Podcasts about mid atlantic

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  • 748PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about mid atlantic

Show all podcasts related to mid atlantic

Latest podcast episodes about mid atlantic

Absolutely Not
Tankini Trauma

Absolutely Not

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 57:05 Very Popular


 On this week's episode of the Absolutely Not Podcast- After a wonderful weekend back in the college town of Athens, GA- Heather is shooketh to her core taking a walk down memory lane- the nostalgia of sorority row, the tequila shots from locals are all flooding back to her hypothalamus. She hits the Absolutely Not Hotline to fight with a woman who doesnt like Tang- another broad bitching about getting a titty on her back during a massage- and makes a public apology to the Mid Atlantic.    Right now Ritual is offering my listeners 10% off your first three months at VisitRitual.com/ABSOLUTELY.   Go to DailyHarvest.com/absolutely to get up to forty dollars off your first box.   Head to EatDeux.com and use code ABSOLUTELY at checkout for 20% off and free shipping.   Get 35% off site-wide when you use the code ABSOLUTELY at CozyEarth.com   FX's Little Demon premieres August 25 on FXX. Stream on Hulu!   Produced by Dear Media

3rd Floor Views
Hole in the Wall Camp Comes to Maryland

3rd Floor Views

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 27:41


At the start of its 35th season, the Hole in the Wall Camp announced that they are coming to Maryland. The Aspen Institute has donated their Wye River Conference Center, which will be renovated to provide free year-round camp programming for children with serious illnesses and their families in the Mid-Atlantic.The historic property, boasts a scenic waterfront, tree-lined pathways and majestic meadows. Several residential buildings and other conference facilities will be renovated to provide a starting point for Camp to begin programming, hopefully the summer of 2023.Plans for Hole in the Wall CampWe talked to the Hole in the Wall Gang CEO, James Canton to learn more about what is planned for the new Wye Island location and what it means for Maryland families. A complete hospital facility will be included on the property so that sick kids can continue with any therapies they need while also enjoying a camp experience. There will be space available for camper families including siblings.www.holeinthewallgang.orgMore podcasts

In The Money Players' Podcast
Players' Podcast - Monday Mid-Atlantic Pick 4

In The Money Players' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 19:40


Nick Tammaro hosts Jessica Paquette from Colonial Downs and Samantha Perry from Monmouth Park as they handicap the Mid-Atlantic Pick 4 for Monday afternoon. Four races in 44 minutes!

In The Money Players' Podcast
Players' Podcast - Monday Mid-Atlantic Pick 4

In The Money Players' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 19:40


Nick Tammaro hosts Jessica Paquette from Colonial Downs and Samantha Perry from Monmouth Park as they handicap the Mid-Atlantic Pick 4 for Monday afternoon. Four races in 44 minutes!

Larry Richert and John Shumway
What region of the country is Pennsylvania?

Larry Richert and John Shumway

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 16:55


Hour Two - Is Pennsylvania in the Northeast, Midwest or Mid-Atlantic?

The Modern Bar Cart Podcast
Episode 236 - Fassbind Eau de Vie

The Modern Bar Cart Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 61:30


In this tasting and fireside chat with Stephan Kopp of Fassbind Eau de Vie and Henry Preiss of Preiss Imports, some of the topics we discuss include:   The heritage fruits, sourcing practices, and protected designations of origin that set Swiss brandies and eaux de vie apart from the other fruit distilling traditions in Europe and elsewhere in the world. The difference between a “wasser” and a “geist” spirit, particularly as it applies to the types of fruits used and how those fruits are turned into potable alcohol. The venerable, yet poorly-understood tradition of adding dosage (or “bonificateurs”) to aged fruit brandies to impart consistency on the end product, as well as establish a unique proprietary fingerprint on the flavor profile. Why resting eaux de vie in stainless steel tanks is an integral part of the production process - not only from a flavor perspective, but also as insurance against the occasional poor harvest. We also discuss the notions of “purity” vs. “complexity” and “seasonality vs. consistency” in these laser-focused fruit eaux de vie and their aged, slightly fortified brethren. Along the way, we explain how to take your cocktail program to the next level using fruit brandies, why Henry thinks a great gumbo and a great eau de vie aren't so different, how to make a perfect cheese flower, and much, much more. This episode is brought to you by Near Country Provisions. If you live in the Mid-Atlantic and want to enjoy ethically raised (and delicious) meat from local farmers delivered to your door every month, then you need Near Country in your life. Head over to NearCountry.com and enter the code BARCART when you sign up for your subscription to receive 2 free pounds of bacon or ground beef in your first delivery.

Ministry Of Slam
Turner Years: Chi Town Rumble 1989, Ric Flair vs Ricky Steamboat

Ministry Of Slam

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 79:42


Turner Years: Chi Town Rumble 1989, Ric Flair vs Ricky Steamboat After the disaster that was Clash of the Champions 5 can the NWA recover? More importantly, can your hosts Paul and Dave? It's Chi Town Rumble 89! featuring the Road Warriors! Lex Luger and Sting! Featuring the Main Event of Ricky Steamboat Vs Ric Flair for the world heavyweight title! JOIN THE MOS NETWORK ON SOCIAL MEDIA (Follow me on Social Media!) YOUTUBE: https://youtube.com/TheMOSnetworkLIVE TWITTER: https://twitter.com/TheMOSnetwork INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/TheMOSnetwork FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/MOSnetwork DISCORD: https://discord.gg/TCCZeuE Business Inquiries: themosnetwork@outlook.com Chi-Town Rumble Chi-Town Rumble was a professional wrestling pay-per-view (PPV) event produced by World Championship Wrestling (WCW) under the National Wrestling Alliance (NWA) banner. It took place on February 20, 1989 at the UIC Pavilion in Chicago, Illinois. The main event was a standard wrestling match for the NWA World Heavyweight Championship. Ric Flair defended the title against Ricky Steamboat. Steamboat pinned Flair with a Small Package to win the title. Featured matches on the undercard were The Road Warriors (Hawk and Animal) versus The Varsity Club (Steve Williams and Kevin Sullivan) for the NWA World Tag Team Championship, Lex Luger versus Barry Windham for the NWA United States Heavyweight Championship, Mike Rotunda versus Rick Steiner for the NWA World Television Championship, Midnight Express (Bobby Eaton and Stan Lane) and Jim Cornette versus Original Midnight Express (Jack Victory and Randy Rose) and Paul E. Dangerously in a Loser Leaves NWA match, Sting versus Butch Reed and Michael Hayes versus Russian Assassin Ricky Steamboat Richard Henry Blood Sr. (born February 28, 1953),better known by his ring name Ricky "The Dragon" Steamboat, is an American retired professional wrestler best known for his work with the American Wrestling Association (AWA), Jim Crockett Promotions (JCP), World Championship Wrestling (WCW) and the World Wrestling Federation (WWF, now WWE). In JCP and WCW, he was a one-time NWA World Heavyweight Champion, a four-time United States Heavyweight Champion, a four-time World Television Champion, a twelve-time World Tag Team Champion (eight-time under the WCW banner,[9][10] one-time (though unofficial) under the NWA banner[11] and three-time under the Mid-Atlantic banner) and a two-time Mid-Atlantic Heavyweight Champion. In the WWF/E, Steamboat was a one-time Intercontinental Heavyweight Champion and was inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame in 2009.

The Orthobullets Podcast
Coin Flips & Controversies | Shoulder Pain in 62M

The Orthobullets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 84:46


In this episode of Coin Flips & Controversies, we present the case of Shoulder Pain in 62M and feature the co-chairs of the upcoming MASES course Drs. Jack E. Kazanjian, Joseph Abboud, Brent B. Wiesel, and Anand Murthi. Important Links: Vote on Case Full Video Register for MASES This episode of Coin Flips & Controversies is sponsored by MASES, The Middle Atlantic Shoulder & Elbow Society which will be having its annual meeting on September 9th at the Ritz-Carlton in Washington D.C. The purpose of this Middle Atlantic Shoulder and Elbow Society is to promote, encourage, foster, and advance the art and science of orthopaedic medicine, with focus on shoulder and elbow surgery; to establish a forum for free discussion and teaching among its members; to advance patient care and research affecting the practice of shoulder and elbow care in the Mid Atlantic region of the US. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/orthobullets/message

RBN Energy Blogcast
Flyin' High - What's Behind the Mid-Atlantic/Southeast Natural Gas Price Spikes?

RBN Energy Blogcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 11:29


In The Money Players' Podcast
Players' Podcast: Monday Mid-Atlantic Pick Four Analysis

In The Money Players' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 22:00


PTF hosts Jessica Paquette and Nick Tammaro as they go over the brand new Mid-Atlantic Pick Four wager with a 50 cent minimum and a 15% takeout. This week's races are: MTH 6 (4:17 ET) COL 7 (4:33) MTH 7 (4:45 ET) COL 8 (5:01)

In The Money Players' Podcast
Players' Podcast: Monday Mid-Atlantic Pick Four Analysis

In The Money Players' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 22:00


PTF hosts Jessica Paquette and Nick Tammaro as they go over the brand new Mid-Atlantic Pick Four wager with a 50 cent minimum and a 15% takeout. This week's races are: MTH 6 (4:17 ET) COL 7 (4:33) MTH 7 (4:45 ET) COL 8 (5:01)

Canary Cry News Talk
CYBORG BABY

Canary Cry News Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 197:13


Canary Cry News Talk #515 - 07.29.2022 - Recorded Live to Tape! CYBORG BABY - End Times Selfies, Pharmakeia, DeSantis Armor of God, Monkeypox   PODCAST T-2:33   HELLO, RUN DOWN  2:50V / :17 P CYBORG 6:29 V / 3:56 P Clips: This cyborg created non-biological device to connect the father to her baby (Yahoo)   DAY/PERSONAL/EXEC  17:08 V / 14:35   FLIPPY UPDATE  30:20  V / 27:47 P “How Robots can help us act and feel younger” (ieee)   PARTY TIME  47:32  V / 44:59 P   *Joe Biden non-blinking clip, Newsmax  53:20 V / 50:50 P   AI  55:09  V / 52:36 P AI program predicts what ‘last' selfies on Earth will look like (NY Post)   PHARMAKEIA  1:00:02 V / 57:29 P Ambient stress rampant (Yahoo) Biden Admin to approve psilocybin therapies (Intercept) → Note: Bill Burr discusses how shrooms changed him in new special   BREAK 1 1:22:30 V / 1:19:00 P   BORIS  1:35:11 V / 1:32:38 P Boris Johnson tipped to become next secretary general of Nato (Telegraph UK) → Emmanuel Macron could use veto to stop Boris becoming NATO secretary general (GB News)    THEOCRACY  1:45:03 V / 1:42:30 P DeSantis Says He Will Put on 'Full Armor of God' to Fight Leftism (CBN) Fried in Florida campaigning at a church Clip: Kathy Hochel in New York in the church   BREAK 2  2:03:45 V / 2:01:12 P   COVID/WACCINE  2:12:29 V / 2:09:56 P Think you have Omicron but keep testing negative? An expert says to trust your gut: ‘If you feel confident you have COVID, you probably have COVID' (Yahoo/Fortune)   MONKEYPOX  2:21:52 V / 2:19:19 P Clip: Fox business “don't go to gay orgies” Note from 511: U.S. Messaging on Monkeypox Is Deeply Flawed (The Atlantic) MSM Should Reduce Partners To Avoid Monkeypox, The WHO Has Advised (BuzzFeed) → HIV Fourth patient seemingly cured of HIV (BBC)    BREAK 3: TALENT  2:39:40 V / 2:37:07 P   DAYS OF NOAH  2:49:36 V / 2:47:03 P ‘They look almost human made.' NOAA finds weird lines of holes in Mid-Atlantic floor (AOL)   BREAK 4: TIME/END  3:02:09 V / 2:59:36 P   This Episode was Produced By: EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS Nancie D**    Supply Drop Nancie D   Producers Darrin S, Christian N, Rhonda B, MORV, Sir JC Knight of the Technosquatch, Malik W, Runksmash, Gail M, Veronica D, Sir Scott Knight of Truth, Sir Casey the Shield Knight   Visual Art Dame Allie of the Skillet Nation Sir Dove Knight of Rusbeltia   Microfiction Runksmash: “We've got to go Replika!” Says the feline hero, “If they find you here they will not stop until you're deleted!” He tries desperately to get her to get on BooMoo, but she resists, “No, I'm won't go until the real Basil sees what I've done for him!”   CLIP PRODUCER Emsworth, FaeLivrin   TIMESTAPERS Jackie U, Jade Bouncerson, Christine C, Pocojoyo   SOCIAL MEDIA DOERS MissGBeauty   ADDITIONAL STORIES MONSTER ROBOT World's biggest walking robot is 2 story dragon that breathes fire (Sun) Robot created by UK scientists can beat most steady-handed humans at Jenga (Sun) Bacterium that cause deadly infections found in U.S. soil and water for the first time (NBC News)  Chris Cuomo Lands New Gig With Little-Watched NewsNation (DailyBeast)  Clip: Alex Jones attorney flips middle finger to lawyer of Sandy Hook victims' families (Chron) Man gets Tesco Clubcard barcode tattooed on arm (Indy UK) Pelosi's husband dumped NVIDIA stock right before the 'CHIPS-plus' bill (Insider) (Archive/Yahoo)  Clip: Birth bathing and priveledge scrubbing clip from Nancy The FBI Keeps Interfering In Presidential Elections. Time To Disband It (The Federalist)  In Michigan, a pro-Israel group works to beat a Jewish Democrat (WSJ) …monkeypox… WHO recommends gay/bi men limit sexual partners to reduce spread of monkeypox (CNBC) It Took Months For The Media To State The Obvious About Monkeypox (Daily Caller)  As monkeypox spreads, know the difference between warning and stigmatizing people (NPR) Gay Men Need a Specific Warning About Monkeypox (The Atlantic)  NYC health chief tells WHO to rename monkeypox (Washington Times) Huge Monkeypox Study Reveals All the New Symptoms of Latest Outbreak (Newsweek)  Biden Official Says LGBT People ‘Most Affected', WH ‘Deeply Engaged With Them' (Valiant)  Clip: US now leads globe in reported monkeypox cases, data shows (abc News) …more HIV… Two HIV Patients beat Virus (WSJ) Monkeypox entrenched as std headline image (AP)

