Podcasts about national oceanic

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Best podcasts about national oceanic

Latest podcast episodes about national oceanic

Initial Conditions: A Physics History Podcast
Energy Crises and Climate Change in the 1970s

Initial Conditions: A Physics History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 45:37 Very Popular


This episode describes efforts undertaken by the Department of Energy in the late 1970s to study the environmental, economic, and social consequences of anthropogenic climate change. In the early 1970s, President Richard Nixon confronted a series of energy crises. Blackouts in major U.S. cities, natural gas shortages, and the 1973 OPEC oil embargo led to cold winters, hot summers, and long lines at the pump. In response, Nixon began reorganizing the executive branch to better respond to such crises, an effort that would continue during the terms of his successors Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter. One proposal that Nixon's new energy advisors suggested was to burn more domestic coal and oil. Meteorologists, atmospheric scientists, oceanographers, and scientists in related fields paid close attention to these new energy policies. Some, including William P. Elliott, then working in the Air Resources Laboratory at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, responded with alarm. Based on the papers of William P. Elliott, this episode covers federal research efforts on anthropogenic climate change during the Carter administration. A handful of scientists began organizing a research program within the new Department of Energy to study the consequences of relying on more fossil fuels. That is, until the sudden closure of that program in 1981. We'll also discuss how debates about climate change from nearly fifty years ago still resonate today.

Earth Wise
A Geoengineering Research Plan | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 2:00


The 2022 federal appropriations act, signed into law in March, directed the Office of Science and Technology Policy to develop a cross-agency group to coordinate research on climate interventions, in partnership with NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the Department of Energy. The group is tasked with creating a research framework to “provide […]

Think Out Loud
Two new federal reports look at removing Snake River dams to help endangered and threatened fish

Think Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 10:27


Last week, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released a report recommending the removal of four dams on the lower Snake River in southeastern Washington to boost the recovery of endangered and threatened salmon and steelhead in the region. Another report commissioned by the Department of Energy found that replacing the lower Snake River dams and the renewable energy they provide would cost between $11 billion and $19 billion. Meanwhile, Washington Governor Jay Inslee and U.S. Senator Patty Murray (D-WA) are expected to release a final report this summer on whether they think the dams should remain or be breached. Courtney Flatt, a correspondent for the Northwest News Network, joins us to talk about the political and economic obstacles to removing the dams, a move which would require Congressional approval.

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - DR. ROBERT WILLISCROFT - From Global Warming to Nuclear Power

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 60:01


Robert G. Williscroft served 23 years in the U.S. Navy and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). He commenced his service as an enlisted nuclear Submarine Sonar Technician, was selected for the Navy Enlisted Scientific Education Program, and graduated from University of Washington in Marine Physics and Meteorology. He returned to nuclear submarines as the Navy's first Poseidon Weapons Officer. Subsequently, he served as Navigator, and as Diving & Salvage and Saturation Diving Officer on both catamaran mother vessels for the Deep Submergence Rescue Vehicle, and then as Officer in Charge of the Navy Saturation Diving School, and of the Test Operations Group out of San Diego, conducting deep-ocean surveillance and data acquisition. In NOAA Dr. Williscroft directed diving operations throughout the Pacific and Atlantic. NOAA published his Doctoral dissertation, A Method for Protecting Scuba Divers from the Hazards of Contaminated Water, and distributed it around the world to interested ports and diving activities. He is a certified diving instructor for the National Association of Underwater Instructors (NAUI) and the Multinational Diving Educators Association (MDEA), and has taught over 3,000 individuals both basic and advanced SCUBA diving. He authored three diving books, developed the first NAUI drysuit course, developed advanced curricula for mixed gas and other specialized diving modes, and developed and taught a NAUI course on the Math and Physics of Advanced Diving. He also served three shipboard years in the high Arctic conducting baseline studies, and thirteen months at the geographic South Pole in charge of National Science Foundation atmospheric projects.His military decorations include:Good Conduct MedalNational Service Defense MedalAntarctic Service Medal (w. winterover device)Unit citation (w. bronze star)Submarine Dolphins (Silver & Gold)Fleet Ballistic Missile Patrol Device (w. silver star & 2 bronze stars)Navy Saturation Diving Officer PinNOAA Diving Officer Pin

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 632 (7-18-22): Checking on the Chesapeake's Condition

