Podcasts about Indian Ocean

The ocean between Africa, Asia, Australia and Antarctica (or the Southern Ocean)

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Indian Ocean

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Latest podcast episodes about Indian Ocean

ClimateBreak
Adapting Ocean Governance for a World of Rising Seas with Dr. Nilufar Oral

ClimateBreak

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 1:44


Climate Change and the Law of the SeaSea level rise due to climate change will directly impact at least 70 countries, many of them small, low-lying island nations. Though their contribution to climate change is very little, they face some of its worst consequences. This is not a new issue, and tension has been building since the late 1980s. In 1989, the Maldives, an island nation in the Indian Ocean, issued an international declaration, the first of its kind, calling attention to sea level rise due to climate change, and how it impacts its land. Island states often have small land area, but, under international law, have jurisdiction over a larger area of their surrounding seas for economic purposes. What if an island loses territory due to sea level rise? If so, it could lose its economic zone. This is also a national security question; could another nation then legally take over this economic zone? Currently, the international law framework, called the Law of the Sea, does not answer these questions even though the  livelihoods of millions are at issue. A 2021 declaration by Pacific Island nations calls for maritime boundaries to stay where they are now regardless of sea level rise. However, this requires the endorsement of other nations. The United Nations, up until now, has paid comparatively little attention to this issue, but, through its study group on sea-level rise, the UN is aiming to engage non-low-lying island nations, and attempt to resolve these and other questions. Climate Refugees Need Protected Status Under the LawBy 2050, there could be 1.2 billion climate refugees, according to the international think tank International Environmental Partnership. But these refugees often do not fit the legal definition of “refugee”, including individuals displaced in the United States. Becoming a “refugee” under the law confers special status; it protects from deportation, for example. In 2013, a man from Kiribati, a country undergoing severe sea level rise, applied for refugee status as a “climate refugee” in New Zealand. His application was denied, and he was repatriated to Kiribati. The man subsequently filed a complaint with the UN Convent of Civil Liberties, claiming his right to life had been violated. The man lost his case, because his life was not found to be under immediate danger. However, the wording of the UN's ruling in the case asserts that those fleeing a climate crisis cannot be sent home, thereby creating a non-binding international construct. This case illustrates some of the complexities raised by climate refugees and how they are currently viewed in many of the world's legal systems.  Sea level rise is not only an issue of the future but already an issue of the present. Who is Dr. Nilufer Oral?Dr. Nilufer Oral is director at the Center for International Law at the National University of Singapore. She is also a member of the International Law Commission at the United Nations and co-chair of the study group at the UN on sea level rise in relation to international law. Read MoreSink or swim: Can island states survive the climate crisis? | | UN NewsStatement by Ms. Nilüfer Oral, Co-Chairs of the Study Group on Sea level rise -- Interaction with members of the ILC 2020Nilufer Oral--COP 26International Law as an Adaptation Measure to Sea-level Rise and Its Impacts on Islands and Offshore Features | Request PDF

Then and Now History Podcast: Global History and Culture

(Bonus) The Imperial Japanese Navy in World War II, at the beginning of the Pacific War in December 1941, was the third most powerful navy in the world, and the naval air service was one of the most potent air forces in the world. During the first six months of the war, the Imperial Japanese Navy enjoyed spectacular success in inflicting heavy defeats on Allied forces, being undefeated in every battle. The attack on Pearl Harbor crippled the battleships of the US Pacific Fleet, while Allied navies were devastated during Japan's conquest of Southeast Asia. Japanese Navy aircraft operating from land bases were also responsible for the sinkings of HMS Prince of Wales and HMS Repulse which was the first time that capital ships were sunk by an aerial attack while underway. In April 1942, the Indian Ocean raid drove the Royal Navy from South East Asia. After these successes, the Japanese now concentrated on the elimination and neutralization of strategic points from where the Allies could launch counteroffensives against Japan's conquests. However, at the Coral Sea, the Japanese were forced to abandon their attempts to isolate Australia while the defeat at Midway saw them forced on the defensive. The campaign in the Solomon Islands, in which the Japanese lost the war of attrition, was the most decisive; they had failed to commit enough forces in sufficient time.

New Books in Film
Samhita Sunya, "Sirens of Modernity: World Cinema via Bombay" (U California Press, 2022)

New Books in Film

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 57:47


Hello, world! This is the Global Media & Communication podcast series. In this inaugural episode, our host Aswin Punathambekar speaks with Samhita Sunya, the author of the book Sirens of Modernity: World Cinema via Bombay (U California Press, 2022). In this episode you'll hear about: Dr. Sunya's intellectual trajectory in studying South Asian cinema from Houston to Bangalore, Bombay, and beyond; How the periodization of the “long” 1960s – bookended by the 1955 Bandung Afro-Asian Conference and the 1975 Indian Emergency – comes into view through the author's interdisciplinary approach; How Dr. Sunya works her way through and out of a popular binary misunderstanding of Indian cinema - a familiar opposition between an auteurist world cinema and song-and-dance driven popular cinema; Why the author chooses what would be considered oddball or off-beat media artifacts, what kinds of sources she gathers in relation to these materials, and where she looks for them in creative ways; Reflection upon the pedagogy of world cinema in the classroom; A discussion of the notion of “excess” and how it is weaved into the three central themes – love, desire, and gender – that emerge throughout the book; How Dr. Sunya's cross-industry and trans-regional perspective counter the spatial biases that are deeply ingrained into the disciplinary boundaries; A reflection on the nature of academic work through the lens of “love” on topics like world cinema and South Asia. About the Book By the 1960s, Hindi-language films from Bombay were in high demand not only for domestic and diasporic audiences but also for sizable non-diasporic audiences across Eastern Europe, Central Asia, the Middle East, and the Indian Ocean world. Often confounding critics who painted the song-dance films as noisy and nonsensical. if not dangerously seductive and utterly vulgar, Bombay films attracted fervent worldwide viewers precisely for their elements of romance, music, and spectacle. In this richly documented history of Hindi cinema during the long 1960s, Samhita Sunya historicizes the emergence of world cinema as a category of cinematic diplomacy that formed in the crucible of the Cold War. Interwoven with this history is an account of the prolific transnational circuits of popular Hindi films alongside the efflorescence of European art cinema and Cold War–era forays of Hollywood abroad. By following archival leads and threads of argumentation within commercial Hindi films that seem to be odd cases—flops, remakes, low-budget comedies, and prestige productions—this book offers a novel map for excavating the historical and ethical stakes of world cinema and world-making via Bombay. You can find the open access version of Dr. Sunya's book through Luminosoa.org at the University of California Press website. Author Bio: Samhita Sunya is Assistant Professor of Middle Eastern & South Asian Languages & Cultures at the University of Virginia. Host Bio: Aswin Punathambekar is a Professor of Communication and Director of the Center for Advanced Research in Global Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania. Editor & Producer Bio: Jing Wang. She is Senior Research Manager at CARGC at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania. Original Background Music by Mengyang Zoe Zhao. Our podcast is part of the multimodal project powered by the Center for Advanced Research in Global Communication (CARGC) at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. At CARGC, we produce and promote critical, interdisciplinary, and multimodal research on global media and communication. We aim to bridge academic scholarship and public life, bringing the very best scholarship to bear on enduring global questions and pressing contemporary issues. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/film

New Books in World Affairs
Samhita Sunya, "Sirens of Modernity: World Cinema via Bombay" (U California Press, 2022)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 57:47


Hello, world! This is the Global Media & Communication podcast series. In this inaugural episode, our host Aswin Punathambekar speaks with Samhita Sunya, the author of the book Sirens of Modernity: World Cinema via Bombay (U California Press, 2022). In this episode you'll hear about: Dr. Sunya's intellectual trajectory in studying South Asian cinema from Houston to Bangalore, Bombay, and beyond; How the periodization of the “long” 1960s – bookended by the 1955 Bandung Afro-Asian Conference and the 1975 Indian Emergency – comes into view through the author's interdisciplinary approach; How Dr. Sunya works her way through and out of a popular binary misunderstanding of Indian cinema - a familiar opposition between an auteurist world cinema and song-and-dance driven popular cinema; Why the author chooses what would be considered oddball or off-beat media artifacts, what kinds of sources she gathers in relation to these materials, and where she looks for them in creative ways; Reflection upon the pedagogy of world cinema in the classroom; A discussion of the notion of “excess” and how it is weaved into the three central themes – love, desire, and gender – that emerge throughout the book; How Dr. Sunya's cross-industry and trans-regional perspective counter the spatial biases that are deeply ingrained into the disciplinary boundaries; A reflection on the nature of academic work through the lens of “love” on topics like world cinema and South Asia. About the Book By the 1960s, Hindi-language films from Bombay were in high demand not only for domestic and diasporic audiences but also for sizable non-diasporic audiences across Eastern Europe, Central Asia, the Middle East, and the Indian Ocean world. Often confounding critics who painted the song-dance films as noisy and nonsensical. if not dangerously seductive and utterly vulgar, Bombay films attracted fervent worldwide viewers precisely for their elements of romance, music, and spectacle. In this richly documented history of Hindi cinema during the long 1960s, Samhita Sunya historicizes the emergence of world cinema as a category of cinematic diplomacy that formed in the crucible of the Cold War. Interwoven with this history is an account of the prolific transnational circuits of popular Hindi films alongside the efflorescence of European art cinema and Cold War–era forays of Hollywood abroad. By following archival leads and threads of argumentation within commercial Hindi films that seem to be odd cases—flops, remakes, low-budget comedies, and prestige productions—this book offers a novel map for excavating the historical and ethical stakes of world cinema and world-making via Bombay. You can find the open access version of Dr. Sunya's book through Luminosoa.org at the University of California Press website. Author Bio: Samhita Sunya is Assistant Professor of Middle Eastern & South Asian Languages & Cultures at the University of Virginia. Host Bio: Aswin Punathambekar is a Professor of Communication and Director of the Center for Advanced Research in Global Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania. Editor & Producer Bio: Jing Wang. She is Senior Research Manager at CARGC at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania. Original Background Music by Mengyang Zoe Zhao. Our podcast is part of the multimodal project powered by the Center for Advanced Research in Global Communication (CARGC) at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. At CARGC, we produce and promote critical, interdisciplinary, and multimodal research on global media and communication. We aim to bridge academic scholarship and public life, bringing the very best scholarship to bear on enduring global questions and pressing contemporary issues. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books in South Asian Studies
Samhita Sunya, "Sirens of Modernity: World Cinema via Bombay" (U California Press, 2022)

