Podcasts about Queue

  • 1,341PODCASTS
  • 2,930EPISODES
  • 50mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Dec 2, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about Queue

Show all podcasts related to queue

Latest podcast episodes about Queue

Present Company
What & Why (The Wonder)

Present Company

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 2:20


Krista and Jenny share this week's What & Why, The Wonder. Curious what else the Queue team is watching? Head over to Netflix and search Queue's Queue for more recommendations! 

Thoughts On A Mic
91. Ghana Ba - Year Of Return

Thoughts On A Mic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 29:05


Season 2: We are back again! On this podcast, two friends, Queue and Maame Hanah talk about the 2019 Year of Return and it's importance to GHANA.

Thoughts On A Mic
73. Justify Your Thug - 12.12

Thoughts On A Mic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 55:15


On this podcast which marks the end of 2019 - Red, Sel and Queue talk about the year in review, areas to improve on any human's personal journey, achievable moments and possibilities of the coming decade, 2020.We rendered our own version of the Christmas CarolSong featuresCommon > HER Love feat. Daniel Caesar (Let Love Album)Ed Sheehan > Don't Care feat. Justin Bieber (No 6 Collaboration Album)Special Christmas song requestMariah Carey > All I Want For Christmas Is YouPodcast is sponsored by Beaux CultureFollow us on Facebook > https://www.facebook.com/BeauxCulture/?ref=bookmarksTwitter > https://twitter.com/beauxcultureInstagram > https://www.instagram.com/beauxculture/

Thoughts On A Mic
78. I Love You and Your Insecurities

Thoughts On A Mic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 54:12


On this week's podcast; Sel, Red and Queue talk about mental, physical and emotional insecurities!What are you doing to compensate your insecurities?

Loser's Queue
Loser's Queue 46 Potatoes and Gravy

Loser's Queue

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 84:36


Today the Loser's go over some roster rumors and changes, Top 5 Thanksgiving food, and more! Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/LosersQueuePod, follow on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and send in your personal stories/memes/highlights to losersqueuepodcast@gmail.com!

Present Company
What & Why (Point Break)

Present Company

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 4:38


Krista and Isabel share this week's What & Why, Point Break. Curious what else the Queue team is watching? Head over to Netflix and search Queue's Queue for more recommendations!

Universal Orlando Explorers
Episode 34: Meet and Greets, Dark Rides, and Kong Queue

Universal Orlando Explorers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 31:55


We share our favorite character meet and greets, chat about the dark rides of Universal Orlando, and narrate a walkthrough of the Kong queue.Support the showSocials, Support the Page, and More

The Jake Gyllenhaal Fan Club
SPECIAL EPISODE: Dispatches from the Taylor Swift Ticketmaster Queue

The Jake Gyllenhaal Fan Club

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 110:32


Welcome to hell! On a special double episode of One Boy Allowed, Gem and Justin discuss the absolute circus that was the rollout for Taylor Swift's Era's Tour. Ticketmaster shit the bed and Gem and Justin try to make sense of it, and the fan reaction to the debacle. They also discuss the Grammy nominees!And Then We Watched is a podcast and radio show where two friends make each other watch stuff. It airs LIVE every Friday at 4pm on WMUC Digital, College Park! You can tune into the show here!Our show is on Instagram @wewatchedwmuc!Gem and Justin have another show! It's called One Boy Allowed, and you can listen to it here!

Present Company
What & Why (He's Just Not That Into You)

Present Company

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 3:50


Krista and Chris share this week's What & Why, He's Just Not That Into You. Curious what else the Queue team is watching? Head over to Netflix and search Queue's Queue for more recommendations!

Loser's Queue
Loser's Queue 45 Deryl Does It for US

Loser's Queue

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 112:38


This week the Loser's finally go over the last bits of World's, Pick'ems recap, our goals for the pod over the next year, House of The Dragon (HOTD) Media Review, and more! Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/LosersQueuePod, follow on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and send in your personal stories/memes/highlights to losersqueuepodcast@gmail.com

Classic Radio Theater with Wyatt Cox
Classic Radio for November 17, 2022 Hour 2 - Matt Dillon and the Queue

Classic Radio Theater with Wyatt Cox

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 41:37


Gunsmoke starring William Conrad, originally broadcast November 17, 1957, The Queue. An educated Chinaman named Chin Wong comes to Dodge to work as a cook. When two bullies steal his pigtail, he threatens to kill them. Also Claudia, originally broadcast November 17 1948, Waiting Up for David.Visit my web page - http://www.classicradio.streamWe receive no revenue from YouTube. If you enjoy our shows, listen via the links on our web page or if you're so inclined, Buy me a coffee! https://www.buymeacoffee.com/wyattcoxelAHeard on almost 100 radio stations from coast to coast. Classic Radio Theater features great radio programs that warmed the hearts of millions for the better part of the 20th century. Host Wyatt Cox brings the best of radio classics back to life with both the passion of a long-time (as in more than half a century) fan and the heart of a forty-year newsman. But more than just “playing the hits”, Wyatt supplements the first hour of each day's show with historical information on the day and date in history including audio that takes you back to World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. FDR, Eisenhower, JFK, Reagan, Carter, Nixon, LBJ. It's a true slice of life from not just radio's past, but America's past.Wyatt produces 21 hours a week of freshly minted Classic Radio Theater presentations each week, and each day's broadcast is timely and entertaining!

Brides Before You
Are we out of the queue yet?

Brides Before You

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 55:00


Unless you've been living under a rock, you probably know Taylor Swift's concert ticket sales began yesterday! While the world was sitting in a never ending queue and looking in couch cushions for spare change, we came across a story that brought us to this week's theme! Upon Taylor announcing her concert dates, at least 2 brides have had their wedding room blocks canceled or triple in price! It got us thinking about how high profile events and concerts effect weddings & if guests have ever chosen a concert over their best friend's wedding. Spoiler Alert...the answer is yes!! Tune in to find out who deems Lizzo & Adele more worry than a wedding, what band included on stage weddings as part of their 2012 tour & which artist officiated a fan's wedding last week! Good luck to all those Swifties out there! Signature CocktailFun FactLautner WeddingTaylor Swift Hotel DramaBride's friend chooses Adele concert over weddingCousin's wedding or Lizzo concertOld Friend's wedding or concert?Weddings at Train concertsPost Malone officiates wedding

TechFirst with John Koetsier
Bots killing the supply chain & driving up prices of everything from diapers to gaming consoles

TechFirst with John Koetsier

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 20:08


We've seen it in tickets and gaming consoles. But now it's happening in diapers and food and consumer goods: bots buying, taking up all available supply, and driving up prices for the rest of us. What can we do about it? In this TechFirst with John Koetsier, we chat with Niels Sodemann, CEO of Queue-it, about bots, e-commerce, pricing, supply, and what we can do to fix the problem. Links: TechFirst transcripts: https://johnkoetsier.com/category/tech-first/ Forbes columns: https://www.forbes.com/sites/johnkoetsier/ Subscribe to the podcast: https://anchor.fm/techfirst Keep in touch: https://twitter.com/johnkoetsier

Skip the Queue
The importance of building a great social community and process behind rebranding a 70 year old attraction