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:30).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 7-15-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of July 18 and July 25, 2022. SOUNDS – ~6 sec Those sounds of shorebirds and Chesapeake Bay waves open an episode on the condition of that bay, which we last explored in an August 2020 episode.  We set the stage with the instrumental opening of a song whose title calls to mind some colors of the Chesapeake region's waters, lands, sky, and creatures.  Here's about 30 seconds of “The Deep Blue Green,” by Andrew VanNorstrand. MUSIC – ~31 sec – instrumental In June 2022, the University of Maryland's Center for Environmental Science issued its latest annual Chesapeake Bay and Watershed Report Card, for conditions in 2021.  For the report's first part, to assess Bay waters, the report compares the status of several physical, chemical, and biological indicators to established goals, in order to generate condition scores ranging from zero to 100%.  Combining the indicator scores, the overall score for 2021 was 50, an increase from the 45 score for 2020 data; the report characterized the 50 score as “moderate health” and gave it a letter grade of C.  The score when the Report Card started in 1986 was 48; the highest score since then was 55 in 2002, and the lowest was 36 in 2003. For the report's second part, the overall watershed assessment, the report for 2021 looked at three categories of indicators: ecological, societal, and economic.  These resulted in a score of 56, characterized as “moderate health” and given a letter grade of C+.  This was the first year that three categories of indicators were used for the watershed assessment, so the results aren't directly comparable to previous years. Besides the Maryland center's annual report, several other Bay condition reports are regularly available.  These include the Chesapeake Bay Program's annual “Bay Barometer” report; the Bay Program's “Chesapeake Progress” Web site, with updates on progress toward the goals of the 2014 Chesapeake Bay Agreement; the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's biennial “State of the Bay” report; and reports by various groups on specific Bay areas, such as the James River Association's “State of the James” reports.  All depend on data gathered by various sources, including universities; governmental agencies at the federal, state, and local levels; and non-governmental organizations. The Chesapeake Bay is the United States' largest estuary.  Monitoring its condition is a large part of decades-old efforts to improve and sustain this irreplaceable water body. Thanks to Andrew VanNorstrand for permission to use “The Deep Blue Green.”  We close with about 50 seconds of another musical selection, created for our previous episode on Chesapeake Bay conditions.  Here's “Chesapeake Bay Ballad,” by Torrin Hallett, a graduate student at the Yale School of Music. MUSIC – ~51 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The waves sound was recorded by Virginia Water Radio at the Chesapeake Bay on Kent Island, Maryland, June 22, 2010. The shorebirds sound was taken from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife National Digital Library, http://digitalmedia.fws.gov/cdm/; the specific audio file was “Shore birds close,” online at https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/audio/id/66/rec/8. “The Deep Blue Green,” from the 2019 album “That We Could Find a Way to Be,” is copyright by Andrew VanNorstrand, used with permission.  More information about Andrew VanNorstrand is available online at https://greatbearrecords.bandcamp.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 504, 12-23-19. “Chesapeake Bay Ballad” is copyright 2020 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 604, 11-22-21. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES (Unless otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) View of the Chesapeake Bay looking downstream from the Bay Bridge-Tunnel (between Virginia Beach and Northampton County), October 7, 2007.View of the Chesapeake Bay looking upstream from Sandy Point State Park in Anne Arundel County, Maryland, March 21, 2010.Summary charts for Chesapeake Bay waters (upper) and watershed (lower) from the “Chesapeake Bay & Watershed 2021 Report Card” (covering data through 2021; published in June 2022), University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.  Images accessed from the report PDF, online at https://ecoreportcard.org/site/assets/files/2560/2021-chesapeake-bay-watershed-report-card.pdf, as of 7-18-22. SOURCES Used for Audio Chesapeake Bay Foundation, “State of the Bay,” online at https://www.cbf.org/about-the-bay/state-of-the-bay-report/. Chesapeake Bay Program, online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/.  Specific pages used were the following:“Slight improvements in Bay health and new economic data added in 2021 Chesapeake Bay Report Card,” June 7, 2022, news release by Caroline Grass;“Bay Barometer,” April 2021 (for 2019-20 data), online (as a PDF) at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/documents/Bay_Barometer_2019-2020_Web.pdf;“Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement” (signed June 16, 2014), online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/what/what_guides_us/watershed_agreement;“Chesapeake Progress,” online at https://www.chesapeakeprogress.com/;“The Estuary,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/the_estuary_system.Jeremy Cox and Timothy Wheeler, “Maryland, Virginia clamp down on crab harvests; cuts imposed as crab population hits record-low,” Bay Journal, June 30, 2022. Maryland Department of Natural Resources, “2022 Blue Crab Winter Dredge Survey,” online at https://dnr.maryland.gov/fisheries/Pages/blue-crab/dredge.aspx.Maryland Department of Natural Resources, “Eyes on the Bay,” online at http://eyesonthebay.dnr.maryland.gov/.See http://eyesonthebay.dnr.maryland.gov/eyesonthebay/whatsitmean.cfmfor “Data Available for Viewing” (dissolved oxygen, pH, salinity, turbidity, algal blooms, and temperature).See http://eyesonthebay.dnr.maryland.gov/eyesonthebay/links.cfmfor links to other Bay water-quality data and information sources.University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, online at https://www.umces.edu/.The “Chesapeake Bay & Watershed Report Card” is online at https://ecoreportcard.org/report-cards/chesapeake-bay/; note links for “Bay Health,” “Watershed Health,” and “Indicators.”A June 6, 2022, news release on the report of 2021 data is online https://www.umces.edu/news/chesapeake-bay-health-score-held-steady-in-2021.A PDF of the report of 2021 data is online at https://ecoreportcard.org/site/assets/files/2560/2021-chesapeake-bay-watershed-report-card.pdf. Virginia Institute of Marine Science, “How big is the [Chesapeake] bay?”  Online at https://www.vims.edu/bayinfo/faqs/estuary_size.php. For More Information about the Chesapeake Bay and its ConditionChesapeake Bay Program, “Discover the Chesapeake,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, “Chesapeake Bay Map,” online at https://coastalscience.noaa.gov/products/vmrc-chesapeake-bay-map/.Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Chesapeake Bay,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/chesapeake-bay. Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS):“Bay Info,” online at https://www.vims.edu/bayinfo/index.php;“SAV Program: Monitoring and Restoration,” online at https://www.vims.edu/research/units/programs/sav/index.php;“Virginia Coastal and Estuarine Observing System,” online at http://vecos.vims.edu/. Virginia Marine Resources Commission, online at https://mrc.virginia.gov/links.shtm. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Rivers, Streams, and Other Surface Water” subject category.  The previous episode on Chesapeake Bay conditions was Episode 537, 8-10-20, Following are links to some other episodes on the Chesapeake Bay. Bay Barometer and other reports – Episode 305, 2-29-16.Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), Phase II Watershed Implementation Plan – Episode 115, 6-18-12.Bay TMDL, Phase III Watershed Implementation Plan – Episode 475, 6-3-19.Chesapeake Bay Commission – Episode 496, 10-28-19.Estuaries introduction – Episode 326, 7-25-16.Oysters and nitrogen (Part 1) – Episode 279, 8-24-15.Oysters and nitrogen (Part 2) – Episode 280, 9-7-15.“Smart” buoys – Episode 538, 8-17-20.Submerged aquatic vegetation (“Bay grasses”) – Episode 325, 7-18-16.Winter birds of the Chesapeake Bay area – EP565 – 2/22/21. Following are other music pieces composed by Torrin Hallett for Virginia Water Radio, with episodes featuring the music.“A Little Fright Music” – used in Episode 548, 10-26-20, on water-related passages in fiction and non-fiction, for Halloween; and Episode 601, 10-31-21, connections among Halloween, water, and the human body.“Beetle Ballet” – used in Episode 525, 5-18-20, on aquatic beetles.“Corona Cue” – used in Episode 517, 3-23-20, on the coronavirus pandemic. “Flow Stopper” – used in Episode 599, 10-18-21, on “Imagine a Day Without Water.”“Geese Piece” – used most recently in 615, 2-7-22, on Brant.“Ice Dance” – “Ice Dance” – used most recently in Episode 606, 12-6-21, on freezing of water.“Lizard Lied” – used in Episode 514, 3-2-20, on lizards. “New Year's Water” – used most recently in Episode 610, 1-3-22, on water thermodynamics and a New Year's Day New River wade-in.“Rain Refrain” – used most recently in Episode 559, 1-11-21, on record rainfall in 2020.“Runoff” – in Episode 585, 7-12-21 – on middle schoolers calling out stormwater-related water words.“Spider Strike” – used in Episode 523, 5-4-20, on fishing spiders.“Tropical Tantrum” – used most recently in Episode 580, 6-7-21, on the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season preview.“Tundra Swan Song – used in Episode 554, 12-7-20, on Tundra Swans.“Turkey Tune” – used in Episode 343, 11-21-16, on the Wild Turkey.“Wade in the Water” (arrangement) – used most recently in Episode 616, 2-14-22.  FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes2.5 – Living things are part of a system.3.5 – Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems support a diversity of organisms.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth.4.7 – The ocean environment.Grades K-5: Earth Resources 1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly, including that most natural resources are limited; human actions can affect the availability of natural resources; and reducing, reusing, and recycling are ways to conserve natural resources.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems.6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life ScienceLS.6 – Populations in a biological community interact and are interdependent.LS.8 – Change occurs in ecosystems, communities, populations, and organisms over time.LS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity.LS.11 – Populations of organisms can change over time. Earth ScienceES.6 – Resource use is complex.ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity.ES.10 – Oceans are complex, dynamic systems subject to long- and short-term variations. BiologyBIO.2 – Chemical and biochemical processes are essential for life.BIO.7 – Populations change through time.BIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 Geography Theme1.6 – Virginia climate, seasons, and landforms.2.6 – Major rivers, mountains, and other geographic features of North America and other continents.3.6 – Major rivers, mountains, and other geographic features of North America and other continents. Grades K-3 Economics Theme2.8 – Natural, human, and capital resources.3.8 – Understanding of cultures and of how natural, human, and capital resources are used for goods and services. Grades K-3 Civics Theme3.12 – Importance of government in community, Virginia, and the United States. Virginia Studies CourseVS.1 – Impact of geographic features on people, places, and events in Virginia history.VS.10 – Knowledge of government, geography, and economics in present-day Virginia. United States History to 1865 CourseUSI.2 – Major land and water features of North America, including their importance in history. United States History: 1865-to-Present CourseUSII.9 – Domestic and international issues during the second half of the 20th Century and the early 21st Century. Civics and Economics CourseCE.6 – Government at the national level.CE.7 – Government at the state level.CE.8 – Government at the local level.CE.10 – Public policy at local, state, and national levels. World Geography CourseWG.2 – How selected physical and ecological processes shape the Earth's surface, including climate, weather, and how humans influence their environment and are influenced by it.WG.3 – How regional landscapes reflect the physical environment and the cultural characteristics of their inhabitants.WG.4 – Types and significance of natural, human, and capital resources. Government CourseGOVT.7 – National government organization and powers.GOVT.8 – State and local government organization and powers.GOVT.9 – Public policy process at local, state, and national levels.GOVT.15 – Role of government in Va. and U.S. economies, including examining environmental issues and property rights.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels.Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school. Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school. Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school. Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade. Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade. Episode 606, 12-6-21 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.

