit from the, And so they auditioned and I remember you had to sing a song and God, I have not told this story, you had to sing a song. And I decided to sing tomorrow from Annie because I was me madly, deeply in love with Andrea Ricardo. And we were actually pen pals. And so I went in there and I sang tomorrow and jump cut to that weekend. And my mom came in Saturday morning smiling as I was watching cartoons and she said, You've been cast in the lead as Bill Bos. And that was sort of like, okay, I I I found my people.3 (37m 47s):That's amazing. Please tell us more about your penal with,4 (37m 54s):So I, I just, I, you know, I I had gotten the album when it came out and I listened to it and I memorized it. And even then I was casting myself as either Rooster or Daddy Warbuck, you know. And so somehow I found her address and sent her, you know, a, a letter as we used to write, you know, before texting. And she wrote back and then I wrote back, and then the thing that was really exciting was 20,3 (38m 28s):Wait a minute, are you married to Annie?4 (38m 31s):No, I am not married to Annie. Okay. But 20 some odd years later I was doing a national tour and staying in a hotel in Hershey, Pennsylvania. Andrea was on tour doing a national tour and was staying in the same hotel, kind of bumped into one another and was like, you know, you don't know who I am, but this. And it ended up, it was wonderful because I went to see her show on my dark night and she and her family came to see me on, on the other night. So.1 (39m 7s):Beautiful. Okay, so here we go. Your family's on board and why didn't you just go and strike it out either in New York or anywhere? Why did you end up going to school? Were you like, I wanna learn more, or how did that transition into schooling go?4 (39m 24s):It did, I did wanna learn more. It, it really was because up at that point, the only influences as far as acting I was going was from, you know, the, either the community theater directors or the high school drama teacher who had, you know, aspirations for theater, but was really just doing it because he didn't wanna coach the football team. So I felt like I needed a stronger foundation for myself. And, but always it was sort of like I was going to the theater school because I didn't feel like, Oh, I don't wanna go to a school where I'm gonna have to learn all of these other things that I'm not gonna ever use.4 (40m 7s):Now I look back and go, you know, I wish I had done some of that other stuff because I did not create any kind of a fallback plan for me. It would, this is either gonna work or it's not gonna work and you're gonna be screwed. I1 (40m 21s):Mean, here's the thing, here's the thing. I don't know what you, you two think, but like, there is this two schools of, well there's probably a bajillion schools of thought, but one of them is like, if you have a fallback plan, you will fall back. The other one is not everyone is gonna be a Colin Douglas or a John C. Riley that's gonna work, work, work, work, work, work, work. So a fallback plan for some of us might have been like another avenue to get into the industry, right? But a fallback plan can also literally have people go and not live their dreams and become, you know, actuary scientists because they're afraid. So it's like, it's so individual, which is why I think theater school training is so tricky is because you're taking young individuals who don't know shit and some know what they wanna do, some don't, some are good, some are talented, but not, it's so individual.1 (41m 10s):So it's like when people ask me, should I go to theater school? I'm like, I fucking don't know who, I'm like, who are you and what do you wanna do on the planet? But nobody ever asked me that as a 17 year old. So here we are. Gina, you were gonna say something? Oh,3 (41m 23s):I was just going, if you remember your audition,4 (41m 30s):My audition into theater school. Okay. So I do, I remember my audition into anda a, and again, I already recognizing I was a character actor. I sang if I were a rich man from Fiddler on the Roof, you know, you know, a skinny ass, you know, kid from, you know, suburbia singing that song. And then I did a monologue from a play that I had done in high school. And which1 (42m 9s):One do you remember? Or No,4 (42m 10s):It's okay. It was it, yes. No, actually it was weird because I look back on it now kind of thinking how the soul sometimes prepares. I think sometimes it was a, from a show called Juvie, and I played a young gentleman who was mentally challenged and I got a lot of incredible feedback from, from the role because I had researched, I had, I had gone to the library and this is, there was a thing called Microfish when you would go to the library and you'd have to look up stories on kind of like a big machine. And I did all of these kind of things and research the roles, and I saw images of babies and young people with different kind of cognitive delays.4 (42m 60s):And so I did that. I got into Amda, whatever, again, sort of jumping forward in life. In 1996, my oldest son was born and he happened to be born with Down syndrome. And when I met him for the first time at the bassinet, I immediately went back to that Microfish machine in high school and remembered seeing babies and images of people with Down syndrome. And so I made that kind of connection. So it was sort of like, all right, this is where life was going as far as Florida School, the arts went, I actually didn't audition for that.4 (43m 43s):What had happened is I was at, and I broke my foot during one of the dance classes. They would bring in dance captains from various Broadway shows and teachers routines. And we were doing a routine from cats and I jumped off of a piling and I came down flat for,1 (44m 5s):Let me tell you something. This is what, this is just one of the many reasons I don't care for that musical is that also what are you having people jumping around for that? Aren't I just, anyway, I'm glad they brought, I'm sure it was a great experience in some ways, but like, I just don't care for, that was my first musical I saw. And I even as a kid, I was like, I don't buy this at all. I don't know what's going on here, but I don't like it. But anyway, so you busted your foot. Oh, and can I just say about microfiche? I'm sorry to be an asshole, but like, I could never figure out how to slow the fucking shit down and I never could see a goddamn story, so I gave up on the microphone, so you made it further than me. I was like, why is it going too fast? That was my, that's like, like, that's like so indicative of my life. But anyway, so okay, so you, you broke your foot and so what happened?1 (44m 49s):You had to, why did you4 (44m 50s):So I, I, I broke my foot, I went home to my parents' place who were now living in Florida and kind of rehabbed for a while. I then auditioned for a play for Pirates of Penza, excuse me, that was up, up performances up near St. Augustine, Florida. And I went up there and I was playing Samuel the the second pirate. And the gentleman who was playing the modern major general in the show was actually the dean and artistic director of Florida School of the Arts. And he said to me, If you'd like to come to school, we'll offer you a full scholarship and you can start at the, as soon as the show closes.4 (45m 38s):And so that's what I did. It was like, I just went straight to Flos Bureau Arts and I did not go back up to Amda after my footed here. Helen,1 (45m 45s):It's really interesting, like, and I was talking about, this was someone else yesterday about how one, obviously one thing leads to the next, Oh it was a showrunner actually, that was that I was listening to a lecture and she just said that what I've done is I have walked through doors that have opened to me without a lot of second guessing. I followed my heart in terms of who took interest in me and who opened doors for me. I walked through them. I didn't say no, but, or no, I just did it. And so it sounds like that's what you did. You were like, Oh, full ride, I'm in Florida now. You could have been like, No, no, no, I'm gonna go back to Amda because whatever.1 (46m 26s):But you were like, I'm gonna do this. And it sounds like it worked in your favor, but what was your experience like at Florida? Did you, I mean obviously we know you left early, but did you get stuff out of it? Did you love it? What was the deal?4 (46m 41s):I did love it in the sense that because it was such a small school and because where the school is located, it's in Plac of Florida, which is sort of geographically in the middle of sort of Jacksonville and Gainesville. And so on a Friday night there really wasn't any partying going on. It was all of us getting together and doing monologues for one another, you know, because there wasn't any place to really go. And then as far as the classes went, because it was such a small institution, so many of my classes were literally just myself and professor in their office.4 (47m 26s):And we would do, you know, that's how I learned dialects was literally just, you know, we were working on the Italian dialect or whatever and I would go in and the professor would speak to me in that Italian dialect and then I would have to answer him and that would be the entire class. And then the next week we would do the brooklynese. And so I had all of that and they were very, very gracious to me because when I came in as quote a freshman, I was taking all of the freshman courses, but then they also had me taking all of the second year acting courses as well, sort of accelerating me through the program and then allowing that by doing that I was able to be cast in all of their different productions.3 (48m 15s):So when you did school and enter the workforce, what surprised about sort of the business that maybe you weren't expecting or hadn't been prepared for? For in terms of your training or, you know, and it could have been a happy surprise or, or, or not such a happy surprise, but like what was some I always just feel like there's, people have their list of things. Oh, I never thought the one that people always bring up as coverage, I never thought, when I watched TV shows that they had to do the same thing 50 times.4 (48m 58s):I, I think