Podcasts about Cigna

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Best podcasts about Cigna

Latest podcast episodes about Cigna

Taproot Therapy: A Mindful Moment

Our brains are hardwired for negativity! A negativity bias is our brain's ability to focus on the negative events of our lives. As a result, we focus heavily on the negative aspects of our lives, and tend to downplay, or even ignore, the positives. In this episode, we explore the negativity bias, as well as mindfulness skills to help you increase your ability to focus on the positive aspects of your day.   Do you have an idea for an episode? Reach out to us! Email me at erin@taproottherapynyc.com.   Follow us on Instagram (@Taproottherapynyc) and Facebook (@TaprootN).  Therapists at our practice have openings and are available to see you! If you are interested in starting therapy, please reach out to us. We have sliding scale options, and we are in-network with Cigna. Email Erin (erin@taproottherapynyc.com) for more information.

Field Guide To Awesome
FG2A 65: Vince Warnock: Detaching, Intention & Clarity: What you want is closer than you think

Field Guide To Awesome

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 13:51


This week I'm talking with Vince Warnock.  Vince Warnock is an award-winning Business and Marketing Strategist, coach, author and host of the Chasing the Insights podcast. An ex-radio announcer with over 20 years in marketing. Vince has been recognized by his peers with numerous awards including being named a Fearless50, a program designed by Adobe to recognize the top 50 marketers in the world who drive bold, fearless marketing and digital transformation. Previously the CMO at Cigna, Vince has founded multiple companies including the Chasing the Insights Academy where he empowers entrepreneurs and business owners to make sense of marketing and grow the business they have always dreamed of.Listen in to hear about:Detaching from the outcome to see opportunitiesThe power of the strategy call & intentionWhat to focus on during free strategy callsGet clear on what you want, it's probably closer than you think.You can learn more about GUEST here:Website: https://chasingtheinsights.comLinked In: https://www.linkedin.com/in/vdub01/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/chasingtheinsights/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vdub01/Media outlets: CIO Magazine, Yahoo Finance, Bloomberg, Forbes, TechCrunch, and many many podcasts Vince is offering a Free Marketing Strategy Call: Not sure what sets you apart from everyone else?Unsure if your website is best set to convert your customers?Want someone to look over your messaging or pitch?This is where I come in. I want to help you get a sense of clarity.Book here: https://chasingtheinsights.com/free-strategy-call/******If you are a driven entrepreneur who's:At the top of your game, yet find your consistent successes aren't feeling like you thought they would,And you are ready to root out any vestiges of imposter syndrome self-sabotage that are holding you back from expanding out of your comfort zone and into your next level,AND you are ready for success that truly feels like successBook a call with me.We'll have an intimate conversation about you and your business. We'll explore what what might be holding you back from enjoying your success. You'll leave with your next step.If you still need more help at the end of the call, and it makes sense to both of us - we'll talk about what it would look like to work together.If this sounds good to you, click the Book Trina link ==> https://bit.ly/BookTrina*********Would you like to be interviewed on the Field Guide To Awesome Podcast?Are you a Coach and an Entrepreneur?Have you had a major mindset shift that helped you overcome a major business challenge, and allowed you to increase your impact?Would you love to share how you are multiplying your impact using your unique skills and abilities?If so, I'd love to interview you!Apply to be interviewed here on The Field Guide To Awesome podcast:  https://bit.ly/fg2aguestapplicationYou can find me on social media:Facebook Group: The Field Guide To Awesome Podcast Tribewww.facebook.com/groups/thefieldguidetoawesomepodcasttribe/The Field Guide To Awesome: Your Energetic Path To Flow free FB group:https://www.facebook.com/groups/fieldguidetoawesome

A Second Opinion with Senator Bill Frist, M.D.
159 - Shawn Morris, CEO of Privia Health, Shares Their Exciting, National Physician Enablement Model Focused on Quality Care & Physician Well-Being

A Second Opinion with Senator Bill Frist, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 63:38


This episode is brought to you by MEDHOST, a Trusted EHR for Healthcare Facilities. To learn more, go to Medhost.com. Shawn Morris is CEO of Privia Health, an exciting, national physician enablement company that's shaking up primary care and other specialty areas. Shawn has led Privia since 2018, expanding into new provider areas including California and West Texas, and successfully taking it public this year.  Privia was recently recognized among Inc. Magazine's Best-Led Companies for 2021. Shawn previously served as the President and COO of Cigna-Healthspring, overseeing Cigna's multi-billion dollar Medicare Advantage business. In today's discussion, he brings his extensive knowledge of the insurance market, and how to equip physicians with the tools they need to deliver the high-value care they want to provide – and consumers want to receive. For more on Privia Health: Privia Health's Chief Clinical Officer, Keith Fernandez, MD, and Chief Medical Officer of Privia Medical Group — Mid-Atlantic, Fred Taweel, MD, were recently featured by the American Medical Association regarding Privia's ACO success within the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) for the 2020 performance year. Read it here: https://www.ama-assn.org/practice-management/payment-delivery-models/physician-leaders-patient-access-drive-privia-health-s

Lead With Heart w/ Amanda Rivera
Ep #75: The ONE Entrepreneurial Superpower To Cultivate That Will Increase Sales + Deepen Your Happiness In Your Biz

Lead With Heart w/ Amanda Rivera

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 39:14


Can vulnerability be a superpower for entrepreneurs? You won't want to miss this interview with my special guest Vince Warnock. Vince Warnock is an award-winning Business and Marketing Strategist, coach, author, and host of the Chasing the Insights podcast. An ex-radio announcer with over 20 years in marketing. Vince has been recognized by his peers with numerous awards including being named a Fearless50, a program designed by Adobe to recognize the top 50 marketers in the world who drive bold, fearless marketing and digital transformation. Previously the CMO at Cigna, Vince has founded multiple companies including the Chasing the Insights Academy where he empowers entrepreneurs and business owners to make sense of marketing and grow the business they have always dreamed of. Click here to get a free strategy call from Vince: https://chasingtheinsights.com/free-strategy-call/ ..................................................................... If you'd like more tips and wisdom on creating an online business that feels good and supports your lifestyle, definitely follows me on Instagram at

CAPcast
November Advocacy Recap

CAPcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 5:34


In this recap, we review the final Medicare fee schedule regulations, updates from Cigna, and more.

Aposto! Altı Otuz
Aposto! Gündem | 13 Aralık - Faiz tahminleri, ABD yaptırımları

Aposto! Altı Otuz

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 7:44


Günaydın. Son Para Politikası Kurulu öncesi yetkililer faiz indirimi yapılıp yapılmayacağını değerlendirdi. ABD; Çin ve Kuzey Kore gibi ülkelere yaptırım uygulama kararı aldı. Ankara'da Barınamıyoruz eyleminde öğrenciler gözaltına alındı. Bugünün bülteni Cigna destekleriyle ulaşıyor. Fotoğraf: Mark Thompson / Getty Images

Value Investing FM
200. Invertir en el Sector Salud con Roberto Salvador

Value Investing FM

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 99:54


En este episodio de Value Investing FM, Adrián y Paco tenemos el placer de entrevistar a Roberto Salvador, fundador de Savanto Capital y asesor del fondo Gestión Boutique VIII Savanto sobre invertir en el sector salud. Nos hablará de: - Sus inicios en la inversión, pasando del trading al value investing - Las ventajas de invertir en el sector salud - Los diferentes nichos dentro del sector, desde las farmacéuticas hasta las aseguradoras médicas - Cómo evitar trampas de valor al invertir en healthcare - Algunas de las principales posiciones en su cartera como Abbvie, UnitedHealth Group, Cigna, Humana, Callaway Golf y Kinnevik - Sus errores de inversión en Aquabounty Technoogy y AliBaba Group

Aposto! Altı Otuz
Aposto! Gündem | 11 Aralık - Macron'un hedefleri, Rembrandt'ın portresi

Aposto! Altı Otuz

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 7:30


Günaydın. Bu hafta sonu gündemde; Avrupa Birliği dönem başkanlığına gelen Fransa'nın planları, Rembrandt portresinin yolculuğu ve Harry Potter'ın dönüşü var. Bugünün bülteni Cigna destekleriyle ulaşıyor. Fotoğraf: Getty Images

Gist Healthcare Daily
Thursday, December 9, 2021

Gist Healthcare Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 5:32


LA area cancer organization City of Hope announces plans to buy Cancer Treatment Centers of America. Cigna invests in insurtech startup BrightHealth. And the House passes legislation to avert Medicare cuts.

Action and Ambition
Jared Jones and Russ Hill Help Successful Executives Grow Their Careers Through Strengthening Their Leadership Effectiveness

Action and Ambition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 35:56


Welcome to another episode of The Action and Ambition Podcast! Joining us today are Jared Jones and Russ Hill. They are the Co-Founders of Lone Rock Consulting, a company specializing in helping leaders develop people management skills to accelerate results. Both worked together previously at Partners In Leadership, where they led some of that firm's biggest culture transformation projects with companies like Ford, Becton Dickinson, Pepsi, Southwest Airlines, Cigna, and Kohler. Their desire to create new content and expand beyond only culture projects led them to create Lone Rock Consulting. Tune in to learn more on this!

Up Your Creative Genius
Deena Pierott: How to embrace change with dignity and integrity with diversity and inclusion pioneer