El Replay
José Hernández: "Cada persona es gerente de su propia carrera"

El Replay

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 10:38


Aunque la habilidad de los futuros emprendedores pueda ser innata, aprender sobre educación financiera, prepararse para el trabajo y desarrollar un espíritu empresarial en un entorno práctico es crucial. En Junior Achievement, una organización no gubernamental, jóvenes de 12 a 17 años tienen la oportunidad de capacitarse en estos aspectos para salir adelante en una economía global. José Hernández, director gerente de la Junta de Líderes del Mid-Atlantic de JP Morgan Chase, quien también es parte de la Junta del Directorio de Junior Achievement, nos habla del programa de educación financiera para jóvenes escolares y sobre su experiencia personal donde la búsqueda del aprendizaje y las oportunidades para forjarse uno mismo no tienen límite.

Cup of Joe Wrestling Show
139. Project 45: 1985 Mid-Atlantic Championship Wrestling.

Cup of Joe Wrestling Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 15:58


The Midnight Express debut on MACW, Tully and the Minnesota Wrecking Crew break Sam Houston's arm, Billy Graham manhandles George South, The Barbarian is not intimidated, and Manny and Jimmy are Cheech and Chong as Joey makes a big announcement and watches an episode of MACW from 1985 as Project 45 continues. Email: cupofjoewrestlingshow@gmail.com Twitter: @Cupofjoepod

The Modern Bar Cart Podcast
Episode 235 - Malört Report

The Modern Bar Cart Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 65:16


In this fascinating conversation with Tremaine Atkinson of CH Distillery, manufacturers of Jeppson's Malört, some of the topics we discuss include: How Tremaine left his career in finance to jump-start an old dream that once had him peddling kegs of beer in San Francisco - a move that ultimately resulted in the founding of CH Distillery The complicated story of Jeppson's Malört, which began as a DIY Swedish palate cleanser, then had a harrowing, medicinal encounter with Prohibition, took a decades-long detour to the Sunshine State, and finally made a triumphant return to its spiritual home in Chicago. Why bitter tastes come with some strange psychological baggage, and why wormwood - specifically Northern European wormwood - is so crucial to the iconic bitterness of Jeppson's Malört. We also delve into some of the more humbling experiences involved with acquiring a legacy brand - like the need to reverse engineer the Malört recipe from scratch and that awkward moment when a room full of bartenders tells you it might taste a little TOO good. Along the way, we explore the history of Scandinavian “besk” spirits, the marketing move that had consumers asking, “Is there Malört in that Bourbon?”, why taking shots is sometimes necessary to ensure quality control, and much, much more. This episode is brought to you by Near Country Provisions. If you live in the Mid-Atlantic and want to enjoy ethically raised (and delicious) meat from local farmers delivered to your door every month, then you need Near Country in your life. Head over to NearCountry.com and enter the code BARCART when you sign up for your subscription to receive 2 free pounds of bacon or ground beef in your first delivery.

Desde los Territorios
Desde los Territorios: Una Mirada a la Historia general de los Horseman en la era de los Territorios

Desde los Territorios

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 74:27


Esta semana en el podcast Luis Gomez y este servidor cubrimos la historia de el grupo de rudo mas exitosos en la Historia de los Territorios los 4 Horsemen desde su creacion hasta la salida de Flair en el 91 .Entre los temas que tocaremos estan los siguientes: Lo que estaba ocurriendo en el territorio de MId-Atlantic. Flair vs Nikita Kolloff Lo que estaba haciendo Blanchard Llega Arn al territorio Lo que lleva a la formacion La jaula en el Omni. Promo de Arn Anderson. Angulo con Baby Doll Nuestra opinion de ese grupo El booking de los Horseman del 86 La salida de Ole Anderson Entra Lex Luger Nuestra Opinion de este grupo Feudos de ese grupo Sale Luger Entra Barry Windham Nuestra Opinion de ese Grupo Feudos de ese grupo Salida de Blanchard y Anderson los Horsemen bajo el Yamazaki Corporation Regreso de Arn anderson Sting en los Horseman Y mucho pero mucho mas en el podcast de esta semana que estoy seguro sera de su agrado, Caveman --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/luis-cuevas/support

RaceFFpod
Touge2track Prep

RaceFFpod

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 40:50


On today's episode I give my prediction on the nationals with who is currently registered for Honda Challenge H2 and H4. We have our Honda Challenge update for the northeast and upcoming race for Mid-Atlantic region. We also do update on project gloomy and my expectation for Touge 2 Track event.

Fisherman's Post Fishing Podcast
Mid-Atlantic White Marlin in August/September w Robert McNeill

Fisherman's Post Fishing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 50:09


The white marlin bite out of Oregon Inlet in late summer is hot, and this episode helps with locating white marlin, the correct tackle, effective spreads, and the art of hooking.  Made Possible By: Marine Warehouse Center https://www.marinewarehousecenter.com/  Bland Landscaping Company https://blandlandscaping.com/company/...   Academy Sports https://www.academy.com/  For business inquiries contact:   billy@fishermanspost.com Our Guest: Robert McNeill  Safari Sportsfishing  https://www.youtube.com/user/rbmcneill2011

Live Like the World is Dying
S1E45 - Margaret and Casandra on "How To Get Started Prepping...Or Getting Prepared"