for, for me, the biggest sort of, even though Patty Crotty, Patricia Crotty had said, you know, Hey, it's gonna be a while before you're gonna start to work. You know, although I did work immediately when I got outta school, it was, it was one of those things where I quickly realized that they really didn't care that I had played Albert and by by Birdie they didn't care that I was in all of the productions. It was basically, no, you've earned the right to stand in the back of a line and you're gonna have to, you know, get up at an ungodly hour, go to equity, sign in at 6:00 AM and then come back at two in the afternoon for your audition.4 (49m 47s):But by the time you come back, if you pick up backstage, you're gonna read that Robert Strong Leonard has already been offered the role that you're auditioning for at two o'clock. So those were sort of some of the realities of, oh, okay, this is not necessarily gonna be the projecting thing that's gonna get me into the room. It's just, it's gonna be more for me that, okay, I feel like I deserve to be here and I'm competent enough in my abilities. But I, I think that was as far as just working in general. But Gina, to answer the question as far as like the thing that I was most surprised by within the industry, I'm, I'm trying to think if there was anything that I really was sort of taken aback by,1 (50m 31s):Well I guess I can ask like, did you, what was your like, like in terms of getting an agent and all that, did anything there go like, Oh my gosh, I didn't understand that I would have to, How did your representation come about? Was that a surprise or did you just get an agent? Cause a lot of our listeners, some of them we talk, you know, we talk about like a showcase or, but you left early and just started working, so what was that transition like in terms of getting representation and going on, on auditions for film and TV or theater? And if you think of anything that surprises you along the way, just let us know. But sure,4 (51m 4s):I didn't have theatrical, I didn't have legit theater representation for a lot of years. I was literally very lucky in that, you know, just using relationships, you know, to help propel me into the next situation that one show would be closing and I would hear about the fact that they were looking for something else. Or I would go to the Southeastern Theater conference and audition and be able to pick up my next year or year and a half worth of work. And I was able to kind of keep it at that point. I finally did get an agent who was gonna cover me theatrically as well as, you know, commercially.4 (51m 46s):And I remember her telling me, she was basically saying the same thing that Patty Crotty had said is that, you know, you know, you're a good actor, I'll put you out there, but it's, it's probably gonna be a while before you're gonna book a commercial or any kind of television cuz you're just really hard to place. She was good to her words. She put me out there and a week later I booked a Budweiser commercial. So I was like, Oh, okay, I think I got this. I, I think the hardest lesson that I had to learn was that because it sometimes came easy, it felt like, like, oh, okay, this is what it was, is I would get say to that chunk of change.4 (52m 29s):And I, it took me a while to figure out that I had to make that chunk of change, stretch as far as I possibly could because I didn't know exactly when the next job was coming from and, and that it was hard when I met and fell in love with my wife who was coming. She had been a model, but she had also worked in the corporate world. And so she was very accustomed to, well no, you make this amount of money every month and this is what you can expect with your expenses. It was hard when we started to realize, oh no, CU just got a great windfall of money, but if you break it down and spread it out over a year, he's not making minimum wage.4 (53m 10s):So, you know, it was a really, that was a hard kind of thing to adjust with.3 (53m 15s):Yes. I mean that's, yes, that's a common story and that's something that they don't teach you about in theater school. They don't teach you money management and how you have to withhold taxes and all kinda stuff. Yeah. So that, that's that, that's, that's a whole education in and of itself. But you were also a writer and director. When did the writing and directing and producing come into your career?4 (53m 40s):The writing actually started in college in that we would have to have monologues for class and I had an affinity to writing the monologues and so I started writing monologues for my classmates for beer money or they would need an audition piece for something in particular. And so I would tailor it to sort of echo whatever play that they were auditioning for kind of a thing. And so it really just sort of came easy for me. And then whenever I was auditioning, my biggest thing was I don't wanna go in there with something that they have seen 3000 times.4 (54m 23s):And so I was like, Okay, you know what? I'm just gonna write my own thing. And it worked, it worked to a degree. And so that's where I sort of started to do it. And then personally after my oldest son Gabe was born, I had a lot of demons to be dealing with. I didn't understand why I had been chosen or whatever, or, or given a child with a disability and, and it took me kind of having to get outta my own way to realize that was the least interesting thing about him. And, but in doing so, I, I started to write in journals and then I ended up writing a one man play that I in turn tour the country with for a handful of years.4 (55m 11s):And it was that play that I then attracted some other attention and then got hired on to do some other writing in script doctoring or whatever. And then as I shared earlier, I wrote a spec script about that time of my life when we were kind of moving into hotels and things like that. And then that kind of just started to snowball. And then I was very fortunate back in 2010, I had the Humanitas Organization, Humanitas Prize. They tapped me as the first recipient of their New Voices fellowship program, which pairs you with showrunners to sort of mentor you in creating a television series.4 (56m 0s):And so I was shared with, paired with Shonda rhymes over at Shondaland and was able to develop a show, which was actually an adaptation of my one man play, about a family, you know, coming to terms and dealing with a child with a disability. But I had already actually had a relationship with Shawnda prior to that because I had gotten cast in an episode of Grey's Anatomy and she and her producing partner, Betsy Beers, put me up for an Emmy for that role. And then when I didn't get the nomination, Shawnda turned around and created a role for me over on private practice.1 (56m 46s):Okay. So you know, all these people, and I guess I'm mindful of time and I wanna know what the hell are you, are you doing now you have this documentary, What is your jam right this second? Colin Douglas. And if you could do anything, what would it be? And tell us about this documentary, because what I don't wanna happen is it's like 10 minutes go by and we haven't heard about the documentary and we haven't heard about like, what is your jam and your juice right this second.4 (57m 13s):Okay. So I, I made the documentary, I started working on it when we got locked out, you know, the world was hurting, the industry was shut down. I couldn't stand in front of a camera, I couldn't direct a bunch of actors in a narrative, but I knew I could still tell stories. And so I, at one point in my career, I detoured and I was an associate show director and a performer at Walt Disney World. I was there for about three years. And the level of talent in those theme parks is just incredible. You know, there are a lot of people who come outta theater schools and they get their job, you know, at Dollywood or at Bush Gardens or at Disney World or Disneyland, and they spend the summer there and then they go off and do whatever else with their life.4 (58m 5s):There are other individuals like the subject of my film, Billy Flanigan, who, he started right after theater school. He went to Boston Conservatory. He then opened up Epcot in 1982 as a kid at the Kingdom and has been working for 40 years straight as a performer out at Disney. When the Disney Park shut down because of the pandemic, Billy was without a stage for the first time in his 40 year career. So what he did is he took it upon himself to start doing singing and dancing telegrams for other performers who were out of work. And then he started to literally take it on the road because he's a cyclist and he started crisscrossing the entire country, delivering these sing in dancing telegrams called Planograms.4 (58m 55s):And my Facebook page was blowing up with, I got Planogrammed, I got Planogrammed and I, so I reached out to some old friends from Disney and I said, I've heard about this name Billy Flanigan for years. He's a, he's a legend. He was a legend 20 years ago when I was working, You know, can you put me in touch with him? And so I spoke with Billy. I reached out to my producing partner and I said, There's a documentary here, because Billy has just been so incredibly selfless. He's always a pay it forward kind of a guy. He's a performers performer, you know, even though he jokes about the fact that he'll get a nosebleed if he's not on center.4 (59m 36s):But it's one of those things where he just really is about making the other people on stage look good. So he's been the face of Disney. But then what ended up happening is he was so busy working and raising an entire family that a handful of years ago, Billy finally slowed down and realized that he had been living a different life than he perhaps should have been. And he came out and it really destroyed his family and, and brought things down. And so you had this guy who day in and day out was still having to give that Disney, you know, RAAs, but behind the scenes, as we all know, his performers, the show's gotta go on.4 (1h 0m 20s):And so his heart was breaking. And so I said to Billy, Look, if we tell your story, we're gonna have to tell all of it, because I feel like you sharing your humanity and your pain is gonna help