Up Your Creative Genius

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 42:46


Deena Pierott is also a Social Impact Entrepreneur and the Founder of the award winning and nationally recognized STEM+Arts program for youth of color called iUrban Teen which has chapters in four states, and most recently launched Black Women in STEM 2.0. Ms. Pierott is also a diversity strategist and international public speaker. She has served on several boards and commissions including a Gubernatorial appointment to the Commission on African American Affairs in the State of Washington. She has been featured on the following publications: Government Technology, Essence Magazine, Working Mother Magazine, Black Enterprise, Ebony Magazine, Deliver magazine, Portland Business Journal, Geekwire, Colors of Influence, Neurology Now, the Chicago Tribune and on NPR. “We are standing on the shoulders of our ancestors who are slaves. It's a responsibility in this life to walk through it with dignity, grace and integrity.” “Stand up for others and be fearless with it.” “Raise your hand, ask questions, be engaged, even if you know the answer to it. Don't be a wallflower.”  Deena Pierott https://www.linkedin.com/in/dpierott  iUrbanTeen https://iurbanteen.org/ Do Better: Spiritual Activism https://www.amazon.com/Do-Better-Spiritual-Activism-Supremacy/dp/1982151277  Follow Patti Dobrowolski - Instagram https://www.instagram.com/upyourcreativegenius/ Linkedin https://www.linkedin.com/in/patti-dobrowolski-532368/ Up Your Creative Genius https://www.upyourcreativegenius.com/  Timestamp [3:56] Meeting Deena Pierott and fling into Diversity, Equity and Inclusion [7:23] Working with innovative ways to change policy [8:44] How being a gay person in Texas is similar to Deena's experience [10:21] You have to be yourself in corporate America [10:55] How Deena started iUrbanTeen [14:26] Growing iUrbanYouth, iUrbanUniversity and working with Microsoft [15:57] Why Black Women in STEM was created [17:19] Making change in the world where anything can be done [19:20] It's never too late. What's your next thing? [21:22] Who is an inspiration to Deena? [22:56] How to tap into your creative genius? What's your routine? [24:35] You got to have skin in the game [27:52] Trick is to get into motivation and keep in momentum [28:20] Workaholic, selfcare, and dealing with trauma [31:30] Hurdles of being a black women founder [34:30] Sometimes its easier to stand up for others [36:27] What is the book you are reading right now [39:40] Biggest tip for someone making a change   Patti Dobrowolski 0:03 Hello superstars. Welcome to the Up Your Creative Genius Podcast where you will gain insight and tips to stomp on the accelerator and blast off to transform your business and your life. I'm your host, Patti Dobrowolski. And if this is your first time tuning in, then strap in because this is serious rocket fuel. Each week I interview fellow creative geniuses to help you learn how easy it is to up your creative genius in any part of your life. Hey, everybody, it's Patti Dobrowolski. What's Up Your Creative Genius? Oh, my God. Today, I have just one of my favorite people in the universe. Deena Pierott. Now listen. So if you don't know who Deena Pierott is, I'm going to give you the lowdown on her and then she's going to tell us about herself. But first, I just want to say thank you to everyone who has been subscribing and listening to the podcast and writing reviews. You like drove us up in the charts! It's fantastic. I love it. And I'm so grateful I am because this podcast is all about making change: how you can make change happen. And I've invited all these changemakers who have decided to change the world for other people or for themselves or their business. And so Deena Pierott is a serious changemaker. I got to read you her bio. Okay, so she is a sought after diversity strategist, Talent Acquisition Professional and international keynote speaker, no doubt, she's created cutting edge DEI programs that yield results in impact. And you know, we need that. Okay. But here's what I want to say she served on a number of boards. She's really super amazing. And she started iUrbanTeen, which really helped to advance and allow for kids who didn't have access to computers to get them. And so I know you're going to talk a little bit about that. But before we go on, I want to say this, that she was honored to be acknowledged by President Barack Obama as a White House Champion of Change for technology inclusion, and by Ebony magazine on their Power 100 list. She is like been, in Essence Magazine, the top 50 black female founders. She's just amazing. I'm telling you, if I showed you this List of awards, you will be here forever. But my God, welcome to the show. Deena Pierott. You're amazing! Deena Pierott 2:41 Oh, wow. Thank you. I you know, when I hear that stuff, I'm going is that me? And now that you know, because a lot of times you're so busy working and creating and working and creating that you have to sometimes stop and look back at you know, I did this. Patti Dobrowolski 2:58 I know it. Deena Pierott 2:59 I did this. Oh, I'm ready to cuss I got it. Because Patti Dobrowolski 3:02 That's okay. i You should have seen somebody else I had was just F bomb every other word. Right? You're all right. Yeah. Here's the amazing. You are just incredible. And I met you because somebody decided that we should meet. We hooked up. We had lunch together with your granddaughter. Yeah. And we were both like, what are we doing in Portland? Wow, this place is so weird. And neither one of us live there anymore. So they're, you know, right. Deena Pierott 3:34 I know. There you have it. But I just think it was just an instant connection. I wonder how they might just like, Look, Patti Dobrowolski 3:41 I know, friends. I know. It is so good. And so I just been following. Honestly, I stalk you all the time to see what you're up to. And then I like, post "Deena Pierott, she's so amazing." So follow her and do stuff with her. Now tell us if you would in your own words, like tell us about you and how you got started doing what you're doing and you know, anything you want to share about it? Well, you know, Deena Pierott 4:03 it's I'm going to try to make it a shorter story because usually I tell this long story with Patti Dobrowolski 4:09 international keynote speaker that goes on. And Deena Pierott 4:13 I sometimes I think I'm a Baptist preacher. Patti Dobrowolski 4:17 Exactly. We love that. You know, Deena Pierott 4:19 I always like to say, what's the why, you know, What's your why and things that you do. And sometimes you end up in a space that you didn't think he would be in, you know, 1015 20 years ago. So I kind of fell into the Diversity Equity work back in the 90s when I moved up to Portland from Compton, California. Patti Dobrowolski 4:39 Alright, so there you go right now. Oh, now I'm from LA Oh, I know all about content. I know in the Portland is white, white. Deena Pierott 4:48 Girl. Let me tell you, it's the whitest white folks I've ever seen in my life. And I even started fading. I was not this color. But I guessed it But then I instantly saw this disconnect, I saw this inequity on how people of color, especially the black community was treated. Yeah, no, I was called the n-word. I don't know how many times and I'm going I've never been called that in California. Right. Not that it doesn't happen, but it didn't happen to me. Right. I also saw when working in the workplace, the inequities there as well. I also saw how my own people and other people of color kind of were a little complacent to things where they didn't know how or didn't feel like they needed to advocate for themselves. Patti Dobrowolski 5:36 Yeah. Would they just let it slide? Slide and just go, like, well, that's the way it is here. Deena Pierott 5:43 And see, that was not me. Oh, no, not me at all. And so I instantly started creating different forums and different initiatives at the City of Portland. And it was interesting, because I worked for a director at a bureau who was from the East Coast. And he wholeheartedly gave me the platform to do what I did right now. I felt that he truly trusted my decisions. Yes, he believed in diversity and equity. And it gave me the floor, let me run with it. And I ran like hell. So I was able to create, like, I created the city's infinity groups that they have employee resource groups, in partnership with the mayor's office, the commissioners and all that and made it really meaty. I created so many different initiatives. Oh, my gosh, I made sure that all of our interview panels were reversed. I ensured that all of our panels for contract reviews were diverse. And that was in the 90s Patti Dobrowolski 6:40 for for my cat popular. Wow, that's crazy. But I also Deena Pierott 6:43 advocated for myself, and that scared a lot of people, you know, because here's this woman of color, a black woman that is holding her own. And yeah, letting you get away with this. And so, but what made me sad, Patti was a lot of the employees from different bureaus would come to me, and they would go Deena, can you ask my boss, if I could do this? If I can go here? Patti Dobrowolski 7:05 Oh my God. I know that. Deena Pierott 7:09 You know, and it Patti Dobrowolski 7:10 makes me sad. Because that means that they don't feel empowered enough to go. They don't have the confidence to go maybe because somebody slapped him down. You know what exactly happened here? Yeah, fear of losing a job. Deena Pierott 7:23 Exactly. And so I will tell them, No, you can tell them. And this is what you say and how you say it. Yeah, I still wouldn't do it, I would still go to their directors and ask these questions. And so, but someone told me and I remember that this was in like the late 90s. One of my own folks from the black communities that Deena, you're too opinionated. You rock the boat too much. You have to make them comfortable, meaning I needed to make white people comfortable. And I'm like, I don't need to make anybody comfortable. Exactly. And I say hold on a second, what plantation? Did I just arrived on? Exactly right. And so but that kind of pushback from not only the white community, but my own community made me try harder. Right. And so that's, I was creating initiatives that were way ahead of their time, and people are just now catching on. Right. So that was my last. And that was my journey into the diversity, equity belonging inclusion arena. And so I still get asked from different companies to either Keynote or to lead their teams on edgy innovative ways to change policy. How do you look at this through an equity lens? Yeah. And how do you do it? Not me, not how I how do you do it? Right? Yeah, within those companies. So that was the DEI journey. Yeah. Now, let's go to iUrbanTeen. Patti Dobrowolski 8:44 Yeah, cuz I want to talk about them. I know. I love them. Well, the other thing is that, I mean, honestly, I'm a gay woman. So you can imagine my story isn't exactly the same. But it is about you. You have to come out every second. And then you know, I live in Texas now. So come on, people go meet my neighbors. And my neighbors were kind of like really skeptical about us. And then, you know, a young transgender kid came and left a card at our door and said, thank goodness, you have that sign in your front lawn? Because now I know that there's possibility for me. Deena Pierott 9:19 Oh, see, right. You never know. You never know who you're the role model for? Or what pathways you're helping to create someone how you're helping their voice be heard. You never know. But for you or just to think if you didn't speak up, if you didn't feel comfortable in your own skin. Think about the health issues, the mental health issues. Yes, I would be steaming inside. That's why I tell people say something. You feel that you just had a micro or macro aggression thrown your way. Say something. It may not be that instant. It may not be that same day. It may not be that week. That's some point. I need to come to Patti Say, Patti, you know what you mentioned to me what you said to me last week, blah, blah, blah. It really felt like a microaggression. That's how it felt for me. How can we bridge this? You know, how can we do this differently? You need to be comfortable enough to have that kind of conversation. don't own that shit. Okay? Patti Dobrowolski 10:18 Yeah, don't take it in. Don't, don't Deena Pierott 10:21 get in, Patti Dobrowolski 10:21 don't try to change yourself. This is me. Like I remember, I wanted to write a book called How to Be yourself in corporate America, because you have to be yourself have to be your own. You cannot. I mean, now, thankfully, some things are breaking open. But in big companies, it's still Deena Pierott 10:38 the same. I still say that's not the company for you if it's feel that way. And that's why I tell all of my folks and even our students in Ireland team. Yeah, one of the things we teach them is how do you best advocate for yourself? Patti Dobrowolski 10:50 I love that. So how did you start that? How did you start Ironman teen, Deena Pierott 10:55 you know, the story goes, I was commissioner here on Governor Greg gwass. Commission on African American Affairs back in 2006, to 2011. And at the time, all of our ethnic Commission's were talking about the opportunity gap issue, especially for male youth of color, you know, falling through the cracks, being marginalized, disenfranchised, not having a clear pathway. And I'm an entrepreneur, I'm not one to sit back and meetings and boards, and just talk something to death over and over overnight, Patti Dobrowolski 11:26 we got to get things going. We got to add some happen. You got to make some happen now. Deena Pierott 11:31 So I instantly started looking at my community is being how if our families knew about the Running Start program, which is an amazing program, which has been graduate high school with not only a diploma but with an associate's degree. The issue was a lot of our brown and black families weren't aware of it because the school counselors were telling them yeah, of course not. That's not and so we were making sure that happened. Then I was asked to participate on a chief information officer Council in Portland. And I told my friend Mark, who arranged these for these councils all across the country, but I'm not a CIO. He goes, I know that, but you're innovative and we need you. So I went okay. Works for me. And so I went to the very first meeting, Patti, and I was a little late getting to the party. And so I opened the door, and it's a roomful of white men. Yeah, so imagine me walking in there with an afro wig on. Alright, I had a big curly Afro wig. Yeah, leopard print jacket, lay Yes. And big hoop earrings. Patti Dobrowolski 12:34 I love it. Deena Pierott 12:35 I went, oh, i Whoa. Okay. So. So during that meeting, I was sitting there and I said to myself, Okay, so over here we have these youth who are being disenfranchised, marginalized. Yeah, clearly don't have a pathway for success. But in this room, is where the opportunities are. That's right. So how do I reach this divide? And during that lunch meeting, I thought up iUrbanTeen, and within six months, we launched with the help of some of those men in the room, who were still engaged with me after all of these years. Oh, that's fantastic. We launched iUrbanTeen in October 2011, exactly 10 years ago, the 13th year, and wow, that was incredible. And I knew from the first event that we had to keep going because I saw this magic happening, you know, during those sessions, because everything we do is fast paced, hands on. Kind of eclectic, cool, kind of funky. You know, all of that. But it grabs them. It grabs your attention. Patti Dobrowolski 13:38 Yeah, they'll switch a notch when they need you since we launched Deena Pierott 13:43 in that 2008. Yeah. 2011 We have since launched in Seattle, Los Angeles, Dallas, Houston. We've also we're hoping to launch in New York and also in Miami, Florida, as well as several other cities in 2022 and 2023. Patti Dobrowolski 14:02 Does that mean you get to go to those cities and launch they see now that's right and went to Texas Come on. You should call me because now Deena Pierott 14:12 are you in Dallas or Houston or I'm in Fortworth? I'm close enough I could go to Dallas Yeah, Dallas Yeah, well you know we're gonna be working with the city of Dallas on expanding all right ramps there so we go I will definitely let you know. Patti Dobrowolski 14:26 Yes, for sure. I love it. Alright, so you set up i Urban Youth, right. And you really helped them to create some programs that gave them access they didn't have before tools and resources and do you do internships too? How did you set the all that up? Deena Pierott 14:44 We do you know, we started just kind of grassroots having these paid internship programs in Portland for high school students. Yeah, with partnership with Cigna and then there was a company I Otis that was there as well. And now because we've had so many youth over the years that have been with our program, now they're in college. So we had to launch I Urban University. Oh, yeah. That is for over 18 crowd. Yeah. And so now do they get mentorship and things like this? Yeah, we have mentors that work with them. Yeah, we have diverse instructors that work with them. And in all the thing that for this Ironman University, that's where we have our scholarships. We have our paid college internships there. And now we are launching a support engineer training program with Microsoft that launches early next. I love it. Oh, that's so we have women we have black women in this first cohort aged 19 to 46. Yeah, that will be trained by Microsoft and also go through the certification process where they can get jobs starting at 80 to 90,000 a year. Oh, after 120 hours worth of trade. i Patti Dobrowolski 15:57 Oh my god, that's so fantastic. Now is this black woman in STEM? Deena Pierott 16:02 That's separate. That's separate. That's I mean, Patti Dobrowolski 16:05 oh my god, that is so incredible. Alright, so now talk about your latest thing, black woman in STEM, Deena Pierott 16:12 STEM 2.0. And we call it 2.0. Because, you know, we change the M and stem to manufacturing. because math is interwoven in all the other elements as well, and sciences and technology and engineering. Math is already interwoven in that. So we wanted to add manufacturing, because yes, that's a segment that sometimes overlooked in the whole stem arena. Definitely. So a couple years ago, some of my colleagues and I wanted to create a platform or an association for women that are in those spaces that we can brainstorm, have training sessions for, conferences for and basic networking, and also sisterhood. Sister fellowship. That's right. And so that's what we did. And so this year, you know, we were supposed to have our conference last year, but because in Texas, but because of COVID Yeah. Hectic, nutso course. So this year, we are having the conference, and it's a hybrid, where we will have in person events and virtual sessions. I learned this this Friday and Saturday here in Bellevue, you know, which is a community. Patti Dobrowolski 17:19 Oh, that's fantastic. Okay, I love that. All right. So look at how many I just so for those of you that are listening, so here is somebody that saw a need way back in the 90s. And then just built that, you know, went to bat for everything that she believes in, and then started to build the infrastructure to help other people. And this is what we're talking about is when you want to make change in the world, like yours is about big change in the world so that it will impact you know, your grandkids, it will impact your neighbors, your community. So these are the things that you did, but you are such an innovator because you sat in that room of all those. This is me, I'm imagining that because that's me too. I walk I know rooms with all white men, and I'm thinking Oh, yeah. Okay, now we're gonna have fun. Now I'm going to be myself and you guys are gonna love me at the end or else right? Yeah. And part of it is that you have to use your woo strength, but you also have to in that moment, you have to really build a bridge between your state of consciousness and theirs. And that's what you are. You excel in that when you do that, how do you do that? What is it that you do that you tap into in yourself to hear what needs to be done? Deena Pierott 18:40 Well, you know, I just kind of sit back. I think I blame my mom for making me think and understand that I could do anything. Right. And I believed it. I fell for it. Yeah. And so I still believe I still know nothing. I believe I know that I can do anything well, and you have Patti Dobrowolski 18:59 such that there's no reason why you shouldn't believe but what if you're a young person coming up? Or even if you've been working in a corporation for a long time or working for somebody else in the city for a long time, and you feel like, oh, yeah, yeah, but it's too late. And I'm almost going to retire. Why would I want to rock the boat? What would you say to them? Deena Pierott 19:20 Oh, it's never too late. It's never too late. Like I just turned 63 You know, on October 6, and I'm are ready. I know. I'm already thinking about what's the next best thing? What's the next thing I could do? Right? I don't know how some of us fell into that trap of okay, well, now you're over 50 So it's time to slow down. Everything is downhill from there. I don't know who sent us that Patti Dobrowolski 19:45 Milan. Oh, no, that was really big. Yeah. Now, you know, I'm older than you. So that's fantastic. I'm like, Yeah, I'm a year older than you. And so we look good girl. We look. I'm just saying and part of it is that We want to make sure that we're evolving. This is what you're saying is, what's my next thing? So that I want to know, like, when you have a vision for yourself, what's interesting to you right now? What are you fascinated with? That you can tell us about? Deena Pierott 20:16 Well, you know, I think that for me, because I'm so people centered, I really want to do something if it is my own, like digital online magazine for