Podcasts about Iraqi

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  • 1,691PODCASTS
  • 3,055EPISODES
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  • Jan 22, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Iraqi

Show all podcasts related to iraqi

Latest podcast episodes about Iraqi

VOMRadio
Visiting Middle East Christians

VOMRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 37:30


Come with us to the Middle East as VOM Radio host, Todd Nettleton, and his wife, Char, share stories from a recent visit to persecuted Christians in the region. Listen as they share updates on Iraqi refugees who fled from ISIS more than five years ago and what the Lord is currently doing in the lives of persecuted Christians – even one who has only been a believer one week! You'll hear about an Iranian woman who, in just two years as a believer, has planted almost 40 churches! She uses every opportunity to pray for others in Jesus' name. When those prayers are answered, they instantly want to know more about the Lord she serves. Learn about Christians in the Middle East sacrificially staying with Muslim family members—in spite of persecution—in the hope of seeing their relatives know Christ. Listen also to hear about a service where former Muslims were baptized into new life in Christ—and the joy radiating from the new believers' faces. As ISIS drove across the Nineveh plains, many Iraqi Christians fled to surrounding countries as refugees. More than five years later, many are still waiting for a new beginning in another country. They are unable to work and their children can't attend school. But the church is welcoming them—both Muslim and Christian refugees. VOM continues to partner with churches to help meet Christian refugees' needs and encourage them in this discouraging season. Learn how you can pray for them and for the church in the Middle East.  Never miss an episode of VOM Radio! Subscribe to the podcast!

AlternativeRadio
[Chris Hedges] American Sadism

AlternativeRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 57:00


The great 20th-century Irish poet William Butler Yeats wrote, "We had fed the heart on fantasies, The heart's grown brutal from the fare." The United States has long fed its heart with fairy tales about itself. Hardly a day goes by without some new story being spun about our noble intentions, benevolence and devotion to international law. American sadism is not something new. Just ask indigenous peoples and Blacks or the Vietnamese and Iraqis. Chris Hedges warns, “The violence and exploitation, which has long defined imperial projects now defines existence at home. For empires in the end, cannibalize themselves. The tyranny we long imposed on others, we now impose on ourselves. The dark pleasure derived from exploiting others is all that is left.” Recorded at the Sanctuary for Independent Media.

Podcast for Healing Neurology
#57 Hiba Jameel: Iraqi nutritionist & artist on food, family, culture, food policy, blue zone eating, and the power of priorities and choices

Podcast for Healing Neurology

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 62:53


Ms Hiba Jameel grew up in Iraq during the Gulf War and transitioned from coming to the US as a refugee to studying Blue-Zone longevity & nutrition including the biomarkers regarding mTor & IGF1 during her Masters training at Tufts University. She paints us a gorgeous table of sitting at her grandmother's table as a child with the fruits, nuts, vegetables and spices of the Iraqi table and moves through her understanding of people through her understanding of food, nutrition and the world 'healthy'. Her love of food is palpable and it's evident especially in her respect for the variety of diets in Blue-Zones around the world. She's sharp on policy as well and lays into our food policies that are driving national health vulnerabilities. As she talks about her art and creativity which was present in her since childhood, she lights up again. This is a wide-ranging show about art, culture, trauma, nutrition, emotion, policy, inequities, and health, all as told through the warm and sweet voice of Ms Jameel that truly represents the ways in which we can choose healing from diverse aspects of our lives. Enjoy! Contact Ms Jameel for nutritional consultation: hjameel2019@gmail.com.

Break It Down Show
Mike Guardia - Skybreak, the 58th Fighter Squadron

Break It Down Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 59:24


Mike Guardia - Skybreak, the 58th Fighter Squadron - Mike Guardia returns to the Break It Down Show to talk military history with Pete A Turner. Mike cranks out books at a pace that makes us shudder. We'll discuss the 58th Fighter Squadron, the top MiG Killers of Operation Desert Storm. To support Eric J Turner's family, go to the donation link: or hit Pete on FB, DM etc. Get Mike's book Skybreak on Amazon at: August 1990: Iraqi forces under the command of Saddam Hussein invaded the tiny emirate of Kuwait. Within hours, the Kuwaiti defenses collapsed under the onslaught of the Iraqi Army. In response, the US military led a coalition of thirty-four nations in what became known as Operation Desert Storm—a violent air and ground campaign to eject the Iraqis from Kuwait. At the tip of the spear were the men of the US Air Force's 58th Fighter Squadron. Please support the Break It Down Show by doing a monthly subscription to the show  All of the money you invest goes directly to supporting the show!   For the  of this episode head to  Haiku Mike's at it again Cranking out book, pace is high Read about Skybreak   ​Similar episodes: Adrian Goldsworthy  DW Wilber  Mark Sullivan  Join us in supporting Save the Brave as we battle PTSD.  Executive Producer/Host: Pete A Turner  Producer: Damjan Gjorgjiev  Writer: Dragan Petrovski  The Break It Down Show is your favorite best, new podcast, featuring 5 episodes a week with great interviews highlighting world-class guests from a wide array of shows.

MintCast
Seyed Mohammad Marandi on the Iran Deal and the Assassination of Soleimani

MintCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 69:47


World leaders have descended upon Austrian capital Vienna to participate in the ongoing nuclear deal being negotiated primarily between the United States and Iran. Today, MintPress spoke to Dr. Seyed Mohammad Marandi, Professor of English Literature and Orientalism at the University of Tehran. Dr. Marandi is currently in Vienna as part of the Iranian delegation.While corporate media often portray Iran as a recalcitrant pariah and the United States as a long-suffering broker in the situation, Dr. Marandi notes that it was actually the Trump administration that unilaterally walked away from the agreement. Furthermore, President Barack Obama refused to live up to his promise to remove financial sanctions against Iran. “Obama, from the very beginning, was violating the deal, the most important element of the deal, because the banking sector sanctions are the most important part of the deal,” Marandi told Mnar Adley today.Relations between the two countries fell to a new low two years ago this month, after the Trump administration carried out a successful drone strike against General and statesman Qassem Soleimani. While then-Secretary of State Mike Pompeo insisted that Soleimani was on the verge of carrying out an attack on Americans, the Iranian leader was, in fact, in Iraq on the invitation of Prime Minister Adil Abdul-Mahdi. Abdul-Mahdi specifically asked Trump for permission to invite Soleimani to his country. Trump acquiesced, then used the opportunity to kill him via a drone strike.In response, the Iraqi parliament passed a unanimous resolution on January 5 (with many abstentions), calling for the expulsion of all U.S. troops. Instead, the U.S. announced it would build a number of new bases on the Iranian border, ramping up the tensions. Since then, Washington has continued to pile on the pressure, increasing its deadly sanctions regime against the country. Soleimani was best known and celebrated outside of Iran for leading the fight against ISIS in Iraq and Syria, successfully crippling their forces. The Financial Times described him as the “hero” who saved the region from Jihadists. Yet Western media largely sided with the U.S. after Trump's decision to kill him. Suddenly, Soleimani was no longer a hero, but “the world's no. 1 bad guy,” as CNBC put it.The discussion also encompassed the sanctions placed on Iran by the United States and how Iran has partnered with Venezuela and other countries to help them neutralize the worst effects of economic warfare.MintPress News is a fiercely independent, reader-supported outlet, with no billionaire owners or backers. You can support us by becoming a member on Patreon, bookmarking and whitelisting us, and by subscribing to our social media channels, including Twitch, YouTube, Twitter and Instagram.Subscribe to MintCast on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and SoundCloud.Support the show (https://www.mintpressnews.com/donations/)

Jewish Ancestral Healing Podcast
Episode 2.10: Judeo-Iraqi Musical Prayer Traditions with George Mordecai

Jewish Ancestral Healing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 49:40


George Mordecai - a rabbi, cantor and composer born in Australia to Iraqi Jews from India and Singapore - shares the ancestral journeys and musical influences that led to the creation of his album, Safra, and speaks to the power of communal chanting and participatory prayer.

SBS Indonesian - SBS Bahasa Indonesia
The growing demand from Iraqi women and girls who want to take up martial arts - Meningkatnya permintaan dari perempuan dan gadis Irak yang ingin mengambil seni bela diri

SBS Indonesian - SBS Bahasa Indonesia

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 5:31


Iraqi fitness trainer Bushra Abdel-Zahra has not let the expectations of Iraqi society stand in her way. - Pelatih kebugaran Irak Bushra Abdel-Zahra tidak membiarkan harapan masyarakat Irak menghalanginya.

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
COI #209: American Wars Will Plague the Middle East for Generations

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 59:42


On Conflicts of Interest #209, Kyle Anzalone discusses the lasting impacts of America's wars in Yemen, Syria, Iraq, and Afghanistan.  The coming winter in Afghanistan is expected to bring extreme hunger - and even death - to millions of Afghan children. The cause of the acute starvation facing Afghan children is America's economic war. Pressure is starting to mount on Biden to make some move to reduce the suffering in Afghanistan. However, Biden has remained willing to starve children to punish the Taliban. The American people are largely unaware of the Afghans' suffering because, since the withdrawal, major news has ceased coverage of Afghanistan.  Five million Iraqi children have been orphaned by America's three decades of warfare. Many of the parentless children live in poverty and are lucky if they are able to find work. The violence and instability created by Bush's overthrow of Saddam has led to fighting by various actors throughout the country.  The NYT reported on the Pentagon's slaughter of Syrian civilians. The reporters sifted through more than 1,000 pages of documents on airstrikes in Iraq and Syria from 2014-2018. The documents show the military has little care for the civilians it kills and never holds anyone responsible for war crimes. Saudi Arabia recently bombed the airport in Yemen's capital, Sanaa. The strike damaged communications equipment. The airport has reopened but ill-functioning equipment is causing dangerous situations with flights. The UN is calling on the Saudi-backed government of Yemen to allow the equipment to be flown in.   Odysee Rumble  Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash Qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Patreon Subscribe Star YouTube Facebook  Twitter  MeWe Apple Podcast  Amazon Music Google Podcasts Spotify iHeart Radio Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD  

Conflicts of Interest
American Wars Will Plague the Middle East for Generations

Conflicts of Interest

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 59:42


On Conflicts of Interest #209, Kyle Anzalone discusses the lasting impacts of America's wars in Yemen, Syria, Iraq, and Afghanistan.  The coming winter in Afghanistan is expected to bring extreme hunger - and even death - to millions of Afghan children. The cause of the acute starvation facing Afghan children is America's economic war. Pressure is starting to mount on Biden to make some move to reduce the suffering in Afghanistan. However, Biden has remained willing to starve children to punish the Taliban. The American people are largely unaware of the Afghans' suffering because, since the withdrawal, major news has ceased coverage of Afghanistan.  Five million Iraqi children have been orphaned by America's three decades of warfare. Many of the parentless children live in poverty and are lucky if they are able to find work. The violence and instability created by Bush's overthrow of Saddam has led to fighting by various actors throughout the country.  The NYT reported on the Pentagon's slaughter of Syrian civilians. The reporters sifted through more than 1,000 pages of documents on airstrikes in Iraq and Syria from 2014-2018. The documents show the military has little care for the civilians it kills and never holds anyone responsible for war crimes. Saudi Arabia recently bombed the airport in Yemen's capital, Sanaa. The strike damaged communications equipment. The airport has reopened but ill-functioning equipment is causing dangerous situations with flights. The UN is calling on the Saudi-backed government of Yemen to allow the equipment to be flown in.  