other people out there within the L G B T community who are feeling bullied or feeling like they don't have their place. So if we can do this, this is, this is sort of our mandate. And he said yes. And his family said yes. And, and thankfully not as a direct link to the film, but I shared the final cut with Billy and his family, because obviously I had to have their final approval. And Billy called me and said, This film is helping heal my family now, because it had given them that creative distance that it was no longer them, it was these other people up on a screen talking about a period of their life.4 (1h 1m 13s):So right now, the film, it premieres digitally on October 7th, and then is available on D V D November 15th. And then after the first of the year, it'll be looking like landing on one of the major streamers.3 (1h 1m 29s):Oh, that's fantastic. I'm so excited to see it because I watched the trailer and that thing that you were describing about, you know, he's, he's, he's gotta always have a stage that comes through from the first frame. You see him, you think, Wow, this guy is like a consummate performer in a way that I could never imagine. I mean, yes, I, I love to be on stage. It's fantastic, but I, I don't have this thing where like, you know, I've gotta be performing every second. And that was really clear. And I didn't know, I didn't glean from the trailer that he was doing that for fun for other performers. I thought he was just starting his business with the singing telegram. So that is even more interesting. Okay, that's really cool.3 (1h 2m 9s):So after the first of the year, it'll come out on a streamer. And actually when you know which one it is, you'll let us know and we'll, we'll promote it on our socials. And I4 (1h 2m 17s):Wanted, but you can preorder now the DVD and the digital.1 (1h 2m 22s):Yeah. I didn't mean to like cut us off from Shonda land, but I really wanted to make sure that we talk about this documentary because I think that it is taking your career and your life in, it's like it's made it bigger and about other things other than, I mean, it's like there's a service component to documentary work that like, I think is not always there in other kinds of media. That documentary work is like at once, for me anyway, really personal, but also universal and also has a great capacity for healing. And so, or at least the truth, right? Like what is the truth?1 (1h 3m 2s):So that's why I wanted to make sure we covered that. But if there's other things you wanna say about your career and like what you're doing now and where you wanna go or anything else, I wanna give you the opportunity, but I wanted to make sure, So I didn't mean to cut off your Shonda land story because I know people are probably like, Oh my God, tell more about Sean Rhymes. But I wanted to talk about the, the Billy documentary.4 (1h 3m 24s):I appreciate that so much. No, I, I, you know, just to sort of bookend the, the documentary, I never felt like it was one of those things that I knew I could tell stories, but I didn't feel like I had any business telling the documentary. I don't necessarily even gravitate towards documentaries, but I just felt like, hold it. This truly is a story that that needs to be told and can maybe bring about a little bit of healing. And that's what I think good films and television do that you, we, we see ourselves mirrored back in many ways and we feel less alone.4 (1h 4m 5s):And so I felt like if I could do that with a narrative, maybe I can do it with a, a documentary. That's not to say that I wanna become a documentarian, because it's not that I wouldn't if the opportunity ever presented itself, but it's the same way in which, you know, writing a narrative feature, it's like, well, I've gotta be compelled to wanna tell this story kind of a thing. And this just happened to be the medium in which to tell it as opposed to making a, you know, a, a film about a guy named Billy who wants to start out being a performer.1 (1h 4m 40s):And I think that you've said a really good word that we talk about sometimes in other ways on this show and in my life I talk about is being compelled. So when someone is compelled to do something, I know that the art created from that feeling of being compelled is usually authentic, true necessary, and, and, and, and, and sometimes healing. So I love the word what doing projects that were compelled. So anything else that you're compelled to do right now?4 (1h 5m 14s):Work great, really, you know, I I, I really, I I still even after, you know, making this, this film, I, I am still very much an actor at heart and I love being on camera. I love the collaborative experience working with other actors. You know, I was very, very fortunate this past season to to work on Barry with Bill Hater and Bill, I guess if I, it was like, what's next? What's my next jam? I would love to be able to emulate what Bill is doing. You know, Bill is the lead. He's also writing, he's also directing all of the episodes.4 (1h 5m 58s):You know, I joked with him that he also ran craft services because it was literally doing all those things and just watching him effortlessly move from being Barry back to Bill, giving me a note and then giving a note to the DP and then stepping back into Barry was just a really wonderful thing. And it's like, you know what, if I can do that, and I have other friends and, and mentors like Tom Verica, Tom actually directed me in that first episode of Grey's Anatomy. And he and I have since become dear friends. He's now the executive producer and resident director on Bridger.4 (1h 6m 39s):He also was the resident director and producer on inventing Anna. And he and I have developed a narrative film that we're looking to produce as well. And, and, and so again, and yet, you know, Tom as sort of an aspiration or an inspiration for me. And he started out as an actor himself. And then, you know, he directed a lot of Grey's Anatomy and then the next thing you know, he's playing Vila, Viola Davis' husband on how to Get Away with Murder. And then he was also the lead producer on Scandal. So it's like, you know, not being defined by what this industry wants to put you in.4 (1h 7m 20s):I feel like I'm finally at the point in my career where Colin can direct a documentary and he could write something for somebody else and he could act. And, and again, you know, from day one when I, when I left Flow Arts early to go out and do the job, it's just because I wanna keep working. Yeah.3 (1h 7m 38s):And that's, that's, everybody says that. Everybody says, I just wish I could be working constantly. Cuz it's where it's where all the fun of, of the work is, you know, not auditioning and getting head shots and whatever. It's, it's, it's doing the work. By the way, Barry is how I came to ask you to be on this podcast, because I didn't watch it when it first came out. I, I kind of came to it late and of course binge the whole thing and it's fantastic. And, and I immediately went and looked up every single actor to see who went to theater school because I, I would love to have them all. What a fantastic show and what an interesting kind of nice little parallel somehow with your documentary and, and also your own story.3 (1h 8m 18s):There's a lot about actors like figuring out what they're doing on screen and, and kind of reconciling that with their offscreen life or, or even just with their career. Do I wanna be this type of actor? Do I wanna be this type of person? You know, Ha and Bill Hater has seamlessly gone, I mean, once upon a time you would not have really thought of a Saturday Night Live person making quite this kind of crossover. And the humor in that show about actors is so perfect. I've ne I've seen things that have come close to that, but I've never seen something that you're just dying laughing if you know anything about the acting profession, Right?3 (1h 8m 58s):Yeah. Or were you gonna say that?1 (1h 8m 59s):I was gonna say that. And also that like, his account, So I have suffered, you know, from panic attacks and anxiety disorder and his journey through that and with that has given me so much hope as a artist because he was one of the first people I knew, especially from snl, especially from comedy, to say, I was struggling with this and this is how I dealt with it. So it didn't totally destroy my life. And he could have chosen to be like, I'm having panic attacks on set at Saturday Live. I'm done, I'm done. But he worked through it and now is doing all of this. So it gives me a lot of hope. So if you talk to him, tell him there's a late, an anxious lady that really feels like I can, I can really reclaim myself as an artist and even maybe thrive through the anxiety.4 (1h 9m 50s):No, I, I, I so appreciate that, Jen. I really do. You know, I have dealt with panic attacks over the years, you know, again, being that new kid, I was kind of predisposed to, Oh my gosh, you know, and luckily I've never had it within my art. It's always been on the other side. But the way in which Bill has navigated all of that is really truly just, you know, motivating and inspiring on so many different levels. And I think the thing that I also recognize is the fact that Bill never had aspirations to be on snl. He wanted to be a filmmaker, you know, he was editing, he was doing all these types of things and he sort of fell in backwards to groundings and, and all that kind of stuff.4 (1h 10m 38s):And somebody saw him and said, Hey, let's do it. It's sort of like he had to kind of take that detour to be able to get back to doing the kind of things that he really wanted to be doing, you know, Which is great for me because I look at like, my time at Disney, okay? I never would've imagined that that brief time at Disney would've been able to fuel me in that it brought back into my life to allow me to direct a film about one of their performers 20 years later.1 (1h 11m 6s):It's a, your story. I'm so glad you came on because your story is a story about the, the consistent inconsistencies and the detours that aren't really detours. And for me, like just being like, I'm just knowing now going into into meetings, being a former therapist for felons. Like that is the thing that people are really interested in. And I

