Podcasts about temperatures

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Physical quantity that expresses hot and cold

  • 709PODCASTS
  • 1,145EPISODES
  • 23mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 21, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about temperatures

Show all podcasts related to temperatures

Latest podcast episodes about temperatures

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
Texas deep freeze Part 2?

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 22:16


Temperatures in Texas are tumbling this week, and occasional host Andy Uhler is getting flashbacks from last year's deep freeze. We'll talk about what Texas has and hasn't done to prevent another disaster. Plus, we’re feeling a little hollowed out after we learned what some college students think the average American earns. To lighten the mood, we jump on the Worldle bandwagon! Here is everything we talked about today: “The Texas Electric Grid Failure Was a Warm-up” from TexasMonthly “Cold Sends Texas Natural Gas Supplies Plunging for Second Time This Month” from Bloomberg “A professor said her students think Americans make six figures on average. That’s a long way off.” from The Washington Post “Building a Better America—One Wealth Quintile at a Time” from the Association for Psychological Science “The Misperception of Racial Economic Inequality” also from the Association for Psychological Science “Absurdle is like Wordle but it fights back” from PC Gamer  “M&M characters redesigned for a “more dynamic, progressive world,” Mars announces” from CBS News Don’t forget, our newsletter drops every Friday. Sign up at Marketplace.org/newsletters.

Marketplace All-in-One
Texas deep freeze Part 2?

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 22:16


Temperatures in Texas are tumbling this week, and occasional host Andy Uhler is getting flashbacks from last year's deep freeze. We'll talk about what Texas has and hasn't done to prevent another disaster. Plus, we’re feeling a little hollowed out after we learned what some college students think the average American earns. To lighten the mood, we jump on the Worldle bandwagon! Here is everything we talked about today: “The Texas Electric Grid Failure Was a Warm-up” from TexasMonthly “Cold Sends Texas Natural Gas Supplies Plunging for Second Time This Month” from Bloomberg “A professor said her students think Americans make six figures on average. That’s a long way off.” from The Washington Post “Building a Better America—One Wealth Quintile at a Time” from the Association for Psychological Science “The Misperception of Racial Economic Inequality” also from the Association for Psychological Science “Absurdle is like Wordle but it fights back” from PC Gamer  “M&M characters redesigned for a “more dynamic, progressive world,” Mars announces” from CBS News Don’t forget, our newsletter drops every Friday. Sign up at Marketplace.org/newsletters.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Rising temperatures, dying cattle: Iraq is reeling from climate change

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 9:25


Iraq is at the frontlines of the climate crisis, with temperatures rising twice as fast as the global average. It's also a major oil producer and the world's second largest offender of gas flaring, a process that releases CO2. Special Correspondent Simona Foltyn reports as part of our ongoing series, "Peril & Promise: The Challenge of Climate Change." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

RunBuzz Running
RB158: How To Acclimate To Cold Temperatures So You Can Enjoy Winter Running

RunBuzz Running

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 26:36


In this episode I share the science behind cold weather acclimatization and show you how you can teach your body to "feel warmer" than it really is. The practical tips will help you adjust to the cold temperatures faster which will lead to more enjoyable runs this Winter. All this and more, coming up on today's show!

Simple English News Daily
Monday 3rd January 2022. World News. Today: Europe COVID wave. UK Spain Italy record temperatures. US New York new Mayor. Mexico digital cur

Simple English News Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 8:47


World News in 7 minutes. Monday 3rd January 2022. Transcript at: send7.org/transcripts betterhelp.com/listenerPlease help to support the podcast by giving what you would spend on a cup of coffee just once a month at send7.org/supportToday: Europe COVID wave. UK Spain Italy record temperatures. US New York new Mayor. Mexico digital currency. Sudan PM resigns. South Africa parliament fire. Kenya Leakey dies. Korean defector. China earthquake. Japan 119th birthday. Send your opinion or experience by email to podcast@send7.org or send an audio message at send7.org for us to broadcast. Please help to support the podcast by giving what you would spend on a cup of coffee just once a month at send7.org/supportWith Stephen Devincenzi and Maya Dil.SEND7 (Simple English News Daily in 7 minutes) tells the most important world news stories in intermediate English. Every day, listen to the most important stories from every part of the world in slow, clear English. Whether you are an intermediate learner trying to improve your advanced, technical and business English, or if you are a native speaker who just wants to hear a summary of world news as fast as possible, this podcast is for you. Transcripts are totally free and can be found at send7.org/transcripts. Simple English News Daily is the perfect way to start your day, by practising your listening skills and understanding complicated stories in a simple way. It is also highly valuable for IELTS and TOEFL students. Students, teachers, and people with English as a second language, tell us that they listen to SEND7 because they can learn English through hard topics, but simple grammar. We believe that the best way to improve your spoken English is to immerse yourself in real-life content, such as what our podcast provides. SEND7 covers all news including politics, business, natural events and human rights. Whether it is happening in Europe, Africa, Asia, the Americas or Oceania, you will hear it on SEND7, and you will understand it. For more information visit send7.org/contact

TIME's Top Stories
Did We Just Blow Our Last, Best Chance to Tackle Climate Change?

TIME's Top Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 11:16


In mid-2020, after the pandemic had settled in, I wrote in a TIME cover story that the stars had aligned to make 2020 and 2021 the “last, best chance” to keep the world from experiencing the worst impacts of climate change. Temperatures have risen more than 1.1°C since the Industrial Revolution, and the COVID-19 pandemic had unexpectedly opened up new pathways to rethink the global economy to help the world avoid the 1.

GNFAC Avalanche Forecast
GNFAC Avalanche Forecast for Sun Jan 2, 2022

GNFAC Avalanche Forecast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022


This morning there is no new snow. Temperatures are single digits to low teens F near Bozeman and Big Sky, and below zero F near West Yellowstone and Cooke City. Yesterday in the Bridger Range west wind was 30 mph with gusts to 45 mph. Overnight, throughout the advisory area westerly wind was 25 mph with gusts of 30-45 mph. Today will be partly cloudy with temperatures reaching low teens to low 20s F. West-southwest wind will be 10-25 mph this morning and will increase to 30-45 mph this afternoon. The next round of snow is expected tomorrow night.

CAST11 - Be curious.
2022 in Prescott Starts off with Cold Weather Forecast

CAST11 - Be curious.

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 1:30


2022 starts off cold across north-central Arizona, with bitterly cold temperatures expected tonight January 1st, especially in areas of snow cover. Quiet and warmer weather then develops as early as Sunday, January 2nd, with warm and dry conditions persisting well into next week. Temperatures for New Years Day: Flagstaff: 26 degrees. Prescott: 37 degrees. Payson: 36 degrees. Show Low: 29 degrees. Jerome: 38 degrees. Williams: 28 degrees. Tuba City: 36 degrees. Eagar: 34 degrees. Window Rock: 28 degrees. Sedona: 38 degrees. Camp Verde: 46 degrees. Winslow: 35 degrees. Happy New Year to All! Information provided by the National Weather Service,... For the written story, read here >> https://www.signalsaz.com/articles/2022-in-prescott-starts-off-with-cold-weather-forecast/

GNFAC Avalanche Forecast
GNFAC Avalanche Forecast for Fri Dec 31, 2021

GNFAC Avalanche Forecast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021


The mountains around Cooke City have 9” of new snow, with 4-7” near West Yellowstone, and  2-4” near Bozeman and Big Sky. Winds have been 15-20 mph out of the west and southwest with gusts as high as 60 mph. Winds will calm dramatically this morning and shift to the north. Temperatures in the single digits this morning will fall throughout the day as a cold front moves through. Light snowfall today will bring 1-3” near West Yellowstone and Cooke City with only a trace around Bozeman and Big Sky.

This Date in Weather History
1880: Negative temperatures and bitter cold hit East coast

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 3:41


The winter of 1880–1881 is widely considered the most severe winter ever known in some parts of the United States. Many children—and their parents—learned of "The Snow Winter" through the children's book The Long Winter by Laura Ingalls Wilder, in which the author tells of her family's efforts to survive. The snow arrived in October 1880 and blizzard followed blizzard throughout the winter and into March 1881, leaving many areas snowbound throughout the entire winter. Accurate details in Wilder's novel include the blizzards' frequency and the deep cold, many railroads stopped trains until the spring thaw because the snow made the tracks impassable, the near-starvation townspeople throughout the mid-west. An October blizzard brought snowfalls so deep that two-story homes had snow up to the second-floor windows in Minnesota and Wisconsin. No one was prepared for the deep snow so early in the season and farmers all over the region were caught before their crops had even been harvested, their grain milled, or with their fuel supplies for the winter in place. By January the train service was almost entirely suspended from the region. Railroads hired scores of men to dig out the tracks but it was a wasted effort: As soon as they had finished shoveling a stretch of line, a new storm arrived, filling up the line and leaving their work useless. There were no winter thaws and on February 2, 1881, a massive blizzard struck that lasted for nine days across the upper Midwest and parts of the Plains states. In the towns the streets were filled with solid drifts to the tops of the buildings and tunneling was needed to secure passage about town. Homes and barns were completely covered, compelling farmers to tunnel to reach and feed their stock. For the most part the snow by passed the big cities on the East coast that winter. The cold was only sporadic but on December 30, 1880, bitter cold hit the east coast, the mercury dropped to 3 below in Washington D. C. the earliest below zero reading there ever, records were also set in Charlotte North Carolina at 5 below and in Philadelphia the temperature also dropped to negative 5 and the afternoon high temperature despite bright sunshine only reach 5 above zero. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

KPFA - The Pacifica Evening News, Weekdays
Ghilane Maxwell guilty of sex trafficking charges for Jeffrey Epstein; W.H.O. Director urges rich countries to help vaccinate 70% of global population; Bay Area Homeless face freezing temperatures, as advocates call for warming centers – December 29

KPFA - The Pacifica Evening News, Weekdays

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 59:58


The Lynda Steele Show
The Regal Hotel finally gets heat back after three nights of freezing temperatures

The Lynda Steele Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 7:27


Guest: Julia Foy, Reporter for Global News See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

レアジョブ英会話 Daily News Article Podcast
25 Greatest Inventions of the 20th Century: Frozen foods

レアジョブ英会話 Daily News Article Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 1:49


Clarence Birdseye loved fish, and that's why we can buy frozen foods. At first glance, the two parts of that sentence may not seem connected, but they are. In the early 20th century, Birdseye worked for the U.S. government as a naturalist in New Mexico and Arizona. But it was his time from 1912-15 in Labrador, now part of Canada, that would earn him a place in history. Temperatures in Labrador can drop well below zero. Birdseye learned from the Inuit how to catch fish from deep below ice, and noticed that they froze hard almost instantly in the cold air. When they were thawed out and cooked, they tasted delicious. What he saw is called flash freezing. When foods are frozen quickly, they taste better than normally frozen foods because the ice crystals that appear are smaller. Birdseye spent years trying to flash-freeze foods at scale. He founded Birdseye Seafood Inc. in 1922 to freeze fish fillets at minus 43 degrees Celsius. The company is now Birds Eye Ltd., and his flash freezing was a breakthrough that shook the foods industry. Over the years, everything improved. Liquid nitrogen could freeze foods more quickly, and down to minus 196 C. And all kinds of foods were frozen, not just fish. By the 1960s, people could buy ready-made frozen meals. You heated them up in an oven — these days, a microwave — and ate them straight away. No muss, no mucking about in the kitchen. So the next time you eat a frozen meal, say a thank you to Clarence Birdseye and his love of fish. (T) This article was provided by The Japan Times Alpha.