women over 50, you know, women of color over 50, particularly, because that's an audience that's overlooked a lot of times, I'm kind of a, like a lifestyle brand type of thing that I want to do I want to get into podcasting, you know, like you. So that's what I feel that the next layer is for me. Yep, thing that's really cool and fun. I Urban Teen will always be at my heart. But you know, I'm building up the infrastructure now where I have now managing director for Portland and southwest Washington. Patti Dobrowolski 20:57 Well, I see you have your infrastructure in there and the people that can do it. And Deena Pierott 21:03 pretty soon it's when do I have all the gears in place where I can just kind of sit back? And just so funny, Patti Dobrowolski 21:10 because when I saw you in Portland, you talked about that, then. So what's true is you have multiple gears now, before you were just working one gear for a while Deena Pierott 21:21 working here, right? Patti Dobrowolski 21:22 Now you got four gears all going at the same time. So that's Yeah, I think will be really, really amazing to see. And you know, who is inspirational to you right now in the world who you look out and you see, and you think, Wow, that is cool. I like that. whatever they're doing, is there anybody that is a role model for you, either now or in the past that really has helped you, and helps you as you get going on ideas? Do you have like your little cadre of sisterhood that you talk to about things, do you? Deena Pierott 21:54 Well, you know, and that's interesting, because I think back on the person, that really was my inspiration, and I know, it may sound a little corny and all but it was my mother, you know, and she passed away suddenly, in 2010. I am such a rogue, that there really isn't anyone out there that I see that I want to learn from or any thing, it's sad to say, but it's sometimes when you are so much into your own. Patti Dobrowolski 22:27 Yep. It's I know, Deena Pierott 22:30 I have a lot, a lot, a lot of mentees or people women that want to consult with me on how do I do this? How do I do what you do? So but there's not a whole lot of others that I see that I can connect with, or brainstorm on. Because usually what I'm thinking about and what I'm envisioning, is so far out there that no one's been there yet. Patti Dobrowolski 22:56 Yeah, I love that. That's fantastic. And so you really what you're doing is you're tapping into your own creative genius, that flow. So you just unlock that. And so tell me, what's your daily routine that you go through? That helps you unlock your creative genius? What Deena Pierott 23:11 do you do? Well, you know, what I do is I just sit back in early morning hours when it's dead silent, and there's no noise, there's no nothing. I haven't even made coffee yet. I just sit in silence. And I just envision what I already have in place, how I can tweak it, how can I make it better? How can I do this? At the same time? How could I add in this creative edge into this? That's not been done before? You know, so I just kind of invid before I write down anything? Yeah, I first have a vision for it. Yeah. Then once the vision clicks, I'll start creating an outline for how I want to do this, then the next step is how am I going to implement this? You know, what's the impact on the students on the companies that I work for in the DEI space? Yeah. And sometimes when I'm even working with the companies like right now, I was working with a global tech company. And we did something totally different that they hadn't done before yet, right? Sometimes I'll work with them. Like, this is what I'm thinking, what how can we do this? So I'll get there. Like I tell companies, you've got to have some skin in the game, I can sit there and talk to you. I'm blue in the face around diversity and equity. But you've got to roll up your sleeves, and you got to help me make this happen. Patti Dobrowolski 24:31 That's right. Because it's not gonna happen without them. Yeah. Because otherwise you're just a consultant coming in. And same thing, if I'm drawing a picture of the vision and nobody's attached to it, then sure, nobody cares. Deena Pierott 24:44 And so if I give them the tools on how do they do this internally, where they don't even need me anymore, a lot of times you'll get diversity, people thinking or saying that they're diversity experts and consultants that intentionally want to keep that company so they can keep getting a Patti Dobrowolski 25:01 paycheck. Oh, no, that's so what is that doing? Deena Pierott 25:05 What is that mindset doing for this next level of students coming through? I haven't seen that might land at your workplace. Right? Yeah, exactly. What is that doing for my sons who are in the workforce now? Yes. What is that going to be doing for my granddaughters who had some yesterday and your workspace? I'd rather I'm this way. And that's why I don't think I'll ever be monetarily rich. I'd rather give them all the tools they can do right now. Yeah. And happen, attach it to action, create it, attach it to metrics, yep, with everything, letting them know where they need to pivot, so that they can be equitable and inclusive workspaces. Don't keep paying me for years and years to keep you sick. Yeah, Patti Dobrowolski 25:46 that's right. Well, and one of the things that I'm listening to is that so you let the ideas germinate about where you are, and you envision how you could make a better so this my friend, Dawn calls this spinning the universe, you're really spinning the universe. Now using your imagination, then you get a plan, you get it down on paper, so that you've got something so that you know, okay, this is what we're going to do. And even if it's with somebody else, you get some partnership in there, so that you can make it happen. So you're not the driver of the activity, because the thing that you can be the driver at the beginning, but you don't want to be the driver for That's right. I Deena Pierott 26:25 always say this is the hardest thing to do when you are someone like me and like you and that very creative space, is find people that share your rhythm. Yeah, right. Oh, that's right. Find people that share your rhythm. I spent so many years trying to consult with people who had no idea what I really wanted to do. Right, but I just knew that what they were saying didn't settle. Well. I'm like, yeah, yeah. And that's crazy. Oh, man. Thank you, man. Oh, thank you. So it took me a long time. And it's still really hard to try to find those people who share your rhythm, right? You're one of those people that share my rhythm. Yeah, we got to get things going girl stuff off the bat, right back and forth. In an hour sit in ideas, right? Patti Dobrowolski 27:11 That's right. But then we got to go do them. We got to get people to help us do them. Like somebody in the background putting together your peloton machine right now, is that right? So if you're listening and you hear like the sound this clanking so Dina warned me that they were going to put up her peloton now and so whoever's back there doing that, you know, keep going and just know that this is what happens in a creative space. You have got to get everything happening at the same time, because there's not enough time in the day. Deena Pierott 27:41 Yeah, the only thing Patti is I'm looking at them putting this peloton treadmill together now I'm going to have to use it. I'm like, Oh, yes, Patti Dobrowolski 27:52 you're gonna have to use well, and and you know, I would say bite off just a small piece of that, like, I just start on things like that. Well, what's true for me is that I know if I don't dive full in and set a goal, that seems like whoa, I wonder if I could do that, then I will really get motivated to do it. I may not do it the next week, but I will that initial week getting myself going. So it's the trick to keep yourself motivated. And that's how it is with change, too. Right? You see something that needs to be changed, you get super excited at the beginning. But how do you maintain your own motivation? How do you maintain it? I want to know how you maintain, Deena Pierott 28:31 you know, for me that and I gotta be honest, until they transparent, this whole self care thing sucks for me, because I don't know how to do it. I have such a workaholic. But I also learned about myself as I have to do this self care, I have to learn this piece as much energy that I'm putting into these ideas and these businesses. Yes, I have to put that in me. You know, I have been through a lot of trauma over the last 20 years. One of the coping mechanisms for trauma is to stay busy. Yes. So I stayed super busy, you know, and it wasn't until my husband that my son's father passed away of cancer in 2019 that I actually hit a wall. I hit a wall and I basically almost had a nervous breakdown. And I realized at that point, I said to myself, I'm a smart enough woman to know that I gotta walk through this trauma. Right? Yeah, trauma that I have been suppressing for over 20 years. And that was a constant it was a continued I just got busier just wrapped more up. Yeah. Then I thought about what I created under trauma. Right. The White House under trauma. I'm honored in the Lincoln Center in New York with Oprah Magic Johnson all of them because if I ever team under trauma, right, I've been all these things under trauma. And I think that's why if they all didn't really resonate with me, well, Patti Dobrowolski 29:53 they don't really sink in. You're like yeah, I did that. I know that because I was on Broadway things like this. You Her major accomplishments you just sort of brushed him off. Yeah. Don't let them soak in. Yeah, yeah. That's great. Thank you so much. And then on to the next thing, because if you slow down too much, yeah. And you have to actually feel what's going on inside of yourself. Exactly. And really takes the passing of somebody who is important to you, to wake you up. I think sometimes, for me, it did. It was when my mom died. That was when I woke up. I couldn't get out of bed. Honestly, I couldn't get out of bed. I was just like, I don't know, you know, what's the point? And then I had to deal with all the things that had happened in my life. Right? Yeah. Deena Pierott 30:37 Well, that's what I've been going through over the past couple of years, since his death is just sitting still and going through the things like, you know, the things that have happened over the years me being discriminated against in the workplace, and, and and all the pushback that I've had to deal with, and it has been a heavy lift. Yeah, me with all of my businesses here in the Pacific Northwest. Patti Dobrowolski 30:59 Oh, you know, got it got to be because if you're in LA, you'd have our alliances. Deena Pierott 31:06 Oh, yeah. Even if I was in New York, Boston, Chicago, Patti Dobrowolski 31:09 any of the big cities, Dallas to the Dallas, Deena Pierott 31:13 I just look at how well we're so embraced in Dallas and Houston. And you know, I just came back from Boston, that was in Boston in Portland, Maine. And it was a totally different vibe there. Yeah. You know, I loved it. So I feel that being a black female founder here in the Pacific Northwest, there's a lot of hurdles to go through. Yep. You know, a lot of hurdles. And it was a harder path to get here. However, I'm the total, optimistic, idealistic person, I feel that all of that struggle, all the traumas, things that I've gone through all of the hardships, helps make me the mosaic of who I am. Patti Dobrowolski 31:57 Oh, it is, and you are so beautiful. You're such a beautiful mosaic that that is what true. And what I love about what you said, is that, you know, the composite of view. And all of us really is all of the things that we've had to go through all the, you know, all the N word, in your case, all the bottles thrown at me out of somebody's car window in LA, you know, all that stuff. Those are the aggressions that happen. And what's true is you understand your essence in the universe for good. You know, you're a vehicle for good. And so you take all that and just say, This is who I am. This makes me empathetic, right? This is where my empathy comes from. And this is where my need for connection. And also, this is where my I don't know about you, but my fuel to make change in the world comes from and you're spot on. You are just so incredible. And I'm so grateful that our paths crossed, because, gosh, I mean, you've just been doing so many things. Since I saw you in Portland. You were like a little lifeline to me in that weird deli that we were eating with your cute little granddaughter. So much older now. Leila Berg. Yeah, she's Deena Pierott 33:19 nine years old. She will be 10 Pretty soon. And you know, crazy. I look at her and I see true leadership in Yeah, yeah. I was honored at Clark College a couple years ago as Iris award winner. Yeah, cool. When in the audience, my son, his wife, and the girls were the audience. And wow, when I was doing the acceptance piece, when I was accepting it, I looked over at my granddaughters, and I asked the audience, you know, can I have a moment I have a message I want to give my granddaughter Oh, my God. And they said yes. And so I asked my son, but Leila up on stage. And I said, because the other ones are way too little. And so I said, Leila, I said, I hope that one day you'll understand why your grandmother is being honored here tonight. And I also hope that you understand the pathway that I'm trying to create for you. I said, Leila, we are standing on the shoulders of our ancestors who were slaves. So it's a sponsibility in this life, to walk through it with dignity, grace, and integrity. Oh, you promise me you'll do that? And she shook her head. Yes. Oh, I blew her kiss. She blew me a kiss. The audience was crying. Oh, Patti Dobrowolski 34:30 I bet. Oh, my God. Deena Pierott 34:31 And I said, ladies and gentlemen, in 20 years, she'll be the one receiving this award. So let's give her a round of applause. Oh, I love that. Oh, it's speaking it into existence. Well, I just reader, I see such a leader in her and I see the empathy, the empathy in her there's a young boy in her classroom at school elementary school, who's autistic. And he says if the other kids fully handled Leila is the only one who's nice for him and stands up for him. Patti? I almost cried because I said, she's got it. Patti Dobrowolski 35:02 That's it. Got it. She got it. She got the gene and the kids got Deena Pierott 35:06 the gene she has a friend and the leadership, stand up for others. And be fearless with it, right? Patti Dobrowolski 35:14 Ah, love it, stand by others and be fearless. With it, that should be all of our call to action, you know, really stand up for others and be fearless with it. And so even if you can't stand up for yourself, be sure to stand up for other people, because it makes a huge, huge difference. It really Deena Pierott 35:32 is easier because sometimes they're more skeptical to stand up for themselves and advocate for themselves in the workplace. Yeah, but it's easier to advocate for someone else, you know, yeah, to see that lifeline for someone else as well, if you do it the right way. Patti Dobrowolski 35:47 Yeah. And I think we need it. I mean, I think that if you know, so many people have been a mentor or an a door opener for me, in my life. And I think for you, too, you know, we get little doors open, and then we open the door way wide. For other people. We're like, let's get okay. Now everyone knows. Deena Pierott 36:07 Let's go I want to do right. And the thing is, is that people need to like for me, I advocate for everybody. It doesn't care what color you are. What gender what anything. Yeah, I believe in fairness, I don't like to see an equity placed anywhere for anyone, you know. And so that's why I was fighting the good fight for Patti Dobrowolski 36:27 fair, do you Yeah, you're so amazing. You just hear I'm telling you, you're so amazing. Now what I want you to tell people what you're reading right now. So they know what they should be reading to? Deena Pierott 36:40 Well, right now I'm reading a book called do better. And it's all around advocating for others advocating for yourself, creating equity, where you are, I was just at the Harvard bookstore in Boston. And I saw it and I bought it. And so I just started reading it. Very good read. The other book that I just listened to on audio was cast about the cast. Oh, yes. Yeah, it's long. Listen, and you really sometimes you got to play it back. And I'll, but it's a very, very good, there is another book that I'm also kind of in between around equity in schools. So I'm always reading that kind of, Patti Dobrowolski 37:18 well, you got to you have to, and everybody should be reading that, you know, Yeah, gotta just change your mindset all the time. Keep up. That's the thing. The other piece about change is, you have to keep up, keep up with what's important for you, and try to push yourself into areas where you don't feel comfortable, so that you can walk into that room filled with white men, and you can get what you need from the audience there. Right. Oh, God. Deena Pierott 37:47 And you know, it's so funny. When I walked into that room that day, I kind of did the whole church thing on here I am so that they can pause the meeting. Yeah, I could walk straight through to the front room. And I tell some of the guys there. Can you move over? So I put a chair here, because there was chairs in the back of the room. But Patti Dobrowolski 38:05 oh, yeah, well, back. Okay. That's right, exactly. Deena Pierott 38:09 What up to the front. I had a move, but a chair there. And but what are the things that I tell women and people of color, when you're in those kinds of situations where you are one of none of other people is to be engaged? Don't be that wallflower. So as soon as it came time for questions, yes, I was the first one that raised my hand. And I asked a question that I already knew the answer to. But I did that. And I do that a lot of times in places that they can see I'm here, I'm engaged. I'm a part of this group. Patti Dobrowolski 38:38 That's right. That's right. I love it. So raise your hand, ask a question. Even if you know the answer to even if everybody knows you're in the room and make a play, make it happen. And I would say that's true, even if you're on Zoom. Because in zoom rooms, it's really important to show up. So you turn your camera on, you got to look your best. And you got your hand up and you got to put comments in the chat. That yeah, that's fantastic. I've been Deena Pierott 39:06 on something zoom things where it's a lot of people and these people are just sitting there like quiet. Are they Patti Dobrowolski 39:10 advocator Tommy, would you entertain me, please? Yeah, I need some entertainment. Yeah. Deena Pierott 39:15 And there's a way to have that engagement even on Zoom or whatever platform Yeah, data. So you know, in fact, we're having our stem a wean for the kids. We've had a couple of virtual stem conferences for the kids. That's fantastic. Fast paced, they're fun. They're this and yeah, they're they're engaging, you know, and also, I think we've pretty much mastered the engaging online presence, you know, stuff so Patti Dobrowolski 39:37 well, you were engaging before when I came in drew with your kids. I mean, that was really, that was fantastic. I love doing that. So thanks for asking me to do that. Oh, they loved it, too. It was super fun now. Okay. So give us one last tip before we let you go. What's your one tip about change that you would tell to people say to people, you know people who are wanting to make a change What do you recommend that they Deena Pierott 40:01 do? I would recommend that they learn how to embrace it. Change is inevitable. Yeah. So my biggest tip is to be comfortable with change. Be comfortable with the pivot, always be that Constant Learner. I mean, I truly embrace change, even if it's things that I have no control of. I try to understand it and all but even for myself, looking at what the peloton that's going to be changed for me because I admit, I've got to embrace look, I've got to embrace it. I'm going to look like Beyonce in about six months. Okay, that's right. But embrace you can you will like either, like kind of grandma. So. But yeah, so I can't imagine not looking forward to the future and change that happens. I think that when you are afraid of change, when you try to stop change, I think that's when you stop growing. Patti Dobrowolski 40:55 Yeah. And when you start, then you're going backwards, you know, they're Deena Pierott 40:58 going backwards, Patti Dobrowolski 41:00 you either go forwards, or you go backwards, or you go backwards, so you got to keep going. Deena Pierott 41:05 My tip is to embrace it to embrace change. Patti Dobrowolski 41:09 I love it. I love you. You're so fantastic. I love thank you so much for spending this time with us listeners, we're gonna put into the show notes how you can get a hold of Deena Pierott because you're gonna want to follow her on Instagram and Facebook, wherever all LinkedIn all the places that she is. So look in the show notes. And I just take this to heart what she said embrace change, we live in a time of flux. If we're not going to get to a new normal flux is our new normal. So get good at change. And I can't wait to see what you do. So if you liked what you heard, you know, be sure to write a review about it or send me a DM on Instagram because we'd love to have you back and loved that you tuned in today to listen to all about Deena Pierott. I love you Deena. Thanks for being here. All right for having me on. My pleasure. Thanks so much for listening today. Be sure to DM me on Instagram your feedback or takeaways from today's episode on Up Your Creative Genius. Then join me next week for more rocket fuel. Remember, you are the superstar of your universe and the world needs what you have to bring. So get busy. Get out and up your creative genius. And no matter where you are in the universe, here's some big love from yours truly Patti Dobrowolski and the Up Your Creative Genius Podcast. That's a wrap