New Books in South Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 57:47


Hello, world! This is the Global Media & Communication podcast series. In this inaugural episode, our host Aswin Punathambekar speaks with Samhita Sunya, the author of the book Sirens of Modernity: World Cinema via Bombay (U California Press, 2022). In this episode you'll hear about: Dr. Sunya's intellectual trajectory in studying South Asian cinema from Houston to Bangalore, Bombay, and beyond; How the periodization of the “long” 1960s – bookended by the 1955 Bandung Afro-Asian Conference and the 1975 Indian Emergency – comes into view through the author's interdisciplinary approach; How Dr. Sunya works her way through and out of a popular binary misunderstanding of Indian cinema - a familiar opposition between an auteurist world cinema and song-and-dance driven popular cinema; Why the author chooses what would be considered oddball or off-beat media artifacts, what kinds of sources she gathers in relation to these materials, and where she looks for them in creative ways; Reflection upon the pedagogy of world cinema in the classroom; A discussion of the notion of “excess” and how it is weaved into the three central themes – love, desire, and gender – that emerge throughout the book; How Dr. Sunya's cross-industry and trans-regional perspective counter the spatial biases that are deeply ingrained into the disciplinary boundaries; A reflection on the nature of academic work through the lens of “love” on topics like world cinema and South Asia. About the Book By the 1960s, Hindi-language films from Bombay were in high demand not only for domestic and diasporic audiences but also for sizable non-diasporic audiences across Eastern Europe, Central Asia, the Middle East, and the Indian Ocean world. Often confounding critics who painted the song-dance films as noisy and nonsensical. if not dangerously seductive and utterly vulgar, Bombay films attracted fervent worldwide viewers precisely for their elements of romance, music, and spectacle. In this richly documented history of Hindi cinema during the long 1960s, Samhita Sunya historicizes the emergence of world cinema as a category of cinematic diplomacy that formed in the crucible of the Cold War. Interwoven with this history is an account of the prolific transnational circuits of popular Hindi films alongside the efflorescence of European art cinema and Cold War–era forays of Hollywood abroad. By following archival leads and threads of argumentation within commercial Hindi films that seem to be odd cases—flops, remakes, low-budget comedies, and prestige productions—this book offers a novel map for excavating the historical and ethical stakes of world cinema and world-making via Bombay. You can find the open access version of Dr. Sunya's book through Luminosoa.org at the University of California Press website. Author Bio: Samhita Sunya is Assistant Professor of Middle Eastern & South Asian Languages & Cultures at the University of Virginia. Host Bio: Aswin Punathambekar is a Professor of Communication and Director of the Center for Advanced Research in Global Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania. Editor & Producer Bio: Jing Wang. She is Senior Research Manager at CARGC at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania. Original Background Music by Mengyang Zoe Zhao. Our podcast is part of the multimodal project powered by the Center for Advanced Research in Global Communication (CARGC) at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. At CARGC, we produce and promote critical, interdisciplinary, and multimodal research on global media and communication. We aim to bridge academic scholarship and public life, bringing the very best scholarship to bear on enduring global questions and pressing contemporary issues. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/south-asian-studies

New Books in Popular Culture
Samhita Sunya, "Sirens of Modernity: World Cinema via Bombay" (U California Press, 2022)

New Books in Popular Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 57:47


Hello, world! This is the Global Media & Communication podcast series. In this inaugural episode, our host Aswin Punathambekar speaks with Samhita Sunya, the author of the book Sirens of Modernity: World Cinema via Bombay (U California Press, 2022). In this episode you'll hear about: Dr. Sunya's intellectual trajectory in studying South Asian cinema from Houston to Bangalore, Bombay, and beyond; How the periodization of the “long” 1960s – bookended by the 1955 Bandung Afro-Asian Conference and the 1975 Indian Emergency – comes into view through the author's interdisciplinary approach; How Dr. Sunya works her way through and out of a popular binary misunderstanding of Indian cinema - a familiar opposition between an auteurist world cinema and song-and-dance driven popular cinema; Why the author chooses what would be considered oddball or off-beat media artifacts, what kinds of sources she gathers in relation to these materials, and where she looks for them in creative ways; Reflection upon the pedagogy of world cinema in the classroom; A discussion of the notion of “excess” and how it is weaved into the three central themes – love, desire, and gender – that emerge throughout the book; How Dr. Sunya's cross-industry and trans-regional perspective counter the spatial biases that are deeply ingrained into the disciplinary boundaries; A reflection on the nature of academic work through the lens of “love” on topics like world cinema and South Asia. About the Book By the 1960s, Hindi-language films from Bombay were in high demand not only for domestic and diasporic audiences but also for sizable non-diasporic audiences across Eastern Europe, Central Asia, the Middle East, and the Indian Ocean world. Often confounding critics who painted the song-dance films as noisy and nonsensical. if not dangerously seductive and utterly vulgar, Bombay films attracted fervent worldwide viewers precisely for their elements of romance, music, and spectacle. In this richly documented history of Hindi cinema during the long 1960s, Samhita Sunya historicizes the emergence of world cinema as a category of cinematic diplomacy that formed in the crucible of the Cold War. Interwoven with this history is an account of the prolific transnational circuits of popular Hindi films alongside the efflorescence of European art cinema and Cold War–era forays of Hollywood abroad. By following archival leads and threads of argumentation within commercial Hindi films that seem to be odd cases—flops, remakes, low-budget comedies, and prestige productions—this book offers a novel map for excavating the historical and ethical stakes of world cinema and world-making via Bombay. You can find the open access version of Dr. Sunya's book through Luminosoa.org at the University of California Press website. Author Bio: Samhita Sunya is Assistant Professor of Middle Eastern & South Asian Languages & Cultures at the University of Virginia. Host Bio: Aswin Punathambekar is a Professor of Communication and Director of the Center for Advanced Research in Global Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania. Editor & Producer Bio: Jing Wang. She is Senior Research Manager at CARGC at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania. Original Background Music by Mengyang Zoe Zhao. Our podcast is part of the multimodal project powered by the Center for Advanced Research in Global Communication (CARGC) at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. At CARGC, we produce and promote critical, interdisciplinary, and multimodal research on global media and communication. We aim to bridge academic scholarship and public life, bringing the very best scholarship to bear on enduring global questions and pressing contemporary issues. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/popular-culture

New Books Network
Samhita Sunya, "Sirens of Modernity: World Cinema via Bombay" (U California Press, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 57:47


Hello, world! This is the Global Media & Communication podcast series. In this inaugural episode, our host Aswin Punathambekar speaks with Samhita Sunya, the author of the book Sirens of Modernity: World Cinema via Bombay (U California Press, 2022). In this episode you'll hear about: Dr. Sunya's intellectual trajectory in studying South Asian cinema from Houston to Bangalore, Bombay, and beyond; How the periodization of the “long” 1960s – bookended by the 1955 Bandung Afro-Asian Conference and the 1975 Indian Emergency – comes into view through the author's interdisciplinary approach; How Dr. Sunya works her way through and out of a popular binary misunderstanding of Indian cinema - a familiar opposition between an auteurist world cinema and song-and-dance driven popular cinema; Why the author chooses what would be considered oddball or off-beat media artifacts, what kinds of sources she gathers in relation to these materials, and where she looks for them in creative ways; Reflection upon the pedagogy of world cinema in the classroom; A discussion of the notion of “excess” and how it is weaved into the three central themes – love, desire, and gender – that emerge throughout the book; How Dr. Sunya's cross-industry and trans-regional perspective counter the spatial biases that are deeply ingrained into the disciplinary boundaries; A reflection on the nature of academic work through the lens of “love” on topics like world cinema and South Asia. About the Book By the 1960s, Hindi-language films from Bombay were in high demand not only for domestic and diasporic audiences but also for sizable non-diasporic audiences across Eastern Europe, Central Asia, the Middle East, and the Indian Ocean world. Often confounding critics who painted the song-dance films as noisy and nonsensical. if not dangerously seductive and utterly vulgar, Bombay films attracted fervent worldwide viewers precisely for their elements of romance, music, and spectacle. In this richly documented history of Hindi cinema during the long 1960s, Samhita Sunya historicizes the emergence of world cinema as a category of cinematic diplomacy that formed in the crucible of the Cold War. Interwoven with this history is an account of the prolific transnational circuits of popular Hindi films alongside the efflorescence of European art cinema and Cold War–era forays of Hollywood abroad. By following archival leads and threads of argumentation within commercial Hindi films that seem to be odd cases—flops, remakes, low-budget comedies, and prestige productions—this book offers a novel map for excavating the historical and ethical stakes of world cinema and world-making via Bombay. You can find the open access version of Dr. Sunya's book through Luminosoa.org at the University of California Press website. Author Bio: Samhita Sunya is Assistant Professor of Middle Eastern & South Asian Languages & Cultures at the University of Virginia. Host Bio: Aswin Punathambekar is a Professor of Communication and Director of the Center for Advanced Research in Global Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania. Editor & Producer Bio: Jing Wang. She is Senior Research Manager at CARGC at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania. Original Background Music by Mengyang Zoe Zhao. Our podcast is part of the multimodal project powered by the Center for Advanced Research in Global Communication (CARGC) at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. At CARGC, we produce and promote critical, interdisciplinary, and multimodal research on global media and communication. We aim to bridge academic scholarship and public life, bringing the very best scholarship to bear on enduring global questions and pressing contemporary issues. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Dance
Samhita Sunya, "Sirens of Modernity: World Cinema via Bombay" (U California Press, 2022)

New Books in Dance

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 57:47


Hello, world! This is the Global Media & Communication podcast series. In this inaugural episode, our host Aswin Punathambekar speaks with Samhita Sunya, the author of the book Sirens of Modernity: World Cinema via Bombay (U California Press, 2022). In this episode you'll hear about: Dr. Sunya's intellectual trajectory in studying South Asian cinema from Houston to Bangalore, Bombay, and beyond; How the periodization of the “long” 1960s – bookended by the 1955 Bandung Afro-Asian Conference and the 1975 Indian Emergency – comes into view through the author's interdisciplinary approach; How Dr. Sunya works her way through and out of a popular binary misunderstanding of Indian cinema - a familiar opposition between an auteurist world cinema and song-and-dance driven popular cinema; Why the author chooses what would be considered oddball or off-beat media artifacts, what kinds of sources she gathers in relation to these materials, and where she looks for them in creative ways; Reflection upon the pedagogy of world cinema in the classroom; A discussion of the notion of “excess” and how it is weaved into the three central themes – love, desire, and gender – that emerge throughout the book; How Dr. Sunya's cross-industry and trans-regional perspective counter the spatial biases that are deeply ingrained into the disciplinary boundaries; A reflection on the nature of academic work through the lens of “love” on topics like world cinema and South Asia. About the Book By the 1960s, Hindi-language films from Bombay were in high demand not only for domestic and diasporic audiences but also for sizable non-diasporic audiences across Eastern Europe, Central Asia, the Middle East, and the Indian Ocean world. Often confounding critics who painted the song-dance films as noisy and nonsensical. if not dangerously seductive and utterly vulgar, Bombay films attracted fervent worldwide viewers precisely for their elements of romance, music, and spectacle. In this richly documented history of Hindi cinema during the long 1960s, Samhita Sunya historicizes the emergence of world cinema as a category of cinematic diplomacy that formed in the crucible of the Cold War. Interwoven with this history is an account of the prolific transnational circuits of popular Hindi films alongside the efflorescence of European art cinema and Cold War–era forays of Hollywood abroad. By following archival leads and threads of argumentation within commercial Hindi films that seem to be odd cases—flops, remakes, low-budget comedies, and prestige productions—this book offers a novel map for excavating the historical and ethical stakes of world cinema and world-making via Bombay. You can find the open access version of Dr. Sunya's book through Luminosoa.org at the University of California Press website. Author Bio: Samhita Sunya is Assistant Professor of Middle Eastern & South Asian Languages & Cultures at the University of Virginia. Host Bio: Aswin Punathambekar is a Professor of Communication and Director of the Center for Advanced Research in Global Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania. Editor & Producer Bio: Jing Wang. She is Senior Research Manager at CARGC at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania. Original Background Music by Mengyang Zoe Zhao. Our podcast is part of the multimodal project powered by the Center for Advanced Research in Global Communication (CARGC) at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. At CARGC, we produce and promote critical, interdisciplinary, and multimodal research on global media and communication. We aim to bridge academic scholarship and public life, bringing the very best scholarship to bear on enduring global questions and pressing contemporary issues. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/performing-arts

Auckland Writers Festival
AFTER THE TAMPA: ABBAS NAZARI (2022)