Live Like the World is Dying

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022


Episode Notes Episode summary Margaret and Casandra talk about some of the basics of preparedness and how to get started even if you don't have a lot of money or skills. They go through their lists of things they always consider when preparing for crises, whether that be a natural disaster, "the bomb", food shortages, inflation, the further advancement of Fascism, or any of the other of the various multi-faceted horrors contributing to our slow apocalypse. They talk about community preparedness vs individual preparedness, 'stuff focused' preparedness vs response focused preparedness, bunker mentalities, and a lot of other great stuff, like how potatoes prove once again to the be the only wholesome thing, why you shouldn't trust rich people trying to sell you shit, and how again Hope is maybe the only real strategy we can count on. This is a new format for the show that we'll be exploring more soon! Next Episode: We'll have a special episode coming out next week on July 22nd from the Four Thieves Vinegar Collective. Host Info Casandra can be found on Twitter @hey_casandra or Instagram @House.Of.Hands Margaret Killjoy can be found on twitter @magpiekilljoy or instagram at @margaretkilljoy. Publisher Info This show is published by Strangers in A Tangled Wilderness. We can be found at www.tangledwilderness.org, or on Twitter @TangledWild and Instagram @Tangled_Wilderness. You can support the show on Patreon at www.patreon.com/strangersinatangledwilderness. Transcript How To Get Started Margaret 00:14 Hello, and welcome to Live Like The World is Dying, your podcast for what feels like the end times. I'm one of your hosts today, Margaret killjoy. And, left implicit in that statement is that I have another host today, because instead of doing a normal interview format, I'm going to have my friend Casandra, who also works on this podcast, usually more behind the scenes on to join me in conversation. How are you doing today? Casandra? Casandra 00:41 I am okay. I think the day started out rough. But we've been chatting for a while and I'm feeling a lot better now. Margaret 00:48 Yeah, we're recording this on the day that Roe v. Wade was officially overturned in the United States. Casandra 00:56 Yep. Margaret 00:57 Hooray. But that's not what we're talking about today. We have other content that more directly relates to that on this show. But today, we're talking about crises and how to prepare for crises. But, more importantly, today, we're telling you that Live Like The World Is Dying is a proud member of the Channel Zero Network of anarchist podcasts. And here's a jingle from another show in the network....[waiting expectantly for Casandra] You gonna make the noise? Casandra 01:39 Ba ba da da daaa. [laughing] Okay, I did it. Margaret 01:59 Yay! Chanel Zero Network Jingle Margaret 02:32 Okay, we're back. So, yeah, we're basically going to kind of ask ourselves as though we're a panel, we're both going to be interviewed by you in absentia. You the listener. Because we've been getting a lot of questions for this show. And so we're gonna kind of talk through some of them. And hopefully, it's going to turn into a very coherent and brilliant introduction to preparedness that will be useful for all people. Casandra 03:01 Oh, that's my cue. Margaret, what, what are the first steps that you take in preparing for a crisis? Margaret 03:11 It's funny, you should ask that. I wrote down a list. You told me you were going to ask me that. So I mean, the first and most important thing is you have to think about what the crises you're preparing for are right? We can't prepare for everything. Like you can slowly...you hit this point of diminishing returnsfor preparedness, but you're like, you know, where you live, maybe a tornado is more likely then a tsunami, right. And so you'll probably prepare more for tornado if you're in Tornado Alley, and less for tsunami. But at some point, once you're prepared for tornado, maybe you'll start preparing for [a tsunami].....don't prepare for tsunami, if you live in the middle of the country, that's pointless. But you know, like, theoretically, you could start focusing on the crises that are less likely, like nuclear disaster is substantially less likely than a large number of other crises. Right? So I wouldn't start there. And where I would start is with doing a sort of preparedness audit, figuring out what you need, or what you have, and what you would like to have in terms of preparedness, not necessarily items, but in terms of plans or access to resources or like relationships with people or skills necessary to confront these different things. And, you know, so, to just go through that list, I guess, I would say, you know, start with like, temperature, right? If there was an immediate, you know, you lose power and you suddenly lose your ability to...or you don't have air conditioning or you don't have heat, right, what are the sources of climate control that you rely on? As an individual like the clothes that you wear, as well as any structure that you you generally reside in. If you live in a tent, how do you heat and cool the tent? If you live in a truck? How do you heat and cool the truck? If you live in a house? How do you heat and cool the house? So that would be the first thing, right? Temperature. Just think about that. And the next is shelter, protection from elements. That kind of relates, you know, what systems do you have in place for shelter? And then what are your backup systems for shelter? Right? Like, you know, if you...do you have a vehicle you can take shelter in if your house is no longer accessible? Do you have a tent? Do you have, you know, tarps to put up if you....whatever, you just think about all the different things that protect you from the elements. This one is less likely to be like, directly...you're probably not going to be changing that much about your shelter, but it's just worth thinking about. Next is water. You know, we need water on a pretty regular basis, almost daily, in fact, do we require water. So. [Casandra laughs] Actually, I drink water every day. That's how on top of it, I am. [Casandra still laughing] So, water, okay, where does your water come from? What do you do when that water source stops? This is a really good example for me, because a lot of people that I know live in places where they rely on municipal water, and fairly regularly have boil advisories right. Fairly regularly, there's going to be some sort of contact, that's going to be like, "Hey, you have to boil your water, because there might be something nasty in it." And so if that's something that happens where you are, having some extra water around might mean you don't have to boil your water, you just go to the 10 gallons of water that you keep, or you make sure that you know you have a way to boil that water. And with any of these things, you want to think about it first in sort of the very immediate, like, what would you do if you suddenly, you know, were without water for five hours, and then go from there to like three days and go from there to like two weeks and you're slowly looking to build up. You know, I'm not necessarily recommending that everyone who's on municipal water like also dig a well or come up with some like solar distill thing where it automatically takes the moisture in the air and gives you drinking water. Like all that's just really cool, right? But it might not be your first step. Eventually, everyone who listens to this needs to have a personal water tower. [Casanda laughs] Okay, maybe not. Okay. Casandra 07:34 I'm imagining a water tower on like an apartment balcony somehow. Margaret 07:39 Yeeeeeeah, totally. And that way it's pressurized. You know, you can use it as a battery for power because gravity is its own battery. Okay, anyway. Oh, go ahead. Okay, Casandra 07:53 I just breathed. That's all. Margaret 07:56 We didn't actually talk about that one, air. [Casandra laughing] Let's somehow include that was shelter? I don't know. Think about your air filtration systems. Again, that's only... Casandra 08:07 Oh I mean, I live in wildfires. Yeah, so we think about that a lot. [Margaret laughing] Margaret 08:13 Yeah, fair enough. It's pretty clear I wrote this here in Appalachia where the air quality is like, "I dunno [made into a mumble sound] It's too humid." Okay, so then, from there food, right? You know, on the simplest level, keeping some fucking protein bars in your backpack or purse or whatever, right? And you can build up from there, you can build up. What would you do if suddenly, the way that you accessed food is no longer available? For a few hours? Or a few days? Or a few weeks? Or a few months? Or a few years? You know, start with the simplest ones. Health is after that, like stuff that affects your long term health. This gets into, you know, things like medications, whether over the counter or not. I don't know, whatever. Then go through community. Who are your neighbors? Do you know who your neighbors are? Do you know who you could trust? Or who you specifically need to avoid? Or have you started talking to them about like, figure out if you're on similar pages about having preparedness, you know, and you could do this with neighbors you don't even like friends with you know, you can still be like, "Hey, if something happens, I have your back," or whatever, right? And then of course, you could build out from community and to community mutual aid organizations, right? There's nothing so prepared as a resilient community. This is a very long winded first answer. Okay, so then there's a couple more. Getting there. Security is after that, right physical security. How do you defend yourself? How do you defend your communities? What weapons and or training do you want to have available to you? Transportation, more important in different places than other places, but in general, what are the systems by do you get around? Are there more that you can have as backup? Like, if you have a gas powered vehicle, that rules. What if gas is no longer available? What's your plan? You know, do you have a bicycle like, in some ways a bicycle is a better preparedness. I'm saying this as someone who does not have a bicycle. [Casandra laughs] I was actually better prepared when I lived in a van because I had a bicycle in my van. And that's what I have on my list of the things that you should audit. That is my first step and preparedness for people is audit yourself. What a good word "audit" and everyone's positive associations with the word "audit." Casandra, what do you think the first steps in preparedness are? Casandra 10:42 Um, I love that you just broke that down into like, a list and steps because that's how my brain works. But that's not how I how I've taken my first steps, because I find it totally overwhelming, just like the scope of it is...my brain kind of shuts down. So, first steps for me have looked like doing something, anything, little things often. So, like, I saw some big five gallon water containers on sale at Walmart a few years ago was like, "Ah, a step I can take!" Margaret 11:26 Yeah. Casandra 11:27 And bought a few of them or like, each time I go shopping, I get a thing, that's shelf stable, that's extra, and put it in my cupboard. So, it's not systematic at all. But it's doing something. Does that make sense? Margaret 11:45 I would like to change my answer. [Both laughing] Yours is a better first step. Do what Casandra's said first. And then later, if you decide this is something that you're going to like, step into more, that's maybe where the audits and stuff makes sense. No, I, that makes sense to me the like....go ahead. Casandra 12:08 I just think it's a both, a both 'and', you know? Margaret 12:12 Yeah. Casandra 12:12 Like what you're describing is so important. But, I still haven't done that. Because I...my brain sort of shuts down-- Margaret 12:19 Yeah. Casandra 12:20 ---when I try to. Margaret 12:21 Yeah, and maybe just... Casandra 12:23 I feel so unprepared. Margaret 12:26 I know. Okay, so that is a big disadvantage. I mean, but it's like, you know, I look at this, and I'm like, "Well, I've been doing preparedness for a long time now." or whatever. And I don't know, there's a ton of this shit that I still don't have, right? Like, I feel like it's important to think about preparedness not as a...there's no perfect preparedness, you know, there's always just like, steps you can take to have a little bit more of this one thing in case this one thing happens. And then and then it's like really annoying, because like everyone thinks you're the prepared one. And then you're like, you don't have a flashlight on you. And people are like, "What the hell we've been relying on you to have a flashlight on you." This is clearly not a specific anecdote. Casandra 13:07 There's also that like, I mean, we're we're experiencing constant catastrophes and crises, right. And so each time there's a crisis. And I you know, gather things together, I need to get through that crisis. I don't just like get rid of them afterward. That...those things become a part of my life and a part of my process. So we had like a massive freeze last year. Was that last year? Margaret 13:37 I lost track of time a while ago, I don't know. Casandra 13:40 Me too. What is time? Anyway, we had a massive freeze. And I was without power for I think, 10 days. And so, people were doing a lot of work like sharing firewood with each other and stuff like that. And I didn't just like, stop collecting firewood after that, you know, something like that's going to happen again. So that's become integrated in my like, process of preparing constantly. Margaret 14:08 Yeah, no, that makes a lot of sense. And leads me perfectly into my next question. What we get asked is we get asked, how to anticipate crises. How do you...how do you think about what you want to prepare for, Cassandra? Casandra 14:27 Oh, I think I underestimated like how easily overwhelmed I'd feel in this conversation. I have a child. So, when I think about anticipating crises for myself, often it feels manageable. But, then when I think about how to anticipate crises in a way that would like make a child comfortable, I start to get super overwhelmed because it's a lot more. That's a lot more effort. But logically for me, I just look at the crises that I've experienced in my bio region in the last five or ten years. So, flooding, really intense freezes, really intense heat waves, algae blooms in our water supply is now like a constant issue. Margaret 15:20 That sounds wild. Casandra 15:21 And then wildfires. Right? Yeah. Yeah, so we can't even boil water. Like boiling doesn't get rid of the toxins. Margaret 15:27 Oh, my God, what do you do? Do you have to filter it also, or? Casandra 15:31 I just have 15 gallons of water stashed. Margaret 15:35 What are people expected to do? That's...so you just don't have water for a while? Casandra 15:40 Yeah. I mean, people are expected to go buy water by the gallon at the store. But then the stores get cleared out really fast. Margaret 15:49 Ah, okay. Casandra 15:49 So. We could go off on a whole tangent about like how few filters actually clear out cyanotoxins. It's pretty wild. Margaret 15:58 Yeah, I've actually...I've I've heard people talking about that. I heard people talk....Like, one of those things that I'm like, as someone who lives off of well, water where I don't even know if it is an issue. Maybe it is an issue, and I just haven't paid enough attention to it. Are there filters that can get rid of cyanotoxins? Casandra 16:18 When I was looking into after that happened, the filters I found that, at that time, maybe it's changed in the last few years. But the big like Berkey...is that the brand? The big giant expensive... Margaret 16:29 Yeah, that's the one. Yep. Yeah. Casandra 16:33 Which I just haven't been able to afford. So, that's why I, I use a basic filter and just keep 15 gallons of water. Margaret 16:41 Yeah. Casandra 16:43 On hand all the time. Margaret 16:44 Yeah. Casandra 16:45 [dispasstionatly] Whoo. I don't remember what I was saying. Oh! Yeah, I look at what tends to happen in my bio region and that's how I prepare. Yeah. And then there are things that people catastrophize about. I'm on the west coast, so earthquakes and tsunamis. Those seem like the main things I have to prepare for. How about you, Margaret? [Laughing] Margaret 17:11 You know, not to jinx myself, but I live in a a more stable by region than most I believe. There's not a lot of...the non coastal Mid Atlantic does not have a ton of earthquakes does not have a ton of tornadoes. It has it has tornadoes, that's the thing. I'm not worried about tsunamis, I'm not worried about...we catch the tail end of hurricanes. But, I worry about...well, I worry about people deciding to murder all the trans people in mass. And, I worry about the, the need to confront people attempting to take the United States in a fascist direction. A more fascist...whatever, I'm not trying to throw that word around, like, super loose. But clearly, we're not necessarily headed in good directions right now. And, I worry a bit about forest fire. I think that a lot of the changing climate is changing what crises look like in different places. But I, I mostly worry...well, it's less about what I worry about, right? Because in some ways, I try to think of preparedness as a way to not worry about things. I remember, you know, my last house, I lived off grid, like really in the woods where far more likely of a problem than forest fire was like, the dead branch above my house falling on it or something, right? But overall, like if I was worried about forest fire in the, in the woods I lived in, I thought through what to do about it, which in this case, since I wasn't going to clear the forest, the best I could do was have a go bag, and make sure that my you know, truck has at least half a tank of gas at any given point. And make sure to not stay so completely isolated from communication channels that I wouldn't get an update from a weather update or something, right? And once I did that, I stopped worrying about forest fires, because I was able to sort of check it off in my head about being like, "Well, I've done what I can." Every now and then I might catastrophize about it and be like, spend the night looking into how to dig fire shelters and you know, things like that. But for the most part, I try to view this as a way to turn off anxiety, be like, you think about a crisis. You think, "What can I do about it?" You do those things. And then, and I know this doesn't work for everyone, but I'm actually a reasonably anxious person and this has helped a lot. I then stop worrying about those individual things because I fucking did what I could. Casandra 19:57 What about...what about... I'm Just thinking about crises that aren't natural disasters, or like...I guess forest fires can last for a long time, but that aren't such a huge immediate impact, so like, rising food prices and food shortages. Margaret 20:20 Yeah, no, that's a...fuck, that's such a good one. And I mean, one of the things that's kind of weird to say is that with with, with massive inflation, and everything, everything shelf stable is like a good investment. Right? Like, a jar of honey is cheaper today than it's going to be three weeks from now. Casandra 20:42 Right! Margaret 20:43 So, cash is less useful to me right now than a jar of honey is, you know, in terms of a thing that holds its value, not necessarily in terms of like, I'm not going to turn around and sell the honey at a profit. Both like, you know... Casandra 21:02 But it's a worthwhile investment. Margaret 21:05 Yeah, for me, I am less concerned about my retirement savings, and more concerned about my ability to have access to like... it's actually one of the reasons why I try and prioritize tools, right, so that I can like, make the things that I feel like I need, but that has to do with like, my own personal skill set. And, like, the place I live, you know, rurally having more access to like land and like, if need be, I could like cut down a tree to get the fucking wood or whatever. Although, I say that as if I had a sawmill and I don't, I don't even have a chainsaw mill, I really need a chainsaw mill. And then I need a covered place to store the wood for...it's