MoneyBall Medicine
Seqster's Ardy Arianpour on How To Smash Health Data Siloes

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 58:48


Your medical records don't make pleasant bedtime reading. And not only are they inscrutable—they're often mutually (and deliberately) incompatible, meaning different hospitals and doctor's offices can't share them across institutional boundaries. Harry's guest this week, Ardy Arianpour, is trying to fix all that. He's the co-founder and CEO of Seqster, a San Diego company that's spent the last five years working on ways to pull patient data from all the places where it lives, smooth out all the formatting differences, and create a unified picture that patients themselves can understand and use.The way Ardy explains it, Seqster “smashes the data siloes.” Meaning, the company can combine EMR data, gene sequence data, wearable device data, pharmacy data, and insurance claims data all in one place. The big goal guiding Seqster, he says, is to put the patient back at the center of healthcare.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare. Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.If you've ever gotten a copy of your medical files from your doctor or hospital, you probably know these records don't make pleasant bedtime reading. They aren't designed to be clear or user-friendly for patients. In fact, it's usually just the opposite.The data itself is highly technical. And on top of that, there's the inscrutable formatting, which is dictated by whatever electronic medical record or “EMR” system your provider happens to use. But the problem isn't just that EMR data is incomprehensible.It's also that different EMRs are often incompatible with each other.So if you're being treated by multiple providers, it can be really tricky to share your data across institutional boundaries. That's why medicine is one of the last industries that still uses old-fashioned fax machines. Because sometimes a fax is the only way to send the data back and forth.But my guest today is trying to fix all that.His name is Ardy Arianpour, and he's the co-founder and CEO of Seqster.It's a company in San Diego that's spent the last five years working on ways to pull patient data from all the places where it lives, smooth out all the formatting differences, and create a unified picture that patients themselves can understand and use.The way Ardy explains it, Seqster quote-unquote “smashes the data siloes.” Meaning, the company can combine EMR data, gene sequence data, wearable device data, pharmacy data, and insurance claims data all in one place.The big goal guiding Seqster, according to Ardy, is to put the patient back at the center of healthcare.At the moment, however, consumers can't sign up for the service directly. Seqster's actual customers are players from inside the healthcare industry. For example, a life science companies might hire Seqster to help them make the experience of participating in a clinical trial more user friendly for patients.Or a health plan might use a Seqster dashboard to get patients more involved in their own care.Seqster did let me do a test run on my own medical data as part of my research for this interview. And I was impressed by how quickly it pulled in data that normally lives in a bunch of separate places. I'm hoping Seqster and other companies in this space will continue to make progress.Because, frankly, I think poor patient access to health data and the lack of interoperability between EMRs are two of the biggest factors holding back improvements in healthcare quality.If we can finally get those two things right, I think it can help unlock the data-driven healthcare revolution that I describe in my new book, The Future You. Which, by the way, is out now in paperback and ebook format at Barnes & Noble and Amazon.When we spoke back in September, Ardy and I talked about better EMRs and many other things. And now here's our conversation.Harry Glorikian: Ardy, welcome to the show. So, it's good to have you here, and you know, for everybody who doesn't know your story and the story of the company, I'd love to, you know, start covering some basics like, you know, the when, the what, the how, the why. What's the founding story of Seqster and what was the problems that you were really trying to go out there and solve when you started the company in 2016?Ardy Arianpour: Thanks so much, Harry. Always been a fan. I think we've known each other for quite some time, but it's been a long time since we've ran into each other since the genomic and precision medicine days. So great to see you. I hope you and your family are well and yeah, look, Seqster is super special and there's a secret story, I guess, that never has been told. It really starts way beyond 2016 when I founded the company. So I spent 15 plus years in DNA sequencing, next gen sequencing genomic market. And during that time in the 2000s to early 2010s, I was fortunate enough of being part of some amazing endeavors and organizations that allowed my team and I to take some risk. And when you take risk, when you're in biotech, pharma, precision medicine, genomics, bioinformatics, you learn new things that most people don't learn because you're you're you're, you know, trailblazing, I guess you could say. And we were able to do that back with one of my old companies where we were able to launch the first clinical exome test, launch the first BRCA cancer panels, launch the first next gen sequencing panels in a CLIA lab. Ardy Arianpour: And then, you know, it wasn't about the testing. It was all about the data, and we didn't realize that till later and we kept on seeing that wow genome data is really only one set of all the other data pieces, right? I think the genomics folks, me being a genomics guy, I guess you could say, for a decade and a half, we're so forward thinking that we forget about the simple things within science, and we never really thought, Oh, collect your medical data and pair it with your genomic data. We never really thought there would be a wearable out there. That data was going to be siloed, too. We never thought there was going to be, you know, many different medical devices and instruments that would be Bluetooth and sensor enabled, where there would be data that would be siloed. Claims data, pharmacy data. Never even crossed our minds. So, you know, when you put this all together, my inspiration with Seqster was actually really simple. And when I founded the company, I wanted to combine the genomic data with your EMR medical data as well as your wearable data, because in 2016, the tailwinds of those other, you know, services was really taken off.Harry Glorikian: Right. Totally understand it. And you know, as we were talking about before I hit record, it's like it was funny because I was just talking to another company that's working on NLP and they're able to look at, you know, papers and see drugs being used in different, you know, medical conditions. And then they figured out, well, they needed to tap into the unstructured data of a medical record to really, like, add the next layer of value to it. So, you know, there's a lot of activity going on about there. But how do you guys, how do you, how do your co-founders, you know, Zhang and Dana play into like the science, the technology and what's the sort of angle that you guys have taken to solve this problem? Or what's your idea on how to fix it? I'm not saying it's been solved yet, because that would be a Herculean task in and of itself. But how are you guys approaching it that? Is a little different than the. You know, maybe any any of your other you would you would consider anybody else out there, the working on this?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah, look for us we spent a lot of time understanding the power of data. But how what makes Seqster different is no one knows the power of the patient better than us. We've spent time with our platform with, you know, tens of thousands of patients: rare disease patients, oncology patients, parents, autoimmune disease patients, patients that have that are seeing functional medicine folks. Patients that were having issues sharing data through telemedicine, clinical trial patients. All these sorts of patients are very different. At Seqster we focused on putting the patient at the center of health care in order to smash all the data silos from their medical institutions to their wearable technology that they wear to the DNA testing that they get and even maybe a COVID test or a vaccine. How do you bring a 360-degree patient view? And you know, you tried the system, so I think you got a small teaser of how we can do that and we've really cracked this large problem. It is Herculean, I believe, and a lot of people believe because it's interoperability, it is the number one problem in all of health care.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I had the pleasure of trying it and imported my data and was able to see, you know, individual pieces. I mean, I made some suggestions on what might make it easier for me to hone in in different areas, right, and have the system highlighting different things. But I guess each data stream is being brought in separately and then at some point you're going to create a master dashboard above it, because now each one is separate from when I go into each record, right, When I go into my medical record, it gives me one set of data with my lab results and everything else and the notes, and then it pulls in my wearable data separately that I have to look at, right? So you've got to look at it separately. It doesn't. Then I guess the next step would be creating a master sort of view of how everything would look in a sort of I don't want to say integrated, but at least a timeline view of the world. But. You know, following up on the the sort of the what question, you know, how do you sort of combine data from different EMRs, tests, apps, devices in a sort of scalable, repeatable way? I mean, it seems like to date, that's been a hugely manual process, and I can imagine you could figure out every provider's ontology and then create a table that shows what's equivalent to. And but you know, there's got to be sort of a translation scheme that would be required that that provides some constant readjustment as the main providers tweak and evolve their own systems, right? Because if the provider is tweaking their system, your system has then got to adapt to changes that are happening in that end. So how are you guys managing all that craziness?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah. So I think it all and you hit on so many points, I'll try and cover them if I remember them all. Look, the number one thing for us is we can connect to any data source. It doesn't matter. And you saw it. And just before I continue, just tell the audience how fast, how fast, how long did it take for your data to be populated after you connected it?Harry Glorikian: Oh, it was. I mean, yeah, as soon as I created it, I could see that it was, you know, it was digesting and then populating. And, you know, I was just I was watching it as a matter of fact, when I was on the phone with your person, that was helping me. Yeah. At first I said, Oh, it's not there. And then a couple of seconds later, I'm like, Oh no, it's showing up, right? So it was happening in, I don't want to say real time, but it was happening as as we were watching it evolve, right? It was sort of it was. It was almost like watching time lapse.Ardy Arianpour: And that's actually a great way. That's a great way to actually describe it. We created the time lapse of all your health data. Now let's get to the what and the how. So we connect to any health data source. The patient is fully in control. You own your data, you control it. It's all consented by you. We don't own your data and we connect to every single medical record. And that's huge that we've achieved nationwide coverage. We didn't know what data you have, but we're you're able to connect to it. Why? Because our team, which our engineering team gets all the credit for six years now, almost since founding of the company we have written, I don't know, seven million lines of code, that standardizes and harmonizes all of the ICD 9, ICD 10, SNOMED codes and every single lab result to every single wearable terminology, from biking to cycling to, you know, you name it, VitaminDB, you know, characterized in 40 different ways. You know, we're harnessing data to improve patient lives at scale. We built it for scale because you can't do it by the traditional method of just faxes and PDFs. Now, you know, being able to do that is not a bad thing.Ardy Arianpour: We can bring that service into our platform as well. It's already integrated, but that type of service takes 30 to 60 days and it's static data. It's not real time right now. If Harry goes, I don't know, you go on a bike ride and you fall and you go to the E.R. and you had whatever data connected automatically in your sister portal, it'll be populated without you even touching Seqster. That's how our real time data works and another way that we're totally differentiated than anything else in the marketplace. I was never a fan of API businesses because they're just data in data out. I truly wanted us to create a patient engagement platform, a PEP right, or a patient relationship management system, what I call a PRM instead of a CRM. And that's what we created with Seqster. So that is beyond an API, beyond just data. We're visualizing the data, as you saw. We really nailed the longitudinal health record or the individualized health record. And I think it's, I always say this, health data is medicine. The reason why it's medicine is because our platform has saved patient lives.Harry Glorikian: Ardy, how do you, how are you handling the free form notes, right, because I noticed that I could look at all my notes, but they weren't necessarily, it wasn't pulling from the note and sort of making sense of it. I mean, I could look at all of it and it was all in one place. But the the system wasn't necessarily processing it, sort of. I was talking to Jeff Felton from ConcertAI and they do a lot of sort of, their big thing is the NLP that sort of tries to choose chew through that, which is not trivial, you know, yesterday today, context matters in health care.Ardy Arianpour: Yeah. Look, if we created the the the Tesla of health care, let's just say, right, we're we're changing the game. From static data to real time data. Ok. Well, you're talking about is, are you going to create a helicopter as well? Right, OK. And all right. So, no, we're not going to go create the helicopter. Is there going to be an electric helicopter by Tesla? There's no market for that, right? So that's why they're not doing it now. I'm not saying there's not a market for NLP. It's just the fact that we'll go ahead and partner with a third party NLP provider. And we already have we have like four of them and they all have their strengths and weaknesses because it's not a one size fits all thing. And you know, we can already run OCR, you know, over the free text and pull certain ontology information out. And then, you know, when you partner with an NLP company, once you have a system that can capture data, you could do anything. So people always ask me, Are you going to get into AI? It's just the buzzword. There's a million A.I. companies. What have they really done right in health care? It's not really there. Maybe for imaging they've done some things, but it's more of a buzzword. AI only becomes valuable if you have a system, Harry, that can instantly populate data, then you can run some great artificial intelligence things on it. So NLP, AI, OCR, all those things are just many tools that can add. Now, in your experience, you only got to see about 5 percent of the power of Seqster, and that probably blew you away, even though it was five percent of the power. Because you probably never -- I don't know, you tell me, have you ever been able to collect your data that quickly? It took, what, less than a minute or two?Harry Glorikian: Yeah, well, thank God, I don't have a lot of data. So, you know, just when I tap into my my health care provider, you know, my data is there and it's funny, I always tell people, being a not exciting patient is a really good thing in one way, and it's a really bad thing because you can't play with all the data. But you know, like even when I did my genome, it's an extremely boring genome.Ardy Arianpour: My question is it's not about it being exciting or not, because thankfully you're not a chronically ill patients. But imagine if you were and how this helps, but take a step back. I'm just asking the speed, yes, and the quality of the presentation of the data that seeks to you. It was less than what hundred seconds?Harry Glorikian: Yeah. Well, it was very quick. And I've already it's funny because I texted my doctor and I was like, I need to talk to you about a couple of these lab results that look out of out of norm, right? And they weren't anything crazy. But I'm just curious like, you know, how do I get them in norm? I'm just I'm always trying to be in in the normal band, if I can be.Ardy Arianpour: So it's interesting you say that because as a healthy individual. You know, and even a chronically ill patient, it doesn't matter. The best way to actually QC data is through visualization, and this is what this is. That's foundational to interoperability. So we hit on semantic and structural interoperability with our, you know, backend engine that we've created to harmonize and standardize the data. We built many different types of retrievers and then we parse that data and then it's standardized and harmonizes it. But that visualization, which some people call the Tableau of health data, you know that we've created when they see it, is really, we got to give the credit to the patients. We had so many patients, healthy ones and unhealthy ones that told us exactly how they want it to look. We did this on the genomic data, we did this on the wearable data. We did this on the medical device data and we have some great new features that can superimpose your clinical data with your fitness data on our integrated view and timeline.Harry Glorikian: Oh, that? See, now that would be, you know, another level of value, even for a healthy patient, right to be able to see that in an integrated way. I made a suggestion, I think that when a panel shows up is. You know, highlight the ones that are out of Norm very quickly, as opposed to having to look at, you know, the panel of 20 to find the one that's out of whack, just either color them differently or reorient them so that they're easier to find. But those are simple changes just from a UI perspective. But so. How would you describe that that Seqster creates value and say translates that into revenue, right? I'm just trying to figure out like, what's the revenue model for you guys? I know that you're I can actually, I'm not even sure if I can sign up for it myself. I would probably have to do it through a system if I remember your revenue model correctly. But how do you guys generate revenue from what you're doing?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah, I'll share another secret on your show here from the founding of Seqster. My dream was to empower seven billion people on our little mothership here called Earth to have all their health data in one place. And I had a direct to consumer model in 2016. The market wasn't really ready for it, number one. Number two, it was going to cost $500 million worth of marketing to just get the message out for people to know that it exists. So long story short, in 2016, you know, when I founded the company, not that many people wanted to talk to us. They thought we were just like nuts to go after this problem. 2017, we got some calls from some investors, we raised some great seed funding after I personally put in some money in in 2016 to get the company going. And then in 2018, I got a call from Bill Gates and that was when everything changed. Bill called and wanted to meet in person, I was supposed to get 30 minutes with him. And the reason why he called is because our first beachhead was with Alzheimer's patients. My grandmother, both my grandmothers, passed away due to Alzheimer's disease. Both my maternal and paternal grandmothers and being a caregiver for my mom's mom and being very close to her since she raised me, I learned a lot about a multigenerational health record, so I actually filed patents in 2016 on a multigenerational health record because I wanted to have my grandma's data, my mom's data, my data, and be able to pass it on to research as well as to generations down my family.Ardy Arianpour: Long story short there, Bill gets all the credit for telling me after I showed him our platform, "You got to take this enterprise. You guys built something that Google Health failed at and Microsoft Vault Health Vault failed at." And it's funny we're talking about this. Look, Google just dismantled their health division again. Why? Because tech companies just don't get it. They have a lot of money. They have a lot of power. They've got a lot of smart people. But they they they don't know where, I'll give you an example. It's like a tourist with a lot of money coming into a city. You don't know where the really good local bar is, right? Why is that? You don't know where the really good, you know, slice of pizza is. You're going to go to the regular joints that everyone finds on TripAdvisor and whatever. You know your friends told you, but if you're a local, you know where to get the authentic cocktails and the authentic, you know, drinks and food. Why? Because you've lived and breathed it in the city. So we've lived and breathed it right. And so we know what not to do. It's not about knowing what to do in health care or in genomics or in biotech. It's actually knowing what you shouldn't be doing. Yeah.Harry Glorikian: And knowing I got to tell you, there's some problems where I'm like, OK, I know exactly who to call for that problem, because there aren't, you know, they're not falling off trees in that particular problem. There's a small handful of people that understand that problem well enough that they can come in and sort of surgically help you solve that problem. And you can have all the money in the world and have all the smart people you want. Doesn't mean they're going to be able to solve that particular problem, especially in health care, because it's so arcane.Ardy Arianpour: And it's getting, you know, this is a problem that is growing like cancer, interoperability. Just on this 20 minute conversation with you it has grown by hundreds of millions of dollars. Do you know why? Because data is being siloed.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. And I think, look, I've always I've said this on, you know, whatever show or and I've actually I've written letters to Congress. You know, I think this this needs to be mandated because expecting the large EMR companies to do anything is a waste of time. They're not going to do it on their own if their feet are not put to the fire and it changes. And honestly, I believe that if anything will stop the innovation of health care or slow it down is the EMR systems. You know, if you don't have the data, you can't do the work.Ardy Arianpour: Absolutely. But you know what people don't understand. And not to go off that tangent, but I'll get back to the business model in a second to answer that question because I just recalled in my mind here that I didn't answer that. Look, people don't understand that at least the EMR companies, even though they're like Darth Vader, you know, they needed. They've put some foundation there at least. If that wasn't there, we would be in a much worse situation here, right?Harry Glorikian: Correct, but if Satya Nadella hadn't really changed Microsoft, really redone it right, it wouldn't be the company it is now, and I think they [the EMR companies] are just back in the dark ages.Ardy Arianpour: Of course, I totally agree. I'm surprised, actually. Microsoft, as an example, didn't come up with their own EMR system and launch it to the hospitals to go, compete with the servers and all scripts and Epics of the world. If I was Microsoft, that's what I would do. I would have enough money in power, know exactly what to do. I would take a system like Seqster and I would explode it in a good way and be the good guys and have it completely open source and open network. But that's a whole cocktail conversation if anyone's listening on the on the podcast that wants to talk about that. Give me a call or shoot me an email or find me on LinkedIn.Ardy Arianpour: Let me go back to the business model real quick so people understand. So direct to consumer was what I wanted to do. We built it for the consumer, for the patients. It was the smartest and dumbest thing I ever did. Let's go to why it was the dumbest thing first, because it was really, really hard. It was the smartest because we would not be where we are today. You wouldn't have called me to talk on your podcast and all these other great, you know, amazing people that want to hear about how we're, you know, cracking the code on interoperability now and changing the health care system, changing clinical trials, changing decentralized trials with our system.Ardy Arianpour: Why? Well, it's because our system was built by patients. Right, and so it's a patient centric, real time, real world data platform that layers in engagements for both the providers, the payers, the pharma companies and any other enterprise that white labels our platform. We have both iOS and Android SDK and Web available. It gets fully branded. We're the Intel Inside with the Salesforce.com business model. It's a Software as a Service service that we offer to enterprises. Patients never pay for the service. And we do give VIP codes to chronically ill patients and VIPs, you know, journalists, podcasters and to be honest, anyone who emails me that wants to try it. I've been always giving on that. That costs us time and money, and I'm happy to do it because it's my way of giving back to the community and health care because I know our team and I have built a system that have saved lives. It's been covered by the news multiple times.Harry Glorikian: So, so in essence, a large provider comes, buys the access to the system and then offers it to its patient population to utilize to aggregate all this information, right? How can the platform stay patient centric if the patients aren't directly paying for it?Ardy Arianpour: Ok, very simple. All of these enterprises in health care, whether that's Big Pharma, right, or Big Oayer from Pfizer to Cigna, to United Healthcare group to Humana to even Amazon, right, to other tech companies, they all want to go down a patient centric way. It's just what's happening. You know, I've been talking about this since 2016 because we pioneered patient centric interoperability. That's what we did. That's what Seqster did. That's that's what we set out to do. And we did it. Some, you know, a lot of people say they can do it. Very few actually. Do we fit in that model now, right? And you had the experience yourself. And I think the first time I saw patient centric ads was. 2020. No, sorry. Yeah, 2020, JP Morgan Health Care Conference in January, just three months before the lockdowns and the pandemic started. It was the first time I went to Johnson & Johnson's afterparty in downtown San Francisco. And saw a huge banner saying, you know, blah blah blah, patient centricity. It's the 22nd century, you know, whatever. So they add a bunch of ads that were all patient centric, and I looked to my co-founder, Dana, and I'm like, Look at this, these guys finally caught on. I wonder if they've been, because we've been in discussions with a lot of these folks, long story short, it's not because of Seqster, I think it's just the market was headed that way. We were so far ahead of the market and there was no tailwinds. Now it is all there. And the pandemic afterwards accelerated digital health, as I say, by 7 to 10 years.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you enjoy hearing from the kinds of innovators and entrepreneurs I talk to on the show, I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer.It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is out in print and ebook format from Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Just go to either site and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian. Thanks. And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: So the platform combines EHR, genetic, and fitness data, so. Why did you start with those three?Ardy Arianpour: So we started with those three, and I'll get to that, but we also do pharmacy, social determinants of health, and claims data as well. So we've added three other very large pillars. We can connect to any data source. We've created a universal interoperability platform that's patient centric that brings real time, real world data. And we're just super excited about all the business opportunities and the big pain points that we're solving for enterprise as well as for the patient. Why did we start with genomics, EMR, fitness. Ok. Here's the story. So I named the company Seqster after actually going on a five or six mile run in downtown San Diego, coming back and watching The Italian Job. And in the movie The Italian Job, it's one of my favorite movies, actually. I love that movie. I could just keep watching it over again, the real Napster was in the movie, and I used to be a Napster user where, you know, it was the way of actually pulling all your music and having it kind of in one place. Not really exactly Seqster's model, Seqster's model is is much more legal because it's patient centric. Yes, Napster was kind of stealing the data, right? So long story short, I was trying to think of a company name and I'm like, Oh my God. I don't know what hit me. I'll remember that moment like it was yesterday, Harry. Sequster came up because I had dived into DNA sequencing. We are doing everything that you can on next gen sequencing. And so I was like, Wow! Seqster. S-E-Q-S-T-E-R.Ardy Arianpour: And I went on GoDaddy.com. I bought it for $9.99. And the story started from right then. It was just me and the website. No co-founders, no onee else. I was just thinking, this is a great name. Now, you fast forward to why it's medical data plus genomic data, plus fitness data, to begin with. Well, the genomic data was an easy one because, right, I have 15 years underneath my belt on genomic sequencing technologies and clinical diagnostics and doing a lot of great things for patients in that arena. And I knew that it couldn't just be the genome, right? That's where the medical data came in because we knew and I never knew that we would be able to actually build something that would be able to pull it on together. I knew it was going to be really tough. I didn't think it was going to be this tough. We would have never done it if I knew that it was this tough. It's so great that we did because we solved it. But if you go back and say, "Ardy, would you do it again if you knew it was going to be this tough?" I wouldn't, because it's really, it's not the number two problem, it's the number one problem. And we're just, you know, I'm a peon. I'm a very small dot. I'm not anyone special. I'm just very passionate about solving this problem. That's it. And so is my team, and we got a great team and we've execute on. So great.Ardy Arianpour: And then, you know, it was my idea. I was forcing the wearable and fitness data because I was interested in that. And when the Apple Series One Watch came out, it was very limited, but I saw how it was going to change, you know, just connection of data. And my team being bioinformaticians and from the genomics world were so against bringing it in, I mean, I could show you emails of fights about me saying, get fitness data in here. They were not interested. I forced it on them. And then next thing you knew, clinical trials. One of the biggest things was how do you bring sleeping data and wearable data to x y z data? And that market started taking off. Decentralized trials. You can't even do it if you don't have wearable data. And so everyone started saying, you know, OK, you were right. That was one. I get one big pat on the back. And then we realized we can't be limited to just those three pillars. So what are the next three that we can work on? And that was claims data so we can marry it with the EMR and medical data for payers. And then we ran into pharmacy data. We just signed our first digital pharmacy deal three weeks ago with Paragon Health. And if we didn't have those capabilities, we wouldn't have the business opportunities. And the social determinants of health data being our last integrations comes in very handy for various different use cases.Harry Glorikian: So, three sort of things, right? You know, you combine all this data. What can you learn that wasn't obvious before? How do you translate into better health outcomes for consumers or, say, smarter decision making by consumers, right, so those are two potentially different ways to look at it.Ardy Arianpour: Absolutely. So one word for you: Seqster's longitudinal health record drives health economics, outcomes, research. It drives it.Harry Glorikian: Is that your clients doing that, you doing that, a third party group coming in?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah. We don't do that. We're just the patient engagement and data aggregation operating system that gets implemented for enterprise. And then the enterprise can run the analytics on top of it. They can, you know, take all of the raw data. So we're the only 21 CFR Part 11 compliant platform too. We're fully FDA compliant, Harry. It took us 19 months working with the FDA in order to get our compliance letter in September, October of last year, 2020. So about a year ago. And not only are we HIPAA compliance, not only are we High Trust certified and 256 bit encrypted on all the data that comes in, but having that FDA compliance sets us apart number one. Number two, because we're not an API, we have FHIR fully integrated. We have an API for sharing data, but we're not an API business. We're a SaaS business in health care, in digital health. We can make any company a digital health company. Let's say it's Coca-Cola, and they want to empower their 200,000 employees. They could launch a Coca-Cola Seqster white label in 72 hours to 200,000 employees. That's what we've created. Now, take that and imagine that now within pharma, within precision medicine, within clinical trials, within the payer network, which we're the only platform that's CMS ONC interoperability compliance from the Twenty First Century CURES Act as well.Harry Glorikian: So let me let me see if I... I'm trying to figure out like the angle, right? So I mean, ideally for interoperability, if we talk about the highest level right, you really want to get Epic, Cerner, Kaiser, et cetera, all in a room right? And get them to agree to something. Which is like an act of God.Ardy Arianpour: Some people say, we're doing, you know, it's not my words, but again, a figure of speech, people say, we're doing God's work.Harry Glorikian: But stepping back here for a second, what I see you guys doing is actually giving a platform to the patient and the patient is then connecting the record, not necessarily the systems themselves allowing for interoperability to take place.Ardy Arianpour: So yes, but you're speaking of it because of the direct to consumer experience that you had. The experience we gave you is much different than the experience from the enterprise side. We have a full BI platform built for enterprise as well. Right. And then we have the white label for the enterprise where they launch it to a million patients.Harry Glorikian: That's what, I'm trying to think about that, right? So. Coca-cola says, like, going down your example, Coca-Cola says, "Love to do this. Want to offer it to all of our employees." We make it available to them. But it's the employee that has to push the start button and say, yes, I want my electronic medical record to be integrated into this single platform, right?Ardy Arianpour: But that's that's an example with Coca-Cola. If we're doing something with Big Pharma, they're running a clinical trial for 500,000 COVID patients, as an example. They're getting data collection within one day versus two months, and guess what, we're going to be driving a new possible vaccine. Why? Because of the time it takes for data collection at scale. We empower patients to do that and they get something back. They get to track and monitor all their family health.Harry Glorikian: Right. So so it's sort of, you know, maybe I'm being dense, but sort of the same thing, right? Big Pharma makes it available to the patient. The patient then clicks, Yes, I want to do this and pull in my medical records to make it all everything to be in one place. Yes.Ardy Arianpour: Yes. And I think it's about the fact that we've created a unique data sharing environments. So that's, you know, Harry and Stacey and John and Jennifer and whoever, you know, with whatever use case can share their data and also consent is built with E-consent and digital consent is built within that process. You don't share anything you don't want to share.Harry Glorikian: Right. So let me see if I got this correct. So Seqster is providing a translation and aggregation between systems through a new layer of technology. Not creating true interoperability between systems, right?Ardy Arianpour: Yes. There's a spider web. And. We have untangled the spider beb in the United States of America. We've done all the plumbing and piping to every single health institution, doctor's office clinic, wearable sensor, medical device pharmacy, the list goes on and on, Harry.Harry Glorikian: So let's... Another question. So how does the 21st Century CURES Act of 2016 relate to your business? I think you know you've said something like Seqster has become law, but I'm trying to. I'm trying to understand, what do you mean when you say that?Ardy Arianpour: So when we founded Seqster, we didn't know there was going to be a Twenty First Century CURES Act. We didn't know there was going to be GDPR. We are GDPR compliance before GDPR even came out. Right? Because of our the way that we've structured our business, number one. Number two, how we built the platform by patients for CMS ONC interoperability, you know, final rulings and the Twenty First Century CURES Act, which is, they're synonymous. We worked hand in hand with Don Rucker's team and Seema Verma on the last administration that was doing a lot of the work. Now a wonderful gentleman, Mickey Tripathy has taken the role of ONC, and he understands, you know, the value of Seqster's technology at scale because of his background in interoperability. But what was interesting in the two years that we worked with HHS and CMS was the fact that they used Seqster as the model to build the rules. I was personally part of that, my team was personally part of that, you know, and so we were in private meetings with these folks showing our platform and they were trying to draft certain rules.Ardy Arianpour: We didn't know that they were going to be coming out with rules until they did. And then that's when high level folks in the government told us specifically on calls and also even at Datapalooza when I gave a keynote talk on on Seqster, when Don Rucker did as well right before me. You know, we're sitting in the speaker room and folks are like, "You're going to become law in a month." And this was in February of 2020. March 9th, those rules dropped. I was supposed to give a keynote talk at HL7,  at HIMMS. HIMMS got cancelled in 2020. I just got back from HIMMS 2021 in Vegas just a week and a half ago. It was fantastic. Everyone was masked up. There was only three cases of COVID with 10,000 people there. They did a great job, you know, regulating it. You had to show your vaccine card and all that good stuff. But you know, I would have never thought Seqster becomes law when we were founding the company. And so this is really special now.Harry Glorikian: So what does success look like for Seqster?Ardy Arianpour: It depends how you measure it. So we're in the Olympics. It's a great question. Here's my answer to you. We're in the Olympics just finished, right? So we started out in track and field. We were really good at running the 400 Meters and then somehow we got a use case on the 4x1 and the 4x4. And then we did really well there, too. And then because of our speed, you know, we got some strength and then they wanted us to get into the shot put and the javelin throw and then we started winning there, too. And then somehow, now people are calling us saying, "Are you interested in trying to swim?" We got the 100 meter butterfly. Well, we've never done that. So success for us is based off of use cases. And every use case that we deal with, within clinical trials and pharma, we've define 24 distinct use cases that we're generating business on. Within the payer community now, because of the CMS ONC Twenty First Century Cures Act, there's a major tailwind. Within life insurance for real time underwriting, there's, you know, a plethora of folks that are calling us for our system because of the patient engagement. So this patient centricity for us has been a central pillar, and I've never allowed anyone in our company, whether it's the board or our investors or employees, you know, get sidetracked from that. We've been laser focused on the patients and success at impacting patient lives at scale.Harry Glorikian: So as a venture guide, though, right, like I'm going to, there's only so much money on so much time to tackle, so many different opportunities, right? So it's there is a how do we create a recurring revenue stream and keep plugging along and then generate either enough revenue or raise enough money to do more? And so just trying to think through that for what you guys are trying to do, I get the 4x100 and the swimming. But all of that takes money and resources right to be able to prove out, of course.Ardy Arianpour: And here's another thing we're in a different state. Look, my team and I had a major exit before. We built a billion dollar company out of $3 million. And even though we weren't founders of that company, you know, I was the senior vice president and we we did really well. So, you know, that allowed us to not take salaries that allowed us to take our money and put it into doing something good. And we did that in 2016 to seed it. And then afterwards, I raised, you know, millions of dollars from folks that were interested in, you know, this problem and saw that our team had a track record. And I actually was not interested, Harry, in raising a Series A because of our experience, but we kept on getting calls. And then just six months ago, we announced, you know, our series a funding. Well, we actually announced it in March, I think it was, but we closed our Series A in January of this year and it was led by Takeda Pharma, Anne Wojcicki's 23andMe and United Healthcare Group's Equian folks that created Omniclaim and sold to UnitedHealth Group Omni Health Holdings.Ardy Arianpour: So check this out. Imagine my vision in 2016 of having medical data, genomic data fitness data. Well, if you look at the investors that backed us, it's pretty interesting. What I reflect on is I didn't plan that either. We got amazing genomic investors. I mean, it doesn't get better than getting Anne Wojcicki and 23andMe. Amazing female entrepreneur and, you know, just the just the force. Secondly, Takeda Pharma, a top 10 pharma company. How many digital health startups do you know within Series A that got a top 10 pharma? And then also getting some payer investors from UnitedHealth Group's Omniclaim folks and Equian OmniHealth Holdings. So this is to me, very interesting. But going to focus our focus has been pharma and clinical trials. And so Takeda has been phenomenal for us because of, you know, they they built out the platform and they built it out better for us and they knew exactly what to do with things that we didn't know. And with things that patients didn't know on the enterprise, you know, Takeda did a phenomenal job. And now other pharma companies are utilizing our platform, not just Takeda.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, well, they want their data aggregation. They want as much data on the patient aggregated in one place to make sense of it.Ardy Arianpour: So not necessarily that they actually want to empower patients with a patient centric engagement tool. That's pharma's number one thing right now, the data part, obviously is important, but empowering patient lives at scale is the key, and that's that's our mission. And so, yeah, that's that's a whole 'nother cocktail conversation when I see you soon hopefully in a couple of weeks.Harry Glorikian: Hopefully as life gets, or if it gets back to normal, depending on the variants, you know, we'll hopefully get to meet him in person and have a glass of wine or a cocktail together. So it was great to speak to you. Glad we had this time, and I look forward to, you know, hearing updates on the company and, you know, continually seeing the progress going forward.Ardy Arianpour: Thanks so much, Harry, for having me. Big fan of Moneyball, so thank you to you and your organizers for having me and Seqster on. If anyone wants to get in touch with me personally, you can find me on LinkedIn or you can follow Seqster at @Seqster. And again, thank you so much for. For having a great discussion around, you know, the the insights behind Seqster.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Thank you.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode.  You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and MoneyBall Medicine at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show. You can find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview. 