Mornings with Simi
Freezing temperatures, The return of the NHL & Helping BC's bud farmers

Mornings with Simi

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 39:42


Ch.1: The freezing temperatures are not going away any time soon, as an arctic outflow continues to put the lower mainland in temperatures below zero degrees. How can those who are homeless find a way to stay warm? Guest: Bruk Melles, Director of Homelessness Services for the City of Vancouver. Ch.2: Looking back on the Lower Mainland Gang War Guest: Kim Bolan, Crime Reporter for the Vancouver Sun. Ch.3: Hockey will return Tuesday after the league took an extended holiday break in the hope that virus cases will not continue to disrupt the season. Guest: Christian Aumell, Sports show host on 680CJOB in Winnipeg. Ch.4: The BC Craft Farmers Co-Op (BCCFC) was established two years ago to help craft cannabis farmers across the province transition to the legal market, maintain BC's global position as a sector leader and ensure consumers have access to the best cannabis. Guest: David Hurford, Volunteer Secretary of BC Craft Farmers Co-Op and former advisor to the federal Minister of Health Hon. Allan Rock. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Derek Cole Podcast
371. Wild Temperatures in December

The Derek Cole Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 6:37


Recommendations: 1 - Visit our website for more home comfort advice https://www.SimmonsOneHour.com 2 - Take the Healthy Home Challenge to learn about what's in your indoor air https://www.SimmonsPros.com/healthyhome 3 - Follow me on Instagram, love to see you there https://www.instagram.com/derekmcole 4 - Text me: 910-463-5811

Earth Wise
Living Walls | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 2:00


Green roofs are popular in many European countries.  A green roof is a layer of vegetation planted over a waterproofing system installed on a flat or slightly sloped roof.  Such roofs provide shade, remove heat from the air, and reduce temperatures of the roof surface, reducing energy use in the building and diminishing the urban […]

The Lynda Steele Show
SRO hotel in Vancouver is approaching its third night without heat.. Nearly 80 tenants have been suffering in freezing temperatures with no answers provided by management or ownership

The Lynda Steele Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 6:08


We received a tip about a developing story that is extremely concerning. It has to do with the subzero temperatures –and a group of individuals who have suffering in their homes. Guest - Jawn Jang, Jas Johal Show Contributor See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

GNFAC Avalanche Forecast
GNFAC Avalanche Forecast for Mon Dec 27, 2021

GNFAC Avalanche Forecast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021


In the last 24 hours, the mountains around Cooke City and West Yellowstone along with the Southern Madison and Southern Gallatin Ranges received 7-10” of new snow with 5-8” in the mountains around Bozeman and Big Sky. Temperatures are in the single digits to low teens F with south to southwest winds blowing 20 to 25 mph. Today, the thermometer will not change much with highs in the single digits to low teens F, winds will be 5-15 mph from the southwest to northwest and by morning, the mountains around Cooke City and West Yellowstone will have another 2-4” with a trace to 1” everywhere else.

Earth Wise
Climate Change And Crops | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 2:00


A new NASA study published in the journal Nature Food looks at the impact of global climate change on food crops.  According to the study, declines in global crop yields are likely to become apparent by 2030 if high greenhouse gas emissions continue. The study used advanced climate and agriculture models to predict the effects […]

They Walk Among Us - UK True Crime
Season 6 - Episode 27

They Walk Among Us - UK True Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 57:43


Temperatures dropped as low as -8 degrees celsius in Coventry on Christmas Eve 2014. Sleet fell hard and fast on the street... *** LISTENER CAUTION IS ADVISED *** This episode was researched and written by Eileen Macfarlane. You can listen to Eileen's podcast CrimeLapse here: www.linktr.ee/CrimeLapseListen to our new podcast ‘They Walk Among America' here: https://play.acast.com/s/they-walk-among-americaBecome a ‘Patreon Producer' and get exclusive access to Season 1, early ad-free access to episodes, and your name in the podcasts credits. Find out more here: https://www.patreon.com/TheyWalkAmongUsOrder our book ‘They Walk Among Us' here: https://theywalkamonguspodcast.com/merchandiseCourt documents and information from the following news organisations were referenced in this episode: BBC NEWS, ITV NEWS, COVENTRY TELEGRAPH, ILFORD RECORDER, WALES ONLINE, DAILY ECHO, BIRMINGHAM MAIL, IRISH EXAMINER and INDEPENDENT More information and episode references can be found on our website https://theywalkamonguspodcast.comMUSIC: Don't Let Go by Alice In Winter Winds of Change by Four Trees Jun by Kevin Graham Headwind by Wild Wonder Ripley by Falls Fable by Stephen Keech Fractals by Stephen Keech Hold this Place by Alice In Winter Fractured Light by Stephen Keech Another Life by Wild Wonder They Walk Among Us is part of the Acast Creator Network - https://www.acast.com/theywalkamongusSOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter - https://twitter.com/TWAU_PodcastFacebook - https://www.facebook.com/theywalkamonguspodcastInstagram - https://www.instagram.com/theywalkamonguspodcastSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/theywalkamongus. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Climate Breaking News ALLATRA
Climate Breaking News AllatRa TV. RED ZONE! Vulcano Island, Italy. LAVA destroys the CANARIES. Floods and record temperatures.

Climate Breaking News ALLATRA

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 22:04


One by one volcano is waking up on the planet. Today, millions of people around the world are witnessing climatic events of frightening magnitude. What do we know about the causes of climate change? Why does it affect each of us? We invite you to watch the worldwide online conference "Global Crisis. Time for the Truth," where the Truth about the real causes of the planet's climate change was voiced, and effective solutions to these problems were proposed on December 4th, 2021. if you are an eyewitness to a natural disaster, please get in touch and share your story. Your words can help save millions of lives. Please, email us climate@creativesociety.com

Bumper to Bumper Radio
Checking Under Your Vehicle's Hood and How Colder Temperatures May Be Affecting Your Car

Bumper to Bumper Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021


Bumper to Bumper Radio, the car guys on KTAR, 92.3 FM in Phoenix, AZ, broadcast every Saturday from 11:00 am to noon. On this show, Matt ...

Orchard Outlook
E2 S3. The Coolest Chat about Early Dormant Pruning: Guest Dr. Richard Marini

Orchard Outlook

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 28:51


On today's episode of the Orchard Outlook podcast, we're chillin'. Temperatures are dropping… and it might not be the most wonderful time of the year if you're a recently pruned tree. How cold, how quickly, and when are all questions that are up in the air. Today's guest Dr. Richard Marini is a horticulturist extraordinaire bringing us his wisdom on cold tolerance. Biography: Dr. Richard Marini is a Professor of Horticulture at PennState University. His areas of expertise are tree and small fruit physiology, fruit production systems, and data analysis. He has also been closely involved in apple rootstock evaluations. In recognition of his work, Dr. Marini has received many honours and awards in horticultural science.

UN News
News in Brief 14 December 2021

UN News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 3:34


Record Arctic temperature confirmed: WMO  Afghanistan revenge killings continue, Human Rights Council hears  Afghanistan hunger impacts 98 per cent of people, warns WFP

Do you really know?
[2021 RETROSPECTIVE] What is a heat dome?

Do you really know?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 3:45


"Do you really know?" is Bababam's daily podcast, which helps you understand the words, acronyms, and concepts that are making the news every day. From December 6th to 20th, discover the words that have left their mark on the year, with our 2021 Retrospective. From the "Pandora Papers" affair to the "#QuitMyJob" hashtag and of course the "Long Covid" condition, (re)discover these words that sum up 2021.What is a heat dome? Thanks for asking!The Pacific north-west is typically a mild region when it comes to weather. But in late June, Western Canada experienced record temperatures, with the province of British Columbia hit particularly hard. Temperatures are usually around 21° on the Pacific coast, but reached 49.5°C in Lytton, a village around 100 miles to the North-east of Vancouver.Cities on the other side of the border weren't spared either, with Portland and Seattle both seeing their respective record temperatures smashed. We're used to talk of heatwaves, but observers have labelled the latest situation a heat dome.What's the science behind these extreme temperatures? How dangerous is the heat dome? To what extent are heat domes due to climate change? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions!To listen to the last episodes, you can click here:What is the Olympic flame?What is the glass ceiling?What is the offside rule?A podcast written and realised by Joseph Chance. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Town Hall Seattle Science Series
154. Martin Williams: When the Sahara Was Green

Town Hall Seattle Science Series

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 55:42


The Sahara desert, once upon a time, wasn't a desert at all. It was green. It was a pleasant place, fed by rivers and lakes. It was home to crocodiles, hippos, turtles, and fish of all stripes. Prehistoric hunters and gatherers came to the lush land, as well, to partake of its rich bounty. It's now the largest hot desert in the world, equal in size to the United States. Temperatures can reach upward of 130 degrees and sand dunes can climb to nearly 600 feet in height. All this begs the question: What happened? Martin Williams, in When the Sahara Was Green: How Our Greatest Desert Came to Be, helped answer this question, and asks many more. A time-traveler, of a sort, Williams went back millions of years to showcase the rich history of earth's greatest desert. Why did its climate change? Did it really have forests roamed through by dinosaurs? How has all this impacted human populations? Will the desert ever return to that verdant Eden? And what will climate change do to the desert? He also brought to the fore the science and scientists who have come to the desert to ask more questions and find more answers in the arid heat and the deep sand. Answers, and the knowledge that even in the harshest of environments, life finds a way. Martin Williams is professor emeritus and adjunct professor of earth sciences at the University of Adelaide. His many books include Climate Change in Deserts; Nile Waters, Saharan Sands; and The Nile Basin. Buy the Book: When the Sahara Was Green: How Our Greatest Desert Came to Be (Hardcover) from Elliott Bay Books Presented by Town Hall Seattle. To become a member or make a donation click here. 