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Off-Season Basketball Funhouse: Episode 261 RAPTORS: Five Raptors made the CBS Top 100 players. Whose position is the most bothersome? (Siakam: 24th, Fred: 38th, Scottie: 48th, OG: 59th, Gary: 75th.) Juancho lit up the Euro Finals. Are we sleeping on him as a rotation guy? Who are the first five off of the Raptors bench? NBA: Dolly Parton has Dollywood. Which NBA player deserves their own theme park? Players have up and down years. What player will be on a comeback mission? What player will come back down to earth? With Ben Davies and Jay Rosales! Creative Commons licensing credits for each episode can be found here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

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Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 19:56 Very Popular


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Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 40:50


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The FI Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 50:30


Today's episode features Heather Blankenship, an RV park investor expert, who also runs Wealthy Woman. Heather had no RV park industry experience and really no capital to get involved either. A great financing option and a big leap of faith left her as the new owner of a struggling park near Dollywood. Originally a money pit, Heather finally turned the park around and became profitable after three years. Since then, she's far surpassed breaking even. Today, Heather owns over $30M worth of real estate and has turned that rundown park into a money-making machine. Heather continually evolves her business and adds more income streams such as golf carts, tiny homes, boat rentals, a country store, laundry, even milk & cookies brought out by their mascot for the kids -- the list goes on and on. Oh, and did we mention she did all this while raising three kids as a single mom!? We are humbled to bring you Heather's journey and couldn't be more impressed with her story. If you enjoyed this episode as much as we did, please share! Links From the Episode HeatherBlankenship.com Wealthy Woman Heather on Instagram Heather on TikTok YouTube Interview https://youtu.be/rKagYa0GWu0 Join the Community We'd love to hear your comments and questions about this week's episode. Here are some of the best ways to stay in touch and get involved in The FI Show community! Grab the Ultimate FI Spreadsheet Join our Facebook Group Leave us a voicemail Send an email to contact [at] TheFiShow [dot] com If you like what you hear, please subscribe and leave a rating/review! >> You can do that by clicking here

DBC Pod
Final D23 Expo Predictions! "Disney Prime" coming? Phil's Thoughts on Dollywood. Plus Over/Under Rated Table Service Restaurants at WDW

DBC Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 70:10


Episode 125 ...  for the week of September 5, 2022  - and this is what is going on in our Disney World...What is Everybody Talking About?- "Disney Prime" - is a new subscription based service coming from Disney? (Source: Blog Mickey)- Final D23 Predictions/thoughts/feelings. Matt has created an odds spreadsheet (Source: Happily EVERything Disney)- Josh D'Amaro comments to the Wall St Journal about rising prices and guest mix at the parks - and people react! (Source: Wall St Journal)Starts @1:40 ...DBC Discord Engagement- What is your breaking point for park ticket prices at Walt Disney World?- Next week's topic: "What could Disney do with tickets that would make you go MORE often?"Starts @32:43 ...DCI Update- DCI is up to 88.23% with the return of Bibbity Bobbity Boutique at Magic KingdomStarts @41:51 ...Topic: Phil's thoughts on Dollywood- On a recent family trip to the area, Phil stopped by Dollywood, often cited as one of the top theme parks in the country ... does it live up to the hype? How does it compare to Disney?Starts @42:37 ...OUR Takes: Table Service Restaurants- New segment as we indicate something we feel is Overrated, Underrated, or Property Rated ... this week's topic is Table Service Restaurants in the Disney parks or resortsStarts @59:25 ...* Reminder to like, subscribe, rate, and review the DBC Pod wherever you get your podcast *Send us an e-mail! .... thedbcpodcast@gmail.comFollow us on social media:- LinkTree: https://linktr.ee/thedbcpod - Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/TheDBCPod/- Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheDBCPod- Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheDBCPod- YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/thedbcpod- TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@thedbcpod- Discord Server: https://discord.com/invite/cJ8Vxf4BmQNote: This podcast is not affiliated with any message boards, blogs, news sites, or other podcasts