Gist Healthcare Daily
The "land grab" is underway as healthcare companies jockey for market share

Gist Healthcare Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 16:41


This fall payers like UnitedHealthcare, Cigna, and Aetna all launched virtual first primary care plans this fall. In this March 2021 conversation, Gist Healthcare co-founders, Chas Roades and Lisa Bielamowicz discuss how insurers are integrating their new care offerings to capture more of consumers' healthcare spend.

Get INTUIT with Gila- a podcast about Intuitive Eating and Personal Growth.
Paige Smathers, Fellow RD and Intuitive Eating Counselor Values Aligned Living and Practicing

Get INTUIT with Gila- a podcast about Intuitive Eating and Personal Growth.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 62:49


Paige and I cover so much ground in this episode. We started off by speaking about where she lives - In Salt Lake City, Utah. I actually never met anyone that lived so that was an interesting place to start. Paige shares her story of leaving the Mormon faith and how, in many ways, that trauma can inform some of the way she practices. That, to me, is so interesting. I find that so many things overlap with Intuitive Eating. For some people - leaving diet culture - is like leaving so much of their identity. Paige has a unique philosophy when it comes to Intuitive Eating and someone who uses social media to promote their business. I specifically wanted to interview her after she announced that she will no longer be doing her very success podcast, Nutrition Matters. I couldn't believe that someone would voluntarily decide to do that. She explains in the podcast that when it didn't feel good anymore, she stopped. She wasn't just in it for the downloads, for the money and to fuel her ego. I respect this perspective so much and I feel Paige has so much to share about aligned based living. Check out the episode here on Youtube or on IGTV. If you want to hear the audio - download the podcast wherever you listen to podcasts! Paige Smathers is a registered dietitian nutritionist in private practice whose work revolves around helping people heal their relationships with food and their body. She specializes in eating disorders, chronic dieting, digestive health and the intersection of mindfulness and nutrition. She is the owner of Positive Nutrition®, which provides individual nutrition therapy and online courses for individuals, and mentorship and coaching for professionals. You can contact Paige at paige@positive-nutrition.com. Thank you for being here! If you liked this episode, please like, subscribe and share it with people who can benefit from this information! Don't forget to leave a 5 star rating on Apple Podcast so more people can find this podcast. If you are ready to make peace with food, check out my website www.gilaglassberg.com. You can sign up for a free 20 minute consultation to make sure we are a good fit! I accept some insurances (Aetna, Cigna, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Emblem and United Health Care only the Empire Plan). -Gila Glassberg, MS, RDN, CDN, Certified Intuitive Eating Counselor If you are ready to make peace with food and never say diet again, check out my website www.gilaglassberg.com and apply for a free 20 minute clarity call. I look forward to hearing from you! https://gilaglassberg.com/scheduling/If you'd like to learn more about what I do, follow me on Instagram @gila.glassberg.intuitiveRD and my podcast, Get INTUIT with Gila. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Where We Live
Connecticut seeing climate change impact on human health

Where We Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 49:00


This hour on Where We Live, a look at climate change and health. Physicians turned climate activists see worsening asthma, COPD, and seasonal shifts in vector-borne diseases, plus higher ER visits for heat stress. Hartford and New Haven have the unfortunate distinction of being in the list of Top 20 Asthma Capitals in the country, according to the 2021 report from the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America. The American Lung Association puts Fairfield County in its map for the highest ozone in the eastern half of the U.S., in part because of pollution transported from other states. The Governor's Council on Climate Change, Science and Technology Working Group in its 2020 report projected that average temperatures in Connecticut could increase by 5º F (2.7º C) by 2050 compared to the 1970-1999 baseline. Our planet is heading towards a crisis brought on by climate change, but experts say our physical and mental health is also at risk. A 2020 report by the Yale Center on Climate Change and Health found that between 2007 and 2016, heat stress led to an average 422 emergency department visits and 45 hospitalizations per year. Connecticut Public Radio's Nicole Leonard reported that New Haven, Hartford, Litchfield, Tolland, and Windham counties experienced an increase in heavy precipitation, which can and has led to a growth in ticks and mosquitoes, increasing the risk for vector-borne diseases. Meanwhile, health insurers including Connecticut-headquartered Cigna and Aetna hold $24 billion in investments in fossil fuel. As the United Nations' climate summit — COP26 — is in its second week in Scotland with world leaders negotiating how best to limit global warming, what can we do at the state and individual level? GUESTS: Kate Rozen: Asthmatic Cyclist, Woodbridge Dr. David Hill: Member, National Board of Directors, American Lung Association, Director of Clinical Research, Waterbury Pulmonary Associates Susan A. Masino: Professor of Applied Science at Trinity College, and a Charles Bullard Fellow at Harvard Forest. Past Co-chair, the Governor's Council on Climate Change, Science and Technology Working Group Tom Swan: Executive Director, Connecticut Citizen Action Group  Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

PopHealth Week
Meet Caitlyn Tung Univerity of Washingon School of Pharmacy

PopHealth Week

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 28:00


On today's show, our guest is Caitlyn Tung, a 4th year student at the University of Washington (UW) School of Pharmacy. Caitlyn received her undergraduate degree in biochemistry at UW, as well as a dual-degree MBA. She has experience as a market analyst for a small consulting firm whose clients are smaller biotech companies. Caitlyn was also the AMCP Foundation/Pfizer Manager Care Summer intern at Cigna and Pfizer this past summer, where she learned a lot about the pharmaceutical industry and managed care. We discuss the role of analytics to improve the quality of care and outcomes for diabetic populations, her career trajectory and the attractive role of the pharmacist innovating in the managed care space. For more information or to learn more about school of pharmacy at UW, go to www.sop.washington.edu or follow on twitter via @UW_Pharmacy

AHLA's Speaking of Health Law
Burnout in the Workplace: What Can Health Law Professionals Do?

AHLA's Speaking of Health Law

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 41:05


Jen McDowell, founder, (re)connect consulting, llc, speaks with Danica Sun, Associate Counsel, Cleveland Clinic Florida, and Keeley Burns, Managing Counsel, Cigna, about the problem of burnout in health law professionals. They discuss the worsening rates of burnout among health law professionals and why repairing relationships with coworkers and talking about workplace feelings is crucial for strengthening workplace relationships and reducing rates of burnout. From AHLA's Women's Leadership Council.

The Leadership Stack Podcast
Ep 293: Should You Really Go for Paid Ads?

The Leadership Stack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 19:15


Sean: Here's my next question for you. Marketing is something that we do and something that all business owners should do, but there is confusion happening, whereas people are thinking, okay, how am I gonna follow Vince's advice and tell who I am to other people without running ads. Do I need to spend on ads? And how can I spend on advertising when the pandemic is there, the lockdowns are there, what do you think about that? Was it smart for them to cut their marketing slash advertising budget during the lockdowns? Vince: A hundred percent, I mean, there are multiple reasons that it was a smart thing to do. First of all, because in some cases it's inappropriate, depending on what it is you're offering, depending on what your services and your product sound and things like that. To market it to people in a time where everybody's in chaos. To market to people in a time where everybody is fearful, they're losing their jobs. They don't know what's around the corner. They're in a sense of heightened anxiety and there's an ethical aspect to not marketing to those people. And I'll give you a good, like over here in New Zealand, we live in a really peaceful country. We live in an amazing country, but from time to time, we have these disasters that happen. We had the Christchurch earthquake, which was absolutely devastating. A lot of people lost their lives. A lot of people lost their homes. A lot of businesses went under and everything. The moment that that happens, just about every single business in New Zealand, certainly all the corporates I was working with, we all killed our budgets and we said, we're not marketing to anybody right now. Right now, our only focus is to make sure that people aren't vulnerable and we don't want to be marketing to a vulnerable individual. We also had a while I was at Cigna, we had a shooting at one of the mosques in Christchurch, but burrow crushed it. So they had the shootings in the mosque there, and it was an absolutely devastating, terrible time. A lot of people lost their life due to just ignorance and stupidity from, from an individual. And as a result, we immediately killed all of our budgets. We took our ads off the air. We took our digital budgets offline, all these kinds of things as well. Because, and there's a state where people are emotional, where people are anxious and there is a moral obligation to you as a marketer to go, you know what? Let's let them get through this, before I start trying to ram things down their throats. Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/leadershipstack Join our community and ask questions here: from.sean.si/discord Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/leadershipstack

The Burden of Command
146 - Build Cultural Agility W/ Dr. Paula Caligiuri

The Burden of Command

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 46:54


Dr. Paula Caligiuri is a D'Amore-McKim School of Business Distinguished Professor of International Business at Northeastern University, and lives in Boston, Massachusetts. She has been named as one of the most prolific authors in international business for her work in cross-cultural management, global leadership development, and cultural agility. She is president of TASCA Global, a consulting firm that specializes in assessing and developing culturally agile professionals and boasts a client list that includes the U.S. Army, Peace Corps, Cigna, 3M, and Johnson & Johnson. She is a frequent expert guest on CNN and CNN International and author of the LinkedIn Learning course “Managing Globally.” Her new book is Build Your Cultural Agility: The Nine Competencies of Successful Global Professionals. Learn more about Paula and her work at TASCAglobal.com and myGiide.com. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/tboc/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tboc/support

The No Normal Show by ReviveHealth
Revive's rundown on HLTH 2021

The No Normal Show by ReviveHealth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 34:51


TakeawaysGetting a feel for HLTH 2021Revive's Gale Pryor and Brennan Mason joined our team on The No Normal Show to share their takeaways from this year's HLTH conference in Boston, Massachusetts.The purpose of the event is to bring everyone in the health ecosystem to reimagine healthcare delivery. Brennan and Gale found that the ecosystem has more players than ever.A good mix of organizations attended, including Amazon, AARP, Fidelity, AHA, IBM Watson, Maven, Philips, ResMed, Teladoc, Verizon, Vertex, CVS, Walmart, Zoom, Optum, Oak, Cigna, Aetna, Humana, and the Blues+.HLTH orchestrated an indoor event of 6000+ attendees while ensuring that everyone in attendance was vaccinated or had tested negative within the last 72 hours of the conference. They made COVID-19 testing accessible in the lobby. The reinvention of primary care Primary care is attracting heated discussions because many of the core themes in healthcare transformation are coming together in primary care.Amazon Care is expanding its virtual and hybrid primary care service beyond its employees, offering other employers a covered benefit in selected cities.UnitedHealth is rolling out a virtual-first primary care product, NavigateNow, to select employers with self-funded plans in nine markets, expanding to 25 markets by the end of 2022.Primary care is a strangely heated space. This year, Rushika Fernadopulle of Iora Health clashed with serial entrepreneur Adrian Aoun of Forward about tech-based primary care. Adrian equated the entrance of pharmacy retailers to "wanting an iPhone and being sold a Motorola."Our hosts found that Adrian came across as disconnected from the reality of primary care and that retailers like Walgreens, CVS, and Walmart have advantages like a massive physical presence, logistical network, longitudinal understanding of consumers, and high net promoter scores. Digital health, of course Digital health has always been the focus of HLTH, but this year was less about an incoming digital revolution and more about the ways different players collaborate and integrate solutions.Walmart Health put it well: It's not just about going digital; it's about having different mechanisms for different consumer preferences.Hybrid care was widely recognized as a critical element in appealing to consumer preferences and building trust.Much of the conversation was focused on chronic care management and wellness, with Noom, Thirty Madison, Big Health, and Everly Health all present. The goal of digital tools in this space is to become a reimbursed benefit.If healthcare delivery wants to transform healthcare delivery, organizations need to take the lead. To lead healthcare delivery, organizations need to change their business model from a pipeline to a platform where all players can connect to your health system.Plans + employers + digital health As employers take a more proactive role in workforce health, plans seem to be reinventing care delivery using digital health and the workplace to do it. As Divya Paliwal, Chief Clinical Transformation Officer of Horizon BCBS said, "How can we use these dollars better than shelling out to a hospital ED or ICU?"The drivers of the growth in digital health are plans and employers. And employers are moving away from PPO, and high deductible plans to incent healthy behaviors – the key focus of digital health tools.In a world of remote work, benefit offerings become even more important. When features of physical workspace become irrelevant, benefits are essential in recruiting and retention.Employers are certainly stepping up to improve access to health solutions through employee benefits, but this only intensifies the division between the "haves" and "have nots" by excluding small businesses and the unemployed.

Up2Me Radio
Call For Caring on Purpose Podcast with Guests Connie Cooper & Callie Bradford

Up2Me Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 72:00


Welcome to the Call For Caring on Purpose Podcast with Host Michelle Bolden and Special Guests Connie Cooper with Pruitt Health and Callie Bradford with Cigna. Topic:  Planning Your Caregiving Journey: Medicaid & Medicare Tune in to hear from experts in this two part episode, Part 1 learn key details you need to know about Medicaid and the programs and services they provide.  Continue listening to hear in Part 2 the A, B, and C's of Medicare, everything from eligibility requirements, when to apply, how to apply, what is covered and more! Contact information is provided. Grab your pen and paper you will want to take notes!  Enjoying the Conversation?  Visit the Call For Caring on Purpose show-page at www.up2meradio.com to learn more, share your comments and to listen to other episodes!  Thank you for tuning in!

She's All That Video-Podcast
READY, LAUNCH, BRAND - with Orly Zeewy

She's All That Video-Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 40:02


In this LAST episode of Season 2 - focus on women offering important skills for the post-pandemic business world - I talk with ORLY Zeewy -  all about her area of expertise - and the topic of her new book READY, LAUNCH, BRAND, The Lean Marketing Guide for Startups - that is  ... BRAND!  When people hear the word BRAND - they often think colors, style, font, and logosbut ORLY - is what she calls a BRAND ARCHITECT - she *builds the DNA of startup brands* and *helps founders cut through the noise so they can scale in months, not years.* Orly Zeewy is an author, keynote speaker, educator and brand architect. She builds the DNA of startup brands and helps founders cut through the noise so they can scale in months, not years. Prior to starting her consulting practice, she ran the award-winning Zeewy Design and Marketing Communications firm for 14 years and directed marketing programs for national clients such as CIGNA, Kraft Foods and Prince Tennis.Orly has lectured at Wharton and taught in The Close School of Entrepreneurship at Drexel University and the University of Pennsylvania. She has led workshops for startup incubators such as REV Ithaca, Rise Up Philly, Startup Leaders Philadelphia and Venture Café. In 2020, nearly 200 people from around the world attended her brand storytelling webinar: Heroes and Villains.Orly has been featured in Medium and written for the Comcast Business Community, Small Business Trends, The Marketing Journal and Smart Hustle. You can find ORLY at:http://zeewy.com/    https://www.linkedin.com/in/orlyzeewy/    https://twitter.com/orlyzeewyand her book: https://www.amazon.com/Ready-Launch-Brand-Marketing-Startups/dp/0367466627

No Limits Selling
Rick Barrera on Becoming Essential To Your Clients

No Limits Selling

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 26:51


Rick Barrera is known as the Revenue Accelerator for the work he does with entrepreneurs, small businesses and enterprise organizations to smooth the on-ramp and make them easier to do business with. He believes that you can generate any level of revenue you choose, whenever you choose to generate it.     Rick worked with Dave Zerfoss, CEO at Husqvarna to take the company from 29 million dollars to half a billion in just over 10 years. Rick is frequently called upon to turn around troubled companies, returning them to robust profitability. He has personally started many companies including a seed company, newspaper delivery, babysitting, landscaping, photo studio, restaurant, vitamin company, sales and customer service training, concierge services, financial services, real estate, an online training company and a professional speaking firm. He is currently engaged with two M&A companies doing consolidations in two different industries. His current passion project is PartnerHere.com, an online marketplace enabling entrepreneurs to find business partners and resources...without cash. His goal is to build the world's largest online community for entrepreneurs of every stripe. As you will soon learn, he believes that entrepreneurship is the solution to many of the issues that we face as individuals, families and as a global community.   Rick is also the Head of Faculty for the Center for Heart Led Leadership in Denver, Colorado where he works with SEAL Team leaders, world class mountain climbers, Fortune 500 CEO's, journalists, actors and astronauts to teach We Before Me, relationship focused leadership, to the next generation of leaders. His client list numbers in the thousands and includes Abbott Labs, American Airlines, Ameriprise, AT&T, AutoCrib, AutoZone, Bayer, Black and Decker, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Caterpillar, Chevron, Cigna, Conoco, Dairy Queen, eBay, EMC, Fidelity, Ford Motor Company, Four Seasons Hotels, GE, GlaxoSmithKline, Hallmark Cards, Harley-Davidson, Hilton, Honda, Honeywell, HP, Husqvarna, IBM, Intel, Intuit, John Hancock, Johnson Controls, Kaiser, Lenovo, Les Schwab Tires, Lexus, Marriott, Merrill Lynch, Monsanto, Nissan, REMAX, Ritz-Carlton, Time Warner, Verizon, Volvo, Weyerhaeuser and Wells Fargo. Rick is a well-known business thought leader having written 8 books on leadership, branding, customer service, sales, and personal development including two best-sellers, Non-Manipulative Selling & Overpromise and Overdeliver.   Contact Rick: Website Company Website LinkedIn YouTube Instagram

Difficult Happens; Effective Communication for Bosses

On top of everything else that you have had to deal with this past year, now loneliness is on the rise, and the impact of loneliness on you and the work you do is impactful. Douglas Nemecek, MD, chief medical officer for behavioral health at Cigna says that the impact of loneliness on your health is equivalent to smoking 15 cigarettes a day and is possibly worse than obesity and that isolated people risk having a significantly shorter life span.  I don't think it's any surprise that any stress on your emotions impacts you physically, as the saying goes, your body keeps the score of your emotions.  Contact with others is not connection, while you may interact with a lot of people, that doesn't necessarily mean that you are connecting with them. On today's episode, signs of loneliness, what to watch out for, and what to do about it. What you'll hear on today's episode: Signs of loneliness that you might not be aware of Mask emotions and their purpose What to watch out for What the heck is going on What next? Healthy alternatives What you need to combat loneliness Join the Difficult Happens Facebook group  “Community Happens Group” Work with Lara:  Got a Question? Comment? Email help@difficulthappens.com Corporate Training Difficult Happens by Lara Currie Difficulthappens.com/workwithme/    Apply for an On-air Coaching Call! Complimentary Breakthrough Consultation Resources: 10 TIPS for Dealing with Difficult People Series on Manipulation Series on Assessments Series on Conflict Personality-Types   © Lara Currie 2021 Show Intro music by Scott Holmes Music Listen for free on the go with any one of these players for both Android & iPhone

TalentCulture #WorkTrends
On-Site Employee Benefits: Bringing Dental Care into the Workplace

TalentCulture #WorkTrends

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 15:54


Workforce expectations are changing — that we know, and that includes benefits. Employees are looking to their workplace to provide more guidance and real solutions on healthcare and wellness — and by the way, employers that step up to the plate aren't just improving their own work culture. They're also boosting their own brand as a forward-thinking employer. Today we're going to one way a new approach to benefits is changing the game – bringing well-being to the workforce.  Pop-up dental clinics right in your workplace are a proven way to ensure your employees get the dental care they need — despite their busy lives. And this ingenious new way to bring benefits on-site can have an enormous positive impact on financial wellness as well. A Cigna study found that regular preventive dental care over a five-year period reduced annual dental costs by 31% for people aged 18-64.  Today Meghan M. Biro talks to Jordan Smith, the CEO of Jet Dental, about this groundbreaking model of employee healthcare. It's a new way for employers to get ahead of employee expectations around benefits and care.