BirdNote
The Arctic Report Card

BirdNote

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 1:42 Very Popular


Many shorebirds breed in the Arctic tundra. It's such an important ecosystem that every year, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration issues an Arctic Report Card that details how the region has been affected by rising global temperatures. Over the last ten years, satellite data has shown that shrubs are spreading in the north. Shorebirds that nest among low-lying tundra plants may soon find woody thickets encroaching on their breeding grounds, which could have ripple effects on shorebird populations around the world.More info and transcript at BirdNote.org. Want more BirdNote? Subscribe to our weekly newsletter. Sign up for BirdNote+ to get ad-free listening and other perks. BirdNote is a nonprofit. Your tax-deductible gift makes these shows possible.

Smart Talk
Is Pennsylvania prepared for hurricane season?

Smart Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 10:25


The Atlantic hurricane season ranges from June 1 to November 30. For the 2022 hurricane season, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is forecasting a likely range of 14 to 21 named storms (winds of 39 mph or higher), of which 6 to 10 could become hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher), including 3 to 6 major hurricanes (category 3, 4 or 5; with winds of 111 mph or higher). NOAA provides these ranges with a 70% confidence. Pennsylvania is not on the coast but that doesn't mean the state won't be impacted by hurricanes or other severe weather events like flooding. The Pennsylvania Insurance Department is encouraging Pennsylvanians to be prepared for the summer hurricane season. Acting State Insurance Commissioner Mike Humphreys is on Wednesday's Smart Talk with more information.Support WITF: https://www.witf.org/support/give-now/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Nightside With Dan Rea
Weather in our World (9 p.m.)

Nightside With Dan Rea

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2022 39:51


Morgan White Jr. filled in on NightSide:What is in store for weather this Summer? We are in the midst of hurricane season and will be until November. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association predicted that this year New England will have an above normal hurricane season. WBZ-TV Meteorologist Jacob Wycoff came on NightSide to answer your questions and discuss what weather might be ahead of us!

Earth Wise
Carbon Dioxide Levels Higher Again | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 2:00


The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reported that carbon dioxide levels measured in May at the Mauna Loa Observatory reached a value of 421 parts per million.  This is 50% greater than pre-industrial levels and is in a range not seen on earth for millions of years. Before the Industrial Revolution, CO2 levels fairly steadily […]

The Dirt Podcast
The Dirt Gets Wrecked - Ep 196

The Dirt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 65:31


Y'all, it has been a TOUGH WEEK. You can tell because Anna somehow manages to get the episode intro WRONG after doing it correctly nearly 200 times. But we're just gonna keep swimming! We couldn't do a month-at-sea theme without talking about shipwrecks. And it's not just pirate ships and the Titanic, either. We'll discuss all kinds of underwater assemblages and the ways in which shipwreck archaeology helps us understand travel, life, commerce, connectivity, and more. Interested in sponsoring this show or podcast ads for your business? Zencastr makes it really easy! Click this message for more info. Links Dokos shipwreck (Wikipedia) Oldest Intact Shipwreck Discovered in the Black Sea (Smithsonian Magazine) Ancient Shipwreck (Archaeology) The Oldest Intact Shipwreck “Odysseus” was an Ancient Greek Vessel (Greek Reporter) Stamnos - The Siren Vase (British Museum) How the world's deepest shipwreck was found (BBC Future) Made in China (National Geographic) The Belitung Shipwreck (SEAArch) Silk Roads Programme (UNESCO) NOAA, partners discover wreck of 207-year-old whaling ship (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) The Science of Shipwrecks (North Carolina Sea Grant) Episode 86 - Check Yourself Before You Shipwreck Yourself (The Dirt) How scientists keep ancient shipwrecks from crumbling into dust (Popular Science) Giant freeze dryer to preserve famous shipwreck (The History Blog) Sustainable Nanotechnologies for Curative and Preventive Wood Deacidification Treatments: An Eco-Friendly and Innovative Approach (Nanomaterials) The Salvage (Vasa Museet) Contact Email the Dirt Podcast: thedirtpodcast@gmail.com ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular Motion

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
The Dirt Gets Wrecked - Ep 196

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 65:31


Y'all, it has been a TOUGH WEEK. You can tell because Anna somehow manages to get the episode intro WRONG after doing it correctly nearly 200 times. But we're just gonna keep swimming! We couldn't do a month-at-sea theme without talking about shipwrecks. And it's not just pirate ships and the Titanic, either. We'll discuss all kinds of underwater assemblages and the ways in which shipwreck archaeology helps us understand travel, life, commerce, connectivity, and more. Interested in sponsoring this show or podcast ads for your business? Zencastr makes it really easy! Click this message for more info. Links Dokos shipwreck (Wikipedia) Oldest Intact Shipwreck Discovered in the Black Sea (Smithsonian Magazine) Ancient Shipwreck (Archaeology) The Oldest Intact Shipwreck “Odysseus” was an Ancient Greek Vessel (Greek Reporter) Stamnos - The Siren Vase (British Museum) How the world's deepest shipwreck was found (BBC Future) Made in China (National Geographic) The Belitung Shipwreck (SEAArch) Silk Roads Programme (UNESCO) NOAA, partners discover wreck of 207-year-old whaling ship (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) The Science of Shipwrecks (North Carolina Sea Grant) Episode 86 - Check Yourself Before You Shipwreck Yourself (The Dirt) How scientists keep ancient shipwrecks from crumbling into dust (Popular Science) Giant freeze dryer to preserve famous shipwreck (The History Blog) Sustainable Nanotechnologies for Curative and Preventive Wood Deacidification Treatments: An Eco-Friendly and Innovative Approach (Nanomaterials) The Salvage (Vasa Museet) Contact Email the Dirt Podcast: thedirtpodcast@gmail.com ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular Motion

Late Night Health Radio
Tips & Tricks to Help Consumers Stay Safe During Extreme Weather

Late Night Health Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 9:37


The number of extreme weather events increases each year, wreaking havoic on communities and economies. The 2022 hurricane season kicked off June 1st and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicts this will become the seventh consecutive “above normal” hurricane season. Genia Welbourn of Verizon visits with Mark Alyn.

Late Night Health
Tips & Tricks to Help Consumers Stay Safe During Extreme Weather

Late Night Health

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 9:37


The number of extreme weather events increases each year, wreaking havoic on communities and economies. The 2022 hurricane season kicked off June 1st and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicts this will become the seventh consecutive “above normal” hurricane season. Genia Welbourn of Verizon visits with Mark Alyn.