Skip the Queue

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 44:49


Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. Your host is  Kelly Molson, MD of Rubber Cheese.Download our free ebook The Ultimate Guide to Doubling Your Visitor NumbersIf you like what you hear, you can subscribe on iTunes, Spotify, and all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue or visit our website rubbercheese.com/podcast.If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review, it really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned in this podcastCompetition ends January 31st 2023. The winner will be contacted via Twitter. Show references: https://www.draytonmanor.co.uk/https://twitter.com/DraytonManorhttps://www.instagram.com/draytonmanor/https://www.tiktok.com/@drayton_manor Danielle Nicholls - Senior Content Executive at Drayton Manor ResortWhen I graduated from Leeds Trinity University with a degree in Media & Marketing and a multitude of marketing placements in 2017, I was set on combining my two passions - storytelling and theme parks.After a year in a marketing communications role with a tour operator, I was lucky enough to secure a role in the Drayton Manor marketing team.Here at Drayton, I'm responsible for creating engaging visual and written content for all marketing channels - including web, PR, email, in park signage and of course, social media.My main focus over the last 4 and a half years has been to build an engaged social community across all our channels – Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, TikTok, LinkedIn and YouTube.I'm forever grateful to work in such a fantastic industry, filled with incredible energy and enthusiasm.https://www.linkedin.com/in/nichollsdanielle/Twitter @dnicholls_Instagram @_daniellenicholls Ross Ballinger - Design & Brand Manager at Drayton Manor Resort (Inc. Hotel, Zoo & Europe's only Thomas Land) Brand protector and innovator... I played a senior role in a busy agency studio team for nearly 9 years. I joined fresh from leaving university with a sort after London placement under my belt.I now produce fresh, engaging, and dynamic design creative for digital advertising, marketing campaigns, theme park attractions, working closely alongside a talented Marketing team. All to promote Drayton Manor Resort in the most effective and exciting method possible.I can guarantee expertise and a wealth of experience, the final outcome of the design process is not the end of my creative input, you can be assured that maintaining brand continuity and freshly injected excitement remains my priority.Spend time with me and you'll understand why I wanted to be an Actor, but you'll be glad I didn't as my energy provides office enthusiasm and endless creative steer.www.linkedin.com/in/ross-ballingerwww.behance.net/rossballinger(Portfolio)Instagram @rossballingerTwitter @rossballingerTikTok @rossballinger Transcriptions: Kelly Molson: Welcome to Skip the Queue, a podcast for people working in, or working with, visitor attractions. I'm your host, Kelly Molson. In today's episode, I speak with two great team members from Drayton Manor, Danielle Nicholls, Senior Content Executive, and Ross Ballinger, the Design and Brand Manager. We discuss the complex rebranding process. And how building a great social media community can mean your fans having your back when it comes to big change. If you like what you hear, you can subscribe on all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue.Kelly Molson: Woohoo, I've got Danielle and Ross from Drayton Manor on the podcast today. Hello.Danielle Nicholls: Hi.Ross Ballinger: Hello there. Very excited to be here.Kelly Molson: I love how excited you are. I'm just talking, listeners, Danielle and Ross are literally the most pumped guests I've ever had on the podcast.Ross Ballinger: That's it, we'd better live up to that now.Danielle Nicholls: I know, right?Kelly Molson: They've got a snazzy Drayton Manor background behind them, which is looking fierce. But as ever, we're going to start with our icebreaker questions. Imagine that you're just down your pub with your mates. This is how I need you to feel with the icebreaker questions.Ross Ballinger: Okay. Get a few beers in.Kelly Molson: Ready?Ross Ballinger: Yeah.Kelly Molson: What are you most likely to buy when you exit through the gift shop?Danielle Nicholls: Pin badge, I reckon. Yeah, I've got a little pin badge collection.Kelly Molson: I like this. Ross?Ross Ballinger: Yeah, I'm very similar. I'm fridge magnet.Kelly Molson: You can't go wrong with a fridge magnet.Ross Ballinger: No. And we've got a secondary fridge, under the stairs, which where we keep the beers. And that's where all the fridge magnets go, at the end, if we've been to an attraction.Danielle Nicholls: I love it.Kelly Molson: Is that because your house is beautiful and your partner does not want them on her fridge and you have to hide them?Ross Ballinger: Exactly. Exactly that. The wife does not want them on the normal fridge. They're hidden behind the door.Kelly Molson: Oh, I like her style.Ross Ballinger: But I've got to get a fridge magnet.Kelly Molson: Pin badges, fridge magnets, excellent choices. Mine would be a rubber. Have I told you about my rubber collection?Danielle Nicholls: That's interesting, no.Ross Ballinger: So you collect branded rubbers?Kelly Molson: Right. Well, I used to when I was a kid. I'm going to show you them. I've got them on the desk next to me.Danielle Nicholls: Oh my God, please do.Kelly Molson: I'm sorry, listeners. For the people that are listening, this is rubbish. But if you're watching the YouTube video, hello. Welcome to my rubber collection.Danielle Nicholls: Amazing.Kelly Molson: So they still smell. Again, this is not podcast material, but they smell absolutely incredible.Ross Ballinger: Smell really good.Danielle Nicholls: Oh my God, I love it.Kelly Molson: This is an '80s collection of novelty rubbers.Danielle Nicholls: What's your oldest rubber in there, which have you had the longest?Kelly Molson: So there's one in there from the planetarium, the London Planetarium.Ross Ballinger: Doesn't exist anymore. There you go, that's memorabilia.Kelly Molson: Look at my Thorpe Park one, that's my Thorpe Park one.Danielle Nicholls: Oh my gosh, that is a throwback.Ross Ballinger: Oh, that's a good one.Kelly Molson: This is an old one as well. Anyway-Ross Ballinger: Everyone still does rubbers, so we fit in there with you.Kelly Molson: Because I can collect them.Ross Ballinger: Pin badge, magnet, rubber.Danielle Nicholls: We stick together.Ross Ballinger: That's a perfect combo.Kelly Molson: It's like the perfect triangle. We're the perfect gift shop triangle. Okay, all right, next one. If you had to live in a sitcom for the rest of your life, which sitcom would you choose and why?Ross Ballinger: Oh, mine's easy.Danielle Nicholls: I feel like we're going to be the same.Ross Ballinger: Yeah.Danielle Nicholls: Friends.Ross Ballinger: Friends, yeah.Kelly Molson: Aww. Who would you be, if you had to be one of the characters?Danielle Nicholls: I'm like a perfect mix between Phoebe, Rachel, and Monica, I think.Kelly Molson: Nice, okay. Again, another little triangle.Danielle Nicholls: Maybe more towards Phoebe, I'm a bit more hippie, I guess.Kelly Molson: Ross, what about you?Ross Ballinger: I love all the guys. I love for all the guys. Because I just love Chandler because he's so funny. But then Ross is funny as well, when he doesn't try to be funny. But Ross is just such a good actor. And you don't realise, until you watch it 17,000 times, actually how good of an actor he was. I think I'd have to-Danielle Nicholls: Can you be a Gunther?Ross Ballinger: No, no. I think I just have to sway towards Chandler. Just because he was known for being comedic and stupid.Kelly Molson: And now you feel like that's your life role?Ross Ballinger: Yeah, yeah. Yeah, I would go and live Chandler's life any day.Kelly Molson: Okay, I love this. All right, good, good answers. It's what I thought you were going to say. This is what I thought.Ross Ballinger: Did you?Kelly Molson: Yeah, I thought it was going to be Friends. All right. If you had to pick one item to win a lifetime supply of, what would you pick?Danielle Nicholls: That is so hard.Ross Ballinger: I know. Probably whiskey, lifetime supply of whiskey, just coming out the tap.Kelly Molson: It's a good choice.Danielle Nicholls: I genuinely don't know. That's really, really hard.Ross Ballinger: It's got to be food or drink, surely.Danielle Nicholls: It's got to be crisps or something like that. You can't beat a crisps and dip combo.Kelly Molson: Yeah. What about a crisp sandwich? How do we feel about crisp sandwiches?Ross Ballinger: Yeah, yeah, yeah.Danielle Nicholls: Oo, I'm not sure about that one.Kelly Molson: What?Danielle Nicholls: I'm not sure.Ross Ballinger: Come one, you're Northern. You can put anything in a sandwich.Danielle Nicholls: I would put crisps inside a cheese sandwich or something like that. But I wouldn't just have the crisps.Kelly Molson: See, I would do it either. I'm happy to have a filling sandwich with crisps in it. Or just a plain crisp sandwich.Ross Ballinger: I'd do either.Kelly Molson: What I really love about you two is how well you get on. And we're going to talk a little bit about this in the podcast today about your roles and what you do at Drayton Manor. But you look like-Ross Ballinger: Is it that evident?Kelly Molson: Yeah, it's that evident. But even from your social media channels... You guys feature quite heavily across Drayton Manor's social media channels. And, honestly, it just looks like you have the best time ever. And I want to hear more about it. But, firstly, I need your unpopular opinions. What have you prepared for us?Ross Ballinger: Okay, do you want to go first?Danielle Nicholls: As Ross alluded, I'm very, very Northern, I think. My accent a little bit, but more like how I am. So mine is, it's not a bap, it's not a bread roll, it's not a cob, it's a muffin.Kelly Molson: What?Danielle Nicholls: A muffin. That's mine.Ross Ballinger: It's a cob, it's a cob.Danielle Nicholls: No, it's a muffin.Ross Ballinger: Cob. You call it a cob.Danielle Nicholls: A muffin.Kelly Molson: No, it's a bun. What's wrong with you all?Ross Ballinger: Do you say bun? A muffin's a cake.Danielle Nicholls: I say batch as well. My partner calls it a batch, which is crazy to me. But muffin, we'll go muffin.Kelly Molson: Okay. For now, we'll accept muffin. Ross?Danielle Nicholls: Moving on.Ross Ballinger: Mine is, I just think soap operas are crap, honestly. I was going to swear, but I can't stand soap operas. And I know there's a lot of people out there that love them. But I just can't, I can't watch them. I just think they're so depressing. And if they're on, if I accidentally get home and the channel's on where it's on, I get anxious. And I have to find the remote as soon as I can to turn it off. What a waste of your life. What a waste of time, honestly. Hours and hours. And you add that up over a week and a year, think what else you could be doing. Honestly, if I turn one on now by accident, it's the same actors that are in it 20, 30 years ago. And I think, "What have they done with their life as well? They've just been in a soap opera for 30 years."Kelly Molson: These are excellent unpopular opinions. Listeners, please let me know if you agree or disagree. Thank you for preparing those for us today. I appreciate it.Ross Ballinger: No problem.Kelly Molson: Right, you guys work together. Tell me a little bit about your roles and what you do there?Ross Ballinger: So my title is design and brand manager. So I'm technically like lead designer for the resort. And the brand guardian. I look after the brand guidelines. So yeah, I'll produce, with me and my little team, everything that goes out graphically or visually across all the channels, website, printed media. So yeah.Danielle Nicholls: You definitely underplayed yourself there.Ross Ballinger: Did I?Danielle Nicholls: Yeah. You do so much. You say your little team, you and one other person. You smash everything, literally everything.Ross Ballinger: Aw, thanks, Danielle.Kelly Molson: That's a lot of work for you and your team.Ross Ballinger: It is, because if you think, in the industry, I can imagine people on a parallel with us would have bigger teams, bigger resource. Because basically Drayton Manor is a massive entity. It's not just a theme park, it's a hotel as well. It's a zoo. Then we have Thomas Land, which could be considered as a separate entity. So they're what I consider as four blue chip clients. And then we operate as a little agency within the resort that looks after all those. But then, you've got the resort's departments as well, which could be clusters of clients. So you've got catering, retail, they're the big ones I can think off my head. But they all have their graphical requirements as well, design requirements. So yeah, it's a massive entity and we look after it all.Kelly Molson: And how many... Did you say there's two of you?Ross Ballinger: There's two of us, yeah.Kelly Molson: That's mad. That is mad. So I really resonate with this because I, obviously, come from an agency background. I set up my agency nearly 20 years ago. I feel ancient. But what you're doing is you are essentially a mini agency with loads of clients and two of you. It's crazy. So I can imagine it's quite stressful, but also lots of fun because you get to work on a lot of variety.Ross Ballinger: Yeah. Oh, very varied. Yeah, every day is different. And that is not just a cliche that you can just say. Literally, every day is so different. Because it's an exciting company as well, where there's new things happening all the time, constantly evolving strategies, or new things come in and go in. So yeah, it's very varied.Kelly Molson: Danielle, what's your role? Because the two of you do work quite closely together as well, don't you?Danielle Nicholls: Yeah. Yeah, we do. So my role is, the title is senior content executive. So I primarily look after the social media channels, so Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, and TikTok. Creating the content, taking the pictures, work with video agents. Sometimes creating a video in-house as well. And all of the community engagement that goes alongside that as well. Whilst also writing any copy, creating the content for the website, and any signage requirements. Literally anything that you see that has text on it, normally, me and Ross have worked together to create that. And with social, it's both paid and organic social media. So all of the adverts you see, alongside all of the organic stuff you see on our feeds. I also help out with PR as well. So we have a PR agency that we work with, but we liaise alongside them. And now, we're getting more into the traditional media as well. So the pair leaflets and out of home magazines, articles. Yeah, little bit of everything now that it's-Kelly Molson: That's mad. I love that you were just glossing over elements of your job that I'm like, "That's a whole person's job there." And we do the social community building and we do this bit and this bit. Wow, yeah, there's a lot. I just think that goes to show, even... We talk to attractions of all kinds of shapes and sizes on this podcast. And I think it just goes to show that even with an attraction that is a big attraction, and it's perceived to be a very big attraction, actually you're working with really small teams here. And there's a lot on each person's shoulder and a lot of responsibility. And I think it's really important that we highlight that, that you're doing a lot there.Ross Ballinger: But the extended team is really good as well. We've got really good team members. So the rapport across the whole team is very tight.Danielle Nicholls: In terms of the marketing side, I report into a digital marketing manager. And she is insane, she's amazing at what she does. And then, alongside me, we also have a digital marketing exec. And how it splits out is, he looks after all of the technical side, so SEO, CRM, that kind of thing. And I look after the creative content. And then we both report in to the digital manager.Kelly Molson: It sounds like-Danielle Nicholls: It's a little team but-Kelly Molson: It sounds like such fun roles as well. Genuinely, they sound really cool. Because I know, Danielle, you are a bit of a theme park... I'm going to say nerd. But you're theme park nut, right? You love theme parks.Danielle Nicholls: Yeah, absolutely, yeah.Kelly Molson: And I'm guessing, Ross, to work in a theme park, you've got to love a theme park.Ross Ballinger: Yeah, absolutely.Kelly Molson: Did you absolutely tailor your careers to make this happen? Was this always your ultimate goals? Like, "I want to work in an attraction."Ross Ballinger: Yes and no, kind of. So I studied to be a graphic designer, went to university for three years. And then I worked as a digital artist while I was at uni. And then I went straight into a local agency, after getting quite a sought after placement in London. And then I worked for an agency for nearly nine years. So I learnt my craft there, really. Worked my way up from a junior, up to a senior creative. And I ended up looking after all the top clients there as well. But almost nine years was enough. I knew I wanted to go in-house because it was at that time, there was a bit of a boom of companies and clients getting in-house designers. Because they knew how cost effective it would be to have your graphic designer in-house. So I started looking about, and I wanted a fun industry. There was no way I was going to go and work for a boiler company. I don't want to bad mouth any other companies out there but something engineering or-Danielle Nicholls: More typically fun.Ross Ballinger: Yeah, I wanted to go full on fun. And I used to come to Drayton as a kid as well so I knew Drayton Manor.Kelly Molson: That's nice to have that connection, isn't it? You know the brand, you've lived it.Ross Ballinger: I've got pictures of me around the park when I'm seven or eight with my mum and dad. So I have that nostalgic connection. And I was a big to a big Thomas fan as well when I was a kid growing up. So Thomas the Tank Engine, I had the wallpaper, had the bedspreads, loved the episodes. So when I knew that the big blue engine was here as well, it was like-Danielle Nicholls: Big boss Thomas.Ross Ballinger: Big boss, yeah, Thomas is your boss, any day. Yeah. So I was a fan of attractions anyway. Who's not a fan of going out on days out? And so it worked.Kelly Molson: Exactly, cool. But, Danielle, you went out and made that happen, didn't you? This was your focus.Danielle Nicholls: It was, yeah. I think, maybe not so much early on, I guess this is different, but from the age of about 13, 14, I knew I wanted to work in marketing. But I wanted to do marketing for a dance company at the time. So I did a couple of placements at some dance companies, Northern Ballet, Phoenix Dance Theatre, places like that. And that was the dream up until about 17, I want to say, when I was at college. I knew that I wanted theme parks. So I went and did a media and marketing degree. And as soon as I got to my second year, I was like, "Right, that's it. I need to find a theme park. I need to get experience. I need to connect with as many people as I can on LinkedIn." And it was my focus.Kelly Molson: That's interesting. Hang on, let me just... Because that isn't a typical 17-year-old's path, is it? They wouldn't necessarily go, "I know that I want to work in this industry, therefore, I need to connect with people that can help me make that happen." That's a really good piece of advice.Danielle Nicholls: Yeah. And I was literally on it, messaging people. I think I messaged, at the time, the PR manager for Legoland. And was like, "Hello, anything you can help me with." I was really a bit brutal. But yeah, then I went to uni, and did everything I could whilst I was there to try and get the connections still. I applied for a couple of grad schemes with some other groups and, sadly, didn't make it through to those. So as a bit of a bridge between finishing uni and starting Drayton, I went to work for a tour operator, who sold overseas UK holidays, but also sold theatre, attraction tickets, theme parks. So it was a bit of a gap between the two.And I worked there for a year, and then the job at Drayton came up. And at the time, I was living in York, working for this tour operator. And I was like, "I've got to go for it." It was a marketing officer job, so a little bit different to what I do now. But I had to. So I drove two and a bit hours up, in my little... I had a little C1 at the time.Ross Ballinger: But I feel that we both came in at Drayton in our respective roles as entry level, really. Because I had just started as a graphic designer. I took a pay cut to come here because I really wanted to start here. It was never about anything like that. So I wanted to work at Drayton. So that proves that I wanted to work. And our roles have both escalated over the seasons that we've been here.Danielle Nicholls: Because I did move so far, and away from my family and stuff, it was a big jump. I had three weeks to find a house and somewhere to live as well, which was fun. But I managed to do it and, honestly, I don't regret it. I don't look back at all. It's probably the best thing I've ever done.Ross Ballinger: If you want it, you make it happen, don't you?Kelly Molson: Yeah, totally. And I think it really says a lot about the Drayton Manor brand that you've done that as well. There is a real... It's clear with both of you, how much you love it. And it's amazing that you've... Ross, you've taken a pay cut. You've changed where you live to come and work and be part of what's happening there. So I think that's a real testimony to the brand itself. And that's a couple of things that we really want to focus on for this conversation today. So I'm going to start with the focus on you, Danielle, if that's okay?Danielle Nicholls: Okay, yeah, that's fine.Kelly Molson: Because I think what you mentioned really briefly, when you went, "Oh yeah and we do this kind of thing as well," is what you said around the social community side. So you have built the social community and I want you to explain how you've been able to do that and what that's looked like. So tell us a little bit about that element of your role.Danielle Nicholls: So I've been here just over four years now. And in that time, we've been through so much change but, also, social has changed so much. So when I first started I was looking at social but it was more, "Let's just post and leave it," kind of thing. And see how it is engaged with, see how it works. But, over time, I've tried to hone it so it's more about a social community, rather than we're just talking at them. It's more we're talking with them and we're engaging with them. Like I say, we've grown into different channels. So we were really just focusing on Facebook. We had a little bit of Twitter, and a little bit of Instagram, but it was primarily Facebook. Whereas now, we've brought in more LinkedIn stuff and TikTok as well, which has really helped. I think in terms of building the social community though, there's so many different to-dos that you can stick to. But, for me, it's more about seeing what works for your brand. Because it doesn't always fit the same, it's not just one formula that fits all.Kelly Molson: And I guess, like you said, about bringing in different social channels, you need to work out where your audience is. I guess where you're getting the most engagement as well. And then, you are a small team, how do you then divide up where you spend your time? You've got to spend it in the areas that you're going to get that engagement. So you might then end up dropping certain channels, or not being as... I don't know, not putting as much effort into those ones, just because it's just not where you get the engagement.Danielle Nicholls: I think in terms of the different channels, they all have a different audience, if that makes sense. So Facebook is very family orientated. You get the grandparents, the mums on there. Whereas, Twitter is theme park fans and slightly younger, it's very conversational. TikTok is younger, but the demographics on there are shifting slightly to be everyone at the moment. Because it's where all the trends are and things, there's a big range. Our audience on there is 13 to maybe 35, 40 upwards. So it is very varied. Instagram is a mix between Twitter and Facebook. So you do get the families and the mums on there, but then you get the theme park fans that just want to see pictures of roller coasters. And with the introduction of reels as well, that's trying to tackle TikTok, so that's really important. And LinkedIn is corporate.But we do have a team, like I say, we have a digital manager as well, but she's so busy with all the other things that she's got to look after. So the social, like creating the content and community engagement, just sits with me. So I have a big plan of all the different channels and the different days. And because I know the Drayton brand inside and out, I know what works now. So we tend to post every other day on Facebook, every day on Twitter. And we try to do every weekday on TikTok. Instagram, very similar to Facebook. But there's not really one that I'd prioritise, necessarily. At first, it was TikTok, at the start of this year, because obviously that was where it was taking off. But now, it's just about tailoring the message across, and trying to keep active on all of them.Kelly Molson: Do you have to really tailor what you put out on each of the channels as well? So you don't do, "This is going to go out across all of our socials." You have to really think about how those... Because I guess there's subtle nuances about how people react to certain things on different channels, and how they might communicate back with you.Danielle Nicholls: I think, from what I've been doing this season in particular, is Twitter's been very conversational. So I've not necessarily been worried about always having an image on there, or always having a piece of media on there. Just some text normally works, so long as it's engaging and people feel like they want to respond to it. Whether there's a CTA on there, or it's just something that's humorous, then that tends to work quite well.Kelly Molson: It's no mean feat. That is an awful lot of work that goes into that. And I think it's really interesting to hear about the tailoring as well. And how you're going to get different reactions, from different people, on different social media platforms.Danielle Nicholls: We tend to get, particularly on Facebook, in the comments, they're always really interesting to read. They're so different to Twitter. Because Facebook, sometimes you get some complaints in there. But because our community is so strong now, we get other people responding for us, which is a good... It's amazing, I love it.Kelly Molson: That's phenomenal.Danielle Nicholls: Sometimes you've got to moderate it because they might give an answer that's not necessarily right. But yeah, a lot of the time they'll be sticking up for us. Or they'll be responding to the questions for us, which is interesting.Kelly Molson: That's really impressive, and I didn't know that that happened. Is that part of, because you've put so much work into building your community, they're now backing you to other people?Danielle Nicholls: Exactly, yeah.Kelly Molson: Wow.Danielle Nicholls: Yeah. They've become our brand guardians without us making them, if that makes sense. Because they're so loyal to the brand, they just want to do all their best for us.Kelly Molson: How does that happen? Is that a time thing? Is it purely because you've spent so much time investing in those relationships that that happens now? Nobody's ever told me this before, that that happens.Danielle Nicholls: I think it's that but, also, like you say, Drayton is such a strong brand. And particularly since I've been here, we've just gone from strength to strength. So I think that helps as well. We also use user generated content. So particularly at the end of a big campaign, so Halloween, we'll say, "Share your pictures with us and we'll share them on our feeds." And that really gives them a sense of belonging as part of the community. Because they'll be scrolling down their Facebook or Instagram or wherever, and they'll see a picture of maybe their little one. Or they'll see themselves and, yeah, they love it.Kelly Molson: Yeah, I love that the whole user generated content is brilliant, because it allows people to see themselves at the place as well, doesn't it?Danielle Nicholls: Yeah.Kelly Molson: So from a sales perspective, I think if people can look at something and go, "Oh, well, that family looks just like mine." Or, "That person looks just like me." Or, "They've got this thing, just like I have." Then they're more inclined to maybe buy a ticket to come and see it as well. So it works two ways.Danielle Nicholls: It's about recognising the top fans as well. So I know Facebook has the top fan badge. And, on Twitter, we've got a closed community group which anyone can join. That's just called Drayton Manor Top Fans. And we, every so often, give them a little bit of information early before we give it to everybody else. Or little things like that, that make them feel special.Kelly Molson: So they feel like VIPs.Danielle Nicholls: So it keeps them interactive. Yes, exactly.Kelly Molson: They've got their own mini community. They feel like VIPs because they get to know stuff early. That's brilliant. Again, I've never heard any other attraction talk about doing stuff like that. Do you think that would be... I always ask about top tips, and what you would recommend other people to do that are building communities. Do you think that would be one of your top tips, is really invest in them?Danielle Nicholls: Yeah. And also, respond in a personal manner, rather than it being very corporate. Include your tone of voice, wherever you can, and make sure your tone of voice is dead on point, according to your brand guidelines. But also, be bold and brave. We always say that, don't we?Ross Ballinger: Bold and brave, yeah.Danielle Nicholls: If you sway away from your brand guidelines slightly, in order to respond, particularly on Twitter, it works really well. Then don't worry too much about that. It's okay, so long as it's in keeping with your values then it's okay.Ross Ballinger: And it's evident out there as well with all the other big companies. And it becomes a news story, doesn't it, when you get supermarkets battling on Twitter. And it's exposure and engagement at the same time.Kelly Molson: And people love that.Danielle Nicholls: That's another really important thing.Ross Ballinger: Yeah, people love it. It's a comedy show.Danielle Nicholls: Yeah, engaging with other brands helps.Kelly Molson: Yeah, they want to know about the people behind the brands, don't they? And if they realise that your brand face, actually there's a human behind it who's got a sense of humour, I think that goes a really long way.Danielle Nicholls: That's what we try and do.Kelly Molson: You do it perfectly, because I love your Twitter chat. You've got a great Twitter chat. We've talked loads about brand today, and that leads me on to what I want to talk to you about, Ross, which is the Drayton Manor brand itself. Because I think, I might have got this wrong, but it's a 70 year old brand. So Drayton Manor's about 70 years old.Ross Ballinger: Yeah, 1950 was when it first came about, yeah. The Bryan family started it in the 1950s. So George Bryan Sr., had this vision to create an inland pleasure resort for the local community. And I guess, in short story, it escalated from there.Danielle Nicholls: We've got a book all about it in the shops.Ross Ballinger: Yeah, yeah. So yeah, we owe a lot to the Bryan family, really, for escalating such a tiny little brainchild into a massive attraction that we are today. So yeah, I can remember thinking that we needed to rebrand years ago though, when I first started. Because I think it's just one of those that was a little bit... I don't want to say anything bad about it but obviously it needed to change. It was a little bit outdated.Danielle Nicholls: It was a bit archaic, wasn't it?Ross Ballinger: Yeah, it was a bit archaic. It stood the test of time and it did a good job.Kelly Molson: So how long had the existing brand been in place, before you got your mitts on it?Ross Ballinger: I think the last logo that we had in the brand was probably in place for about 20 years. I think it's early 2000s, the last logo.Danielle Nicholls: There was always slight variations, wasn't there?Ross Ballinger: Yeah, there was always a few modifications on it.Kelly Molson: But I can imagine that things had changed quite dramatically over those 20 years as well. So you talk about the need for a rebrand, it was really needed.Ross Ballinger: Absolutely.Kelly Molson: What I always think's quite interesting is how long some of these things take. Because I think that people don't fully understand how long a rebrand can actually take you. So can you remember when those conversations first started?Ross Ballinger: Since I started, it's always been a project that was a pinnacle project that we always wanted to try and get on to. But just in terms of budgets and time, we never got around to it. Obviously, it came to the point, I think it was November 2021, when we first sat down and said, "Now is the time to do it." Because, obviously, we were bought out by a big company, Looping Group, and it was the perfect opportunity to do it. It's obviously a new era so it made perfect sense.Kelly Molson: So when did you launch it? So November, you sat down and went, "Right, November '21, we're going to do this." When did it actually launch?Ross Ballinger: Literally-Danielle Nicholls: Two minutes later.Ross Ballinger: Six months.Kelly Molson: Six months?Ross Ballinger: Six months, yeah. We put a brand team together, firstly. And, honestly, because we're such a small in-house team, we knew that we needed some help. So we got agency help, and we got local agencies to pitch in their best processes. So they were the experts in doing it, and they knew what protocols and procedures to go through. And we chose a really talented local agency in Birmingham. Yeah, started the project in '21, and launched it six months later.Kelly Molson: Wow, that's a phenomenal amount of work in six months.Ross Ballinger: Yeah. In, I don't know, design industry terms and the size of the business, that's no time at all, really.Kelly Molson: No, it's not. I honestly thought you were going to say we started talking about this three years ago and it took two years. It was a two year process.Ross Ballinger: The best thing was, is that we were doing that, alongside launching our brand new Vikings area. So we've got three new rides launch. We're launching a new website at the same time.Danielle Nicholls: We had a new booking system.Ross Ballinger: Yeah, a new ticketing system. As well as the regular day to day work and seasonal campaigns to market. It was literally like all Christmases come at once.Danielle Nicholls: It was. Everything we'd wanted for so long, they just went, "There you go."Ross Ballinger: All at the same time.Kelly Molson: You can have it all, but you need to do it in this amount of time. Wow. That is such a lot to all be happening at the same time. But I'm not going to lie, this happens at attractions. Suddenly, they just spring into action. We have just worked with a client with exactly the same. They did a rebrand, new website, booking system, all at the same time. And you're like, "Ah, the world is on fire. What's happening?"Danielle Nicholls: It was great though.Ross Ballinger: It was good though. We collaborated for most of it. The agency were a bit of a rock, really. And they did a lot of the legwork in terms of the brand personality, putting together the guidelines, creating the initial design concepts. But I did sit alongside them and collaborate with them. It would've just been a too big a task solely, on my own, internally, which it wouldn't have been possible. But I'd like to think I had a lot of input, inspirational design ideas along the way, that probably helped chisel the final outcome and the look of the brand that we've got now.Danielle Nicholls: Just logos in itself, you had sheets and sheets of-Ross Ballinger: Sheets and sheets of logos, yeah, logo concepts and variations. But I know I wanted something that was super flexible in terms of composition and layout. Because I know what I'd created before, it was archaic, but it was flexible. It would work on all different platforms. And then the typeface that we chose for the final logo was one of my early typefaces that I pitched in. And the swirl, that was one of my babies, that was one of my original concepts. So I always wanted to push that.Kelly Molson: Yeah, yeah, yeah. I love that. But that's what makes for a good agency client relationship is that you do collaborate. That's how it should be. And they obviously nailed it. And I know that you would've had so many stakeholders involved in this process as well. So I can imagine how big a challenge that was to actually come to a final, "This is what it's going to be like," and everyone be happy.Ross Ballinger: It was a challenge, but only because we had a lot of passionate stakeholders that wanted valued input. And they had strong views, which was very fair.Kelly Molson: So the bit that ties these two stories together, the things that we've talked about today, is that... I think you alluded to the fact, Ross. That when the brand launched, it's a big change for people. The way that you've talked about the brand is incredibly passionate. I can imagine that local people, people that come to visit every week, every month, they are so... The brand is in their heart. So a big change like this can be quite uncomfortable for people. And when the brand launched, there was a little bit of-Ross Ballinger: Yeah, there was a bit of uncertainty, yeah, and a bit of shock. Yeah, they've had a logo installed in their brain for 20 years. But when we wanted to launch the rebrand, it wasn't just about a logo. We did focus on the logo probably, in hindsight, more than we should have.Danielle Nicholls: I think that's maybe a bit of a learning curve, particularly on social. The asset that we used was the old logo going into the new logo, which we thought was great. But then when we put it out, we were like, "Actually, maybe we should have focused more on..." Like you say, brand personality and visions and values, rather than just the logo.Ross Ballinger: Because the end user hasn't really seen the six months of graft that's gone into creating that. And we did portray it in five seconds.Kelly Molson: So they just get the, "Hey, this is new, you should love it." But they haven't understood about the process of why you've done certain things, and the decisions that have been made.Danielle Nicholls: Exactly, yeah. We had a blog which explained it all perfectly, but you had to click through to the blog. People didn't necessarily do that. They just saw the logo and keyboard-Ross Ballinger: But I like the journey we went through because the people that didn't actually really like it in the beginning and really just sacked it off straight away, they're the people that have warmed to it now. And seen it in execution, and how adaptable it is, and how we can get our messages across. And the fact that they love it now, and I love that, that we've turned them round.Danielle Nicholls: Because the main thing we were trying to do, really, is come away from fun family memories, and turn it to fun for everyone. That was the main message that we wanted to portray, particularly on the social channels, and in brand in general. But I think going forward we're definitely going to achieve that.Kelly Molson: But it's quite interesting because I think what you talked about earlier, Danielle, your social community, they would've played a big part in this when you launched it. So I guess it would've been harder if you hadn't already built those relationships and nurtured that community. Launching something like this, would've been 1,000 times more difficult than actually... All right, there was a bit of a bump in the road, but it wasn't the end of the world. And people, like you say, are now warming to it and loving it. Would that have happened if you hadn't put all that work into the social community aspect?Danielle Nicholls: Possibly not. I think, like I said earlier, there was a lot of people, they had our backs. So there was people like, "This is..." Being very negative. But people were responding saying, "Look, they have to move forward, they've been through this, that and the other. They have to move forward. See the positives," which was good.Ross Ballinger: I think as well, probably because we've got such a good social community, they felt comfortable with saying what they thought about it and being honest.Danielle Nicholls: Which helps because we did run focus groups beforehand, as part of the rebrand process, with suppliers, annual pass holders, staff members, literally with so many people. But until it's out there, you're not necessarily going to get that big, full, wider picture. So it did help us with how we were going to move forward with the rebrand as well, looking at their feedback.Kelly Molson: So you actually took some of their... So obviously from the focus groups, you would've taken on board some of the input that you got from those. When it launched, was there anything that you took on board from the feedback that you were getting at that point? That you could look to, not necessarily change, but I guess look at the ways that you implement it in a different way?Danielle Nicholls: I think the main thing was, like we said, the logo situation. Because everyone was so focused on the logo, we knew that, moving forwards, as we were going to explore the brand even more, we had to make sure it was about the imagery and the personality. And including the shop line there and things like that, rather than... I think that learning curve definitely came from the feedback.Kelly Molson: Brilliant. It is such a huge project to go through a rebrand. And I think there's always that anxious moment when you unveil it to people and they go... It could be a bit Marmite. But I think the way that it's been managed, that's the important part of this story, really. And that comes back to, again, it all fits together about how the two of you work together as well. And I think that's quite an important aspect to take away from this podcast episode as well. It's about, it's a team, this is a team thing that happens here. And it's not just about one person. So the brand has launched and then, suddenly, it's all on Danielle's shoulders to deal with all the stuff that's coming back. It's, this is a team thing.Ross Ballinger: Well, no, it cascaded all the way through the company, didn't it?Danielle Nicholls: Yeah.Ross Ballinger: People would be like... Even engineers, and everyone, and HR, they were like... They felt the same... It was almost a little bit of disappointment that the reaction wasn't amazing. But then, everybody felt it.Danielle Nicholls: But we all came together and-Ross Ballinger: Yeah.Danielle Nicholls: Our director of people bought us a box of Krispy Kremes in the office that day. And was like, "There you go, guys. Are you all okay?" And we were like, "Yeah, it's all good."Ross Ballinger: But there's obviously horror stories of brands doing this and reverting back. But we knew that we'd got something that was amazing that we were going to stick to. And once we knew we could roll it out, that it was going to flourish. So we're just glad that we stuck to our guns and just... We had the negativity at the beginning and, now, people love it.Danielle Nicholls: Like you say, we have people coming up to us, just telling me it's good. Saying, "I wasn't sure at first? But now we love it."Kelly Molson: Ah, see, and that's what you want. You want it to be loved by everybody that sees it now. That's brilliant. You just reminded me of something that I saw a few weeks ago. Have you seen the video when Staples changed their logo, they put out?Danielle Nicholls: Yes.Ross Ballinger: Yes, yes.Kelly Molson: That's just like, as you were talking about it, I was going, "Oh my God, I watched that last week." And it's so crazy.Danielle Nicholls: Yeah. And they're all like, "Whoopa." It's amazing.Kelly Molson: "Wow, look at us." And I just didn't think it was amazing either. But I just felt really sorry for the whole team being forced to clap it and, "Yay, a logo." Oh dear, if that's what they thought brand was-Ross Ballinger: I loved it. I just think that's how you should do it, even if it is a bit cringey.Danielle Nicholls: I thought it was hilarious.Ross Ballinger: What they've done is open up the stapler in the logo, and put it on the side. But sometimes that probably would've cost them an arm and a leg just to do that as well.Danielle Nicholls: So much time.Kelly Molson: There's a massive buildup to that happening as well. And I was a bit like, "Wow, that's a massive anticlimax."Danielle Nicholls: A big press conference for it.Ross Ballinger: I just loved everything about it, honestly.Kelly Molson: The next rebrand, that's what you'll be doing, Ross. You'll get everyone in the attraction, you'll launch it on a big screen. I think what you've done, and what you've achieved, is phenomenal. Thank you for coming on the podcast and talking to me about it today. I really appreciate it. As ever, we always ask our guests if they've got a book that they love that they'd like to share with our audience. So you can pick one each.Danielle Nicholls: I think for me... And going back to me being a theme park nerd, this ties in very well. John Wardley, who is-Ross Ballinger: No.Danielle Nicholls: I know, right. John Wardley, who is a big theme park, mainly rollercoaster, designer. He's done work for Merlin, PortAventura, Oakwood, so many. He was really, really big. He worked on things like Nemesis, Oblivion, Katanga Canyon at Alton Towers, was Megafobia at Oakwood. He had an autobiography called Creating Your Nemesis, which basically spanned through his life of how we got into the theme park industry and where we went through. And it's very story based and anecdotal, but it was really inspiring. And helped me create the courage to knock on doors and do that kind of thing.Kelly Molson: Oh, I love that. Great book. Great book choice.Ross Ballinger: That's a really good response to the question. See, I'm a designer so I don't really read. I can read, but I just don't read. I'm very visual, as you can imagine. So I'm just not a fan of reading. I prefer to just scroll through Instagram and TikTok. But I have read books in the past. I remember one book, I think it's probably the only book I have read, was The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown. I think it's Dan Brown. But that's only because I was interested in Leonardo da Vinci, who was obviously a scientist or an... He was a bit of an artist and an architect. So I was more interested in his theories, and his Vitruvian Man, I think it is. So I was more interested in his works, really. But other than that, I do own every book by Jamie Oliver, so if a cookbook works.Kelly Molson: I don't know if you should be sharing that.Ross Ballinger: So yeah, I love Jamie Oliver. 5 Ingredients, 30 Minute Meals, brilliant.Kelly Molson: Jamie Oliver gets a bad rap and I don't really know why because he seems like a nice guy.Danielle Nicholls: Are we going back to unpopular opinion?Kelly Molson: Well, I think we should. But also a little story in that. I live in Saffron Walden, Jamie Oliver lives five minutes around the corner.Ross Ballinger: He's down the road.Kelly Molson: He goes to the market in my town every Saturday, and goes and buys his-Ross Ballinger: Oh, I'd love to meet him.Danielle Nicholls: You'd be there for a selfie.Kelly Molson: Ross, join the queue. I'd love to meet him. I've lived here since 2019. I've never seen him once. All my friends have seen him. And now, it's a thing with them. They're like, "Have you seen him yet? Have you seen him?" No. And I feel like, I'm not a Jamie Oliver stalker. I'm not going to go and harass him. I just would like to live in the town and be like, "Oh yeah, I saw him this morning." I've never seen him. My mum has been messaging me once, and she's been in the cafe in Saffron Walden, and been like, "I think Jamie Oliver's on the table next to me. I'm not sure if it's him though. I don't know if it's a fat version of Jamie Oliver, or if it's actually... Oh no, it is Jamie. It's Jamie Oliver."Ross Ballinger: Oh no. I can understand why people don't like him. But he just sploshes his olive oil everywhere, sploshes it around. But he has got that passion for cooking, which is what I resonate with. So he loves what he does, he's so-Danielle Nicholls: You can't knock his passion.Ross Ballinger: You can't knock his passion. So I'm in tune with that.Kelly Molson: All right. Listeners, well, I think that we should scrap Ross's book choice, and I think we should go with the Jamie Oliver book. So if you head over to Twitter, and you retweet this Twitter announcement with, "I want Ross and Danielle's books," then you might be in with a chance of winning Danielle's book and a Jamie Oliver cookbook. Does that sound fair?Ross Ballinger: Yeah, that'd be ace.Kelly Molson: I feel like you were more passionate about that.Ross Ballinger: Yeah, yeah, yeah.Kelly Molson: All right, let's do that then. Thank you. It was lovely to have you both on. I've really, really enjoyed it.Ross Ballinger: Thank you.Danielle Nicholls: Thank you.Kelly Molson: And also thank you for the lovely little tour that I got of the new Vikings area at Drayton Manor, when you hosted the UK Theme Park Awards earlier this year.Danielle Nicholls: I'm glad you liked it.Ross Ballinger: Yeah, we did, yeah.Kelly Molson: It was awesome.Danielle Nicholls: It was amazing.Ross Ballinger: I think that's where you spotted us.Danielle Nicholls: Yeah.Kelly Molson: Well, look, I'm not going to lie, you guys were sitting behind me and you were extremely loud. And I thought, "They'll make great podcast guests."Danielle Nicholls: We were whooping everyone.Ross Ballinger: We had so much energy that day though. I was knackered by the end of the day.Kelly Molson: I loved it. No, you hosted it perfectly. It was a brilliant event. But the new area is fantastic, so definitely go on, book your ticket.Ross Ballinger: We're very proud of it.Kelly Molson: And go on and see that while you can. So thanks for coming on, guys.Ross Ballinger: Thank you.Danielle Nicholls: Thank you.Kelly Molson: Thanks for listening to Skip the Queue. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review. It really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned. Skip The Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions, that helps them increase their visitor numbers. You can find show notes and transcriptions from this episode and more, over on our website; rubber cheese.com/podcast.