Krisha & Frank Show
Frank & Friends Show 0079

Krisha & Frank Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 45:38


Frank Murphy is joined by Elyssa Hurley of MEDIC Regional Blood Center as he donates platelets via apheresis. Frank's platelets are more valuable to MEDIC than his unpopular whole blood type.  MEDIC often has incentive gifts for donors, such as Dollywood tickets or Tennessee Valley Fair tickets. Learn more at https://medicblood.org  Frank once saw a blood splatter demonstration at the National Forensic Academy in Oak Ridge. They used expired human blood from MEDIC.  There is a photo of Alex Grappin on the wall at MEDIC. Frank knows the Grappin family. Alex was a Boy of the Year for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. Alex's dad Tony is a frequent blood donor.  Elyssa was deferred from donating blood due to low iron. That also happened to Frank once. He was told to go eat a burger and come back the next day. Frank ate a bison burger before coming to MEDIC.  When Frank donates whole blood, he drinks a lot of extra fluids and is often finished in less time than other donors at the blood drive.  While in college, Frank signed up for a blood drive. While waiting for his appointment, he went for a ride in a military helicopter that was visiting the college campus. The helicopter didn't have seats. The riders sat on the floor and strapped themselves to the wall. The back door of the copter stayed open during the flight. Upon landing, Frank was deferred from donating blood because his heart rate and blood pressure were too high.  When Frank worked for radio stations that sponsored blood drives, he would donate while working. He would often donate at the same time as TV news anchors and they would all post about it on social media.  Frank asks Elyssa about the pint of Sea Salt Caramel Blue Bell Ice Cream that he once received as a thank-you gift for donating blood. The flavor is not available in stores but can be found at some ice cream parlors, including D & B's Hot Dogs and Ice Cream in Solway.  Frank was warned that he might get cold during apheresis. He brought along a Frank & Friends Show beach towel to use as a blanket but didn't need it.  Elyssa's parents moved to Tennessee from New York just before she was born. Frank says that makes her a Tennessee native but Elyssa's mom says that she doesn't have Tennessee blood in her veins.  Elyssa likes to visit the desert. She went to New Mexico and was surprised how cold it was when she went night swimming at her hotel. She wants to visit the Pacific northwest. She wants to visit the Grand Canyon. Frank tells her about his trip to Wyoming, Montana, Idaho, and Washington.  Elyssa is interested in visiting Mount St. Helens. Frank looks online to see that Mount Rainier is also a volcano. Elyssa mentions the supervolcano under Yellowstone National Park. Frank says the supervolcano is included in the SkyFly: Soar America ride at The Island in Pigeon Forge.  Elyssa is beginning a masters program in historic preservation and museum management. Frank asks if she has heard of the National Museum of Health and Medicine in Silver Spring, Maryland.  Elyssa tells Frank about writing a research paper discussing if Franklin Delano Roosevelt had polio or Guillain-Barré syndrome. Frank talks about the original goal of the March of Dimes was to eradicate polio. That's part of the reason FDR is pictured on the dime. March of Dimes has since pivoted to help premature babies.  Sign up for a 30-day trial of Audible Premium Plus and get a free premium selection that's yours to keep. Go to http://AudibleTrial.com/FrankAndFriendsShow  Find us online https://www.FrankAndFriendsShow.com/  Please subscribe to our YouTube channel at https://YouTube.com/FrankAndFriendsShow  and hit the bell for notifications.  Find the audio of the show on major podcast apps including Spotify, Apple, Google, iHeart, and Audible.  Support the Frank & Friends Show by purchasing some of our high-quality merchandise at https://frank-friends-show.creator-spring.com  Come to the Secret City Improv Festival on September 30 and October 1, 2022 at the Historic Grove Theater in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Use the discount code FRANK at checkout for 25% off when purchasing tickets at https://secretcityimprovfest.com/tickets  Find us on social media:  https://www.facebook.com/FrankAndFriendsShow  https://www.instagram.com/FrankAndFriendsShow  https://www.twitter.com/FrankNFriendsSh  Thanks!

The Passholder Lounge Podcast
Episode 7: Dollywood Dreamin' with Louis and Val Pt. 1

The Passholder Lounge Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 46:02


Louis (@DisneyPicaDay on Twitter) and Val (@ValPalMickey on Twitter)  join Justin Monorail in The Passholder Lounge for part 1 of their discussion about Dollywood in Pigeon Forge, TN. We discuss resorts both current and future, food, festivals, rides and many more wonderful reasons you should consider taking a trip to Dolly's little playground in the foothills of the Smokies.   Twitter: @ThePHLPod Email: passholderloungepod@gmail.com

CHEATIES with Lace Larrabee and Katherine Blanford
220. MOUNTAIN OF LIES w/ Hilliary Begley

CHEATIES with Lace Larrabee and Katherine Blanford

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 76:53


Today, Lace and Katherine interview actor, comic and Asheville, NC's own, Hilliary Begley! In true Southern style, Hilliary's cheating tales span generations and include prison, illegitimate children and Dollywood. FOLLOW OUR GUEST ON IG: Hilliary Begley FOLLOW US ON IG: CHEATIES PODCAST | Lace Larrabee | Katherine Blanford HAVE YOU CHEATED, BEEN CHEATED ON OR BEEN A SIDEPIECE IN A RELATIONSHIP? CALL TO LEAVE A VOICEMAIL TEASING YOUR STORY & YOU MIGHT JUST END UP ON AN EPISODE OF CHEATIES! 888-STABBY-8 (888-782-2298) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

SHE 100.3 Flash Briefing
J Lo is getting real, Dolly and Jimmy reunite, and hit the lake today!

SHE 100.3 Flash Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 1:38


Jennifer Lopez is none to happy about a wedding guest leaking a video from her big day, Dolly Parton and Jimmy Fallon team up for a christmas special at Dollywood, and Happy National Beach Day !

The Sole Premise Podcast
#1 Experience Based Brands are back - Featuring Click Partnerships

The Sole Premise Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 17:15


Live and in Studio we have some very special guests with us today Jason Blain and Kyle Grigsby from Click Partnerships, which is an organization that works with entertainment properties and Brings Brands Together to Connect Guest Experiences, Improve Operations, and Increase Revenues which is always the goal. They oversee brand partnerships and integrations for national entertainment treasures such as Dollywood, Wild Adventure Theme Parks, the Fox Theater in Atlanta, the Grand Ole Opry, and the World-Famous Harlem Globe Trotters just to name a few. 