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
CLAMoring for Data with Christine Bassett - DIRT 195

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 71:59


Ahoy! We're still at sea, the ocean is still None of Our Business, and yet we're learning so much about it! This week, we've got a special guest to guide us. Christine Bassett is currently a program coordinator for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Weather Program Office (NOAA). Christine collects data from ancient Arctic shell middens to reconstruct climate and sea ice levels for archaeological sites in the Aleutian islands. Tune in to learn how she's turning thousand-year-old clams into a climate thermometer! Interested in learning about how to use X-Rays and similar technology in archaeology? Check out the linked PaleoImaging course from James Elliot! Connect with James on Twitter: @paleoimaging Interested in sponsoring this show or podcast ads for your business? Zencastr makes it really easy! Click this message for more info. Links The Unalaska Sea Ice Project Follow Christine on Twitter @ClamsAndClimate Contact Email the Dirt Podcast: thedirtpodcast@gmail.com ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular Motion

The Dirt Podcast
CLAMoring for Data with Christine Bassett - Ep 195

The Dirt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 71:59


Ahoy! We're still at sea, the ocean is still None of Our Business, and yet we're learning so much about it! This week, we've got a special guest to guide us. Christine Bassett is currently a program coordinator for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Weather Program Office (NOAA). Christine collects data from ancient Arctic shell middens to reconstruct climate and sea ice levels for archaeological sites in the Aleutian islands. Tune in to learn how she's turning thousand-year-old clams into a climate thermometer! Interested in learning about how to use X-Rays and similar technology in archaeology? Check out the linked PaleoImaging course from James Elliot! Connect with James on Twitter: @paleoimaging Interested in sponsoring this show or podcast ads for your business? Zencastr makes it really easy! Click this message for more info. Links The Unalaska Sea Ice Project Follow Christine on Twitter @ClamsAndClimate Contact Email the Dirt Podcast: thedirtpodcast@gmail.com ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular Motion

Caring for Animals & Creating Trust
Sharing The Dairy Sustainability Story With Consumers

Caring for Animals & Creating Trust

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 33:07


A 2021 survey of food consumers by Kerry indicated that https://explore.kerry.com/sustainability-whitepaper-2021 (62% of North American consumers) sustainability as a strong influence when making food and beverage purchases, and say it's a greater priority when selecting dairy, meat, or alternative protein products. At the same time, consumer interest in plant-based products is growing – but is it more sustainable? Important to our discussion, the https://www.noaa.gov/news-release/increase-in-atmospheric-methane-set-another-record-during-2021 (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) recently reported) that “global emissions of methane surged by a record amount in 2021: 17 parts per billion, the largest amount recorded since systematic measurements began in 1983. Methane is 84 times more potent than carbon but breaks down faster. https://www.cnbc.com/2022/04/07/methane-emissions-surged-by-a-record-amount-in-2021-noaa-says-.html ((CNBC).) Critics are often quick to point the finger at agriculture, but may not know that cattle are actually part of the solution.  This increased awareness and interest from consumers and the reality of our ever-changing environment means farmers – particularly those produce meat, milk and eggs – are receiving questions and input about how their farms impact the environment not only from grocery shoppers but also business investors. A study released by the International Food Information Council IFIC: https://foodinsight.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/IFIC-Regenerative-Ag-Consumer-Survey.pdf (Consumer Perspectives on Regenerative Ag) in February found that over half of those consumers surveyed have heard of organic farming, crop rotation and sustainable farming; fewer are familiar with regenerative agriculture (in research file); 4/10 consumers believe organic foods are more nutritious; 1/3 want food grown using regenerative ag (but few know what that is); 35% would purchase more expensive cereal if grown utilizing regenerative ag. But the good news is while many misconceptions exist about the sustainability of animal agriculture, data and science bring clarity to the sustainability story, helping stakeholders from farm to fork understand the progress made so far and focus on continuous improvement. In this episode, guests will discuss the farm to table perspective on sustainability including what consumers are looking for and the latest sustainability trends – and why it's important for agriculture to engage in the conversation about sustainability, whether on social media, in the board room, with financial institutions, or with other food stakeholders, what we can do better to be more effective and reach a broader audience, and the research and data that can help share a realistic view of what's happening on the farm. They will also discuss what farmers in the dairy and beef industries (in honor of Dairy Month in June) are doing today to continue improving their operations. Guests will discuss: The latest consumer insights on sustainability and consumer wants/drivers. Existing data and science that helps tell the on-farm sustainability story, and how it's helping bridge the gap between perception and reality. What are farmers doing now, and what are they aspiring to do in the future, to continue building on past success in natural resource management and production. Regenerative agriculture – what it is and how it helps How animal agriculture is actually part of the solution – not the problem How everyone plays a role in continuous improvement and a successful sustainable story   Podcast guests:  Tara Vander Dussen, New Mexico Milkmaid – Environmental Scientist/Dairy farmer/online influencer and co-founder of Elevate Ag - https://www.elevateyouragstory.com/ (https://www.elevateyouragstory.com/) Jamie Jonker – Chief Science Officer and Vice President of Sustainability & Scientific Affairs for...

Curiosity Daily
Shoo Shoes!, Murmuration Information, Nanoplastic Particles

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 13:53 Very Popular


Today, you'll learn about why it's best to leave your shoes at the door when you come inside, how animals form and maintain their mesmerizing murmurations, and how certain food storage products release sub-microscopic, plastic particles when exposed to hot water.Your mom was right about taking your shoes off inside.“The science is in: wearing shoes inside your home is just plain gross” by Mark Patrick Taylor and Gabriel Filippellihttps://www.theguardian.com/society/2022/mar/17/the-science-is-in-wearing-shoes-inside-your-home-is-just-plain-gross“Scientists Discover Why You Should Take Off Your Shoes Before Entering Your Home” by Robert Lockehttps://www.lifehack.org/317735/scientists-discover-why-you-should-take-off-your-shoes-before-entering-your-home“Should You Take Your Shoes Off While Indoors?” by Ally Spierhttps://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/should-you-take-your-shoes-off-while-indoorsMurmurations not murmuring.“The Secrets and Science Behind Starling Murmurations” by John Donovanhttps://animals.howstuffworks.com/birds/starling-murmurations.htm“Gazing at the “Black Sun”: The Transfixing Beauty of Starling Murmurations” by Søren Solkærhttps://www.nytimes.com/2022/04/04/travel/starling-murmurations.html“Swarm Robotics Promises to Boost Diagnostics, Treat Cancer” by Inga Shugalohttps://www.roboticsbusinessreview.com/health-medical/swarm-robotics-boosts-diagnosis/The tiny side of plastic.“Your Take-Out Coffee Cup May Shed Trillions of Plastic 'Nanoparticles'” By Dennis Thompsonhttps://www.usnews.com/news/health-news/articles/2022-05-03/your-take-out-coffee-cup-may-shed-trillions-of-plastic-nanoparticles“NIST Study Shows Everyday Plastic Products Release Trillions of Microscopic Particles Into Water” By NISThttps://www.nist.gov/news-events/news/2022/04/nist-study-shows-everyday-plastic-products-release-trillions-microscopic“What are microplastics?” by The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrationhttps://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/microplastics.htmlFollow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to get smarter with Calli and Nate — for free! Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers.Find episode transcripts here: https://curiosity-daily-4e53644e.simplecast.com/episodes/shoo-shoes-murmuration-information-nanoplastic-particles

Space Cafe Radio
Space Café Radio - with Kian Mirshahi

Space Cafe Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 20:26


In this Space Café Radio, SpaceWatch.Global Event coordinator and Space Café Young Global Talents Host Chiara Moenter spoke with Kian Mirshahi, CEO of Mayday.ai about Mayday, the space ecosystem, and the importance of finding and relearning our balance and harmony with nature.Mayday.ai is a German-based provider of real time risk and disaster intelligence. It covers multiple disasters, all phases of disaster management and all geographical regions of the world. Its platform is powered with earth observation and ancillary data. These are processed using some industry-first remote sensing solutions and its proprietary AI fusion engine. For crisis management, Mayday provides early warning and a common operating picture which can be area- or event-centric. The data solutions are complemented by a 24/7 staffed operational center, on-demand field services and a mobile app for civilians and professionals. Mayday activities have been supported by the European Space Agency (ESA), the German Aerospace Center (DLR), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), as well as a whole host of other global partners. Space Cafe Radio brings our talks, our interviews, our impressions to you. In this format, you will hear conversations or the entire team of SpaceWatchers while being out on the road. Each show will have a specific topic, unique content and a very personal touch. Enjoy the show format and let us know your input to radio@spacewatch.global.