Present Company
What & Why (Love Is Blind)

Present Company

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 10:24


Krista and Alyssa share this week's What & Why, Love Is Blind.  Curious what else the Queue team is watching? Head over to Netflix and search Queue's Queue for more recommendations!  

Scared Confident
Should I have said “no” to this?

Scared Confident

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 22:13


In this solo show, Tiffany takes a beat to reflect after a jam-packed six-week sprint in the Sauder household. Between Tiffany and her husband's hectic travel schedule, sick kiddos, and seemingly never-ending house construction projects, Tiffany has learned a lot about her own “minimums”—and what happens when she lets go of them in busy seasons. Queue this one up for your next drive and listen to Tiffany chat about setting your own minimums, knowing when to say “no” to things, and a reflection on how her recent trips to Washington D.C. have her thinking about service and sacrifice. For more on minimums, listen to Tiffany's episode with Zach Pello: https://www.tiffanysauder.com/scared-confident/health-is-more-than-looking-good-with-zach-pello/

Queue & A
Episode 52 - It's all about remixes baby (and also Crazy Frog)

Queue & A

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 94:14


In today's episode: We talk about remixes! Randy and I have a different approach to remixes and how we grew up with them so we trade songs and break things down per the usual. Also, let's finally talk about it - Crazy Frog. Check us out on Youtube HERE! Subscribe to our podcast for some entertainment and music Follow us on Instagram @queueanda and DM us your recommendations. Let's hear your thoughts! Email us at queueandapodcast@gmail.com with your thoughts or recommendations on songs. Shout out to Johnny Rock for letting us use his music! He's a great producer and you can check him out here: https://j-rockny.bandcamp.com/ //// This podcast includes copyrighted material for the sole purpose of commentary, review, and education regarding the copyrighted material. Queue & A makes no claims of ownership of any of this copyrighted material. This use is protected under United States law, specifically Section 107 of the Copyright Act as it applies to fair use of copyrighted material for the purpose of criticism and commentary. If you are the owner of any copyrighted material appearing here and wish for it to not be utilized for this purpose, please contact us directly at queueandapodcast@gmail.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/queueandapodcast/support

Thinking Transportation: Engaging Conversations about Transportation Innovations
Border Balancing Act: Finding harmony between commercial efficiency and security demands.