FactSet U.S. Daily Market Preview
Financial Market Preview - Friday 8-Oct

FactSet U.S. Daily Market Preview

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 4:30


US futures are largely flat as of 05:00 ET. European markets opened mixed following a mostly higher session in Asia overnight. Greater China equities traded moderately higher, resuming trading on Friday following the Golden Week holiday. Focus this morning on payrolls data. Companies mentioned: Cigna, Chubb

Live Inspired Podcast with John O'Leary
Max Lucado: Courage for Today and Hope for Tomorrow (ep. 398)

Live Inspired Podcast with John O'Leary

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 50:45


Max Lucado is a pastor, speaker, and New York Times bestselling author. He's captivated the hearts of millions with his poetic storytelling and homespun humor. Join us as Max shares a timely message of hope and encouragement for a society still reeling from racial divides, political strife and a global pandemic. SHOW NOTES: As a teenager + young adult, Max was on a prodigal path. For decades, Max didn't share about the sexual abuse he experienced as a child because he felt healed shortly after the incident, assured his perpetrator would face God. According to Cigna, 61% of Americans felt lonely in 2019. Another 64% feel as if they have no one with whom they can share their truth.  Thirty-seven percent of US adults struggled with anxiety in the past week and 59.8% of young people 18-25 struggled with anxiety in the past seven days, according to CDC. Why is anxiety at an all-time high? We're leading fast-paced lifestyles, have access to more information than ever before and are less connected to a higher power. Unmet expectations drive unhappiness. Two out of three Americans identify as being unhappy (Harris Poll). "A man who wants to lead the orchestra must turn his back on the crowd." "To call yourself a child of God is one thing. To be called a child of God by those who watch your life is another thing altogether." If you enjoyed hearing from Max Lucado, tune into our New York Times bestselling authors playlist. Hear from Mel Robins, Bob Costas, Mitch Albom, Patrick Lencioni and more here. MAX LUCADO'S LIVE INSPIRED 7 Q. What is the best book you've ever read? A. The Bible and William Barclay's Commentary. Q. What is a characteristic or trait that you possessed as a child that you wish you still exhibited today? A. Play well. Q. Your house is on fire, all living things and people are out. You have the opportunity to run in and grab one item. What would it be? A. My Bible from 2000. Q. You are sitting on a bench overlooking a gorgeous beach. You have the opportunity to have a long conversation with anyone living or dead. Who would it be? A. My father and many characters from the Bible. Q. What is the best advice you've ever received? A. Life is short. Time is fleeting fast. Q. What advice would you give your 20-year-old self? A. Trust God's great grace. Q. It's been said that all great people can have their lives summed up in one sentence. How do you want yours to read? A. Life is short and then it's past. Only what's done for Christ will last.

The Fearless and Successful Podcast by Dijana Llugolli
Vince Warnock: Your Superpower - Vulnerability

The Fearless and Successful Podcast by Dijana Llugolli

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 56:33


I have to start this caption by saying: BUSINESS IS FUN you guys and my guest Vince Warnock knows how to entertain, educate and encourage people. I've known Vince for a year and he hosted me on his podcast Chasing the Insight in December 2020. Definitely go and listen to the episode: https://chasingtheinsights.com/ep47-dijana-llugolli-success/⁣ ⁣ What I like about Vince is that he is so smart and fun and he loves to serve. This LIEV TALK show was one of my favourites because it represents all my values: Freedom to be yourself, Fearlessness, Fun and Flow! Yup, your coach D love good F words! ⁣ ⁣

Disability Matters
University of Harford's Commitment to Students with Disabilities

Disability Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 53:26


Joyce welcomes Mark Boxer, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer for the University of Hartford to the show. Named to this post in June of 2020, he will discuss how he has carried over the same commitment to hire people with disabilities that he held at Cigna to help all students including those with disabilities at the University of Hartford.

The Pat Thurston Show Podcast
September 14, 2021: Pat Thurston: The Medicare Advantage scam

The Pat Thurston Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 33:45


Wendell Potter, former VP of Cigna joins the show. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Afternoons with Helen Farmer
THE SEVEN STAGES OF EXPAT LIFE

Afternoons with Helen Farmer

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 77:50


13 September 2021: Steve Cronin of Dead Simple Saving outlines the seven stages of expat life. Where are you in your expat journey? Teens and Money: Now that teens can do part time work in the UAE, will "Dubai kids" have more opportunities to learn the value of money? Helen meets Mateo, who says he's been earning his own money at 10 years old. Women are more stressed than men during the pandemic. Fact? That's what a Cigna survey has found.  What are some courses to take in university to survive and thrive in a post-pandemic world? Chris Taylor of the University of Birmingham fills Helen in.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Embark
Branding, Ugly Babies and Bubble Wrap: Define Your Business and Win

Embark

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 41:37


Your brand is greater than a good-looking logo. The success of your business is dependent on knowing who you are. Be clear about who you are and why we should care, and you have a good chance of finding your ideal client. That takes the time, objectivity and self-awareness to That's the magic of working with Orly Zeewy. She is a brand architect, who can help you put your business on track from the foundation up. We talk about the blessings of ugly babies (metaphorically speaking),  how much businesses should allocate to marketing and bubble wrap.Orly Zeewy is an author, keynote speaker, educator and brand architect. She builds the DNA of startup brands and helps founders cut through the noise so they can scale in months, not years. Prior to starting her consulting practice, she ran the award-winning Zeewy Design and Marketing Communications firm for 14 years and directed marketing programs for national clients such as CIGNA, Kraft Foods and Prince Tennis.Orly has lectured at Wharton and taught in The Close School of Entrepreneurship at Drexel University and the University of Pennsylvania. In 2020, nearly 200 people from around the world attended her brand storytelling webinar: Heroes and Villains.Orly has been interviewed for Medium and written for the Comcast Business Community, Small Business Trends, The Marketing Journal and Smart Hustle.Her book, Ready, Launch, Brand: The Lean Marketing Guide for Startups was published in May 2021 and was the #1 new business book release on Amazon in April 2021.

Aposto! Altı Otuz
2 Eylül Perşembe | İkinci çeyrek büyümesi, seçim barajı

Aposto! Altı Otuz

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 13:31


Türkiye ekonomisi 2021 ikinci çeyrekte %21,7 büyüdü. MHP lideri Bahçeli Cumhur İttifakı'nın %7 seçim barajında anlaştığını duyurdu. El Salvadorlular Bitcoin konusunda çekinceli. Bugünün bülteni Cigna'nın destekleriyle ulaşıyor. Fotoğraf: Marvin Recinos/AFP/Getty --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/aposto/message

The Patriots In Tune Podcast
IRVINE ”RAY RAY” BROOKSTEIN - Patriots In Tune Show - Ep. #442 - 8/31/2021

The Patriots In Tune Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 142:46


#TuneIn2InTune on the Patriots In Tune Show with TOOTS SWEET & JEWELS JONES. Joining us tonight is Author & Poet IRVINE "RAY RAY" BROOKSTEIN  Irvin R. Brookstein (aka) Ray Brookstein, RayRay (poetic moniker) is an American Poet and Author who has distinguished himself on social media for the past four years. His unique style combines Poetry and Politics expressing a strong Patriotic voice and important messaging, about the dynamic, yet divisive, political climate facing our Country. Ray is retired and lives In Miami.  Ray's words create dialogue sorely needed today. Those that know him, love his heart, levity and the passion which he brings to the body politic! His published poetry books include, “Rays of Light II”, “The Trump Chronicle” years 1, 2 and 3. He was born in New York to Michael “George” Brookstein (deceased) an Army WWII war hero and Ex-POW in Nazi Germany and Estelle Brookstein (age 94), London Born mother of 3, War Bride, who lived through the “Battle of Britain”. Early Development – Ray grew up during the turbulent 1960's where he experienced numerous life changing events: Cuban Missile Crisis, Space Race, Man/Flag on the Moon, Kennedy Assassination(s) & MLK, Military Draft, Vietnam War and Protests… Kent State, Democratic National Convention Riots, Chicago 1968. Highlights – Early life on Long Island, named the top athlete at MacArthur HS ‘70 Soccer, Basketball, Lacrosse, Captain of every team I ever played on. Education – The University of Pennsylvania, (Penn) '74, All-Ivy (Twice) ‘73 & ‘74 and All-American Lacrosse Midfield 1974. Professional Career – Life and Health insurance agent for 37 years, Connecticut General, CIGNA, and Guardian Life, And Independent Sales Agent, Manager and Trainer, trained over 500 agents. Roots of Writing – Coached recreational and travel Soccer teams for 20 years, coached a Colorado State Champion Youth Lacrosse team. As a youth soccer coach, I started to express thoughts through newsletters written for the children and their parents. Learned to write in such a way that a child could understand. Poetry laid dormant for many years, through a difficult Marriage, children and surviving Cancer in 1992. Began Writing Poetry since the early 90's. Poetic Style – Simplistic and distilled thoughts of the world around me in such a way that the essence could be easily understood. Heartfelt expressions of love, emotions, relationships and world events… Politics, rhyme and rhythmic, lighthearted with some levity and satire with an emphasis on message. “Don't hide your light under a bushel.” — Estelle Brookstein IRVINE "RAY RAY" BROOKSTEIN LINKS:  Website: https://rayraypoetryworld.com/my-books/about/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/raybnboca Join The Mighty200+ PIT Crew in Live Chat! #WeAreTheNewsNow

A Health Podyssey
Julian Harris on the Connection Between Unmet Social Needs and Health Care Costs

A Health Podyssey

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 43:09


If you're a regular listener of A Health Podyssey, you know that most episodes revolve around a particular study published in Health Affairs. Every once in awhile, a person's experience as it relates to health care warrants an excursion from the constraints of discussing a single study. For those, we want to offer listeners a broader conversation.Welcome to A Health Podyssey Excursion.  Dr. Julian Harris is the CEO of ConcertoCare, a provider of integrated care for seniors living at home. His career touches both the public and private sectors.Before joining ConcertoCare in 2021, Harris served as President of Care Allies, a group of Cigna-affiliated population health management and home-based primary care companies. Prior to Cigna, Dr. Harris served as an adviser to Google Ventures (GV) with a focus on tech-enabled health care services.In the public sector, Harris led the health care team in the White House Office of Management of Budget (OMB). As the federal government's Chief Health Care Finance Official, he had oversight of more than $1 trillion in spending in Medicare, Medicaid and a myriad other programs. He also previously served as the chief executive of the $11 billion Massachusetts Medicaid program.Listen to Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil trace Julian Harris' career and discuss how his varied experiences have shaped his perspectives on health and health care. The two discuss social determinants of health, the connection between unmet social needs and health care costs, how COVID-19 affected health equity, why the Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) is special and more.Come along on an excursion to hear from the top minds in health policy and health care industry on A Health Podyssey.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts

Work and Life with Stew Friedman
Ep 214. Gorick Ng: The Unspoken Rules for Early Career Success

Work and Life with Stew Friedman

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 52:29


Gorick Ng is a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Business School and is now a career adviser at Harvard College, specializing in coaching first-generation, low-income students. He's also a researcher with the Managing the Future of Work project at Harvard. His new book, The Unspoken Rules: Secrets to Starting Your Career Off Right, is now offered to employees at companies such as IBM, Houlihan Lokey, Invesco, Cigna, Qualcomm, GE, and others. Harvard Business School has also given The Unspoken Rules to every 2021 MBA student to give them an edge in their internships and full-time jobs. In this episode, Stew talks with Gorick about specific guidance for how young people can navigate school and their first jobs for early career success, with particular emphasis on first-generation and low-income students. Gorick's research and practice reveals there are three critical questions one must answer well: Are you competent? Are you committed? Are you compatible? After Gorick describes how his personal history led him to devoting himself to this field, he gets into some practical tips with examples for how to go about demonstrating competence, commitment, and compatibility. Here then is an invitation for you, a challenge, after you've had a chance to listen to this episode. For yourself, or for a young person you know, ask the three critical questions and come up with an action implied by whatever the answer might be. Share your reactions to this episode and your suggestions for future shows with Stew by writing to him at friedman@wharton.upenn.edu or via LinkedIn. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Where We Live
Therapist In Your Pocket? The Surge In Mental Health Apps

Where We Live

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 48:00


Digital downloads for mental health needs surged nearly 200 percent during the pandemic. Now, it seems this trend is here to stay. The market for mental health apps is projected to reach 3.3 billion dollars in the next six years. This hour, experts discuss how digital products are changing the way people care for their mental wellbeing, and the scientific rigor required from app developers to ensure successful outcomes.  Coming up, we talk to industry experts on the future of apps in mental healthcare. Anecdotes versus evidence: What works, and what doesn't?  GUESTS:  Briana Benn-Mirandi - therapist at Art and Soul Art Therapy in Madison, CT. Dr. Paul Weigle - psychiatrist and Associate Medical Director of Ambulatory Programs at Natchaug Hospital, part of HartfordHealthCare's Behavioral Health Services. Dr. Doug Nemecek -  Chief Medical Officer for Behavioral Health, Cigna. Karen Brown - Health Reporter at New England Public Radio. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Where We Live
Therapist In Your Pocket? The Surge In Mental Health Apps

Where We Live

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 48:00


Digital downloads for mental health needs surged nearly 200 percent during the pandemic. Now, it seems this trend is here to stay. The market for mental health apps is projected to reach 3.3 billion dollars in the next six years. This hour, experts discuss how digital products are changing the way people care for their mental wellbeing, and the scientific rigor required from app developers to ensure successful outcomes.  Coming up, we talk to industry experts on the future of apps in mental healthcare. Anecdotes versus evidence: What works, and what doesn't?  GUESTS:  Briana Benn-Mirandi - therapist at Art and Soul Art Therapy in Madison, CT. Dr. Paul Weigle - psychiatrist and Associate Medical Director of Ambulatory Programs at Natchaug Hospital, part of HartfordHealthCare's Behavioral Health Services. Dr. Doug Nemecek -  Chief Medical Officer for Behavioral Health, Cigna. Karen Brown - Health Reporter at New England Public Radio. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Outcomes Rocket
Making Healthcare Affordable, Predictable and Simple with Rajesh Manglani, VP of Pharmacy Product Strategy at Cigna

Outcomes Rocket

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 23:53


What are the forces impacting health care? In this episode, we are privileged to feature Rajesh Manglani, VP of Pharmacy Product Strategy at Cigna. Rajesh discusses Cigna's goal to make healthcare affordable, predictable, and simple for everyone. He explains how his company delivers sustainable solutions, early behavioral lifestyle interventions, and timely cost-effective access to care. He also talks of the value of data integration and benefits integration. Rajesh provides great examples to support his points, what he looks forward to, and the challenges the pharma space faces. Click this link to the show notes, transcript, and resources: outcomesrocket.health

The NFL Legends Podcast
Legend Stephon Morris on the Cigna Work/Life Resources for Legends

The NFL Legends Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 33:56


NFl Legend, Stephon Morris, explains the Cigna Work/Life resources available for former NFL players - from the perspective of a former player and now as a Cigna employee. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

CTStartup Podcast
Episode 135: Talking Insurance in the Insurance Capital

CTStartup Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 54:22


Any podcast on businesses in Connecticut HAS to discuss innovation in insurance, and on this episode, Eric and Ojala kick off a discussion with two of Hartford's insurance innovators. Join us for a conversation with Cigna, a Hartford insurance staple for decades. This episode sponsored by CTNext and Connecticut Innovations.

The HPScast
John Kim - Founder and Managing Partner of Brewer Lane Ventures

The HPScast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 26:59


Host Colbert Cannon is joined by founder and managing partner of Brewer Lane Ventures, John Kim. We'll hear about how he went from earning an MBA at University of Connecticut to leading Cigna's Retirement and Investment services business all the way through Prudential's acquisition of the company in 2004. John speaks about joining New York Life as CEO in the midst of a global financial crisis. We'll also hear about what led him to launch Brewer Lane Capital, an early stage venture capital firm, in 2019.To learn more about Brewer Lane Ventures, visit the website here.Check out John's Best Idea, Stephen Covey's book Seven Habits of Highly Effective People here. Learn more about Colbert's Best Idea, the book Cod, by writer Mark Kurlansky here.

Everything with Everett

Everett talks about the healthcare system and ways that it needs to change. Everett shares his personal experience when he needed to utilize an Emergency Room in April 2021, and how conflicted he felt (even with insurance) about using a system that was in place to ensure that all who come are healthy or given the best chance to live.Also included in the episode are some videos that can be watched here:PBS NEWS HOUR: Why there are shocking costs on your emergency room bill https://youtu.be/yaWZoyDD1zECNBC: Why Medical Bills In The US Are So Expensivehttps://youtu.be/3NvnOUcG-ZI_________SPONSORED BY EVERETT MCCONNAUGHEYConvert your VHS tapes to digital, Today!Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREEDisclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.Support the show (https://paypal.me/emcconnaughey)

The No Normal Show by ReviveHealth
Navigating a changed behavioral health landscape

The No Normal Show by ReviveHealth

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 38:08


Behavioral health needs are outpacing the healthcare industry's ability to deliver behavioral health services. COVID-19 spotlighted this trend, though it existed well before COVID-19.Now, groups outside and within the healthcare industry are coming to the table with solutions for addressing behavioral health needs.How different healthcare groups are addressing behavioral health needs The government The government is properly incentivized to address behavioral health needs since Medicaid is the largest payor for mental health services in the U.S.This backing makes sense considering those eligible for Medicaid are more likely to have mental health conditions that lead to chronic co-morbidities.Local governments are also taking action. For example, the Reno Nevada City Counsel allocates its CARES Act funding on contract with Talkspace, available to Reno residents 13+ years of age.Private payors Private health insurance typically covers acute services but rarely long-term or proactive behavioral health services.Data shows people are 5x more likely to go out of network for behavioral healthcare than for physical healthcare. Even so, reimbursement rates for covered behavioral health services are significantly less than physical healthcare reimbursements.Payors are verticalizing through partnerships and consolidation to accommodate mental health needs. For example, Ginger, Talkspace, and other high-profile behavioral health management apps are covered by payor giants like Cigna and Humana.Digital health leaning into B2B and B2C models Digital health companies are adopting various models to "crack the code" for improving public mental health.In 2020, many tech vendors leaned into behavioral health, many of whom expanded their B2B lines, selling to employers and payors. Ginger eliminated its direct-to-consumer line altogether.Hospitals – Clinician support, patient support The Biden Administration's crackdown on health system and hospital consolidation limits health systems' ability to offer integrated behavioral health services.Despite this obstacle, health systems must find different ways to address behavioral health to remain a trusted "whole health" partner. This is imperative because payors are repositioning themselves to own the whole health of the consumer.Systems are not only addressing patient mental health but also staff and clinician mental health.Mission is a massive driver for health systems to offer expanded behavioral health services. Many health systems have community care embedded in their DNA – behavioral healthcare is an extension of that mission.If hospitals want to be the go-to partner for health, they must integrate behavioral health into every aspect of what they do.How and where providers are leading the way Kaiser Permanente addressed teen behavioral health needs by meeting them where they spend time teens where they spend time – online gaming and esports. They teamed up with Cloud9 to normalize conversations around mental health using influencers who talk about their struggles.Cincinnati Children's Hospital is building a new behavioral health in-patient facility for expanded behavioral health treatment options. They also were recently awarded a grant to pivot suicide prevention efforts with a focus on telehealth.Last year partnered Hoag partnered with BehaVR to deploy therapies to workers during COVID-19. Now, they're expanding to patient care for populations like expectant mothers to help address conditions like post-partum depression.