Carolina Weather Group
GOES-18, newest weather satellite, transmits first images [Ep. 415]

Carolina Weather Group

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 30:11


GOES-18, which launched March 1 as GOES-R, is continuing operational testing ahead of becoming the United States' newest weather satellite. Part of those tests, is the transmission of its initial test imagery. Our guest this week on the Carolina Weather Group is Dr. Dan Lindsey, the Chief Scientist for NOAA's GOES-R Program. Lindsey explains the ongoing testing, where the satellite is now, and what remains before the satellite can begin monitoring the weather for the West Coast of the United States. GOES-18 will assist GOES-17 with GOES West operations in late summer 2022 and again in early fall. NOAA plans for GOES-18 to replace GOES-17 as GOES West in early 2023. GOES-16, which launched in 2016 as GOES-R, provides weather data for the United States East Coast, including both North Carolina and South Carolina. GOES-U will be the fourth and final spacecraft in the GOES-R Series of geostationary weather satellites operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The GOES-R Series is a joint effort between NASA and NOAA and includes GOES-R, GOES-S, GOES-T, and GOES-U. Imagery from GOES-18 during the post-launch testing phase should be considered preliminary and non-operational. More information: https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/news/earth-orbit-noaa-debuts-first-imagery-goes-18 https://www.goes-r.gov/ LEAVE A TIP: https://streamelements.com/carolinawxgroup/tip SUBSCRIBE TO OUR PODCAST: https://anchor.fm/carolinaweather SUPPORT US ON PATREON: https://patreon.com/carolinaweathergroup VISIT OUR WEBSITE: https://carolinaweathergroup.com The Carolina Weather Group operates a weekly talk show of the same name. Broadcasting each week from the Carolinas, the show is dedicated to covering weather, science, technology, and more with newsmakers from the field of atmospheric science. With co-hosts across both North Carolina and South Carolina, the show may closely feature both NC weather and SC weather, but the topics are universally enjoyable for any weather fan. Join us as we talk about weather, environment, the atmosphere, space travel, and all the technology that makes it possible. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/carolinaweather/message

Tallahassee Business Podcast
Ep. 113 - Ensuring Your Business is Red Cross Ready, Sharon Carraway and Tom Derzypolski, Red Cross Capital Area Chapter

Tallahassee Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 23:44


June 1 marked the beginning of hurricane season. According to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predictions, we're facing an “above-average” 2022 Atlantic hurricane season with 14 to 21 named storms, including three to six major hurricanes. Are you prepared? Is your business? On this special episode of the Tallahassee Business Podcast, sponsored by The Health Network, local business owner, Tom Derzypolski who serves as Chair of the Capital Area Red Cross joins us with Executive Director Sharon Carraway to share best practices when preparing your business for an emergency. Think your business is ready? The Red Cross launched the American Red Cross Ready Rating™ program as a complete 123-point self-assessment of your preparedness and reveals areas for improvement. For more information on the Red Cross and to access the Preparation Checklist, visit www.redcross.org.

This Date in Weather History
2014: Hail storm causes $400 million in damage in Abilene, TX

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 1:25


On June 12, 2014 a hail storm that hit Abilene produced more than $400 million in insured losses to vehicles, homes and commercial property. "This is the worst storm damage I've seen in my 41 years in the insurance business," Leroy Perkins of the Perkins Insurance Agency in Abilene, told the largest state insurance trade association in the United States. the storm, packing baseball-sized hail, moved directly south across Abilene pounding the city's north side and downtown area. Commercial buildings downtown received millions of dollars in damage to roofs, windows and structures. Total uninsured losses are also expected to be high, Perkins adds. "Downtown looks like autumn because all of the trees have been stripped of their leaves and many limbs down in the street," Karla Martin with the Taylor County Sheriff's Office said the day after the storm. Hundreds of vehicles, many of them new cars, were declared totaled from the beating they took. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) notes that hail causes approximately 1$ billion in damage to crops and property each year. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Clarke County Democrat Podcast
Alex name already used as hurricane season starts

The Clarke County Democrat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 2:26


Hurricane season is here again and the forecast from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) isn't what most coastal area residents want to hear: Another above-average season — which would make it the seventh consecutive above-average hurricane season. Neither citizens nor local governments welcome the news. Many counties and municipalities still haven't received full FEMA reimbursements for debris cleanup from Hurricane Zeta two years ago. NOAA's outlook for the 2022 Atlantic hurricane season, which runs from June 1 to November 30, predicts a 65% chance of an abovenormal season, a 25% chance of a near-normal season and a 10%...Article Link

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 629 (6-6-22): The 2022 Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Season Begins with a Re-formed Pacific Storm