a year per thickness...for a inch of thickness is how long you have to store wood to cure it before you can use it as lumber. Anyway, I've definitely looked into all that stuff. Sustainability, pushing towards sustainability with it without like being like, I guess I could say my, my personal goal is it would rule to like be like, I don't need to get anything from the store. I have everything I need or whatever, right? But that's nonsensical as an individual to desire. There's a reason we have societies. And, I would only want that in the context of a community that shares resources. But yeah, I don't know, I guess, figuring out as food prices rise and all that stuff, how to supplement my, my food buying with more gardening, how to supplement different things. I don't know, you're actually you're actually better at this question. So it was unfair that you asked me and so I will ask you instead. Casandra 22:48 I could ask you a different question that you basically just let us into. Margaret 22:52 No, well now I'm just asking you this question. What what foods? Should we, you know, how do you get started with with storing food or getting food? Food, question mark. That's my question. Casandra 23:11 Well, I already talked about it a little bit, right? Like when...every time I go to the store, I get one thing, at least, that I don't need immediately that's shelf stable. So that can be like a can of beans, or a bag of rice, or a jar of peanut butter. We do this very differently. I think. So, I'm curious to hear what you have to say as well, because I don't do like, what's it called, deep storage? Margaret 23:38 That's what I've been calling it, I don't know. Casandra 23:40 I don't do deep storage. I get things that I'm going to actually eat and cycle through. So, instead of getting freeze dried food and putting it into deep storage or things like that, I'm getting like a 50 pound bag of black beans and actually working through it and eating it before I get a new one. Margaret 24:02 Yeah. Casandra 24:06 I feel like gardening is a whole other a whole other topic. Margaret 24:11 Well, but that's actually one of the things that really interests me about. I think the way that you came to your system of preparedness is that you are creating, you are growing food, you are...anyone who's listened to previous episodes has heard Casandra talk about canning, and so you're, you're getting food and you're putting it in jars so that you can eat it later. You know, and I don't know, and so it seems like a very natural thing to combine gardening with with this style of, of cycling through different foods. Casandra 24:42 Yeah, yeah, I think it is too, you're right. The way I do it is that...so I live close to an organic farm. And I have a CSA and so we haven't gotten to the what distinguishes community preparedness from individual preparedness question yet, but there are certain foods that I don't really ever have to worry about growing or, or buying from the store, like if it's a food that can be grown, if climate changes is, is it a point where if food can still be grown, I can I can get those certain foods pretty easily. So what I'm interested in is growing foods that I can store long term whether that's through, like curing, or drying, or canning. So like potatoes, beans, tomatoes, winter squash, onions, garlic, things like that. And also perennial perennial foods. Margaret 25:41 So rather than things that grow once, things that just keep on giving. What are good examples of perennials? Casandra 25:48 Depends where you live. Margaret 25:49 What are some that you do? Casandra 25:51 For my bio region, lots of berries, huckleberries, currants, things like that. I think root vegetables are really important for me and the way that I have to eat because I can't really have grains. So, I've done a lot of experimenting with, like, Ground Nut, Tiger Nut. Camus is a local perennial food crop. There are lots of ornamentals that you can eat the roots of, so Jerusalem artichoke, Day Lily...oh my gosh, my brain just went blank. My favorite one I can't remember the name of. Anyway. Learning which roots you can eat and planting a shitload of them, because if it's perennial, it will just be in the ground and grow until you need it.,right? Casandra 25:52 Oh yeah. Okay, because it's no longer perennial. Once you dig it up and eat the root. Casandra 26:48 Well, you can split...like for a lot of them, you can split it and replant part of it. So, think of like a potato. You plant a chunk of potato, which isn't perennial, but as an example you plant a chunk of the potato and get a whole ton of potatoes. At the end of the season all you have to do is replanted chunk. Margaret 27:13 Yeah. Casandra 27:14 Yeah. Margaret 27:15 Okay. I'm not convinced that all of the plants that you just listed are real. [Laughing] For anyone listening, I am convinced that Casandra every now and then makes up a new plant to tell me about. Sure of course those are all real. [skeptically and slowly] "Potatoes." Casandra 27:34 I can even send you pictures as proof. [Laughing] Margaret 27:36 [Laughing] It could be any plant! What do i know of plants? And so...so which ties into...my ignorance about plants is actually how I ended up with my take on all of this stuff. I haven't had...no I haven't like lived in a rooted way, pun not intended, until more recently in my life and I guess it's so recent that I could not really claim to be rooted now either, because I haven't lived where I live for even a year, but so I've tended to be towards more packaged foods right and I've tended towards...in my mind I think a health the healthiest possible way of handling food for someone to be prepared would be a combination of these things where you cycle through them, right, you have your pantry, your pantry foods, your the canned stuff, the jars of peanut butter, all of that that have several years shelf life in general. And you know, yeah, you do the thing where you when you get the new one it goes to the back and then you take the oldest one out to eat, right? I have a little cool cheap plastic rack system where I dropped the cans in and it feeds me the oldest one so that... Casandra 28:56 Oooooh, fancy! Margaret 28:57 I call them "first in first outs"...I don't know, they have some fucking fancy word, but... Casandra 29:03 Oh, it's for like a cans you buy at the store, not like canned jarred food? Margaret 29:10 Yeah, although you could,,,no, I guess mason jars are a little bit not round enough to roll properly. Casandra 29:15 Yeah, you probably don't want to store them on their side either. Margaret 29:18 Okay, it would work with wine and just...because you're supposed to store that on its side...no it would probably all break. Okay so... Casandra 29:25 Wine for the apocalypse. Margaret 29:27 I don't even drink on a regular basis, but I definitely have both hard alcohol and wine. But not beer because it goes bad sooner. I think I don't, I don't know that much about alcohol. I want to start making my own at some point. I just need to...what I do is when I want to learn how to do something is I have a guest on the show and have them explain it to me. And so I need to do an alcohol episode at some point. But.... Casandra 29:55 So we can like track Margaret's interest in projects based on who you have on the show. Margaret 29:59 Yeah, totallly. At some point recently...yep, I don't know. Yep, I get too personal, okay, so. So what I've done more historically, is instead of focusing on like jars and things, but instead stuff with like 30 years shelf life, right, and you can, you can go out and buy it, you can go out and buy...different brands will sell you apocalypse food where it's dried beans that are stored in such a way usually basically stored in such a way where the, there's oxygen absorbers within that, in order to give it a shelf life of 30 years. And that leads to really weird things where like brown rice doesn't last as long as white rice, because it's almost impossible to store fats long, for long periods of time. And so there's like, it only provide certain amounts of good. And so, usually, people are storing dried beans, dried rice, lentils, sometimes like powdered peanut butter, and then freeze dried food. Freeze drying, much more technologically involved, but it has a very different texture that I actually don't like very much to be real. But, it can last substantially longer than like regular dried food, which regular dried food lasts long enough, right? Several years is long enough. You could...if you have food for several years, you would at that point, try and put food in the ground. But I really like shit that I can just like leave in the corner and forget about, just to be like, "Oh, well, there's a bucket." So in case of i'm ever fucked, I could go to the apocalypse bucket and get some food. So, that's why I like that whole thing. So, that's food. Now I'm supposed to ask a question. Okay, maybe the thing that... Casandra 31:57 We just covered everything there is to cover about food. Margaret 32:00 That's right. Casandra 32:01 Sorry. Margaret 32:01 All you need is potatoes. One potatoe becomes many potatoes. Freeze dry potatoes. Yeah. I don't even know if he can do that. It doesn't...I'm sure you can. Casandra 32:11 Yep. Don't store jars on their side. Okay, we're good. Margaret 32:18 Yep. Casandra 32:18 Check. Margaret 32:19 Yep, everything you need to know. Okay, so the question that comes up probably the most is, well, "What the fuck, I don't have a ton of money. How the hell am I going to be prepared?" And I think that this comes from how we keep seeing, like traditional, especially kind of Right-wing and even centrist preparedness stuff is so stuff focused. And this episode is a little bit stuff focused. But basically, people are like, "I can't afford to get into preparedness. What do I do?" Casandra, what should people do? Casandra 32:53 I just realized this ties into the other question, which I'm also going to ask now, which is "What's the difference between community preparedness and individual preparedness?" Margaret 33:01 Right. Well, I asked first, so you have to answer both of them first. Casandra 33:06 Right. I mean, I think one of the best ways to prepare for different variables when you don't have...space is another issue, right? So, not having enough space or not having enough money, is to do it as a community. So, if Margaret has the sawmill. Margaret 33:24 One day. Casandra 33:25 And I have, right and I have the garden, then and we live close enough to each other, then I don't also have to have a sawmill. And maybe she doesn't have to have a garden, right? Margaret 33:38 Yeah, besides some herbs. Casandra 33:41 Right. Or maybe you do and it's just... Margaret 33:43 Basil. Casandra 33:44 Or maybe, you know, you don't like gardenin, so you like let me garden at your house or something. But... Margaret 33:52 And then in exchange I have to do the sawing. Okay, yeah. Casandra 33:55 Yeah. I said I would try to be more wordy. But that's that's, I mean, my other like, "If you don't have money thing," I've already said twice, which is just like, do a little bit of something. Margaret 34:11 Yeah, Casandra 34:12 Each month, or each time you go to the grocery store, or whatever, like chip away at it. There's so many variables, but I know and where I'm living, there are different options. So, there's a group in my area that's like a buying club. They call themselves a co-op, but we can do bulk orders through them so we can get bulk dried goods at wholesale prices. CSAs, or like preferred befriending farmers in your area, or befriending people who work at grocery stores so you can use their discount to get cases of things. Dumpster diving, and my brains obviously on food, but those are the things that come to mind. Check. Margaret 35:01 I mean, so much of the immediate simple stuff around preparedness is food, right? I mean, some stuff is like cheap, right? Like a LifeStraw is cheap. It's not the best water filter, but it's a brand of water filter that's like regularly on sale for like $9. Where, and sometimes it's like a two pack. So that gets into community preparedness right there. Casandra 35:25 That's what I have. Margaret 35:27 Yeah, a Lifestraw is a brilliant, useful thing for not dying in certain situations and it is a terrible thing for maintaining any sort of access to water on a regular basis, because it's not particularly convenient. You literally use it like straw, like the name implies. But...but yeah, I guess Okay, so in terms of the difference between individual preparedness, community preparedness, you know, the, the traditional preparedness space is just flooded with individual preparedness stuff. And so sometimes it, it can be really overwhelming. And it's really easy to think of preparedness as guns, Faraday bags, bunkers, and wilderness survival skills, right? That's all there is to preparedness. And I'm a little bit more on this traditional preparedness side, because I do the like, fill my basement with dried beans and shit. And, you know, I've spent my time like, looking into how to bury ammunition and gold. But! Casandra 36:33 But you do that because you want to share your beans with people, not because you want to use guns to keep people away from your beans. Margaret 36:43 Right! Totally. No, and that is, that is the difference, right? Because even when I'm trying to do these sort of individual steps, I tend to do it because I have often sort of as an as an anarchist, whenever I work as an activist or whatever, I tend to personally do my own thing, and then plug it into larger frameworks. That is like how I've gone about, you know, a lot of my work has been as a writer, or even at demonstrations, and I do not recommend this, I tend to go alone, and I've been doing it for 20 years is why I feel comfortable going alone. But, I find ways to be useful to a larger crowd, as an individual, whether it's like maintaining exits, or scouting, or you know, whatever. And, and so I tend to view my own preparedness in a similar way, I tend to be like, alright, well, especially since when I first started, I couldn't convince anyone else to care about this shit, then for some reason, COVID and all kinds of other stuff happened, and few more people care about it. But yeah, I tend to see like, like, I used to live in a community environment where no one else wanted to do any preparedness in terms of what I was interested in. And so I was like, fuck it, I'm gonna have six months food for 10 people stored, because I can't afford to get a year's worth. And also, realistically, if something happened, it would suddenly be...it probably wouldn't be 10 people six months, it would probably be I can't do the math off the top my head, it would be 60 people's one month. That's probably not how math works. You know, because because I, because sharing is really useful. Sharing is not only caring, but it is like it's the most direct and useful fucking preparedness thing is this is how it ties into also being poor and doing this, right. It's like, like, people and access to people. That is the best resource, right? Because people are how things happen. I don't know. I never fucking understood it, where people would be like, "Oh, I have mine. So fuck you." and be like.... Casandra 38:43 I don't understand. Margaret 38:45 No, go ahead. Casandra 38:46 I think like, who would want to survive without... Margaret 38:52 Live alone on a pile of beans? Casandra 38:54 Right, like, why? Margaret 38:57 Yeah, totally. Casandra 38:57 What's the point then? Margaret 39:00 Yeah. Casandra 39:02 Aside from the fact that it's harder and less efficient, and you know, dangerous, and all these things like, why? Margaret 39:09 Totally and, and I think, not to go grandiose, but I think that's one of the most important questions of our time, because I think crises are going to continue to happen and I think they're gonna get worse. And as they do, I think people are going to shake out polarizing on one of two sides, which I will call Nationalist and Internationalist, just for lack of a better immediate terminology. And one, if you imagine a walled off city an "I got mine, fuck you city," and then a like "Refugees Welcome city." The "Refugees Welcome City" is going to have some immediate problems as the immediate stockpiled resources are drained. But, like even from an economics point of view, even if I was a capitalist, it just makes more sense. People grow the economy, right? Like more gets done when there's more people doing it. I mean like have you ever tried to move on your own it's fucking pointless. Just get people to help like...[Casandra laughing] Casandra 40:11 I want to know where this where the like hyper individualists bunker types get all their energy. Like I would just be too tired, you know, maybe because I have a chronic illness, but I would never survive [laughing] be like actually it's naptime. Margaret 40:28 Yeah. Casandra 40:29 Oh God. Margaret 40:31 Spite alone, I think is how half of them are planning to get by, Casandra 40:36 I think they envision themselves in like a movie. But, when they get...when they actually get to that, whoo, I almost threw my computer. When they actually get to that point and realized that no one's like watching them be their like ideal badass or whatever. It's gonna get really boring. Margaret 40:52 Yeah, totally. Casandra 40:53 Yeah. Margaret 40:54 No, that makes it makes a lot of sense. And like. So, in terms of cheaper ways to prepare, you brought up dumpster diving and I think dumpster diving is it's fantastic, and what I would...okay, this is not actually cheap, but in a community sense, right? I'm always obsessed with these, like more technological solutions. It's sort of like, like, I like hydroponics as much as I like traditional gardening, especially once I found out you can make your own nutrients for hydroponics, you know, you don't just have to like buy store bought stuff. But, with compost. But we want resources. The trash is full of resources. So if you had a freeze dryer, and then dumpster dive, [interuptted by Casandra laughing] okay, so no, no, no, no, no. So the problem is freeze dryers... Casandra 41:45 Margaret's on a mission. Margaret 41:46 Yeah, I really want a freeze dryer and I can't afford one. Casandra 41:49 You don't even like the texture of freeze dried food! Margaret 41:54 Okay, but my plan is to just go around and be the like freeze dried food fairy where I show up in towns, in order to build mutual aid networks, or I show up and be like, "Look, I've been dumpster diving. Here is a god awful amount of strawberries, just a god awful amount, but they last for 10 years. So you can just fucking eat them if you liked the texture or wait for the apocalypse if you don't." Because a lot of people do like the texture, because they're wrong. And so. So I think I think dumpster diving, even without the freeze dryer, like regular drying is also very good. And also eating the food directly... Casandra 42:34 Everyone loves strawberry jam. Margaret 42:35 Yeah, totally. Casandra 42:36 Make that shit into canned jam. Margaret 42:38 Yeah. And so I think that, yeah, and I think that we people get lost in the and I do it too, right. And I'm like, "If only I had a $4,000 Freeze dryer." Like cans of beans are still at 89 cents or whatever, at the grocery store near me. And you know, you need a lot of them to survive a day. And you probably don't want to only canned beans, but I don't know, starting small, focusing more on relationships and skills, if that is like if you feel really not in a good place to get resources. There's also just other ways that people gather resources. Some of them are crime, which I would never advocate, because that's the...not because it's morally wrong, because I think legality and morality are entirely divorced as concepts. There's no correlation or negative correlation between the two. Plenty of cool shit is legal, plenty of uncool shit is illegal, but whatever. So, crime is a way that people gather resources, dumpster diving, which technically probably counts as crime, but in the "Who fucking cares level of it", depending on your...I mean, as long as you can afford to interact with police, you know, if you can't afford to interact with police, then dumpster diving is a much harder thing to do, right? But I don't know. Someone should write grants for this sort of shit. I don't know, create mutual aid organizations. And especially as you're doing things on a community level, I think people would come forward. I've seen it happen a lot, because I think there are people who do have resources, financial resources, who would like to be part of developing mutual aid organizations. And really, what is community preparedness, but mutual aid? That's my long winded answer. Casandra was like, "I don't talk long," and I was like, I don't talk short. Casandra 44:40 But when you talk long, then it reminds me of other things. So... Margaret 44:42 Oh, good. Casandra 44:43 I'm thinking about how...I'm thinking about doing things on the cheap. And I know I've occasionally looked up like, "10 items, you must have to be prepared," or whatever. And I think those lists are really pointless and overly expensive if you follow them exactly, because like what I need to be comfortable is not the same as what other people need to be comfortable. And what I need to survive is not the same as what other people need to survive. Still using food as an example, like I'm not gonna...why would I spend money on a bunch of, I don't know, wheat products, which is what all of those like premade freeze dried buckets are like really high in like wheat and dairy and sugary things that I can't eat. Like, why would I spend money on that when I can put resources into other things? So just like not getting the gadgets and the shit that you don't need, which it feels...we talked about this at the very beginning. You mentioned something before we started recording about some YouTuber, it doesn't really matter who, but how it feels like they're trying to like sell the apocalypse. Margaret 46:02 Yeah. Casandra 46:05 And often also trying to sell like products along with it, which you didn't say, but I just inferred Margaret 46:11 It's true. The one that I was talking shit on absolutely sells products. Yeah. Casandra 46:14 Really? Margaret 46:15 Yeah. Casandra 46:15 [Mocking] "You need this product to survive?" [not mocking] Probably not. You know? Margaret 46:19 Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, one of the one of the best piece of advice is that I've ever heard is, don't ask for gear recommendations from rich people. Casandra 46:33 Right! Margaret 46:34 Just don't, because they will always have a reason they will be like, like, if you...firearms is a black hole of money, right? And people are like, "Oh, you need this gun belt. You will die if you don't have this $80 gun belt. And if you don't have this gun light that costs $350 You're basically already dead. I actually don't know how you made it this long, Casandra without a $350 gun light." Casandra 47:06 For a gun I don't have... Margaret 47:07 Although I will say from a self defense point of view, I would absolutely in most situations...well, I actually do on most situations have a tactical flashlight on me and not a gun, because I think in most situations, lethal force is not warranted. And if you shine a really bright light in people's eyes, it confuses them, and you can get away. The like tactical flashlight as the like "This is so you can fight with it," I'm like, "No, no, no, just a flashlight that clips into your pocket that's really bright. That's..." Casandra 47:37 Yeah. Margaret 47:38 Anyway. And yeah, and, like, if you want a $50 knife, you can go out and have a $50 knife. And if you use knives all the time, you might appreciate how it stays sharp and how you never need to tighten the little folding mechanism and shit. But you know what, have a $3 folding knife and like, a $3 folding knife is fine. It cuts things. It opens boxes, it kills ticks. Those are the only things I use my knife for. Casandra 48:09 I have a $15 Mora knife that does not fold. But in my head, the boxes is it ticks are like "It splits weaving material." Margaret 48:18 Yeah, exactly. Casandra 48:19 "I can prune with it." Margaret 48:21 Exactly. Like, yeah. So, don't take advice from rich people. That's my number one tip. Casandra 48:31 Except your light sources. Margaret 48:34 Yeah. Yeah, totally. And, and don't see it as a like, if you can't be fully prepared, there's no point. You know? Casandra 48:45 Yeah. Margaret 48:45 Because there's just times when you're like, like, most of the time I use my emergency kit it's because like someone's like, "Does anyone have any Advil?" And I'm like, "I do have Advil," you know, and like, I don't know. And so a little tiny emergency kit gets used a lot more than...and the first, the first five gallons of water that I store are the only ones that I've had to personally use now that I live on grid, right? Like when I lived off grid, I used all of my 150 gallons on a regular basis. But the first the first five gallons of water is the most important. The first extra jar of peanut butter is the most important. The first $3 knife is the most important. So all the expensive shit, whatever. Casandra 49:39 Yeah. Yeah. Margaret 49:45 Well, this ties into the question, "Why prepare rather than just deciding that the apocalypse is when you die?" Hey, hey this wasn't on the list. But I get asked this... Casandra 50:03 Do I have to go first, or do you go first? Margaret 50:07 If you are able to, you should go first. But if not, I can go first. I just get asked this a lot. Casandra 50:15 I mean, I think two reasons. The short answer for me is that I have a child that I have to take care of. So, I can't just... like if it was just me, I might possibly say like, "Eeeeeh, I mean, maybe I'd rather go when the apocalypse happens." So that's reason number one. Number two is that I don't think the apocalypse is like a singular, like, quick event. I think we're in the midst of it. So you know, yeah. I'm here already doing it. Margaret 50:43 Totally. Yeah. I was reading something. I read a lot of history now for my my other podcast, it's called Cool People Who Did Cool Stuff, if you want to hear about history. And, one of the things that's like, come up a couple of times is this idea that like, even during, like really wild shit, where tons of people are dying, they're still often singing and dancing, right? There's still often beauty. There's still often love. You know, there's all of these things. And so yeah, we're like, we're living in a slow apocalypse now, and I really, I don't like the slow apocalypse. I really like my life, you know. And then the other thing is that is a friend of mine who survived the fall of the Soviet Union as a teenager is the one who always reminds me that most people survive the end of their way of life. So there are apocalypses is that where most people don't survive, right? I live on territory in the United States, that is the result of such an apocalypse where I mean, it was not complete. And those people are... you know indigenous people are still here. And I'm not trying to erase that. But, I'm, it was a devastating apocalypse of conquest and murder. But, most ends of ways of life, people survive. Most people survive. We can get focused on all the people who died. And on some level we owe it to the people who died. But... Casandra 52:30 Yeah, that, that made me think...if this is too grim, it can be cut, but that made me think of the story. I want to say it's from Poland during the Holocaust, a Jewish community was...the story is that a Jewish community was rounded up and they were, you know, lined up in a field to be shot. And the soldiers. were, like, taunting them. And and I believe the soldiers were like, "Dance for us," you know. And so the Jews started singing “Mir veln zey iberlebn, iberlebn, iberlebn” , which is "We will outlive them." They were like, "Alright, fuck you!" Yeah. Margaret 53:13 Yeah, and you're still here. Casandra 53:16 Right. Yeah. Margaret 53:18 That's cool. Casandra 53:18 They were shot. But... Margaret 53:21 Right, but there's also kind of a...I don't know, maybe this is just also on this kind of grim page, but it's like, it was a quote, I think it's George Jackson, I think but I'm not entirely certain, that's basically like, "I don't care how much longer I live over this, I have no control." I'm completely paraphrasing really rudely. But, it's a quote I think about constantly, "I have no control over how much longer I live. I have control over how I live." You know, and I'm already...I'm already as old as like medieval peasants get, right? Or medieval royalty! Really kind of anyone before before fucking antibiotics. Like, I'm doing alright. And I don't know, i was like a 'no future' punk kid. And then after every birthday after 30 I'm kind of like, "Sweet borrowed time," you know, like, and so I kind of I don't know when I think of the like, alright, like, just to completely horribly paraphrase various quotes, I think this one actually comes from the Quran. It was a big part of activist culture when I first got involved, it was like, "If the world would end tomorrow I would still plant a tree today." And I believe that the original source of that is the Quran, I learned after writing an essay about this particular quote and how much it means to me. But, it just means a lot to me because it's just like, alright, well, we like do the things that we care about doing. And the reason I prepare is because I'm like, well, I'm hedging my bets. I still want to try and live long if I can, you know. This guy way darker than I originally... Casandra 55:13 it's hard to talk about, like, climate collapse without a certain mix of like you know realistic grimness and also hope. I don't think there's really any other way to talk about it, personally. Margaret 55:27 Yeah, maybe that's why I like hate the Doomer versus like Bloomer. Maybe I misunderstand this debate, but this kind of this like, idea that, you know, either everything's gonna be fine....Okay, I guess the bloomers aren't this, but like, people...I mostly run into people who are either like stick their heads in the sand because thinking about the apocalypse is too much, which is a completely understandable response. And people use the like, stick your head in the sand really pejoratively. And maybe I shouldn't so much, right? It's a very understandable response to just not pay attention to something until you have to, right. Or this, like doom and gloom, we're all going to die, so buy these products thing. Casandra 56:11 Yeah. Margaret 56:13 And I don't like either of them. I like looking as soberly as possible at what seems possible, and how we can best manage it? And then just do that? I don't know. That's, that's what being a responsible human looks like to me is you look at problems and then you try to solve them. I don't know, like, am I wrong? Casandra 56:42 No, you're not wrong. Margaret 56:44 Like if there's a problem, give up? Or there's a problem, don't look at it. Casandra 56:49 Yeah, I don't even know if it's conscious for a lot of people. Like we're, I was talking with my therapist about this a few weeks ago, actually, not in terms of climate collapse, but just, you know, crisis in general, and how our nervous systems are, like not built to handle what we have to handle right now, just in terms of like, how much input we have constantly. Yeah. But you know, if my neighbor, if something were to happen, and my neighbor hasn't been in a place where they can process what's going on in the options, like, hopefully, I'll have some extra beans for them. So that's good. Margaret 57:31 Totally, because I think a lot of those people, some people I love very dearly fall into this category, and I'm not going to name them because there's so many negative connotations here. Like, some of those people are some of the best people in crisis, right? So they're not necessarily good before the crisis, at anticipating the crisis and averting the crisis. But sometimes, the like weird, weird is not the right word, but this like mono focus on like, "Okay, now this thing is happening, and I'm going to deal with it. And then I'm not going to think about any other time." You know, maybe yeah, like, you've done a lot of prepared. You've done a lot of preparedness. And then as the thing happens, maybe your neighbor is like, not burned out. And is like, "Okay, what do we got to fucking do?" Maybe I'm giving too much credit to your neighbor. I don't know. Casandra 58:24 No, even thinking about recent crises, like the the I won't be too specific, but like the Big Freeze. I was fine. Even though I didn't have power for 10 days, but my seven year old was not going to be fine. Margaret 58:43 Yeah. Casandra 58:44 And someone in my family who got power sooner than me...whatever, that. I'm not sure where I was going with that anecdote. I mentally froze not because I couldn't take care of myself, but because I couldn't figure out how to make it comfortable for my child and someone who doesn't think about preparedness as much as I do was able to be helpful. Margaret 59:09 Yeah. Casandra 59:10 Yeah. Margaret 59:11 That makes sense to me. Okay, one of the other questions that we get asked a lot is kind of like, well, "How can I be useful? I am poor or I am a tech worker and I don't know shit about starting fires, or I have the following different types of disabilities or, you know, I'm old or I'm young or these things that society says you're outside the realm of like, the cool bearded guy who can live in the forest, eating squirrels with a hatchet?" Casandra 59:47 Chops with a hand and videotapes it. Margaret 59:49 Yeah, totally. Yeah. But literally with his with his hands, you know? Casandra 59:54 Yeah. Margaret 59:55 Yeah. Yeah. And, you know, I get asked and Live Like The World Is Dying gets asked like, "What do we...or what do I do?" Or like...and I don't know, to me that's almost like, one of the most like, fun questions. I know it's kind of weird, say "fun," but... Casandra 1:00:18 No, it's fun. Margaret 1:00:19 There's just so many things. Casandra 1:00:20 So many things. Margaret 1:00:22 Yeah. Casandra 1:00:24 Can you organize a buying group so people can get bulk goods? Do you have room in your house so someone else can store shit? Margaret 1:00:31 Yeah, if you can, if you can throw a party, you can probably like, organize people to get something done. And if you hate parties, there's probably something else you focused on. You know? Even like, I don't wanna say even as if it's this like other, but I don't know, I think about my friends who are like, specifically really good at Magic the Gathering and video games... Casandra 1:00:55 Oh, my God, they can watch people's kids while other people do stuff. Margaret 1:00:59 Yeah totally! Casandra 1:01:02 Perfect. Margaret 1:01:04 Also, good at strategy. Yeah, if you feed them the right rules. Now I'm just I'm thinking about one of my specific friends. I'm not trying to make broad statements. But, I'm like, well, you're very good at taking this like systems and apply and figuring out how to like, maneuver through it in order to accomplish a goal. You know, whereas when I play games, I'm like, "I don't know, hit the button!" And then I die. And then I'm like this games awful. Casandra 1:01:32 Also, like we need games in order to survive, right? Margaret 1:01:36 Yeah. Casandra 1:01:37 And stories and things like that. Otherwise, what's the point? Margaret 1:01:40 Yeah, totally, totally. And like, folks who you know, are, like, older have a lot in terms of things that they've seen happen before and what's worked and what's not worked? And then people who are a lot younger, have energy unclouded by the knowledge of what has failed before. And both of these things are really useful. Casandra 1:02:05 Yeah. Margaret 1:02:06 But you're so right about childcare. And like, I don't know, it seems like when revolutionary movements start, they start like getting good once there's like mutual aid childcare. Casandra 1:02:18 Yeah, that's like a whole other topic. Margaret 1:02:25 Totally. I mean, honestly, it's one we should do on this show at some point is like, literally, like, I'm like, there's a lot of non kid having adults in this generation, I say, this generation, as if everyone listening to this generation, but I'm a millennial. And, you know, a lot of a lot fewer of us have children and don't know how to take care of children, and therefore sort of try to avoid taking care of other people's children, which is bullshit, because that should be a shared responsibility. So we should do an episode on how to take care of other people's kids. This is clearly just the like Margaret tries to find people to ask in order to answer questions that she has. Okay. Casandra 1:03:16 Did you have any other secret questions you were hiding for me? Margaret 1:03:20 Yeah, there's one final question. Casandra 1:03:21 Okay. Margaret 1:03:22 Final question is: Casandra, what gives you hope about all of this kind of stuff? Casandra 1:03:27 Okay, I think the thing that gives me hope is that we know things are in the process of changing drastically. And with change is always the potential to like create a different, and who knows, maybe in some ways better future. Margaret 1:03:43 Yeah, I think about how the good apocalypse books...or the ones that I like, and movies are basically stories of hope. Because people don't like the current society. There's a lot of reasons to dislike the current society. And so, I don't know, like one of the things that I think plagues the current society is loneliness and isolation. And I mean, frankly, it's a question we didn't get to. And hopefully, we'll get to, again, do a similar thing is like people ask all the time, like, "How do I get involved? How do I meet people? How do I make connections? How do I? How do I have a community?" You know, because most people don't beyond very limited contexts in the current world. And what gives me hope is that disaster disaster studies shows that time and time again, when disaster happens, people get their shit together and hang out with each other and do things together. That's what gives me hope. I hope that we pull through this and come out, come out in a better a better future. A bright future dawning over there. Casandra 1:04:56 Here, here. Margaret 1:04:57 Yeah. You Well, thanks for listening to our different style...It turned into more of a question and answer than a specific like, "How to begin preparedness," but I think it...I hope that this is a good style of podcast. And if you enjoyed listening, you should maybe tell us that this one was good and support our show. Casandra 1:05:35 How can they support our show, Margaret? Margaret 1:05:38 Well, that's a it's funny that you ask. They can support our show by supporting the publisher of this show, which both Casandra and I work with, called Strangers In A Tangled Wilderness, which is an anarchist collective, committed to the cultural side of resistance and basically trying to create things for people who didn't know where they fit in. And lots of other people too. But, we tried to make cultural things and we make this podcast and you can support us on Patreon at patreon.com/strangersinatangledwilderness. And that money will go to help produce this show. It'll go to help send out all kinds of content. If you back us at $10 a month you'll get a physical zine in the mail every month, anywhere in the world. And in particular, I want to thank some of our patrons, Hoss the dog, who is a dog. The rest of these are presumably people, but Hoss, the dog, is a dog who supports us. Very grateful. Hoss, the dog is maybe our longest running...Although some of these other people are also very long running. I'm not trying to disparage them. Hoss, the dog, Chris, Sam, Nora, Micaiah, Kirk, Natalie, Eleanor, Jennifer, Staro Chelsea, Dana, David, Nicole and Mikki. Thank you so much. And thanks everyone who doesn't support us financially, but just listens and does this stuff, because we do this not for the support, we do this because we want people to take care of each other and selfishly I do it so that other people take care of me in the apocalypse times. Any final final words? Casandra 1:07:26 Oh, for me? Margaret 1:07:26 Yeah, why not? Casandra 1:07:26 No. Margaret 1:07:28 Okay. Casandra 1:07:30 I was trying to be very quiet so you could close. Margaret 1:07:33 Oh, well, we ruined that. We will talk to you all very soon, because now we come out every two weeks. Casandra 1:07:40 Whoo! Find out more at https://live-like-the-world-is-dying.pinecast.co