Tennessee Music Pathways
The Birth of Country Music

Tennessee Music Pathways

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 33:55


Follow award-winning travel writer Aaron Millar on a road trip across East Tennessee's Music Pathways, from the Great Smoky Mountains to Bristol and the birth of country music. Along the way, we will hear traditional Appalachian Music as it would have been performed more than a century ago; find out about the Bristol Sessions, a seminal recording that happened here in 1929 and went on to change the world. We'll get a tour of Dolly Parton's hometown with one of her childhood friends and see the theme park which holds her name. Opening and closing the show is acclaimed songwriter Ed Snodderly with a live performance you won't forget. Harlan Howard famously said: “Country music is three chords and the truth.” We're looking for that truth, where it comes from, why it connects with us and where it's headed today.  Produced in a documentary style, the Tennessee Music Pathways series takes listeners on a more than 1,000-mile road trip, from Bristol and the birth of country music to Memphis and the start of rock n' roll. Along the way, listeners will hear bluegrass played fast as lightning and traditional Appalachian music performed live in the Great Smoky Mountains. Follow along as Millar shops in Elvis' favorite clothing store, bangs drums in the studio that made Uptown Funk, learns to play the spoons and drinks whiskey in a distillery housed in a more than 100-year-old former prison. Join us on an audio adventure across seven genres of music home to Tennessee. “This is the story of America, from its roots in traditional fiddle music brought over by immigrants to the New World and enslaved individuals stolen in Africa, to the spark of rock n' roll and soul that started here, united a nation, and spread across the world, Tennessee is the soundtrack to the evolution of America itself.” Aaron Millar, presenter of the Tennessee Music Pathways podcast Thank you to our guests and musicians: Ed Snodderly www.edsnodderlymusic.com  Amber Rose www.dollywood.com/ Boogertown Gap www.boogertowngap.com Ruth Miller www.visitsevierville.com Rene Rogers www.birthplaceofcountrymusic.org/ Explore Bristol www.explorebristol.com Listen to historical recordings of the artists and songs we mention in this episode on our specially curated Spotify playlist: Tennessee Music Pathways  From the largest cities to the smallest communities, the Tennessee Music Pathways is a guide that connects visitors to the rich musical heritage of our state. Visitors can curate their own path based on interests using an interactive guide at www.TNmusicpathways.com. Follow the conversation on social using or searching hashtag #tnmusicpathways. TNvacation.com | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube This series was produced by Armchair Productions, the audio experts for the travel industry www.armchair-productions.com

Tennessee Music Pathways
Pathway Sessions: Live at Pittman Center with Boogertown Gap

Tennessee Music Pathways

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 22:44


Today we have a live session from Boogertown Gap, an old-time mountain music duo that plays and preserves traditional Appalachian string music just as it would have been heard more than a century ago.  Husband and wife team Keith Watson and Ruth Barber invited us to their cottage in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains. We sat outside in their yard, a bubbling stream rushing past and birdsong in the air. It was the perfect setting to hear traditional Appalachian music. So, close your eyes, sit back, and let Boogertown Gap transport you to mountain cabins, barn dances and old porches of 19th century Tennessee, where this music once filled the air and would go on to inspire the country music we know and love today.  “It connects into our DNA. It's the music of our ancestors, it's the music of their ancestors. and it's just so soulful” Keith Watson, Boogertown Gap Find out more www.boogertowngap.com Facebook Boogertown Gap YouTube Boogertown Gap From the largest cities to the smallest communities, the Tennessee Music Pathways is a guide that connects visitors to the rich musical heritage of our state. Visitors can curate their own path based on interests using an interactive guide at www.TNmusicpathways.com. Follow the conversation on social using or searching hashtag #tnmusicpathways. TNvacation.com | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTubeThis series was produced by Armchair Productions, the audio experts for the travel industry www.armchair-productions.com

Madigan's Pubcast
Episode 101: Killer Hot Dogs, Dolly's Monster Roller Coaster, & The KGB Discovered In Texas

Madigan's Pubcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 78:05 Very Popular


Kathleen opens the show drinking an Afternoon Dillight Hard Pickle Seltzer from Crook & Marker, which she loves. “GOOD BAD FOOD”: In her quest for new and delicious not-so-nutritious junk food AND in continuing her search for the best Ranch, Kathleen samples Dot's Homestyle Baked Cheese Curls, Good & Gather Organic Ranch Dressing, & Hostess Glazed Twinkie Bouncers. THE QUEEN'S COURT: In Queen news, Kathleen updates that Queen Dolly Parton is unveiling her new mega rollercoaster in her Dollywood theme park. UPDATES: Kathleen gives an update Jeff Bezos' megayacht leaving its Dutch harbor, and the STL McCloskey's pardon.“HOLY SHIT THEY FOUND IT”: Kathleen is amazed to read about the discovery of the remains of twelve German Hessian Soldiers in New Jersey, and a mysterious metallic orb that fell from the sky has been located in Mexico. FRONT PAGE PUB NEWS: Kathleen shares articles on Nevada's move to eliminate natural grass, Casper hires “professional sleepers,” two KGB agents disguised as regular “American's” are found in Texas, Miami devises a new solution for their homeless population, a Brink's armored trailer is robbed of over $100M in assets in California, Domino's Pizza exits the Italian market, and Kathleen reviews the Top 5 Foods that could shorten your life. WHAT TO WATCH THIS WEEK: Kathleen recommends watching “The First Lady” on Showtime.SEE KATHLEEN LIVE: See Kathleen live on her “Do You Have Any Ranch?” Tour. Tickets available at kathleenmadigan.com/tour See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Rise Guys
WILLIE ON A GOLF CART

The Rise Guys

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 0:56


If you were at Dollywood then yes, you saw who you thought you saw

Visit My Smokies
NBC Announces New Dolly Parton Christmas Special Set at Dollywood

Visit My Smokies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022


You haven't seen the last of Dolly Parton Christmas specials! NBC recently announced a brand new Christmas musical coming this holiday season. “Dolly Parton's Mountain Magic Christmas” is a unique musical about the making of a TV special at the world-class theme park, Dollywood. We've gathered all the details we know about the new Dolly Parton Christmas special so far! About ‘Dolly Parton's Mountain Magic Christmas' Nothing goes better together than Dolly Parton and the holiday season! This year, our Smoky Mountain hometown hero is bringing us a The post NBC Announces New Dolly Parton Christmas Special Set at Dollywood appeared first on Visit My Smokies.

Theme Park Paradise
Dollywood

Theme Park Paradise

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 29:47


In celebration of the Big Bear Mountain roller coaster announcement, we discuss the origin story of Dollywood and some of our favorite facts and aspects about the park. 00:28 - theme park news 12:29 - Dollywood Twitter & Instagram: @themeparkpd Email: themeparkparadise@theunikelyalliance.com Check out all of our content, including the podcast Dallas VS Ryan, at theunlikelyalliance.com

Partners in Crime in the 19046
#100: Return to Argument Park With Joe Gunn

Partners in Crime in the 19046

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 53:51


We're back! After a brief hiatus, the PIC have returned for episode 100 along with special returning guest, Joe Gunn! We discuss the completion of "Argument Park," Jose Pistola's quinceañera, post-pandemic life, Joe's trip to the greatest place on earth, Dollywood, NFT chickens, and so much more! This is an episode you won't want to miss. It's interesting, it's funny, it's just what you hoped for when you subscribed to the pod...LIVE from the 19046! Topics Discussed: - Rent Joe Gunn's House - Argument Park - Quizzo Hosting at Human Robot Jenkintown - Jose Pistola's quinceañera party - Post-Pandemic restaurateur life - Restaurant Staffing Issues - Gunns in Dollywood - Steve's Epic DMV Rant - Gaming Headphone Trouble - We're Famous…In a Google Search - The McSweeney Club - Brewery Acoustics - Beach vs Mountains - LCB BS - The House That Chickens Bought

Donna & Steve
Thursday 8/11 Hour 3- Steve Martin Says He Wont Do Anymore TV/Movies

Donna & Steve

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022


DVal reviews Bullet Train, A study on Back to School, Throwback Thursday Movie Trivia, Cool moment for people at Dollywood

Loper & Randi in The Morning
8-8-22 Loper & Randi - Beartooth Concert, Stay At Home Parenting, Kim And Pete Breakup, Pete Rose, Flirting, Johnstown Drama

Loper & Randi in The Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 143:34


We have a recap of the Beartooth concert from Saturday. Jennette McCurdy says Nickelodeon tried to pay her hush money. Vince Neil played the Grand Ole Opry. Loper claims a girl was flirting with him and Randi disagrees. A listener wants advice on his wife and her new mom's group. Plus, Kim and Pete broke up, Pete Rose, Dollywood, Johnstown drama and more!