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:52).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 6-3-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks June 6 and June 13, 2022. MUSIC – ~11 sec – instrumental. That's part of “Driving Rain,” by the Charlottesville- and Nelson County-based band, Chamomile and Whiskey.  The storm-themed music sets the stage for our annual preview of a potential bunch of rainy, windy, and storm-surge-causing summer and fall visitors.  Have a listen for about 35 seconds to some more of the music accompanying 21 names that we hope will NOT become infamous this year. MUSIC and VOICES ~36 sec – Music lyrics: “In the driving rain”; then instrumental.  Voices: “Alex.  Bonnie.  Colin.  Danielle.  Earl.  Fiona.  Gaston.  Hermine.  Ian.  Julia.  Karl.  Lisa.  Martin.  Nicole.  Owen.  Paula.  Richard.  Shary.  Tobias.  Virginie.  Walter.” Those were the names planned for storms that may occur during this year's Atlantic basin tropical cyclone season.  The Atlantic basin includes the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, and Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic tropical cyclone season runs officially from June 1 through November 30.  Most Atlantic tropical cyclones occur within this period, but not all of them do.  In fact, 2022 is the first year since 2014 in which there was NOT a named Atlantic basin storm before June 1, although it was close: as of June 3, the remnants of Pacific basin Hurricane Agatha, which formed in late May and made landfall in southern Mexico, were predicted to re-form in the Gulf of Mexico as the Atlantic basin's first named storm. [Editor's note, not in the audio: Pre-June named Atlantic storms in the previous seven years were Ana in 2015, Alex in January 2016 and Bonnie in May 2016, Arlene in April 2017, Alberto in May 2018, Andrea in May 2019, Arthur and Bertha in May 2020, and Ana in May 2021.  The first named storm in 2014 was in July.  The National Hurricane Center upgraded Potential Tropical Cyclone One to Tropical Storm Alex around 2 a.m. EDT on June 5, 2022.]Tropical storms and hurricanes are two categories of tropical cyclones, which are rotating storm systems that start in tropical or sub-tropical latitudes.  A tropical cyclone is called a tropical storm—and gets a name—when sustained wind speeds reach 39 miles per hour; at 74 miles per hour, a tropical cyclone is considered a hurricane.  Tropical depressions—with wind speeds below 39 miles per hour—don't get named if they never reach tropical storm wind speed,* but they can still bring damaging rainfall and flooding.  Hurricane-force storms are called typhoonsin northwestern areas of the Pacific Ocean. [Editor's note, not in the audio: A tropical system that never gets above the tropical depression wind-speed level won't be given a name, but a lingering tropical depression that previously was at the wind speed of a tropical storm or hurricane will have a name associated with it.]Before a tropical system of any speed or name barges into the Old Dominion, here are five important preparedness steps recommended by the National Weather Service.1.  Know your zone – that is, find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation area by checking the Virginia Department of Emergency Management's “Hurricane Zone Evacuation Tool,” available online at  vaemergency.gov/prepare, or by contacting your local emergency management office. 2.  Assemble an emergency kit of food, water, flashlights, first aid materials, a battery-powered radio, and other items that would be useful in a power outage.3.  Have a family emergency plan, including plans for evacuating and for getting in touch with one another in an emergency. 4.  Review your insurance policies to ensure that you have adequate coverage for your home and personal property. And 5.  Establish ways to stay informed, especially if the power goes out. Detailed safety tips for hurricanes and other severe weather are available from the “Safety” link at the National Weather Service Web site, www.weather.gov; from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management, online as noted earlier at vaemergency.gov/prepare; and from various other sources. Thanks to eight Blacksburg, Va., friends for lending their voices to this episode.  Thanks also to Chamomile and Whiskey for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “Driving Rain.” MUSIC – ~21 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “Driving Rain,” from the 2012 album “The Barn Sessions,” is copyright by Chamomile and Whiskey and by County Wide Records, used with permission.  More information about Chamomile and Whiskey is available online at http://www.chamomileandwhiskey.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 579, 5-31-21. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Satellite photo of Tropical Storm Alex off the southeastern Atlantic Coast of the United States at 2:51 p.m. EDT (18:51 Z), on June 5, 2022.  Photo from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), “GOES Image Viewer: GOES-East/U.S. Atlantic Coast/Band 1 (Blue Visible)”, online at https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/goes/sector.php?sat=G16§or=eus; specific URL for the photo was https://cdn.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/GOES16/ABI/SECTOR/eus/01/20221561851_GOES16-ABI-eus-01-500x500.jpg, as of June 6, 2022.Predictions for the 2022 Atlantic tropical storm season.  Graphic from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), “NOAA predicts above-normal 2022 Atlantic Hurricane Season; Ongoing La Niña, above-average Atlantic temperatures set the stage for busy season ahead,” May 24, 2022, online at https://www.noaa.gov/news-release/noaa-predicts-above-normal-2022-atlantic-hurricane-season.Map showing the names, dates, and tracks of named Atlantic basin tropical cyclones (tropical storms and hurricanes) in 2021. Map from the National Hurricane Center, “2021 Atlantic Hurricane Season,” online at https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/data/tcr/index.php?season=2021&basin=atl.“5 Things to Know About Having and Evacuation Plan” poster from the National Weather Service, “What to Do Before the Tropical Storm or Hurricane,” online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane-plan.  The site also has posters with “5 Things to Know About…” hurricane hazard risks, strengthening one's home, getting information, and insurance. EXTRA INFORMATION ON TROPICAL CYCLONE PREPAREDNESS The following information is quoted from the National Weather Service, ‘Hurricane Safety,” online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane, as of June 6, 2022. Plan for a Hurricane: What to Do Before the Tropical Storm or Hurricane(online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane-plan) “The best time to prepare for a hurricane is before hurricane season begins on June 1.  It is vital to understand your home's vulnerability to storm surge, flooding, and wind.  Here is your checklist of things to do BEFORE hurricane seasons begins.Know your zone: Do you live near the Gulf or Atlantic Coasts?  Find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation area by contacting your local government/emergency management office or, in Virginia, by visiting https://www.vaemergency.gov/hurricane-evacuation-zone-lookup/. Put Together an Emergency Kit: Put together a basic emergency kit; information to do so is online at https://www.ready.gov/kit.  Check emergency equipment, such as flashlights, generators, and storm shutters.Write or review your Family Emergency Plan: Before an emergency happens, sit down with your family or close friends and decide how you will get in contact with each other, where you will go, and what you will do in an emergency.  Keep a copy of this plan in your emergency supplies kit or another safe place where you can access it in the event of a disaster.  Information to help with emergency plan preparation is online at https://www.ready.gov/plan. Review Your Insurance Policies: Review your insurance policies to ensure that you have adequate coverage for your home and personal property.Understand NWS forecast products, especially the meaning of NWS watches and warnings.Preparation tips for your home are available from the Federal Alliance for Safe Homes, online at https://www.flash.org/. Preparation tips for those with chronic illnesses are available from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, online at https://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/infographic/emergency.htm. Actions to Take When a Tropical Storm or Hurricane Threatens(online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane-action) “When a hurricane threatens your community, be prepared to evacuate if you live in a storm surge risk area.  Allow enough time to pack and inform friends and family if you need to leave your home. Secure your home: Cover all of your home's windows.  Permanent storm shutters offer the best protection for windows.  A second option is to board up windows with 5/8 inch exterior grade or marine plywood, built to fit, and ready to install.  Buy supplies before the hurricane season rather than waiting for the pre-storm rush. Stayed tuned in: Check the websites of your local National Weather Service office (online at https://www.weather.gov/) and local government/emergency management office.  Find out what type of emergencies could occur and how you should respond. Listen to NOAA Weather Radio or other radio or TV stations for the latest storm news. Follow instructions issued by local officials. Leave immediately if ordered! If NOT ordered to evacuate: *Take refuge in a small interior room, closet, or hallway on the lowest level during the storm.  Put as many walls between you and the outside as you can. *Stay away from windows, skylights, and glass doors. *If the eye of the storm passes over your area, there will be a short period of calm, but at the other side of the eye, the wind speed rapidly increases to hurricane force winds coming from the opposite direction.” After a Hurricane(online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane-after) Continue listening to a NOAA Weather Radio or the local news for the latest updates. If you evacuated, return home only when officials say it is safe. Once home, drive only if necessary and avoid flooded roads and washed-out bridges.  If you must go out, watch for fallen objects in the road, downed electrical wires, and weakened walls, bridges, roads, and sidewalks that might collapse. Walk carefully around the outside of your home to check for loose power lines, gas leaks, and structural damage. Stay out of any building if you smell gas, if floodwaters remain around the building, if the building or home was damaged by fire, or if the authorities have not declared it safe. Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the leading causes of death after storms in areas dealing with power outages.  Never use a portable generator inside your home or garage. Use battery-powered flashlights.  Do NOT use candles.  Turn on your flashlight before entering a vacated building.  The battery could produce a spark that could ignite leaking gas, if present.”

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Marketplace Tech
Turning to drones and other instruments to hunt hurricanes

Marketplace Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 8:33 Very Popular


Forecasters from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NOAA, predict yet another season of “above-normal” hurricane activity. To track and predict these storms, scientists rely on data from satellites, radar and planes. This year, on top of that technology, staff at NOAA will also be using a fleet of autonomous vehicles in the air and at sea to reveal new data about what happens during the worst of a storm. Marketplace’s Kimberly Adams speaks with Jason Dunion, NOAA's hurricane field program director.