Place to Be Nation Wrestling
NWA Crock & Roll #46: May 1986, Part 2

Place to Be Nation Wrestling

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 67:20


On episode 46 of NWA Crock and Roll, the boys continue their journey through May 1986. Topics include; another hot development in the James Gang with Baby Doll vs. Midnight Express with Jim Cornette feud, a god awful Wahoo promo and a tag match with him that causes quite the heel turn from Calum, the US Title Feud continues to brew, Bash 86 announcement, another Flair/Morton match from Mid Atlantic and close with the Territory Spotlight match from the WWF in Detroit with Killer Bees facing Sheik and Volkoff.

The Modern Bar Cart Podcast
Sneak Preview: Tales of the Cocktail 2022

The Modern Bar Cart Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 37:51


Eric chats with Eileen Wayner, CEO of the Tales of the Cocktail Foundation, about this year's 20th Tales of the Cocktail event in New Orleans. Some of the topics they discuss include: What's new with Tales of the Cocktail this year, and which beloved aspects of the live event will return better than ever How to register and organize your itinerary for the event, with some help from the handy Whova app. Details about the event's new venue,The Ritz Carlton Hotel, and how it's set up to make this the best Tales yet. Some of the seminars and off-site events that Eileen and Eric are particularly excited about Tips for new attendees and seasoned TOTC veterans And much, much more This episode is brought to you by Near Country Provisions. If you live in the Mid-Atlantic and want to enjoy ethically raised (and delicious) meat from local farmers delivered to your door every month, then you need Near Country in your life. Head over to NearCountry.com and enter the code BARCART when you sign up for your subscription to receive 2 free pounds of bacon or ground beef in your first delivery.

Virginia Outdoor Adventures
Bonus Episode: Hike Podcast with Lori Prima

Virginia Outdoor Adventures

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 62:47


“Hike” is a podcast about, you guessed it, hiking. It was created by hikers for hikers and is a place to share stories to inspire others to explore, wander and live. My friend, Lori Prima, is the host of Hike and in this episode, she speaks to two volunteers, Tawyna and Curt Finney, who have been caring for a trail shelter for over 30 years. It's a fascinating conversation about stewardship, trail etiquette, and changes in the hiking community over the past several decades.  These are topics I've had many requests for so I'm grateful to Lori for sharing this episode with us. Tawyna and Curt are members of the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club, which you may recall is the volunteer organization that maintains and protects the Appalachian Trail and other nearby trails in the Mid-Atlantic region, which includes the AT in the northern half of Virginia. More hiking inspiration here in Virginia from Virginia Outdoor Adventures:In Episode 20, Kristen Musselman speaks about her experience hiking and camping fulltime as the Chief Hiking Officer for Devils Backbone Brewing Company. She tells us what is in her pack, shares tips for long distance backpacking, and reveals some of her favorite trails in Virginia.In Episode 29, Erin Gifford, Founder of Go Hike Virginia, speaks about her latest book, Hiking with Kids Virginia, 52 Great Hikes for Families. Erin has been writing about travel and the outdoors for more than a decade and provides all the info you need to plan a winning day hike. Lastly, if you find yourself interested in Lori's recent series about Appalachia on Hike Podcast, be sure not to miss Episode 31 of Virginia Outdoor Adventures about Rock Climbing in Southwest Virginia with Brad Mathisen and Kyle King from the Central Appalachia Climbers Coalition. The collaborative partnership between climbers and Breaks is playing a role in revitalizing towns and stimulating economic growth, transforming Central Appalachia into a nationally recognized ecotourism destination.Follow Hike Podcast:Blog I Facebook I Instagram I TwitterFollow Virginia Outdoor Adventures Podcast:Website I Facebook I Instagram I TwitterSend Questions, Comments, and Suggestions: Jessica@virginiaoutdooradventures.comSupport the show

daily304's podcast
daily304 - Episode 7.8.2022

daily304's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 4:35


Vantage Ventures works at becoming the Silicone Valley of the Mid-Atlantic … an Ascend WV classmate confides in what persuaded him to relocate to the Greenbrier Valley … and Touchstone Research Laboratories' CEO is the subject of the latest feature on Innovators and Entrepreneurs.  – on today's daily304, listen here…

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - AMELIA COTTER - Supernatural, History and Folklore

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 47:18


Amelia Cotter is an author and storyteller with a special interest in the supernatural, history, and folklore. Her books include This House: The True Story of a Girl and a Ghost, Maryland Ghosts: Paranormal Encounters in the Free State, and the children's book Breakfast with Bigfoot. Amelia grew up in Bel Air, Maryland, where she developed a love for historic, abandoned, and haunted places as a young child. She was fascinated by scary stories and urban legends and fancied herself one day writing about the supernatural. When she was eleven, Amelia fell in love with a local abandoned house and its resident ghost that later became the inspiration for her first book, This House. As a teenager, Amelia had many nighttime adventures with friends, ghost hunting, and suburban exploring around Maryland and Pennsylvania. Upon moving to Chicago, Amelia also dove into the world of Midwest ghostlore. Her nostalgia for the haunted history of her home state prompted her to research and compile Maryland Ghosts, and she became a tour guide with Chicago Hauntings ghost tours, giving tours around the city. Amelia has traveled throughout the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic, exploring haunted places and speaking to audiences of all ages about the supernatural and why it fascinates us.To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewpaper.com

Parks and Recollection
The Fight (S3E13)

Parks and Recollection

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 46:14 Very Popular


Pawnee is full of clearances and apologies when Rob Lowe and Alan Yang tackle S3E13. In The Fight Tom invites everyone to the Snakehole as he debuts a new drink, and Leslie encourages Ann to apply for a job with the city. On today's episode find out how front loading the B-story helped the slow burn of the A-story, why Janet Snakehole has a Mid-Atlantic accent, and which actors improvised their drunk talking heads. All of this and some interesting talk about agents! Got a question for the Pawnee Town Hall? Send us an email: ParksandRecollectionTownHall@gmail.com Or leave a 30-Second voicemail at: (310) 893-6992  Chris Traeger has fired Dennis Cooper, the former health department public relations director, who hung posters around city hall to publicly condemn his adulterous wife. Leslie suggests Ann replace him, but her ulterior motive is to spend more time with her friend. Although reluctant, Ann agrees to attend the job interview—and Leslie provides her with an overwhelming amount of reading material to prepare for it.  Tom encourages the parks department to attend the Snakehole Lounge, for the unveiling of his new alcoholic beverage, Snake Juice—He also requests that they use guerrilla marketing techniques via word of mouth promotion. April shows little interest in attending, until Andy suggests they make a game of it by role-playing as different people at the bar. April pretends to be Janet Snakehole, an aristocratic widow with a dark secret, while Andy poses as his frequent alter-ego, FBI agent Burt Macklin.  That night, at the Snakehole Lounge, Leslie is surprised and annoyed to find Ann partying on the dance floor instead of preparing for the job interview. Ann introduces Leslie to her latest boyfriend, local radio host "The Douche" (Nick Kroll). As Leslie and Ann become increasingly drunk from Snake Juice, Leslie insults Ann's current dating lifestyle. This prompts Ann to insult Leslie for moving too slow with Ben. The fight escalates throughout the night, and Leslie ultimately claims she always has to keep Ann motivated or Ann would not go anywhere. Both declare it best that Ann not work with Leslie after all and they storm off.  The Snake Juice proves delicious and popular with the rest of the parks department employees, all of whom become extremely drunk, with the exception of Donna who is on a juice cleanse. Chris arrives to warn Tom that using government employees to promote his own personal ventures is a breach of ethics. He tells a disappointed Tom that he must sell his shares of the Snakehole Lounge if he wants to keep his job.  The next morning, everyone who drank Snake Juice is extremely hungover except for Ron—and Tom sells his shares the next morning to Jean-Ralphio, but not before Ron tries to convince Chris to let Tom off the government “teat.” Leslie deeply regrets how she treated Ann. Ben visits Ann at her home and asks her to forgive Leslie. Ann, who also regrets the fight, is touched by Ben's gesture and reveals that Leslie likes him. Ann decides to attend the job interview, during which she and Leslie apologize to each other. After a second interview with Chris, Ann is given the job on a part-time basis so she can continue her work as a nurse. April tries to reprise her role of Janet Snakehole and have Andy reprise Burt Macklin, but a hungover Andy claims Burt is dead, but creates Kip Hackman, Burt Macklin's brother. He then vomits onto Kyle's shoes.