Thinking Transportation: Engaging Conversations about Transportation Innovations

Play Episode Play 54 sec Highlight Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 33:34 Transcription Available


Along America's 2,000-mile border with Mexico, there's plenty of room for things to go awry when it comes to the secure, efficient movement of people and goods. Myriad public and private partnerships and the latest research are helping ensure that they don't.

Eat Cleaner, Live Larger with Karen Knowler
Episode 21: Why You Should Have a Queue of Dreams

Eat Cleaner, Live Larger with Karen Knowler

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 16:22


If you're like most people, you have a whole bunch of goals, dreams and desires floating around your head and yet only some of them written down. As such it becomes genuinely difficult to track them and remember them – let alone make them all come true! To make matters even more complicated, that list comprises big goals, small goals, teen-tiny goals and the whopping life-changing goals that will take way more time, money and energy than all of the rest. How to corral this craziness? Create Your Queue of Dreams! Listen to this podcast and you will learn: What is a Queue of Dreams? The many great reasons to have one The special way you can use a Queue of Dreams to completely change your life The kinds of dreams that people include in their Queue of Dreams And the piece de resistance: How to get a free spot on the upcoming “Create Your Queue of Dreams” live interactive workshop happening on Saturday 12th November 2022. To join this free workshop, simply click here or visit karenknowler.com/dreamsworkshop and enter your details to receive everything you need to participate. If you're reading this after the workshop has taken place, if the link is still working you can opt-in to receive access to the replay. It's going to be fabulous!  

L'After Foot
Igor Tudor fait son auto-critique : "Il y a bien mieux à faire, les erreurs sont récurrentes" selon Jonatan MacHardy Et "Il faut se servir de Payet mais il faut aussi qu'il soit bon, c'est le serpent qui se mord la queue",

L'After Foot

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 22:17


L'émission qui dit tout haut ce que le monde du foot pense tout bas ! Cette année, l' « After Foot » fête ses 16 ans et propose un choc des générations ! Composée de ceux qui ont grandi avec l'After, la « Génération After » prendra les commandes de l'émission entre 20h et 22h. Avec Nicolas Jamain aux manettes, entouré de Kévin Diaz, Mathieu Bodmer, Walid Acherchour, Simon Dutin, Romain Canuti et Sofiane Zouaoui, cette nouvelle génération débattra avec passion, mais toujours en conservant les convictions et les codes de l'After. De 22h à minuit, place à la version originelle et historique de l'After autour de Gilbert Brisbois, Daniel Riolo, Stéphane Guy, et Florent Gautreau. Les soirs de Ligue des Champions, Jérôme Rothen rejoindra la bande pour les matchs du PSG et Mamadou Niang pour les matchs de l'OM. Nicolas Vilas sera aux commandes pour faire vivre les matchs dans l'After Live. Cette année, Thibaut Giangrande pilotera l' « After Foot » le vendredi et samedi.

Filmsteria
#334 Una de terror y una de espanto: Barbarian y Bardo - Filmsteria

Filmsteria

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 157:24


Josue se atrevió a ver #Bardo y no creerán lo que pasó. Además vimos otras tres de sustos: #Barbarian Sandy la Regia nos hace el reporte de lo que vio en el FICM donde destaca #Huesera.Nos preguntamos lo que todo México quiere saber: ¿Que pan serían Iñárritu, Cuarón y Del Toro?Eso y más en el episodio 334 de Filmsteria:0:00 | Intro2:24 | Bienvenidos a Filmsteria3:24 | Calaverita Erickcito9:03 | Sandy y su reporte del FICM35:22 | Opinamos sobre Bardo1:22:00 | #QUEUE, la revista de Netflix1:27:08 | Comentarios del público1:47:40 | Qué pan serían Iñárritu, Del Toro y Cuarón1:56:15 | Barbarian Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

What's Upset You Now?
S5 EP4: The bread starts guiding you

What's Upset You Now?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 20:42


In this episode Seann Walsh and Paul Mccaffrey moan about annoying people at airports, Queue jumping & Pizza rebellion. Please Subscribe, Rate & Review And for those of you who said that 15 minutes was not enough head on over to www.patreon.com/wuyn where you can support the podcast and get access to full hour long episodes, New sections, Early access to ad free guest episodes, An opportunity to be on the podcast and much more!! We have over 40 hours of extended episodes available exclusively to Patreon starting at just £3 a month so come and join the WUYN community Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Universal Orlando Explorers
Episode 29: Busy Days, FJ Queue Walkthrough, and HHN

Universal Orlando Explorers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 40:14


We discuss how to handle busy days at the parks, narrate a walkthrough of the Harry Potter and the Forbidden Journey queue, and compare HHN to Escape Hell House in Lehighton, PA. Support the showSocials, Support the Page, and More

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Operation Feather: planning for 'The Queue'

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 18:10


The queue for mourners to pay their respects to Queen Elizabeth II was one of the biggest in history, with 250,000 people waiting up to 24 hours, in a queue 16km long. A team of experts had been planning for this expected queue for many years in a project codenamed 'Operation Feather'. Professor Keith Still advised on the project, as well as 'Operation Marquee' and 'Operation Unicorn'. His expertise in queueing theory blends mathematics with behavioral psychology and is used around the world; at sports games, religious festivals and theme parks. Kathryn speaks with Professor Keith Still, a visiting professor in crowd science at the University of Suffolk, who has taught and advised on crowd science for 30 years and has lectured at the Cabinet Office Emergency Planning College.