Scuba Shack Radio
86. A look at the 1976 British Sub Aqua Club Diving Manual plus Wet Notes News and Information Updates

Scuba Shack Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 19:31


Congratulations Leslie Leaney on receiving the 2022 California Scuba Service Award. There is a new bill making its way through Congress. House Resolution 7431, titled the Don Young Veterans Advancing Conservation Act or VACA if passed will be a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration or NOAA grant program providing funding to non-profit groups who hire, retrain, and redeploy veterans to conduct coastal, Great Lakes and underwater conservation missions. The second quarter Alert Diver magazine from Divers Alert Network is now available. One article that may cause a lot of stir around the dive community is the one on the placement of an octopus alternate second stage regulator. There is a new recall notice from Aqualung for their i330R dive computer. It is for all computers made and sold in 2021 and 2022. Big news from Shearwater Research this week regarding their top of the line Perdix dive computer. They are releasing a new version of the Perdix. It will be the Perdix 2 and come in two different versions, the TI or TI Black. Some more good news on the pandemic recovery front. The Philippine government has announced that it will no longer require a PCR or Antigen covid-19 test for fully vaccinated and boosted tourists as of May 30, 2022. The British Sub Aqua Club Diving Manual from 1976 was a comprehensive guide to the techniques of swimming underwater. This manual listed all of the training requirements necessary to progress from a snorkel diver through their 3rd class, 2nd class and 1st class scuba diver. Listen for more information on the requirements to become a BSAC diver.

Marketplace All-in-One
Turning to drones and other instruments to hunt hurricanes

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 8:33


Forecasters from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NOAA, predict yet another season of “above-normal” hurricane activity. To track and predict these storms, scientists rely on data from satellites, radar and planes. This year, on top of that technology, staff at NOAA will also be using a fleet of autonomous vehicles in the air and at sea to reveal new data about what happens during the worst of a storm. Marketplace’s Kimberly Adams speaks with Jason Dunion, NOAA's hurricane field program director.

Nightside With Dan Rea
New England Is "Overdue" ... (9 p.m.)

Nightside With Dan Rea

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 38:33


Today marks the first day of hurricane season. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is predicting an "above-average" Atlantic hurricane season. New England has not experienced a hurricane make landfall since 1991. Weather experts at the National Weather Service say New England is “overdue” for a direct hit from a hurricane. Meteorologist Tom Chisholm joins Dan to discuss what you can expect this hurricane season.

Town Square with Ernie Manouse
With the hurricane season now upon us, Houstonians share lessons learned from Hurricane Harvey

Town Square with Ernie Manouse

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 50:18


Town Square with Ernie Manouse airs at 3 p.m. CT. Tune in on 88.7FM, listen online or subscribe to the podcast. Join the discussion at 888-486-9677, questions@townsquaretalk.org or @townsquaretalk. All Houstonians, especially those in hurricane evacuation zones, should start getting ready for this year's hurricane season.  According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,  hurricane season along the Atlantic Ocean is expected to be more active than usual this year, with a higher probability that major storms will land in Texas. As we know, every first day of June marks the beginning of the hurricane season, and if Hurricane Harvey taught us anything, it's that we should never let our guard down. Weather and disaster assistance experts are here to detail the forecast outlook for the 2022 hurricane season, explain the differences between weather advisories, and discuss what residents need to do for tropical storm preparedness or recovery. Also, we take calls from our listeners to find out what lessons they've learned from past hurricane seasons and if they're ready for the storm this time around. Meanwhile, our host, Ernie Manouse, along with Craig Cohen of Houston Matters, take us shopping with them for what to purchase for your hurricane emergency kit. Review the Harris County hurricane preparedness checklist here. Guests: Frank Billingsley KPRC 2 Chief Meteorologist Francisco Sanchez Associate Administrator for the U.S. Small Business Administration Office of Disaster Assistance Town Square with Ernie Manouse is a gathering space for the community to come together and discuss the day's most important and pressing issues. Audio from today's show will be available after 5 p.m. CT. We also offer a free podcast here, on iTunes, and other apps.

The Atlas Obscura Podcast
A Sound Garden

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 15:57 Very Popular


This sculpture at the western regional center for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration was inspired by flying kites over a garbage dump.READ MORE IN THE ATLAS: https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/a-sound-garden

GovExec Daily
The Mission to Explore a Sunken Civil War Battleship

GovExec Daily

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 20:05


In 1862, the ironclad ship USS Monitor fought the Confederacy's CSS Virginia to a draw in the Battle of Hampton Roads, but later sunk during a storm off the coast of North Carolina. Now, 160 years later, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is leading a federal mission to explore and live stream the wreckage of the ship as it rests on the ocean floor. Helming that mission is NOAA  marine archaeologist Tane Casserley. The expedition began on May 15 and will run until May 25 with daily live streams online. Recently, GovExec correspondent and frequent GovExec Daily guest Eric Katz interviewed Casserley about the mission and the ship. In this episode, you'll hear their conversation.