Auckland Writers Festival

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 60:49


Abbas Nazari was just seven when his family, fearing Taliban persecution, fled Afghanistan, embarking on a desperate and dangerous journey that ultimately lead him to New Zealand. Crammed with more than 400 other asylum seekers on a sinking fishing boat in the Indian Ocean, they were saved by cargo ship Tampa in a dramatic rescue. After being rejected by Australia, some of the group including Nazari's family and were offered asylum here. He has gone on to become a Fulbright Scholar, completing a Master in Security Studies from Georgetown University in Washington DC, and authoring the moving memoir 'After the Tampa'. As the rise of the Taliban once again haunts the people of his homeland, Nazari reflects on questions of home and security, challenge and hope, opportunity and resilience. In conversation with Nikki Mandow. AUCKLAND WRITERS FESTIVAL WAITUHI O TĀMAKI FRIDAY 26 AUGUST 2022 – 12.30-1.30PM KIRI TE KANAWA THEATRE, AOTEA CENTRE

The Hellenistic Age Podcast
079: The Indo-Greeks - Homer on the Indus

The Hellenistic Age Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 64:12


Following the death of Menander I Soter, the Indo-Greeks would decline in power over the next 150 years as the newly arrived Indo-Scythians/Indo-Saka seized the Punjab, and with the last king disappearing by 10 A.D, Greek rule in Central Asia and India was brought to a definitive end. In their wake, later powers like the Kushan Empire established control over Bactria and Gandhara, and trade with the Roman Empire would flourish along the sailing routes of the Indian Ocean. Despite the disappearance of the Greco-Bactrian and Indo-Greek kingdoms, evidence points to a survival of Hellenistic culture nearly five centuries after Alexander's death. Episode Notes: (https://hellenisticagepodcast.wordpress.com/2022/09/27/079-the-indo-greeks-homer-on-the-indus/) Episode 079 Transcript: (https://hellenisticagepodcast.files.wordpress.com/2022/09/079-the-indo-greeks-homer-on-the-indus.pdf) A Reader's Guide to Greco-Bactria and the Indo-Greeks: (https://hellenisticagepodcast.files.wordpress.com/2022/09/a-readers-guide-to-greco-bactria-and-the-indo-greeks.pdf) Social Media: Twitter (https://twitter.com/HellenisticPod) Facebook (www.facebook.com/hellenisticagepodcast/) Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/hellenistic_age_podcast/) Twitch (https://www.twitch.tv/hellenisticagepodcast) Show Merchandise: Etsy (https://www.etsy.com/shop/HellenisticAgePod) Redbubble (https://www.redbubble.com/people/HellenisticPod/shop?asc=u) Donations: Ko-Fi (https://ko-fi.com/hellenisticagepodcast) Amazon Book Wish List (https://tinyurl.com/vfw6ask)

The afikra Podcast
SHAWKAT TOORAWA | Arabic Literature | Conversations

The afikra Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 55:48


Shawkat M. Toorawa talked about his work in Arabic translation and literature.Professor Shawkat M. Toorawa is a Professor of Arabic at Yale, he received his BA, MA, and PhD from the University of Pennsylvania. He has taught Arabic at Duke University, medieval French literature and Indian Ocean studies at the University of Mauritius, and Arabic and other literatures at Cornell University. His scholarly interests include: classical and medieval Arabic literature, especially the literary and writerly culture of Abbasid Baghdad; the Qur'an, in particular hapaxes, rhyme-words, and translation; the Waqwaq Tree and islands; Indian Ocean studies, particularly Creole literatures of Mauritius and the Mascarenes; modern poetry; translation, and SF film and literature. His books include a translation of Adonis's A Time Between Ashes and Roses: Poems (2004), Arabic Literary Culture: 500–925, co-edited with Michael Cooperson, and more. Toorawa is a Director of the School of Abbasid Studies, on the editorial boards of the Journal of Abbasid Studies, the Journal of Arabic Literature, the Journal of Qur'anic Studies, and Middle Eastern Literatures, and an executive editor of the Library of Arabic Literature.Created by Mikey Muhanna, afikra Hosted by Aya NimerEdited by: Ramzi RammanTheme music by: Tarek Yamani https://www.instagram.com/tarek_yamani/About the afikra Conversations:Our long-form interview series features academics, arts, ‎and media experts who are helping document and/or shape the history and culture of the Arab world through their ‎work. Our hope is that by having the guest share their expertise and story, the community still walks away with newfound curiosity - and maybe some good recommendations about new nerdy rabbit holes to dive into headfirst. ‎Following the interview, there is a moderated town-hall-style Q&A with questions coming from the live virtual audience ‎on Zoom.‎ Join the live audience: https://www.afikra.com/rsvp   FollowYoutube - Instagram (@afikra_) - Facebook - Twitter Support www.afikra.com/supportAbout afikra:‎afikra is a movement to convert passive interest in the Arab world to active intellectual curiosity. We aim to collectively reframe the dominant narrative of the region by exploring the histories and cultures of the region- past, present, and future - through conversations driven by curiosity. Read more about us on  afikra.com

The King & Kandy Show
NASA Attempts to Destroy Asteroid Headed Towards Indian Ocean!

The King & Kandy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 38:00


In this episode we discuss Nasa's plan to smash an Asteroid headed towards the Indian Ocean. Also, we talk about Rihanna's announcement that she'll be performing at the Superbowl Halftime Show.Cash App: KingKandyShowE-mail: KingKandyShow@Gmail.comWebsite: www.KingKandyShow.com

Highlights from Moncrieff
Nasa probe set to smash into an asteroid

Highlights from Moncrieff

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 12:21


A specially designed probe will tonight collide with a meteor over the Indian Ocean in order to test NASA's capability to defend the planet against objects that could potentially have a devastating impact on Earth. Sean was joined on the show by Professor Alan Fitzsimmons, Astronomer and member of the Nasa Dart investigation team at Queen's University Belfast, to discuss...

Moncrieff Highlights
Nasa probe set to smash into an asteroid

Moncrieff Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 12:21


A specially designed probe will tonight collide with a meteor over the Indian Ocean in order to test NASA's capability to defend the planet against objects that could potentially have a devastating impact on Earth. Sean was joined on the show by Professor Alan Fitzsimmons, Astronomer and member of the Nasa Dart investigation team at Queen's University Belfast, to discuss...

In The Seats with...
Episode 429: In The Seats With....Jaques De Silva, Shamilla Miller,, John Barker and 'The Umbrella Men'

In The Seats with...

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 27:15


Sometimes the music just has to move you in many different ways....On this episode we're still playing catch up from TIFF as we dive into the joyous brilliant adventures of 'The Umbrella Men'.Reluctantly returning to Cape Town to bury his estranged father, Jerome (Jaques De Silva) learns he's been bequeathed the Goema Club, home to his father's beloved minstrel troupe. The Umbrella Men are a mainstay band in the historic Cape Town Minstrel Carnival, celebrated every year since the early 19th century on January 2, marking the only day off Dutch colonists gave their enslaved captives from across the Indian Ocean (including South and Southeast Asia, Madagascar and Mozambique). Along with the club, though, Jerome inherits his father's enemies — chief among them rival troupe leader Tariq Cupido (Abduragman Adams) — as well as a million-ZAR debt to the bank. With the threat of the club's foreclosure only weeks away, a desperate Jerome decides a bank heist, using the annual carnival as cover, is the only way to save the club — and his father's legacy.The Umbrella Men is one of those films that perfectly encapsulates why we go to film festivals in the first place.  It was just fun and we got to have some more fun talking with writer/director John Barker and stars Jaques De Silva and Shamilla Miller about the origins of the film and so very much more

The Thriller Zone
Adam Hamdy, the author of The Other Side of Night

The Thriller Zone

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 84:55


On today's 96th Episode of The Thriller Zone, I'm 101% jazzed to welcome THE Adam Hamdy, author of many epic thrillers, and the very latest The Other Side of Night. In this show, Adam and I of course chat about the book, we refer to some of his other books, much different than this one, but we also veer off the beaten path. Several times. And for me? Those "off the beaten path" moments are among my very favorite. Why? Because it's "real conversation" from two "dudes" who greatly admire one another and enjoy a good chat. Adam also took this show a step further for me. How? He introduced me to not one, or two, but THREE other authors, none of whom I'd ever heard of before. They are: Anthony Horowitz, author of kids books, adult books, graphic novels and more. Link: https://anthonyhorowitz.com And yes, we're hoping to get him on TheThrillerZone Podcast. Rudolph "Rudy "Vrba, who wrote, "I Escaped from Auschwitz." Link: https://tinyurl.com/RudyVrbaBook Dean Buonomano, author of "Your Brain is a Time Machine." Link: https://tinyurl.com/BrainTimeMachine Thank you, Adam. I've purchased two of the three, and have the third coming to my library soon. There's more to unbox in this show, as Adam and I travel down the paths of several obscure topics, from our favorite vintage t-shirts, and why dudes like us enjoy buying several copies of a shirt we particularly adore. We chat at length about his new home in Maritius, which is an African island in the Indian Ocean, about as far away from "standard civilization" as one can get. But that's grand, isn't it? Not to mention WAY cheaper to live. Learn more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mauritius There's SO much solid, in-depth conversation that I implore you to lend your ears to the slightly-over-an-hour show. It's worth the time. To learn more about Adam and his mad talents, go to: AdamHamdy.com AS ALWAYS, you can follow us on Twitter & Instagram @thethrillerzone. LISTEN to us on TheThrillerZone.com and ALL major Podcast Channels. WATCH us on YouTube.com/TheThrillerZone. I put a LOT of extra time into the video portion, because I have a background in television production, plus I enjoy the extra benefits it provides. IF you enjoy it, please SUBSCRIBE to the channel. Trust me, it helps me in the long run (doing this on a weekly basis, on both TV and "Radio" (aka Podcasts), isn't cheap. Okay, I've gotta bounce, I've got some readin' to do. Until next time, I'm David Temple your host. Mentioned in this episode: AuthorBytes 92222 You know the nice thing about having a website that works? Is it works! AuthorBytes will sign you up, dial you in, and deliver a secure, handsome website that works, so you don't have to worry about a thing. Sign up today with code: ThrillerZone & get 3-MONTHS FREE with a 1-Year Contract. Warwicks 92222 Warwicks.com is one of my favorite places to shop when I want to purchase a special one-of-a-kind gift for a special someone. With complimentary gift-wrapping & free parking, it makes your next shopping trip simple. Books galore & great Customer Service.

ThePrint
ThePrintPod: How Cholas, Mings dominated Indian Ocean before INS Vikrant

ThePrint

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 8:36


The idea of dominating the Indian Ocean is not new. Naval interactions between South India and Sri Lanka date back to the 11th century.  

Barrelled Surf Podcast
Damon Eastaugh - Part 2

Barrelled Surf Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 121:38


Damon Eastaugh joins us in the Shedquarters this week. Winemaker, Father, Husband and former Oakley Big Wave Award winner, Damon has lived and rich life surrounded by the Indian Ocean and vineyards. Taking us to Hawaii, Indonesia and of course the South West, Damon regales us with some incredible tales of adventure, mateship and some sickening wipeouts. Please enjoy our part 2 of our epic chat.

Brand Alchemist Podcast
The Alchemy of Sauces, Community, and Universe Alignment

Brand Alchemist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 37:15


Hawa Hassan is the CEO and Founder of Basbaas Foods, an authentic, packaged line of Somalian hot sauces and chutneys. The brand has been featured in Forbes, The New York Times, Eater, and many other notable publications. As a dynamic chef, recipe developer, and entrepreneur, Hawa is the author of In Bibi's Kitchen, where she shares recipes and stories from grandmothers in eight African countries bordering the Indian Ocean. In this episode… As a pioneer of authentic products in the CPG space, it's crucial to position your brand as an industry leader. So, what does it take to develop an inspiring brand story that impacts your consumers? Hawa Hassan emphasizes the importance of community and relationships in brand success. When establishing her business, she partnered with another brand owner who shared her beliefs and ideologies. This partnership generated growth opportunities for both companies who were able to help each other overcome challenges. Hawa encourages others to create meaningful change by supporting similar brands with the potential to make a valuable impact on the market. Tune in to this episode of the Brand Alchemist Podcast as Taja Dockendorf sits down with Hawa Hassan, CEO and Founder of Basbaas Foods, to talk about fostering community and storytelling with CPG brands. Hawa shares how her background inspired her to launch Basbaas, the origin of her sauces, and the influence community plays on her brand.