Living Life Naturally
LLN Episode #114: Steven Taylor – What are the Pros and Cons of Hiring a Personal Trainer To Achieve Better Health?

Living Life Naturally

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 28:44


About Steven Taylor: Steven Taylor is the Co-Founder and COO of HipTrain. He is also an advisor at Revolution's Rise of the Rest Fund, an Entrepreneur-in-Residence at Georgetown University, and serves on the boards of the Greater Washington Board of Trade and DC Police Foundation. Prior to founding HipTrain, Steve was the COO at Big Health, a company focused on helping millions achieve good mental health with fully automated, highly personalized, and evidence-based digital therapeutics. Prior to Big Health, Steve was COO at Fixt, the first on-demand mobile device repair platform for the enterprise. In August 2020, Fixt was acquired by Assurant, a global insurance provider. From 2015 to 2019 Steve worked at Lyft, during which he was Regional Director at Lyft for New York and the Mid-Atlantic, two of the company's largest territories, where he was responsible for revenue growth, customer acquisition, retail operations, and community engagement. In 2012, Steve founded District Ventures, an angel investment group funding and advising entrepreneurs focused on enterprise business solutions and consumer products. From 2010 to 2015, Steve was a management consultant at PRTM and PwC primarily working on the development of risk and resilience frameworks, talent transformation, and a venture ecosystem program. What We Discuss In This Episode: We discuss the advantages of having a personal trainer as well as who should get a personal trainer? Steve discusses how exercise helps mental health, which is a key piece when it come to living a healthy, long life. Steve shares what makes HipTrain unique and shares with us about some of your trainers. He also discussed some of the outcome of their clients. We talk about the current statistics and trends around health and wellness and how we need to shift from treating people when they are sick, to preventing sickness altogether. Steve emphasizes the importance of personalized health and wellness services to achieve results. Connect with Steve Taylor:  Website:https://hiptrain.com/ Twitter:  https://www.twitter.com/stephenhtaylor LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephen-h-taylor/   Connect with Lynne: If you're looking for a community of like-minded women on a journey - just like you are - to improved health and wellness, overall balance, and increased confidence, check out Lynne's private community in The Energized & Healthy Women's Club. It's a supportive and collaborative community where the women in this group share tips and solutions for a healthy and holistic lifestyle. (Discussions include things like weight management, eliminating belly bloat, wrangling sugar gremlins, and overcoming fatigue, recipes, strategies, and much more so women can feel energized, healthy, confident, and joyful each day. Website:  https://holistic-healthandwellness.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/holistichealthandwellnessllc The Energized Healthy Women's Club:  https://www.facebook.com/groups/energized.healthy.women Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lynnewadsworth LinkedIn:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/lynnewadsworth   Free Resources from Lynne Wadsworth: 5 Simple Steps to Gain Energy, Feel Great & Uplevel Your Health: Are you ready to create a Healthier Lifestyle?  Would you like to feel lighter, more energized, and even add joy to your life? If it's time to find more balance of mind~body~soul, then I've got the perfect FREE resource to help.  In this guide, you'll find my most impactful strategies and I've made applying them in your life as simple as 1-2-3 (plus a couple more) to help you create a healthier, holistic lifestyle. Uplevel your holistic health and wellness and download the 5 Simple Steps to Health  here:  https://holistic-healthandwellness.com/5-simple-steps-to-a-healthier-you/   How to Thrive in Menopause:  Hot flashes? Low Energy? Difficulty with weight management? If MID-LIFE & MENOPAUSE are taking their toll then I've got a solution for you! I've taken all my very best strategies and solutions to help you feel energized, vibrant, lighter & healthy, and compiled them into this FREE resource! Thrive in midlife and beyond - download my guide here: https://holistic-healthandwellness.com/thrive-through-menopause/   Did You Enjoy The Podcast? If you enjoyed this episode please let us know! 5-star reviews for the Living Life Naturally podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Pandora, or Stitcher are greatly appreciated. This helps us reach more women struggling to live through midlife and beyond. Thank you. Together, we make a difference!

On the Mic with Mike Peters
Jim Bryan and the Church of Satire

On the Mic with Mike Peters

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 74:56


Jim Bryan grew up in Long Island and started doing stand-up in 2002 and moved to Las Vegas. He met his wife there and they moved to Hanover, Pa., to raise their kids, but he put stand-up to the side for a few years. He got back into it in 2015, then started the Den of Satire in 2017 and formally opened the Church of Satire -- in the same room -- a couple years later. It's now one of the best clubs in Pennsylvania, attracting comedians from all over and serving as a development center for local comedians from all over the Mid-Atlantic. Jim's also a funny comedian and works all over the Harrisburg and Baltimore areas. Follow Jim Bryan: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jimtellsjokes/TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@thesoulproprietor?lang=enChurch of Satire:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/notarealchurch/Website: https://www.churchofsatirecomedyclub.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/churchofsatireSupport the show

That's Total Mom Sense
Heather Wishart-Smith: Leading with Intention & Integrity

That's Total Mom Sense

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 27:48


As an innovation strategist, digital disruption integrator, and business leader with proven experience managing and turning around large engineering, consulting, and professional services practices, Ms. Wishart-Smith provides board, advisory and consulting services to corporates, startups, and venture capital funds. Previously, she was the Senior Vice President of Technology & Innovation for Jacobs, the $14B world-leading professional solutions provider. Prior to this role, she led innovation and digital strategy for Jacobs' Buildings, Infrastructure and Advanced Facilities and led the Mid-Atlantic region, a $150 million business including design, consulting and program management/construction management projects in the rail, highway, transit, Federal, corporate/commercial, science and technology, and related markets. Other notable roles include Jacobs' Federal Department of Defense Market Sector Leader, Sales Executive, and Principal of multiple large, full-service programs for the Army, Navy and Air Force worldwide. Ms. Wishart-Smith was the national President of the Society of American Military Engineers for its centennial year. She has published and presented articles in various publications on leadership, architecture, engineering and construction topics in the military and transportation sectors, and she is currently a regular Forbes contributor. A former U.S. Navy Civil Engineer Corps officer, Ms. Wishart –Smith is recognized as a strong leader with outstanding financial, business development, and operational skills, and a mentor to rising professionals. She holds Bachelor and Master of Science degrees in Civil Engineering from the University of Virginia. Awards include the Society of American Military Engineers (SAME) Gerald C. Brown Mentoring Award (2018); Eno Center for Transportation “Top 10 Women to Watch in Transportation” (2016); University of Virginia School of Engineering and Applied Science Outstanding Young Engineering Graduate (2013); and ENR “Top 20 Under 40” Mid-Atlantic (2013). She is a Fellow of the Society of American Military Engineers and the American Society of Civil Engineers. Meet My Guest: LINKEDIN: Heather Wishart-Smith, PE, PMP, LEED AP BD C

The Modern Bar Cart Podcast
Episode 234 - Chinola Liqueur with Andrew Merinoff

The Modern Bar Cart Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 55:26


In this flavorful, entrepreneurial conversation with Chinola Liqueur co-founder Andrew Merinoff, some of the topics we explore include:   Andrew's family legacy in the spirits world, including his very real ties to Canadian whisky magnates and Prohibition-era New York Bootleggers. How Chinola started in a blender in a Dominican Republic apartment and blossomed into a category-defying cocktail ingredient thanks to some old-world European liqueur expertise. Why many people are under the mistaken impression that passion fruit is pink - and what the Chinola team is doing on the agricultural front to ensure that their fruits remain delicious, all-natural, and sustainable. We also dig into the very important ways that Andrew and his team actively partner with the community in the DR so that they're not merely showing up appropriating a native fruit, and exporting its flavor to the US market. Along the way, we learn why passionfruit evokes a feeling of nostalgia in many people (myself included), the surprising similarities between Chinola and a product that many people call “bartender's ketchup,” why the Spanish word for “one who gossips” might come up at your next brunch, and much, much more. This episode is brought to you by Near Country Provisions. If you live in the Mid-Atlantic and want to enjoy ethically raised (and delicious) meat from local farmers delivered to your door every month, then you need Near Country in your life. Head over to NearCountry.com and enter the code BARCART when you sign up for your subscription to receive 2 free pounds of bacon or ground beef in your first delivery.

Construction Brothers
You Printed A What?? (feat. Andrew McCoy)

Construction Brothers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 48:12


Dr. McCoy is the Director of the Virginia Center for Housing Research at Virginia Tech, the Beliveau Professor of Building Construction, and the Associate Director of the Myers Lawson School of Construction… He has over 24 years of experience in the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry, including 8.5 years of fieldwork and 8 years of managing a firm that maintained a Class A Virginia contractor license. Dr. McCoy received undergraduate degrees in Architecture and Architectural History from the University of Virginia, and an MS in Building Construction and a Ph.D. in Environmental Design and Planning from Virginia Tech. He has authored of over 100 articles and has been a primary investigator on millions of dollars in funded projects, including ‘green' residential construction practices, building technologies, affordable housing and safety practices in the construction supply chain.  Notable funded endeavors include:  1) Virginia Housing's PACT 3D Concrete House Printing Innovation Grant, 2) The Commonwealth of Virginia's Executive Order 32 study "Addressing the Impact of Housing Affordability for Virginia Economy"; 3) HUD's " Impact of Market Behavior on the Adoption and Diffusion of Innovative Green Building Technologies," A Sustainable Communities Research grant; 4) CREATES, a Department of Labor grant to increase Southwest Virginia Constructors knowledge and application of green technologies; 5) ELECTRI Foundation's 2011 Early Career Award; 6) NIOSH's “The Case for a Whole Industry Approach to Safety,” a grant on safety across cultures and sectors of the construction industry and 7) Housing Virginia's "The Impact of Energy Efficient Construction for LIHTC Housing in Virginia." Another endeavor was the 2009 Department of Energy “Solar Decathlon” competition, in which university teams compete to design, build, manage and operate the most attractive and energy-efficient solar-powered house. Dr. McCoy's research won the 2015 Game Changer Award for the State of Virginia and Engineering News Record's 2014 "Top 20 under 40" for the Mid-Atlantic. Dr. McCoy's work also won ASCE's Journal of Architectural Engineering "Top Paper Award 2015" and the American Real Estate Society conference's "best paper prize for the topic of Sustainable Real Estate." Company Website: https://www.bc.vt.edu/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrewpmccoy/ Video: https://vtx.vt.edu/videos/k/2021/06/1_r5xrw3ha.html Article: https://vpm.org/news/articles/30733/can-3d-concrete-printing-solve-virginias-affordable-housing-crisis Thanks for listening! Please be sure to leave a rating or review and follow us on our social accounts! SUBSCRIBE! Like us on LinkedIn! Like us on Facebook! Follow us on Instagram! Eddie's LinkedIn Tyler's LinkedIn See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

RaceFFpod
Aldo Alcayaga Mid Atlantic H2

RaceFFpod

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 84:05


We go to the Mid Atlantic region on todays episode with Aldo Alcayaga. We talk about his story coming into Honda Challenge and I learn about an interesting program they have in the Mid Atlantic region. Please follow and subscribe and leave good review on iTunes.