Moonshots - Adventures in Innovation
Zaha Hadid: Listener Favorite

Moonshots - Adventures in Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 60:16


Dame Zaha Hadid born October 31, 1950, died March 31, 2016. She was known as the “Queen of the Curve” for buildings such as the Heydar Aliyev Center in Azerbaijan with its gently sloping and yet zany curves. She was an Iraqi-born British architect known for her radical deconstructivist designs. In 2004 she became the first woman to be awarded the Pritzker Architecture Prize. Only rarely does an architect emerge with a philosophy and approach to the art form that influences the direction of the entire field. Such an architect is Zaha Hadid who created and set new boundaries for the art of architecture.

SBS World News Radio
Iraqi woman takes on martial arts - despite social norms

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 3:19


Fitness trainer Bushra Abdel-Zahra was undeterred by conservative societal expectations when she decided to take up boxing and karate.

Cities and Memory - remixing the sounds of the world
Radio Kuwait (start of Iraqi invasion): August 2, 1990

Cities and Memory - remixing the sounds of the world

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 28:50


"Recording of Radio Kuwait during the start of the invasion by Iraq. My understanding is that the broadcast originated from the Radio Kuwait transmitter site, which had not yet been occupied by Iraqi forces. Transmission consisted of music and announcements in Arabic." Recorded by Tom Gavaras, courtesy of the Shortwave Radio Archive. Part of the Shortwave Transmissions project, documenting and reimagining the sounds of shortwave radio - find out more and see the whole project at https://citiesandmemory.com/shortwave

PBS NewsHour - World
Turkey's expanding militarized zones in Iraq raise fears of invasion, frustrate civilians

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 9:21


For decades, Turkey has fought the PKK, a Kurdish separatist movement that's considered a terror organization by the U.S. The rebel group has sought refuge in northern Iraq. The Turks have established dozens of military bases on Iraqi soil and expanded military activities in the Middle East. Special correspondent Simona Foltyn gained exclusive access to Turkish-controlled parts of northern Iraq. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Turkey's expanding militarized zones in Iraq raise fears of invasion, frustrate civilians

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 9:21


For decades, Turkey has fought the PKK, a Kurdish separatist movement that's considered a terror organization by the U.S. The rebel group has sought refuge in northern Iraq. The Turks have established dozens of military bases on Iraqi soil and expanded military activities in the Middle East. Special correspondent Simona Foltyn gained exclusive access to Turkish-controlled parts of northern Iraq. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

The Jedburgh Podcast
#039: The United States Army - Vice Chief of Staff - General (Ret.) Peter Chiarelli

The Jedburgh Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 82:24


Some organizations are so vast, so large, and so dynamic that it is often almost impossible to comprehend the scale and complexity; making leadership the most important factor in performance.General(R) Peter Chiarelli served as the Vice Chief of Staff of the United States Army, an organization of over 1.1 million employees and a budget of $240 billion dollars. General Chiarelli is one of our nation's most innovative leaders; always challenging the way the Army operated. He transitioned the Army from Vietnam, through the Cold War and into the modern Army of today.General Chiarelli and Host Fran Racioppi discuss the General's career, his days as a professor at West Point, how he led the medical industry in changing the way we view post traumatic stress, how COVID has set the example for collaboration and teamwork, the importance of wearables in tracking our health, the lessons of the war in Iraq, and what type of leaders we need in our nation today. Read the full episode transcription here and learn more on The Jedburgh Podcast Website.Highlights:-GEN Chiarelli recounts his early days in the Army in the post-Vietnam era and how not getting into law school changed his life.-GEN Chiarelli explains how the West Point Department of Social Sciences forces leaders to think differently about challenges which leads to innovation. -Traumatic brain injury was relatively unstudied prior to the war in Iraq; GEN Chiarelli questioned the doctors and forced them to think differently about how the Army treated these cases.-GEN Chiarelli breaks down the stigma behind post traumatic stress, and how he has led the medical industry in dropping the word “disorder” from the diagnosis. -Fran and GEN Chiarelli discuss the importance of wearables in the reduction of Veteran suicide; including Nightware, a product replacing the use of prescription drugs. -The COVID vaccine development is used as an example of how teamwork in medical research can advance medical innovation and save lives.-GEN Chiarelli explains how he prepared the 1st Cavalry Division, the US Army's heaviest division, to fight in Baghdad and how his leaders adapted to learn about basic services and providing essential training to the Iraqi defense forces.-Fran and GEN Chiarelli examine the lessons of the war in Iraq, the importance of a whole-of-government approach to conflict and the impact of General Colin Powell and Norman Schwarzkopf.Quotes:-”I came in for four and it ended up being 40.”-“That's the essence of team building, to not be in the transmit mode all the time. You never learn anything when you're talking.”-”How can you go up to a woman who has been violently sexually assaulted…and say she has a disorder because of that.”-“I'm a big fan of wearables. I think they are going to be particularly useful in the military population who is tired of being given a bag of pills.” -“Leadership is about listening.”-”I always tell young leaders, remember what really upset you.”-”We did not fight these wars with a whole-of-government approach.”-“We need to break some of the molds that have guided us in the past.”GEN Chiarelli's Three Daily Foundations to Success:-Make my bed to complete one task-Dedicate 60 minutes to read something outside of my comfort zone-Determine what my team needs from me to achieve their missionThis episode is brought to you by 18A Fitness and Analytix Solutions.

The Jiggy Jaguar Show
Ep. 12/23/2021 - The Jiggy Jaguar Show

The Jiggy Jaguar Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021


IQ al-Rassooli, Iraqi-born Islam scholar and Arabic speaker, is the author of Lifting the Veil: The True Faces of Muhammad and Islam Volumes 1, 2 and 3, which are the full transcriptions of 312 audio/videos of the YouTube series Idiots Guide to Islam.

The Spear
Fire in the Skies Over Baghdad

The Spear

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 48:27


In this episode, retired US Air Force Col. Kim Campbell joins to share a story from 2003. A career A-10 pilot, her squadron was deployed to the Middle East at the beginning of the war in Iraq. During a mission, she and her flight lead in another A-10 responded to a call for air support from a US unit engaged with Iraqi troops. On her last rocket pass, she felt and heard an explosion—and knew immediately that she had been hit. Listen as she explains what happened that day and how she responded when she suddenly found herself flying a heavily damaged aircraft.

WarDocs - The Military Medicine Podcast
Dr. Benjamin Starnes- Surgeon Stepping Up to Lead During 9/11 and in Austere Locations Across the Globe

WarDocs - The Military Medicine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 37:56


Dr. Starnes is a vascular surgeon at Harborview Medical Center and is the Chief of the Division of Vascular Surgery and Vice Chair of the Department of Surgery for UW Medicine in Seattle, Washington.    In this episode Dr. Starnes shares his experience of being one of the first responders at the Pentagon on 9/11 and taking charge of managing the most injured patients onsite while the building was on fire nearby.  His and similar stories are captured in a recent book written by his brother called American Phoenix- Heroes of the Pentagon on 9/11    He also tells the incredible story of going outside the wire in Northern Iraq with a CIA operative to coordinate care for wounded Peshmerga soldiers.  You won't forget the story of driving to Mosul with “Bob” and his experiences which seemed like entering the Twilight Zone.    He describes how he used his surgical skills during deployment to perform a life-saving operation on a 2-day old Iraqi girl named Ayat with a complicated life-threatening congenital defect.   Dr. Starnes describes how the skill set of a vascular surgeon is beneficial on the battlefield and gives the listener an idea of how we need to be training surgeons in light of the changing battlefield and advances in technology.   Dr. Starnes is talented storyteller and you will be engaged and entertained while also learning some valuable insights from his experience.     Find out more about Dr. Starnes at wardocspodcast.com/guest-bios and visit our webpage and become part of Team WarDocs at wardocspodcast.com.     Please take a moment to follow/subscribe, rate and review WarDocs on your preferred Podcast venue.   Follow WarDocs on Social Media Twitter: @wardocspodcast Facebook: WarDocs Podcast Instagram: @wardocspodcast

This Day in Esoteric Political History
Bush, Meet Shoe (2008)

This Day in Esoteric Political History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 16:53


It's December 14th. This day in 2008, at a press conference in Baghdad, an Iraqi journalist flung his shoes at George W Bush. Jody, NIki, and Kellie discuss the incident, why Muntadhar al-Zaidi was moved to fling his shoes, and the many interesting wrinkles to the story — including the massive monument to the shoes that was built in Tikrit. This Day In Esoteric Political History is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX. Your support helps foster independent, artist-owned podcasts and award-winning stories. If you want to support the show directly, you can do so on our website: ThisDayPod.com Get in touch if you have any ideas for future topics, or just want to say hello. Our website is thisdaypod.com Follow us on social @thisdaypod Our team: Jacob Feldman, Researcher/Producer; Brittani Brown, Producer; Khawla Nakua, Transcripts; music by Teen Daze and Blue Dot Sessions; Julie Shapiro, Executive Producer at Radiotopia

The Retrospectors
On This Day: Dubya Dodges A Shoe-ing

The Retrospectors

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 10:30


When George W Bush flew to Baghdad for a press conference with Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki on 14th December, 2008, he had hoped the headlines would reflect his triumphant appraisal of his deployment of American troops. Instead, it became known as the day he got some shoes thrown at him.The man throwing the shoes was Iraqi journalist Muntadhar al-Zaidi, who yelled in Arabic: “This is a farewell kiss from the Iraqi people, dog!”. The president ducked, and Zaidi let his other shoe fly. “This is from the widows, the orphans and those who were killed in Iraq!”. Bush ducked that one too.In this episode, Arion, Rebecca and Olly reveal how the episode inspired a brief moment of Zaidi-Mania in the Arab world, including various offers of marriage; reflect on the torture he endured as a result of his protest; and investigate the copycat attacks around the world… Further Reading:• ‘Raw Video: Iraqi Journalist Throws Shoe at Bush' (AP, 2008): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OM3Z_Kskl_U• ‘Why I threw the shoe, by Muntazer al-Zaidi' (The Guardian, 2009): https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2009/sep/17/why-i-threw-shoe-bush• ‘The Iraqi Journalist Who Threw His Shoes at George W. Bush Has Thoughts About Milkshaking' (Mother Jones, 2019): https://www.motherjones.com/politics/2019/06/the-iraqi-journalist-who-threw-his-shoes-at-george-w-bush-has-thoughts-about-milkshaking/For bonus material and to support the show, visit Patreon.com/RetrospectorsWe'll be back tomorrow! Follow us wherever you get your podcasts: podfollow.com/RetrospectorsThe Retrospectors are Olly Mann, Rebecca Messina & Arion McNicoll, with Matt Hill.Theme Music: Pass The Peas. Announcer: Bob Ravelli. Graphic Design: Terry Saunders. Edit Producer: Emma Corsham.Copyright: Rethink Audio / Olly Mann 2021. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Local Maximum
Ep. 203 - Iraq and Social Choice Theory