His2Go - Geschichte Podcast
His2Go#96 - Zheng Hes große Expeditionsflotte: Als Chinas Armada die See beherrschte

His2Go - Geschichte Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 54:30


1405 stach von Nanjing aus eine Flotte in See, wie sie die Welt noch nie gesehen hatte. 200-300 hölzerne Dschunken mit 28.000 Passagieren, jede einzelne größer als jedes bisher gebaute Schiff, segelten auf insgesamt sieben Expeditionsreisen über das südchinesische Meer und den indischen Ozean. Befehligt wurden sie von Admiral Zheng He, Eunuch und Günstling Kaiser Yongles. Wie eine schwimmende Stadt segelte die riesige Flotte bis an die Grenzen der bekannten Welt, um Macht und Ruhm der Ming-Dynastie zu demonstrieren. China erreichte so eine Vormachtstellung auf den Weltmeeren, die Europa in dieser Zeit weit überragte. Jedoch war diese Dominanz nicht von Dauer...........WERBUNGDu willst dir die Rabatte unserer Werbepartner sichern? Hier geht's zu den Angeboten!........FOLGENBILDDas Folgendbild zeigt eine Darstellung bzw. Rekonstruktion der Flotte Zheng Hes im Cheng Ho Cultural Museum.........LITERATURDreyer, Edward L.: Zheng He: China and the oceans in the early Ming dynasty, 1405 – 1433, New York 2007.Liu; Chen; Blue (Hrsg.): Zheng He's maritime voyages (1405-1433) and China's relations with the Indian Ocean world: a multilingual bibliography, Leiden 2014.https://www.businessinsider.de/wirtschaft/china-zerstoerte-vor-500-jahren-eigene-marine-2017-3/Jost, Alexander: Hoher Besuch im Land des Himmelsplatzes - die Fahrten der Ming-Flotte in die Arabische Welt, 1413-1433, Tübingen 2011 (Magisterarbeit)..........UNTERSTÜTZUNGIhr könnt uns dabei unterstützen, weiterhin jeden 10., 20. und 30. des Monats eine Folge zu veröffentlichen!Folgt und bewertet uns bei Spotify, Google Podcasts, Apple Podcasts, Podimo, Instagram, Twitter oder über eure Lieblings-Podcastplattformen. Über diesen Spendenlink oder unseren Fanartikel-Shop könnt ihr uns auch finanziell unterstützen!Wir freuen uns über euer Feedback, Input und Vorschläge zum Podcast, die ihr uns über das Kontaktformular auf der Website, Instagram und unsere Feedback E-Mail: kontakt@his2go.de schicken könnt. An dieser Stelle nochmals vielen Dank an jede einzelne Rückmeldung, die uns bisher erreicht hat und uns sehr motiviert..........COPYRIGHTMusic from https://filmmusic.io: “Sneaky Snitch” by Kevin MacLeod and "Plain Loafer" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com) License: CC BY Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Therapy Chat
348: What Is Embodiment + How Do We Do It? With Dr. Raja Selvam

Therapy Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 50:08


Welcome back to Therapy Chat! We often talk about embodiment, and connecting with emotion held in the body; but what does it actually mean and how do we do it? This week, host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C interviews Dr. Raja Selvam, PhD, a licensed clinical psychologist who is the developer of Integral Somatic Psychology (ISP), a therapeutic approach based on affective neuroscience and emerging scientific paradigms of embodied cognition, emotion, and behavior in cognitive psychology to improve cognitive, emotional, behavioral, relational, and spiritual outcomes in all therapy modalities. Earlier this year, Dr. Selvam's book, "Embodying Emotions: A Method for Improving Cognitive, Emotional, and Behavioral Outcomes" was released this year.    Dr. Selvam is also a senior trainer in Dr. Peter Levine's Somatic Experiencing (SE) Professional Trauma Training Program. He has taught for twenty-five years in nearly as many countries in North and South Americas, Europe, Asia, Australia, the Middle East, and the Far East . His work is informed by older body psychotherapy systems of Reichian Therapy and Bioenergetic Analysis, newer body psychotherapy systems of Bodynamic Analysis and Somatic Experiencing, and bodywork systems of Postural Integration and Biodynamic Craniosacral Therapy. His work is also inspired by Jungian and archetypal psychologies, Kleinian and intersubjective schools of psychoanalysis, affective neuroscience, quantum physics, yoga, Polarity Therapy, and Advaita Vedanta (a spiritual psychology from India). Dr. Selvam's work also draws upon his clinical psychology PhD dissertation on Advaita Vedanta and Jungian psychology, based on which he has published an article titled “Jung and Consciousness,” in the international analytical psychology journal Spring in 2013. He did trauma outreach work in India in 2005–2006 with survivors of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, based on which he has published an outcome study titled “Somatic Therapy Treatment Effects with Tsunami Survivors,” in the journal Traumatology in 2008. Dr. Selvam's work is also inspired by the work he did in Sri Lanka in 2011–2013 with survivors of war, violence, loss, and displacement, and with mental health professionals engaged in treating them, after Sri Lanka's thirty-year civil war ended in 2009.    Resources Thank you to TherapyNotes for sponsoring this week's episode! TherapyNotes makes billing, scheduling, notetaking, and telehealth incredibly easy. And now, for all you prescribers out there, TherapyNotes is proudly introducing E-prescribe! Find out what more than 100,000 mental health professionals already know, and try TherapyNotes for 2 months, absolutely free. Try it today with no strings attached, and see why everyone is switching to TherapyNotes. Now featuring E-prescribe. Use promo code "chat" at www.therapynotes.com to receive 2 FREE months of TherapyNotes! Thank you to The Receptionist for iPad for sponsoring this week's episode. It's the highest-rated digital check-in software for therapy offices and behavioral health clinics, used by thousands of practitioners across the country. Sign up for a 14-day free trial of The Receptionist for iPad by going to www.thereceptionist.com/therapychat  and when you do, you'll also receive a twenty five dollar Amazon gift card. This episode is also sponsored by Trauma Therapist Network. Learn about trauma, connect with resources and find a trauma therapist near you at www.traumatherapistnetwork.com. We believe that trauma is real, healing is possible and help is available. Therapists, registration opens in October for Trauma Therapist Network membership. Join a compassionate and skilled group of trauma therapists for weekly calls focused on Self Care, Case Consultation, Q&A and Training.  Get on the waiting list now to be the first to know when registration opens! Sign up here https://go.traumatherapistnetwork.com/join  Podcast produced by Pete Bailey - https://petebailey.net/audio 

Barrelled Surf Podcast
Damon Eastaugh

Barrelled Surf Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 138:14


Damon Eastaugh joins us in the Shedquarters this week. Winemaker, Father, Husband and former Oakley Big Wave Award winner, Damon has lived and rich life surrounded by the Indian Ocean and vineyards. Taking us to Hawaii, Indonesia and of course the South West, Damon regales us with some incredible tales of adventure, mateship and some sickening wipeouts. Please enjoy our part 1 of our epic chat.

Barrelled Surf Podcast
Damon Eastaugh - Part 1

Barrelled Surf Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 138:14


Damon Eastaugh joins us in the Shedquarters this week. Winemaker, Father, Husband and former Oakley Big Wave Award winner, Damon has lived and rich life surrounded by the Indian Ocean and vineyards. Taking us to Hawaii, Indonesia and of course the South West, Damon regales us with some incredible tales of adventure, mateship and some sickening wipeouts. Please enjoy part 1 of our epic chat.

Mongabay Newscast
Mongabay Reports: Spies in the sky, albatrosses alert authorities to illegal fishing

Mongabay Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 7:29


Can an albatross detect illegal fishing vessels? Findings from published research say yes: over the course of six-months, 169 albatrosses fitted with radar-detecting trackers covered 47 million square kilometers of the southern Indian Ocean found radar signals from 353 ships. Many of these vessels had no AIS signal, which is an indicator that a ship has switched it off in an attempt to remain hidden, but little did they know that the albatrosses revealed them. Science journalist Shreya Dasgupta reported on the study for Mongabay in 2020, here: Any illegal fishing going on around here? Ask an albatross Please invite your friends to subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever they get podcasts, or download our free app in the Apple App Store or in the Google Store to have access to our latest episodes at your fingertips. If you enjoy this series, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay. Episode Artwork: A wandering albatross chick on its nest on Possession Island in the Crozet archipelago of the southern Indian Ocean. The species is listed as vulnerable by the IUCN. Image by Alain Ricci via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0). Please send feedback to submissions@mongabay.com, and thank you for listening.

New York Style Guide
Camper & Nicholsons Announces Line-up at Monaco Yacht Show in Celebration of 240th Anniversary

New York Style Guide

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022


Camper & Nicholsons Announces Line-up at Monaco Yacht Show in Celebration of 240th Anniversary TRANQUILITY 91.50m (300ft 2in) | Oceanco | 2014 Asking: EUR 149,900,000 Also available for charter: SUMMER 2022 in Mediterranean (From: EUR 1,100,000 p/w) and WINTER 2022 in Indian Ocean and Middle East (From: USD 1,100,000 p/w) Tranquility is an outstanding 91.5m superyacht built ...

Afropop Worldwide
Mauritius's Sega Roots

Afropop Worldwide

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 20:31


The Indian Ocean island of Mauritius is perhaps best known for sandy beaches and, recently, a catastrophic oil spill. It is also home to a unique folkloric pop music called sega. Sega is a product of an unusual history on an island that has been populated by humans for less than five centuries. In this episode we meet three musicians traveling the world to highlight environmental issues through music as part of the Small Island Big Song project. They take us deep into the history and current state of sega music. Narrated and produced by Banning Eyre

Global Security Briefing
Episode 32: The Rise of a Wider Red Sea Security Region

Global Security Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 51:13


A new security space is emerging around the Red Sea. Encompassing the East Mediterranean and the northern Indian Ocean, the region is seeing increasing strategic competition between countries from the Gulf, the Middle East and North Africa, Asia and the Horn of Africa, as well as Europe and the US. The shifting security environment in this complex and diverse region is the topic for this episode. Dr Tobias Borck, RUSI Research Fellow for Middle East Security Studies, and Dr Simon Rynn, RUSI Senior Research Fellow for African Security, join Dr Neil Melvin, Director, International Security Studies at RUSI. They look at how increasing international competition over energy, transport infrastructure and defences ties is reshaping long-established relationships and foreign and security policies.

Groundless Ground Podcast
Embodying Emotions

Groundless Ground Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 49:15


Psychologist Raja Selvam, discusses his new book, The Practice of Embodying Emotions: A Guide for Improving Cognitive, Emotional, and Behavioral Outcomes.  Raja is the creator of Integral Somatic Psychology™ (ISP™), an effective somatic therapy that encourages optimal mental health by fully embodying emotions. Raja and I explore how clinicians can facilitate patient resolution of difficult emotions by allowing increased recognition of emotion and then expanding that emotion to more of the body. Rather than cognitively down-regulating emotions, this somatic approach of expanding emotion increases affect tolerance and resolves systemic distress. ISP is a complementary modality for all talk therapy methods. It was an honor to dialogue with Raja about ISP and also our mutual interest in non-dual philosophy.Clinical psychologist Raja Selvam, PhD, is the developer of Integral Somatic Psychology™ (ISP™), an effective somatic therapy that helps clients achieve optimal mental health by fully embodying their emotions. Raja is also a senior trainer at Somatic Experiencing® International. His work is informed by Reichian Therapy and Bioenergetic Analysis, Bodynamic Analysis and Somatic Experiencing, and bodywork systems of Postural Integration and Biodynamic Craniosacral Therapy. His work is also inspired by Jungian and archetypal psychologies, Kleinian and intersubjective schools of psychoanalysis, affective neuroscience, quantum physics, yoga, Polarity Therapy, and Advaita Vedanta (a spiritual psychology from India). He did trauma outreach work in India in 2005–2006 with survivors of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, based on which he has published an outcome study titled “Somatic Therapy Treatment Effects with Tsunami Survivors,” in the journal Traumatology in 2008. Dr. Selvam's work is also inspired by the work he did in Sri Lanka in 2012–2014 with survivors of war, violence, loss, and displacement, and with mental health professionals engaged in treating them, after Sri Lanka's thirty-year civil war ended in 2009.

The Children's Book Podcast
Historic Flooding in Pakistan

The Children's Book Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 5:22


Historic flooding is impacting nearly 1 in 7 people living in Pakistan as the country enters its second month in the monsoon season. The reasons behind the floods and the catastrophic impact on the Pakistani people are Worth Noting.Sources consulted:Bloch, H., & DiCampo, P. (2022, August 30). Photos: A third of Pakistan is under water in catastrophic floods. NPR. Retrieved August 30, 2022, from https://www.npr.org/sections/pictureshow/2022/08/30/1119979965/pakistan-floods-monsoon-climateGuterres, A. (2022, August 30). The Pakistani people are facing a monsoon on steroids. More than 1000 people have been killed - with millions more lives shattered. this colossal crisis requires urgent, collective action to help the government & people of Pakistan in their hour of need. pic.twitter.com/avffy4irwa. Twitter. Retrieved August 30, 2022, from https://twitter.com/antonioguterres/status/1564556094680227841?s=20&t=nitAvQs4ZomLA31U-cg31wMonsoon. National Geographic Society. (n.d.). Retrieved August 30, 2022, from https://education.nationalgeographic.org/resource/monsoonSaifi, S., Magramo, K., & Dewan, A. (2022, August 30). Pakistan floods caused by 'monsoon on steroids,' says UN chief in urgent appeal. CNN. Retrieved August 30, 2022, from https://www.cnn.com/2022/08/29/asia/pakistan-flood-damage-imf-bailout-intl-hnk/index.htmlShih, G., Hussain, S., & Jeong, A. (2022, August 30). Pakistan reels from 'apocalyptic' floods, pleads for international aid. The Washington Post. Retrieved August 30, 2022, from https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2022/08/30/pakistan-flooding-underwater-monsoon/United Nations. (n.d.). Pakistan: $160 million UN emergency plan launched, as 'monsoon on steroids' continues | | UN news. United Nations. Retrieved August 30, 2022, from https://news.un.org/en/story/2022/08/1125752Wikimedia Foundation. (2022, August 30). Climate of Pakistan. Wikipedia. Retrieved August 30, 2022, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Climate_of_Pakistan#:~:text=Pakistan%20has%20four%20seasons%3A%20a,period%20of%20October%20and%20November 

New York Style Guide
Ultra Worldwide unveils Asia Tour 2022 and announces return of ULTRA Beach Bali

New York Style Guide

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022


Ultra Worldwide unveils Asia Tour 2022 and announces return of ULTRA Beach Bali The ULTRA Asia Tour will circle the Pacific and Indian Oceans with stops in Tokyo, Japan, Seoul, Korea and Bali, Indonesia Tickets are on sale now at https://umfworldwide.com/ Celebrated for producing top-tier festivals on all six inhabited continents, Ultra Worldwide will return to Asia ...

Italian Wine Podcast
Ep. 1066 Jay Di Donato Interviews Marc Zani | Clubhouse Ambassador's Corner

Italian Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 64:09


Welcome to Episode 1066 in which Stevie Kim moderates Clubhouse's Ambassadors Corner. In this episode Jay Di Donato with Marc Zani. These sessions are recorded from Clubhouse and replayed here on the Italian Wine Podcast! Listen in on this series as Italian Wine Ambassadors all over the world chat with Stevie and their chosen wine producer. Which producer would you interview if you had your pick? About about today's guest host: Jay Di Donato is an Italian Wine Ambassador through Vinitaly International Academy, WSET 3, and a certified Italian Wine Specialist from the North American Sommelier Association. He has worked part-time as a sommelier and at various wine retail and restaurants in Chicago and San Diego since 2016. Jay commissioned as a Surface Warfare Officer in the United States Navy in 2012. He deployed multiple times to the Mediterranean Sea, Red Sea, and Indian Ocean. In 2019 he earned his law degree from Loyola University of Chicago School of Law and still serves in the Navy as a Judge Advocate General, stationed in San Diego. Traveling throughout Europe with the Navy spurred his love of wine and he hopes to be stationed in Italy again soon!" To learn more visit: https://www.linkedin.com/in/julian-didonato/details/skills/ About today's guest producer: Marco Zani is one of the newer additions to the Selection Massale portfolio, but he already feels very much part of the family. The family domaine was put together by his father, who bought the castle (yep, there really is one, and Marco makes his wine with in its 10th Century cellars) and surrounding vineyards, which are situated on the lower slopes of the mountains that tower either side of the little town of Rovereto. Although his father was not a vigneron (like most growers in the village, he sold each years' crop to the cooperative), Marco knew from an early age that he wanted to make wine, and since 1989, Marco has been (fanatically) tending the vineyards and making the wine at Castel Noarna, as well as helping his wife to run the best hotel/restaurant in town. The castle and the vineyards lie on east/southeast facing slopes at about 350 meters above sea level -- these are high alititude vineyards, similar to those of Belluard in the Haute-Savoie, and Knauss and Beurer in Swabia. The soils, which Marco has worked organically since 2008 are rich in minerals and poor in organic matter, and exactly what's needed for making of grands vins. Limestone, our favorite, quartz, slate, silt. If you want to learn more visit: https://www.selectionmassale.com/marco-zani.html More about the moderator Stevie Kim: Stevie hosts Clubhouse sessions each week (visit Italian Wine Club & Wine Business on Clubhouse), these recorded sessions are then released on the podcast to immortalize them! She often also joins Professor Scienza in his shows to lend a hand keeping our Professor in check! You can also find her taking a hit for the team when she goes “On the Road”, all over the Italian countryside, visiting wineries and interviewing producers, enjoying their best food and wine – all in the name of bringing us great Pods! To find out more about Stevie Kim visit: Facebook: @steviekim222 Instagram: @steviekim222 Website: https://vinitalyinternational.com/wordpress/ Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodcast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/

CBC Newfoundland Morning
Ultra-marathoner Kelsey Hogan heading to race on Reunion Island

CBC Newfoundland Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 7:16


Racing through tropical jungles and climbing over active volcanoes sounds like something straight out of an action movie. But Kelsey Hogan will be doing exactly that in just a few weeks. She's is an ultra-marathon athlete from Steady Brook who's been invited to race on Reunion Island in the Indian Ocean. She joins us now to chat about her next adventure.

Decisive Point – the USAWC Press Podcast Companion Series
Dr. Roger Cliff – Enabling a More Externally Focused and Operational PLA – 2020 PLA Conference Papers

Decisive Point – the USAWC Press Podcast Companion Series

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 5:09


Dr. Roger Cliff – “Enabling a More Externally Focused and Operational PLA” Although the People's Liberation Army is not yet a global expeditionary force on par with the US military, the former has nevertheless significantly expanded its ability to operate abroad. Through enhanced technological capabilities, robust relationships with foreign militaries, increased access to overseas military bases and dual-use facilities, and the implementation of major structural reforms, the People's Liberation Army has built a more integrated joint force capable of conducting a wider and more complex array of missions. This volume advances the understanding of the People's Liberation Army's capability to conduct overseas missions by examining China's military relations with Europe, Africa, and Latin America; the country's military activities in the Indian Ocean, polar regions, and Pacific Island countries; and the emerging roles of the People's Liberation Army Rocket Force and the Joint Logistic Support Force. This volume finds the People's Liberation Army is engaged in a wide range of activities throughout the world, including port calls, joint exercises, seminars, and personnel exchanges. China sells weapons to some parts of the world and seeks to acquire military and dual-use technology from others. In addition, the People's Liberation Army seeks to increase its capability to operate in parts of the world, such as the Indian Ocean, Pacific Island countries, and polar regions, where the organization has only had a minimal presence in the past Click here to read the monograph. Keywords: China, People's Liberation Army, PLA Rocket Force, Chinese expeditionary operations, Pacific Island countries    

Overheard at National Geographic
Playback: Why War Zones Need Science Too

Overheard at National Geographic

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 29:48 Very Popular


It's a jewel of biodiversity, the so-called Galápagos of the Indian Ocean, and might also hold traces of the earliest humans to leave Africa. No wonder scientists want to explore Socotra. But it's also part of Yemen, a country enduring a horrific civil war. Meet the Nat Geo explorer with a track record of navigating the world's most hostile hot spots who's determined to probe the island—and empower its local scientists before it's too late. Want more? See Socotra's wonders—including the dragon's blood tree—through the eyes of National Geographic explorers. And check out human footprints preserved for more than 100,000 years, which could be the oldest signs of humans in Arabia.  Ancient caravan kingdoms are threatened in Yemen's civil war. Their storied legacy—including temples built by the queen of Sheba—is entwined with the fate of modern Yemenis. Read more here.  Also explore: Learn more about Yemen's civil war. One Yemeni photographer explains why she looks for points of light in the darkness. And for subscribers, go inside the country's health crisis and the life of violence and disease the war has brought to many civilians. Also, learn more about Ella Al-Shamahi's new book, The Handshake: A Gripping History, and visit Horn Heritage, Sada Mire's website preserving heritage in Somalia, Somaliland, and the Horn of Africa.    If you like what you hear and want to support more content like this, please consider a National Geographic subscription. Go to natgeo.com/exploremore to subscribe today.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

In Focus by The Hindu
The diplomatic kerfuffle over a Chinese vessel in Hambantota port | In Focus podcast

In Focus by The Hindu

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 27:19


On August 26, China's Ambassador to Sri Lanka Qi Zhenhong published an article in a Sri Lankan newspaper in which he drew parallels between American leader Nancy Pelosi's visit to Taiwan, and India's objections to Chinese tracking tracking vessel Yuan Wang-5 docking at Sri Lanka's strategically significant Hambantota port. In the article, without naming India, he effectively accused India of bullying Sri Lanka, and interfering with its sovereignty by trying to pressurise it over its decision to allow the docking of the Chinese vessel. He concluded his piece by saying that China and Sri Lanka should join hands to protect their respective sovereignties from countries such as the US and India. India's response was uncharacteristically sharp. In a series of tweets, the Indian High Commission in Sri Lanka charged the Chinese Ambassador with “violating basic diplomatic etiquette”. Is the entire episode, involving India, Sri Lanka and China an outlier, or are we likely to see more such confrontations as the geopolitical competition in the Indian Ocean heats up? What are Sri Lanka's options in this scenario?