Skip the Queue
Why smell is a form of mind control, with Liam Findlay

Skip the Queue

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 37:20


Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. Your host is  Kelly Molson, MD of Rubber Cheese.Download our free ebook The Ultimate Guide to Doubling Your Visitor NumbersIf you like what you hear, you can subscribe on iTunes, Spotify, and all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue or visit our website rubbercheese.com/podcast.If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review, it really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned in this podcastCompetition ends January 31st 2023. The winner will be contacted via Twitter. Show references: https://aromaprime.com/https://www.linkedin.com/in/liam-r-findlay/Smells for Theme Parks and Dementia Care: AromaPrime on BBC NewsKickstarter for the game where a reward is a scent collection, based on the locations in the game Smell tour of Amsterdam Liam R. Findlay is a designer of themed attractions who also works for AromaPrime, advising attractions on how to enhance their experiences using scent. AromaPrime was founded in 1973, and it creates weird and wonderful pongs for venues like Alton Towers, The British Museum and Madame Tussauds. The company's collection of over 400 concoctions ranges from Dinosaur to Dungeon, and Pirate Ship to Penguin Sick. While Liam helps clients select or develop the best smells to tell their stories, he also assists in implementing them in the most effective ways. Transcriptions: Kelly Molson: Welcome to Skip the Queue, a podcast for people working in or working with visitor attractions. I'm your host, Kelly Molson.We're getting smelly on the podcast today as I speak with Liam Findlay, Multisensory Attraction Designer and Sensing Specialist at AromaPrime. Liam discusses the use of Aroma's storytelling and psychological influences in your attraction and why smell is a form of mind control. If you like what you hear, you can subscribe on iTunes, Spotify, and all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue.Kelly Molson: Liam, hello. Welcome to Skip the Queue.Liam Findlay: Hi, how are you?Kelly Molson: I'm very good. How are you is the question?Liam Findlay: I'm very good. Fatigued from lots of orders, but it's a good thing.Kelly Molson: Right, we'll talk about that in a minute because it's a very busy season for you. Our listeners will find out why soon, but first, icebreaker questions. So I'm going to start with a couple of topical ones. I want to know, what is your favourite smell and also, what is the smell that turns your stomach?Liam Findlay: My favourite smell is probably a kind of, when I was growing up there was an attraction called The Timewalk in the town I lived in, and it had a musty smell in a Black Death scene. And it was very scary and dark in there and it had that horrible smell but the attraction's been closed for over a decade now, and everyone in the town remembers it for its Black Death smell. And now I work for the company that made that smell, so I have kind of a personal connection to it.Kelly Molson: Oh, how funny. Okay, so do they have the smell in the archives? So can you go and find the smell and it takes you back to that attraction?Liam Findlay: Yeah, we're selling it now as The Timewalk smell for locals who might want to transport themselves back.Kelly Molson: This is amazing. And again, this is something that we will talk about a little bit later, the reasons why smell is so emotive for people. Okay. And what about the worst smell?Liam Findlay: I'm not sure when it comes to that because I'm so used to all sorts of horrible smells, and especially with AromaPrime, everything's artificial so I know it's just chemicals, so I don't tend to be repulsed by them. Personally, I think things that are to do with people's mouths, like food-related smells or if someone's just been eating and you can smell it.Kelly Molson: Like if someone had eaten raw onion or something like that? Yeah, okay. All right. I mean, mine's tequila but there's a whole other story around that that we'll save for another day. All right. What are you most likely to buy when you exit through the gift shop?Liam Findlay: Probably a magnet for my parents' fridge.Kelly Molson: Do they collect magnets when they go on holiday and stuff? Is it full of them?Liam Findlay: Yeah, it's kind of a mandatory thing, if someone goes on holiday they have to get a magnet for the fridge.Kelly Molson: Okay. All right, I like that. That's quite a good collection to have. Liam Findlay: Unless they sell smells, Efteling sells smells of its rides in its gift shop. So that's a must do for me.Kelly Molson: I've never heard of that before. Is that the only attraction that you know that does that?Liam Findlay: I think Europa Park might have done it, and Blackpool Pleasure Beach has candles that are inspired by the rides, but they aren't the actual smells. So yeah, I don't know why more places don't do it.Kelly Molson: Well, maybe they will after they hear this podcast, Liam, who knows? Okay. And if you could choose any attraction to create a smell for, what attraction would it be?Liam Findlay: It's hard to say because I kind of work on lots of smells for all sorts of attractions anyway. I think I always enjoy kind of time travel ones, maybe linking back to The Timewalk attraction that I grew up with, because they always have a nice variety of smells with all the different time periods you can go through.Kelly Molson: Okay, yeah, all right. So yeah, there's a little bit of variety involved in what you could create with them, so it wouldn't all be the same.Liam Findlay: Yeah.Kelly Molson: Okay, interesting. Thank you. All right, Liam, what's your unpopular opinion?Liam Findlay: I would say that bad smells are not necessarily bad in that like I was just saying they can bring back memories. We work with lots of care homes at AromaPrime, and sometimes you can have a horrible fishy smell that's used in scare mazes, but it's also used to bring back memories for people that used to be fishermen or fisherwomen. Bad smells, if you put them in different contexts, they can actually not be so bad. Sometimes you can have a kind of horrible manure smell, but if you present it as something like a lovely countryside kind of atmosphere, people can react positively to it. And actually, rhino dung, I was sniffing some rhino dung last week.Kelly Molson: As you do.Liam Findlay: At Chessington World of Adventures, and we were saying how it's just got a lovely kind of grassy smell to it because the rhinos eat grass, but then when you realise it's rhino dung, you might end up reacting to it negatively.Kelly Molson: So we need to reframe our minds around what that smell is and take away the bad connotation of it?Liam Findlay: Yeah. Bad smells are perhaps not always necessarily bad depending on how you look at them, that's my message.Kelly Molson: All right, listeners, well let us know what you think. As ever, I'm going to need to reframe tequila in my mind. Maybe, I don't know, maybe if we meet up at an event, someone can help me do that, who knows? I thought about you while I was on holiday a few weeks ago, Liam. I don't often think about many of my podcast guests when I'm on a holiday, but you definitely came to mind. It was because of some of the things that we're going to talk about today.So I took my husband and my daughter into the Museum of Torture, which was a very small museum in Tuscany, in Sienna, probably not child friendly, I'm not going to lie. I don't think my 14 month old was overly impressed. But it was very small museum, we went down into the dungeon area and it was very small and it was very dark and it smelt really musty. And it was the one part of the museum for me that really captured that sense of for like, "Oh, this is a dangerous place to be, something horrid is going to happen here." And it was because of the smell. You didn't have that in any of the other areas.And it was really fascinating, you walked around and you looked at these torture instruments and you saw how people were treated and what they did to people but that area was the one place that it really got under my skin and up my nose, but for the right reasons because of the smell. And it instantly made me think about you and what you guys do. So tell us a little bit about AromaPrime and then tell us a little bit about what your role is there.Liam Findlay: Well, AromaPrime's been around since 1973, so we're turning 50 next year and throughout that time we've been making immersive smells for visitor attractions. So it could be to kind of increase anticipation and anxiety in a rollercoaster queue with the smell of fire, for example, like at Alton Towers it's Wickerman rollercoaster. Or it could be to educate people and engage them in the past if it's a historical smell. It could be to kind of bring about certain feelings if they're walking into a hotel and you want a lovely signature scent that's going to make people relaxed, or if it's historical or a nostalgic sense that are used in care homes like I was just saying to kind of bring back fond memories. So there's kind of lots of ways you can use smells to trick the mind and change how people feel, maybe feeling anxious in the Torture Museum.And my job is to advise attractions on how to implement these smells and which smells might work best and kind of lead to the best results in their attractions. So whether they want to make people feel a certain way or if they want to tell a certain story and use smells to change how the story's being told as it developed. So it's very exciting, always lots of different projects.Kelly Molson: It is. And I'm really intrigued about how you came to be in this role. So your bio says that you advise on Aroma's storytelling influences, psychological influences and thematic influences, as well as practical ways to utilise aroma in different environments. All of this is really, really fascinating. But what did you study and how did you get to be this person that advises them on all these things?Liam Findlay: Well, I actually did an animation degree and then I worked in the animation industry for a while. And from that I kind of learned lots of design skills and storytelling skills and I ended up putting that into work at an escape room where I designed escape rooms. So there was kind of sound design and visual design and telling stories again. And then I ended up working freelance designing experiences and museum interpretation for attractions like castles and more escape rooms and a ghost train on one occasion. And through working in the attractions industry as a designer, I wondered if I could maybe contribute my kind of understanding of the processes behind attraction design and put that into smell. And I knew that AromaPrime existed and I wondered if maybe I could help them out through that. So I sent them an email and they said, "Oh, we're looking for someone like you," and they took me on and I think it was late 2018 maybe so it's been a few years now and it's been going quite well.Kelly Molson: So you've kind of honed your craft working at AromaPrime. So can you just explain a little bit about, I understand about the storytelling influences that we talked about and how smell brings back those memories and it can transport you to a different place, tell me about the psychological influences and the thematic influences. What do you mean by those? How does that work?Liam Findlay: It's a bit like what I was saying about the rollercoaster queue or in a scare maze, for example, you might use a pleasant smell that lots of people have a familiar connection with like the smell of bananas. Maybe not everyone likes bananas, maybe the smell of chocolate, to kind of lift people's spirits and give them a false sense of security so that when they suddenly turn a corner and see something horrid and it has a disgusting kind of rotten smell, you're kind of crafting the psychological journey for them. So you're bringing back these pleasant emotions and memories and then you're twisting it. And maybe that horrible smell will be the smell of vomit that most people will have really unpleasant associations with and it'll make them feel uncomfortable when suddenly a pig man jumps out with a chainsaw. So you can tie the sense into how the story develops and manipulate or influence emotions as it goes along.Kelly Molson: Yeah. And what about the thematic influences? What does that mean in terms of smell?Liam Findlay: It's probably the most basic way of looking at sense. So at fantasy experience for example, like we did a wizard mini golf attraction recently, so it's kind of binding or creating sense that apply to a theme. And sometimes that can be tricky if it's a fantasy theme, you might not really be sure what kinds of smells potions have. But with our unicorn smell, for example, we sniff some horses, as you would, and we read lots of ancient myths about unicorns and we kind of approached it like we would approach historical smells. So we want them to be backed up with stories and kind of authenticity where possible to make sure that the theme is as strong as it can be.Kelly Molson: Isn't that funny though because when you said unicorn, the image of unicorn in my head is glittery and pink because every little girls are obsessed by glittery pink unicorns. And so I was like, "Oh yeah, but for me, unicorns smell a bit sugary," a sweet sugary smell they'd smell like.Liam Findlay: Yeah, well that's what the final product is really. It's like got a little undertone of horse, but it's mostly like a birthday cake.Kelly Molson: Yes. Oh, I love that. Thank you for explaining that. That's put me right. Yeah, it's really weird how you see what something looks like and you instantly imagine what it smells like, even though I have no clue what a unicorn smells like, obviously.I guess it's the same feeling, the one that you spoke about in terms of making people feel comfortable and then shocking them is, I can remember reading something years ago about if you are selling your house, have some freshly baked bread just come out of the oven because that is a smell that everyone finds quite comforting and quite homely. And so then if you can smell that while you're in a new home, you think, "Oh yeah, I could see myself living here. This is a cozy place to be, isn't it?" So it's that kind of sense that you're trying to get build in people.Liam Findlay: Yeah, it's a big thing in retail using scents in shops. There was a study where people went into a room, I think it was full of shoes and it wasn't scented and they kind of responded to what they thought of the products, whether it was shoes or not. And then there were some other participants who went into a room that was scented and it had the same products and the people in the scented room valued the products as being more expensive, or they guessed that they would be more expensive because they saw them as a higher quality because the room was scented even though they didn't realise it was the scent that was causing that.Kelly Molson: Because they could smell the leather and the... Right, okay. Gosh, that's interesting, isn't it? How it can affect how you perceive something as well.Liam Findlay: Yeah, it can change perception. And also like you say about pleasant smells, if you smell something like bread, it makes you kind of hungry because it kind of triggers those memories of enjoying bread and therefore you'll start to kind of seek it out and you won't necessarily find bread, but you'll seek out some kind of satisfaction and that satisfaction might end up being purchasing something.Kelly Molson: A very expensive house purchase.Liam Findlay: Yeah.Kelly Molson: How do you create smells? Because I watched one of the interviews that you did, I think it's for the BBC, which I will link to in the show notes, it's really interesting. But I think one of them said that your recipes, some of them are based on 30 year old recipes, these smells. So how do you even start to create the smells?Liam Findlay: Well, yeah, well like I was saying, we are turning 50 next year, so it was actually slightly inaccurate in the BBC video is-Kelly Molson: Sorry, kids, it's wrong.Liam Findlay: Well that was my fault, I told them the wrong date. Because actually, there are not many records about the company history and I only a while ago realised or found a document that said when it was founded. So it's always been a bit of a mystery. But yeah, over that time we've accumulated over 400 aromas, so we've kind of got a big stock of anything anyone could imagine just about. And if they want something that's a bit more specific, sometimes we might combine our existing scents. So it might be a bit of grass with a bit of rotten eggs for some kind of Roald Dahl soup for example. And then if we are making something from scratch, it will be a case of finding the chemicals that kind of have certain qualities like you might have a chemical that is generally used in rose products because it has a rose smell and then you can combine it with others. And often we'll have references like maybe rhino dung, we've been sent otter poo and jaguar urine before to get that right.Kelly Molson: In the post? Go get the post today, I wonder what could be in it, that's a surprise.Liam Findlay: Yeah. So sometimes we'll be kind of mixing things and sniffing and then we'll also send lots of samples to the clients so they can say if it's accurate or not and it works that way.Kelly Molson: That's brilliant, isn't it? Funny to understand what might turn up in your letter box each day. So when you work with an attraction, Halloween is a very obvious market for you. There's lots of scare things that happening and they are very smell related. But how do you work with an attraction? What's that process of them calling you in and going, "Look, we've got this thing that we are doing, how can you work with us?" What do you do?Liam Findlay: It kind of varies on what their end goal is. Sometimes regardless of what the kind of function of the attraction is, sometimes it will just be a case of them telling us how large the space is and then we'll advise on the kind of machine that they'll need because we do machines as well and the themes as well and then we'll suggest some scents and then they put them in the machines. And it can be quite a quick process sometimes.If it's more complex, it might be like a museum that wants a historical scent and they don't want it spreading around the whole museum and stinking things out or ruining the paintings down the corridor, there can be more advice to give in that regard. So museums often it's good to use what's called dry diffusion when you have an object that's scented rather than liquid kind of going out as a mist into the air. So that object will just kind of emit a smell and you can maybe put a lid over it or have it in a container that has a puffer. So yeah, I would often ask what the end goal is and then kind of make some suggestions from there.Kelly Molson: Yeah, because I hadn't thought about if it's a museum, those artefacts and those things could be damaged by certain smells. It's also, I guess you have to be quite consultative in your approach about what you offer to them individually.Liam Findlay: Yeah, another case or another issue can be around whether people want to smell things or not. Like if they go to a scare maze, they'll probably expect to be repulsed. But if you go into a museum, I suppose it's because people aren't really used to it, they're not always prepared to sniff things. So it can be good to have flaps so people can choose whether they're going to smell things or not. Or maybe some places will put up little warnings if it's kind of a profound world war trench set that they can walk into and there's going to be horrible smell of bodies and things. Sometimes there might be a warning because it almost equates to having gory images, like in museums you'll have warnings that there'll be gory images here.Kelly Molson: Yeah, and I guess talking about what we were saying earlier about those emotive, it can take you right back to a place, I guess that could be quite frightening for some people as well if they don't want to be taken back to those places, for example.Liam Findlay: Yeah. And because smell's kind of flexible and a horrible smell relating to war could also be a horrible smell relating to some other unpleasant personal memory. So yeah, sometimes you have to think about how the smell's going to be presented in a way that's going to work for the visitors.Kelly Molson: Okay. Thorpe Park, the Dungeons and Warwick Castle all have promotional scent ranges. This is something that you helped them develop, isn't it? I think this was during the pandemic. Am I right? So can you tell us about this? How did this happen?Liam Findlay: Well, it was a tricky time because all the parks were closed so the parks were wondering what to do while they were closed. And the parks were our customers as well, so we couldn't sell to them. So everyone was kind of out of action at that point. So we were kind of thinking of ways that we could engage people in our products for the parks and for us. So I think it was Thorpe Park we approached first and we just suggested that we could kind of release some of their smells that they used in their scare mazes and eventually it was Warwick Castle and the smells they used in their Kingmaker Experience and the Dungeons and their smells to make them available, branded under the scenes that they appear in those attractions so people could buy the Blacksmith smell at the Warwick Castle Kingmaker Experience. And that was a nice way to take people back to the attractions while they weren't able to visit.And it helped AromaPrime as well because we were kind of profiting from the customers of our customers in a way that everyone was kind of happy with because it was promoting the parks and the customers were happy because they were being taken back to the parks. There was one customer who contacted me and was thanking me for the opportunity to buy the smell of the Tomb Blaster ride at Chessington World of Adventures because her sister had autism and she was really struggling with the lockdown and being able to transport herself back to the ride through the smell during lockdown kind of brought her lots of comfort. So it turned out to be a kind of lovely and beneficial project for everyone, a nice way of adapting to the scenario.Kelly Molson: That is so wonderful, isn't it? By the power of smell, being able to be in your favourite place without being able to leave your house. That's incredible, what an amazing thing to have been able to do.Liam Findlay: Yeah, and fans really enjoy it. The Wicker Man Woodsmoke smell from Alton Towers is really popular and we get people that diffuse it in their living room and make all the lights red and they play the music and send us photos.Kelly Molson: That's taking true fan to a whole nother level, isn't it? Recreating the smell of your favourite attraction in your living room, wow. Okay, that's great. But there's other ways of using smells as well, isn't it? And I think this is something that you've been talking about quite a lot on LinkedIn that I was really interested in. A smell tour of Amsterdam has been developed. And you've been part of this, haven't you? So this isn't just about attractions, this is about tourism as well. Tell us about this. I don't fully understand what it is and how you've developed it.Liam Findlay: Well, this was run by Odeuropa, who I've been collaborating with a lot. And Odeuropa is a kind of global group of academics who are working to improve the ways that senses are used to tell historical stories and how they are used their museums. And one of their projects was this smell tour of Amsterdam and this was done through a scratch and sniff card. So my job was to illustrate the card and it was a map of Amsterdam so you could kind of follow a route and go to an apothecary that had a certain ingredient to its perfume that it once used or you could go down to the canals and smell what the canals used to smell like hundreds of years ago and kind of scratch as you went around. And they developed an app as well so you could kind of track where you were going.And that was a really nice way to engage people in history and they were able to access the stories themselves. They weren't just going through a museum and reading stuff, they were properly exploring and sniffing and taking it all in. And it was a really exciting way. It was throughout the month of September and the cards were available at Amsterdam Museum and it was an exciting way to get people enjoying and almost living the past because they were going through the real places where all this stuff happened.Kelly Molson: That's such a brilliant idea. So yeah, it's completely immersive, isn't it? You are in the area, you're doing a walking tour so you can see the places that are being described to you and then you can smell what they smell like a hundred years ago.Liam Findlay: Yeah, it was cool.Kelly Molson: Wow. That is really cool.Liam Findlay: Got lots of good responses.Kelly Molson: And I guess you worked with them in the same mode that you would an attraction, it's just understanding what used to be there, finding the smells that you already have and then bringing them all together into the scratch card.Liam Findlay: Yeah. In this case, Odeuropa already had the smells because they've been working on lots of different historical smells themselves like the smell of hell, I think based on a kind of 1700s painting, maybe it was another century.Kelly Molson: And what does hell smell like? Can you describe it to us?Liam Findlay: From what I understand, it's mostly fire and bodies.Kelly Molson: Burning hot stuff? Okay.Liam Findlay: But one of the members of Odeuropa had worked on an exhibition in The Hague where people could go around a gallery and they had paintings and smell puffers like foot pumps so they could pump it and a smell would come out and that would be the smell of the painting or of something that was in the painting. And it was a nice way to kind of engage them with the contents of the painting, kind of look a bit harder and think about what's making that smile and why did it smell that way? So Odeuropa already had lots of interesting smiles that they could incorporate into this.Kelly Molson: That's brilliant. I would absolutely go on a scratch and sniff tour of anywhere.Liam Findlay: Yeah, well it's a nice model because you can kind of apply it to any city or even, I don't know, an ancient school or a hospital or all sorts of places.Kelly Molson: And if you think, I guess there's just so many advantages to it as well for people that can't see the places that they're in but can still feel that emotive connection to them by being able to smell what those places smell like.Liam Findlay: Yeah, smell is very good in terms of accessibility because even if you're on a theme park ride and you're going along in a boat and maybe there are cannons going off, if you can't see the cannons or you can't hear the cannon sound effects, if you smell it, it kind of means that you're not missing out on the story.Kelly Molson: Yeah, it's brilliant. I hope they do more of those, I'd be up for that.Liam Findlay: Yeah.Kelly Molson: There's a quote that I read from you that said, "Smell is a form of mind control." It really resonated with me, especially because of some of the things that we've been talking about. But let's go back to what you started to talk about at the beginning of our interview was about the smells for care homes because you've worked on quite a few projects for those as well. And I think obviously this is not attraction related, but I just think this is such a wonderful thing to be able to use your skillset for. Tell us a little bit about what you've done.Liam Findlay: Well, care homes was one of the company's first kind of activities I suppose back in the seventies. I mean, back then it would be the smells of the 1920s that would be made to take people back into the past. And that's something interesting as well because the kind of residents who are always getting that bit older and the smells that will be familiar to them change gradually so we have to kind of think, okay, maybe World War smells, I saw on Twitter someone was complaining that their mother was being subjected to World War II songs, even though most care home residents probably weren't around back then anymore or at least a small number.So yeah, we've been producing nostalgic smells for care homes for a long time and it can be really nice if there's like carbolic soap for example is a popular one. If there's a smell that lots of people perhaps with dementia who will have personal memories with, it's a nice way of unlocking those memories, especially you tend not to lose your smell memory. So if you smell something from the past and even if you have memory problems, smelling that can kind of unlock something from years and years ago and bring back those memories and encourage conversation with the other residents that you might live with about their memories and then they'll kind of start talking about it and sniffing and it can be a nice way to lift spirits as well as bringing back memories.Kelly Molson: Yeah, it's wonderful, isn't it? I saw the clip, and again this was in the clip that we will add into the show notes, but it was about the soap smell and the lady said, "Oh, it just makes me feel comfortable." It took her to a happier place where she just had really good memories of it and it was just such a lovely clip to see, you could almost see her face kind of light up with the smell because it took her back there instantly. It was just brilliant. And just think that's such a lovely thing to do.Liam Findlay: Yeah, there's a company called Rempods, which they make a kind of sets for all care homes like a recreated nostalgic pub from the sixties or a train carriage, that's quite a popular one. So like a wall and there's a window that's a screen and you can see the countryside going past. And we work with them quite a lot to supply smells to kind of bring that whole experience together. So that kind of ties into the theme entertainment as well.Kelly Molson: Yeah, it's like a mini attraction in a care home with sense. That's incredible. I had no idea that that was even a possibility. What a brilliant thing to be able to do for people.Liam Findlay: Yeah. It could even be as simple as a memory box that. We have a customer who makes memory boxes for care homes, which are just kind of full of props and things that the residents might be familiar with and they include the smells as well. And that same customer, she is a funeral director and we have what are called aroma cubes, which are normally used by care homes and they're just little cubes you can pick up and sniff. And there was someone who was in her chapel of rest who had died and the person who had died had worked in a bakery so this funeral director had put the smell of bread in a little aroma cube just in the same room. And when her family, the person's family visited in the chapel, they could smell this and they just found it really kind of nice and it took them back to her bakery and it wasn't kind of gimmicky, the room wasn't full of bread smells, it was just a little thing that they could use to have a nice moment with. And it worked really well.Kelly Molson: That is so lovely. I was just thinking, because I lost my granddad a really, really long time ago, I think I was like 20 when I lost him. And if I could be in a room now and his smell would be Polos, he had Polos, pockets full of Polos everywhere, even when he passed away, all of his cardigans had Polo packets in them. And that would be the smell that would bring me back to him instantly. So I can completely imagine how comforted they were by smelling that. Oh, it sounds really lovely. Liam, I know that you're super busy at the moment because we are recording this at the beginning of October and Halloween is coming and everyone goes crazy at Halloween, right? So you've been busy since probably a good few months with people ordering in their smells. What's the most popular Halloween smell on order at the moment?Liam Findlay: I'd say the familiar one is the most popular because you want smells that are going to affect the largest range of people. So it will be things like vomit and poo and rotting flesh is actually popular. And I suppose not many people would be familiar with that.Kelly Molson: It's not a statement you hear very often, "Rotting flesh is very popular." It's not popular here.Liam Findlay: We've released a new blocked urine smell as well. Because we already had a urine smell, but I wanted to try something that had more of a kick to it. So we've got kind of two urine choices this year.Kelly Molson: Wow, wow. We've taken it to a whole new level of poo and wee smells on the podcast people. Liam, thank you for joining us today. I've thoroughly enjoyed talking about this and I think it's such a fascinating subject to talk about. So thanks for sharing your insight. We always ask our guests for a book that they'd like to recommend to us, something that they love or something that's helped them in some way. What would you like to share with us today?Liam Findlay: Mine is Theme Park Design and the Art of Themed Entertainment by David Younger. And this is like, I think-Kelly Molson: It's like a Bible, Liam. It's huge.Liam Findlay: Yeah. Well I was just going to say, lots of attraction designers kind of treat this as their Bible because it's like a big encyclopedia of everything to do with theme park design. So there's a bit about smells in it, there's a bit here about costumed characters, there's stuff on cues and how different cues work. So it's like anyone wants to go into theme park design or attraction design in general, even if it's like museums, this is a great resource.And actually David Younger, the author, I've just been working with him because he's started a Kickstarter for a video game that's based on a theme park sort of. And we've put together a scent collection of the different locations in the game so as people are playing, they can sniff the smells and kind of transport themselves into the world of the game.Kelly Molson: Oh, how cool. You must send over the link to us and then we can pop that in the show notes for any of the listeners that will be interested in it.Liam Findlay: Yeah.Kelly Molson: Okay. So look, as ever, I feel like this is going to be an expensive one for my marketing budget, because that looked like a really big book, Liam. But as ever, if you'd like to win a copy of this book, then if you pop over to our Twitter account and retweet the episode announcement with the words, "I want Liam's book," then you'll be in a chance of winning it. Liam, thank you for joining us on the podcast today. Good luck with Halloween, I know it's a really crazy busy time, but thank you for coming on and sharing all of your wonderful smells with us today.Liam Findlay: That's all right. Thank you for having me. It's been fun to talk about them.Kelly Molson:  Thanks for listening to Skip The Queue. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review. It really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned. Skip the queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. You can find show notes and transcriptions from this episode and more over on our website, rubbercheese.com/podcast.

Squiz Today
Wednesday, 2 November: Putting bombers up north; Interest rates rise again; Ukrainians queue for essentials; And a muddy Melbourne Cup

Squiz Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 9:46


The Squiz is your shortcut to the news. More details and links to further reading for all of today's news can be found in The Squiz Today email. Click here to get it in your inbox each weekday morning. LINK: See some of the Melbourne Cup fashion on show yesterday. Other things we do: Squiz Shortcuts - a weekly explainer on big news topics Squiz Kids - a news podcast for curious kids. Age-appropriate news without the nasties!