Ride This One Podcast
RTO - EP 101- Big Bear Mounting

Ride This One Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 100:13


This week the RTO crew is joined by Zach from your Favorite Coaster Sucks. Dollywood has made their 2023 announcement and Muscle Daddy is a good man.  Website - www.RideThisOne.com Call or Text the show! 26-RIDE-THIS (267) 433-8447 Follow The Show! Facebook - Twitter - Subscribe Bitch! Join the Ride This One discord! https://linktr.ee/RideThisOne BUY MERCH! https://www.teepublic.com/user/ridethisone Follow the RTO CREW! @RTOSlater @RTOGoliath @RTOMuscleDaddy  

Disney Dependent
Welcome to Dollywood

Disney Dependent

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 54:45


Episode 107! James, Sarah, and Producer Ash take a little detour and head to Dollywood for this week's episode. They talk about the creation of the park, Dolly's legacy, and much more. Buy some shirts from Dynamite Goat Trading Co! Follow Disney Dependent on Instagram! Executive Producer: Producer Ash Producer/editor/mixer: Deanna Chapman Intro music written by Ryan Knowles Logo design by Ryan Hatch --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/disney-dependent/support

CoasterRadio.com: The Original Theme Park Podcast
CoasterRadio.com #1637 - Glenwood Caverns' Defiance

CoasterRadio.com: The Original Theme Park Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 58:58 Very Popular


We're joined by Nancy Heard from Glenwood Caverns to talk about their newest coaster "Defiance." We also talk about changes at Carowinds, possible themes for Halloween Horror Nights, rumors out of Dollywood and a Harry Potter themed attraction near Mike.

The Twerk Ethic Show
Can You Name All Of The Kardashians?

The Twerk Ethic Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 38:00


In Episode 78 of the Twerk Ethic Show, JT and Cooley talk Kardashians, landing on the moon, and Dollywood.

Debut Buddies
Bicycles with John Peros

Debut Buddies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 58:46


We'll try to keep our balance and not to get derailed this week talking about Bicycles with A Vague Idea alum / co-founder and cyclist John Peros. Topics include 29ers, Dandy Horse, Cyclo-Cross and much much more. We play Bike Brand or Not, and I See What You Did There! And most importantly. we wax nostalgic and poetic about the beginning of the podcast nearly 200 episodes ago! Check out Strides Ballroom, for all your Denver dance lesson needs: https://www.stridesballroom.com/Listen to Michael J O'Connor's tunes: https://michaeljoconnor.bandcamp.com/Check out Spaceboy Books: https://readspaceboy.com/And keep your ears open for an announcement about this podcast... coming soon! 

The Mark White Show
Dollywood PR Director Wes Ramey, Elkmont Elementary's Heather Haden, & Cora's Corner

The Mark White Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 50:08


Did you know that Dolly Parton's father was illiterate and that was the motivation for Dolly Parton's Imagination Library? Today, in addition to sharing about Dollywood educational attractions, we're highlighting the subject of literacy with Dollywood Public Relations Director Wes Ramey and Elkmont Elementary School's Heather Haden along with Imagination Library parent Laura Cornelison! After those conversations, we'll be giving you an example of one of the great books from the Imagination Library program as Cora reads, “Squeak!” on Cora's Corner! You can also subscribe to TMWS via TuneIn Radio, Apple iTunes, SoundCloud, Audioboom, Spotify, Stitcher, Blubrry, Google Podcasts, & iHeart Radio. All shows are archived at TheMarkWhiteShow.com.

Subliminal Jihad
[PREVIEW] #121b - OUT OF THE WOODS: Weird Scenes Inside the Sand Dune (Part 2)

Subliminal Jihad

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 15:28


For access to full-length premium episodes and the SJ Grotto of Truth Discord, subscribe to the Al-Wara' Frequency at patreon.com/subliminaljihad. Dimitri and Khalid continue their trek through various National Park-adjacent mysteries, including: the Ape Canyon cryptid attack of 1924, the National Park connection to the creation of the FBI, John D. Rockefeller Jr. and the sus Smokey Mountains, Dolly Parton's Dollywood theme park (née Rebel Railroad where you could experience the magic of the Confederacy), similarities to the Smiley Face Killer phenomenon, Chameleo psyops in Colorado's Black Forest, the Yucca Man who haunts the Mojave desert, the Monster of Elizabeth Lake in Angeles National Forest, Dead Man's Hole in the San Diego County desert, the overabundance of natural landmarks named “Devil's x”, the Mount Baldy sand dune in the Indiana Dunes National Park that inexplicably swallowed a child, Silas Jane's sinister Horse Syndicate, and David Paleides finally getting jinnpilled via Whitley Strieber.

Murphy, Sam & Jodi
After The Show PODCAST: Hooray for Dollywood.

Murphy, Sam & Jodi

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 13:47


EVERYTHING Murphy & Jodi did in Dollywood, and does it OUTDO Disney??

Just Matt and CJ
Space Bubbles | 07.11.2022

Just Matt and CJ

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 57:19


Oh, man, tons of fun stuff in today's episode. Researchers at MIT have considered putting giant "space bubbles" into orbit around Earth in order to assist in reflecting some of the sun's harmful UV rays away from us in an attempt to cool down the entire globe. Find out more in today's Weird or Wired. Emily visited the Southeastern United States last week, and she even visited Dollywood! Listen to today's episode as we highlight her adventures in Dolly Parton's Tennessee theme park. What was Emily's favorite experience? You might be surprised. And CJ is irritated by a habitual guitarist who has been playing at Barton Springs. Sure, it's one thing to play music quietly near your friend/family group, but crooning on and on in a public space? Is that rude? Or is CJ just jealous?  Some people want to relax at the springs, take in the rays, and splash in that wetness. Others? Well, maybe their idea of relaxation is some nice, uninvited acoustic guitar playing. Feel free to weigh in @TheCJMorgan.  Okay, bye.Support the show: https://www.101x.com/justmattandcj/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Number One Movie in America

The first new number-one movie of the millennium was NEXT FRIDAY, the sequel to the mid-90s classic. But with the loss of Chris Tucker, as well as Ice Cube's devastating lack of interest in anything but the soundtrack, is there anything to love this time around? In recommendations, Sean likes ELVIS, Kahmeela loves IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT and Robin went to Dollywood.