The Delicious Legacy
The History of Spice Trade Pt3

The Delicious Legacy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 37:06


The spice trade episode was an epic undertaking and I am so pleased with it, but sadly we have reached the end!On this final part we are examining a number of other spices -namely black pepper, cardamom and ginger- and we learn about the demise of the Nabateans in the early centuries of our common era. We also see how the clever tribes enhanced the selling of their incense and spices by weaving elaborate stories, with monsters and dangerous birds guarding the valuable trees!The ancient world was highly globalised and the Arabian traders were in the middle of a lucrative route; incense and spices and precious, exotic luxury goods were coming from the East and used in the West, for many millennia. For rituals, for food and seen as items that bestowed power and authority to the person who possessed them. Were the magical tears of Frankinsence, much coveted by the Egyptian Nobility, the thing that kick-started the global race for spices?Enjoy!Music by Epidemic Sound and Motion Array exceptTheme of The Delicious Legacy and end song by Pavlos KapralosFree Mily by Miltos BoumisVoiceover actors appearing in order : Mark Knight, Baron Anastis, Jim Bryden, Rachael Louise Miller.Sources:The Periplous of the Erythraean Sea (ancient unknown author),Roman Arabia by BowersockCumin, Camels and Caravans - A Spice Odyssey by Gary Paul Nabhan Food in the Ancient World from A to Z by Andrew Dalby.Wikipedia : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinnamonhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indo-Roman_trade_relationshttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pre-Islamic_Arabiahttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Ocean_tradeSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/the-delicious-legacy. If you love to time-travel through food and history why not join us at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-delicious-legacy. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Guy Who Knows A Guy Podcast
Stan Kasprzyk, Author of Suspended In Vast Plain

The Guy Who Knows A Guy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 40:00


This is part of our special series in association with our friends at Writer's Republic. We are highlighting some of the most interested and up-and-coming authors in their community. Stan Kasprzyk has an incredible story of leaving communist Poland to live in capitalist Africa and the amazing adventures that occured. In his own words... I was born in Poland, and three years later, Stalin died in the Kremlin. In my happy childhood, I threw myself into the world's geography. First, I studied countries, their capitals, rivers and mountains, and all objects on the map. My parents bought me atlases. I tended to spread the message of geography and quizzed adults about it. What is the capital of Columbia? I asked, and surprisingly, no one knew. Some were embarrassed, though. Interests in history and maths came later, which led to economics as my serious study and profession. But what kind of economy and economic study can one enjoy in a communist country where Marxist theory is the religion for the masses and leads to a market and social catastrophe similar to what we see in Sri Lanka today? But Poland in the 1970s and 1980s was not a free, neutral island on the Indian Ocean. It remained in a grip created by Stalin. And here we have a narrative arc spanning the first half of my life. To begin the second half, I had to enter my purgatory. It happened to be the Kingdom of Adamawa in the North-eastern corner of Nigeria and the town of Yola. Being a geography maniac, I had nothing against going to Africa for at least two years. Moreover, I adored the idea, so I fully accepted Yola with its rustic beauty and tranquility - except for the bloody days of early March in 1984 (see Maitatsine). The purgatory in Yola was for two years with a chance of extension. With my family, we decided to take the second leap. We went West. I became a software specialist and enjoyed three decades working on absorbing and taxing projects. In retirement, I looked for new frontiers, and the top one was writing the “African” memoir. It took five years to learn the craft and write SUSPENDED IN VAST PLAIN. Find the book here: https://www.writersrepublic.com/bookshop/suspended-vast-plain (https://www.writersrepublic.com/bookshop/suspended-vast-plain)

Seasoned
And the winner is. . .Seasoned celebrates its James Beard Award-winning guests

Seasoned

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 49:00


The 2022 James Beard Awards in June were a triumph (welcome back, food world!). We were lucky enough to talk with three authors about their (now!) James Beard Award-winning cookbooks. This hour on Seasoned, we listen back to our conversations with Hawa Hassan, Gregory Gourdet, and Joanne Lee Molinaro (aka The Korean Vegan). We'll get to know them through their personal stories, culinary journeys, and inspiring cookbooks. Guests: Hawa Hassan:  Entrepreneur and author of In Bibi's Kitchen: The Recipes and Stories of Grandmothers from the Eight African Countries That Touch the Indian Ocean. Gregory Gourdet: Chef and author of Everyone's Table: Global Recipes for Modern Health Joanne Lee Molinaro: Content creator and author of The Korean Vegan Cookbook: Reflections and Recipes from Omma's Kitchen Recipes from our guests:Sukuma Wiki (Greens and Tomatoes)Zanzibar Pilau (Rice Pilaf) Kicha Fit Fit (Torn flatbread with spiced yogurt) Watermelon-Berry Salad With Chile Dressing And Lots Of HerbsHaitian Pineapple Upside-Down Cake Omma's Korean BBQ SauceMushroom Bulgogi (카레떡꼬치 Grilled Steak)Pecan Paht Pie (피칸팥파이 Sweet Red Bean) This show was produced by Robyn Doyon-Aitken, Catie Talarski, Emily Charash and Katrice Claudio. Join the conversation on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and email: seasoned@ctpublic.org. Seasoned is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode!Support the show: https://www.wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Johnny Dare Morning Show
Terror In The Air! Former Naval bombardier/navigator Lt. Keith Gallagher tells us about his brush with death!!

Johnny Dare Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 20:52


July 9th, 1991 is a day that retired Naval bombardier/navigator Lt. Keith Gallagher will always remember…because on that day, he cheated death. While flying in an A6 “Texaco” Intruder over the Indian Ocean at 8000 ft, he was partially ejected from the plane and somehow managed to survive…due to a lot of luck and the skills of his pilot Lt. Mark Baden. And thanks to our own Leif Lisec, we got the chance to have Keith on the show this morning to tell us the whole harrowing story!

Your Daily Dose of Everything
D.I.A. Conspiracy VS Underwater Hotels

Your Daily Dose of Everything

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 25:35


Denver Colorado International Airport where people come and go on a daily basis. Many of you have probably gone there and never realized the many conspiracy theories that revolve around such a well known place. Along with traveling to remarkable locations, why not take a trip to some of the most rated underwater hotels and restaurants. With many hotels and restaurants located in the Indian Ocean, you get the perfect view of the beautiful waters and the occupying sea life that inhabits the area.Support the show

The Delicious Legacy
The History of Spice Trade Pt2

The Delicious Legacy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 27:08


Making this episode was an epic adventure, "travelling" through the ancient world and through time, so I had to divide it into three parts.Today in part two of our adventure amongst other things we follow the trails of frankinsence and who were the Nabataeans?The ancient spice route is inextricably linked with the Arabian peninsula. At first, this seems a little bit odd perhaps, and a little baffling. Why this inhospitable desert, is connected with the spice trade so closely?In today's part two of our trilogy about the ancient history of the spices and spice trade, we'll talk about the Frankincense and other spices introduced to the temples and plates of ancient Egyptians, Greeks and Romans.Let's delve a bit deeper to the history of aromatics and spices, their use in ancient Greece and EgyptThe ancient world was highly globalised and the Arabian traders were in the middle of a lucrative route; Incense and spices and precious, exotic luxury goods were coming from the East and used in the West, for many millennia. For rituals, for food and seen as items that bestowed power and authority to the person who possessed them.Enjoy!Music by Epidemic Sound and Motion Array exceptTheme of The Delicious Legacy and end song by Pavlos KapralosFree Mily by Miltos BoumisVoiceover actors appearing in order : Mark Knight, Baron Anastis, Jim Bryden, Rachael Louise Miller.Sources:The Periplous of the Erythraean Sea (ancient unknown author),Roman Arabia by BowersockCumin, Camels and Caravans - A Spice Odyssey by Gary Paul Nabhan Food in the Ancient World from A to Z by Andrew Dalby.Wikipedia : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinnamonhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indo-Roman_trade_relationshttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pre-Islamic_Arabiahttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Ocean_tradeSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/the-delicious-legacy. If you love to time-travel through food and history why not join us at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-delicious-legacy. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

ThePrint
ThePrintPod_Don't just ‘keep a watch' on China's spy ship at Sri Lankan port. Emulate the enemy

ThePrint

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 6:49


China has made a larger point about the power shift in Indian Ocean region by docking the missile and satellite tracking ship Yuan Wang 5 at Hambantota Port.

Resoundingly Human
We're going to need a bigger … data set: Shark attacks and wicked problems

Resoundingly Human

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 53:48


Today's episode will be a little different than most, we're going to take a bit of a detour but stick with me and I promise, I'll bring us back around to data science. I'm going to take us back in time a little, back to the first time I watched what was to become my favorite movie, Jaws. It was the summer between 4th and 5th grade (probably way too young to be watching a movie about a killer shark) and I was at a sleepover where the next day, after being thoroughly terrified by this movie, we went to the beach where, wait for it, a shark had washed up on shore! Needless to say, I spent much of the rest of that summer playing in the dunes, BUT, it cemented in me an absolute fascination and, let's be honest, fear of sharks. So fast forward a couple of decades to this summer, I'm on my morning run through the Pennsylvania woods, far from any beach, and listening to my newest podcast obsession, “Reunion: Shark Attacks in Paradise,” which is about a series of unprecedented shark attacks on the French island of Reunion. All of a sudden, I hear the host mention “the totally fascinating academic journal Management Science.” That's right, the INFORMS journal Management Science! He's referring to an article by UC Berkey professor Charles West Churchman titled “Wicked Problems” and proceeds to lay out the shark attacks on Reunion as a wicked problem! I literally stop dead in my track, I'm texting my coworkers, “The coolest thing ever just happened!” and of course, I keep bingeing the podcast. So needless to say, I am beyond excited to welcome Daniel Duane, award winning journalist and author, and host of my new favorite podcast, to talk about what exactly data science has to do with a series of shark attacks on a small island in the Indian Ocean.