K9 Detection Collaborative
More Questions from the Crowd!

K9 Detection Collaborative

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 56:17


Today, Stacy, Robin, and Crystal unpack another five listener questions and scenarios that were originally sent in on Ask A Stupid Question Day back in September.Key Topics:“How do you work an area with residual odor?” (01:41)“My dog is a field-trained spaniel and is very good at nosework (lavender, eucalyptus, and anise) for Danish competition standards. Now we are following another program parallel to our nosework training to learn water search on cadaver scent. The search area is marked with markers (‘yellow balls'). They're floating on the surface of the water. My dog is overexcited over these, and the stimulus for these markers seem to overrule all search drive. Could you elaborate on what goes on inside of my dog and what solutions can overcome such a distraction?” (13:04)“How do you keep your classes fresh and fun?” (24:01)“What is the best way to catch oneself queuing the dog when solo training?” (35:11)“Do you have any tips for training AKC Buried Hides?” (46:11)Resources:K9 Detection Collaborative Episode 33: Stupid Question Day 2022K9 Detection Collaborative Episode 34: The Importance of Odor HygieneTiny Decisions AppWe want to hear from you:Check out the K9 Detection Collaborative FB page and comment on the episode post!K9Sensus Foundation can be found on Facebook and Instagram. We have a Trainer's Group on Facebook!Scentsabilities Nosework is also on Facebook. Here is a Facebook group you should join!Crystal Wing K9 Coach can be found here!You can follow us for notifications of upcoming episodes, find us at k9detectioncollaborative.com to enjoy the freebies and tell your friends so you can keep the conversations going.Jingle by: www.mavericksings.com Instagram: @mavericktasticAudio editing & other podcast services by: www.thepodcastman.com Instagram: @the_podcast_man

Living The Life We Love
A Quirky Quote Queue (yeah, we did that)

Living The Life We Love

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 46:33


Welcome to Living The Life We Love Podcast! Each week Kyle and Brandie sit down and talk about different areas of their life. On today's episode, we each pick 5 quotes that we posted from the last week. We talk about why they speak to us and how we've used them in our lives. Thank you for listening and please remember to Rate (we'd love your 5 stars), Review, Subscribe (you will be notified when a new episode drops), & Share with your friends and family!

The Xboxcast
#GameFace! Deluxe, Like the Paint

The Xboxcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 81:16


#TerrorGameToberFace is still upon us.  And The Blair Witch even allowed Lee and Simone to come out and play.    Lee is firmly entrenched in Gotham Knights. To the point that we have almost his entire play through on our YouTube channel. Make sure to check it out if you're wanting to see what all the fuss is about.    Kyle has some handy tips for all you Scorn players. And is making sure to not get too grossed out by adding some Overwatch 2 to the mix.  Just for funsies, he started a new game. A PC game! Queue the shock and horror. But don't jump to conclusions just yet - this one is on GamePass for PC and is a factory building game. Are you ready for you next obsession?    Simone is still playing A Plauge Tale, and has some quick facts for us! Who says we don't tech you anything? Because then they'll be lying.    We went to #PAXAUS! And we were all together. In the same room! So we did what we did best, and recorded a podcast. You can listen to it, and find everything else about us, here!    If you'd like to support the podcast, but don't know how, then just leave a review on your podcast platform of choice. It takes 2 seconds and helps in more ways than you can imagine.    -- For everything about the podcast, check out our official website!  Follow us on Twitter, find all our links on LinkTree and support us on Patreon.    -- Your hosts are:   Kyle: XarCrius on Xbox and Twitter Lee: Leehoward on Xbox and Twitter  Simone: GymBeanNZ on Xbox and Twitter 

Rise and Run
55: runDisney Expo Virtual Queue, Galloway Pace Groups, and the Be Our Guest Podcast

Rise and Run

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 158:35


Rise and Runner Sarah introduces this week's podcast episode. If you want to leave us an intro to be used, click the Join The Conversation link. We start off with quick apologies and alibis chat with last week's intro guest so  Bob can tell Joshua and his mother, Nicole, that he is sorry for calling him Justin.The discussion then turns to the new Expo Virtual Queue for entry to the runDisney merchandise area on the first day of the expo. We discuss some of the pros and cons we see with this new way to enter. You will need to join a virtual queue at 7:30 a.m. and have up to 6 people total in your party. You will not be allowed to enter the merchandise area on first day of expo without a virtual queue time. This queue is only for the runDisney merchandise shop and not the fitness expo or bib pickup.We are joined by returning guest Chris Twigs and and welcome Chris Turner to discuss running with a Galloway pacer.  After a brief introduction, Chris Turner discusses running with a Galloway pacer at a runDisney event or any event that features a Galloway pace group. We go over some of the following topics:How do you join a pace group?How close do you come to your advertised pace?Do you run the same pace the whole race ?Will there be pacers in all corrals?Do people duck in and out for race photos?If you want to run with a pacer you can chat with a pacer at Jeff Galloway's booth at the Expo.On the Podcasts We Listen To segment, we  chat with our friend  Mike from the the Be Our Guest Podcast.  Mike hosts an excellent podcast and has great tips on planning your Walt Disney World vacation.Listeners have asked us where to cheer during the races, so we give some of our tips and insight on cheering locations for Wine and Dine. If you want more info, check out our friend Kristen from Running in Makeups Video that has a section on spectating. We announced the drop of our new merchandise pre-order on our website of our new logo shirts.On the Race Report Spotlight this week, we head back to the Granite State and chat with Heather about the Loco Half Marathon in Newmarket, NH. Heather talked about the challenges of being in a push-rim racing chair and about being a part of the Roll Disney Community. Join the ConversationRise and Run Podcast Facebook PageRise and Run Podcast InstagramRise and Run Podcast Website and ShopPassport to Run Show LinksGalloway Pacers Be Our Guest PodcastRunning in Makeups Video Affiliate LinksFluffy FizziesKawaiian Pizza ApparelGYMBOSSRise and Run Podcast is supported by our audience. When you make a purchase through one of our affiliate links, we may earn a commission.

#Millennial: Pretend Adulting, Real Talk
S8 Ep39: FMK The Hosts? Our Listeners Shock Us

#Millennial: Pretend Adulting, Real Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 67:17


Welcome to #Millennial, the home of pretend adulting and real shit talking phone scammers. Andrew provides a SPECIAL UPDATE on his recent COVID scare. Also, if you see a picture of his butt floating around online, please email millennialshow@gmail.com. Adidas has officially dropped Kanye West over his repeated vitriol towards the Jewish community - took 'em long enough! While we were on vacation a lot happened in the news! Liz Truss was outlasted by a head of lettuce, the UK gained a new Prime Minister, Trump was officially subpoenaed by the J6 Commission, and the student loan forgiveness application opened up. But because no good deed goes unpunished, a federal appeals court has put a pause on any forgiveness being issued because some salty Republican governors challenged Biden's loan forgiveness program. Instagram is supposedly working on a new feature that would allow users to add song to their profiles - 2005 called, MySpace Tom wants his business model back! We take a walk down memory lane and reminisce about our MySpace profile songs, who was in our Top 8, and how glad we are that MySpace didn't show whose profiles we were creeping on. Things go off the rails when Andrew reveals he has ALL of his old AIM chat history from back in the day. Queue major millennial cringe moment. This week's episode is sponsored by Expedition Roasters (https://www.expeditionroasters.com and use code COFFEEGEEKS for 15% off your order). Believe us, your nerdy caffeine souls will thank you for this one! Support #Millennial by supporting our sponsors! Need something new to do? This week's recommendations should help! Where the Water Goes by David Owen (Andrew), Phasmophobia (Laura), and 'The Loneliest Time' by Carly Rae Jepsen (Pam). And in this week's After Dark: Inspired by this tweet, we ask ourselves, 'what is something that is objectively terrible but I still like anyway?' Why can't we quit the crappy food of our youth? We watch trash TV so we can judge and feel better about ourselves #sorrynotsorry. Is doom scrolling bad for our mental health? Yes. Do we still do it all the time? Also yes.

Not After 30 Podcast
NA 30 Ep. 197- Toronto Sport Therapy With Kyle - 2022 - 10 - 23, 8.28 AM

Not After 30 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 52:34


well, *Queue up the dj Khaled voice** here's another one! Anthony El Hefe is joined by long time friend and supporter of the show Kyle (From S.F.P, superior finish painting) and we talk about the highs and lows of being a toronto sports fan.

Loser's Queue
Loser's Queue 44 The Gamer's

Loser's Queue

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 93:37


Today the loser's go over the second week of groups, roster rumors, our pickem's, top 5 games that aren't league, and more! Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/LosersQueuePod, follow on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and send in your personal stories/memes/highlights to losersqueuepodcast@gmail.com!

Attack of the Killer Podcast
Attack of the Killer Podcast 272: Friday the 13th Part V: A New Beginning (1985) Commentary

Attack of the Killer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 121:41


When you reach the fifth entry in a horror franchise all bets are off, and the Friday the 13th franchise is no exception. Queue up your VCR or laser disc player and join us as we watch Friday the 13th: A New Beginning, with special guest Popeye. Listen & subscribe wherever you get your podcasts or go to http://www.aotkp.com Connect with the show: Become an Official Attacker: http://jointheattackers.com/ Visit our website: http://www.attackofthekillerpodcast.com/ Like us on https://www.facebook.com/attackofthekillerpodcast Follow us on https://twitter.com/AotKP Follow us on https://www.instagram.com/attackofthekillerpodcast/ Subscribe on https://www.youtube.com/attackofthekillerpodcast Support the show at https://www.patreon.com/aotkp/posts And check out our sponsor Shudder at https://www.shudder.com and use the promo "AOTKP" to get a free month when you sign up! Lastly, check out all the amazing shows at http://thepfpn.com

Harry Potter Theory
History of the UNSPEAKABLES and Department of Mysteries - Harry Potter Explained

Harry Potter Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 12:51 Transcription Available


Welcome to Harry Potter Theory. Today, we're going to be unpacking one of the more mysterious aspects of Harry Potter- the department of mysteries. Honing in further, we're going to be taking a look at the peculiar workers of this department- Ministry employees known as The Unspeakables. We'll also be looking at, later in the video, all of the rooms / chambers that reside inside the Department of Mysteries. The ministry of magic is the primary form of government in the magical world - at least in the UK. Like a muggle government, the ministry's responsibilities are vast, as they are the primary body that attempts to sustain law and order in the magical world. Like any system of government, in an effort to cover as much ground as possible, the primary governmental body is systematically divided to focus on different sectors of the wizarding world.  These ‘sectors' or ‘departments' cover the more common areas like the Department of Magical Law Enforcement and the Department of Magical Transportation, but there are also OTHER departments reserved for less..obvious pursuits. Queue level 9 and the Department of Mysteries. The department of mysteries is responsible for studying the mysteries of the wizarding world, mysteries associated with love, space, thought, time, death, and other things. Basically anything that is unknown. Anything pertaining to this department is highly confidential, and those who work in this department are referred to as ‘unspeakables'. The divisions of this department are broken up by area of study, and includes the following: The brain room, the hall of prophecy, the death chamber, the love chamber, the space chamber and the time room. These rooms are accessed via the ‘room of doors' - a large circular room where everything is black. What's particularly curious or dare I say..Mysterious about the Department of Mysteries is that it actually preceded the existence of the Ministry itself. The Ministry was established in 1707 and the Department of Mysteries had activity as early as 1672. The name checks out.