This Week in Amateur Radio
PODCAST: This Week in Amateur Radio #1212

This Week in Amateur Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022


PODCAST: This Week in Amateur Radio Edition #1212 - EXPANDED HAMVENTION COVERAGE Release Date: May 21, 2022 Here is a summary of the news trending This Week in Amateur Radio. This week's edition is anchored by Terry Saunders, N1KIN, Dave Wilson, WA2HOY, Don Hulick, K2ATJ, Fred Fitte, NF2F, Eric Zittel, KD2RJX, Will Rogers, K5WLR, George Bowen, W2XBS, and Jessica Bowen, KC2VWX. Produced and edited by George Bowen, W2XBS. Approximate Running Time: 1:58:51 Podcast Download: https://bit.ly/TWIAR1212 Trending headlines in this week's bulletin service: 1. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Hurricane Center WX4NHC Annual Communications Test 2. North Florida Club Participating In Simulated Cyber-Attack 3. ARRL West Texas Section - Hospital Use of Amateur Radio 4. New ARRL World-Wide Digital Contest To Premier June 4th and 5th 5. The 2022 Dayton Hamvention -- May 20-22 -- Is Ready to Go! 6. Mobile App Available to Navigate 2022 Dayton Hamvention 7. Armed Forces Day Crossband Test Successful 8. Vibroplex Acquires SPE Expert Linear Amplifiers 9. W1AW Continues To Fill QSL Card Requests 10. Qualcomm Founder Franklin Antonio, N6NKF, Silent Key 11. Amateurs In North Carolina Take On A Marathon Challenge 12. Military In The U-S Explores The Wider Use Of HF In The Greater Pacific Regions 13. Radio Society of Great Britain Offers New Incentive For Foundation License Holders 14. ACMA (Australia) Makes A New Calculation Tool For Fees Available Online 15. Boy Scout Club To Offer Hamvention Souvenirs 16. German radio amateurs plan to investigate using GSM & GPRS technology on the amateur bands 17. Shortwave radio outlets around the world, including the BBC, reactivate to broadcast news to the Ukraine 18. International Amateur Radio Union Region 1 interim meeting in June preparing for the World Radio Conference 19. Marconi 125th Transmission Anniversary 20. Amateur Radio support for Ukraine Mother's Day Event. Ukrainian Amateurs Appear On VoIP Remote Operation 21. Ham radio Moon bounce demonstration video up on YouTube 22. Amateur radio observations help monitor space weather 23. Paper Published: Deep space reception of Tianwen-1 by AMSAT-DL using GNU radio 24. Voyager One space probe, now in interstellar space, is suddenly sending NASA what it calls "Wacky Data" Plus these Special Features This Week: * Technology News and Commentary with Leo Laporte, W6TWT, will answer that age old question this week, "Why does my home WiFi suck so bad? And how can I get better coverage? * Working Amateur Radio Satellites with Bruce Paige, KK5DO - AMSAT Satellite News * Tower Climbing and Antenna Safety w/Greg Stoddard KF9MP, covers everything you need to know to install and maintain your tower and antenna installation for your station. * Foundations of Amateur Radio with Onno Benschop VK6FLAB, will answer the question, I studied, passed the test, got my call sign, so now when should I go on the air? * Weekly Propagation Forecast from the ARRL * A special humorous look at Hamfests by broadcaster Oren Brand, K9KEJ * Bill Continelli, W2XOY - The History of Amateur Radio. Bill returns with another edition of The Ancient Amateur Archives, this week, Bill takes a look at the battery operated transistor radios of the late twentieth century. ----- Website: https://www.twiar.net Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/twiari/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/twiar RSS News: https://twiar.net/?feed=rss2 iHeartRadio: https://bit.ly/iHeart-TWIAR Spotify: https://bit.ly/Spotify-TWIAR TuneIn: https://bit.ly/TuneIn-TWIAR Automated: https://twiar.net/TWIARHAM.mp3 (Static file, changed weekly) ----- Visit our website at www.twiar.net for program audio, and daily for the latest amateur radio and technology news. Air This Week in Amateur Radio on your repeater! Built in identification breaks every 10 minutes or less. This Week in Amateur Radio is heard on the air on nets and repeaters as a bulletin service all across North America, and all around the world on amateur radio repeater systems, weekends on WA0RCR on 1860 (160 Meters), and more. This Week in Amateur Radio is portable too! The bulletin/news service is available and built for air on local repeaters (check with your local clubs to see if their repeater is carrying the news service) and can be downloaded for air as a weekly podcast to your digital device from just about everywhere, including Acast, Deezer, iHeart, iTunes, Google Play, Spotify, TuneIn, Stitcher, iVoox, Blubrry, Castbox.fm, Castro, Feedburner, gPodder, Listen Notes, OverCast, Player.FM, Pandora, Podcast Gang, Podcast Republic, Podchaser, Podnova, and RSS feeds. This Week in Amateur Radio is also carried on a number of LPFM stations, so check the low power FM stations in your area. You can also stream the program to your favorite digital device by visiting our web site www.twiar.net. Or, just ask Siri, Alexa, or your Google Nest to play This Week in Amateur Radio! This Week in Amateur Radio is produced by Community Video Associates in upstate New York, and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. If you would like to volunteer with us as a news anchor or special segment producer please get in touch with our Executive Producer, George, via email at w2xbs77@gmail.com. Also, please feel free to follow us by joining our popular group on Facebook, and follow our feed on Twitter! Thanks to FortifiedNet.net for the server space! Thanks to Archive.org for the audio space.

Infinite Plane Radio
"Dr. Evil Erecting Tower of Babel in Virginia" 4/24/22 INFINITE PLANE RADIO

Infinite Plane Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 76:54


"Dr. Evil Erecting Tower of Babel in Virginia" 4/24/22 INFINITE PLANE RADIO Jeff Bezos is literally building the Tower of Babel now. The plan to build a helix-shaped "Tower of Babel" style headquarters in northern Virginia has been given the green light by the Arlington County Board. In The Metascript Decoded, I identified the Space Program as a symbolic Tower of Babel uniting man, one language (the Internet), and a mission to go as one from Earth to Heaven as a collective: "One small step for a man, one giant leap for all mankind." -Neil Armstrong Space is the replacement for the archaic and competing heavens of the past religions. The new worldview we have been given offers a universally acceptable replacement, one that is compatible with the religions of the past age. Amazon in particular stands out as representative of the Tower concept because of its A to Z collection of all things published, sold, and distributed; amazon is a universalizer, a unifier, for the new universal faith. Blue Origin also connects Bezos to Nimrod, the builder of the tower, as it allows man to invade Heaven. Bezos did just that on July 20, 2021, on the anniversary of the first man on the moon. His liftoff that day was at 9:11 am. On the sixth episode of the Netflix show Inside Job, Jeff Bezos is on his megayacht, another symbol of the Tower of Babel concept, a modern Titanic, a product of the world's richest man's conceit of being too rich to fail, when he's devoured by a Kraken. Bezo's megayacht was making headlines around the time that Don't Look Up was trending, a movie that uses an Earth-killing comet as a metaphor for our failure to listen to the science on climate change because of greedy capitalists. Leonardo Di Caprio was the lead character because he was the face of The Titanic, and was used to draw the inference that the Earth is the Titanic now, and the Comet (a space iceberg). If we understand this Earth to be our Titanic, then we must decide are we going to allow the richest men on earth to decide our fate. There is no doubt that Biblical stories/ events are used to template our modern worldview. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is literally our modern Noah. The story playing out involves the worldly ignoring the warnings of the Scientist priesthood and suffering the consequences---the Kraken. Pluto's return to its 7/4/1776 location relates to the Kraken, as it is released by Hades, and Hades is just another name for Pluto. Consider the following: Jeff launched at 9:11 am on the day man set foot on the moon. This is man's incursion into Heaven, and the 9:11 am has an obvious connotation of falling towers, and the dissolution of world unity (World Trade Towers and NYC templated on Babylon) Genesis 11:9 — "The New King James Version (NKJV) Therefore its name is called Babel because there the Lord confused the language of all the earth, and from there the Lord scattered them abroad over the face of all the earth." Richard Branson launched nine days prior, 7/11/2021, the forty-second anniversary of Skylab falling to Earth. He launched to space in a "space plane" carried up by the White Knight Two. I suspect the Space Needle is another Tower of Babel symbol, as is the One World Trade Center, which happens to be 1776 feet tall, a number significant to the signing of the Declaration of Independence, and the founding of the Illuminati. I suspect the subtext may be a declaration of INDEPENDENCE FROM GOD...Thus, the Kraken, the Titanic, and the Falling Tower motif. I suspect that the one-world unity is designed to break, and finalize the Great Reset. The 6uilding 6ack 6etter can't start until the old one is washed away. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/infinite-plane-radio/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/infinite-plane-radio/support

Brief Encounters
Making A Difference: A Conversation with Nancy Brown-Kobil of the House Natural Resources Comm.

Brief Encounters

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 27:31


In the third and final spring episode of the series, "Making A Difference: Inspirational Women Leaders in Environmental and Energy Law and Policy," D.C. Bar EENR Community Co-Chair Kathryn Caballero and Cathy Pagano of the Board of the Women's Bar of Association of DC (WBA) interview Nancy Brown-Kobil, who is the acting Deputy Chief Counsel at the U.S. House of Representatives Natural Resources Committee. Nancy discusses the wide range of environmental issues she encounters in her current role, and how her expertise from working with the Department of the Interior and the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration supports the legislative process. She also shares how workplace flexibilities developed during the pandemic can help support parents in successfully balancing work and family life. Please note, the positions and opinions expressed by the speakers are strictly their own, and do not necessarily represent the views of their employers, nor those of the D.C. Bar, its Board of Governors or co-sponsoring Communities and organizations.

Shine
58. 6 Solutions to Water Conservati