AJC Passport
The Forgotten Exodus: Egypt

AJC Passport

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 34:17 Very Popular


One of the top Jewish podcasts in the U.S., American Jewish Committee's (AJC) The Forgotten Exodus, is the first-ever narrative podcast to focus exclusively on Mizrahi and Sephardic Jews. In this week's episode, we feature Jews from Egypt.   In the first half of the 20th century, Egypt went through profound social and political upheavals culminating in the rise of President Gamal Abdel Nasser and his campaign of Arabization, creating an oppressive atmosphere for the country's Jews, and leading almost all to flee or be kicked out of the country. Hear the personal story of award-winning author André Aciman as he recounts the heart-wrenching details of the pervasive antisemitism during his childhood in Alexandria and his family's expulsion in 1965, which he wrote about in his memoir Out of Egypt, and also inspired his novel Call Me by Your Name.  Joining Aciman is Deborah Starr, a professor of Near Eastern and Jewish Studies at Cornell University, who chronicles the history of Egypt's Jewish community that dates back millennia, and the events that led to their erasure from Egypt's collective memory. Aciman's modern-day Jewish exodus story is one that touches on identity, belonging, and nationality: Where is your home when you become a refugee at age 14? Be sure to follow The Forgotten Exodus before the next episode drops on August 22. ___ Show notes: Sign up to receive podcast updates here. Learn more about the series here. Song credits:  Rampi Rampi, Aksaray'in Taslari, Bir Demet Yasemen by Turku, Nomads of the Silk Road Pond5:  “Desert Caravans”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI), Composer: Tiemur Zarobov (BMI), IPI#1098108837 “Sentimental Oud Middle Eastern”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI), Composer: Sotirios Bakas (BMI), IPI#797324989. “Frontiers”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI); Composer: Pete Checkley (BMI), IPI#380407375 “Adventures in the East”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI) Composer: Petar Milinkovic (BMI), IPI#00738313833. “Middle Eastern Arabic Oud”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI); Composer: Sotirios Bakas (BMI), IPI#797324989 ___ Episode Transcript: ANDRÉ ACIMAN: I've lived in New York for 50 years. Is it my home? Not really. But Egypt was never going to be my home. It had become oppressive to be Jewish. MANYA BRACHEAR PASHMAN: The world has overlooked an important episode in modern history: the 800,000 Jews who left or were driven from their homes in Arab nations and Iran in the mid-20th century. This series, brought to you by American Jewish Committee, explores that pivotal moment in Jewish history and the rich Jewish heritage of Iran and Arab nations as some begin to build relations with Israel. I'm your host, Manya Brachear Pashman. Join us as we explore family histories and personal stories of courage, perseverance, and resilience.  This is The Forgotten Exodus. Today's episode: leaving Egypt. Author André Aciman can't stand Passover Seders. They are long and tedious. Everyone gets hungry long before it's time to eat. It's also an unwelcome reminder of when André was 14 and his family was forced to leave Egypt – the only home he had ever known. On their last night there, he recounts his family gathered for one last Seder in his birthplace. ANDRÉ: By the time I was saying goodbye, the country, Egypt, had essentially become sort of Judenrein.  MANYA:  Judenrein is the term of Nazi origin meaning “free of Jews”. Most, if not all of the Jews, had already left. ANDRÉ: By the time we were kicked out, we were kicked out literally from Egypt, my parents had already had a life in Egypt. My mother was born in Egypt, she had been wealthy. My father became wealthy. And of course, they had a way of living life that they knew they were abandoning. They had no idea what was awaiting them. They knew it was going to be different, but they had no sense. I, for one, being younger, I just couldn't wait to leave. Because it had become oppressive to be Jewish. As far as I was concerned, it was goodbye. Thank you very much. I'm going. MANYA: André Aciman is best known as the author whose novel inspired the Oscar-winning film Call Me By Your Name – which is as much a tale of coming to terms with being Jewish and a minority, as it is an exquisite coming of age love story set in a villa on the Italian Riviera.  What readers and moviegoers didn't know is that the Italian villa is just a stand-in. The story's setting– its distant surf, serpentine architecture, and lush gardens where Elio and Oliver's romance blooms and Elio's spiritual awakening unfolds – is an ode to André's lost home, the coastal Egyptian city of Alexandria.  There, three generations of his Sephardic family had rebuilt the lives they left behind elsewhere as the Ottoman Empire crumbled, two world wars unfolded, a Jewish homeland was born, and nationalistic fervor swept across the Arab world and North Africa. There, in Alexandria, his family had enjoyed a cosmopolitan city and vibrant Jewish home. Until they couldn't and had to leave.  ANDRÉ: I would be lying if I said that I didn't project many things lost into my novels. In other words, to be able to re-experience the beach, I created a beach house. And that beach house has become, as you know, quite famous around the world. But it was really a portrait of the beach house that we had lost in Egypt.  And many things like that, I pilfer from my imagined past and dump into my books. And people always tell me, ‘God, you captured Italy so well.' Actually, that was not Italy, I hate to tell you. It was my reimagined or reinvented Egypt transposed into Italy and made to come alive again. MANYA: Before he penned Call Me By Your Name, André wrote his first book, Out of Egypt, a touching memoir about his family's picturesque life in Alexandria, the underlying anxiety that it could always vanish and how, under the nationalization effort led by Egypt's President Gamel Abdel Nassar, it did vanish. The memoir ends with the events surrounding the family's last Passover Seder before they say farewell.   ANDRÉ: This was part of the program of President Nasser, which was to take, particularly Alexandria, and turn it into an Egyptian city, sort of, purified of all European influences. And it worked.  As, by the way, and this is the biggest tragedy that happens to, particularly to Jews, is when a culture decides to expunge its Jews or to remove them in one way or another, it succeeds. It does succeed. You have a sense that it is possible for a culture to remove an entire population. And this is part of the Jewish experience to accept that this happens. MANYA: Egypt did not just expunge its Jewish community. It managed to erase Jews from the nation's collective memory. Only recently have people begun to rediscover the centuries of rich Jewish history in Egypt, including native Egyptian Jews dating back millennia. In addition, Egypt became a destination for Jews expelled from Spain in the 15th Century. And after the Suez Canal opened in 1869, a wave of more Jews came from the Ottoman Empire, Italy, and Greece. And at the end of the 19th Century, Ashkenazi Jews arrived, fleeing from European pogroms. DEBORAH STARR: The Jewish community in Egypt was very diverse. The longest standing community in Egypt would have been Arabic speaking Jews, we would say now Mizrahi Jews. MANYA: That's Deborah Starr, Professor of Modern Arabic and Hebrew Literature and Film at Cornell University. Her studies of cosmopolitan Egypt through a lens of literature and cinema have given her a unique window into how Jews arrived and left Egypt and how that history has been portrayed. She says Jews had a long history in Egypt through the Islamic period and a small population remained in the 19th century. Then a wave of immigration came. DEBORAH: We have an economic boom in Egypt. Jews start coming from around the Ottoman Empire, from around the Mediterranean, emigrating to Egypt from across North Africa. And so, from around 5,000 Jews in the middle of the 19th century, by the middle of the 20th century, at its peak, the Egyptian Jews numbered somewhere between 75 and 80,000. So, it was a significant increase, and you know, much more so than just the birth rate would explain. MANYA: André's family was part of that wave, having endured a series of exiles from Spain, Italy, and Turkey, before reaching Egypt. DEBORAH: Egypt has its independence movement, the 1919 revolution, which is characterized by this discourse of coexistence, that ‘we're all in this together.' There are images of Muslims and Christians marching together.  Jews were also supportive of this movement. There's this real sense of a plurality, of a pluralist society in Egypt, that's really evident in the ways that this movement is characterized. The interwar period is really this very vibrant time in Egyptian culture, but also this time of significant transition in its relationship to the British in the various movements, political movements that emerge in this period, and movements that will have a huge impact on the fate of the Jews of Egypt in the coming decades. MANYA: One of those movements was Zionism, the movement to establish a Jewish state in the biblical homeland of the Jews. In 1917, during the First World War, the British government occupying Egypt at the time, issued a public statement of support for the establishment of a "national home for the Jewish people" in Palestine, still an Ottoman region with a small minority Jewish population. That statement became known as the Balfour Declaration. DEBORAH: There was certainly evidence of a certain excitement about the Balfour Declaration of 1917. A certain amount of general support for the idea that Jews are going to live there, but not a whole lot of movement themselves. But we also have these really interesting examples of people who were on the record as supporting, of seeing themselves as Egyptians, as part of the anti-colonial Egyptian nationalism, who also gave financial support to the Jewish project in Palestine. And so, so there wasn't this sense of—you can't be one or the other. There wasn't this radical split. MANYA: Another movement unfolding simultaneously was the impulse to reclaim Egypt's independence, not just in legal terms – Egypt had technically gained independence from the British in 1922 – but suddenly what it meant to be Egyptian was defined against this foreign colonial power that had imposed its will on Egypt for years and still maintained a significant presence. DEBORAH: We also see moves within Egypt, toward the ‘Egyptianization' of companies or laws that start saying, we want to, we want to give priority to our citizens, because the economy had been so dominated by either foreigners or people who were local but had foreign nationality. And this begins to disproportionately affect the Jews.  Because so many of the Jews, you know, had been immigrants a generation or two earlier, some of them had either achieved protected status or, you know, arrived with papers from, from one or another of these European powers. MANYA: In 1929, Egypt adopted its first law giving citizenship to its residents. But it was not universally applied. By this time, the conflict in Palestine and the rise of Zionism had shifted how the Egyptian establishment viewed Jews.   DEBORAH: Particularly the Jews who had lived there for a really long time, some of whom were among the lower classes, who didn't travel to Europe every summer and didn't need papers to prove their citizenship, by the time they started seeing that it was worthwhile for them to get citizenship, it was harder for Jews to be approved. So, by the end, we do have a pretty substantial number of Jews who end up stateless. MANYA: Stateless. But not for long. In 1948, the Jewish state declared independence. In response, King Farouk of Egypt joined four other Arab nations in declaring war on the newly formed nation. And they lost.  The Arab nations' stunning defeat in that first Arab-Israeli War sparked a clandestine movement to overthrow the Egyptian monarchy, which was still seen as being in the pocket of the British. One of the orchestrators of that plot, known as the Free Officers Movement, was Col. Gamel Abdel Nassar. In 1952, a coup sent King Farouk on his way to Italy and Nassar eventually emerged as president. The official position of the Nassar regime was one of tolerance for the Jews. But that didn't always seem to be the case. DEBORAH: Between 1948 and ‘52, you do have a notable number of Jews who leave Egypt at this point who see the writing on the wall. Maybe they don't have very deep roots in Egypt, they've only been there for one or two generations, they have another nationality, they have someplace to go. About a third of the Jews who leave Egypt in the middle of the 20th century go to Europe, France, particularly. To a certain extent Italy. About a third go to the Americas, and about a third go to Israel. And among those who go to Israel, it's largely those who end up stateless. They have no place else to go because of those nationality laws that I mentioned earlier, have no choice but to go to Israel. MANYA: Those who stayed became especially vulnerable to the Nassar regime's sequestration of businesses. Then in 1956, Egypt nationalized the Suez Canal, a 120-mile-long waterway that connected the Mediterranean Sea to the Indian Ocean by way of the Red Sea – that same waterway that created opportunities for migration in the region a century earlier. DEBORAH: The real watershed moment is the 1956 Suez conflict. Israel, in collaboration with France, and Great Britain attacks Egypt, the conflict breaks out, you know, the French and the British come into the war on the side of the Israelis. And each of the powers has their own reasons for wanting, I mean, Nasser's threatening Israeli shipping, and, threatening the security of Israel, the French and the British, again, have their own reasons for trying to either take back the canal, or, just at least bring Nassar down a peg. MANYA: At war with France and Britain, Egypt targeted and expelled anyone with French and British nationality, including many Jews, but not exclusively. DEBORAH: But this is also the moment where I think there's a big pivot in how Jews feel about being in Egypt. And so, we start seeing larger waves of emigration, after 1956. So, this is really sort of the peak of the wave of emigration.  MANYA: André's family stayed. They already had endured a series of exiles. His father, an aspiring writer who copied passages by Marcel Proust into his diary, had set that dream aside to open a textile factory, rebuild from nothing what the family had lost elsewhere, and prepare young André to eventually take over the family business. He wasn't about to walk away from the family fortune – again. DEBORAH: André Aciman's story is quite, as I said, the majority of the Jewish community leaves in the aftermath of 1956. And his family stays a lot longer. So, he has incredible insights into what happens over that period, where the community has already significantly diminished. MANYA: Indeed, over the next nine years, the situation worsened. The Egyptian government took his father's factory, monitored their every move, frequently called the house with harassing questions about their whereabouts, or knocked on the door to issue warrants for his father's arrest, only to bring him in for more interrogation. As much as André's father clung to life in Egypt, it was becoming a less viable option with each passing day. ANDRÉ: He knew that the way Egypt was going, there was no room for him, really. And I remember during the last two years, in our last two years in Egypt, there wAs constantly references to the fact that we were going to go, this was not lasting, you know, what are we going to do? Where do we think we should go? And so on and so forth. So, this was a constant sort of conversation we were having. MANYA: Meanwhile, young André encountered a level of antisemitism that scarred him deeply and shaped his perception of how the world perceives Jews. ANDRÉ: It was oppressive in good part because people started throwing stones in the streets. So, there was a sense of ‘Get out of here. We don't want you here.' MANYA: It was in the streets and in the schools, which were undergoing an Arabization after the end of British rule, making Arabic the new lingua franca and antisemitism the norm. ANDRÉ: There's no question that antisemitism was now rooted in place. In my school, where I went, I went to a British school, but it had become Egyptian, although they taught English, predominantly English, but we had to take Arabic classes, in sort of social sciences, in history, and in Arabic as well. And in the Arabic class, which I took for many years, I had to study poems that were fundamentally anti-Jewish. Not just anti-Israeli, which is a big distinction that people like to make, it doesn't stick. I was reading and reciting poems that were against me. And the typical cartoon for a Jew was a man with a beard, big tummy, hook nose, and I knew ‘This is really me, isn't it? OK.' And so you look at yourself with a saber, right, running through it with an Egyptian flag. And I'll never forget this. This was, basically I was told that this is something I had to learn and accept and side with – by the teachers, and by the books themselves.  