Skip the Queue
State of the nation report, with Steve Mills

Skip the Queue

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 34:11


EPISODE NOTESSkip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. Your host is  Kelly Molson, MD of Rubber Cheese.Download our free ebook The Ultimate Guide to Doubling Your Visitor NumbersIf you like what you hear, you can subscribe on iTunes, Spotify, and all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue or visit our website rubbercheese.com/podcast.If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review, it really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned in this podcastCompetition ends January 31st 2023. The winner will be contacted via Twitter. Show references: https://decisionhouse.co.uk/https://twitter.com/decision_househttps://www.linkedin.com/in/steve-mills-0528661b/ Steve Mills set up Decision House in July 2017, having spent 15 years at leading insight agency BDRC where he was Board Director and Head of the Culture & Tourism team.His work focusses on generating and sharing insight to further understanding of both how to deliver better experiences for existing visitors, members, customers or other stakeholders and how to effectively grow audiences and develop new markets. During the pandemic, Steve provided regular insight to the sector through ALVA, producing regular reports and webinars on public sentiment towards returning to visitor attractions and reaction to the ‘new' visit experience in a Covid world.  In more ‘normal' recent times he has delivered insight for clients across the culture and leisure attraction sector including Historic Royal Palaces, Royal Collection, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, Royal Museums Greenwich and the National Trust, as well as developing Voice of the Visitor, a new template helping attractions to gather and benchmark visitor feedback.    Transcriptions: Kelly Molson: Welcome to Skip the Queue, a podcast for people working in or working with visitor attractions. I'm your host, Kelly Molson. Each episode, I speak with industry experts from the attractions world.In today's episode, I speak with Steve Mills, founder of Decision House. What does the cost of living crisis mean for attractions as we move into winter and beyond? Steve gives us a snapshot of how your potential visitors are feeling, and what the next few months might hold for the sector.If you like what you hear, subscribe on all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue. We have a small issue with Steve's audio, but don't let that detract from the important content. This is a really, really important episode.Kelly Molson: Steve, thank you so much for joining me on Skip the Queue podcast today. It's really good to see you.Steve Mills: Pleasure. Thanks for inviting me, Kelly.Kelly Molson: I've got a few icebreaker questions for you, Steve.Steve Mills: Go for it.Kelly Molson: You can only save one of the Muppets. Which Muppet do you choose, and why?Steve Mills: Oh my God. Well, I'll tell you the one I'd like to be, I'd like to be the drummer, Animal. Aspiring to be fun and exciting and a bit off the wall, really, to be honest. But I would say very much it's an aspiration rather than reality with me, to be honest. I'm probably more like Scooter, who is the more rational, down to earth, logical one.Kelly Molson: I think that might come across in what we talk about today, Steve.Steve Mills: Okay. Fair enough, fair enough. No, that's definitely it for me.Kelly Molson: All right. How would you describe your job to a two year old?Steve Mills: I find out all the fun stuff that people like doing.Kelly Molson: That's a great answer. That is a great answer. You nailed that, Steve.Steve Mills: Good.Kelly Molson: Okay. Last show that you binge-watched on your television viewing platform of choice? I don't know why I've done that. I'm not the BBC. No one cares what I say.Steve Mills: No, no, it's all right.Kelly Molson: Netflix, Amazon, whatever. Disney+.Steve Mills: I'm quite sporty, so Disney+, I've been watching this series called Welcome to Wrexham, which is all about Wrexham Football Club and the fact that Ryan Reynolds and the other guy whose name everybody always forgets ... Jim, Joe, McElhenney or whatever it is, taking over the football club. And it's a kind of fly on the wall documentary about how they've taken over the club, and trying to make a success of it. But very interestingly, there's lots of these fly on the wall, football type documentaries, and this one is made for an American audience. It has some quite subtle differences in there, so they have things like translations between English and American phrases for things like bloke means buddy and that kind of thing. It has got a little twist in it, which I quite enjoy.Kelly Molson: That's interesting. That's on my list, to watch that one. But we've watched the Tottenham one that was on Amazon, because we're big Tottenham fans. And we watched ... What was the one ... Was it Sunderland? Was there one about-Steve Mills: Yeah.Kelly Molson: Yeah, we watched that one as well, that was really good. Okay, we'll watch that one, and there's little, subtle differences because it's for Americans.Steve Mills: Yes.Kelly Molson: All right, Steve. What is your unpopular opinion?Steve Mills: That's an interesting first question because given my profession, which we'll come on to, my job is really about conveying others' opinions rather than having them of my own, to be honest with you. But my unpopular opinion is sticking with the sporting theme, really, is that I think that there's no better sporting drama than a five day cricket test match.Kelly Molson: Oh God.Steve Mills: Which is definitely an unpopular opinion, to be honest. Or even a four day cricket county championship match that's watched by three men and a dog on a wet Tuesday in April, to be honest. Because I know it's difficult to believe that anyone could be interested in a sport where you could have a draw after five days' worth of activity, but for me, it's like reading a novel, but it's being played out in front of your eyes, in many ways. There's time to get to know all the characters properly, and story kind of ebbs and flows, and you get these unexpected instances happening that change the plot. And you can see these individual battles gradually unfolding during five days that you'd never get in a couple of hours.Steve Mills: And what I like about it is it's a kind of test of character and a test of patience for the players, not just the audience, as well as pure, sporting ability. Yeah, I'm sure it's a very unpopular opinion, but I think it's a kind of antidote to where we're going as a society generally, so it's the whole antidote to having low attention span, these quick rewards and these superficial pleasures. You don't want any of that, go and watch a five day test match. Which ironically, I don't think I've ever done, to be honest with you. But it's certainly something I've got in mind when I retire in a few years' time.Kelly Molson: Steve, it was a really beautiful analogy. I really enjoyed your analogy about it being like a novel, and playing out the roles and the characters and stuff, but you have not sold it to me.Steve Mills: I wasn't intending to.Kelly Molson: But well done on the analogy. All right, listeners, let us know what you think about Steve's cricket is a novel analogy, and we should all be in watching cricket for five days. I know that I've got a lot of different things that I could be spending my days on, but there you go. Thank you for sharing.Steve Mills: That's all right.Kelly Molson: Right, Steve, I've asked you to come on today because we're going to do a bit of a state of the nation chat. But tell us a little bit about you and what Decision House does, for our listeners that haven't heard of you, which I will be surprised if they haven't.Steve Mills: Okay. No, thank you, yeah. I started Decision House back in 2017. I used to head up the Tourism and Culture team at BDRC, which is now called BVA BDRC. I headed those up for a good few years before that. Decision House really specialises in generating insights that help organisations in the culture and tourism sector specifically, and particularly attractions, really. Just helping them to make better decisions for their organisation, hence the Ronseal type name, Decision House.Steve Mills: And we mainly do that by conducting fresh, primary research, either with your current customers, so whether you call your current customers visitors or bookers or members, and that helps with making sure that we deliver, or they can deliver, optimum experiences for their visitors. Or, we do research with prospective customers, so more market and audience research to understand how they can grow their customer bases, actually. We can do that. We do both quantitative research, so the typical surveys, online surveys, face-to-face surveys et cetera, or we also do qualitative research as well, so things like focus groups, in-depth interviews, which really get under the skin of the issues that organisations have. Typically, quantitative surveys will measure visitor opinion, whereas qualitative gets to the root of why visitors have those particular opinions.Steve Mills: That's really what we do, and during COVID, we did an awful lot of work to really track public sentiment. And that led us to setting up visitor benchmarking surveys to understand reactions the visitors had to COVID measures being put in place once attractions reopened back in 2020. And that's really, both of those surveys, public sentiment work for ALVA and the visitor benchmark and consumer views for the last couple of years and still going now, really, albeit they've evolved into pieces of work that aren't COVID related anymore. They're more general sentiment work now.Kelly Molson: And they've been incredibly valuable, Steve. And I reference them continuously, and I do reference the BVA BDRC's work as well. And they've been incredibly insightful. Now, we spoke a couple of weeks ago about coming on to talk about the state of the nation and where people at, because what had been happening is I had been contacted by a few attractions, saying, "What have you heard? Numbers are down a little bit. What have you heard? What's the sentiment like?" And I always fire them your way, but I thought why not get the man in himself to talk us through where we're at?Kelly Molson: We've got a really weird situation at the moment in the UK. I mean, we're recording this. It's the fifth of October. We're in the run-up to what is usually a busy half-term, and then the run up to Christmas which can be quite quiet for a number of attractions, depending on what you're doing. But we've got the cost of living crisis, we've got the pound was at its lowest since the '70s, which blows my mind. We've had the death of our monarch, we have a new king, and a new prime minister, all happening at once. I mean, that's quite a lot to be dealing with. But I guess, what does all of this mean for attractions as we move into that winter period and beyond? And I thought this is what we could talk about today, Steve. So, where are we at? It's big question, but where are we at?Steve Mills: A massive question. I'll try my best to try and pick some of those issues apart, really. I think if we deal with the death of Her Majesty the Queen first of all, and what the ramifications of that might be ... And this is, I guess, a personal opinion, first of all, really. I mean, I think domestically, it's not going to have a huge impact, if I'm perfectly honest. People will move on relatively quickly from that. I suspect attractions won't see ... Unless you are something that is specifically related to the monarchy, you probably won't see a huge amount of difference. I mean, clearly somewhere like Windsor Castle is already seeing queues of people outside the gates, for example.Steve Mills: But I think outside of that niche, domestically, I doubt we'll see a huge difference. But then, obviously, internationally, it has raised the profile. And actually, I think showcased all the positive associations that people abroad associate with the UK, and why they travel here. It has emphasised our heritage, it has emphasised our amazing ability in terms of the pomp and ceremony, et cetera. And it has been a great showcase for London sites, to be honest. I think internationally, it should have a significant impact going into next year, allied of course with the low value of the pound. Now, it's not all good, obviously, but obviously, in exchange rates terms, it's a good thing for next year, particularly [inaudible 00:10:48]. I guess that's where I'd see the death of the monarch situation.Kelly Molson: It's interesting, what you said about the pomp. I mean, as we watched the funeral here, a very emotional day, actually. And I was transfixed to the ceremony for the entire day. It was quite mesmerising. But in my head, I just kept thinking, people outside of the UK that watched this, it's strange, isn't it? It's quite strange, and it's very grand, and it's a real sense of what the UK is about, that kind of level of ceremony, and people coming together. It was quite phenomenal. And it did make me think ultimately, it's a really sad day, but it's such a big thing for the UK to be able to do. I wonder if that does represent a surge in international tourism because of that, and people wanted to come and be a small part in that kind of thing.Steve Mills: Yeah. I think increasingly, whether it's people from the UK or people coming into the UK, people want to do things now that is different. And they want to be seen to be doing things that you can only do in one particular location. And I think the UK, I don't think there is anywhere quite like it in terms of ability to deliver on things like the pomp and ceremony. And that's what really sets us apart from many other countries around the world. And I think we shouldn't forget that, and not be afraid to promote it.Kelly Molson: Yeah, absolutely. And then that brings us to the new king. There will be a coronation at some point.Steve Mills: Yeah, it's similar, similar.Kelly Molson: So, similar kind of reaction to that, probably, and something very positive to celebrate as well.Steve Mills: Yeah. But then yeah, the other side of it is I think you mentioned cost of living.Kelly Molson: Small, little issue that we're all struggling with.Steve Mills: Probably yeah, less positive. I think with that one, as a lot of listeners will know, we have been commissioned by ALVA throughout COVID, and also a couple of waves this year, just to gauge public sentiment into how people are feeling about visitor attractions. We did a wave back in June this year, which first highlighted some financial concerns for the attraction-visiting public. And it also said at that point that COVID actually was still a noticeable barrier, particularly for the older generation and those who are more vulnerable. We're just literally hot off the press at the end of September, so we did another wave the 22nd and 27th of September, just to update that and try to understand how people are feeling about visiting attractions in the autumn and the winter, up until about February next year. So, how attractions are going to cope.Steve Mills: And one of the key questions we asked is just a completely open question. People can respond in any way they like to this question. But we just ask, "At the moment, how are you feeling about visiting attractions over the next few months?" As I said, they could say absolutely anything there. We've not prompted them with anything. And I think the issues that are coming up here, first of all on the positive side, is that COVID is being mentioned by less and less people. I think the assumption is that it's completely not an issue any more, but I wouldn't say it has done that. But back in June, we still had 15% of people at that point saying something to do with COVID was putting me off going to visitor attractions, which was partially explaining why we hadn't seen that bounceback to pre pandemic levels.Steve Mills: That has now, in the September wave, come down to 9%, so it's disappearing. That said, you've still got one in 10 people who have still got some sort of concerns around COVID. As I say, it's particularly older people and vulnerable people that are still saying that. But that's quite positive.Steve Mills: But then on the other side, the financial concerns have gone up considerably. Again, back in June, we had about 15% of people mentioning some sort of financial concern as a barrier to why they wouldn't be visiting attractions, or would maybe think twice. But that has now gone up to 24, 25%, something like that. So, quite a significant increase. And again, it's as you would expect, it's especially among those with lower incomes, but also families are increasingly expressing financial concerns. And this time around, we asked a specific question as well about whether there was any positive benefit of all the government support around energy bills. And actually, we're finding that it's probably not because any sort of positive benefit of government support is being negated by just the still absolute rises in energy costs.Steve Mills: It's a difficult situation at the moment, and we've now got around about half the country really feeling that they feel worse off than they did at the same point last year. Clearly, that's going to have an impact.Kelly Molson: Yeah. I wonder, I mean, I can give you an example. I went to an attraction on Monday. I took my daughter, I met up with some friends, and went to Paradise Wildlife Park for the day. And I definitely thought more about what I was going to spend when I got there than I usually would. And I thought well, I'm quite lucky. My daughter is a big eater. She's not fussy. She eats anything. But I went, do you know what? I'm going to just pack her a packed lunch, so she has got sandwiches, fruit, whatever, and I'll buy myself my lunch when I'm there, and that just saves just a tiny, little bit of money. And it sounds silly. It's insignificant, but it was enough to make me, in my head, go, "I feel a bit better about that."Kelly Molson: And I probably spent longer at the attraction as well, because in my head I was like, well, "I've paid, I want to get my money's worth. We'll go here and we'll go in the Tumble Tots place and we'll do the soft play." And I just really extended the time that I was at the attraction as well, for the money that I paid for it. And it wasn't unreasonable at all. We had a great day, it's a brilliant, brilliant day out. But it did make me think about just small changes I wouldn't have thought about six months ago.Steve Mills: Yeah, yeah, absolutely. I think you've picked up on secondary spend there. I think that is one thing that's going to be a challenge. And also, memberships as well. We were, a bit earlier in the year, seeing people saying things like, "Well, I'll squeeze as much as I possibly can out of my existing memberships," which is a good thing. Makes you more likely to renew. But I think now we've reached the stage where people are starting to do that a bit less, because they've actually scared of any visit occasion because there is secondary spends associated with even a visit occasion that is associated with a membership, because you've got to travel to get there. And then you've got to potentially have something to eat there, or buy something in the shop. And I think the situation is now with some people that they're, even when they have a membership of some organisation, they're actually more reluctant to use it now, more than trying to squeeze as much as possible out of it.Steve Mills: I think it's going to be a tough time for memberships over the next few months, definitely. We've got, again, evidence from that piece of work that is saying people are less likely to renew and less likely to acquire new memberships over the next few months, because of their personal financial situation. And it's all within that 50% of people who are feeling worse off, obviously. Which I guess on the positive side, what we're seeing is that I guess if there was going to be a prediction, it's that at the high end, limited supply-type products, there's virtually going to be no change there. If you've got limited supply of something that's priced at a high level, I think there is still going to be plenty of demands for that sort of thing. And you see it all the time, really.Steve Mills: I mean, I think things like the Christmas lights displays, for example, at attractions, I have a feeling they're still going to be okay and do well. I mean, I tried to go to, there's one reasonably local to me at Walterstone. And I don't know if it's completely sold out yet, but I know the slots that we wanted to try and book, we booked three or four weeks ago for it. I think those sorts of events and the higher price point end with limited supply should be okay, in my view.Kelly Molson: Yeah. And I would agree with that, again from personal experience of trying to book the Audley End miniature railway Christmas experience. All of the weekends are gone. I did manage to get a Friday, thankfully. More for me, to be perfectly honest. I can't wait to go on it. But yeah, those peak Saturdays and weekend slots sold out within hours, and they're all gone completely. Yeah, I definitely agree with you on that.Kelly Molson: Do you think that that then leads attractions to they're just going to have to try harder in terms of the experience that they're putting on? Should they be looking at trying to offer things that are a bit more unique, at a higher price point?Steve Mills: Yeah, I think yes, definitely. I think as well, it's important to point out that this isn't going to be across the board. Again, there's a lot of evidence for ... Again, I guess this is all very intuitive, but there's going to be a much higher negative impact on paid attractions than free attractions, so again, there's very strong evidence that people will be switching out from paid attractions to free attractions. But then even within that, within paid attractions, it's perhaps starting to emphasise that this is all going to be about value message. And what else can you do to add value to whatever ticket price is, really?Steve Mills: Yeah, and again, a third of people said they will visit paid attractions less than normal, and only 13% said more. Whereas on the free attractions side, you've got a third saying they will visit free attractions more than usual, and only 8% said less. And again, that's all driven by those that feel worse off. Yeah, I think it's all completely about that value message over the winter. Need that reassuring communications around it.Steve Mills: And I think as well, what has also come out of this is there's this assumption that the cost of visiting attractions will be rising at the same rate as everything else in the economy. There were quite a few people saying things like, "just assuming that the cost of visiting attractions was going to be going up". I think there is a really important communications message to put in there, some thought actions to come across, is that we are maybe holding our prices at '22 levels, or whatever it is. Or only increasing it by a small amount, or adding this extra value item in or whatever it is. I think something that is related to value and price has to be the message this year, just to reassure people that actually, we're not going up at the same price as energy and wheat and sunflower oil and all the rest of it. Actually, it's going to be fairly marginal, if anything, for visitor attractions, which I thought was one of the quite interesting things that came out of it.Kelly Molson: That's really interesting, isn't it? Yeah, I hadn't considered that. I mean, look, it's unfair to say that attractions won't be putting up their prices, because their energy bills are going up just as ours are. Actually, their energy bills are going up more dramatically than ours, because there's currently no cap on businesses. There isn't a reassurance piece to be done, but I think that has to be done quite tactically by the attraction because they can't come out and say, "Look, we're not putting our prices up. We're not doing this," because they might have to because of the cost of living. Okay, but that's something that I wasn't expecting, that they just assumed that it would rise that rapidly.Steve Mills: Yeah. And coincidentally, I read something somewhere recently in the trade press as well of just someone had done some research across other sectors as well, and was seeing a very similar sort of scenario as well. Actually, when you think about it, average Joe Public, if inflation is at 10%, your immediate thought is well, everything is going up 10%. Why wouldn't it be? Most members of the public wouldn't think about the nuances of what's going up and what isn't going up.Steve Mills: I think it's just something to bear in mind. Although again, what I would say is that I'm of the view that attractions should try and hold their nerve in terms of pricing. And I suspect there won't be much merit in reducing prices or holding prices as they are just for the sake of it, because I don't think we're talking here about those people who are financially squeezed. The odd pound or two lower admission price at a visitor attraction I don't think is going to make a huge amount of difference to whether they visit or not, to be honest. All you'll be doing is rewarding the people who would visit anyway. Why would you do that? I think it's holding your nerve and being confident that you offer a good value, worthwhile experience.Kelly Molson: Yeah. Good advice, Steve. And that also backs up the last interview that we had with Simon Addison about being confident in what you're delivering, and the price that you're charging for it. Yeah, really, really good advice. Okay, what else have you discovered?Steve Mills: I think they were probably the main points, really. Yeah, I mean I think as I said, it's going to be pretty tough for membership, so existing members, we're now seeing they're less likely to renew than they were back in June, and they're less likely to acquire new memberships as well. And yeah, just more reticent about using and squeezing as much value out of their existing membership as well.Kelly Molson: Yeah. It's interesting, the membership one, because my National Trust membership is up for renewal in January time. We were very kindly gifted it for a wedding present last year. And I'm absolutely going to renew, because for me, it's such incredible value for money. And we were literally talking about it last night. We were like, "Well, that's fine. We'll renew our membership. We'll make sure that we are not only using the brilliant National Trust parks that are around us, like Wimpole and Anglesea Abbey, et cetera, Ickworth, but go further afield as well. Actually, if we're going to use that membership, then we don't mind traveling a little bit further, even though that's going to cost us a bit more in petrol, to go to that attraction because you're then not paying the attraction fee on top of the travel costs as well. Yeah, it's funny. I'd never even considered not renewing it.Steve Mills: Yeah. And I'm exactly the same. And I guess, let's be clear, here. I said 50% of the population are feeling worse off than they did at this point last year, but then 50% are feeling okay, the same or better. And I think it was something like 15% or so were actually feeling better off than last year, which I think says something about where we're going as a society. You've got people dividing even further, to be honest with you. There are still significant proportions of people that are feeling fine about things, and will renew their memberships, or see them as a charitable donation.Kelly Molson: Steve, I want to ask you a little bit about pre booking, because I mean we've talked about this for years now, pre booking. Obviously, it was kind of forced upon attractions during the pandemic, when they were allowed to open. I still don't know why anyone wouldn't pre book in advance, but then I am an organised planner. I need to know that I've got my ticket and I'm going to get in. I'm not going to have a wasted journey. And obviously, from an operational side, aspect from attractions, it's a brilliant thing to be able to do.Kelly Molson: What's the kind of sentiment now from general public? Are they still happy with it? Are they starting to want to go back to the old days, where things were just a little bit more flexible and bit more spontaneous?Steve Mills: Yeah. Well, I think almost, it's switching that around a little bit. I mean, I think obviously COVID was this fantastic opportunity to almost change the culture of the public to one where, as you said, it's why wouldn't you pre book an attraction in the same way that you would pre book lots of other things in society, like going to the theatre or going to a restaurant or whatever? Certainly, paid attractions. There was a really good opportunity to change the culture. And so I think the main point for me is that attractions need to be proactive in encouraging that behaviour.Steve Mills: It's not something that will naturally come to the public, and public sentiment won't change unless attractions are proactive in changing it. Why would it, really? I think it's incumbent upon attractions to really create that appetite for pre booking. And I think to an extent, we're beginning to get there. But I think there's a lot more to be done in terms of what nudges can we put to the public to encourage to pre book? I think things like online discounts that are notable, or switching it around premiums to walk-ups, depending on which way you want to look at it, should be used more than they probably are at the moment.Steve Mills: And things like dynamic pricing for advanced booking, for example. Again, I know you talked to Simon Addison about dynamic pricing last week. But the more that that can be used, in particular for things like advanced booking, I think just will encourage pre booking. And then gradually over a period of time, it then gets ingrained into the people's psyche, "I'm going to an attraction, therefore I will pre book."Steve Mills: I think it's just one of those that I think the industry as a whole almost needs to come together and say, "Right, we're going to push pre booking as much as we possibly can because we need to change the way that society thinks about booking attractions." Easy for me to sit here and say that, and much more difficult to do. But I think that's what needs to be done because yeah, as we've seen, there's huge benefits in terms of creating that relationship with anybody as soon as you grab their email address. And that investment or the discounts you offer may well pay dividends in years to come because you've managed to keep that relationship going, which means you get more repeat visits, you get more top of mind so you get more recommendation being spread around, et cetera. I think it's a worthwhile investment.Kelly Molson: Brilliant, yeah. Good advice. I agree with every, single word you have said, Steve. Thanks for backing up everything that I put online about it as well.Steve Mills: It's all right. And to be honest, it helped me as well on my visitor surveys. I now try and make sure that they are online, post visit surveys, which tend to help the more pre bookers people have got. It makes that research a lot more cost effective, shall we say, as well.Kelly Molson: Helping us all round, Steve. That's what I like. Sector collaboration and all that. Right, Steve, thank you for sharing your insights today. It's really appreciated, and I know that this will help a lot of people that are feeling a little bit anxious about what's going on and just not really sure how to approach things. Thank you very much.Kelly Molson: I always ask our guests to recommend a book that they love or something that has helped shape their career in some way. What have you got for us today?Steve Mills: Okay. I've read this book called Silt Road, silt road rather than silk road, by a guy called Charles Rangeley-Wilson or Rangeley-Wilson. Not quite sure, to be honest. And he's quite niche based, so be prepared. It tells the social history of High Wycombe, which is where I live, through the lens of the River Wye, which sort of runs through it, although most of it has been culverted and put under a shopping centre and a flyover, these days. Yeah, it tells that story through the lens of a river. It tells a story about things like the mills on the river, the history of Wycombe as a furniture and chair making town, which led to me actually being ... I'm now Chair of the Wycombe Chair Museum, which is rather ironic.Kelly Molson: That's niche as well, isn't it? I love it.Steve Mills: It is. It's incredibly niche. It's incredibly niche. And it also tells the story of things like how trout became ... Trout are a thing in New Zealand, apparently, and they are a thing in New Zealand because they were taken from the River Wye and transported over thousands of miles to New Zealand many years ago.Steve Mills: But the reason why I mention it is because I'm not originally from Wycombe. I've lived here for about 15 years. But it really helped me form this identity with the town, because Wycombe is a few miles outside London. It's very commuter-able, which means that actually, there's not many people live in Wycombe who are originally from Wycombe. I'm a big believer in getting pride in your local area so you look after it better and make you want to contribute to the community.Steve Mills: Books like this help with that because it has really helped me to understand Wycombe in more detail, understand the social history, and feel more proud of the place I live.Kelly Molson: Steve, I love that.Steve Mills: It's not really a recommendation to read that specific book. It's more of a kind of a plea to go and find out a bit more about your local area, read about the social history, so that you feel more proud about the places you live in.Kelly Molson: And more connected to it as well.Steve Mills: Completely, yeah, yeah, yeah. Pride and connection.Kelly Molson: Steve, I think that's lovely. It's amazing, the stuff that you can learn on this podcast. Who knew? Who knew? Who knew that Wycombe ... I had no idea that it was a big chair and furniture manufacturing place, and that you had got a Chair Museum as well.Steve Mills: We do, yes. It's mentioned in Gavin and Stacey as well.Kelly Molson: Is it?Steve Mills: Yeah, there you go.Kelly Molson: Well, I mean I'm an Essex girl, so that fits for me too.Steve Mills: Well, James Corden is from High Wycombe, so that's why it's mentioned in there.Kelly Molson: Got you. Right, okay. Well, look, listeners, if you want to win Steve's book, and why wouldn't you? If you go over to our Twitter account and you retweet this episode announcement with the word, "I Want Steve's Book", then we'll get you a copy of that book. We'll get you a copy of it, and you could be in with a chance of winning it, and then you can find out about High Wycombe as well. Thank you, Steve. It has been an education.Steve Mills: Absolute pleasure.Kelly Molson:  Thanks for listening to Skip The Queue. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review. It really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned. Skip the queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. You can find show notes and transcriptions from this episode and more over on our website, rubbercheese.com/podcast.