The Local Maximum

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 49:01


Max and Aaron discussion the rule change that the Iraqi government has made in their elections and what this means from a social choice theory stand point. They compare world political systems, and discuss the problem of apportionment and the mathematical paradoxes it creates. localmaxradio.com/203

History Daily
The Capture of Saddam Hussein

History Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 21:12


December 13th, 2003. Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein is captured by American forces. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Gratitude Podcast
More Things More Happiness? - Dr. Mark Wade

The Gratitude Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 43:45


Dr. Mark Wade is the co-founder of the American Posture Institute with a combined experience of more than 10 years. Dr. Wade has a passion for posture and health that has driven him to become one of the best Postural Practitioners in the world. Dr. Wade Wade is also the founder Hustle and Scale, helping entrepreneurs scale their business. Mark has built multi-million dollar businesses from the ground up, but he only found fulfillment after discovering gratitude. He shares with us his story, how he achieved great success, how he found his motivation for leaving a legacy behind while being involved in the Iraqi war and how traveling the world changed his perspective on life.  Share this episode with one person that you feel will be inspired by it! Resources:Dr. Mark's website: https://hustleandscale.com Stay in touch on social:Insta: https://www.instagram.com/thegratitudepodcast/Twitter: http://twitter.com/GeorgianBentaFacebook: http://facebook.com/TheGratitudePodcast/Intro by Cristina Muresan-Toth: https://www.instagram.com/p/CLHlus5Jwj3/

通勤學英語
每日英語跟讀 Ep.K264: About cars - 德國男開車赴駕駛執照考試與丹麥沒收超跑

通勤學英語

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 2:53


每日英語跟讀 Ep.K264: About cars - Man in Germany drives to driving test A man in Germany has discovered the hard way that it's best to get a driving license first before trying to use it. 德國一名男子從教訓中學到:在試圖使用駕駛執照之前,最好先拿到它。 Police in Bergheim, near Cologne, said Tuesday that the 37-year-old drove himself to his driving test, parking an Opel Zafira outside the test center in front of an astonished examiner. 科隆附近的貝格海姆警方週二說,這名37歲民眾自己開車赴駕駛執照考試,在一名驚訝的監考官面前,把一台歐寶Zafira車款停在考試中心外。 They said he told police officers who were called to the scene on Monday that he had only driven because he wanted to make sure to get to the driving test on time. 他們說,他告訴週一被叫到現場的警官們說,他開車只是因為想要確保及時抵達那場駕駛執照考試。 His test was immediately called off. The man now faces an investigation for driving without a license. Police also opened an investigation of the car's owner. 他的考試立刻被取消。這名男子現在因無照駕駛面臨調查。警方也對車主展開調查。   Next Article Danish police confiscate luxury sports car caught speeding 丹麥警方沒收超速的豪華跑車   Danish police have confiscated a high-performance luxury car after its new owner was caught speeding as he drove it home from Germany to Norway. 丹麥警方沒收了一輛高性能的豪華汽車,在它的新車主超速被逮以後,當時他開著它從德國回挪威家。 The man, an Iraqi citizen resident in Norway who was not identified, was registered Thursday as driving at 236 kph in his Lamborghini Huracán on a stretch of highway where the top speed is 130 kph. 這名男子是個居住於挪威的伊拉克公民,身分未明,週四在一段最高時速130公里的高速公路上,被紀錄到以每小時236公里速度駕著他的藍寶堅尼「颶風」。 Under a new Danish law, police can seize the vehicles of reckless drivers and auction them off, with the money going into Danish coffers. 根據丹麥一項新的法律,警察可沒收魯莽駕駛人的車輛並拍賣它們,錢則進丹麥國庫。 The Nordjyske newspaper said the man had bought the car hours earlier in Germany for 2 million kroner. 《北日德蘭報》說,這名男子幾個小時前在德國以200萬克朗購入這輛車。 The car owner will also be fined for speeding in due course. 車主當理也將因超速被罰。 Source article: https://features.ltn.com.tw/english/article/paper/1486857 ; https://features.ltn.com.tw/english/article/paper/1478842

Optimal Finance Daily
1734: 8 Secrets Your Broker Won't Tell You (and Why You Need to Know Them) by Jeff Rose of Good Financial Cents

Optimal Finance Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 12:55


Jeff Rose shares 8 need-to-know secrets that your broker won't tell you Episode 1734: 8 Secrets Your Broker Won't Tell You (and Why You Need to Know Them) by Jeff Rose of Good Financial Cents Jeff Rose, CFP® is a Certified Financial Planner™, founder of Good Financial Cents, and author of the personal finance book Soldier of Finance. Jeff is an Iraqi combat veteran and served 9 years in the Army National Guard. His work is regularly featured in Forbes, Business Insider, Inc.com and Entrepreneur. The original post is located here: https://www.goodfinancialcents.com/what-your-broker-financial-advisor-wont-tell-you/  Gusto is an easy, online payroll and benefits service built for modern small businesses — one place to pay and take care of your hardworking team. Get three months free when you run your first payroll by visiting Gusto.com/ofd  Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com Interested in advertising on the show? https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalFinanceDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Micro Empires
Retirement Starts Today with Benjamin Brandt

Micro Empires

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 40:32


Benjamin Brandt is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ and Founder/President of Capital City Wealth Management,  He is also the host of the popular podcast Retirement Starts Today Radio and the accompanying blog. Benjamin was recently named as one of the top 40 financial advisors under age 40 by Investment News. An Iraqi combat veteran, who served in the North Dakota Army National Guard for 8 years, including a 15 month deployment to Iraq in 2003. You may have seen Benjamin featured in The Huffington Post, CNBC.com, Forbes, Business Insider, ClarkHoward.com, and many others. In his free time, Benjamin and his wife Kristen can be found on the weekends at the hockey rink, or on the gymnastic and wrestling mats, chasing their SIX (count 'em!) energetic children.   In this episode, Benjamin shares with us the importance of viewing wealth. That it's not just about buying things, but it's also about creating an environment of abundance so that you can live the life that you want to live. And he also shares with us his journey from being a financial advisor to being a podcaster, and how he was able to use this platform to eventually grow his brand and his business. I hope you enjoy the show as much as I did and please let me know what you think.  [00:01 - 21:56] Opening Segment I welcome everyone to the show I introduce our guest, Benjamin Brandt Benjamin shares about his money culture  Money is scarce In order to have more, you “have to save more”  Learning to look at things at the lens of abundance  Deciding to be foster parents Looking at the situation as an opportunity to be a service to the community  Seeing the situation as an abundance of resources Processing the adoption of triplets Fortunate to have abundance  Shoutout to my podcast producers: Streamlined Podcasts GET A DISCOUNT on your first month with Streamlined Podcasts by using this link! [21:55 - 48:08] Financial Advisor Turned Podcaster  How Benjamin transitioned into the podcasting world  The goal was to grow the clientele Used podcasting as a wealth-building tool Retirement Tax Podcast New show to watch out for  Marrying your CFP (certified financial planner) and your CPA (certified public accountant) Starting the Retirement Starts Today Podcast Being visible online  Using this platform to nurture people Vetting financial advisors before hiring one Check their social media Do some research and find some key items  [38:09 - 40:32] Closing Segment Watch out for the new podcast on December  Connect with Benjamin through the links below  Final Words  Tweetable Quotes: “And so I looked at my situation through this lens of abundance and said I don't have to spend less. I've got this time, latitude or longitude, to pursue other business activities so that I have this blue ocean of possibilities.” - Benjamin Brandt   “That's why I put less focus on spending less and more focus on earning more.”  - Benjamin Brandt Take the money quiz at www.moneyscripts.com    Connect with Benjamin on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn and listen to his podcast at www.retirementstartstodayradio.com. You can connect with me on LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, and Facebook. I'm excited to hear more about you. I'm excited to know more about you. Also, feel free to shoot me an email at jennifer@micro-empires.com. You can call or text 213-973-7206 TELL US WHAT YOU THINK! LEAVE A REVIEW + help someone who wants to explode their business growth by sharing this episode or click here to listen to our previous episodes.   This podcast is about YOU.  We all have a story, whether your story is a lot like mine or totally different. Maybe you have a good job, but you know in your heart that you want more.  Let's Work Together   Are you ready to begin INVESTING in your future but you don't know where to start? Need more CONNECTIONS in the investing community? Sign up at https://micro-empires.com/investing-opportunities/ for investing opportunities!   I have created a NEW eBook called "You Don't Have to be Wealthy to Build Wealth" Click https://micro-empires.com/how-to-build-wealth/ for a FREE copy! The post Retirement Starts Today with Benjamin Brandt appeared first on Micro Empires.

Red Transmissions Podcast
Sleeping in Another Galaxy

Red Transmissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 18:58


Abhishek Singh is an Independent filmmaker from India who is currently a MA (Film Studies) student at ELTE University, Budapest, Hungary. Recently, he shot his first Hungarian short film with the support of the National Film Institute Hungary. In the year 2020, he also directed and produced a feature-length film in India. During his stay in Hungary, he teamed up with Masar Smari, an Iraqi actor and scientist, to make Arabic poetry films on the concept of alienation.  