And the irony of the whole thing is that one of the best tutors we had, was actually the headmaster of the Jewish school. He was Jewish in very sort of—very Orthodox himself. And he was teaching me how to recite those poems that were anti-Jewish. And of course, he had to do it with a straight face. MANYA: One by one, Jewish neighbors lost their livelihoods and unable to overcome the stigma, packed their bags and left. In his memoir, André recalls how prior to each family's departure, the smell of leather lingered in their homes from the dozens of suitcases they had begun to pack. By 1965, the smell of leather began to waft through André's home. ANDRÉ: Eventually, one morning, or one afternoon, I came back from school. And my father said to me, ‘You know, they don't want us here anymore.' Those were exactly the words he used. ‘They don't want us here.' I said, ‘What do you mean?' ‘Well, they've expelled us.'  And I was expelled with my mother and my brother, sooner than my father was. So, we had to leave the country. We realized we were being expelled, maybe in spring, and we left in May. And so, for about a month or so, the house was a mess because there were suitcases everywhere, and people. My mother was packing constantly, constantly. But we knew we were going to go to Italy, we knew we had an uncle in Italy who was going to host us, or at least make life livable for us when we arrived. We had obtained Italian papers, obtained through various means. I mean, whatever. They're not exactly legitimate ways of getting a citizenship, but it was given to my father, and he took it. And we changed our last name from Ajiman, which is how it was pronounced, to Aciman because the Italians saw the C and assumed it was that. My father had some money in Europe already. So that was going to help us survive. But we knew my mother and I and my brother, that we were now sort of functionally poor. MANYA: In hindsight, André now knows the family's expulsion at that time was the best thing that could have happened. Two years later, Israel trounced Egypt in the Six-Day War, nearly destroying the Egyptian Air Force, taking control of the Gaza Strip and the entire Sinai Peninsula, as well as territory from Egypt's allies in the conflict, Syria and Jordan. The few remaining Jews in Egypt were sent to internment camps, including the chief rabbis of Cairo and Alexandria and the family of one of André's schoolmates whose father was badly beaten. After three years in Italy, André's family joined his mother's sister in America, confirming once and for all that their life in Egypt was gone. ANDRÉ: I think there was a kind of declaration of their condition. In other words, they never overcame the fact that they had lost a way of life. And of course, the means to sustain that life was totally taken away, because they were nationalized, and had their property sequestered, everything was taken away from them. So, they were tossed into the wild sea. My mother basically knew how to shut the book on Egypt, she stopped thinking about Egypt, she was an American now. She was very happy to have become a citizen of the United States.  Whereas my father, who basically was the one who had lost more than she had, because he had built his own fortune himself, never overcame it. And so, he led a life of the exile who continues to go to places and to restaurants that are costly, but that he can still manage to afford if he watches himself. So, he never took cabs, he always took the bus. Then he lived a pauper's life, but with good clothing, because he still had all his clothing from his tailor in Egypt. But it was a bit of a production, a performance for him.  MANYA: André's father missed the life he had in Egypt. André longs for the life he could've had there. ANDRÉ: I was going to study in England, I was going to come back to Egypt, I was going to own the factory. This was kind of inscribed in my genes at that point. And of course, you give up that, as I like to say, and I've written about this many times, is that whatever you lose, or whatever never happened, continues to sort of sub-exist somewhere in your mind. In other words, it's something that has been taken away from you, even though it never existed.  MANYA: But like his mother, André moved on. In fact, he says moving on is part of the Jewish experience. Married with sons of his own, he now is a distinguished professor at the Graduate Center of City University of New York, teaching the history of literary theory. He is also one of the foremost experts on Marcel Proust, that French novelist whose passages his father once transcribed in his diaries. André's own novels and anthologies have won awards and inspired Academy Award-winning screenplays. Like Israel opened its doors and welcomed all of those stateless Egyptian Jews, America opened doors for André. Going to college in the Bronx after growing up in Egypt and Italy? That introduced him to being openly Jewish.  ANDRÉ: I went to Lehman College, as an undergraduate, I came to the States in September. I came too late to go to college, but I went to an event at that college in October or November, and already people were telling me they were Jewish.  You know, ‘I'm Jewish, and this and that,' and, and so I felt ‘Oh, God, it's like, you mean people can be natural about their Judaism? And so, I began saying to people, ‘I'm Jewish, too,' or I would no longer feel this sense of hiding my Jewishness, which came when I came to America. Not before. Not in Italy. Not in Egypt certainly. But the experience of being in a place that was fundamentally all Jewish, like being in the Bronx in 1968, was mind opening for me, it was: I can let everything down, I can be Jewish like everybody else. It's no longer a secret. I don't have to pretend that I was a Protestant when I didn't even know what kind of Protestant I was. As a person growing up in an antisemitic environment. You have many guards, guardrails in place, so you know how not to let it out this way, or that way or this other way. You don't speak about matzah. You don't speak about charoset. You don't speak about anything, so as to prevent yourself from giving out that you're Jewish. MANYA: Though the doors had been flung open and it felt much safer to be openly Jewish, André to this day cannot forget the antisemitism that poisoned his formative years. ANDRÉ: I assume that everybody's antisemitic at some point. It is very difficult to meet someone who is not Jewish, who, after they've had many drinks, will not turn out to be slightly more antisemitic than you expected. It is there. It's culturally dominant. And so, you have to live with this. As my grandmother used to say, I'm just giving this person time until I discover how antisemitic they are. It was always a question of time. MANYA: His family's various displacements and scattered roots in Spain, Turkey, Egypt, Italy, and now America, have led him to question his identity and what he calls home. ANDRÉ: I live with this sense of: I don't know where I belong. I don't know who I am. I don't know any of those things. What's my flag? I have no idea. Where's my home? I don't know. I live in New York. I've lived in New York for 50 years. Is it my home? Not really. But Egypt was never going to be my home. MANYA: André knew when he was leaving Egypt that he would one day write a book about the experience. He knew he should take notes, but never did. And like his father, he started a diary, but it was lost. He started another in 1969.  After completing his dissertation, he began to write book reviews for Commentary, a monthly American magazine on religion, Judaism and politics founded and published, at the time, by American Jewish Committee.  The editor suggested André write something personal, and that was the beginning of Out of Egypt. In fact, three chapters of his memoir, including The Last Seder, appeared in Commentary before it was published as a book in 1994.  André returned to Egypt shortly after its release. But he has not been back since, even though his sons want to accompany him on a trip. ANDRÉ: They want to go back, because they want to go back with me. Question is, I don't want to put them in danger. You never know. You never know how people will react to . . . I mean, I'll go back as a writer who wrote about Egypt and was Jewish. And who knows what awaits me? Whether it will be friendly, will it be icy and chilly. Or will it be hostile? I don't know. And I don't want to put myself there. In other words, the view of the Jews has changed. It went to friendly, to enemy, to friendly, enemy, enemy, friendly, and so on, so forth. In other words, it is a fundamentally unreliable situation.  MANYA: He also doesn't see the point. It's impossible to recapture the past. The pictures he sees don't look familiar and the people he used to know with affection have died. But he doesn't want the past to be forgotten. None of it. He wants the world to remember the vibrant Jewish life that existed in Cairo and Alexandria, as well as the vile hatred that drove all but a handful of Jews out of Egypt. Cornell Professor Deborah Starr says for the first time in many years, young Egyptians are asking tough questions about the Arabization of Egyptian society and how that affected Egyptian Jews. Perhaps, Israel and Zionism did not siphon Jewish communities from the Arab world as the story often goes. Perhaps instead, Israel offered a critical refuge for a persecuted community. DEBORAH: I think it's really important to tell the stories of Mizrahi Jews. I think that, particularly here we are speaking in English to an American audience, where the majority of Jews in North America are Ashkenazi, we have our own identity, we have our own stories. But there are also other stories that are really interesting to tell, and are part of the history of Jews in the 20th and 21st centuries. They're part of the Jewish experience. And so that's some of what has always motivated me in my research, and looking at the stories of coexistence among Jews and their neighbors in Egypt. MANYA: Professor Starr says the rise of Islamist forces like the Muslim Brotherhood has led Egyptians to harken back toward this period of tolerance and coexistence, evoking a sense of nostalgia. DEBORAH: The people are no longer living together. But it's worth remembering that past, it's worth reflecting on it in an honest way, and not, to look at the nostalgia and say: oh, look, these people are nostalgic about it, what is it that they're nostalgic for? What are some of the motivations for that nostalgia? How are they characterizing this experience? But also to look kind of critically on the past and understand, where things were working where things weren't and, and to tell the story in an honest way. MANYA: Though the communities are gone, there has been an effort to restore the evidence of Jewish life. Under Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi, Egypt's president since 2014, there have been initiatives to restore and protect synagogues and cemeteries, including Eliyahu Hanavi Synagogue in Alexandria, Maimonides' original yeshiva in old Cairo, and Cairo's vast Jewish cemetery at Bassatine. But André is unmoved by this gesture. ANDRÉ: In fact, I got a call from the Egyptian ambassador to my house here, saying, ‘We're fixing the temples and the synagogues, and we want you back.' ‘Oh, that's very nice. First of all,' I told him, ‘fixing the synagogues doesn't do anything for me because I'm not a religious Jew. And second of all, I would be more than willing to come back to Egypt, when you give me my money back.' He never called me again. MANYA: Anytime the conversation about reparations comes up, it is overshadowed by the demand for reparations for Palestinians displaced by the creation of Israel, even though their leaders have rejected all offers for a Palestinian state. André wishes the Arab countries that have attacked Israel time and again would invest that money in the welfare of Palestinian refugees, help them start new lives, and to thrive instead of using them as pawns in a futile battle.  He will always be grateful to HIAS, the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, for helping his family escape, resettle, and rebuild their lives. ANDRÉ: We've made new lives for ourselves. We've moved on, and I think this is what Jews do all the time, all the time. They arrive or they're displaced, kicked out, they refashion themselves. Anytime I can help a Jew I will. Because they've helped me, because it's the right thing to do for a Jew. If a Jew does not help another Jew, what kind of a Jew are you? I mean, you could be a nonreligious Jew as I am, but I am still Jewish.  And I realize that we are a people that has historically suffered a great deal, because we were oppressed forever, and we might be oppressed again. Who knows, ok? But we help each other, and I don't want to break that chain. MANYA: Egyptian Jews are just one of the many Jewish communities who in the last century left Arab countries to forge new lives for themselves and future generations. Join us next week as we share another untold story of The Forgotten Exodus. Many thanks to André for sharing his story. You can read more in his memoir Out of Egypt and eventually in the sequel which he's working on now about his family's life in Italy after they left Egypt and before they came to America.  Does your family have roots in North Africa or the Middle East? One of the goals of this series is to make sure we gather these stories before they are lost. Too many times during my reporting, I encountered children and grandchildren who didn't have the answers to my questions because they had never asked. That's why one of the goals of this project is to encourage you to find more of these stories.  Call The Forgotten Exodus hotline. Tell us where your family is from and something you'd like for our listeners to know such as how you've tried to keep the traditions alive and memories alive as well. Call 212.891-1336 and leave a message of 2 minutes or less. Be sure to leave your name and where you live now. You can also send an email to theforgottenexodus@ajc.org and we'll be in touch. Atara Lakritz is our producer, CucHuong Do is our production manager. T.K. Broderick is our sound engineer. Special thanks to Jon Schweitzer, Sean Savage, Ian Kaplan, and so many of our colleagues, too many to name really, for making this series possible. And extra special thanks to David Harris, who has been a constant champion for making sure these stories do not remain untold. You can follow The Forgotten Exodus on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts, and you can sign up to receive updates at AJC.org/forgottenexodussignup. The views and opinions of our guests don't necessarily reflect the positions of AJC.  You can reach us at theforgottenexodus@ajc.org. If you've enjoyed this episode, please be sure to spread the word, and hop onto Apple Podcasts to rate us and write a review to help more listeners find us.