She Makes Waves
Lindsay Mayuga - Calming the Chaos

She Makes Waves

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 15:38


All of the sudden my life got chaotic between my daughter, a new puppy, my husband being out of town and a bunch of little things that built up. Queue overwhelm.Typically I deal with chaos by kicking it into high gear, over working + over delivering. But this time I wanted to cope with things a little differently. In this week's episode, I explain my week and what I  implemented to calm the chaos. Prioritizing tasksBeing intentional with my timeLeaving space for life to happenIdentifying what grounds meEveryone can relate to this. My hope is anyone listening in on what I did differently will help find their own calm.Follow along on Instagram: @LindsaymakeswavesStay connected with all the latest happenings with LindsayShe Nets Worth: hairstylist's guide to going independent waitlist! 

Loser's Queue
Loser's Queue 43 Ban Yuumi!!

Loser's Queue

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 90:45


Week 1 of the groups stage has concluded and we go over how the groups stacked up, how great the meta is, and more! Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/LosersQueuePod, follow on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and send in your personal stories/memes/highlights to losersqueuepodcast@gmail.com!

Horror Babes
Phantom Of The Paradise (1974)

Horror Babes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 47:22


Hey, Babes! Nicole and Topher continue their Horror Musicals October with Brian de Palma's "Phantom of the Paradise" (1974). Queue it up to vibe with their takes on wild costume design, coherent story disguised as chaos, and why the whip-pan is still one of the best shots in all film. YO!! There be SPOILERS beyond the first two minutes of this pod! CW: discussions of self-harm

The Casuals Fantasy Football Podcast
Warshington Cummanders

The Casuals Fantasy Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 64:10


Episode 2.38 - Warshington Cummanders3 mics back to scrambling and gambling!What it is Wednesday with the Chad Alpha Gambler Vol. 6. Let's see if this parlay hits, baby!Grunts @ Grizzlies. Who you got??**Disclaimer...Queue the "Hello Darkness My Old Friend" music this time for Antonio Gibson...**Love,Beau Jangles** Get 20% OFF @manscaped + Free Shipping with promo code CASUALS at MANSCAPED.com! #ad #manscapedpod **

Sales vs. Marketing
Spencer Rascoff & Sophia Rascoff - Founders of Recon Food | The Evolution of Social Media

Sales vs. Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 64:52


➡️ Like The Podcast? Leave A Rating: https://ratethispodcast.com/successstory   ➡️ About The Guest⁣ Spencer Rascoff is an entrepreneur who co-founded Zillow, Hotwire, and dot.LA, Pacaso, Recon Food, Queue, and Supernova, and who served as Zillow's CEO for a decade. Spencer is an active angel investor and is starting new companies through his Los Angeles startup studio “75 & Sunny.” Spencer is co-chair of Supernova, a family of Special Purpose Acquisition Companies (SPACs) which have raised over $1 billion in capital. He is also on the Board of Directors of Varo Money. In spring 2022, Spencer was a Visiting Professor. He taught Harvard College's first-ever startup class “Startups from Ideation to Exit,” and in the Fall of 2019, co-created and co-taught the Harvard Business School course, “Managing Tech Ventures. Spencer is the host of "Office Hours,” a podcast featuring candid conversations between prominent executives on leadership, diversity and inclusion, and startups. Sophia Rascoff is co-founder and CEO of Recon Food, the vertical social media app where people can reconnect over a shared love of food.  Sophia is a student at Harvard-Westlake School in Los Angeles, where she is a leader in the entrepreneurship and creative problem-solving organization; a leader in the Latin American/Hispanic Student Organization; a recipient of the presidential volunteer service award. ➡️ Show Links https://www.instagram.com/spencerrascoff/  https://twitter.com/spencerrascoff/  https://www.instagram.com/spencerrascoff/  https://twitter.com/sophiarascoff/  ➡️ Podcast Sponsors HUBSPOT - https://hubspot.com/ ➡️ Talking Points⁣ 00:00 - Intro 04:16 - Sophia Rascoff's origin story 07:45 - Spencer Rascoff's origin story & his starting a company with his daughter 11:23 - Starting up a social media app  13:52 - Vertical-driven social media 20:23 - Some ways of growing and building up a community 23:06 - Turning a community into a successful business model 25:24 - What are the benefits and drawbacks of working in a family? 30:16 - Managing her studies and her business at the same time 33:16 - Sophia's future education plans & Spencer's thoughts on them 36:17 - Learning to code at such a young age & Sophia's role at the company 38:49 - The most important traits to be a successful entrepreneur 41:37 - How did the Rascoffs find the founder-product fit? 45:28 - How did Sophia accomplish all that she did at a young age and how did social media affect it? 54:16 - Where can people connect with Sophia Rascoff and Spencer Rascoff? 55:08 - The biggest challenges faced by Spencer and Sophia Rascoff 57:08 - The most impactful person in Sophia's and Spencer's lives 59:44 - Sophia and Spencer's book or podcast recommendations 1:01:04 - What would Spencer and Sophia tell their younger selves? 1:02:47 - What does success mean to Sophia and Spencer Rascoff? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Casuals Fantasy Football Podcast
Jared "The Jerk" Goff

The Casuals Fantasy Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 66:57


Episode 2.33 - Jared "The Jerk" GoffShoutout Manscaped! Take the gamble on The Casuals!What it is Wednesday with the Chad Alpha Gambler Vol. 5. Let's see if this parlay hits, baby!Blue Horses @ Orange Horses. Who you got??**Disclaimer...Queue the "Hello Darkness My Old Friend" music for Jonnu Smith...**Love,Beau Jangles** Get 20% OFF @manscaped + Free Shipping with promo code CASUALS at MANSCAPED.com! #ad #manscapedpod **

Hotline League
EG on the RISE to GROUPS! Champ's Queue HYPE, Format fixes and more feat. Chronicler | HLL 243

Hotline League

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 95:12 Very Popular


00:00:00 Intro 00:16:00 Mark arrives 00:18:52 delfino wants to talk about player branding 00:27:35 Alienware break 00:28:56 IMissInfiniteCrisis' take: get rid of 4th seeds 00:37:56 eeveeFIGHTING's take: NO GROUPS! Just Bo5s! 00:51:05 tako's take: this has been the best Play-Ins ever 01:01:50 danxor's take: allchat should be shown on broadcast 01:11:10 parnellyx's take: CQ could've been better 01:21:55 Grubhub break! 01:23:23 lazerfruit's take: the reason EG looked so good against MAD was that they played around Kaori 01:32:35 Outro

Free Library Podcast
Vladimir Sorokin and Max Lawton | Telluria and Their Four Hearts

Free Library Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 48:34


In conversation with Mark Krotov, publisher and editor of n+1  Vladimir Sorokin is one of contemporary Russian literature's most popular writers. Banned by the Soviet Union, his numerous novels include The Queue, The Blizzard, Day of the Oprichnik, and the controversial Blue Lard. His work also includes several screenplays, plays, short story collections, art exhibitions, and an opera libretto, and his writing has been translated into more than 30 languages. The subject of a 2019 documentary and famed for his outspoken criticism of Vladimir Putin's government, Sorokin has earned an O. Henry Award, the Andrei Bely Award for outstanding contributions to Russian literature, and a nomination for the Russian Booker Prize. His latest novel, Telluria, imagines a fractured future in which a holy war between Europe and Islam has sent the world spiraling into a state of feudalism and disarray. Max Lawton has translated eight of Sorokin's novels and has translated his stories for n+1 and The New Yorker. The recipient of the prestigious Clarendon Scholarship for the University of Oxford, he is also a novelist and musician. (recorded 10/3/2022)

Monday Morning Homilist
Ep. 59 - Increase Our Faith

Monday Morning Homilist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 65:02


It was a busy weekend at the parish, leading us into a busy week - and month - ahead! The vibrancy of the parish is a small reminder of all the Lord can do with our faith the size of a mustard seed. But our conversation this morning centers on the beautiful plea and prayer of the Apostles, "Lord, increase our faith!" How can we increase our faith? And what can we expect from even the smallest increase in faith, an increase the size of a tiny mustard seed? In sports, we've got ALL our local teams in action and we go around the room. Online Neuroscience Degrees, dumpster-fire NFL Pick 'Em results, the Tyler Herro extension.... and an EPIC Angry Manny Rant you won't want to miss. Grab some popcorn. Queue the fireworks! Don't forget to like, comment on, rate/review, and share the podcast! Have any questions you'd like Fr. Manny and Jorge to tackle? Send them in to podcast@cotlf.org and listen in next Monday to see if we were able to answer it!

The Travelmation Podcast
Queue-less Attractions in Walt Disney World!

The Travelmation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 27:20


Join Alston, Tim, Cristina, and correspondent Chretien as they give you their favorite things to do in Walt Disney World that you DON'T have to wait in line for!Follow the hosts on Instagram @TravelmationPodcast

Pod Save The Queen
The Queen's Funeral

Pod Save The Queen

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 47:22


After yet another historic week, Zoe Forsey and Russell Myers reflect on the Queen's funeral. They discuss the pomp and ceremony of the day, the moving tributes and the personal touches added by the royal family to ensure their ‘Gan-Gan' had the perfect send off. And of course, they couldn't not talk about The Queue (and The Queue for The Queue), the most British of British tributes to a Monarch who served her country for 70 years.

TRASHFUTURE
*PREVIEW* Britainology 45: The Queue

TRASHFUTURE

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 10:11


Call it an act of reportage. Call it 'we simply couldn't refuse the opportunity.' We went down to the queue for Queen Elizabeth II's lying in state and interviewed people. We also recorded our observations. It was... an experience. Get the whole episode on Patreon here: https://www.patreon.com/posts/72260831   If you're looking for a UK strike fund to donate to, here's one we've supported: https://www.rmt.org.uk/about/national-dispute-fund/   *MILO ALERT* Here are links to see Milo's upcoming standup shows: https://www.miloedwards.co.uk/live-shows *AUSTRALIA ALERT* We are going to tour Australia in November, and there are tickets available for shows in Sydney: https://musicboozeco.oztix.com.au/outlet/event/3213de46-cef7-49c4-abcb-c9bdf4bcb61f and Brisbane https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/trashfuture-live-in-brisbane-additional-show-tickets-396915263237 and Canberra: https://au.patronbase.com/_StreetTheatre/Productions/TFLP/Performances *WEB DESIGN ALERT* Tom Allen is a friend of the show (and the designer behind our website). If you need web design help, reach out to him here:  https://www.tomallen.media/ Trashfuture are: Riley (@raaleh), Milo (@Milo_Edwards), Hussein (@HKesvani), Nate (@inthesedeserts), and Alice (@AliceAvizandum)  

The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters
The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters #483

The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 91:24


Carl and Harry discuss the Queue, the funeral of Queen Elizabeth II, and the monarchy's significance to Britain.

The Allusionist
160. Coward

The Allusionist

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 34:15 Very Popular


“Anxiety is the parrot sidekick that rides on my shoulder and occasionally squawks warnings in my ear,” says Tim Clare, poet and podcaster and author of the book Coward: Why We Get Anxious & What We Can Do About It. We talk about anxiety, cowardice, magic bullets vs silver bullets, the scary Bible, and seagulls. Content note for discussion about mental health, unsurprisingly, and colonial and military harmful practices. Find out more about this episode and some sources of the information therein at theallusionist.org/coward, where there's also a transcript. Find Tim's books, podcasts, writing courses and more at timclarepoet.co.uk. The Allusionist's online home is theallusionist.org. Stay in touch at twitter.com/allusionistshow, facebook.com/allusionistshow and instagram.com/allusionistshow. The Allusionist is produced by me, Helen Zaltzman. The music is by Martin Austwick. Hear Martin's own songs via palebirdmusic.com. Our ad partner is Multitude. To sponsor the show, contact them at multitude.productions/ads. This episode is sponsored by: • Bombas, whose mission is to make the comfiest clothes ever, and match every item sold with an equal item donated. Go to bombas.com/allusionist to get 20% off your first purchase. • NordVPN. Browse safe, browse fast. And, exclusivelusionist big discounts: grab the NordVPN deal at nordvpn.com/allusionist. Try it risk-free now with a 30-day money-back guarantee.• Squarespace, your one-stop shop for building and running a sleek website. Go to squarespace.com/allusionist for a free 2-week trial, and get 10 percent off your first purchase of a website or domain with the code allusionist.   Support the show: http://patreon.com/allusionistSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.