Suncoast Culture Club
Jared Mancuso and Nick Gallardo of Florida Studio Theatre's "Rock 'n' Roll Reignited" Join the Club

Suncoast Culture Club

Play Episode Play 60 sec Highlight Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 39:33 Transcription Available


From Pennsylvania to Tucson, the Buddy Holly Story to Dollywood, and many stops in between, Jared Mancuso and Nick Gallardo combined their love of playing rock 'n' roll and formed the band "Not Fade Away." Now, they can travel the country performing your favorite 50's and 60's rock 'n' roll tunes in their reimagined arrangements. Their show "Rock 'n' Roll Reignited" is playing now through August 7 at Florida Studio Theatre's Court Cabaret and you can hear the story of their careers, the influence for this show, and their many other creative projects on this week's episode of the Suncoast Culture Club podcast. Come along and join the club!• Florida Studio Theatre Website & Facebook & Instagram & YouTube• Not Fade Away Show Website & Facebook & Instagram & YouTube• Jared Mancuso Website & Facebook & Instagram• Nick Gallardo Facebook• The Barber Website & Facebook & Instagram• Lido Key Beach Website• Bricks Smoked Meat Website & Yelp & Instagram• The Pops Orchestra of Bradenton and Sarasota Website & Facebook & Instagram• SCF Music Program Website & Facebook & InstagramSupport the show

Madigan's Pubcast
Episode 95: A Mayonnaise Murder, Lake Mead's Ghost Town, & A Night On Dolly's Tour Bus

Madigan's Pubcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 85:50 Very Popular


Kathleen opens the show drinking an Old Bay bloody Mary with a Success For Breakfast IPA from Broadway Brewery and reviews her 4th of July weekend activities in Nashville. “GOOD BAD FOOD”: In her quest for new and delicious not-so-nutritious junk food AND in continuing her search for the best Ranch, Kathleen samples Tabasco Jalapeno Mesquite BBQ Sauce, which she thinks is waaaay too sweet. She moves on to taste Kettle Brand Farmstand Ranch potato chips, which she finds not very “Ranch-like” but probably fantastic dipped in Ranch dip. She finishes her tasting with Gus's Pretzels Monterey Jack Con Queso Dip from STL, which she absolutely loves and recommends pouring on anything. A NIGHT ON DOLLY'S TOUR BUS: Kathleen is delighted to read that Dolly Parton has donated her 1986 tour bus to Dollywood's DreamMore Resort and Spa, allowing fans to book a min 2 night stay as part of the “Suite 1986 Tour Bus Experience.” The price is approx.$10K, and all proceeds have been directed to Dolly's Imagination Library foundation. UPDATES: Kathleen gives updates on the dismantling of the Rotterdam bridge to release Jeff Bezos' new superyacht, the “Fake Hitler” capitol rioter is convicted, another Bison incident in Yellowstone, and Elon begins cracking down on Tesla's return-to-work procrastinators.“HOLY SHIT THEY FOUND IT”: Kathleen is amazed to read about the Mormon ghost town that has appeared in Lake Mead after a significant drop in the lake's water level, and divers pulled a marble head of Hercules from a 2,000-Year-Old Shipwreck in Greece.SUBWAY MAYONNAISE MURDER: Kathleen can't believe the actions leading to a Subway restaurant employee in Atlanta getting shot and killed recently after a customer got upset after too much mayo was added to his sandwich. TACO BELL'S LATEST MASH-UP: Kathleen laughs reading an announcement from Taco Bell about their latest partnership; this time with Cheez-It. The chain is releasing tostadas and Crunchwraps made with gigantic Cheez-Its in a few locations across the US for a limited time. Kathleen maintains that Cheez-Its and Goldfish crackers should be left alone, and tells all Termites to “protect the Cheez-Its.”US GOV'T REQUESTS REMOVAL OF TIKTOK: Kathleen laughs out loud reading an article advising that the Federal Communications Commission has asked Apple and Google to remove TikTok from their app stores over China-related data security concerns. She laughs musing about the revolution that “the children” would start if this action was taken. RICHEST MAN WHO EVER LIVED: Kathleen introduces us to Mansa Musa, the fourteenth-century leader of the Mali Empire and the richest person who has ever lived.WHAT TO WATCH THIS WEEK: Kathleen recommends watching “Candy” on Hulu.SEE KATHLEEN LIVE: See Kathleen live on her “Do You Have Any Ranch?” Tour. Tickets available at kathleenmadigan.com/tour See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Grim Grinning Guys: Walt Disney World Planning (WDW)
Ep. 218: Ranking the Dollywood Rides

Grim Grinning Guys: Walt Disney World Planning (WDW)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 41:21


Howdy, foolish mortals! Welcome back to the graveyard as today we visit a new park on the show...Dollywood! Travel with us back down to Pigeon Forge, TN, for a rootin' tootin' good time! Pardon the country accents as we get into the spirit of things, and of course be prepared for controversy. Do you agree with our rankings? If not let us know! Thanks for always listening, and enjoy the show!

Welcome Home: A Disney Parks & DVC Podcast
Episode 179: Mini Golf, Private Jet Around the World & Lightyear Space Mountain Rumor

Welcome Home: A Disney Parks & DVC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 87:09


The guys answer listener questions on topics including ways to ruin a day at Disney, bragging about DVC and favorite Disney dads. Damon talks about his recent conversations with listeners about Hilton Head, his upcoming Dollywood trip, and mini golf. Adventures by Disney announces Disney Parks Around The World – A Private Jet Adventure, which takes guests to every Disney park around the world. Walt Disney Imagineering shares a look inside TRON Lightcycle Run's ‘Upload Conduit' canopy. To celebrate the recent release of ‘Lightyear' Disney announced new experiences and merchandise. A rumor indicates that Space Mountain in Disneyland will be re-themed as ‘Lightyear Mountain' as part of the upcoming Tomorrowland overhaul. The guys discuss exclusive Father's Day food and new dishes coming to the parks this summer. Disneyland announced all of the fall favorite events returning to the parks this year.

Even the Rich
Saint Dolly | Crying at Dollywood with Justin Kirkland | 4

Even the Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 38:01 Very Popular


Dolly Parton fandom has reached new heights over the last few years. Her admirers run the gamut: From city slickers to small town folk, conservative churches to RuPaul's Drag Race. But she's always been Dolly. So why all the love and appreciation now? Culture writer Justin Kirkland joins Brooke and Aricia to unpack Dolly's recent spike in popularity, how meeting Dolly set him up for a career in journalism, and what was going on when she tried to turn down a spot in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame?!For more, check out Justin's podcast, My Year with Dolly, where he breaks down every Dolly Parton album.Listen ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App. https://wondery.app.link/eventherichPlease support us by supporting our sponsors!Wooga: June's Journey - Find your inner detective. Download June's Journey FREE today on the Apple App Store or Google Play!Indeed - Get started with a $75 job credit and upgrade your job post at indeed.com/rich!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.