Caged Vision
Faster Insights from Your Data with Nick Amabile - CEO at DAS42

Caged Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 26:19


How to get faster insights from your data for better-informed decision What would you do for faster insights from your data? How would it help you to make better-informed decisions? If you've asked these questions, you are not alone. …it may even be what's keeping you up at night. This is exactly why I'm super excited for you to hear today's Caged Vision Podcast with Nick Amabile. Nick has worked with some of the largest organizations in the world like Dropbox, Cigna, Snap, Uber, Walmart, and Amazon to name a few. Needless to say, he's got some great ProTips I can't wait for you to hear. Download to listen to Nick's confident, smooth, and approachable methods to getting faster insights from your data for better decisions. Oh, and if you're interested in connecting with Nick, below are the best way to connect with him: Follow Nick on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/namabile/ Learn more about Nick and his company here: https://das42.com Holy Christmas, I really need to talk to Nick ASAP: https://das42.com/contact Thanks for downloading and listing!

Where We Live
Therapist In Your Pocket? The Surge In Mental Health Apps

Where We Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 49:00


Digital downloads for mental health needs surged nearly 200 percent during the pandemic. Now, it seems this trend is here to stay. The market for mental health apps is projected to reach 3.3 billion dollars in the next six years. This hour, experts discuss how digital products are changing the way people care for their mental wellbeing, and the scientific rigor required from app developers to ensure successful outcomes.  Coming up, we talk to industry experts on the future of apps in mental healthcare. Anecdotes versus evidence: What works, and what doesn't?  GUESTS:  Briana Benn-Mirande - therapist at Art and Soul Art Therapy in Madison, CT. Dr. Paul Weigle - psychiatrist and Associate Medical Director of Ambulatory Programs at Natchaug Hospital, part of HartfordHealthCare's Behavioral Health Services. Dr. Doug Nemecek -  Chief Medical Officer for Behavioral Health, Cigna. Karen Brown - Health Reporter at New England Public Radio. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
548: Erica Meloe: Knowing your Strengths as an Entrepreneur

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 45:11


In this episode, Owner and Founder of Velocity Physiotherapy, Erica Meloe, talks about the business of physical therapy. Today, Erica talks about her previous career, how to foster motivation and commitment in patients, and addressing company culture. What does it mean to be out-of-network? Hear about the biggest lessons Erica has learned in her career, the importance of mentorship, and get some valuable advice, all on today's episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.   Key Takeaways “Being an entrepreneur, you need to be able to know what your strengths are, and really work with those strengths.” “I learned over the years to delegate out what I don't like to do or what's not in my strengths.” “Practice makes permanent. It does not make perfect.” “If you put a computer between you and your patient, you decrease the outcome by 50%.” Some important definitions Co-pay. This is a fixed amount that's generally used for an in-network model. Co-insurance. This is based on a percentage of the bill. Balance-billing. This is balancing the bill up to what you typically charge. “Lately, a lot of plans are being reimbursed as a percentage of Medicare.” “A lot of being an entrepreneur is mindset.” “Why reinvent the wheel when someone else has done that?” “Be unapologetically yourself.” “We need to find joy in our life, and whatever that is, we need to do more of that.”   More about Erica Meloe Erica Meloe is a board certified physiotherapist in private practice in NYC. After a decade solving financial puzzles on Wall Street, Erica took her MBA and her problem solving skills into the clinic. She specializes in treating patients with unsolved pain and her mission is to raise awareness of the physical therapy profession to a level like no other. Erica is co-host of the podcast “Tough To Treat. A physiotherapist's guide to managing those complex patients.” She is also a thought leader in the profession and helps her patients as well as her colleagues empower themselves to lead and live with purpose. Erica's book “Why Do I Hurt? Discover the Surprising Connections That Cause Physical Pain and What To Do About Them” was released in June of 2018. She has also been featured in Forbes, BBC, Women's Day, Better Homes and Gardens, Muscle and Fitness Hers and Health Magazine. Erica is also fluent in Spanish and loves traveling!   Suggested Keywords Physiotherapy, Therapy, Health, Motivation, Commitment, Consistency, Practice, Entrepreneurship, Culture, Mentorship, Business, Mindset, Healthy, Wealthy, Smart   To learn more, follow Erica at: Website:          https://ericameloe.com                         https://toughtotreat.com                         https://www.velocityphysiony.com Facebook:       Erica Meloe PT                         Velocity Physio NYC                         Tough To Treat (Podcast) Twitter:            @EricaMeloe                         @VelocityPTNYC Instagram:       @toughtotreatpodcast Pinterest:         @emeloe LinkedIn:         Erica Meloe                         Velocity Physio YouTube:        Tough To Treat Business Round Table on July 27, 2021 at 8:00 PM EST  Subscribe to Healthy, Wealthy & Smart: Website:                      https://podcast.healthywealthysmart.com Apple Podcasts:          https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/healthy-wealthy-smart/id532717264 Spotify:                        https://open.spotify.com/show/6ELmKwE4mSZXBB8TiQvp73 SoundCloud:               https://soundcloud.com/healthywealthysmart Stitcher:                       https://www.stitcher.com/show/healthy-wealthy-smart iHeart Radio:               https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-healthy-wealthy-smart-27628927   Read the Full Transcript Here:  Speaker 1 (00:04): Hey, Erica. Welcome back to the podcast. It is always a pleasure to have you on, so thank you for coming back. Speaker 2 (00:11): Thanks. Thank you Karen, for asking me, I can't believe it it's been, I remember our first podcast was probably 10 or 11 yeah. Years ago. Speaker 1 (00:19): So yes. So long ago, like way way, the beginning of healthy, Speaker 3 (00:23): Wealthy and smart. You were Speaker 2 (00:27): On the second street. I was just, so I remember taking a car going up in the elevator and sitting there in the office. Oh my God. Yes. It's a pleasure to be back on again. Thank you so long Speaker 1 (00:37): Ago. Gosh. Yeah, that was a long time. It was like 10 years ago. And now this month we are talking all about the business of physical therapy. So I thought who else to have on who better to have on than you, who is a successful physical therapy entrepreneur business owner here in New York city. So before we get into your, what your business structure is like and how you run your business, I would love for you to remind the listeners a little bit of your background. So just so people know, Erica had a career before she became a physical therapist. So talk about that and how that career prepared you for your role as an entrepreneur. Speaker 2 (01:24): Yeah, that's a great question. I, it's funny, I've gotten much more involved during this time being at home a bit more during COVID with the whole wall street and and, and the whole, the financial markets, cause I've had more time to look at it, but I graduated just in brief. I have an MBA from stern school of business at the NYU stern school. And after graduation, I ended up working for an investment bank, a global investment bank and international foreign owned bank, literally starting in Karen, when I tell you and I'm dating myself, but I started like just before the market crashed. Okay. Like the 87 crash, Speaker 3 (02:05): I was going to say, you have to, you have to be more specific. There's been a few. So, Speaker 2 (02:12): So that was, and I started off in research and, and that was all great, but I ended up going on to a trading floor and it's, it's a, you know, like a huge trading floor with a lot of seats and it's an open, open area and mostly selling and trading international bonds, futures and options. And I, I really, I loved it. I loved, I really enjoyed working on wall street and I think that it was a different time back then, way different than it is now. And, you know, somebody asked me recently, why did you leave? And I was like, I didn't want to retire on a trading floor, which was the truth. You think God. Right. But I, I, I often think about why did I like it so much and how can I take that, that part of the business into anything else that I do. Speaker 2 (02:58): Right. And I liked it for many reasons. And one of it was, I was part of a team, you know, and I think the team of people, you know, we talk about collaborating in our, in our, in our world. I do very well with people, with a team, people who are team players. And I think for me, that's why I think in physical therapy land, I've been, you know, in the profession going on. Yeah. Committee's trying to run for different positions because I like being part of that team. It's just an, and we all have a lot in common too, I think as well. So it, and that's, you know, I got to talk to people on the phone a lot. I was, it was very much, it was back in the old days where we actually had to pick up the phone and call people and not, and it wasn't all computers. Speaker 2 (03:42): So that's the point. I think for me, I enjoyed the most and, and also figuring things out and problem solving. And as an entrepreneur, I mean, we have to figure things out all day long. Right. I think for me, it's, it was being a team player was definitely the main thing why I miss it. But I also liked the, the fast pace and, and, you know, yes, we're in New York, we all liked the fast paced and certainly not as fast as it used to be. That's for sure. But I enjoyed making those quick decisions and, and, and talking to clients and analyzing with them to solve their problems. So it's similar to physical therapy, right? I mean, we deal, we see patients, we try to, we talk to them, we try to figure out, you know, what, what's going on, what's going wrong with them or what their problem is. Speaker 2 (04:33): And, you know, I did recently a a paper for I'm doing part-time some courses and I did something on the therapeutic Alliance and the therapeutic Alliance, the quality that is the most important is really being, being a good listener and like listening to your patients, listening to your clients. So that's how I'm when I was on wall street. I, I really, this is when we had great expense accounts. Peter I've waited, you know, I flew to Mexico city for, for lunch one day with, for the central bank and came back. I exploited, I mean, that's the life I loved and I, to this day, I do miss it. I'll be, be honest, you know? And I, I was able to fly. I didn't, I didn't, I only covered a few international clients was mostly of domestic, but it was establishing those relationships, maintaining those contacts. Speaker 2 (05:25): I know you talk about like the concierge I read your article actually in an impact magazine. It was excellent. And it's about, you know, it's that extra service it's that, it's that developing that relationship. It's going that for mile. And, you know, I was one of the top sellers on the desk. And when I left people, some of my top clients were like, we liked you, or, you know, the, what if they use the word like, but they were like, you never shoved anything down our throats. I never shoved the deal down their throat. I never shoved anything down their throats. It was a, and I think that's, what's, I've taken a lot from that, you know, in a nutshell that, that whole experience, you know, Speaker 1 (06:05): And as an entrepreneur, where, where does that sort of plug in? Where does that fit? How did that help you grow your practice? Because you have a thriving practice in New York city. It doesn't happen overnight. Speaker 2 (06:20): Oh no. Oh no, no, no, no. And to be honest with you, I think as entrepreneurs, we are lucky in the sense that, you know, since we don't work for somebody, we work for ourselves, right. We have a little bit more leeway to discover things about ourself and what we want to do to grow the business. Right. and I think that what has from taking from the wall street experience the ability to that, what's the word I want to use. It's almost like being an entrepreneur. You need to be able to know what your strengths are and really work with those strengths. So when I first started out, I knew that my strength was I did the strength finders 2.0, you know, everybody should do that. It's, you know, and I'm like a learner achiever. You have to be a connector. I swear you have to be a connector. Speaker 2 (07:14): Right. You must, right. I'm a learner achiever like maximizer input and responsibility for those of you who have done that. So for me, the way I work best is when I play to my strengths. And I learned over the years to delegate out what I don't like to do, or what's not in my strength. Like, I it's just, why would you, do you, you know, we have the ability to do that. So playing to your strengths is that one of the first things I learned early on, because, you know, people say, oh, you can be a generalist physical therapist. You can treat everything, but what makes you different from the person down the street? Right. And for me, it's like, and I'm still, I still hone this to this day. This is all a work in progress. But you know, it's the problem solving. I love to figure stuff out. Speaker 2 (08:06): That's just basic. I love to figure stuff. I look to look at a trade when I was on wall street to figure it out, how can you make money? How can I make you money? Because if you make money, I make money. Right. And you know, if you feel better, if I can make the patient feel better, I do make more money. Cause they'll refer their friends and family. So it's very similar mindset. I think that was the hope. That was the answer you wanted, but it's, for me, it was really honing on, on what I did best. And then more recently, Karen, I looked at patients who I really like to treat. And what was the common thread, right. Wow. Speaker 1 (08:45): You knew what was it? What was the common thread? Speaker 2 (08:49): The, honestly it was being motivated and coming in consistently and being committed to going the full pro the full, raw, the full round. Don't come for two visits and don't come back. You want to, you're, you're literally, you are committed to having someone look at your entire body from the brain to the foot and looking at the connections in the body and be willing to commit some time to getting yourself better. That was the commonality, Speaker 1 (09:15): But, and they were athletic. But here I have, I have something to say about that. So was that the common thread they innately had or was that something that you helped to foster in them when you first see them, those first one or two visits? Speaker 2 (09:34): Yes. I helped to foster that. How Speaker 1 (09:37): Do you do that? How do you do that? How do you help to foster that? So, Speaker 2 (09:41): So when people phone initially, I'll backtrack a second. When people like this recently I had someone come in to sit, you know, she said, I'm seeing a well-known therapist in New York, blah, blah, blah, et cetera. What makes you different? And I was like, this is what makes me different. And I start off and I say, everybody says, they treat the whole body. You know, it's everybody treats differently. But what I do is I look at the connections in the body of the relationships of the regions, of the body, to each other. And I don't just treat your symptom. I look at your impairment and I look at their relationship with the head to the PIP, the need of the foot. And I tell them a story. I say, I have a patient recently. She had a pet issue in her pelvis, low back pain. Speaker 2 (10:18): And her driver was her foot. And I explain a little bit about why I do that. And I do that with patients when they first come in, this is what I say. I say, look, I don't want say, look, I basically tell them it's w I try. I listened for quite a bit. And then I basically tell them that it's, this is a relationship. And we're trying to change your movement patterns. If learning is very important, and I need to know how you learn best practice makes permanent. It does not make perfect. So you need to be able to come in and I'll say this to them. I need you to come in consistently at the beginning, once a week, I generally don't treat twice or three times and they start a surgical. But I'll treat for the hour. And I'll say, you know, minimally once a week for, let's say three weeks, I need to front load the visits because I'm trying to change strategies and trying to train your change, your brain. Speaker 2 (11:11): And I need to do that with a lot of input at the beginning of the treatments of the treatments. And if you want to space those out after I'm fine with that. And if patients can't do that, I basically say for whatever reason, if it's financial or Trey or vacation, I tell them that that's okay, but you won't get the same results. It will take longer. And the people who come in at the beginning, who front-load them get results quicker, and those are the people. And I looked at that list and that very true. They were coming in consistently and front-loaded, but I tell them that, but you know, it's based on the assessment and if I can give them, like, I don't want to say a wow, but if I, if they get what I'm trying to say, I can make a change in the first visit. Speaker 2 (11:55): Then they are more convinced of coming in more frequently. And I think because I do a lot of listening and I ask questions that not many people ask. I mean, we're similar. You and I, but I think that they don't get a lot of that outside of, of medicine, traditional medicine. And I think that when I explained to them, I'm trying to change your movement pattern. I'm trying to change your strategy. You're, I'm trying to work with you. You know, I'm trying to change how you move about your nervous system, your neuromuscular recruitment, things like that. And I, I, I work with them. I'll have the move and I can see I can. And I take P ever since COVID started, I've been with that Darla health. I've been taking more pictures in the office because I can really, I mark them up on my apple preview. And I'm seeing things that I never saw in the clinic before. And then when I show them this, they're like, oh my gosh. Wow. And I think their brain starts to change immediately when they in the first visit. And I think that that's important to get that buy-in at the beginning a little bit to help them come more consistently. Speaker 1 (13:00): Yeah, absolutely. If you don't have buy-in in the beginning, then they're not gonna, they're not going to be that patient who you said this common thread is they're motivated and committed. But I think that yes, if people are coming to see if they're seeking out a physical therapist, they're somewhat motivated, maybe committed, but it's, you who's educating them and listening and going that extra mile, making them feel comfortable, making them feel heard. And that's why you have motivated and committed patients. Correct. So it's a combination of the patient and what you do. So don't say, oh, it's just these motivated people. Speaker 3 (13:43): Good point [inaudible] I Speaker 2 (13:47): Know. And it's so funny because the, the, because we spend so much time listening, that is the form of communication, the best therapist or the best communicators. I mean, when I was doing this paper for therapeutic Alliance, you look at the, there's a like different pieces of the puzzle, listening and communication where like 70% of the outcome. I mean, maxi, Missy acts, she's a researcher at a McMaster, right? She says, you know, you walk into a treatment room, I'd say for somebody who's, you're, you're the fifth person you walk in there, hypervigilance, you know, distracted, you've exerted a no cebo effect on your patient before you even sat down. And they're not coming back after that. Right. So it's so important. And to, to know that, and I think that that'll help them make, make changes. You, if you go in there, you can be the best therapist ever and, and try to get them to be more motivated and committed. But if you're distracted, that doesn't work. Speaker 1 (14:43): Yeah. I mean, just put yourself in their shoes. That's all you need is, is like just a smidge of empathy, you know? Cause we all, you don't have to be like an empath. You just need a smidge because like, we all know what it's like, like when you go to the doctor and, and you're trying to like spill your guts to them. And they're like on their commute computer. Aha. And you're like, well, nevermind. I don't feel like telling you anything. Speaker 2 (15:10): I know. I know. And you literally, if you put a computer between you and your patient, you've decreased the outcome by 50%. Wow. That was an interesting statistic I found. And so now people are looking at me and this is extra work for me. And it's something I'm working through, but I literally barely write in the first part of the interview. I'm just listening to them and looking them in the eye. And I'm like, I'm trying to remember, and I have a good memory, but I'll write a few things down, but I'm listening to them. And I'm just passive, to be honest, if they don't give, I don't get what I want. I will ask other questions. But I think that that writing that paper on the therapeutic Alliance, even as an entrepreneur, because yes, we have the, we have the ability to make it, make our own schedule. Speaker 2 (15:54): Right. Have the freedom to do that. We have the, we have the freedom to tell people we don't want to see them. You know, I literally someone said to me recently, I don't know what you think about this is that you should have an application process to have them become your patient. I was like, Ooh, that's interesting. I'm not sure I'm there yet, but that's an interesting concept. You know, how business coaches do that a lot, you can apply for the program, right? I'm not sure I'm there yet. I can, you know, I can talk to somebody on the phone and get an idea of who, if they're right for me or if they're not, I'll say maybe there's somebody else, but I don't like, like a formal application process to do that. Speaker 1 (16:32): Qualifying people. I mean, I guess you can, but I, I mean, I think that you're doing that in that first visit by saying, you know, I, I really want you to be committed to this process. Is that something you think you can do? Yes. Right. how do you learn best? Because I want to make sure that my teaching style matches your learning style depending on who you are and how you do things. And, you know, what's interesting is you know, there's StrengthFinders, there's all these different things. In the Goldman Sachs class that I'm taking now, we used one called people styles at work, by Bolton, Bolton and Bolton second edition. And it basically it's 18 questions and it splits you up into four different kinds of learning styles or leader, sorry, leadership styles. But you can use that even with your clients and with, if you're an entrepreneur, let's say you have multiple people working for you. Speaker 1 (17:31): You can have them take these take this test or quiz if you will. And if someone is more analytical, maybe you want them doing this kind of work. If someone is more, there's four different kinds, there's analytical, which I think you are which would be less assertive. But some of these, I, I don't agree with that. I mean, it's, they're not all perfect, but less responsive to others, task oriented, precise, and attentive to detail, prefers to work with procedures and symptoms motivated by the right way to do things I, and, you know, we sort of fall into things that might be a little analytical, a little expressive, but there's our analytical, your exp you could be an expressive and amiable or a driver. Speaker 1 (18:22): And it's, it was very interesting to look at that, even from a client standpoint. So as you're talking, you can kind of guess like what the, what maybe your client is and how you can. So if they're more analytical, maybe you're going to want to hit them with your facts, your figures, your numbers. If they're more expressive, maybe you're going to want to hit them with the things that sort of tug at the heartstrings. If you're more amiable, if you think they're more amiable, then you're gonna maybe want to challenge them a little bit. So they're not always just yessing you all the time. You know what I mean? Yeah, Speaker 2 (18:58): Yeah, yeah, absolutely. That's, that's a great that's a, that's a great tool. I have to look into that. It's funny because I sent out some questionnaires ahead of time as well. I do the CSI questionnaire and the DAS questionnaire, and I get a good idea of, of just what their personalities are by looking at those. And some people I see them and I look at them, their questionnaires and they're like completely different people, you know, honestly. Right. But that gives me an idea of just their, just their overall persona. And then I explained to them, you know, I explain how I assess and I just say, and they're like, well, why are, you know, why are your hands in my armpits type thing? And I'll cause I'm well on the thorax, the head had the feet and I'll say, well, I'm, I explained the rules of the game. Speaker 2 (19:39): I said, I'm just gonna explain the rules of the game. Cause we don't know the rules we can't play and they all laugh and it's fun, you know? Cause I think it's just a way to make people feel at home. And I think it's funny because when I weirs ago and when I was working for other people as like a staff PT, yes, I'm older now, but I, I feel that as an entrepreneur, you can, you can express yourself differently and you have more freedom than if you were to be with, you know, sort of in the confines of a culture, like a corporate culture, like on wall street. For me, I wasn't confined in the sense because it was all about getting the deal done, making the money is pretty driven by money, right. So there were kind of no limits at that point back then. Speaker 2 (20:18): So you did what you felt, whatever you, whatever you do, you get the deal done. And we didn't really have, it was just, we had limits obviously, but it was very different. We weren't reigned in so much, you know, and then we were able to sort of be ourselves a little bit. And I, I always believe that things happen for a reason. I believe that I was meant to cover central banks are meant, I was meant to cover other banks at other different hedge funds because of the analytical style that these people have. You know, I think, you know, people say you find patients, I think patients find us, you know? Speaker 1 (20:54): Absolutely. Yeah, absolutely. And that's where, you know, your website, your wording, your copy, all of that can reflect that. And you hit on something that I want to touch on quickly too. And that's company culture. So how did you, and you have a partner and he gal, how did you guys address your company culture, the culture of your clinic, where you sort of very what's the word I'm looking for? Speaker 2 (21:31): Like, did we have like something Speaker 1 (21:33): Like, was it purposeful, did you sort of purposefully, like this is going to be our culture, this is, these are our values and what we want to reflect on our business. Yeah. Speaker 2 (21:45): I mean, we didn't do that formally. But we certainly, if it evolves over time, because it naturally the types of patients that would, that would come into the office would be those ones who sort of have been elsewhere or have, you know, really wants I don't even want to say hands on approach anymore, but more of a, of a, of a whole person approach and that it naturally evolved that way. And that sort of like when we did at one point when we were gosh, I think this was when we first started, we actually had to go up to Columbia university to speak to the student center up there. And, you know, we did a little PowerPoint and in that PowerPoint, it was, we talked about, you know, why the, you know, the hip is related to the foot. And, and so it evolved over time that, that whole, that whole culture and, and, and we were out of network from the get-go all right, because we knew that in order to treat this way and certainly New York rents, you know, you know, they're changed now, but back then, it was you, you could not at least in New York state, cause we're like, like the lowest reimbursed state in the country, right. Speaker 2 (22:55): I mean, you cannot maintain a business in New York city on an network network, unless you see, you know, five patients an hour, which is unacceptable to me. So that is not the way I'm I treat. And even, you know, it's funny when I graduated PT school, I called up a lot of places that I was going to interview at and see how many patients they saw an hour. And if it was four, I didn't go for the interview. And I had, I was lucky I had a career change. I had some savings, so I could be a little bit choosy, but I, I, it's very stressful working in that kind of an environment. Speaker 1 (23:25): Yeah, absolutely. So let's talk about the structure of your business. So you said you've been out of network from the beginning. So what does that mean? Can you explain to the listeners what that means? Speaker 2 (23:34): Yeah, so we don't contract. So basically we don't contract with an insurance company. So we have, we take Medicare. We are what we call par for Medicare. So that's con that's a contracted in New York city rate. And, but other than Medicare, we are out of network, which means that if your client has out of network benefits, we can do one of two things. You either build the insurance company directly. We charge them the co-insurance and then we get paid. So we get paid or the patient pays us directly. And then they submit the claim themselves, or we can submit the claim for them. So the majority of patients now have no out of network benefits. So what we end up doing is just billing the patient directly. And there are some insurances that we don't take it all. And so even out of network, so what we'll do is we'll just, the patient will pay us directly and then they'll submit on their own. We just give them a receipt, but out of network. So long-time patients of ours. We will bill the insurance company for them and wait for the insurance company to pay them, pay us, excuse me. And we'll charge them the co-insurance and that's gotten much less lately. Speaker 1 (24:51): Yeah. And can you explain what a co-insurance is? Speaker 2 (24:55): Yeah. So there's the co-pay and the co-insurance, the co-pay is a fixed amount. That's generally used for an in network model. So you have a 60 per dollar copay when you see a specialist. So co-insurance is based on a percentage. So for example, I work for, you know, large company, a here in New York, I have Cigna, my benefits are 70%, 30% Cigna will pay 70% of what's reasonable and customer in 30% is the co-insurance that 30% of the co the co-insurance is based on what you bill out of network. So you bill $400, the co-insurance can be 120 bucks, or it could be lower. We generally drop it lower. Okay. But we're because we're not contracted with, with any insurance companies. So a lot of people lot of lately, a lot of insurance companies have been sending patients letters like you, just so you know, you're seeing an out of network, I'm using this in air quotes, out of network, physical therapist, just so you know, they can balance bill you. So they're doing a lot of these sort of nefarious practices to get the patients saying, well, I don't know if I want to do an out of network practice, and they've been doing this for a while now, but in my patients know better. But recently someone brought in a piece of paper and it was not, was not a bill. It was just a statement of fact we've received charges, you're out of network, just, just FYI. They may balance bill you, which is, you know, they never did that before. Speaker 1 (26:21): Yeah. And balanced billing is Speaker 2 (26:24): They're going to build. So I'll use a simple example. Let's say $300. We charge, for example, let's say that's the number the patient's covered at 70%. Assuming. So let's say that it's, that would be two 10. That's usually not what they pay. Let's say they pay one 50. The co-insurance we charge was 50 bucks. That's $200. We can bill them to a hundred. That's a balanced bill means you balance you balance bill up to what you've charged. Speaker 1 (26:48): Got it. Got it. Yep. Just so people understand what all the well, because we're throwing out a lot of terms here. I want to make sure people understand, because this is all about the business of physical therapy, right. This whole month. So this is, this is literally the business, right. Speaker 2 (27:04): And I will, and I will. Yes. And I will tell you lately, a lot of plans just for anybody who's wants to do an out of network and bill and accept what they pay. A lot of plans are being, being reimbursed as a percentage of Medicare, which as we know is not great. So more often than not, you do not know that upfront. Sometimes they'll tell you, we do mostly electronic right now. And they won't, if there's nothing on the site that says patient is reimbursed at a certain rate, so you'll get paid. And then you realize, oh no, this is not enough. And so, you know, and that happens a lot of times after the fact. And so we have to, we have to you know, make the different part of the difference up in the co-insurance. So it has to, it's just, we have to, because of the, you need, we deserve caring. Speaker 2 (27:51): We deserve to get paid. This is what I say every night or every morning I write in my journal, my work is of high value and worthy of massive compensation because it is yes, we deserve to get paid. And and patients accept that now a lot more than they used to, a lot of patients now do not have out of network benefits at all. So they just pay and that's that, and that also comes down to your ideal client, right? Who, you know, you want, do you want somebody who's just going to like, you know, ask you to drop your rate or cause they, they will do that. They will ask you to drop your rate. And I generally don't do that anymore. You know, it's a special situation of course, but because those people are not sort of going to stick around, right? Speaker 2 (28:36): You want a lot of people who have no problem paying and it, depending on what your rates are, they will stick around and they will have no questions asked. And that, you know, as, as an entrepreneur, you will hone that ideal customer avatar over time. But speaking from experience, it is very frustrating when you, you, you treat an hour an hour and 15 minutes sometimes with people in any insurance company, out of network reimburses you at a percentage of Medicare, that's a joke. So you and I would get angry over it. And so at a certain point, you know, I, you know, a lot of I'm happy that we don't have out of network benefits a lot of the times, because it will save me that frustration and anger and the patient can just get reimbursed themselves, you know, pay me directly. But once again, as a new PA, if, if we have people who are just starting out or they're five years in the business and they want to start their practice, they may have to do that. And you're going to learn over time that the reimbursement changes from between insurance companies in between dates of service. I mean their insurance companies who we bill out of network will pay different rates for the same codes. It's just ridiculous. It's ridiculousness. And, you know, we have a small practice, someone who has a large practice like that, who's getting hurt like that. You need to almost hire us, hire like an advocate or somebody who can negotiate for you, you know, because that that's, that's a full-time job. Speaker 1 (29:57): Yeah, absolutely. And, and I think that it was really important to go through all of that, because that can be really confusing, especially for a new physical therapy entrepreneurs who want to start their own practice, who are on the fence. Should I take insurance? Should I not take insurance? I always tell people, call insurance companies and find out what they reimburse in your area. Yeah. Because it may be worth it to take an insurance, take one insurance and not take the others because there are insurance companies that may reimburse 120, 150 a visit. Hey, that's not bad. Speaker 2 (30:33): I will tell you there's a couple of patients. And if it's planned dependent, because there's far and few between, like I can count on one hand, the amount of patients I have who have like the platinum insurance plan. Right. And you will get paid more than your direct rate, which that number is dwindling. I've had people therapist asked me recently, should I? Because of COVID because of the financial stresses people are under, should they start billing out of network for their patients? And I basically tell them what I just told you. It's, it's, it's a great service you can offer. But if you don't have an assistant, you will be on the phone way too much than you want to be on the phone. Okay. so it just misses out your priorities. Yeah. Yeah. Speaker 1 (31:16): And actually my next, that was going to be my next question for you is if let's say a, a budding physical therapy entrepreneur comes to you and says, gosh, what, what was one of the biggest lessons you learned when in the course of either starting or now continuing to run your business? What would that be? Hmm. I think Speaker 2 (31:47): With regards to, I would say being willing, being open and being open to collaboration, being open to like expecting the patient to do the right thing. Because a lot of times we can say, oh, their patients never got going to pay. They're not going to do this. They're not going to do that. And I think that a lot of about being an entrepreneur, and this is one of the biggest lessons is, is your mindset. It's the vibration that you have. And it may sound woo woo. But trust me, it works. You know, 80% of this is mindset. 20% is execution. You know, you can sign up with an insurance company, you can do the billing, you can put the codes and you can do the evil, right. It's about minds. If you expect people not to pay you, or if you expect people to, you know, B B be difficult with, with regards to where, if you expect with insurance, we expect to have a difficult time. Speaker 2 (32:44): You will have a difficult time. And a lot of it is mindset. That's the biggest lesson I think because the technical stuff can be, can be taught, you know? And when I first started out opening the practice, I was looking for a mentor in our profession and, you know, Karen, I still, I couldn't find one. And it was very frustrating because I was I was, you know, did have an MBA, but the school of entrepreneurship didn't was not open at stern. And when I was there, right. So I was coming from a corporate culture, transitioning to an entrepreneur, an easy transition in terms of mindset, but not an easy one in terms of logistics of, you know, what does it take to be an entrepreneur versus working for a corporation or corporate it's very different. You have to really advocate for yourself. Speaker 2 (33:32): You have to know who you have to know who you are treating. Your marketing is huge. You have to really learn a lot about that even before way before you even, I mean, I w I wouldn't say learn that before you start your business, because most people, if we did that, we would still not have a business. You know, I would just start and go and you'll learn, you know, but, but the mentorship is huge. I think because why reinvent the wheel when someone else has done that? So talking about the 80% strategy, why, why reinvent the wheel, find somebody in our profession who can mentor you, right. That can help you do that. And the 20, the mindset is stuff is, is, is you, you can learn with mentors or finding somebody outside of our field to help you with that. But that's, that is important. Speaker 2 (34:17): And I believe that the, the, I know we've got a lot of business groups out in our field right now who charge very large sums of money to, to, you know, to up to, you know, and they're great programs, but I will throw out an option. You know, there are a lot of great physical therapists out here, you know, who have business backgrounds, who are entrepreneurs, who have successful businesses like you and me, we, we could all easily help out people, you know from a mentor program. And, you know, we need to grow the profession. We need to grow our physical therapists. And I think it's important that we give back and, and it being, and, and learning one of the main things I've learned as side's, the mindset is learning to be a mentor and learning the importance of mentorship. Because I didn't have one when I first came on and I still don't have one yet. I'm still looking, but, you know, that's why I have a team and collaborate with people like yourself, you know, cause we learn. But I do think that people should like you and I are like on the front lines, so to speak, right. We're, we're, we're, we're seeing patients, we're, we're actually doing it, we're running a business. And I do think that is important when people look for programs out there. Right. Because I think it's, it's, you know, we've done all the hard work. Why reinvent the wheel? Yeah, Speaker 1 (35:41): Absolutely. I couldn't agree more. And I think that's great advice for any upcoming entrepreneur in the physical therapy space. And before we jump off, where can people find you, if they want to ask you questions, if they want to know how you do things, where's the best places for people to reach Speaker 2 (36:00): You? A couple of things, we have a podcast with the wonderful Susan Clinton and myself it's called tough to treat. Yes. we've got our a hundred, our hundredth episode was last week kind of Speaker 5 (36:11): Crazy. Right. I was so proud my God. Speaker 2 (36:14): So there's our website, tough to treat.com and I've got a bunch of website, our business, the website, but I'll give you like the way to reach me is all my handles on social media are at Erica mellow. And my email is erica@ericamellow.com. Speaker 1 (36:31): Perfect. And your website, Eric Speaker 3 (36:33): And mellow.com. Yes, yes, yes. Speaker 2 (36:37): Yeah, no, I'm thinking more philosophy. Physio. One is being redone right now. So that Erica mellow.com is a, Speaker 1 (36:42): It's a good one. Perfect. And we'll have the links to all of that at podcast dot healthy, wealthy, smart.com and the notes for this site for this podcast. And I know that you've answered this question before, but I'll ask it again because you know, more advice from you is not a bad thing. And that's, what advice would you give to your younger self? Maybe like fresh, forget, forget you your first job out on wall street, or even your MBA. How about like fresh out of undergrad? Speaker 2 (37:18): That's a good question. And you asked this of everybody, right? I, I know this, I know you do. I think that, and, and I'm saying this now because I've experienced so much throughout the life, I've lost loved ones and things like that, but be unapologetically yourself. You know, Speaker 1 (37:39): I know don't we waste too much time being somebody else. Yep. Speaker 2 (37:44): Yep. It's at it is. Yes, we have. We do. And I think that if we are Susan always calls me my podcast. CO's a confronter, I'm like, I'm not really a confront her, but I do, you know, have opinions. And I think that we that's the advice just, you know, open your mouth basically and be up, be yourself. Speaker 1 (38:09): Excellent advice. Because like, like you said, we waste so much time trying to be somebody else and trying to conform to what people think we should be instead of just being who we are. Speaker 2 (38:19): Yes. And I, and I think that if I were to give an like other advice, because there's so much burnout in our profession now is that, you know, we need to find joy in our life and whatever that is, it varies for everybody need to do more of that. And this is a practice that I've done. So I recently went to a polo match gesture day. And so I have every year I have a thing called magical moments. And if I have a magical moment like that, I write it down. So it can be like, you know, spinning at soul cycle and Hudson yards during a pandemic, you know, or, or, you know, going to the, met with my niece or going to a polo match or Disney when I, and so at the end of each year or new year's Eve, I'll look at that. And I'm like, oh, I actually did have a nice year because I think we don't write those things down, you know? And I, and I think that's good for, for, for us to do. Speaker 1 (39:10): I love that. I love it yet. Another great piece of advice. Well, thank you so much for coming on the podcast and we will see you again at the end of the month on Tuesday, the 27th of July for our business of physical therapy round table talks, I'm really excited. And for all the people listening, you can find that out in the show notes as well, how to get more information on that round table. So I'm looking forward to that. So thank you so much, Erica, for coming on Speaker 2 (39:45): Again. You're welcome, Karen. Thank you. And, and to all Speaker 1 (39:48): Of you guys listening, thanks so much, have a great couple of days and stay healthy, wealthy and smart.  