WTAQ News on Demand
1 P.M News on Demand - Temperatures drop

WTAQ News on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 2:50


Snow fell across Northeast Wisconsin on Sunday, with some of the biggest snowfall totals piling up around the Wisconsin/Upper Michigan border. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WTAQ News on Demand
5 P.M. News on Demand - Temperatures Drop Drastically in Northeast Wisconsin

WTAQ News on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 2:41


An initial hearing has been scheduled for a resident complaint filed with the City of Green Bay against Mayor Eric Genrich. The city's Ethics Board will hold the initial hearing next Tuesday, December 14th, at 5 p.m. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bourbon Lens
152: Wheated Bourbon of the West with Wyoming Whiskey

Bourbon Lens

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 62:39


Our guest this week is David DeFazio, co-founder of Wyoming Whiskey. We discuss building a distillery on a ranch and making whiskey in Wyoming. David is a former lawyer turned whiskey maker and has a wealth of experience in working hard, solving problems, and crafting whiskey. We also want to give a huge shoutout to Bob Cutler of Novio's Bistro in Bangor Maine for connecting us with Wyoming Whiskey.  He's a long-time supporter of the show and of Wyoming Whiskey and we are so excited that we were able to collaborate for an episode.  We hope you enjoy this week's episode and if you have a chance to try Wyoming Whiskey, let us know what you think! We are thankful for everyone who has supported us. A huge shoutout to our growing Patreon Community as well! We'd appreciate it if you can take the time to give us feedback on our podcast. If you enjoy our content, consider giving us a 5 star rating on your favorite podcast app, leave us a review, and tell a fellow bourbon lover about our show. Follow  us @BourbonLens on Instagram, Facebook, & Twitter.  And please check out our Patreon to learn how you can support our endeavors, earn Bourbon Lens swag, be part of future barrel picks, and more. If you have any comments, questions, or suggestions, please email us at TheBourbonLens@Gmail.com. Visit our website BourbonLens.com to check out our blog posts, or even purchase your own Bourbon Lens tasting glass or t-shirt. Cheers,Scott, Jake, & MichaelBourbon Lens   About Wyoming Whiskey Based in Kirby, Wyoming, Wyoming Whiskey has a simple goal: to create America's next great bourbon. The company and product is a collaboration between its partners and 97,818 square miles of Wyoming. The Mead family first came to Wyoming as ranchers in 1890 and the state defines them, and their whiskey.  They use the finest corn, wheat, barley, and water from the Big Horn Basin and promote Wyoming's natural and human resources.  Every drop of this bourbon is 100% Wyoming. When was WW founded? 2006 Who are it's founders? Brad & Kate Mead, 4th generation Wyoming cattle ranchers, and David DeFazio. All of the founders currently reside in Jackson, but the distillery is at the Mead Ranch in Kirby, WY. How many styles does Wyoming have? 6 in the main lineup Small Batch (flagship, highest quantity produced and sold) Outryder (Straight American Whiskey - WW's take on a rye) Single Barrel (top 1% of their liquid) Double Cask  Barrel Strength National Parks Limited Edition Other limited release offerings they've done: Wide Open Spaces collection and some Wyoming-only releases in limited batches such as Stargazer, Thunder Basin and Wilderness. What are some unique factors that set Wyoming Whiskey apart in the industry?  #1: WW uses non-GMO grains, including corn, wheat, barley, and rye, all sourced from a local WY farmer named Brent Rageth. Part of WW's culture is to draw upon the natural environment in making their product. Genetically modified grains are, to an extent, unnatural. And for that reason, they will only use natural seed when raising their crops in Byron, Wyoming. An experienced farmer easily works around the challenges presented by non-genetically modified crops.  #2: Wyoming Whiskey does not source any alcohol. Every drop in our bottle comes from grains grown in Wyoming, which are cooked, fermented, distilled, barreled and bottled in Kirby, Wyoming. All of our grains come from Rageth Farms in Byron, Wyoming. WW's water comes from a mile-deep limestone aquifer 40 miles to the north of our distillery. This makes their product 100% Wyoming. In an age where a vast number of brands are taking the easier, cheaper and faster route of sourcing bulk whiskey, WW prefers to put in the extra time and effort to do things the right way.  #3: Our environment: Wyoming is a special place. And as mentioned previously, our maturation environment is the most unique in the industry. On the hottest of days in the summer, the top of our warehouse can reach 132 degrees and in the depth of winter it will hit 0 degrees. Where else is a whiskey exposed to such extreme temperatures without moving an inch? WW Barrels experience the extreme temperature variations of the high basin between the Absaroka and Bighorn Mountains. Temperatures reach 135° at the height of the warehouse during the summer and fall precipitously to 5° degrees in the depths of Winter. In the summertime, warehouse temperatures can swing 20 – 30 degrees and facilitate greater whiskey and wood interaction.  How does the unique terroir of Kirby, WY and its temperature fluctuations impact the development of WW?  WW does not use temperature controlled warehouses. As a result, they are at the mercy of the environment. Their maturation environment is arguably the most unique in the whiskey industry because of it's violent temperature swings. Diurnal temperature swings can be over 50 degrees in a day, which results in a more dynamic maturation environment in every barrel. Given the thermal mass in each warehouse, barrel temperatures will not change to this profound of a degree, however, even a 1 degree change in a barrel will cause the alcohol to push into the oak and later withdraw to a greater extent than maturation environments that do not share this cycle. The result is a more meaningful and effective maturation period during the summer months. To the contrary, our barrels go into hibernation during Wyoming's harsh winters. At about 40 degrees, alcohol activity in the barrel ceases and maturation stops. Whatever magic happens in the winter months is a mystery to us, but what we do know is that our maturation process produces an outstanding line of whiskies. Years ago, we used to rotate barrels in an attempt to balance the warehouses' effect on each barrel, however Nancy taught us that it was unnecessary given the complexity of her batching protocol and the precision with which each barrel is selected. In short, we batch around this issue.  To learn more, visit http://www.wyomingwhiskey.com and sign up to become a Whiskey Baron to receive the latest news and special offers from Wyoming Whiskey. For daily updates, follow Wyoming Whiskey on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. Show Links: Wyoming Whiskey: The Best American Made Whiskey & Bourbon  The Legacy of Wyoming Whiskey's Outryder Lives On — Verde Brand Communications Lawyer becomes whiskey connoisseur | Biz Quiz | jhnewsandguide.com Wyoming Whiskey Releases Fifth Outryder Expression

The Dana & Parks Podcast
D&P Highlight: Record breaking temperatures & a good misdial.

The Dana & Parks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 8:59


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Greek Current
The COP26 summit and the threat of rising temperatures

The Greek Current

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 19:07


World leaders recently gathered in Glasgow for the COP26 summit, where they signed off on the Glasgow Climate Pact, which states that carbon emissions will have to fall by 45 percent by 2030 to keep alive the goal set out in the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to 1.5°C. This summit followed a summer of record breaking heat waves and intense wildfires, such as those experienced by Greece and other Mediterranean countries, which were largely attributed to climate change. Experts Alice Hill and Madeline Babin join The Greek Current to assess whether COP26 was a success, look at the many challenges rising temperatures pose to humans across the globe, and explore the policy initiatives that can be adopted in response.Alice Hill is the David M. Rubenstein senior fellow for energy and the environment at the Council on Foreign Relations. She previously served as special assistant to President Barack Obama and senior director for resilience policy on the National Security Council staff, leading the development of national policy to build resilience to catastrophic risks, including climate change.Madeline Babin is a research associate for the Energy Security and Climate Change Program at the Council on Foreign Relations, where her research focuses on climate change policy and building resilience to the catastrophic risk of climate change.Read Alice Hill and Madeline Babin's latest pieces here:What COP26 Did and Didn't AccomplishThe Policy Challenge of Extreme Heat and Climate ChangeA World Overheating: How Countries Should Adapt to Climate ExtremesThe Fight for Climate After COVID-19You can read the articles we discuss on our podcast here:Pope Francis coming back to GreeceMigrant crisis front and center in pope's Greece-Cyprus tripWith migrants in mind, Pope Francis visits divided CyprusEU launches €300bn bid to challenge Chinese influenceEU launches €300bn fund to challenge China's influence