Middle East Centre
Afghanistan and the Middle East

Middle East Centre

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 60:06


This is a recording of a live webinar held on Thursday 25th November 2021 for the Middle East centre. Dr Ibrahim al-Marashi (Associate Professor of Middle East history at California State University San Marcos and Visiting Professor at the IE University School of Global and Public Affairs in Madrid, Spain) and Kate Clark (Co-Director and Senior Analyst, Afghanistan Analysts Network (AAN), https://www.afghanistan-analysts.org ) present ‘Afghanistan and the Middle East'. Dr Michael Willis (St Antony's College, Oxford) chairs this webinar. Ibrahim Al-Marashi - Contesting the "Graveyard of Empires" Trope: Situating Afghanistan within Middle East History". First, this talk will examine the relevance of history, particularly Middle Eastern history for understanding the current crisis in Afghanistan, from antiquity to the Soviet invasion of the nation. This talk will examine the relevance of history, particularly Middle Eastern history for understanding the current crisis in Afghanistan. The fall of Kabul has been compared to the 1975 fall of Saigon or the British and Soviet defeats, hence the epitaph of the "Graveyard of Empires." While historical context is crucial, the aforementioned historical tropes are misleading, denying agency to Afghanistan as a nation and people Kate Clark - Killing the Goose that Laid the Golden Egg: How overnight Afghanistan became a rentier state with no rent. The capture of the Afghan state by the Taliban was an economic calamity. The foreign assistance which had made up 43 per cent of GDP was cut. UN and US sanctions applied to the Taliban as an armed group suddenly applied to the whole country. Afghanistan's foreign reserves and World Bank funds were frozen and the banking sector was paralysed. The repercussions are already catastrophic: only one in 20 households now have enough to eat. With such shaky economic foundations, will the Taliban's new Islamic Emirate prove any more sustainable than the old post-2001 Islamic Republic? Biographies: Kate Clark has worked for AAN, a policy research NGO based in Kabul, since 2010. Her research and publications have focussed on the conflict, including militia formation and investigations into breaches of the Laws of War, detentions and the use of torture. She has written extensively on Afghanistan's political economy, as well as its wildlife and the environment. Kate experienced both of the most recent falls of Kabul, in 2021, and in 2001, when she was the BBC correspondent (1999-2002). During the last years of the first Taleban emirate, she was the only western journalist based in Afghanistan. Kate has also worked at the BBC Arabic Service, on Radio 4 news and current affairs programmes, and has made radio and television documentaries about Afghanistan, including on the insurgency, weapons smuggling, corruption, the opium economy and war crimes. Kate has an MA in Middle Eastern Politics from Exeter University in Britain and has also lived, studied and worked in the Middle East. Ibrahim Al-Marashi obtained his doctorate in Modern History at St Antony's College, University of Oxford, completing a thesis on the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait. His research focuses on 20th century Iraqi history. He is co-author of Iraq's Armed Forces: An Analytical History (Routledge, 2008), and The Modern History of Iraq, with Phebe Marr (Routledge 2017), and A Concise History of the Middle East (Routledge, 2018). If you would like to join the live audience during this term's webinar series, you can sign up to receive our MEC weekly newsletter or browse the MEC webpages. The newsletter includes registration details for each week's webinar. Please contact mec@sant.ox.ac.uk to register for the newsletter or follow us on Twitter @OxfordMEC. Accessibility features of this video playlist are available through the University of Oxford Middle East Centre podcast series: http://podcasts.ox.ac.uk/series/middle-east-centre

Bitch Slap  ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!
Interview #48: Dawson Church PhD and best selling author talks "Bliss Brain".

Bitch Slap ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 44:47


Dawson and I go deep on meditation and emotion regulation.  He discusses the attention network, empathy network, and the self-centeredness suppression network.  He is a PhD and an award-winning science writer with three best-selling books to his credit. The Genie in Your Genes was the first book to demonstrate that emotions drive gene expression. Mind to Matter, showed that the brain creates much of what we think of as objective reality. And Bliss Brain which we discuss in the interview.  And he has conducted dozens of clinical trials and founded the National Institute for Integrative Healthcare, www.niih.org, to promote groundbreaking new treatments. Its largest program, the Veterans Stress Project, has offered free treatment to over 20,000 veterans with PTSD over the last decade.Administrative: (See episode transcript below)Get Dawson Church's books hereGenie in Your Genes at www.yourgeniusgene.com.Mind to Matter here www.mindtomatter.com.Bliss Brain where www.blissbrain.com,Check out the Tools For A Good Life Summit here: Virtually and FOR FREE https://bit.ly/ToolsForAGoodLifeSummitStart podcasting!  These are the best mobile mic's for IOS and Android phones.  You can literally take them anywhere on the fly.Get the Shure MV88 mobile mic for IOS,  https://amzn.to/3z2NrIJGet the Shure MV88+ for  mobile mic for Android  https://amzn.to/3ly8SNjGet A Course In Miracles Here! https://amzn.to/3hoE7sAAccess my “Insiders Guide to Finding Peace” here: https://belove.media/peaceSee more resources at https://belove.media/resourcesEmail me: contact@belove.mediaFor social Media:      https://www.instagram.com/mrmischaz/https://www.facebook.com/MischaZvegintzovSubscribe and share to help spread the love for a better world!As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.Transcript:0:00:06.8 Mischa Zvegintzov: Welcome back everybody to the Tools For A Good Life Summit. And right now, I would like to introduce to you Dawson Church, PhD. I'm so excited to have you on board. We just had an amazing moment, a big breath of joy, and hope for this for everybody. But a... Quick, I'm gonna read your bio if that's okay.0:00:28.6 Dawson Church: Go for it. And I hope everyone is breathing with us.0:00:32.2 MZ: Yes. Yes.[laughter]0:00:36.3 MZ: So good. All right. Fantastic. Dawson Church, PhD is an award-winning science writer with three best-selling books to your credit. The Genie in Your Genes was the first book to demonstrate that emotions drive gene expression. You can find that book at www.yourgeniusgene.com. We've got, Mind to Matter, showed that the brain creates much of what we think of as objective reality. You can find that at www.mindtomatter.com, and we've got Bliss Brain, which you can find at www.blissbrain.com, which we'll be discussing in a minute. Very excited for that. Which demonstrates that peak mental states rapidly remodel the brain for happiness. You have conducted dozens of clinical trials and founded the National Institute for Integrative Healthcare, niih.org, to promote groundbreaking new treatments. Its largest program, the Veterans Stress Project, has offered free treatment to over 20,000 veterans with PTSD over the last decade. Thank you so much for that. And you share how to apply these health and performance breakthroughs through EFT Universe at eftuniverse.com. One of the largest alternative medicine sites on the web. Welcome, Dawson Church.0:02:09.8 DC: I'm having fun doing it all, Mischa.0:02:12.1 MZ: I'm having fun doing it all.[laughter]0:02:13.8 MZ: I love it. That is so... Yes, so good and so powerful. I just watch... I'm looking over here 'cause I have another screen but watching some of your content and just your joy and your enthusiasm and your passion for life. It is infectious. And I have a note here, "learned." We can learn this, learned happiness.0:02:38.7 DC: Learned happiness. Absolutely. And it's like, use it or lose it and the neural circuits that we use the most, the habits and behaviors through which we send signals through our brain, those things are what grow and circuits we don't use shrink. So absolutely, we can learn these things as we practice them. Our bodies, our brains are literally changing with every thought in our minds and consciousness.0:03:03.9 MZ: Yes. Which I think is so hopeful. If we are willing to just take a little bit of positive action, the results can be massive. Before we get to that, however, I wanted to discuss... I wrote down some notes. You were asked to speak before Congress a couple of times, correct?0:03:25.4 DC: Yes.0:03:26.1 MZ: And did you actually do... Go ahead, tell me.0:03:29.1 DC: Well, it was exciting because I've been to Washington DC several times. And when I began to get reports back from therapists working with veterans coming back from Iraq and Afghanistan, and they said, "We're working with these veterans spending just a few sessions, five, 10 sessions with them. And they're recovering from flashbacks, nightmares, PTSD." I was like... I was pretty skeptical because that's a big claim. And the American Psychiatric Association had just commissioned a survey which showed that basically PTSD just gets worse over time. Maybe you can manage it with drugs. That's the best you can do. So I heard these accounts, then we had to actually put some numbers to them and do some pilot research on the methods these therapists were using. And it was true that veterans really were recovering really quickly using these advanced psychotherapeutic methods. And so we eventually got that work in front of several Senators and Congress members.0:04:25.7 DC: We then were able to advocate for them in Congress. And then, I was invited to testify before the House Armed Services Committee and the Senate Veterans Affairs Committee. And those are powerful moments to sit there in this room full of Members of Congress and share about the potential of these methods and then really see if we can get these to veterans who are suffering. And that was a really profound experience. And what I found is that we have these tools now in our hands, in our toolboxes. And it's true that we really can shift most cases of PTSD. About nine out of 10 is what research shows us most cases of anxiety and depression. And after six, seven, eight sessions, these veterans just leave their therapy sessions, and they're free of flashbacks and nightmares, intrusive thoughts, all of the other things that would have otherwise have bothered them the rest of their lives. So, it's amazing to watch that happen.0:05:21.3 MZ: Yeah, that's incredible, I think. Well, two things, one, the palpable experience of the energy in front of when you're testifying, I guess testifying sounds aggressive, but when you're having an opportunity to speak to the... What did you call it? The joint say it again. The Joint Commissioner, what...0:05:45.8 DC: Yeah, the Veterans Affairs Committee and the Armed Services Committee.0:05:48.7 MZ: Yes. Yeah, yeah, yeah. So did you feel a palpable energy shift of awareness with these Senators and things? I'm looking for some visceral experience there.0:06:01.5 DC: You know, it's really interesting question, Mischa. And one of the things that I found interesting was that what made the most impact on the Members of Congress was the stories of veterans themselves. Like we had one Vietnam veteran, and he said he was due to have six sessions. After the first session, he emailed his therapist and said, "After that very first session with you, I got my first full night's sleep since Vietnam, 35 years earlier." And so, the members of Congress would hear from veterans.0:06:37.2 DC: Another veteran was a young veteran. He'd done four tours in Iraq. And he had this terrible PTSD, nightmares, and flashbacks. Because one of the first things he had to do when he got there... Almost immediately, he arrived in Iraq as a medic, one of his best friends was killed. And one of his jobs is he had to prepare the uniform of his dead friend to send back to the family in the US with all the other personal effects. And so this young man was so traumatized, remembering, having to clean the blood and body fluids off the uniform. And it also smelled really bad because it'd been sitting in the Iraqi sun for a few days. And he literally had to run outside the hut, take a deep breath of air, run back inside, do a little bit of cleaning, run back outside just to breathe. 'Cause, it smelled so bad in there. So here he was. His emotions were 10 out of 10 as he recalled that event. After we worked with him in just one session, he was at a zero. He had no more emotion around it. He had only positive feelings. He said, "You know that, I realize now that was an act of love. And I felt now the love that I was giving his family and him by that act of service."0:07:47.6 DC: And so it shifted in his mind. So when you've seen, as you mentioned, over 20,000 veterans have this experience and a randomized controlled trial shows that these effects are true for most people, it just affects you profoundly. And that's what we thought made the biggest impact on those Senators, and Congress Members was that when they heard stories by real people, it was even more impactful than the research numbers data.0:08:13.3 MZ: Thank you so much for sharing that. I mean, I love that. I... Obviously circumstance to get there, not so excited about. But the result and the service aspect of that too. So for yourself...0:08:26.8 DC: Yeah, we all have stuff leftover from our past Mischa, we all have stuff leftover from our past, like childhood, really experiences that will otherwise stay with us. And so when you see people shed these past burdens of trauma and then claim the lives they can live, it's just powerful.0:08:44.1 MZ: It's amazing. I was gonna ask. I imagined seeing that again and again, and to be a part of that and to be able to be a part of that and help grow that is just gotta be insanely gratifying.0:09:00.2 DC: They call it a job.[laughter]0:09:03.7 MZ: Oh my gosh.[chuckle]0:09:06.2 DC: It's not hard work. It's wonderful.0:09:08.4 MZ: Thank you.0:09:08.4 DC: It also really works for you because when you're helping people heal like that, we call it... There's a term for it. We call it "borrowing benefits." And you literally, as you work with other people, seeing them heal, it heals you as well.0:09:20.0 MZ: That's beautiful. And then I think, I am... As I was digging and looking, and I'm like the amount of hours that you have put into this. And I say that in a good way, just in a massive way. I wrote down, "How many hours do you think you've put into this?"0:09:41.6 DC: No, it's a bad way, Mischa. When I was 15 years old, when I was a teenager, I was so depressed, I was so anxious. I had all the symptoms of PTSD myself; flashbacks, intrusive thoughts, hyper-vigilance. And so, I just fled into a spiritual community when I was 15 to try and get over my own inner demons. And I then spent... What I write about in... There's a section of my book, Bliss Brain. It's called "From 50 Years to 50 Seconds." And it took me 50 years to figure out how the brain works, how the neurochemistry of all this works. How our genes are being affected epigenetically by these positive and negative experiences, how we can use these methods for healing.0:10:26.2 DC: And then what I've been doing for the last few years is hooking people up to EEGs. And so we literally read their brain information processing ability and how their brains are running information, especially when they think about trauma or think about bad events in their lives. And we found that now within four minutes or so, we can bring people from that intense emotionally triggered state back down to deep peace, inner calm. And we had one lady in our seven-day retreat. By the end of the seven days of practicing these methods, she was down to 47 seconds between sitting down, closing her eyes, entering that state. And in 47 seconds, under 50 seconds, she was having a full-blown mystical, elevated what we call the awakened mind, Bliss Brain experience. So we now have figured out, with the aid of neuroscience, how to train people into doing this, not 50 years like me, but 50 seconds. [chuckle] 50 seconds or less.[chuckle]0:11:30.8 MZ: You know what? Thank you for taking the pain, Dawson.[laughter]0:11:35.9 DC: Don't do what I do... Did. Go to an ashram and sit there for 10 years, trying to control your breathing and your thoughts. It won't work.[chuckle]0:11:43.6 MZ: It's so good. I don't wanna give away the ghost here, and we're gonna get to this in a second. But I took a couple of notes, some other notes, and one was, "Remodel your brain in as little as eight weeks," but... Or no buts, but... And then this other part, "It's important to turn those temporary states into long term enduring traits." Turn a state into a trait. And when I came across where you said that, I was like, "That is awesome." And so we can... Let me... Go ahead. You can say something to that if you want. But...0:12:26.0 DC: Yeah, that really is the goal here on meditation, of EFT acupressure tapping, of the various other techniques I advocate in my books. And what you wanna do is not have a temporary state of wellbeing. 'Cause it feels good to feel good, and it feels good to be happy. It feels good to be content and have inner peace. But it's a state, and it'll pass. And then you hear some bad news. You stub your leg on a piece of furniture. You have a financial reverse. And suddenly you lose your state. And so those states are nice, but they're just transient. What you wanna do is fire those neurons repeatedly over and over and over again. And then as your neural bundles get bigger and thicker, and research shows that in just one hour of repeat stimulation, that the number of synaptic connections in a neural bundle can double. So, you can double the number of connections in a neural bundle in an hour. So now you're turning the software of a state into the hardware of a trait. And then you are not just feeling happy, sometimes, you are a happy person. You aren't just feeling creative, sometimes, you are a creative person. So you've now got the trait of creativity, the trait of resilience, the trait of joy, and then no one could take that away from you because it's hard-wired into your brain.0:13:48.6 MZ: Love that. That's a vision of hope. That is so good. Thank you for that. Alright, let's get to the good, good stuff. I'm gonna pose a scenario to you and then ask you a question. Okay? Fantastic. So, given this scenario, think of life as a three-legged stool of relationships, finances, and health. And now think of someone who is or was successful and who has had two of those legs fall out from under them. This could be a combination of divorce, career upheaval, financial stress, kids acting out, or not going the direction that the parents want. It could be physical health challenges for themselves or a loved one. Maybe a death in the family and continued failed relationships. For me, it was divorce. My kids started to veer a little bit, I felt. Like career upheaval. And then both my parents died in rapid succession. It really shook some foundations that I had. And to top it off, my "pull myself up from my bootstraps" mentality, that "fix it or push my way through it," was no longer working. I needed some new tools. And by the grace of God, I was open to some new tools. So, this is my question to you. Thinking of your Bliss Brain work and your book, what are the exact next steps you would offer this person, so they know they are headed in the new right direction, that they will have positive momentum towards getting their life back on track.0:15:38.9 DC: This is gonna sound really counterintuitive and odd. [chuckle] But it starts with self-acceptance. And self-love and accepting yourself just the way you are. And if circumstances; the way they are. And research into healing shows that acceptance is where you have to start. Like... I'm trying to think of a good example to use here. There are a whole bunch of them, they are crowding together in my brain, to mention. But when you have multiple challenges like that, just breathing and remaining centered and accepting and loving yourself is the first thing. In your loss, in your confusion, in your difficulty, and it's hard to be in that state, and yet, if you're trying to get out of it, if you're trying to... Now, you said, "pushing my way through." That works up to a point until it doesn't. [chuckle] So the first thing is just love and compassion. Just self-love, self-compassion.0:16:38.0 DC: The phrase we use in EFT acupressure tapping is, "Even though I have this problem, I deeply and completely love and accept myself." And that's really reassuring to you when you hear that when we're working, say, with a man who is 200 pounds overweight. Now, the last thing he wants to accept is being 200 pounds overweight. And yet, if we can train him to love and accept himself in that state, that unlocks all of the tension in the psyche between the part of yourself that's the inner coach, inner critique, inner CEO saying, "You should lose weight, you should quit smoking, you shouldn't drink so much, you should eat healthy, you should take more vacations, you should just save more money, blah, blah, blah, bloody blah." It's just yelling at us all the time, and that top-dog coercive inner voice is just keeping the energy pattern of what we've got going on, stuck and in place. And the moment you relax and say, "You know, I just accept myself the way I am."0:17:40.5 DC: We did an MRI study, some colleagues made an MRI study of obese women. Women who are overweight. When they put them in the MRI and showed them images of chocolate cake, and strawberry pie, and vanilla ice cream, and all these things, their mid-brains, their limbic system, the emotional part of the brain, was totally lit up. In other words, they weren't seeing food as food or nutrients. They were seeing food as a highly emotional event. After those five or six sessions of these simple therapies, we put them back in the MRI. They were getting exposed to all those emotive images, and they had no response at all. In fact, the guy running the MRI, the neuroscientist, said to my colleague, "What have you done to these women that they just have no emotional response to food anymore?"0:18:31.2 DC: So again, now they don't have that huge emotional response, and they love and accept themselves the way they are. Then all of the energy that's trapped in that top dog-underdog kind of struggle, "You should fix yourself, you should improve, you should be better." And underdog saying, "Oh yes, I will, top dog, I will improve, I will quit smoking, blah, blah, blah." And then underdog runs out behind the shed when top dog's back is turned and smokes the cigarette. And so, all of the tension behind these weird psychological struggles is just removed when you love and accept yourself. So love and acceptance is the first step. So that's number one. Accepting where you are, and admitting it, and acknowledging it just as a fact, and then you look at what you can do to shift and then you practice it.0:19:20.6 MZ: Now I can't over-stress the value of practice. What I try and do in my own work, so I try to get people addicted. So I wanna get them addicted to their own dopamine, serotonin, anandamide, oxytocin, nitric oxide all these wonderful neuro chemicals that happen in your brain spontaneously when you meditate and when you do that, people have a habit of meditating, so if I can get people hooked one time on high serotonin, high dopamine then they'll stay hooked and they'll keep on meditating so I can't over-stress the importance of getting yourself addicted to the right stuff to meditation, and then day after day, you meditate, and within a month, our MRI research shows your brain patterns are already changing. Your brain, the way your brain processes information is already shifting, and then you start to turn those temporary states into traits. And that's the value of practice. It doesn't take long. In one MRI study, it took