HealthcareNOW Radio - Insights and Discussion on Healthcare, Healthcare Information Technology and More

Host David Harlow talks to Joseph Nicholson, MD, CMO of CareAllies. “Dr. Joe” shares about his work as CMO at CareAllies, a value-based care innovation platform and a CIgna company, that has added to its traditional services additional tools that are instrumental in addressing needs in the realm of social determinants of health exacerbated and exposed by the pandemic. To stream our Station live 24/7 visit www.HealthcareNOWRadio.com or ask your Smart Device to “….Play HealthcareNOW Radio”. Find all of our network podcasts on your favorite podcast platforms and be sure to subscribe and like us. Learn more at www.healthcarenowradio.com/listen/

HOT FLASHES & COOL TOPICS
Dethrone Your Inner Critic with Psychotherapist Joanna Kleinman

HOT FLASHES & COOL TOPICS

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 41:56


On this episode, we explore the power of your inner critic.  Do you allow that critical voice to control your actions? Do you understand that voice is not sharing your true thoughts? Our guest, Joanna Kleinman is a licensed psychotherapist, Amazon #1 international best selling author of Dethroning Your Inner Critic, life and corporate coach, podcast host of The Dethroning Your Inner Critic podcast, and public speaker.  She is also the creator of The M.I.N.D Method™, a time tested, proven system that brings together practical psychology, neuroscience and the power of intention to discover who you are separate from the critical voice in your mind.  With over 25 years experience, she has worked with corporations such as Cigna, Nestle, TD Bank, Provider Trust, Susan G. Komen, Lendlease, Campowerment, and Virtua Health Systems, and has transformed the lives of thousands of people, detailing how they can design a new future by rewiring the automatic way they think and act, and breaking the habit of giving energy and attention to their Inner Critic.  Listen on any podcast platform. https://dethroningyourinnercritic.com/ www.hotflashescooltopics.com  

The News & Why It Matters
Ep 742 | Will IDENTITY of Colorado Shooter Change DEMS' Narrative? | Guest: Sheriff Bill Waybourn

The News & Why It Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2021 44:57


A horrific shooting took place in Boulder, Colorado, at a grocery store. Ten people were killed, and Democrats are wasting no time in pushing for gun control. And as more details are coming out about the shooter's identity, will that change the narrative of the Left? In Rochester, N.Y., BLM protesters surrounded a Wegmans, causing the store to have to shut down, but weren't these protests supposed to go away once Biden became president? A reporter asked White House press secretary Jen Psaki about using taxpayer dollars to put migrants in hotels while letting the National Guard in D.C. sleep in a parking garage. And VP Kamala Harris awkwardly laughed when asked if she would visit the border. Are the Democrats in over their heads with this border crisis? One of the largest health insurance providers, Cigna, tells its employees not to hire white men. And lastly, the former UFO program chief at the Pentagon says the information about UFOs is "compelling and real." Today's Sponsors: The FBI calls home title theft one of the fastest-growing white-collar crimes. Register your home at https://www.hometitlelock.com/ to see if you’re already a victim and don’t know it. Enter promo code RADIO for one month of free protection! Don’t give up on your resolution! Built Bar is the answer. Go to https://builtbar.com/ and use promo code NEWS15 to get 15% off your next order. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices