Podcasts about Guinea

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Country on the west coast of Africa

  • 860PODCASTS
  • 1,567EPISODES
  • 32mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Oct 25, 2021LATEST
Guinea

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Best podcasts about Guinea

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Latest podcast episodes about Guinea

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Special Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 194:00


Listen to the Sun. Oct. 24, 2021 special edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The program features our regular PANW report with dispatches on the need for the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) Regional Economic Commissions to make the project a reality; Ethiopia is accusing the western media of spreading misinformation on the situation inside the country; a delegation from United Nations is visiting the West African state of Mali to assess the security situation; and the military junta in Guinea has appointed three new members to its cabinet. In the second hour we listen to a briefing by the World Health Organization (WHO) Director General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus on the status of the COVID-19 pandemic internationally. Finally, we review some of the important issues impacting Africa and the world.

New Books in Islamic Studies
Susanna Fioratta, "Global Nomads: An Ethnography of Migration, Islam, and Politics" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books in Islamic Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 85:42


Countering the traditional narrative of "migration as crisis," Global Nomads tells the story of a group of people for whom migration is not a symptom of a disordered world, but rather an ordinary practice full of social and personal meaning. Decentering migration from North America and Europe, this ethnography explores how ethnic Fulbe people in the West African Republic of Guinea migrate abroad to seek their fortunes and fulfill their responsibilities--and in the process, securing a place at home.  Based on twenty-three months of ethnographic research, Global Nomads: An Ethnography of Migration, Islam, and Politics in West Africa (Oxford UP, 2020) investigates how mobility abroad shapes belonging at home and shows that political and economic motivations to migrate are important in Guinea, as elsewhere--but they are only part of the story. Family and community expectations, cultural ideals of work, notions of gender, and religious piety all come into play when people dream of going abroad and when they contemplate coming home again. Ultimately, Global Nomads shows how understandings of the past and its connections to the present--of what being a respectable person entails, of individual responsibilities to a larger community--all shape how people live in contexts of insecurity. Dr. Sara Katz is a postdoctoral associate in the history department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/islamic-studies

New Books Network
Susanna Fioratta, "Global Nomads: An Ethnography of Migration, Islam, and Politics" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 85:42


Countering the traditional narrative of "migration as crisis," Global Nomads tells the story of a group of people for whom migration is not a symptom of a disordered world, but rather an ordinary practice full of social and personal meaning. Decentering migration from North America and Europe, this ethnography explores how ethnic Fulbe people in the West African Republic of Guinea migrate abroad to seek their fortunes and fulfill their responsibilities--and in the process, securing a place at home.  Based on twenty-three months of ethnographic research, Global Nomads: An Ethnography of Migration, Islam, and Politics in West Africa (Oxford UP, 2020) investigates how mobility abroad shapes belonging at home and shows that political and economic motivations to migrate are important in Guinea, as elsewhere--but they are only part of the story. Family and community expectations, cultural ideals of work, notions of gender, and religious piety all come into play when people dream of going abroad and when they contemplate coming home again. Ultimately, Global Nomads shows how understandings of the past and its connections to the present--of what being a respectable person entails, of individual responsibilities to a larger community--all shape how people live in contexts of insecurity. Dr. Sara Katz is a postdoctoral associate in the history department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Africa Today
Ecowas parliament discuss banning presidential term extensions

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 25:20


The West African regional parliament at its meeting in Ghana, expresses concern about the recent military coups and the growing trend of extension of presidential term limits. Plus, the military authorities in Guinea dismiss and move senior officers from the old regime. And Somali pop star Aar Maanta tells us how he's using music and the performing arts to help children stay connected to the language and culture of their parents' homeland.

Reverb Effect
Season 3, Episode 1: Music Time in Africa

Reverb Effect

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 31:35


The adventure began in 1961, when Leo Sarkisian and his wife Mary were living in West Africa. They traveled across the region documenting traditional and pop music for Tempo Records. But one day, Edward Murrow came to Guinea and asked if Leo would be willing to join the Voice of America.  Leo Sarkisian signed up and in 1965 created Music Time in Africa, which has continued for more than 50 years. Christopher DeCou follows Leo's story to examine how entertainment can be caught up in political conflicts and asks the question, what makes propaganda?

The Insider
Mac King Part Two

The Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 27:20


Guinea pigs, the origin of The Cloak Of Invisibilty, and so much more. As promised, here's Mac King Part Two. Guinea pigs, the origin of The Cloak Of Invisibilty, how to move from a middle act to a headline slot, what Mac finds exciting about magic today and so much more. And here's the link for Josh's new podcast: How Magicians Think --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/vi65/message

SBS Vietnamese - SBS Việt ngữ
Quá trình duyệt xét tị nạn của Úc tại PNG sẽ kết thúc vào tháng 12

SBS Vietnamese - SBS Việt ngữ

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 6:06


Chính sách duyệt xét người tị nạn đến Úc bằng việc giam giữ họ ở các trung tâm dành cho người tầm trú tại Papua Tân Guinea từng bị thế giới lên án. Nay các trung tâm giam giữ này sẽ đóng cửa vào tháng 12, sau tám năm hoạt động. Úc sẽ gởi người tầm trú đi thuyền đến Úc vào trại giam giữ ở một quốc gia Thái Bình Dương khác là Nauru.

Jobs with Jodi
Leaders in Action featuring Doug Teschner, Leadership Expert

Jobs with Jodi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 47:57


Join us with special guest Doug Teschner as he shares his expert advice and knowledge on being a leader.  He share his rich experience and career trajectory that  has led him to mentoring and leading RPCVs.  Doug has had a wealth of experience in and outside of Peace Corps at leadership levels and is a huge advocate for the importance of being a good leader.Doug Teschner: RPCV Morocco, Leadership trainer, elected official at the state level, and former Country Director with Peace Corps in the Ukraine, Burkina Faso and Guinea (2008-17).

Grit & Growth
Communicating Your Big Idea

Grit & Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 30:20


Meet Martin Stimela, CEO of Botswana-based Brastorne Enterprises, and Matt Abrahams, Stanford Graduate School of Business lecturer and communications expert. As Martin prepares to pitch his business expansion plan, hear Matt's tips on how to grab attention, harness emotions, and create a lasting connection with your audience. Then listen in on Martin's actual pitch...and Matt's feedback. Almost every entrepreneur eventually needs to make a pitch to capture attention...and dollars. Martin Stimela is no exception. As CEO of Brastorne Enterprises, he's looking to raise capital to scale his growing technology company to 19 more countries, starting with Cameroon, Ethiopia, Guinea, and Mali. His vision: to connect the unconnected by enabling Internet access without the need for expensive data plans or smartphones. Matt Abrahams shares some tips and then listens in on Martin's pitch. Matt Abrahams is a Stanford lecturer and host of the podcast "Think Fast, Talk Smart," and he has plenty of strategic communications advice and techniques for both Martin and fellow entrepreneurs. Before you even write the first word of your pitch, Matt suggests you need to think first about who your audience is and what they need from you.“A fundamental mistake people make is they start by saying, here are the things I want to say. Rather, you need to focus on What do I want them to know? How do I want them to feel? And what do I want them to do?”Here are a few pitch-worthy pieces of advice:Create a good hook to capture people's attention“You know, 99% of people start with: Hi, my name is_______. Today, I'm going to talk about______. If you do something different, you automatically stand out as different.”Introduce a character“Think about leveraging testimonials, examples of how people are benefiting from your particular set of offerings. If we become familiar with a particular person and their situation, it makes it much more real for us than simply talking in generality.”Be conversational“Avoid reading word for word from a script or slides. Instead, focus on the structure of your message and the key ideas you want to get across.”Practice by teachingLike most things in business and life, practice makes perfect. And Matt encourages practicing by teaching.“Something that I find very useful for entrepreneurs to do is when they're working on pitches, I invite them to actually think about how would they teach somebody else to pitch their business. So bringing on a co-founder or a colleague, how would you teach them to pitch the business by putting themselves in the role of teacher, it helps them see things that we don't typically see.”Listen to Matt's advice and Martin's pitch to learn new strategies and techniques to improve your own pitch.Think Fast Talk Smart podcastNo Freaking Speaking Stanford SeedStanford Graduate School of BusinessSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Rejects & Revolutionaries: The origins of America

England's participation in the Western African trade started very slowly, and the slave trade was explicitly rejected by early English traders to Africa.  Still, within 40 years, English participation in the slave trade became common, and England's most valuable colony (Barbados) had shifted to slavery as a labor source.   This episode looks at the history of that trade, as well as nuances of the history of the adoption of slavery in Virginia.  

Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters
A Coup in Guinea is the Latest of a Trend in West Africa

Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 26:46


On September 5th, a special forces unit of the Guinean military attacked the presidential palace in the capital Conakry, and deposed President Alpha Conde. This was the third coup in West Africa in the last 12 months. David Zounmenou, senior research consultant at the Institute for Security Studies, explains the circumstances that lead to this coup. He also explains how events in Guinea fit into a broader regional trends in which once duly elected presidents become authoritarian and are deposed in a coup.    

New Books Network
Antonio Tomas, "Amlicar Cabral: The Life of a Reluctant Nationalist" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 57:41


Amilcar Cabral was one of the most significant African nationalists of his generation. Born in the Cape Verde Islands, Cabral led the African Party for the Independence of Guinea and Cape Verde (PAIGC) in its fight against Portuguese rule. In addition to helping found the party and then lead it, he also became a leading theoretician of revolutionary struggle and Marxism. Cabral shaped the larger independence struggle until his assassination in 1973, and though he did not live to see the independence of Cape Verde or Guinea Bissau, he remains an important source of inspiration for many revolutionaries. Despite this, biographies and studies of Cabral have been relatively sparse. What English-language literature does exist on Cabral is somewhat dated. Dr. António Tomás' Amílcar Cabral: The Life of a Reluctant Nationalist (Oxford UP, 2020) provides a fresh look at Cabral. Through archival research and a reexamination of Cabral's own writings, Tomás sketches the development of Cabral's nationalism and ideology from his early childhood and his studies in Portugal. Not only does this biography make clear the importance of Cabral's life, but it sheds valuable light on the processes of decolonization and the complexities embedded within the liberation movements. Zeb Larson is a recent graduate of The Ohio State University with a PhD in History. His research deals with the anti-apartheid movement in the United States. To suggest a recent title or to contact him, please send an e-mail to zeb.larson@gmail.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Biography
Antonio Tomas, "Amlicar Cabral: The Life of a Reluctant Nationalist" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 57:41


Amilcar Cabral was one of the most significant African nationalists of his generation. Born in the Cape Verde Islands, Cabral led the African Party for the Independence of Guinea and Cape Verde (PAIGC) in its fight against Portuguese rule. In addition to helping found the party and then lead it, he also became a leading theoretician of revolutionary struggle and Marxism. Cabral shaped the larger independence struggle until his assassination in 1973, and though he did not live to see the independence of Cape Verde or Guinea Bissau, he remains an important source of inspiration for many revolutionaries. Despite this, biographies and studies of Cabral have been relatively sparse. What English-language literature does exist on Cabral is somewhat dated. Dr. António Tomás' Amílcar Cabral: The Life of a Reluctant Nationalist (Oxford UP, 2020) provides a fresh look at Cabral. Through archival research and a reexamination of Cabral's own writings, Tomás sketches the development of Cabral's nationalism and ideology from his early childhood and his studies in Portugal. Not only does this biography make clear the importance of Cabral's life, but it sheds valuable light on the processes of decolonization and the complexities embedded within the liberation movements. Zeb Larson is a recent graduate of The Ohio State University with a PhD in History. His research deals with the anti-apartheid movement in the United States. To suggest a recent title or to contact him, please send an e-mail to zeb.larson@gmail.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

New Books in History
Antonio Tomas, "Amlicar Cabral: The Life of a Reluctant Nationalist" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 57:41


Amilcar Cabral was one of the most significant African nationalists of his generation. Born in the Cape Verde Islands, Cabral led the African Party for the Independence of Guinea and Cape Verde (PAIGC) in its fight against Portuguese rule. In addition to helping found the party and then lead it, he also became a leading theoretician of revolutionary struggle and Marxism. Cabral shaped the larger independence struggle until his assassination in 1973, and though he did not live to see the independence of Cape Verde or Guinea Bissau, he remains an important source of inspiration for many revolutionaries. Despite this, biographies and studies of Cabral have been relatively sparse. What English-language literature does exist on Cabral is somewhat dated. Dr. António Tomás' Amílcar Cabral: The Life of a Reluctant Nationalist (Oxford UP, 2020) provides a fresh look at Cabral. Through archival research and a reexamination of Cabral's own writings, Tomás sketches the development of Cabral's nationalism and ideology from his early childhood and his studies in Portugal. Not only does this biography make clear the importance of Cabral's life, but it sheds valuable light on the processes of decolonization and the complexities embedded within the liberation movements. Zeb Larson is a recent graduate of The Ohio State University with a PhD in History. His research deals with the anti-apartheid movement in the United States. To suggest a recent title or to contact him, please send an e-mail to zeb.larson@gmail.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Lofi Poli Sci Podcast
"Lo-fi Global News: Poland, Afghanistan, the Game, Haiti, Guinea, Greta"

Lofi Poli Sci Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 13:10


Today's Topics: 'Some' Polish Communities Remove "LGBT-Free" Stances, Women in Afghanistan Not Being Allowed Back to University, The Game: Are we land-locked or not, Haiti Elections Suspended, Guinea Military Junta Proposes Time-Table for Elections, Greta Talking Messy About the UN/World Leaders Always remember that Lofi Poli Sci is more than just me, it's the “we”, that we be. Episode 37 Season 4 (series 353) Email: lofipolisci@planetmail.com Instagram: lofi_poli_sci_podcast Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/lofi-poli-sci-podcast/id1513691477 Spotify: open.spotify.com/show/4Ii0JKbsKEzkO8SA2u3796 Google Podcast: https://podcasts.google.com/?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy8xNzg1MjhjYy9wb2RjYXN0L3Jzcw YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCaLg4TOVb7nh4laDatZZ3yQ LinkedIn: Michael Pickering #lofipolisci #lofi #politicalscience #news #worldnews #globalnews #lofiGlobalNews #alwaysHope #podcast #lofipoliscipodcast #Top10 #GoodNewsFriday #PickeringUnplugged #LettersOfTheLofiPoliSci #Poland #Afghanistan #theGame #Haiti #Guinea #Greta #UN #UnitedNations #World

Simple English News Daily
Wednesday 29th September 2021. World News. Today: Japan elections. Thailand floods. US boosters. Cuba exports. Colombia rebel killed.

Simple English News Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 8:23


World News in 7 minutes. Wednesday 29th September 2021.Transcript at: send7.org/transcripts Today: Japan elections. Thailand floods. US boosters. Cuba exports. Colombia rebel killed. Guinea coup to transition. Nigeria shias arrested. Italy Greta speaks. France Greece defence pact. Denmark stolen money art.Send your opinion or experience by email to podcast@send7.org or send an audio message at send7.org for us to broadcast. With Stephen Devincenzi and Khadija Tahir.SEND7 (Simple English News Daily in 7 minutes) tells news in intermediate English. Every day, listen to the most important stories in the world in slow, clear English. This easy English news podcast is perfect for English learners, people with English as a second language, and people who want to hear a fast news update from around the world. Learn English through hard topics, but simple grammar. SEND7 covers all news including politics, business, natural events and human rights. For more information visit send7.org/contact

By Any Means Necessary
Dems Threaten To Gut Reconciliation Bill and Fail Working and Poor People Again

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 115:23


In this episode of By Any Means Necessary, hosts Sean Blackmon and Jacquie Luqman are joined by Dr. Jack Rasmus, economist, radio show host, & author of 'The Scourge of Neoliberalism' to discuss the politics and corporate agenda surrounding the debate around the reconciliation bill, the reality and context behind the debt ceiling debate, and how society can be reorganized to meet the needs of working and poor people rather than corporations. In the second segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Milton Allimadi, Chief Editor of Black Star News, producer/host of the Black Star News Show on WBAI in NY and author of “Manufacturing Hate: How Africa was Demonized in Western Media” to discuss the quest for justice after a massacre in Guinea, how the recent coup has disrupted that process, and how corporate media coverage of the African continent contributes to neocolonialism and racist caricatures of Africans as irrational and tribal.In the third segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by technologist Chris Garaffa, the editor of TechforthePeople.org to discuss the CIA targeting Julian Assange with kidnapping or assassination, the “predictive policing” and surveillance threats posed by social media data mining technology used by police, and Amazon's absurdly sensitive surviellance of drivers.Later in the show, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Rania Khalek, journalist with Breakthrough News and co-host of the Unauthorized Disclosure podcast to discuss Congress' approval of funding for the Iron Dome missile system and how Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's “present” vote encapsulates progressive frustrations with her, the economic situation in Lebanon and Iran and Hezbollah's efforts to provide relief, and the US's waning power as demonstrated at the UN General Assembly.

Africa Today
Guinea junta releases roadmap to civilian rule

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 30:19


The military junta which has been ruling Guinea since overthrowing President Alpha Condé has laid out its roadmap to civilian rule. Under the terms of the transition plan, members of the junta will be barred from standing in elections. Plus, Russia's government says Mali has made a deal to use Wagner Group contractors to fight jihadist militants, as thousands of French troops are poised to leave. And we hear from Kenya's Defence Minister Monica Juma, who's been nominated to be the next Secretary General of the Commonwealth.

Strange Animals Podcast
Episode 243: Bats and Rats

Strange Animals Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 10:33


Sign up for our mailing list! We also have t-shirts and mugs with our logo! Don't forget the Kickstarter, as if I'd let you forget it: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/kateshaw/beyond-bigfoot-and-nessie Let's pre-game Halloween and monster month with an episode about some Halloween-y bats and rats! Thanks to Connor for the suggestion! Further reading: Meet Myotis nimaensis Hyorhinomys stuempkei: New Genus, Species of Shrew Rat Discovered in Indonesia Fish-eating Myotis The orange-furred bat is Halloween colored! The hog-nosed rat has a little piggy nose and VAMPIRE FANGS: The fish-eating bat has humongous clawed feet: The crested rat does not look poisonous but it is: Show transcript: Welcome to Strange Animals Podcast. I'm your host, Kate Shaw. This week we're getting ready for October by talking about a bat suggested by Connor, along with another type of bat and two rats. It's the bats and rats episode ushering us into Monster Month with style! Don't forget that our Kickstarter for the Strange Animals Podcast book goes live in just over a week! I know, it hasn't even started yet and I'm already shouting all about it, but I'm excited! There's a link in the show notes if you want to click through and bookmark that page. Also, I have a correction from our recent squirrel episode. Nicholas wrote to let me know that vitiligo isn't actually a genetic condition, although some people are genetically slightly more likely to develop it. I think that's what caused my confusion. Vitiligo can be caused by a number of things, but it's still true that you can't catch it from someone. I'll include a more in-depth correction in next year's updates episode. Okay, let's start this episode off with Connor's suggestion. Connor told me about a newly discovered bat called Myotis nimbaensis, and it's not just any old bat. It's a Halloween bat! Its body is orange and its wing membranes are black. It's called the orange-furred bat and it lives in the Nimba Mountains of Guinea in West Africa. The orange-furred bat was only discovered in 2018, when a team of scientists was exploring abandoned mine shafts in the mountains, looking for the critically endangered Lamotte's roundleaf bat. The team was surveying the bats in cooperation with a mining company and conservation groups, because they needed to know where the bats were so the old mine shafts could be repaired before they fell in and squished all the bats. Then one of the team saw a bat no one recognized. It was orange and fluffy with big ears and tiny black dot eyes, and its wings were black. They sent a picture of the bat to an expert named Nancy Simmons, and Dr. Simmons knew immediately that it was something out of the ordinary. Sure enough, it's a species unknown to science. The team described the bat in 2021. Next, let's talk about a rat. It was also discovered recently, in this case in 2013 and described in 2015. It's usually called the hog-nosed rat. It lives in a single part of a single small island in South Asia, specifically in North Sulawesi, Indonesia. This is one of the same places where the babirusa lives, if you remember episode 218. The hog-nosed rat is a rodent but it's not actually that closely related to other rats and mice. It's even been assigned to its own genus. It's a soft brown-gray on its back and white underneath, with big ears, a very long tail, and a pink nose that does actually look a lot like a little piggy nose. Its eyes are small but its incisors are extremely long and sharp. In fact, they look like vampire fangs! In 2013, a team of scientists was studying rodents living in the area. To do this they would put special traps out at night and check them in the morning. This isn't a regular rat trap that kills rats, of course, but a box that keeps the rodent safe inside so it can be examined before being released again. One day they checked a trap and inside was a rodent no one recogn...

The Fifth Floor
What's behind Guinea's coup?

The Fifth Floor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 41:47


The military coup earlier this month in the West African state of Guinea has been a huge story for BBC reporter Alhassan Sillah, based in the capital Conakry. He tells us about the main players - coup leader Colonel Mamady Doumbouya, and the man he ousted, President Alpha Condé. The swimming camels of Kutch The Kharai are a rare breed of camel found in the Indian state of Gujarat. They swim up to three kilometres in shallow seas to reach the mangroves where they graze. But as salt companies block tidal water, the mangroves are dying, and there's less grazing. BBC Gujarati's Prashant Gupta met the herdsmen and their swimming camels. Cairo's belly dancing school Egypt is known for belly dancing, but recently this art has been dominated by belly dancers from Eastern Europe and Latin America. Reem Fattelbab of BBC Arabic has visited a belly dancing school in Cairo to find out why more Egyptian women don't follow this tradition. Ukraine's toxic mines BBC Ukrainian recently reported from the frontline in the Donbas region about the impact the conflict is having on the environment. During the Soviet era, Donbas was a mining hub, but now many old mines are flooding, leading to contamination of local water supplies. Reporter Zhanna Bezpiatchuk went down one of the mines to see for herself. Capybaras and class war in Argentina The exclusive Nordelta gated community north of Buenos Aires were recently invaded by capybaras, the world's largest rodent. Gardens were tunneled, plants eaten, but with half of Argentinians living in poverty, many were siding with the animals, as BBC Mundo contributor Macarena Gagliardi reports. Image: Special forces commander Mamady Doumbouya in September 2021 Credit: Reuters/Saliou Samb

The Critical Hour
Clinton Campaign Exposed as Russia-gate Founders; Neocons Eye Ethiopia

The Critical Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 115:16


Jim Kavanagh, writer at thepolemicist.net and CounterPunch, and author of "Danger to Society: Against Vaccine Passports," joins us to discuss Russia-gate. The Durham probe into the origins of Russia-gate has exposed the 2016 Hillary Clinton campaign for pushing lies and propaganda aimed at election influence. The latest charging document makes it clear the Clinton campaign and its contractors maliciously worked to spread false information to the press and the FBI. Dr. Yolandra Hancock, board-certified pediatrician and obesity medicine specialist, joins us to discuss Covid. The FDA denied President Biden's request for booster shorts for all Americans, but did ok it for those in high-risk categories. Also, hospitalizations continue to be high and the booster debate continues. Laith Marouf, broadcaster and journalist based in Beirut, joins us to discuss Syria. The Assad government works to rebuild the war-torn nation as their battle against ISIS mercenaries sponsored by Western imperialists comes to an end. Will the US and its allies hang on to a failed regime change strategy or accept reality?National Director for Code Pink Ariel Gold joins us to discuss Israel. Israeli officials have communicated that they are not concerned about the possibility of losing billions in US aid because they are confident that they can work the system to get the money within a few weeks by other means.Steve Poikonen, national organizer for Action4Assange, joins us to discuss Iran. The President of Iran has said that he sees US sanctions as an alternative method that the US empire uses for warfare. Also, there are rumors that the US has discussed alternate plans to the JCPOA with Israel.Kweku Lamumba, external relations coordinator for KOSSA, joins us to discuss the Haitian immigrant crisis. There are charges of racism as scenes of verbal and physical abuse hit social media from the Mexican border. The immigrants face a desperate situation as food and shelter are scarce and they have no way of knowing what comes next.Gerald Horne, professor of history at the University of Houston, author, historian, and researcher, joins us to discuss the coup in Guinea. Observers are suspicious about the Africom ties to the coup in Guinea. Also, President Biden's recent discussion of Ethiopia as a threat to US national security seems to indicate that the US empire may be aiming its regime change machine at the beleaguered African nation.Dr. Linwood Tauheed, associate professor of economics at the University of Missouri- Kansas City, joins us to discuss Evergrande. The Chinese real estate giant Evergrande is facing a debt crisis. However, many economists are concerned that the US debt of 30 trillion dollars and rising is a more immediate threat to world economic health.

The Critical Hour
Professor Gerald Horne Discusses the Coup in Guinea

The Critical Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 14:58


Gerald Horne, professor of history at the University of Houston, author, historian, and researcher, joins us to discuss the coup in Guinea. Observers are suspicious about the Africom ties to the coup in Guinea. Also, President Biden's recent discussion of Ethiopia as a threat to US national security seems to indicate that the US empire may be aiming its regime change machine at the beleaguered African nation.

The Smoking Hot Confessions BBQ Podcast
BBQ in the UK | Ryan Guinea | The BBQ Talks Podcast

The Smoking Hot Confessions BBQ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 57:41


If you've been following SHC for a while now, then you'll know that I love to cook BBQ, eat BBQ, and talk about BBQ. One man that loves barbecue almost as much as I do, is Ryan Guinea, from the BBQ Talks podcast, based out of the United Kingdom.  Now a quick confession - I bungled the audio on my end. Ryan still sounds awesome, but the recording of my end of the conversation isn't as good as normal. It's not terrible, it's just not the usual sound. Luckily, it's a really interesting conversation about the state of barbeque in the United Kingdom, and Ryan does most of the talking.  You really should do yourself a favour and check out The BBQ Talks show. Host Ryan Guinea hails from the land of merry old England, but he doesn't let the rainy weather stop him from getting out there on his grill and sharing low'n'slow barbecue with all his friends and family. In fact, he loves BBQ so much, he started his own podcast to spread the love even further and wider.  In this full episode of the Smoking Hot Confessions BBQ Podcast, Ryan and I get into: What exactly is a ‘kebab' in England? (6:45) Why Ryan's favourite BBQ to cook on is an Ugly Drum Smoker (12:30) The thing about brisket… (19:01) The BBQ Talks Podcast (25:57) Ryan's tips for trimming and breaking down meat (46:14) If you would like to become a Podcast Partner we'd love to hear from you. Send Ben an email at ben@smokinghotconfessions.com and let's get that conversation started! To get your free copy of 'The Beginners Guide to Real BBQ', including some smoked meat recipes, head to: https://smokinghotconfessions.com 

La ContraCrónica
Aluminio a precio de oro

La ContraCrónica

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 42:14


El precio del aluminio se ha puesto por las nubes y esta semana ha superado los 3.000 dólares la tonelada en la Bolsa de Metales de Londres, su precio más alto desde la crisis de 2008. Dos impactos seguidos, un golpe de Estado en Guinea, uno de los principales productores mundiales de bauxita, y problemas de producción en China debido a la escasez de carbón han hecho que el precio se haya multiplicado por dos en un año. Desde mediados de marzo este metal, de capital importancia en la industria y el transporte, no hay hecho más que subir y es probable que lo siga haciendo a causa de los problemas persistentes de suministro de carbón que tienen en China. El invierno está a la vuelta de la esquina y en China el carbón se utiliza tanto para generar electricidad como para hacer funcionar las calefacciones. El Gobierno chino ha pedido a algunas fundiciones de aluminio que dejen de funcionar para reducir el consumo de electricidad. En Europa el problema es el precio del kilovatio, que se ha disparado en los últimos meses y que ha encarecido la producción local de aluminio, cuya demanda ha crecido mucho acompañando al rebote económico tras el fin de las restricciones. El aluminio proviene de la bauxita, un mineral muy abundante en Guinea, un pequeño país africano que sufrió un golpe de Estado el pasado 5 de septiembre. Guinea es el segundo productor mundial de bauxita y el principal proveedor de China. Como era de esperar, la inestabilidad política allí está empezando a pasar factura. El sector minero (oro, bauxita, diamantes) es estratégico en Guinea, supone el 80% de las exportaciones del país. Guinea cuenta con las mayores reservas probadas de bauxita del mundo, unos 7.400 millones de toneladas. Se necesitan entre cuatro y cinco toneladas de bauxita para producir dos toneladas de alúmina, de las que a su vez sale una tonelada de aluminio. Los problemas en Guinea podrían resolverse rápido si el nuevo Gobierno se consolida en el poder, pero el resto de la cadena seguirá tensionado durante varios meses este mercado, por lo que las subidas de precios en una gama muy amplia de productos no tardarán en materializarse. En La ContraRéplica: - Vacunación obligatoria en Italia - Origen de los vascos - Refugiados afganos - Incidentes de Mondragón Apoya La Contra en: · Patreon... https://www.patreon.com/diazvillanueva · iVoox... https://www.ivoox.com/podcast-contracronica_sq_f1267769_1.html · Paypal... https://www.paypal.me/diazvillanueva Sígueme en: · Web... https://diazvillanueva.com · Twitter... https://twitter.com/diazvillanueva · Facebook... https://www.facebook.com/fernandodiazvillanueva1/ · Instagram... https://www.instagram.com/diazvillanueva · Linkedin… https://www.linkedin.com/in/fernando-d%C3%ADaz-villanueva-7303865/ · Flickr... https://www.flickr.com/photos/147276463@N05/?/ · Pinterest... https://www.pinterest.com/fernandodiazvillanueva Encuentra mis libros en: · Amazon... https://www.amazon.es/Fernando-Diaz-Villanueva/e/B00J2ASBXM Escucha el episodio completo en la app de iVoox, o descubre todo el catálogo de iVoox Originals

Conference of the Birds Podcast
Conference of the Birds, 7-09-21

Conference of the Birds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 178:02


This week: Coltrane; Nara Leão; Sameyda Ensemble; Kpelle music from Guinea; Jeanne Lee; Georgia Gaslini; Joby Bernabé; Maysa & Orquesta RGE; Dahmane el Harrache; Ahmed Hamza; Sonia López; Arthur Jones; María Grand; Tiziana Ghiglioni; Roy Nathanson reprises Roland Kirk;  much more... Always FREE of charge to listen to the radio program on WRFI, or stream, download, and subscribe to the podcast: via PODBEAN: https://conferenceofthebirds.podbean.com/ via iTUNES: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/conference-of-the-birds-podcast/id478688580 Also available at podomatic, Internet Archive, podtail, iheart Radio, and elsewhere. PLAYLISTS at SPINITRON: https://spinitron.com/WRFI/pl/13642184/Conference-of-the-Birds and via the Conference of the Birds page at WRFI.ORG https://www.wrfi.org/wrfiprograms/conferenceofthebirds/  We will continue to update playlists at confbirds.blogspot.com 24-48 hours of the program's posting  online. Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/conferenceofthebirds/?ref=bookmarks FIND WRFI on Radio Garden: http://radio.garden/visit/ithaca-ny/aqh8OGBR Contact: confbirds@gmail.com

Eat The Rich
Patreon Ep 077 - It's Just Not Real Teaser

Eat The Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 4:36


On this week's Patreon episode, we discuss climate remediation, a new firm of former Kamala Harris staffers aimed at protecting CEOs from cancellation, the Economist's defense of child labor, America's involvement in the coup in Guinea, and films. patreon.com/eattherich

The Science Hour
Ebola can remain dormant for five years

The Science Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 63:59


An international team of researchers has discovered that an outbreak of Ebola in Guinea in February this year was the result of re-activated Ebola virus in someone who'd been infected at least five years ago during the earlier large Ebola epidemic that swept through Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. This means the virus can remain dormant in some Ebola survivors for five years or more. Virologists Alpha Kabinet Keita and Robert Garry talk to Roland Pease about the research and its implications. Also in the programme: The eruption of lavas from Iceland's newest volcano Fagradalsfjall continues six months on. Geochemist Ed Marshall tells us how he gets up close to sample the molten rock with a long scoop and a bucket of water, and what he's learning about this remarkable eruption. NASA's Katie Stack Morgan updates Science in Action on the Perseverance rover's successful sampling of rocks from Jezero crater on the planet Mars. When the specimens are eventually returned to Earth, she says they may turn out to contain tiny samples of Mars' water and atmosphere from early in the Red Planet's history. Also...Look into my eyes. What do you see? Pupil, lens, retina… an intricate set of special tissues and mechanisms all working seamlessly together, so that I can see the world around me. Charles Darwin called the eye an ‘organ of extreme perfection' and he's not wrong! But if the eye is so complex and intricate, how did it evolve? One listener, Aloyce from Tanzania, got in touch to pose this difficult question. It's a question that taxed Darwin himself, but CrowdScience is always up for a challenge! The problem is that eyes weren't ever designed - they were cobbled together over millions and millions of years, formed gradually by the tweaks and adaptations of evolution. How do you get from the basic detection of light to the wonderful complexity - and diversity – of visual systems we find throughout the animal kingdom? CrowdScience sent Marnie Chesterton on an 800 million year journey to trace how the different elements that make up the human eye gradually came into being; from the emergence of the first light-sensitive proteins to crude eye-cups, from deep sea creatures with simple pinhole eyes to the first light-focusing lenses, all the way to the technicolour detail of the present day. (Image credit: Getty Images)

Give The People What They Want!
Give The People What They Want! September 17

Give The People What They Want!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 30:20


Vijay Prashad, Zoe Alexandra and Prasanth R bring you your weekly fix of the most important developments across the world. They explain what is the AUKUS military alliance and the growing threat of nuclear arms race, what's behind the developing political crisis in Argentina, the fallout from the coup in Guinea, US support to Egypt amid rampant human rights violations, anti-neoliberal protests in Ecuador and Uruguay, and vaccine apartheid and access in Africa.

Africa Today
Travel bans and asset freezes for Guinea junta leaders

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 21:18


ECOWAS will push for elections in Guinea within six months and impose sanctions on coup leaders who ousted President Alpha Conde'. The United States is to impose sanctions against individuals and groups impeding humanitarian aid in Ethiopia. How governments in West Africa are fighting the traffic in fake drugs. Plus The Resident Presidents ask if magic beliefs help endure society's big problems.

Science in Action
Ebola can remain dormant for five years

Science in Action

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 28:24


An international team of researchers has discovered that an outbreak of Ebola in Guinea in February this year was the result of re-activated Ebola virus in someone who'd been infected at least five years ago during the earlier large Ebola epidemic that swept through Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. This means the virus can remain dormant in some Ebola survivors for five years or more. Virologists Alpha Kabinet Keita and Robert Garry talk to Roland Pease about the research and its implications. Also in the programme: The eruption of lavas from Iceland's newest volcano Fagradalsfjall continues six months on. Geochemist Ed Marshall tells us how he gets up close to sample the molten rock with a long scoop and a bucket of water, and what he's learning about this remarkable eruption. NASA's Katie Stack Morgan updates Science in Action on the Perseverance rover's successful sampling of rocks from Jezero crater on the planet Mars. When the specimens are eventually returned to Earth, she says they may turn out to contain tiny samples of Mars' water and atmosphere from early in the Red Planet's history. (Image credit: Getty Images) Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker

Africa Today
Somalia President withdraws PM's executive powers

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 22:13


The president of Somalia strips his Prime Minister of his executive powers. We assess what this means for the country which is in the midst of elections. We ask Guinea's main opposition leader if he's ready to be part of a unity government with ousted president Alpha Conde party?. UNICEF freezes all its social media accounts for 18 hours to raise awareness about the fate of children whose education has been disrupted by the pandemic. Ugandans can now use their phones to trade in the stock exchange. What's behind Zimbabwe's success in vaccinating more than twelve per cent of its population?

The Conversation Weekly
Why is Justin Trudeau more popular abroad than in Canada? + Clues on why mosquitoes bite some of us more than others

The Conversation Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 41:49


Ahead of Canadian elections on September 20, two experts in Canadian politics profile the current prime minister, Justin Trudeau. They explore why he's so much more popular abroad than at home and assess what his real foreign policy record has been beyond being a celebrity.Featuring Alex Marland, professor of political science at Memorial University of Newfoundland and Jeremy Wildeman, Research Fellow at the Human Rights Research and Education Centre, University of Ottawa and Adjunct Assistant Professor at Queen's University, Ontario.In our second story (at 28m55), we hear about research providing new clues on why mosquitoes bite some people more than others. Madelien Wooding, a researcher at the Department of Chemistry at the University of Pretoria, explains how her team pinpointed some of the chemical compounds that make our skin more attractive to mosquitoes.We also hear (25m50) from Clea Chakraverty, politics editor at The Conversation in France about their new podcast series on what it takes to be president of France, Moi président·e, and Moina Spooner, assistant editor at The Conversation in Nairobi, recommends some reading on two concerning recent events in Guinea (39m38).The Conversation Weekly is produced by Mend Mariwany and Gemma Ware, with sound design by Eloise Stevens. Our theme music is by Neeta Sarl. You can sign up to The Conversation's free daily email here. Full credits for this episode available here.Further readingFrom sunny ways to pelted with stones: Why do some Canadians hate Justin Trudeau?, by Fenwick McKelvey, Concordia University and Scott DeJong, Concordia UniversityRhetoric Check: Historically, how important is the 2021 Canadian election?, by Alex Marland, Memorial University of NewfoundlandCanada's non-diplomacy puts Canadians at risk in an unstable Middle East, by Jeremy Wildeman, University of BathWe're a step closer to figuring out why mosquitoes bite some people and not others, by Madelien Wooding, University of Pretoria and Yvette Naudé, University of PretoriaPasha 121: Why we need mosquitoes, featuring Jeremy Herren, Scientist, International Centre of Insect Physiology and EcologyGuinea coup highlights the weaknesses of West Africa's regional body, by Benjamin Maiangwa, Lakehead UniversityMarburg in Guinea: the value of lessons from managing other haemorrhagic outbreaks, by Michelle J. Groome, National Institute for Communicable Diseases and Janusz Paweska, National Institute for Communicable Diseases See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Africa Today
Kenya's mysterious river deaths

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 21:28


Ongoing mystery in Kenya as the police find at least twelve bodies on the shore of a river in the east of the country. We hear from opposition figures in Guinea as they meet with coup leader Colonel Doumbouya while President Alpha Conde is still being held in custody. What's behind a recent spike in Covid-19 cases in Mauritius?.d How Nigeria's oil plants are causing urgent health problems to residents living near them.

Newshour
Climate change: World now sees twice as many days over 50C

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 48:09


The number of extremely hot days every year when the temperature reaches 50C has doubled since the 1980s, a global BBC analysis has found. They also now happen in more areas of the world than before, presenting unprecedented challenges to human health and to how we live. Also in the programme: poll highlights climate anxiety among youngsters, we hear from one; and Guinea's military junta starts consultation to try to build a consensus after the country's latest coup d'etat. (Photo: A man takes a drink close to a street thermometer (reading 49 degrees Celsius, 120.2 Fahrenheit) in southern Spain on the 13th of August. Credit: EPA).

Zero Blog Thirty
New Coup Goofin'!

Zero Blog Thirty

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 57:53


Round 1: Propaganda is my favorite. Round 2: Acrobatic squirrels may hold the key to better jumping robots in Army-funded research Round 3: Update the safety brief. The Latvian military conducted some realistic training out in town over the weekend … the problem is that they didnt tell the town they were doing an exercise Round 4: New coup goofin in Guinea after some Green Berets accidentally helped oust a president

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know
Strange News: The Satanic Temple Vs. Texas, President Calls For 9/11 Transparency, the World Ignores the Coup in Guinea

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 54:35


The Satanic Temple challenges the controversial new abortion law in Texas. The Biden administration pushes to release still-classified documents concerning 9/11. Over in west Africa, the Guinean military has overthrown the government -- and no one's sure what will happen next. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Reading With Your Kids Podcast
Reading With Your Kids - My Story Of Injustice

Reading With Your Kids Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 26:00


Adama Bah is on the #ReadingWithYourKids #Podcast to celebrate her #MiddleGrade Nonfiction title "Accused, My Story Of Injustice". Adama grew up in East Harlem after immigrating from Conakry, Guinea. As a young teen she began experiencing discrimination and dehumanization as prejudice toward Muslim people grew. At age 16 FBI agents arrested her and falsely accused of being a potential suicide bomber. Adama also talks about the need to reform our current immigration system Click here to find Adama's Book on Amazon - https://amzn.to/3liUKXN Click here to visit our website - www.readingwithyourkids.com

World News with BK
Podcast#266: 9/11 20 year anniversary, Guinea coup, Arkansas school district sex hazing lawsuit

World News with BK

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 151:17


Started this week with some remembrance and personal reflection on the 20th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terror attacks and how it shaped the world. Then it was the Guinea coup, North Korea parade, Lebanon financial crisis, California recall, and a school district in Arkansas being sued over turning a blind eye to the disgusting rampant sexual hazing. Music: Kreator/"Hail to the Hordes"

American Prestige
E10 - So Far from God, So Close to the United States w/ Alexander Aviña

American Prestige

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 98:32


Danny and Derek discuss COVID-19 and how vaccine colonialism reflects longer-term trends in U.S. history, the recent coup in Guinea, the formation of the new Afghanistan government, and the upcoming German elections. The boys then speak with Alexander Aviña, an assistant professor of history at Arizona State University, about the history of Mexico and U.S.-Mexican Relations from the 1810 Mexican War of Independence to the "drug war" of today. Become a patron today! www.patreon.com/americanprestige

The Intelligence
Putsch back: Africa's latest coup in Guinea

The Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 22:25


It is unclear whether better governance lies ahead after a military takeover; what is certain is that Africa's unwelcome trend of defenestrations has returned. We ask why. Justin Trudeau, Canada's prime minister, thought it a good time to shore up his party's mandate; as election day nears that plan looks shaky. And the rise and fall of Georgia's sex-selective abortions.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Economist Radio
Putsch back: Africa's latest coup in Guinea

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 22:25


It is unclear whether better governance lies ahead after a military takeover; what is certain is that Africa's unwelcome trend of defenestrations has returned. We ask why. Justin Trudeau, Canada's prime minister, thought it a good time to shore up his party's mandate; as election day nears that plan looks shaky. And the rise and fall of Georgia's sex-selective abortions.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

By Any Means Necessary
Examining Imperialist Ties and Neocolonial Interests in the Guinea Coup

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 110:46


In this episode of By Any Means Necessary, hosts Sean Blackmon and Jacquie Luqman are joined by Dr. Bill Honigman, California State Coordinator and Co-Coordinator of the Healthcare as a Human Right Issue Organizing Team for Progressive Democrats of America to discuss the California recall election of Governor Gavin Newsom, the danger for working and poor people that this recall election poses, and some of the disgusting statements made and positions held by conservative frontrunner Larry Elder.In the second segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Kambale Musvuli, activist, writer, & analyst with the Center for Research on the Congo-Kinshasa to discuss the role of imperialist powers in the coup in Guinea, Col. Mamady Doumbouya's history with imperialist powers and President Alpha Conde, and the economic and political interests of neocolonialist powers in Guinea. In the third segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Tanda Blubear, an organizer with Women with Bows to discuss resistance to the Line 3 pipeline in Minnesota, the environmental impact posed by the pipeline and tar sands, the frequent and continuous violation of indigenous treaty rights in Minnesota and in the United States, and how the struggle against Line 3 and for indigenous sovereignty presents the need for solidarity across movements.Later in the show, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Esther Iverem,, artist, author and independent journalist, host and producer of On The Ground: Voices of Resistance from the Nation's Capital on Pacifica Radio to discuss how the end of additional unemployment benefits exposes capitalism's subsistence on exploitation, erasure of history and the desecration of historic Black cemeteries in the Washington, DC area, and the mythologies that uphold belief in the capitalist system.

By Any Means Necessary
The Imperialist and Neocolonialist Interests in the Coup in Guinea

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 17:51


In this segment of By Any Means necessary, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Kambale Musvuli, activist, writer, & analyst with the Center for Research on the Congo-Kinshasa to discuss the role of imperialist powers in the coup in Guinea, Col. Mamady Doumbouya's history with imperialist powers and President Alpha Conde, and the economic and political interests of neocolonialist powers in Guinea.

The World and Everything In It
9.8.21 Washington Wednesday, World Tour, and a 20-year grief

The World and Everything In It

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 34:48


On Washington Wednesday, Mary Reichard talks to national security and foreign policy expert, James Carafano, on what to expect next in the war on terror; on World Tour, Onize Ohikere reports on Guinea's new military junta; and Kim Henderson talks to a woman whose husband died when the twin towers collapsed. Plus: commentary from Janie B. Cheaney, Blockbuster nostalgia, and the Wednesday morning news. Support The World and Everything in It today at wng.org/donate. ​​ Additional support comes from Covenant College, a distinctly Christian, liberal arts college on beautiful Lookout Mountain, Georgia. Explore more at covenant.edu. And from the Missions on Point podcast … 15 minutes every Friday … reenergizing your vision for world missions through the local church. Missions on Point … available wherever you get your podcasts.

Pod Save the World
20 years after 9/11

Pod Save the World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 97:35


Tommy and Ben cover the latest from Afghanistan, right-wing protests in Brazil, a coup in Guinea, bitcoin in El Salvador, Biden's immigration policy, big elections in Germany, Japan and Canada, and tough times for celebrities in China. Then Ben talks to former US Ambassador to Russia Michael McFaul about the Ukrainian President's visit to America. For a closed-captioned version of this episode, please visit crooked.com/podsavetheworld.  For a transcript of this episode, please email transcripts@crooked.com and include the name of the podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Pour Over
Wednesday, September 8, 2021

The Pour Over

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 5:00


Pandemic-era unemployment benefits end, a coup in Guinea sends aluminum prices soaring, the Taliban forms a government, and other top news for September 8th. Stay informed, while remaining focused on Christ, with The Pour Over.

By Any Means Necessary
As Economic Recovery Lags, Millions Left Vulnerable to the Death Cult of Capitalism

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 113:40


In this episode of By Any Means Necessary, hosts Sean Blackmon and Jacquie Luqman are joined by Dr. Jack Rasmus, economist, radio show host, & author of 'The Scourge of Neoliberalism' to discuss the reasons behind the stalling economic recovery, the realities behind the slow return to work and the ending of unemployment benefits in the middle of a pandemic, the converging crises of capitalism that threaten the working class, and how the political system refuses to provide any relief for working and poor people while serving the interests of capital.In the second segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Leo Flores, Latin America Campaign Coordinator at CODEPINK to discuss negotiations between the government of Venezuela and the right-wing opposition, the political destiny of Juan Guaido, and the way forward for the Biden administration.In the third segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by technologist Chris Garaffa, the editor of TechforthePeople.org to discuss the harsh environmental impact of Bitcoin and its continuation of the impact of the capitalist death drive, the myth of egalitarian access to Bitcoin, Facebook's racist labeling of a video of Black men as “primates” and the racism encoded into artificial intelligence services that such processes rely on.Later in the show, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Netfa Freeman, Coordinating Committee member with the Black Alliance for Peace, organizer with Pan-African Community Action, and host of Voices with Vision on WPFW 89.3 FM to discuss the coup in Guinea, the impact of neocolonialism, neoliberalism, and imperialism on Guinea and the African continent, how the harms of neoliberalism and imperialism manifest on poor and working people in the US through the police, gentrification, and more, and the purpose of policing in a capitalist system.

Marketplace All-in-One
Bitcoin can now be used to pay for your grocery run in El Salvador

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 7:47


From the BBC World Service: The Latin American country will require businesses when possible to accept bitcoin from paying customers. It’s the first nation to have bitcoin as an official currency. But there have been protests and the World Bank and IMF have expressed concerns over the move. Plus, semiconductor shortages are on the agenda at a major motor industry trade show in Munich. And, how a coup in Guinea, one of the world’s biggest bauxite producers, sparked supply concerns, leading aluminum prices to surge to a 10-year high.

Global News Podcast
Taliban claim disputed Panjshir Valley

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 30:59


The Taliban say they've seized Afghanistan's Panjshir province, which would consolidate their control of the entire country, but resistance fighters dispute this. Also: The Belarusian woman who led mass protests against President Alexander Lukashenko is sentenced to eleven years in prison, and soldiers who have seized power in Guinea call government ministers to a meeting.

Global News Podcast
Soldiers seize power in Guinea

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 30:03


Troops announced a takeover on TV, capturing the president Alpha Conde. Also: Taliban accused of killing pregnant Afghan police officer in Ghor province, and could seaweed be a key raw material for a sustainable future?