just 30 days of practice 20 minutes a day, and people's brains were processing information totally differently.0:20:33.1 MZ: That's amazing. Can I ask you, what I wanna ask you and I look at... And I was checking out your Bliss Brain book and such. You say you teach seven simple steps. Is this part of that? Is this literally part of what we're talking about right here?0:20:49.8 DC: Yeah. That technique is called Eco-meditation. E-C-O meditation and is just a seven-step process, we do the acupressure, we do mindful breathing, we do a little bit of self-hypnosis, we do heart coherence, and we do neuro-feedback all in a certain order, and there's seven of these things we practice... And when you do that, suddenly you just, your brain flips into ecstasy with its elevated emotional state, no 10,000 hours, no spiritual master, no special training, no spiritual belief required. You can be an atheist. [laughter] You can be Jewish, you can be episcopalian you can be anything and it's just gonna work, it's a mechanical neurological event you're triggering in your body and you feel great.0:21:35.5 MZ: Okay, fantastic, fantastic. I didn't mean... Alright, I was just curious. So we'll go back to the self-acceptance, what you can do to shift, so that would be like in this particular case, it sounds like meditation would be a specific tool you're talking about, but it could be many different things for somebody.0:21:56.3 DC: In my earlier book, Mind Matter, I list about 30 things you can do, there's grounding, there's time in nature, social support, but two I recommend though that are fundamental and easy, one Mischa is that style meditation that puts you in those elevated emotional states and doing it first thing in the morning. That's a number one, and that's I think should be universal, just the benefits. One of my doctor friends said, "If meditation were a drug, it would be medical malpractice to fail to prescribe it." [laughter] So it's just the foundation as a frame for a good life. So you wanna do it in the morning, doesn't have to be an hour or two hours, half an hour is plenty. And then if you use a guided meditation that'll guide you into that elevated state. And then the second thing I recommend as having everyone should have this in their Personal Growth Tool Kit is EFT acupressure tapping, that's just somebody tapping on a series of 13 acupressure points.0:23:03.4 DC: It regulates the body's energy, that's what helped those women get over their emotional attachment and projection to food. So you wanna get over your high cortisol, you wanna get over your stress and EFT within two minutes, it'll just crash your cortisol, crash your adrenalin, your level of all of these stress neurotransmitters and hormones will go way, way, way down. And then all kinds of beneficial things increase including immunity and cell repair, all kinds of good things go up when those molecules become available to your body for building healthy cells. So those are the two things I think that are great, then layer in time in nature and layer in a spiritual practice, layer in... There's a wonderful medieval term called lectio divina reading inspirational material, fill your mind with this stuff, don't fill your mind with all the crap in the mass media and whatever you do, don't turn on your phone and start looking at it first thing in the morning when you wake up because you're gonna get then stuck in the lateral level of everything going on in the world, which is not in your best interest, instead, orient yourself meditation to what I call in my books, non-local mind and non-local reality in meditation, and then you can deal with the world through the framing of being one with the universe.0:24:20.3 DC: But that's the order to do it in. Hook up to the universe, then deal with the outside world, don't open your eyes and look at your phone and get sucked into the outside world and then try and meditate because you've blown it at that point, and it's hard to get back to that good space.0:24:35.0 MZ: Too little too late.0:24:36.6 DC: Oh, yes.0:24:37.6 MZ: Yes. I love meditation myself. I have had a committed practice for a while, and so I think it's so, so powerful, and I think oftentimes the results are evident later, or I'll notice too, just getting that nice breathing going even with the monkey mind, it's almost like the monkey mind is irrelevant, but...0:25:03.6 DC: It is.0:25:03.7 MZ: Yeah. Just carrying that nice breath, that connection to the universe you're talking about through the day is... Before you look at the phone is so good. Thank you for that.0:25:15.5 DC: And you're right about the monkey mind being irrelevant because we can't still our minds, we can't quiet our minds, our brains were meant to be highly active and highly involved with everything around us, think about... I was just thinking about just the ancestors, and I was going down a path in the forest near me a couple of days ago, and there was a stick lying in the path, and I thought, "You know my ancestors 100,000 years ago, when they see us that long brown skinny thing lying on the path. It might be a snake." So the optimist says, "Oh no, it's a stick. It's fine." And 99 times out of a 100, 100,000 years ago, it was a stick and nothing bad happened. The pessimist is seeing every stick and saying, "It's a snake. It's gonna bite me."0:26:00.2 MZ: Yes.0:26:00.8 DC: And so the pessimist is... The one time it is a snake, the pessimist says, "You see? It was a snake. It didn't bite me because I was so paranoid and suspicious, and now I'm safe." The optimist, unfortunately, at one time in a 100 gets bitten and dies. So he gets weeded from the gene pool, and only the pessimist lives to perpetuate his genes to the next generation. Multiply this by 10,000 generations and you have you, Mischa and me Dawson. And we are capable of the monkey mind like you wouldn't believe. Always looking around for the baddest stuff in our environment. We've just been bred that way for tens and of thousands of generations. And now we sit there and close our eyes and try and be happy? [laughter] Isn't gonna happen. [laughter]0:26:45.7 MZ: Oh, my God. That's amazing. Okay, so then you said... What can we do to shift? You have, in your book, one of your books, which you referenced, you've got 30 great tools, but start with the some sort of meditation and some EFT style of tapping in and then layer in more as time goes by. And then practice, so practice, practice. Find some consistency, yes?0:27:18.9 DC: Build those neural bundles, turn those states to traits, and that's what consistency will do. So then when one or more of the legs of your stool is gone, you're still totally serene, have total inner peace, and you have something that outside tragedy can't take away. You've now built the neural wiring or resilience in your brain, and that's just who you are. So when the pandemic strikes, when the economic crash happens, when you get divorced, when your kids are acting out, you are this highly resilient person. The research that I cover in both Bliss Brain and Mind to Matter shows that not only are you that person during meditation. Research by a wonderful neuro-scientist called Teresa Amabile at Harvard shows you reach that state mentally for that 30 minutes or so in the morning... Meditation, flow states, they then perpetuate themselves for 48 hours of increased productivity, creativity and problem solving ability.0:28:22.9 DC: And in one US government study, they showed that people in those states have five times the ability to solve complex problems. So now, even if you have had two of the three supports, legs knocked off out from under your stool, you have five times the ability to solve complex problems. You are gonna can put your stool back together again far quicker than somebody who doesn't have those. And in fact, there is this whole field, I talk about in Bliss Brain called post-traumatic growth. Not only do you wind up okay, you wind up better. You've actually used disaster as a springboard for personal transformation, so that's the potential of that practice.0:29:05.0 MZ: Yeah, fantastic. I love that. So many cool thoughts just were going through my brain as you were talking about that. And now they've all escaped me, but they will come back to me in a second, I'm sure. So after practice, was there anything else or were you... I don't mean to cut you off with the sort of the steps.0:29:31.5 DC: Yeah. So self-love, practice, at least, meditation and learn tapping, 'cause tapping takes you all of two minutes to learn. Takes you all of 30 seconds to do, and then you quickly are gonna regulate your emotions. And I cover in Bliss Brain, there are four circuits to the brain that start to change. Now, this is the absolute miracle of neuroplasticity. 20 years ago, we had no idea the brain was remodeling itself that way, but I have case studies in Bliss Brain showing that if you practice in this way, the emotion regulation network in your brain, the little hub that governs emotional network, emotional regulation in your brain, grows by, get this, 10% a month. So in three months, that part of the brain can be 30% larger. So now you can regulate your irritation, your annoyance, your resentment, your negative emotion, and that opens the door to a much happier life. So that's why in Bliss Brain I say there are four networks to develop, but develop emotion regulation first.0:30:43.7 DC: The next network is the one that controls the self, and so we have these elaborate stories about who we are. "I was born at such and such a time. This is my biography. This is what my job is like, my life is like, my money is like." That's all the self, and unfortunately, that is the part of the brain that draws us into suffering. That's called the default mode network. Our brain defaults to that suffering network automatically when we aren't engaged in a task. And so we need to dial that part of the brain down. Tibetan monks, with 10,000 hours of meditation practice, they can dial down the default mode network. Literally, they close their eyes, and in a second they shut it down. You and I, maybe five minutes if we are able to practice. So you wanna shut down the self-absorbed chatter.0:31:32.6 MZ: On a good day. Yes...0:31:33.5 DC: About your life that we're all doing, the monkey mind, and the self-critical part of the brain, especially. So that's the next thing you wanna develop. You wanna develop compassion and feel compassion for other people. Not just be thinking about yourself but loving other people, loving everything the way it is, loving every... It will actually guide you to loving every atom in the universe. So we develop developed these networks, the empathy network, and then the attention network. We learn to... It's part of the brain, called the orbital prefrontal cortex. We develop that part of the brain, so it grows, becomes better at firing, and then we can pay attention to what's important and we can screen out irrelevant information. Our work productivity goes through the roof, we're far more productive at work, we're far better at solving problems. Our creativity at least doubles with these methods in a very short order. So the benefits to your regular life are immense.0:32:29.9 MZ: That's amazing. And one of the thoughts that I had, which I love, and you're just verifying with data, with research, is this idea that I don't have time. I don't have time, right? And if we take the time, it will make us that much more efficient, that much more productivity... Or more productive. And it sounds like that... And I would verify this for myself, but maybe you can validate it for me. Time taken for the meditation, the simple practices, the rewards far... The productivity rewards, happiness rewards, time rewards, efficiency rewards far outweigh the limited amount of time we need to put in to achieve those results.0:33:24.3 DC: Some people say, "I don't have time to meditate." My retort is, "You don't have time not to meditate." In one study done by a huge consulting firm called McKinsey, they found that executives who are already high performers and are entering these flow states via meditation, their productivity goes up five-fold. So you get done now in one day what used to take you five. Now, those are the peak performers. And we're now measuring this in ordinary people. We're measuring how much productivity goes up. But even if it goes up 20%, that's like an extra day a week you have available to you. And you won't be using that week to do email and that extra day of the week to work. You'll be using it to go play, be creative and have fun. So it changes your whole life game plan to have that huge increase in productivity.0:34:16.0 MZ: Perfect. Before... I wanna do one thing, if you would, for me really quick. You were talking about in the Bliss Brain book; there's the four neural networks that you're effecting change in, correct?0:34:26.6 DC: Yes.0:34:26.9 MZ: I think that's what you said. And so the first one was...0:34:29.8 DC: Emotion regulation.0:34:31.3 MZ: Say it again?0:34:32.8 DC: Emotion regulation.0:34:33.8 MZ: Emotion regulation. And so that would be, for example, the meditation, the stuff like that, right?0:34:39.0 DC: Yes.0:34:39.2 MZ: And then the second one was...0:34:43.4 DC: There's also the attention network.0:34:47.7 MZ: Intent... So, what would be a...0:34:47.8 DC: The empathy network and the...0:34:48.1 MZ: Oh, go ahead.0:34:48.5 DC: So yeah, the attention network, empathy network, and the self-centeredness suppression network. There's a part... Parts of the brain that take that self-absorbed mental chatter and switch off that project.0:35:02.0 MZ: Perfect. Okay. For the second one, could you give a simple tip or tool to help with that, to give someone a vision, so the... I can't read my own writing. [chuckle]0:35:17.5 DC: For the attention network, for example...0:35:21.2 MZ: Yes.0:35:21.5 DC: That's why a guided meditation is so useful.0:35:24.7 MZ: Okay.0:35:24.9 DC: There's dozens of guided meditations free on the web. Both at ecomeditation.com and also Insight Timer has them. A bunch of websites have my meditations for free. Blissbrain.com has them. Mind to Matter has unique ones for manifestation. And so these guided meditations give your attention network a voice, some music to focus on. That's good for you for maybe six months, maybe two or three years. At that point, you wanna graduate from that, and you'll be doing meditations yourself. You'll be able to focus your attention without the words. But for novices, it's really hard to do. You need something to focus on, like that voice and that music, so that's a second...0:36:06.0 MZ: I love it. Fantastic! And why not take advantage of those tools? Especially, since a ton of them are out there for free. Right?0:36:14.6 DC: Yep. Yep.0:36:14.6 MZ: Okay, so the empathy network, what... Tell me a tip, trick, tool for that. Is that more meditation, or is that... Is that basically... And what I'm hearing you say is that meditation is gonna fire all four of those. [chuckle]0:36:29.3 DC: Yes. It will. So empathy, like the guided meditations, we have you focus on a source of unconditional love. A person or being with whom you feel that some sort of connection. And when you do that, that activates a part of the brain called the insula, which has to do with pro-social emotions. So empathy, altruism, love, gratitude, all of those things are activated. And all of those are part of what the insula runs. And so, when you activate the insula, all of these pro-social emotions kick in, and then you can feel this immense compassion. Your heart rate slows down then, your heart rhythm becomes very regular. All kinds of good things happen in your body. So you deliberately activate the insula during the compassion part of EcoMeditation.0:37:19.1 MZ: Fantastic, thank you. And then the self-centeredness.0:37:24.7 DC: Yeah. And so in Chapter 1 and Chapter 7, beginning at the end of my book, Mind to Matter, I talk about local reality and non-local mind. And we all have to navigate local reality. I have to keep my car tuned up, and I have to keep my mortgage and rent paid, and I have to take care of my children, and I have a whole local reality I have to attend to. And then, what meditation allows you to do is step into non-local reality. And so when I sit there in the morning and meditate, I find myself being drawn up into this whole other world of just pure being. And then you're merging with non-local love, non-local information fields. And when you then end meditation and move back into your work world, you're drawing down all of the information into your local reality. That's what makes it so productive. Like, Albert Einstein said that that's the way all great scientific discoveries are made by people in altered states of consciousness where they're in tune with these global reality fields. And he'd been trying to figure out the theory of relativity for a long time. And then, one night, he fell asleep. He was really depressed and frustrated at the time. He just was... It was like beating his head against the wall. And he just saw the whole theory of relativity in a dream, in his vision. And then woke up in the morning and then spent four years working out of mathematics bit.[chuckle]0:38:52.9 MZ: That is amazing. Dawson, this has been amazing. Everybody who's watching and listening. If this interview with Dawson has been fantastic and you want to get even more content from Dawson, upgrade to the All-Access Pass for the bonus interview, which we're gonna be doing right after this. And I've got great questions there, and Dawson's obviously amazing so you won't wanna miss it. So be sure to upgrade to the All-Access Pass for that. And then any final thoughts to share that we did not get a chance to cover, Dawson?0:39:28.2 DC: Lots. [chuckle] We can't covered them all now. I would encourage you to just fill your life with everything that you can to support yourself. So it's meditation in the morning. Again, first thing in the morning, before you get involved in the outside local reality of your life, tapping to bring you back to that baseline during the day only takes a minute or two to tap, and then you feel better right away. And then nurture yourself with great friendships, people who support and love you. Nurture yourself with great media, just read books, read my books, read other people's books, there's so much information out there. Some free information out there, or even the cost of a book now 10, $20, it's amazing how much you can get. And then you start to fill your mind, inner reality with all of this. And when you filled your inner reality with such good inputs, the good outputs just appear all around you in friendships, in money insights, in well-being, in massive epigenetic shift in your cells.0:40:27.6 DC: So just doing all those things to truly love, nurture yourself and create a good life for yourself. You can create a good life for yourself. Research shows that you can be dramatically happier than you are today. In some of these MRI studies, we've seen these monks and they close their eyes, meditate, and their waves, the brainwaves of happiness go up 700% over baseline. So the bottom line is you can be like seven times as happy as you could even imagine. What neuroscience is doing meditation said to me, "Dawson. I thought it was a 10 out of 10 happiness before, but now I'm like a 15. I'm having like transcended happiness." And that is what anyone can learn to cultivate in their own brains.0:41:11.6 MZ: It's amazing, Dawson. This has been amazing, and anybody can go to blissbrain.com and download that ebook for free, I believe. Correct?0:41:23.9 DC: Yeah.0:41:24.8 MZ: Yeah. So absolutely everybody should go do that. No matter what, you've just reinforced as well in me that the choice is mine. Like more happiness is there for me if I choose to go grab it. And that's outside of the shiny object so thank you for that. And then there was another thought, but it's fleeting and gone, but thank you so much. I'm gonna hit stop here and then we'll come back in a minute for round two.[music]