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 605 (11-29-21): Preparing for the Season of Freezing Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:17).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 11-26-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 29, 2021.  This episode is part of a series this year of winter-related episodes. MUSIC – ~10 sec – instrumental. That excerpt of “Mid-winter Etude,” by Timothy Seaman of Williamsburg, Va., opens our annual episode on winter preparedness.  This coincides with Virginia Winter Weather Awareness Week, which is being observed this year from November 29 to December 3, according to the Wakefield, Va., National Weather Service office. In 2021, winter astronomically begins in Virginia on December 21 at 10:59 a.m.  That's the Eastern Standard time of the winter solstice in the Northern Hemisphere, when that hemisphere is at its maximum annual tilt away from the sun. At its beginning, middle, or end, winter can bring cold temperatures, hazardous roads, power outages, and fire hazards.  To help you be prepared, here are 10 tips compiled from information provided by the Virginia Department of Emergency Management, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC.1. Avoid traveling in winter-storm conditions if you can. If you must travel, get road conditions from the Virginia 511 telephone system, Web site, or app.   And have an emergency kit for your vehicle, including jumper cables, water, non-perishable food, blankets, a flashlight, and other items.2. Have battery-powered sources of lighting and information, particularly weather information, along with enough batteries to last through a power outage of several days.  Whenever possible, use flashlights and not candles during power outages.  If you do use candles, put them in safe holders away from anything combustible, and don't leave a burning candle unattended.3.  Make a family emergency plan that covers sheltering; evacuation from your area; escape from a home fire; emergency meeting places; communications; a supply of food, water, and medications; and other factors specific to your circumstances; and practice your plan. 4.  Get fireplaces, wood stoves, and chimneys inspected and cleaned.5.  Install a smoke detector in every bedroom and on every floor level, test them monthly, and replace the batteries at least annually. 6.  Install a carbon monoxide detector in your home and check or replace the battery every six months.7.  If you use space heaters, make sure they'll switch off automatically if the heater falls over; plug them into wall outlets, not extension cords; keep them at least three feet from combustible objects; don't leave heaters unattended; and check for cracked or damaged wires or plugs. 8.  Generators, camp stoves, and other devices that burn gasoline or charcoal should be used outdoors only.9.  Learn where to shut off water valves in case a pipe bursts. And 10.  Be careful of overexertion during snow shoveling. More information on preparing for winter weather, fires, and other emergencies is available online from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management, at vaemergency.gov.Next time the forecast calls for snow, freezing rain, or other wintry weather, here's hoping that you can stay warm, dry, and safe.Thanks to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 25 more seconds of “Mid-winter Etude.”  MUSIC – ~28 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “Midwinter Etude,” from the 1996 album “Incarnation,” is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Mr. Seaman is available online at http://timothyseaman.com/en/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 561, 1-25-21. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com.IMAGESSnow and ice on a seasonal pond at Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va., December 26, 2020.Snow along Toms Creek at Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va., December 26, 2020.Ice hanging from tree twigs at Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va., February 20, 2021.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT WINTER WEATHER PREPAREDNESS AND FIRE SAFETY On Winter Weather Preparedness The following information is quoted from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management (VDEM), “Winter Weather,” online at https://www.vaemergency.gov/winter-weather/, accessed 11/29/21.Winter storms can range from freezing rain or ice, to a few hours of moderate snowfall, to a blizzard that lasts for several days.  Many winter storms are accompanied by dangerously low temperatures, power outages and unpredictable road conditions.  Before, during, and after a winter storm, roads and walkways may become extremely dangerous or impassable.  Access to critical community services such as public transportation, child care, healthcare providers and schools may be limited.  Preparing your home, car and family before cold weather and a winter storm arrives is critical. Overview for Dealing with a Winter Storm*During a winter storm, stay off the roads as much as possible and only drive when absolutely necessary.  Always give snow plows the right of way. *Never use a generator, grill, camp stove or gasoline, propane, natural gas or charcoal burning device inside your home, garage, basement, crawlspace or any other partially enclosed area. *Snow shoveling is a known trigger for heart attacks!  Always avoid overexertion when shoveling. *When severe weather occurs, plan to check on elderly or disabled neighbors and relatives. *If you must travel, know road conditions before you leave home.  Visit 511Virginia.org or call 511 for road condition updates. *Protect yourself from frostbite!  Hands, feet and face are the most commonly affected areas so wear a hat, mittens (which are warmer than gloves) and cover your mouth with a scarf to reduce heat loss. *Keep dry!  Change out of wet clothing frequently to prevent a loss of body heat. *Wear several layers of loose-fitting, lightweight, warm clothing rather than one layer or heavy clothing.Prepare Your Home *Make sure your home is properly insulated. *Check the weather stripping around your windows and doors. *Learn how to shut off water valves in case a pipe bursts. *Have additional heat sources on hand in case of a power outages. *Keep a fire extinguisher accessible. *Replace the batteries in your carbon monoxide detector annually. Prepare Your Car *Batteries lose power as temperatures drop, be sure to have yours tested. *Check your car's antifreeze level. *Have your radiator system serviced. *Replace your car's windshield wiper fluid with a wintertime mix. *Proactively replace your car's worn tires and wiper blades. *To help with visibility, clean [snow or ice] off your car entirely, including your trunk, roof, windows and headlights. Did You Know?*Dehydration can make you more susceptible to hypothermia.*If it's too cold for you, it's too cold for your pet!  Don't leave pets outside for prolonged periods of time and have plenty of fresh, unfrozen water on hand.*Each year, snow, sleet, slush and/or ice on the road leads to approximately, 537,000 crashes, 136,000 injuries, and 1,800 deaths.*It can snow at temperatures well above freezing*Temperatures do not have to be below zero degrees to cause harmOn Fire SafetyThe following information is quoted from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management (VDEM), “Fires,” online at https://www.vaemergency.gov/fires/, accessed 11/29/21. In just two minutes, a fire can become life-threatening.  In just five minutes, a home can be engulfed in flames. Learn About Fires *Fire is FAST!  In less than 30 seconds a small flame can turn into a major fire. It only takes minutes for thick black smoke to fill a house or for it to be engulfed in flames.*Fire is HOT!  Heat is more threatening than flames. Room temperatures in a fire can be 100 degrees at floor level and rise to 600 degrees at eye level. Inhaling this super-hot air will scorch your lungs and melt clothes to your skin.*Fire is DARK!  Fire starts bright, but quickly produces black smoke and complete darkness.*Fire is DEADLY!  Smoke and toxic gases kill more people than flames do. Fire produces poisonous gases that make you disoriented and drowsy. Asphyxiation is the leading cause of fire deaths, exceeding burns by a three-to-one ratio. Create and Practice a Fire Escape Plan*In the event of a fire, remember that every second counts, so you and your family must always be prepared.  Escape plans help you get out of your home quickly.*Twice each year, practice your home fire escape plan.  Some tips to consider when preparing this plan include:*Find two ways to get out of each room in the event the primary way is blocked by fire or smoke.*A secondary route might be a window onto a neighboring roof or a collapsible ladder for escape from upper story windows.*Make sure that windows are not stuck, screens can be taken out quickly, and that security bars can be properly opened.*Practice feeling your way out of the house in the dark or with your eyes closed.*Teach children not to hide from firefighters.  Smoke Alarms*A working smoke alarm significantly increases your chances of surviving a deadly home fire.*Install both ionization AND photoelectric smoke alarms, OR dual sensor smoke alarms, which contain both ionization and photoelectric smoke sensors.*Test batteries monthly.*Replace batteries in battery-powered and hard-wired smoke alarms at least once a year (except non-replaceable 10-year lithium batteries).*Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, including the basement, both inside and outside of sleeping areas.*Replace the entire smoke alarm unit every 8-10 years or according to manufacturer's instructions.*Never disable a smoke alarm while cooking – it can be a deadly mistake. Smoke Alarm Safety for People with Access or Functional Needs*Audible alarms for visually impaired people should pause with a small window of silence between each successive cycle so that they can listen to instructions or voices of others.*Smoke alarms with a vibrating pad or flashing light are available for the hearing impaired. Contact your local fire department for information about obtaining a flashing or vibrating smoke alarm.*Smoke alarms with a strobe light outside the home to catch the attention of neighbors, and emergency call systems for summoning help, are also available. During a Fire*Crawl low under any smoke to your exit – heavy smoke and poisonous gases collect first along the ceiling.*Before opening a door, feel the doorknob and door. If either is hot, or if there is smoke coming around the door, leave the door closed and use your second way out.*If you open a door, open it slowly. Be ready to shut it quickly if heavy smoke or fire is present.*If you can't get to someone needing assistance, leave the home and call 9-1-1 or the fire department. Tell the emergency operator where the person is located.*If pets are trapped inside your home, tell firefighters right away.*If you can't get out, close the door and cover vents and cracks around doors with cloth or tape to keep smoke out.  Call 9-1-1 or your fire department. Say where you are and signal for help at the window with a light-colored cloth or a flashlight.*If your clothes catch fire, stop, drop, and roll – stop immediately, drop to the ground, and cover your face with your hands.  Roll over and over or back and forth until the fire is out.  If you or someone else cannot stop, drop, and roll, smother the flames with a blanket or towel.  Use cool water to treat the burn immediately for 3 to 5 minutes.  Cover with a clean, dry cloth.  Get medical help right away by calling 9-1-1 or the fire department. Fire Escape Planning for Older Adults and People with Access or Functional Needs*Live near an exit. You'll be safest on the ground floor if you live in an apartment building. If you live in a multi-story home, arrange to sleep on the ground floor, and near an exit.*If you use a walker or wheelchair, check all exits to be sure you get through the doorways.*Make any necessary accommodations, such as providing exit ramps and widening doorways, to facilitate an emergency escape.*Speak to your family members, building manager, or neighbors about your fire safety plan and practice it with them.*Contact your local fire department's non-emergency line and explain your special needs. Ask emergency providers to keep your special needs information on file.*Keep a phone near your bed and be ready to call 911 or your local emergency number if a fire occurs. After a Fire – The following checklist serves as a quick reference and guide for you to follow after a fire strikes.*Contact your local disaster relief service, such as The Red Cross, if you need temporary housing, food and medicines.*If you are insured, contact your insurance company for detailed instructions on protecting the property, conducting inventory and contacting fire damage restoration companies.  If you are not insured, try contacting private organizations for aid and assistance.*Check with the fire department to make sure your residence is safe to enter. Be watchful of any structural damage caused by the fire.  The fire department should see that utilities are either safe to use or are disconnected before they leave the site.  DO NOT attempt to reconnect utilities yourself.*Conduct an inventory of damaged property and items.  Do not throw away any damaged goods until after an inventory is made.  Try to locate valuable documents and records.*Begin saving receipts for any money you spend related to fire loss.  The receipts may be needed later by the insurance company and for verifying losses claimed on income tax.*Notify your mortgage company of the fire. Cooking*Stay in the kitchen when you are frying, grilling, or broiling food. If you leave the kitchen for even a short period of time, turn off the stove.*Wear short, close-fitting or tightly rolled sleeves when cooking.*Keep children away from cooking areas by enforcing a “kid-free zone” of 3 feet around the stove.*Position barbecue grills at least 10 feet away from siding and deck railings, and out from under eaves and overhanging branches. Smoking*Smoke outside and completely stub out butts in an ashtray or a can filled with sand.*Soak cigarette butts and ashes in water before throwing them away. Never toss hot cigarette butts or ashes in the trash can.*Never smoke in a home where oxygen is used, even if it is turned off. Oxygen can be explosive and makes fire burn hotter and faster.*Be alert – don't smoke in bed! If you are sleepy, have been drinking, or have taken medicine that makes you drowsy, put your cigarette out first. Electrical and Appliance Safety*Frayed wires can cause fires. Replace all worn, old or damaged appliance cords immediately and do not run

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Doug Stephan presents the DJV Show
DJV Download - 11/30/21 – Biden Admin. Approves Offshore Wind Farm

Doug Stephan presents the DJV Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 19:03


An update from Doug's Hawaiian adventure includes a not-so-great boat ride, and it's enough to make us all feel ill. Temperatures are rising in the Arctic Ocean with eyes on the Atlantic Ocean's flow being to blame; and, news on the Biden administration's approval of an offshore wind farm. Week 2 of the WORX Holiday Prize Pack Giveaway is open for entries on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter at @DJVShow. Tell us what this time of year means to you. More info available on djvshow.com. In celebrity news, Bradley Cooper recounts being held at knifepoint while en route to pick up his daughter from school. Follow us @DJVShow on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. More information on DJVShow.com.

Garage Logic
11/29 Turns out arctic temperatures have been warming since at least 1900

Garage Logic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 66:25


Turns out arctic temperatures have been warming since at least 1900, according to new research that casts doubt on scientific modeling. Our friend Bill Stein alerts us to a new scam that GL'ers need to be aware of. Too much violence in the middle schools in Rochester.

Growing Harvest Ag Network
Afternoon Ag News, November 29, 2021: Temperatures expected to stay mild into the beginning of December

Growing Harvest Ag Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 2:36


USDA meteorologist, Brad Rippey, has the National Weather Service's Outlook into the first week of December. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Earth Wise
Drought And U.S. Hydropower | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 2:00


The ongoing severe drought in the western U.S. has led to low water levels in the rivers and reservoirs that feed hydroelectric power systems.  The Energy Information Administration is projecting a 13.9% decrease in hydroelectric generation this year compared to 2020. Water levels in Lake Powell have fallen so low that it may not be […]

UF Health Podcasts
Warmer temperatures make for better donor lung storage, study finds

UF Health Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021


Most of the time, organs for donation and eventual transplant are served on the…

This Date in Weather History
Arctic cold outbreak leads to record temperatures in East US

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 1:44


An early-season arctic cold outbreak on November 19, 2008, led to records being broken, both for overnight lows and daytime highs all across the eastern part of the United States. Worcester, MA had a high of only 29 degrees. Even as far south as Saint Simons Island, GA there was a record cold day, with a high of only 50 degrees. Killing frost and freezes were felt in the deep South and with a strong wind accompanying the cold many marginal plants and vegetation didn't stand a chance putting an abrupt end to the growing season all the way to the Gulf coast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Mayo Clinic Q&A
Travel trends and colder temperatures could mean a COVID-19 holiday surge

Mayo Clinic Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 18:59


Cold weather, increased travel, waning immunity and the potential for new variants may serve up the perfect recipe for a holiday COVID-19 surge, according to Dr. Gregory Poland, head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group.  "I have consistently said what's very likely to happen as we get to the cooler weather and see the trends in travel is that we will have another surge," says Dr. Poland. "We're in this unusual situation where the pandemic is actually getting worse because humans don't want to believe that the pandemic is just as important now as it was a year ago."In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland answers several listener questions and talks more about being vigilant against COVID-19 as the U.S. heads into a second winter with this coronavirus. He also addresses the recent news that wild deer have shown evidence of COVID-19 infection and what that might mean in the battle to eliminate the disease.

Earth Wise
The Coastal Northeast Is A Hotspot | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 2:00


Global warming is, obviously, a world-wide phenomenon.  When the concept of a 2 degrees Celsius temperature rise is discussed, it refers to the average global temperature and the effects that would have on such things as sea level rise and weather patterns.  But the effects of the changing climate are not homogeneous.  Very different things […]

This Date in Weather History
2003: Mild temperatures alter moose migration

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 2:50


The moose is the largest of all deer species, standing about five to six and a half feet tall. Moose require habitat with adequate edible plants; grasses, young trees and shrubs, cover from predators, and protection from extremely hot or cold weather. Moose travel or migrate among different habitats with the seasons to address these requirements. Moose are cold-adapted mammals with thickened skin, a dense, heat-retaining coat, and a low surface volume ratio, which provides excellent cold tolerance but poor heat tolerance. Moose survive hot weather by accessing shade or cooling wind, or by immersion in cool water. In hot weather, moose are often found wading or swimming in lakes or ponds. When heat-stressed, moose may fail to adequately forage in summer and may not gain adequate body fat to survive the winter. Also, moose cows may not calve without adequate summer weight gain. Moose require access to both young forest for browsing and mature forest for shelter and cover. Forest disturbed by fire and logging promotes the growth of fodder for moose. Moose also require access to mineral licks, safe places for calving and aquatic feeding sites so they do move from season to season. The autumn season of 2003 was quite mild across northern Canada and on November 15 as the moose started their migration trek from Northern Quebec to the Labrador Sea it stalled car and truck traffic. Moose had to use the highways because the ground was not frozen due to unusually warm weather. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Current
How climate change has helped spread the practice of moose hide tanning

The Current

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 16:14


Temperatures are warming in parts of the north, and moose are becoming more and more common as a result. This has led to a growing demand for moosehide tanning in those parts. We hear from Melaw Nakehk'o, a Dene artist, film maker and moosehide tanner, who's taught moosehide tanning to Inuit people in northern Labrador; and Liz Pijogge, a northern contaminants researcher at Nunatsiavut Government, and one of Nakehk'o's students.

TODAY
November 5: Breaking overnight: promising new details on a pill to treat Covid. Frigid temperatures for millions — Al Roker's full forecast. NFL investigation into Aaron Rodgers over whether he violated COVID protocols for unvaccinated players after te

TODAY

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 33:21


Breaking news overnight: promising new results from a clinical trial of Pfizer's anti-viral pill to treat Covid. Plus, millions of Americans are waking up to another frigid morning today — Al Roker has your full forecast. Also ahead, Aaron Rodgers is out from Sunday's big game against the Kansas City Chiefs after testing positive for Covid. Now, the NFL is launching an investigation into whether Rodgers followed Covid rules as new questions rise over his vaccination status. And, with just 50 days until Christmas, Vicky Nguyen is taking you behind-the-scenes of a UPS “super hub” as it prepares for a very busy holiday season.

Earth Wise
Marine Heatwaves And Fish | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 2:00


Marine heatwaves are periods of abnormally high temperatures in the ocean that can trigger devastating impacts on ecosystems, including coral bleaching, toxic algal blooms, and mass mortality events.  Marine heatwaves can occur in any ocean and in any season.  They are defined based on the differences between actual and expected temperatures for the location and […]

Making It Grow Minutes
Researching the downturn in vegetable yields due to higher temperatures

Making It Grow Minutes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 1:00


In recent years, changes in climate have resulted in high night-time temperatures and dramatically reduced the fruit set of many of our important vegetable crops. When it is seventy-five degrees or higher at night, many crops will not pollinate – there maybe vigorous, well-tended plants in the field that are covered with flowers, but the pollination process is impeded by those high thermometer readings.

This Date in Weather History
1972: Autumn storm brings cold and snow to central plains

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 2:17


November typical brings the first widespread wintry weather of the season to the United Stated and in 1972 the month didn't waste any time getting started. A severe autumn storm moved out of the Southern Rockies into the central plains leaving in its wake heavy snow, flooding and zero degree cold. Heavy snow fell in Denver. More than 10” on rain in 3 days pushed the Hickory Creek out of its banks in the Neosho area of southwestern Missouri. Residents of low-lying areas in the town of 8,000 were evacuated. One person drowned at Poplar Bluff, in SE Missouri, when a 3 1/2-inch downpour triggered local flooding. The mercury dropped to near zero in the mountains of Arizona and New Mexico where snows measured a food and a half deep impeding travel. Temperatures dropped to near freezing in the deserts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Global News Podcast
Scientists say average global temperatures have reached a new record high

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 25:36


The stark warning comes as the COP-26 climate conference in Glasgow gets underway. Also: The tough choices of conscientious objectors in Israel, and Ado Campeol, the 'Father of Tiramisu', has died in Italy.

The Par Train - Live. Golf. Improve.
#158: Chipping Away - Committing in Cold Weather

The Par Train - Live. Golf. Improve.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 44:41


Temperatures are beginning to plummet. Our hands are starting to sting with every thin iron shot. But... rest assured. There are things we can do to play better in the colder weather. Stay warm out there! If we've helped your game even a smidge, do us a solid and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-par-train-live-golf-improve/id1136003885 NOT SURE WHAT TO ASK FOR THIS HOLIDAY SZN? We got you! Get a new quarter zip or hoodie and keep playing golf even in the cold weather! Get 15% the best fitting performance golf apparel in the game with this link bit.ly/3myURyP and you'll never wear anything other than Rhoback again.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
News Wrap: Energy costs may soar by up to 54% amid this winter's colder temperatures

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 5:21


In our news wrap Wednesday, a federal forecast says global inflation and supply shortages will boost energy costs as much as 54 percent over last year. The surge in inflation means social security recipients will get their biggest cost-of-living adjustment in 39 years, with an increase of 5.9 percent. U.S. land borders will reopen to non-essential travel for vaccinated foreigners. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
In the Dirt 24: Part One - Questions and Answers

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 38:11


This week we tackle our first Q & A episode from The Ridership Community. Randall and Craig tackle your questions in part 1 of 2 fun filled episodes. The Ridership Support the Podcast Book your free Thesis Bike Consult Automated transcription (Please excuses the errors): Episode 24 [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: Hello and welcome to in the dirt from the gravel. The ride podcast. I'm your host, Craig Dalton. And i'll be joined shortly by my co-host rental jacobs In this week's episode, we're tackling our first Q and a episode.  [00:00:14] We've mentioned the ridership community on a number of occasions on this podcast. It's a community that's full of vibrant questions all the time. So we thought we'd put out an ask to say, what are the things you want to learn about what should Randall an IB discussing? And we were overwhelmed by. By the number of questions we received.  [00:00:34] So much. So in fact that we're going to break this episode down into two parts. So today we'll focus on part one. And in the coming weeks we're released part two. [00:00:44] Before we jump into this week's episode, I'd like to thank this week. Sponsor Thesis bikes. As you know, Randall Jacob's my co-host in these, in the dirt episodes is the founder of Thesis bikes. Which you might not know is it's the bicycle I've been riding for the last let's say year and a half.  [00:01:01] Over the course of this podcast, I've had the opportunity to ride many bicycles and I keep coming back to my Thesis. As my number one bike in the garage, it really does deliver on the promise of a bike that can do anything. As many of, you know, I operate with two wheel sets in the garage. So I've got a 700 C wheel set with road tires on, and my go-to six 50 B wheel set for all my off-road adventures.  [00:01:26] In the many, many hours of conversation I've had with Randall, I've really come to appreciate how thoughtful he was in designing this bike and everything that goes in the Thesis community. Randall and the team are available for personal consults, which I highly recommend you take advantage of. If you're interested in learning more about the brand and figuring out how to get the right fit for your Thesis bicycle.  [00:01:49] In a shocking statement. I can actually express that Thesis has bikes in stock. It's something we haven't been able to say about a lot of bike brands these days during the pandemic. It's October as we're releasing this episode and they have bikes available for November delivery with the SRAM access builds. They also have frame sets available.  [00:02:10] So I encourage you to head on over to Thesis.bike, to check out more about the brand, the story. Cory and the product and book one of those free consultations with a member of the Thesis team. With that said, let's dive right into this. Week's. Q and a episode [00:02:25] Craig: Randall, how are you today? [00:02:26] Randall: I am doing well, Craig, how are you my friend?  [00:02:30] Craig: I am doing good. I'm particularly excited for this episode because it essentially came entirely from the Ridership community. We're doing our first ever Q&A episode.  [00:02:42] Randall: Yeah, people have a lot of trust in us, maybe too much in terms of our knowledge here. So we'll try not to get over our heads in terms of uh what we claim to know, but a lot of good questions here and hopefully we can answer most of them.  [00:02:54] Craig: Yeah, I think that's been one of the cool things about the ridership is I see these questions going on all the time and I quite regularly. See them answered by people Smarter than you and I in a specific area of the sport. They have particular knowledge about a specific region. So it's really cool to see those happening in real time, every day for the members of that community. [00:03:17] Randall: Yeah, everything from fit related questions where we have some experts in there. Professional fitters like Patrick Carey, who I just did the episode with just before this one, I was in there answering questions, but then also if you've got a question about tires, nobody's going to have ridden all of them, but somehow every one has been written by someone in the forum there. And it's one of our most popular topics.  [00:03:38] Craig: Yeah. And I've seen some really detailed, help transpire between members as well, just like random disc bait break problems or compatibility problems. And I'm always shocked when someone raises their hand digitally and start to answering a question saying, no, I experienced that exact same weird problem in combination of things. [00:03:57] Randall: Yeah, it really fits into the spirit of The Ridership in which embodied in that word was this idea of fellowship, like writers, helping writers. So it's been super cool to see that community develop organically. And so thank you all members who are listening, and to those who aren't in there yet, we hope you'll join us.  [00:04:15] Craig: Yeah. just head over to www.theridership.com and you can get right in and start interacting as much, or as little as you want. I think the uniqueness of the platform is it is designed inherently to be asynchronous. So you can put a question in there give it a little time to marinate and a couple of days later Get lots of answers. [00:04:35] This is pretty cool.  [00:04:36] Randall: And in addition to that, there's also rides being coordinated. So myself and another writer here in the new England area or leading a ride. And we have about 10 or 15 people who chimed in wanting to join. And we've seen quite a bit of that in the bay area as well. So that's another use case for this in addition to sharing routes and general bicycle nerdery.  [00:04:54] Craig: Yeah, it's super cool. [00:04:55] So this episode, we're clearly going to jump around a bunch. We've tried to organize the questions, so there's, there's some pairing around them, but these are questions that all came in from subset of individuals. So They are what they are and we wanted to jump on them. So with that, let's let's dive right in. Okay.  [00:05:12] Randall: All right, let's do it.  [00:05:14] Craig: Cool. So the first question comes from Keith P E. And he says, every time I go out for a gravel ride, I think why is this roadie where I'm like Rhonda trails when there's no podium to win or anybody watching. What is this obsession with wearing skin tight clothing in a sport that resides in the dirt.  [00:05:31] Randall: I don't know about you, but I'm just showing off.  [00:05:34] Craig: Your physique.  [00:05:35] Randall: My, my Adonis like physique, sure. It's just more comfortable for me. And I like to go pretty hard and I'm sweating a lot. And if I had baggier gear on, I would tend to have, potential issues with chafing and the like so for intensity I definitely find that the Lycra is a lot more comfortable.  [00:05:54] Craig: Yeah, I'm sorta with you. Like I do I desire to be that guy in baggy shorts and a t-shirt, but every time it comes down to it, I'm grabbing the Lycra. I think for me, there's a couple of performance things, definitely on the lower body. I appreciate the Lycra just cause I don't get any binding and less potential for chafing. So I'm like, I'm all about a big short for riding, unless it's a super, super casual outing for me.  [00:06:21] And then up top. I think it comes down to, I do having the pockets in the Jersey. So that sort of makes me tend towards wearing a Jersey, even if it's just solely to carry my phone in my pocket.  [00:06:34] Randall: And if you really want to be pro show up to an elite race and like a led Zeppelin t-shirt and some cutoff jorts, and hairy legs and just rip everyone's legs off that would be super impressive. But for the rest of us,  [00:06:45] If you ha, if you have those sorts of legs,  [00:06:47] Yeah, it would be very impressed. Send pictures in to the ridership. If you actually do that .  [00:06:50] Craig: Yeah. So you'll see me. You'll see me. Rock a t-shirt you. As a performance t-shirt instead of a cycling Jersey on occasion. And I just jam stuff into bags, but yeah, nine times out of 10, unfortunately I'm that Lycra. Reclad. Gravel cyclists. [00:07:06] Randall: MAMIL, I think right.  [00:07:08] Middle aged man in Lycra.  [00:07:11] I'm right behind in the age category.  [00:07:13] Craig: Second question comes from Tom Schiele. And forgive me if I mispronounced your last name, he'd love to get our insights into winter riding, especially tips for those of us in new England who go out on cold dark mornings.  [00:07:29] I'm going to, I'm going to go out on a limb here and Randall and say, it's probably not the guy. [00:07:32] from California that should be offering this advice.  [00:07:34] Randall: Let's have you go first for that reason.  [00:07:38] Craig: Look. I mean you, new Englanders will throw hay bales at me and make fun of me, but I do find it cold here. And it's all about layers.  [00:07:48] Randall: Okay. [00:07:48] Carry  [00:07:48] Craig: all about layers.  [00:07:49] Actually, in fact, I just got some great gear from gore and I was Scratching my head because it's really designed for way cooler Temperatures. [00:07:58] than I have available to me. So a fleece lined tight is something that's just outside of the weather that I'm going to experience as much as I'll complain about it being cold. But I do appreciate a thermal Jersey for the Dawn patrol rides and things like that.  [00:08:12] But for me, it's always come down to layering. And as someone who's Been around. [00:08:16] the sport for a while, what I really do like about my wardrobe today is I think I have a really good understanding about what to layer on for what temperature And having been in the sport long enough. I've just acquired a lot of clothing along the way. So I even go down to having.  [00:08:32] Like a thicker vest. Than just a standard thin, vast, and they're very nuanced and it's only because of, I had decades worth of clothing kicking around that I've really started to understand and embrace how each garment is for a particular degree temperature. And the layers will get me to a certain point.  [00:08:51] Randall: Yeah. I'm a hundred percent with you on layers. I like to go like Jersey and then maybe a base layer or older Jersey underneath add to that thermal sleeves a vest that has a wind breaking layer on the front. A balaklava. Is also a great thing to have when the weather gets a bit colder, one to keep your head warm and your ears warm, and to keep the wind off your face, but then also you can breathe through it. So you're preheating the air and when it gets bitingly cold, which I don't know, you may not have experienced this, but I've definitely written around the Boston area and five degree temperatures and you got, ice crystals forming on the front of it, but at least you're getting a little bit of that preheating first.  [00:09:29] Definitely wants some wind breaking booties. Wind breaking layers on the front of the body. Generally when it gets really cold. If you must, you could do like heat packs on the backs of your hands. So over your arteries, delivering blood. If you're in real extreme conditions,  [00:09:44] Let's see, Tom also mentioned riding cold dark mornings, which means low pressures for grip. And then also lots of lots of lights, lots of reflectivity. You definitely don't want to be caught out and that's a good general rule, but especially riding in dark conditions when people might be tired.  [00:10:00] And then what else?  [00:10:02] Craig: Going to add the other big thing that I really enjoy is a thermal cap with the little flaps over the years, I find that really just, keeps the heat in there.  [00:10:11] Randall: Yeah, that's a nice intermediate solution before it's too cold to expose your face.  [00:10:16] Going that route. Other things pit stops with hand dryers. So I knew where all the Dunkin donuts were along my routes. I could just go in there on a really cool day and just dry off and heat up. People around here sometimes like in embrocation, gives you like a Burnie tingling sensation on the skin.  [00:10:30] Vaseline. It's actually a big one. It helps with insulation on exposed skin and helps it from getting dried and raw and so on. So I'll put Vaseline on my face and that actually makes a big difference in keeping me warm. And I don't find that it has any negative effects on my skin, my pores and things like that.  [00:10:48] I'm trying to think. Did we miss anything? Oh, tape the vent holes on your shoes. That's a big one. 'cause even with booties sometimes the holes will still, oftentimes the holes will still be exposed. And so close that up. Otherwise you just going to get air flow into the shoe and you'll know exactly where it's coming from. Once you get on the road.  [00:11:08] Craig: Yeah. And I remember. When all hell broke loose. I would even stick my foot in a plastic bag and then put it in the shoe.  [00:11:16] To get a little extra warmth. I don't necessarily recommend that. And I do know and aware em, aware that, you can get like Russ socks now in different kind of obviously wool is a great material to have underneath your shoe. It, yeah. [00:11:28] Randall: I love wool and I'll take like old wool sweaters and stuff and cut the sleeves and then put it in the dryer to shrink. So it's tight against the body and that'll be a base layer. Cause it's just great for loft and for wicking. So if you're trying to be cheap, that can be a way to go about it.  [00:11:43] Craig: I'm Now like off in my head, imagining sleeveless Randall in a tight fitting wool sweater. And it's more reading burning man then cycling performance.  [00:11:54] Randall: with the jorts, I might show up at a race near you.  [00:11:56] Craig: Our next couple of questions are from Alan Collins and the first one's around everyday carry. What do you always carry with you on every ride tools, parts, spares, pumps, hydration, snacks, gels, et cetera. Are you traveling light or packing an RV?  [00:12:14] Randall: So I'm now back in new England, so I'm often relatively near civilization, so I'm not as comprehensive as I would be say, like riding in Marine where I might be a good five, six mile walk over some mountains to get to anywhere. But critical things. I bring plugs like tire plugs. In my case, dynaplugs bacon strips, same deal.  [00:12:36] Spare tube. A tool that has all the critical things I need. If you're one of our riders, make sure you got a six mil on your tool because that's what you need for your through axles. What else? If there's any risk whatsoever. Me getting caught out in the dark. I'll have lights front and rear might as well.  [00:12:54] I'm trying to think of anything else that I always bring along. That's the key stuff. How about you?  [00:12:59] Craig: Yeah, I'm a mid-weight packer. Like I've really embraced that quarter frame bag. So I just tend to be ready for most eventualities that I expect. And obviously I gear up depending on the amount of hours I plan on being out. I tend to bring one nutritional item per hour that I'm going to be out. Obviously if I'm going out for an hour, I tend to be forgetful about hydration and nutrition. I don't really think too much about it.  [00:13:26] But I do think about it in terms of the number of hours I'm going to be out and then building Certainly my nutrition and hydration on top of that.  [00:13:33] my basic everyday carry same with you. I just want to make sure I can handle. [00:13:37] the most likely kind of repair scenarios out there on the trail. And I don't go overboard with it. There's probably many more things I would bring on a bike packing trip than I do on a five-hour ride.  [00:13:50] Randall: Yeah.  [00:13:51] And one thing I forgot to mention.  [00:13:53] Yeah, we did the everyday carry in the dirt episode nine. So listen there. That's where we go. Deep nerd on all the things. If you want a comprehensive list of what you might bring. The other thing, I don't know if I mentioned a pump. Duh. So I forgot that one there.  [00:14:06] Craig: Pump and CO2 for sure. [00:14:07] Randall: Yeah. Yeah.  [00:14:08] But otherwise it really depends on the ride. These days, I'm doing mostly like hour and a half, two hour higher intensity rides actually oftentimes even shorter, lower intensity rides. So I don't need to bring as much. But I'll where you are, you have micro-climates all over the place on Mount Tam.  [00:14:23] Craig: Yeah. Yeah. So. I'm always rocking like a full spare jacket in there, unless I'm going out mid day, which is rare these days. I just figure if I'm going downhill, I might as well be warm and it just makes it more pleasant. So that's why, again, like I have that quarter frame bag and I just jam it full of stuff.  [00:14:40] After our everyday carry episode, I did get a magic link. Cause it's it's nothing like this. Obviously no weight. And I just threw it in there. [00:14:48] Fortunately, I haven't had to use it, but it's there. If I ever did need it. [00:14:51] Randall: Oh, you don't have the technique for breaking the chain and being able to piece it back together without the magic link.  [00:14:57] Craig: I'm fairly skilled at that, But I don't have a chain breaker that I bring with me.  [00:15:01] Randall: Got it. Okay.  [00:15:02] Craig: Yeah.  [00:15:04] Alan's next question was, do you have any tips for prepping a gravel bike for competition in road, gravel mix or cyclocross?  [00:15:11] Randall: Don't do it the night before.  [00:15:14] Craig: Yeah. I I think there's a couple of different ways to go with this question, right? Obviously if you're a cross specialist, there's going to be lots of things you're going to do. For me, if I got the courage to raise cross again, I would just show up with what I got and I wouldn't really mess with it too much.  [00:15:29] Randall: Yeah, I would do basic checks. A couple of weeks out, I would just be making sure that I don't have anything that's about to fail because especially now parts are a challenge to find in many cases, even brake pads. And in fact, if you don't already have a set, get some extra brake pads, just have them around just in case.  [00:15:47] But otherwise checking chain lengthen and the lubrication making sure the sealant and the tires. I'm having all my gear and kit and nutritional stuff laid out, making sure the brake pads have have enough life in them. This sort of thing would be the basics. And I would do this several days in advance and I would make sure to get a ride in before I actually did the race, just to make sure that I didn't mess up anything that's going to bite me later. Like the worst thing you can do is be working on your bike the night before, or the morning of, and then, potentially miss something or break something or have to replace something.  [00:16:18] Craig: Yeah, I forget who I was listening to. It might've even been kate Courtney or perhaps a professional female gravel rider who was saying they arrived at actually the Sarah Sturm. Sorry. She arrived at the start line of an event and realized that her brake pads were totally thrashed. And her mechanic slash partner said. [00:16:39] I'm going to change them right now. And that would stress me the heck out.  [00:16:43] But he did add new successful. She's Thank God. because I never would have been able to stop on the way downhill. I was swapping bikes from one, the one I had written the other day and just didn't think about it.  [00:16:54] Randall: All right, everyone you've been warned.  [00:16:57] What have we got  [00:16:58] Craig: reminds me, I need to get an order in for some brake pads, because I'm definitely reaching the end of the life of the current ones.  [00:17:06] All right. So the next couple of questions are from Ivo Hackman, and he's asking thoughts on red bull entering gravel with a race in Texas. I don't know if you caught this Randall, but it was calling strict Lynn and pacing pace and McKell then. I have bonded together and are doing a race out of Marfa, Texas that red bull is sponsoring, which is, I a natural because both of those athletes are red bull sponsored.  [00:17:31] Randall: So I'm assuming like extreme gravel jumps, flips things like this. It's just the evolution of the sport.  [00:17:38] Craig: Exactly. I think, both those two guys are so grounded in the culture of gravel racing And in my opinion have been good stewards of conversation as we bring these mass star gravel events forward. I think it's great. I think the bigger question probably within this question is about is red bull coming in as an, as a quote unquote, an Advertiser and sponsor of the event. Is that somehow changing the Experience, is it becoming more corporate? Is it something other than the community wants to see? Again, with those two people involved. I think it's a positive thing.  [00:18:12] Randall: Yeah, I don't see it as a problem, even if it's not not any, my personal thing, for me, I love the really local. Really community oriented events that are much more like mullet rides and yeah, this is a little bit of a competition going on upfront, but it's not a huge deal.  [00:18:27] And, we definitely do see more of a professionalization of gravel. There's a space for everyone and there's a space for different types of events. So I don't see them displacing the events that are even more kind of grassrootsy. So yeah, I don't have a problem with it, especially if they end up doing flips.  [00:18:45] Red bull.  [00:18:47] Craig: The next question from Ivo is how to transition from weekend warrior to competitive rider.  [00:18:54] I feel like I'm better suited to answer the reverse question, to move from a competitive rider to weekend warrior. That one is easy.  [00:19:02] Randall: Yeah. Let's see. Step one. Have a kid.  [00:19:06] Craig: Yeah.  [00:19:07] Randall: That'll That'll take care of that in a hurry.  [00:19:09] Craig: Yeah. For me, this trend, it's all about structure.  [00:19:13] Like I, and I don't have any or much in My writing anymore, but I recognize in listening to coaches and Talking to them, it really is all about structure. And Even if that structure just means. You have one specific interval training session a week, and then your long endurance rides on the weekend to me, by my likes, I think you'll see a lot of progression. And as you progress, I think then you start to see the potential for coaching, more multi-day structured program in your week, If you're willing to go down that route. But to me, from what I've seen first stop is intervals.  [00:19:50] Randall: Yeah. Structure. Intervals is. Is one. And then within the context of a period iodized training program, Which is to say you do different types of training at different times during the season, based on the amount of training time you have available and the events that you're preparing for, because there's no sense in doing a lot of intensity several months out from a race and then, be firing on all cylinders, say, three months out and then just be totally kicked by the time your van comes around, you have that build, you do base training, and then you're doing more tempo. And then towards the events, your hours are going down and your intensity is going up and you're really trying to peak for that specific event.  [00:20:33] The book that was one of the Bibles when I was racing some time ago was Joe Freels I think it was called like the training and racing Bible or the mountain bikers, Bible or something. A book like that would be a good starting point. And then if you have the budget working with the coach, especially early on to really just accelerate your learning and to get someone to bounce ideas off of, and to use them as a way of learning your body. And that last part I would add at the very least heart rate monitor, learn how your body responds to stress, but then a power meter as well It's just a tremendously helpful tool and they're cheap. Now you need a four I power meter bonded onto a lot of cranks for 300 bucks. So there's really no reason not to make that investment if you're spending all this time to train and to, go to events, 300 bucks is pretty low lying fruit.  [00:21:25] Craig: Yeah, it is a great source of truth. Having a power meter. [00:21:29] For sure.  [00:21:29] Randall: yeah. One last thing would be a bike fit, actually if you haven't done it already, I think everyone should invest in a bike fit if you're doing any reasonable amount of riding, but if you're gonna be racing and training and trying to squeeze out every last bit and not get injured go get yourself a bike fit.  [00:21:44] Craig: Next question, moving on to what we've deemed at components category. JC Levesque probably pronounced that wrong. Sorry jC, appreciate the question he's asking. What about handlebars? There's a move towards wider flared bars and gravel and a few odd ones out there. There's the kitchen sink candle bar from our friends at red shift. The coefficient bar. From our friend, Rick Sutton. Obviously he's mentioned the canyon hover bar, although that isn't an add on it's integrated into that bike.  [00:22:14] But he asked him maybe worth going over the different expectations are for drop bar bikes that is tackling. Gravel versus pavement versus term.  [00:22:22] Randall: Sure you want to. Take a stab at this first.  [00:22:26] Craig: So for me, I think we're going to continue to see more and more riders explore Wider and flared bars. Like when I jumped on that trend and went out to a 48 millimeter with a 20 degree flare, I immediately felt more comfortable. My orientation as a gravel cyclist is towards rougher terrain, More like pure off roady kind of stuff. So I really appreciate. Appreciated that with.  [00:22:52] It is a pretty easy component to you forget about when you get a bike, right? So many things are going through your mind when you're buying a bike. The handlebars just the handlebar it comes with. If you're working with a good shop from a good direct manufacturer, they're going to ask you appropriate questions about what width you should get. But I do think there's going to be this continued trend towards exploring these different types of bars as the gravel market continues to see people ride these bikes in different ways.  [00:23:21] Randall: Yeah, I generally agree. And I think it's a good thing. I'm not sold on the extremes of flare. I just don't see it as necessary. There's not so much torque being delivered through the steering column when I'm riding, even on technical terrain that I'm finding myself needing more control. With a dropper post of course that's the big caveat, right? Cause that's lightening up the front wheel taking, mass off of that front wheel, putting it on the back, allowing the body to access suspension more. So that helps a lot in reducing the need for leverage. We do a 10 degree flare and I find that for me, that's the max I can do with a traditional flare and I was still having my hands in a comfortable position. And I actually find that flair is helpful in terms of my risk comfort in hand comfort.  [00:24:06] And you see this as a trend, actually on road bars to, four to six degrees of flare on road bars starting to happen. You also see a trend towards leavers coming standard with a bit of kick out a bit of flair at the lever itself which goes along with these trends. The thing that I'm actually really interested in is bars like the 3T Aero Ghiaia. I think that's how it's pronounced.  [00:24:26] This bar has a pretty compound bend. So it's relatively standard on the hoods, but then flares out below the hoods and gives you that extra leverage while at the same time giving you more of a roadie position on top. And I really like. Sticking with this one bike trend and making, keeping these bikes as versatile as possible, just because they can be. And in the case of that bar, it's also that arrow profile, I don't think is super important. Frankly, people overblow the value of arrow and we can talk about that. But, it's certainly not a problem. And that arrow profile probably gives it some more vertical flex.  [00:25:02] And I think that's actually a great way to get some additional compliance on gravel bikes is to have some flare in the wings of the bar.  [00:25:10] Craig: Yeah, I think you're right. I think people are going to continue to explore that. It's a market that I think is tricky for manufacturers to play in because people are so entrenched with what they know and have, and exploring some of these new trends can often be costly. It might be $100 to $300 to get a handlebar and try it out. [00:25:31] Randall: Yeah. For. $400 plus in some cases you can spend a lot of money on a carbon bar.  [00:25:36] Craig: Yeah. Yeah. A related question comes from east bay grants. Just question on Aero bars and gravel.  [00:25:42] Randall: Yeah. Pretty trivial gains. All in all. If you're going to be spending money on, even just on arrow, get an Aero helmet. I think that would be a bigger impact. Then arrow, handlebars. These are just very marginal gains and I wouldn't at all compromise ergonomics or control in order to go arrow. So if you're already getting a new bar and there's an arrow version and a non arrow version that you like. And there aren't any other compromises sure. Go with the arrow version, but I don't think that this is where your low lying fruit is.  [00:26:17] Craig: Yeah. I was reading it as arrow bar extensions on the handlebar and my perspective is it just depends on what you're doing at the end of the day. If you're hauling across the Plains for 200 miles, I understand having a variety of hand and body positions is required and useful, and I'm all for it. If you're ripping around Marin I think you're going to find that you never.  [00:26:39] You never set your arms in a gravel bar if you're actually in the dirt, but that's just where I live.  [00:26:44] Randall: Without, now that you've reframed the question. Yeah, they definitely has their place. And in addition to offering another hand position that's particularly useful if you're just bombing down a really straight road and into a headwind it can be a real aerodynamic advantage there. It also gives you another place to secure gear too. So if you're doing extended bike packing tour. It has that added benefit. There's a place for it, for sure.  [00:27:08] Craig: Yeah. Next question comes from our friend, Tom boss from Marine county bike coalition. He was out riding and he mentioned that he was thinking about how things get named in the cycling world. And how his gravel bike. If he thinks of as an adventure bike effectively, the way he rides it. And then he had a funny note is just about why clipless pedals are called clipless when there's actually no clip.  [00:27:32] Randall: Yeah.  [00:27:33] Craig: Actually. Yeah. So anyway. I think this is something you've been on about the naming convention in cycling, just about these bikes being adventure, bikes, more than anything else. [00:27:42] Randall: Yeah, it's really like adventure is what we're doing with it. Gravel is one type of surface that we're riding. And I like the idea, granted not only a subset of bikes fall into this category, but we call our bike a onebike. And I think bikes like the the allied echo, the servo, a Sparrow, and a few others fall into this category of being, an endurance road or even in the case of the echo,  [00:28:07] borderline, crit type geometry that you can achieve. While at the same time being very capable for adventure riding. And for that type of bike, you could call it a one bike, but then otherwise, what is being called a gravel bike on the more off-road technical end of the spectrum. I think it's an adventure bike.  [00:28:23] And in fact even if it doesn't has have bosses and other accommodations for bags and bike packing. A lot of these bags and so on, or you can strap on or mountain other ways. So you could go and do some adventuring with it.  [00:28:36] Craig: Yeah, I think they, these names. Of category starts to take hold at the grassroots level and then manufacturers just get behind them. And certainly in the early days of the quote unquote gravel market, It was just easy to call it gravel as opposed to road or mountain.  [00:28:54] Presently, obviously we can acknowledge there's so many, there's so many nuances there and there's this spectrum of what gravel means. So yeah, they are adventure, bikes, plain and simple. But I guess I understand where gravel came from.  [00:29:06] Randall: What's good though, is we have another category, right? So we can get you to buy an adventure bike and a gravel bike and endurance road bike, and a crit bike and a cyclocross bike. And even if all these bikes could be the same bikes. Let's not tell anyone because that gets them to buy more bikes. I think that's the marketing perspective on some of the naming conventions.  [00:29:26] Craig: Next up comes a series of questions from Kim ponders. And we should give a shout out to Kim because she's the one who really set this off. She actually recommended and suggested in the ridership forum that, Hey, why don't you guys do a Q and a episode? And I immediately thought that great idea, Kim, I'm all about it. [00:29:44] Randall: Yeah. Thanks, Kim.  [00:29:46] Craig: So our first question is what should I do not do to avoid damaging a carbon frame?  [00:29:52] Randall: So I'll jump in on this one. Carbon is strong intention, but not in compression, so never clamp it in a stand or sit on the top tube, use a torque wrench, always. And avoid extreme heat sources like car exhausts, which generally isn't a problem with frames because they don't end up in the main stream of the exhaust, but is definitely a problem with carbon rims.  [00:30:13] We've seen a number of molten rims. And it's usually they fail at the spoke holes first. Cause there's just so much tension on those spokes that as soon as the resin starts to transition. Into more of a liquid glass it immediately starts to crack at the rims that'd be my main guidance for carbon generally.  [00:30:32] Craig: And as we've talked about it a little bit before on the podcast, I think as a frame designer, You're layering in carbon, in greater, greater levels of material in more sensitive areas.  [00:30:44] But you are. Yeah. [00:30:45] So like your, your down tube and by your bottom bracket. They can take a ding from a rock and they're going to survive. [00:30:52] Randall: Generally. Yes. So if you're kicking up a lot of rocks, adding a layer of thicker film is definitely a good idea. We put a very thin film on ours. It's mostly to protect the paint. And then film on the insides of the fork plates seat stays and chain stays where the tire passes through.  [00:31:08] I can save you a lot of grief. If you end up with mud caked on your tires. Cause that'll just grind right through the paint and potentially to layers of carbon. So we do that stock for that reason. And it's a good idea. If you don't already have it, get yourself some 3m protective film.  [00:31:22] Craig: Yeah, and for me, I actually run it's essentially a sort of protective sticker layer from a company called the all mountain style and they just, in my opinion, do great visual designs. And check them out because personally, I love when you look underneath my, down to that, you see this. Digital cammo kind of thing on my nice pink bike.  [00:31:43] Randall: Yeah, it's rad. It's definitely a way to pretty things up.  [00:31:47] Craig: Next question from Kim is their basic regular maintenance checklists that I should be aware of. You things I should check every ride every month, every season, every year.  [00:31:57] Randall: Yeah. When you got.  [00:31:59] Craig: I think there's a lot there, obviously, we've talked about the importance of making sure your chain is lubed your tire pressure. Those are the things I check every single ride. Be aware of how your brakes are changing and performance. So keep an mental eye on.  [00:32:14] Your brake pads and how they're wearing, I'm not going around tightening bolts at all. Unless I've removed something, I'm not really messing with Any of that. I do find my Thesis to be pretty much ready to go. As long as I'm paying attention to the tire and the chain lube. [00:32:31] Randall: Yeah. Yeah, that's that's about right. I would add to that, check the chain length every so often. And there's a question in here about how to do that. Get one of these go-no-go gauges. I've got the the park tools, CC three.  [00:32:44] There's a bunch of good ones out there. And if it has multiple settings to check, go with the most conservative one. Swap your chains early and often, because it will save you a lot of money on your expensive cogs and cassettes.  [00:32:58] And it'll just make everything perform better. And then every so often, if you feel any looseness in your headset, that's a common thing that will come up over time, potentially just, just check that every so often. If you feel any looseness, you want to tighten it up early. So it doesn't start to wear down the cups or things like that.  [00:33:14] Craig: Yeah. And if you can afford it and you don't have the skills in your own garage, definitely bring it in for an annual tune-up. I think the bikes are going to come back working great and you've got some professionalize on them. [00:33:26] Randall: Yeah.  [00:33:26] Craig: Next question. Kim asked was what's the best way to pack a bike for air travel.  [00:33:31] Randall: So if you try to be. The cheapest option for the packaging. Cardboard box. And if you're not doing it frequently, that's a good way to go.  [00:33:41] Craig: Yeah, agreed. There's a reason why every bike manufacturer in The world is shipping with a cardboard box. As long as you protect the bike. Inside the box with some bubble wrap or some additional cardboard, they generally arrive where they need to go intact and safe. And I've had multiple occasions where I've used the cardboard box on an outbound trip and the box is Perfectly intact for the return trip. [00:34:05] Randall: And we should say specifically. Carbo box that a bike would have come in. Cause generally this'll be a five layer corrugated box. It'll be a thicker material. And if you need to reinforce it with some tape, At the corners and so on. And if you get, if it gets a hole in it, patch up the hole, but you can go pretty far with the cardboard box.  [00:34:24] I have a post carry transfer case, which I love, it's a bit more involved. I got to pull the fork and it takes me usually about 15 minutes or so. 20 minutes to pack it up, and to squeeze some gear in between the wheels and the frame and things like that.  [00:34:38] But I generally get past any sort of oversize baggage fees and I have the bigger of the two bags too. So oftentimes I don't even get asked what it is and if I get asked, it's oh yeah, it's a sports gear. Massage table. Yeah, whatever.  [00:34:50] Craig: That's the key for me that post carry bag or or, okay. This is another company that makes one of these bags where as you said, you've got to do a little bit more disassembly, whereas typically it might've been take the handle Bazaar off the pedals and your wheels, and you can get into a cardboard box. Would these particular smaller bags, you do need to pull the fork, which seems incredibly intimidating. When you first talk about it, but in practice, it's actually not. [00:35:15] Randall: It's not too bad. Probably the biggest issue is if you have a bike with integrated cabling, Then it can be a real nightmare. And in fact I might even go as far as to say, if you don't know what you're doing, don't mess with it. A bike with external cabling, or at least partially external, like our bike, you just have to be careful not to kink the hoses. That's the big, probably the biggest city issue, kinking the hoses, or bending the housings and cables in a way that affects the breaking or the shifting.  [00:35:44] Craig: Yeah. Yeah. If you've, if your cables are particularly tight, It then becomes a problem. I think my routing is just on the edge. I do feel like I'm putting a little bit of stress. On the cables when I'm disassembling in that bag, but so far so good. [00:35:58] Randall: Yeah. Yeah.  [00:35:59] And then of course you have the full sized bags where if you don't care about paying the airline fees, then get one of these was it Evoque I think makes a really nice one that has good protection there's a bunch of companies that make good ones where you just  [00:36:11] Craig: Yeah, I've.  [00:36:12] Randall: the front wheel and throw it in.  [00:36:14] Craig: I've got a Tulay one that is like bomber. It's got like a through axle slots, but one it's hard as hell to move it around. And two, I got dinged on both weight and access size on my trip to Africa. It's out. I was pretty ticked. [00:36:31] Randall: Yeah. And then the other thing is on the other end can you get it into the trunk of a cab. And so that's actually another advantage of bags like the post transfer case in the oral case ones is you can. I think I know the post one has backpack straps, and then you can fit it in the boot of pretty much any vehicle.  [00:36:49] Craig: Yeah, totally under emphasized attribute and benefit of those types of bags. Totally agree. [00:36:54] Like you can get into a sedan. With a, a Prius, Uber Lyft driver and make it in. No problem. [00:37:00] Randall: Oh, yeah.  [00:37:01]  [00:37:01] Craig Dalton: Pardon the segue that's going to do it for part one of our Q and a episode. I thought that was a great time to break and we'll jump into another half hour of questions and answers in our next episode of, in the dirt, which we'll release in the coming weeks. As always, if you're interested in communicating with myself or Randall,  [00:37:20] Please join the ridership www.theridership.com. If you're able to support the podcast, your contributions are greatly appreciated. You can visit, www.buymeacoffee.com/thegravelride to contribute in any way you can to support the financial wellbeing of the podcast. If you're unable to support in that way, ratings and reviews are hugely appreciated.  [00:37:46] On any of your favorite podcast platforms. Until next time. Here's to finding some dirt under your wheels.