Veterans Chronicles
SgtMaj David Devaney, USMC Sniper, Iraq

Veterans Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 34:31


David Devaney enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps in 1983. After surviving boot camp, he soon pursued the opportunity to become a U.S. Marine sniper and was part of the early invasion of Iraq in March 2003.In this edition of "Veterans Chronicles," SgtMaj Devaney shares his memories at Parris Island both in training and as a drill sergeant. He also talks about what it takes to become a sniper, dealing with Iraqi forces and sandstorms in the early days of the Iraq War, and the mindset necessary to be effective in combat.

The Business Method Podcast: High-Performance & Entrepreneurship
Ep.531 ~ The NavySEAL Mindset w/ Commander David Sears

The Business Method Podcast: High-Performance & Entrepreneurship

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 68:51


For twenty years, our guest today served in the most elite special operations force in the world, the US Navy SEALs.  He is a decorated veteran, who planned, led and executed hundreds of special operations missions in more than 40 countries on 5 continents.  He was involved in some of the most significant and defining special operations missions of our time. He led the ground assault on an Iraqi paramilitary stronghold to conduct the first successful US prisoner of war rescue since WWII.  Years later, in the jungles of Colombia, he played a key role in the planning and execution of the successful rescue of US and Colombian personnel held for over 5 years in captivity by the FARC. He has briefed the Secretary of Defense, Chairman of Joint Chiefs of Staff, Director of the CIA, Director of the NSA, Director of National Intelligence, members of the National Security Council, as well as ambassadors. With twenty-plus years of tactical, operational, and strategic knowledge as a leader on the frontlines, he is now the co-founder at Xundis Global, which helps organizations and individuals increase performance, leadership, and innovation. His name is Commander David Sears and he is on the podcast today!    04:19 Who is Commander David Sears?    05:39 Being Surrounded By Elite Performers Constantly    12:14 The Beginning of Becoming a Navy Seal - What Commander Sears Was Like in His Early Years    22:09 Commander Sears' 1st Missions Into Colombia & Iraq    28:39 How to Control Emotions    32:59 A Mission That Made Commander Sears' Think Differently    41:24 Never Ending Systems that Control Us    44:14 NavySEAL Maxims    52:14 Applying the NavySEAL Mindset to Entrepreneurship 1:01:04 Commander Sears' Daily Routine & High-Performance Tips Contact Info:   https://www.dcsears.com/ Commander Sears Book: “Smarter Not Harder: 17 Navy SEAL Maxims to Elevate Critical Thinking and Prosper in Business and Life” Subscribe to the Podcast:    

Foam Talks
Digital Layers of War - Alexandra Rose Howland & Wafaa Bilal

Foam Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 71:14


Twenty years ago 9/11 took place, leading the United States to announce its 'War on Terror' and involving Iraq in an ongoing conflict. This war was deemed as the first 'smartphone war' due to the introduction of the smartphone as an object of mass consumption in 2007. The widespread use of digital cameras enabled millions of users to capture the conflict from angles which had previously been out of sight. What formerly had been the domain of photojournalists and governmental agencies, became a limitless stream of images shared on the internet. This gave digital media a vital role in portraying the confrontation's countless layers. In this podcast, curator Mirjam Kooiman engages in a conversation with artists Alexandra Rose Howland (b. 1990, US/UK) and Wafaa Bilal (b. 1966, IQ/US). Through their distinctive artistic practices, they reflect on the role of remote-access technology, social media and online and offline participation in the Iraqi conflict from opposite sides of the spectrum. Concept: Mirjam Kooiman and Valeria Posada Villada Production: Nordin Janssen Mastering & Mixing: Andersen Audio Productions

The 18th Airborne Corps Podcast
Episode 91: The Tanker War

The 18th Airborne Corps Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 65:21


Remember the Tank War? No? Well, then you really should listen to this episode. In the 1980s, Iran and Iraq, embroiled in a massive land war, engaged in a series of shoot-outs on the high seas. Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein, supported by the United States, believe it or not, started the whole thing. He began attacking Iranian shipping vessels in an attempt to weaken Iran's ability to fight on land. The US eventually became involved and, with the world watching, the whole thing became, well....it became really complicated. American forces were involved in a series of exchanges at sea. An Iraqi jet fire two missiles into an American frigate, killing 37 Navy Sailors. An American ship hit a naval mine. Our Navy engaged in the largest American sea battle since WWII. This is a WILD story, one in which Clausewitzian fog of war serves as a principle character. In 1988, an Iranian passenger plane was tragically shot out of the sky by an American guided missile cruiser, killing all 290 on board in a chaotic mistake. To this day, many in Iran believe this was a targeted shoot down ordered by the White House. We have no better guide on this compelling journey back to the Reagan days of foreign policy: David Crist, a senior historian for the Department of Defense and the author of a RIVETING book published in 2012 titled "The Twilight War: The Secret History of America's Thirty-Year Conflict With Iran." David has been studying Iran for decades and he joins host Joe Buccino to describe the Tanker War in vivid detail. This is a story that begins with Iran as an early Cold War American ally. It's a story of the Iranian Revolution and the subsequent hostage crisis. It's a story with big moments: the 1983 Beirut barracks bombing, the storming of an Iranian ship by Navy SEALS, the American shelling of an Iranian oil platform. It's a story of big global figures: Ronald Reagan, Ayatollah Khomeini, Zbigniew Brezinski, Casper Wienberger, Oliver North. It's also a story of American miscalculation and incompetence.  Finally, it's a story that involves the bizarre Iran-Contra scandal that almost brought down the Reagan presidency. All these elements are manifest in this episode. So, give us an hour and 5 minutes, because we break all this down in this fantastic episode. Anyone looking to understand our relationship with Iran today must first understand how we came to the edge of a full-scale war with the Islamic Republic during the Tanker War. This is an episode rich with insight about the Middle East, the Persian Gulf, and Tehran's motivations.  

Jewish History Matters
76: Iraqi Jewry and Its Global Diaspora with Sasha Goldstein-Sabbah

Jewish History Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 60:45


In this episode, we're joined by Sasha Goldstein-Sabbah to talk about Iraqi Jewry and its global diaspora. Listen in as we dive into the development of Iraqi or Baghdadi Jewry and its many satellite communities in the twentieth century—in India, China, Singapore, and elsewhere—and how we thereby can understand the global nature of Jewish communal, commercial, and other kinds of networks, and also the meaning of diaspora and dispersion more generally. Sasha Goldstein-Sabbah is an assistant professor in the Department of Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Groningen. She is the author of Baghdadi Jewish Networks in the Age of Nationalism, which was published by Brill in 2021, and is the starting point for our conversation in this episode.

Military Money Show
The Top End of Year Tax Planning Tips for 2021

Military Money Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 42:54


Taxes aren't top of the fun things to do every year. In fact, it's something that a lot of us avoid. But if you do a little planning and preparation in advance, it can make tax time and your finances run a little smoother. In this episode, I talk with Benjamin Brandt about the list of tax items you should review at the end of the year, mistakes you can avoid, and what military families need to know about taxes. Benjamin Brandt is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ and Founder of Capital City Wealth Management, a Bismarck, North Dakota fee-only financial planning company. He's an Iraqi combat veteran having served in the North Dakota Army National Guard for 8 years, including a 15-month deployment to Iraq in 2003. The show notes can be found here: https://laceylangford.com/podcast/end-of-year-tax-planning-tips-for-2021/

What A Day
Legislating Environmental Justice with EPA's Michael Regan

What A Day

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 26:35


House Democrats are on the verge of passing President Biden's Build Back Better bill, and once they do, it will head to the Senate. The $1.9 trillion social spending bill is a key part of Biden's agenda. Both that legislation and the recently passed infrastructure bill have provisions to address climate change. And all this week, EPA administrator Michael Regan has been touring the country to get a first-hand look at polluted communities fighting for environmental justice. Regan joins us to discuss how those bills could lead to better investments in these communities, climate change, and more.  And in headlines: Julius Jones's death sentence was commuted to life in prison, more than 400 Iraqis flew home after weeks of life-threatening conditions at the Belarus-Poland border, and two Iranian nationals were indicted for interfering in the 2020 U.S. presidential election. Show Notes: EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan to Embark on “Journey to Justice” Tour – https://bit.ly/3nsRBHs The Guardian: “Residents of Louisiana's Cancer Alley hopeful for action after EPA head's visit” – https://bit.ly/3CzHqVE For a transcript of this episode, please visit crooked.com/whataday Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Learn French with daily podcasts
4603 - Echec (Failure)

Learn French with daily podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 3:33


Texte:Les journaux au Moyen Orient ont réagi à la tentative qui a échoué d'assassiner le premier ministre irakien.Traduction:Papers in the Middle East react to a failed assassination attempt against the Iraqi prime minister.

War Stories by Preston Stewart
169: Only Time Will Tell - Generation Kill 7

War Stories by Preston Stewart

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 40:58


We're back today to discuss episode seven of Generation Kill (The Bomb in the Garden). This wraps up our discussion of this series on the invasion of Iraq in 2003. We get into the challenges of leadership determining when someone needs to be fired, if the Marines were set up for success when they entered the Iraqi cities and how to decide what 'hill you're going to die on'.

American Prestige
E19 - Cuba's American History w/ Ada Ferrer

American Prestige

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 79:35


Danny and Derek talk about the Nicaraguan elections, MBS and his pro-Republican oil policy, and last weekend's attack on the Iraqi prime minister. They then speak with Ada Ferrer (21:00), professor of history and Latin American and Caribbean Studies at NYU, about the history of Cuba from the precolonial period until the Spanish-American War/War of 1898. Grab Ada's book here: https://bit.ly/3CevBUK Become a patron today! www.patreon.com/americanprestige

Witness History
Kuwaiti oil fires of 1991

Witness History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 9:43


After the end of the Gulf War in 1991, retreating Iraqi forces set light to oil wells in the desert. Specialist firefighters were drafted in by the Kuwaiti government to help put them out. Simon Watts spoke to one of those firefighters, Richard Hatteberg, in 2010. This is a rebroadcast. Photo: an oil fire in Kuwait. March 1991. Credit:Getty Images.

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1799: Iraq shows evidence of sovereignty. Michael Knights, @WashInstitute @FikraForum; Jill and Jay Bernstein Fellow at The Washington Institute. Malcolm Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 11:12


Photo:  March 10, 2007, Iraqi civilians conduct a nonviolent demonstration in front of the 7th street Security Station in Ramadi, Iraq. Iraqi Police along with Marines from st Battalion, 6th Marines (/6), Second Marine Division, and Iraqi Army Soldiers communicate with the crowd using the buildings broadcast speakers located on the roof. /6 is deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in the Anbar province of Iraq MNF-W to develop the Iraqi Security Forces, facilitate the development of official rule of law through democratic government reforms, and continue the development of a market based economy centered on Iraqi reconstruction. Ramadi, Iraq. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by SGT. Michael...   Iraq shows evidence of sovereignty.  Michael Knights, @WashInstitute @FikraForum;   Jill and Jay Bernstein Fellow at The Washington Institute.   Malcolm Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1 ·         https://www.washingtoninstitute.org/policy-analysis/harrowing-mustafa-kadhimi ·         https://www.timesofisrael.com/iran-backed-militia-launched-drone-attack-targeting-iraqs-pm-report/ ·         https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2021/11/5/iraq-protesters-take-to-the-streets-and-clash-with-police ·         https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/11/08/attempted-assassination-iraqs-prime-minister-backfired-spectacularly/ ·         https://www.chathamhouse.org/2021/10/explaining-iraqs-election-results

The Moth
The Moth Radio Hour: Veterans Day 2016: Iraq, Aircraft Carriers & Candy

The Moth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 53:26


A special Veterans Day episode of The Moth. A soldier trains to land his plane on an aircraft carrier, a future marine rebels against her abusive father, an Iraqi man risks his life working as a translator for the armed forces. Hosted by The Moth's Artistic Director Catherine Burns. The Moth Radio Hour is produced by The Moth and Jay Allison of Atlantic Public Media. Hosted by: Catherine Burns Storytellers: Ted Hartley, Taniki Richard, Abbas Mousa

The John Batchelor Show
1795: Iran attempts to assassinate Iraqi PM with drones. Malcolm Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1 @ThadMcCotter @theamgreatness

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 16:30


Iran attempts to assassinate Iraqi PM with drones.  Malcolm Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1 @ThadMcCotter @theamgreatness https://www.reuters.com/world/middle-east/iran-backed-militia-behind-attack-iraqi-pm-sources-2021-11-08/

PBS NewsHour - Segments
News Wrap: U.S. reopens to vaccinated international travelers

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 4:14


In our news wrap Monday, the United States fully reopens to most travelers for the first time since before the pandemic. The U.S. charged two hackers -- a Ukrainian and a Russian -- in a string of major ransomware attacks. U.S. and Iraqi officials say Iranian-backed militia forces carried out Sunday's drone attack on Iraq's prime minister. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

The FOX News Rundown
Evening Edition: Ethiopian Rebels Close In On Capitol In Civil War, Iraq Says Iran Behind Assassination Attempt

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 11:56


The Ethiopian civil war has reached the capital as a 'state of emergency' has been issued and the U.S. State Department has withdrawn all non-essential personnel from the embassy. Also, Iraqi officials are saying Iran was behind a failed assassination attempt on Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadimi. FOX Field Producer Yonat Friling, joins Trey to discuss these stories and others developing around the world. 

Start Here
A Big BIF'ing Deal

Start Here

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 27:45


After a whirlwind of deal-making, President Biden prepares to sign a massive infrastructure bill. Eight Texas concertgoers die amid crushing crowds. And terrorists target the Iraqi prime minister using armed drones.

The Lawfare Podcast
Ambassador Doug Silliman on What's Next in U.S.-Iraq Relations

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 57:38


The complicated relationship between Iraq and the United States is once again approaching a crossroads. Parliamentary elections held in Iraq last month promise a new government featuring a new cast of political forces with their own difficult histories with the United States. The United States, meanwhile, is approaching the self-imposed deadline by which it has promised to withdraw U.S. combat troops from the country, even as its diplomatic and military presences in the country have continued to come under attack by Iran-backed militias. To discuss these developments, Scott R. Anderson sat down on Lawfare Live with Ambassador Doug Silliman, who served as the U.S. ambassador to Iraq from 2016 to 2019 and was previously the deputy chief of mission and political counselor there. They talked about the Sadrist block that appears to have won the recent elections, what other challenges are facing the Iraqi state and what they all mean for the future of our bilateral relationship.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Newshour
Iraqi PM survives drone attack

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 48:35


Iraq's Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhemi said he was unhurt and appealed for "calm and restraint" after a drone attack on his residence early Sunday heightened political tensions in the war-scarred country. Also in the programme: Bosnia-Herzegovina's senior Serb leader; and Bianca Jagger on Nicaragua's elections. (Picture: Iraqi PM Mustafa Al-Kadhimi addresses the nation following a drone strike targeted his residence in Baghdad. credit: Reuters)

Student of the Gun Radio
299 Days & Armed Citizen Helps Police Stop Shooter | SOTG 1101

Student of the Gun Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 52:48


An armed citizen helped the police by stopping an active shooter in a Lancaster, Pennsylvania mall recently. Did you hear about this on your local news? Does the national news media even care? What are some lessons we can learn from this SOTG Homeroom segment from CrossBreed Holsters?  During our Brownells Bullet Points, we will pop over to the Emergency and Survival Gear section. Once more, we have additional evidence that the food supply chain in the United States is going to be stretched thin this winter. Are you prepared?  Is it time to follow Glen Tate's 299 Days model? Is your household prepared to weather a 299 day storm?  Thanks for being a part of SOTG! We hope you find value in the message we share. If you've got any questions, here are some options to contact us: Send an Email Send a Text Call Us Enjoy the show! And remember…You're a Beginner Once, a Student For Life! TOPICS COVERED THIS EPISODE • [0:04:55] Follow Up from Monday's Episode• [0:11:50] Brownells Bullet Points - Brownells.com    - TOPIC: Food prices will go up ‘tremendously': Billionaire supermarket owner www.foxbusiness.com   - 299 Days: Time to Follow Glen Tate's Model? www.studentofthegun.com/articles • Huge thanks to our Partners: SDS Imports | Brownells | CrossBreed | Duracoat | Hi-Point Firearms • [0:32:09] SOTG Homeroom - CrossBreedHolsters.com    - TOPIC: Bystander with gun helps stop suspect in Pa. mall shooting www.fox19.com FEATURING: Glen Tate, Fox19, Fox Business, Madison Rising, Jarrad Markel, Paul Markel, SOTG University PARTNERS: SDS Imports, Brownells Inc, CrossBreed Holsters, DuraCoat Firearm Finishes, Hi-Point Firearms FIND US ON: Full30, Parler, MeWe.com, iTunes, Stitcher, AppleTV, Roku, Amazon, GooglePlay, YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, tumblr SOURCES Glen Tate's 299 Days: studentofthegun.com/articles From www.fox19.com: A bystander with a legally owned gun took matters into their own hands and stopped a 16-year-old suspect after an armed fight broke out at a Pennsylvania mall. Hana Ali, the owner of Tabarek International Foods, delayed opening her shop at Park City Center Mall in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, after Sunday's shooting of four people. The Iraqi native says watching the violence unfold in front of her around 2:30 p.m. brought back horrible memories. “It reminds me of the Desert Storm war when I was there. It was awful. The sounds of shooting, it's really bringing things back to you. It's so terrifying,” she said. (Click Here for Full Article)

Up First
Texas Abortion Ban Reinstated, Iraq's Upcoming Election, Afghanistan Bombing.

Up First

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 16:05


A federal appeals court allows Texas SB-8 to go back in effect. Iraqis are about to head to the polls to vote for the next parliament after protests against the government in 2019 triggered new elections. In Afghanistan, a branch of the Islamic State has claimed responsibility for a suicide bombing at a mosque. It's the worst attack since US forces left the country.