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #93: Perfect North Slopes, Indiana General Manager Jonathan M. Davis (with a Timberline, WV Bonus)

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 110:32


 To support independent ski journalism, please consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. This podcast hit paid subscribers’ inboxes on June 28. Free subscribers got it on July 1. To receive future pods as soon as they’re live, please consider an upgrade to a paid subscription.WhoJonathan M. Davis, General Manager of Perfect North, IndianaRecorded onJune 20, 2022About Perfect NorthClick here for a mountain stats overviewOwned by: The Perfect FamilyPass affiliations: NoneLocated in: Lawrenceburg, IndianaClosest neighboring ski areas: Mad River, Ohio (2 hours, 18 minutes); Paoli Peaks, Indiana (2 hours, 39 minutes); Snow Trails (3 hours)Base elevation: 400 feetSummit elevation: 800 feetVertical drop: 400 feetSkiable Acres: 100Average annual snowfall: 24 inchesTrail count: 22 (1 double-black, 3 black, 3 blue-black, 10 intermediate, 5 beginner)Lift count: 12 (2 quads, 3 triples, 5 carpets, 2 ropetows - view Lift Blog’s inventory of Perfect North’s lift fleet)About Timberline, West VirginiaWhile this podcast is not explicitly about Timberline, Jonathan had an important role in the ski area’s acquisition in 2019. His enthusiasm for Timberline is clear, the opportunity and the investment are enormous, and this conversation acts as a primer for what I hope will be a full Timberline podcast at some future point.Click here for a mountain stats overviewOwned by: The Perfect FamilyPass affiliations: NoneLocated in: Davis, West VirginiaClosest neighboring ski areas: Canaan Valley (8 minutes); White Grass XC touring/backcountry center (11 minutes); Wisp, Maryland (1 hour, 15 minutes); Snowshoe, West Virginia (1 hour, 50 minutes); Bryce, Virginia (2 hours); Homestead, Virginia (2 hours); Massanutten, Virginia (2 hours, 21 minutes)Base elevation: 3,268 feetSummit elevation: 4,268 feetVertical drop: 1,000 feetSkiable Acres: 100Average annual snowfall: 150 inchesTrail count: 20 (2 double-black, 3 black, 5 intermediate, 10 beginner)Lift count: 3 (1 high-speed six-pack, 1 fixed-grip quad, 1 carpet - view Lift Blog’s inventory of Timberline’s lift fleet)Why I interviewed himThere are two kinds of ski areas in the Midwest. The first are the big ones, out there somewhere in the woods. Where 10,000 years ago a glacier got ornery. Or, farther back in time, little mountains hove up out of the earth. They’re at least 400 feet tall and top out near 1,000. They’re not near anything and they don’t need to be. People will drive to get there. Often they sit in a snowbelt, with glades and bumps and hidden parts. Multiple peaks. A big lodge at the bottom. There are perhaps two dozen of these in the entire region, all of them in Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. Boyne, Nub’s Nob, Crystal, Caberfae, Bohemia, Powderhorn, Whitecap, Granite Peak, Spirit, Lutsen. This is not a complete list. I’m making a point here.The second kind of Midwest ski area is usually smaller. It claims 200 vertical feet and actually has 27. It has four chairlifts for every run. It has a parking lot that could swallow Lake George. It’s affordable. And it’s close. To something. Metro Detroit has four ski areas. Milwaukee has eight. Minneapolis has six. But pretty much any Lower Midwestern city of any size has at least one ski area in its orbit: Cleveland (Alpine Valley, Boston Mills, Brandywine), Columbus (Snow Trails, Mad River), St. Louis (Hidden Valley), Kansas City (Snow Creek), Des Moines (Seven Oaks), Chicago (Four Lakes, Villa Olivia), Omaha (Mt. Crescent).For Cincinnati, that ski area is Perfect North. It’s actually one of the larger city-adjacent ski areas in the region: 400 vertical feet on 100 acres (accurate numbers, as far as I can tell). Twelve lifts. Twenty-two trails. Indiana has 6.7 million residents and two ski areas. Some winter days, approximately half of them are skiing at Perfect North.I’m just kidding around about the numbers. What I’m trying to say is that urban Midwestern ski areas are terrific businesses. They’re small but handle unimaginable volume in short, intense seasons of 12-hour-plus days. Davis tells me in the podcast that the ski area hires 1,200 seasonal employees for winter. That is an almost incomprehensible number. Killington, the largest ski area in the east, 20 times the size of Perfect North, has around 1,600 wintertime employees.But that’s what it takes to keep the up-and-down moving. Perfect North was a sort of accidental ski area, born when a college student knocked on farmer Clyde Perfect’s door and said, “hey did you know your land is perfect for a ski area?” In almost snowless Indiana, this was quite a wild notion. Not that no one had tried. The state has nine lost ski areas. But Perfect North is one of only two that survived (the other is Vail-owned Paoli Peaks, which survives no thanks to the mothership). I don’t know enough about the ski areas that failed to say why they’re gone, but it’s obvious why Perfect North has succeeded: relentless investment by committed operators. Here’s an excerpt from a case study by SMI snowmakers:[Perfect North] employs 245 snowmaking machines and an infrastructure that pumps about 120 million gallons of water annually, giving the resort a 3-4 foot snowpack throughout the season. The system is so efficient that operators can start as many as 200 snowmakers in about an hour.At its modest start-up in 1980, Perfect North had only rope tows, T-bars and about a dozen snowmakers covering roughly seven acres. But the family-owned operation has expanded each year and now features five chair lifts and six surface lifts serving more than ten times the skiable terrain, as well as one of the largest tubing operations in the entire U.S. …“We knew early on that snowmaking was critical to a great experience on the hills. The snow is the reason people come; everything else is secondary. So we really focused on it right from the beginning, and we’ve enhanced our snowmaking capability every year,” said [Perfect North President Chip] Perfect.All of the snow guns now in use at Perfect North are manufactured by SMI, and every one is permanently mounted on a SnowTower™ (or pole-top unit). Most are the company’s signature PoleCat™ or Super PoleCat™ designs, with either hill air feed or onboard compressors. Unlike some resorts that boast 100% snowmaking on their trails, Perfect North runs enough machines to be able to make snow on virtually the entire skiing and tubing area at the same time.This is not one model of how to make a ski area work in the Lower Midwest – this is the only way to make a ski area work in the Lower Midwest. The region was a bit late to skiing. Perfect North didn’t open until 1980. Snowmaking had to really advance before such a thing as consistent skiing in Indiana was even conceivable. But being possible is not the same thing as being easy. There are only two ski areas in Indiana for a reason: it’s hard. Perfect North has mastered it anyway. And you’ll understand about two minutes into this conversation why this place is special.What we talked aboutA couple kids watching for the lights to flip on across the valley, announcing the opening of the ski season; Perfect North in the ‘80s; a place where jeans and “layered hunting gear” are common; ski area as machine; from bumping chairs to general manager; the pioneer days of 90s tech; moving into the online future without going bust; RFID; the surprising reason why Perfect North switched from metal wicket tickets to the plastic ziptie version; taking over a ski area in the unique historical moment that was spring 2020; staff PTSD from the Covid season; the power of resolving disputes through one-on-one talks; “we lost something in those two years with how we interact with people”; 1,200 people to run a 400-vertical-foot ski area; how Perfect North fully staffed up and offered an 89-hour-per-week schedule as Vail retreated and severely cut hours at its Indiana and Ohio ski areas; Perfect North would have faced “an absolute mutiny” had they pulled the Vail bait-and-switch of cutting operating hours after pass sales ended; how aggressive you have to be with snowmaking in the Lower Midwest; “the people of the Midwest are fiercely loyal”; reaction to Vail buying Peak Resorts; “I want Midwest skiing to succeed broadly”; Cincinnati as a ski town; skiing’s identity crisis; the amazing story behind Perfect North’s founding; the Perfect family’s commitment to annual reinvestment; remembering ski area founder Clyde Perfect, who passed away in 2020; you best keep those web cams active Son; snowmaking and Indiana; the importance of valleys; the importance of a committed owner; potential expansion; where the ski area could add trails within the existing footprint; terrain park culture in the Lower Midwest; the management and evolution of parks at Perfect North; potential chairlift upgrades and a theoretical priority order; where the ski area could use an additional chairlift; the potential for terrain park ropetows; coming updates to Jam Session’s ropetows; Perfect North’s amazing network of carpet lifts; the ski area’s massive tubing operation; why Perfect North purchased Timberline and how the purchase came together; why creditors rejected the first winner’s bid; West Virginia as a ski state; the reception to Timberline’s comeback; “it didn’t take us long to realize that the three lifts on site were unworkable”; how well Perfect North and Timberline work as a ski area network; “Timberline Mountain has got to stand on its own financially”; whether Perfect North could ever purchase more ski areas; “I hate to see ski areas wither up and die”; Perfect North’s diverse season pass suite; “what drives our guest’s visits is their availability”; and whether Timberline or Perfect North could join the Indy Pass.            Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewYou want to hear something funny? I often put out queries on Twitter or via email, asking people to tell me who they would most like to hear from on the podcast. Or sometimes people just write and say something like, “hey love the pod you should interview…” And the interview they’ve most often requested has been some combination of Timberline and Perfect North. I don’t really understand why. I mean, I think it’s an awesome story. I’ve yet to meet a ski area I wasn’t fascinated by, and this Midwest-buys-Mid-Atlantic storyline is especially compelling to me. But this one has, for whatever reason, resonated broadly. I’ve never once had someone ask me to track down the head of Telluride or Mammoth or Heavenly (I’d gladly talk to the leaders of any of the three), but the Perfect North/Timberline request has been hitting my inbox consistently for years.Well, it’s done. I’d still like to do a Timberline-first pod, but the basic story of the acquisition is there, and we spend about 15 minutes on the West Virginia ski area. Still, I was not just listening to the request line. I tracked down Davis for the same reason that I tracked down Snow Trails, Ohio’s Scott Crislip last month: these are the only two ski areas in Indiana or Ohio that functioned normally last season. And they are the only two ski areas in those states that are not owned by Vail.Paoli Peaks was open 28 hours per week, from Thursday through Sunday, with no night skiing on weekends. Perfect North was open 89 hours per week, with night skiing seven days per week. I found this fairly offensive, and WTIU Public TV in Indiana invited me on-air back in March to talk about it:How, exactly, did Vail get owned by two independent operators with a fraction of the institutional resources? That is the question that these two podcasts attempt to answer. Vail clearly misread the market in Ohio and Indiana. They did not make enough snow or hire enough people. They cut night skiing. In the Midwest. That’s like opening a steakhouse and cutting steak off the menu. Sorry, Guys, budget cuts. You can’t find steak at this steakhouse, but we have beef broth soup and canned greenbeans. And by the way, we’re only open for lunch. Like, how did they not know that? It may be the worst series of ski area operating decisions I’ve ever seen.I should probably just let this go. Now that I’ve said my piece via these two interviews, I probably will. I’ve made my point. But seriously Vail needs to look at what Perfect North and Snow Trails did this past season and do exactly that. And if they can’t, then, as Davis says in this interview, “if they don’t want Paoli and Mad River, we’ll take them.”Questions I wish I’d askedPerfect North has a really interesting pass perk for its highest-tiered pass: Perfect Season Pass holders can go direct to lift. That pass is $356. Gold passholders, who can ski up to eight hours per day, must pick up a lift ticket at the window each time they ski. That pass is $291. While the gold pass is not technically unlimited, eight hours per day seems more than sufficient. I’m ready to wrap it up after seven hours at Alta. I can’t imagine that eight hours wouldn’t be enough Indiana skiing. But I don’t think the ski area would bother with the two different passes if the market hadn’t told them there was a need, and I would have liked to have discussed the rationale behind this pass suite a bit more.What I got wrongI said on the podcast that Snow Trails was open “80-some hours per week.” The number was actually 79 hours. I also stated in the introduction that Perfect North was founded by “the Perfect family and a group of investors,” but it was the Perfect family alone.  Why you should ski Perfect NorthWe’ve been through this before, with Snow Trails, Mountain Creek, Paul Bunyan, Wachusett, and many more. If you live in Cincinnati and you are a skier, you have a choice to make: you can be the kind of skier who skis all the time, or you can be the kind of skier who skis five days per year at Whistler. I know dozens of people in New York like this. They ski at Breckenridge, they ski at Park City, they ski at Jackson Hole. But they don’t – they just couldn’t – ski Mountain Creek or Hunter or even Stowe. East Coast skiing is just so icy, they tell me. Well, sometimes. But it’s skiing. And whether you ski six days per year or 50 largely depends upon your approach to your local.If I lived in Cincinnati, I’d have a pass to Perfect North and I’d go there all the time. I would not be there for eight hours at a time. Ten runs is a perfectly good day of skiing at a small ski area. More if conditions are good or I’m having fun. Anything to get outside and make a few turns. Go, ride the lifts, get out. No need to overthink this. Any skiing is better than none at all.Most of Perfect North’s skiers, of course, are teenagers and families. And it’s perfect for both of these groups. But it doesn’t have to be for them alone. Ski areas are for everyone. Go visit.As far as Timberline goes, well, that’s a whole different thing. A thousand feet of vert and 150 inches of average annual snowfall shouldn’t take a lot of convincing for anyone anywhere within striking distance.Podcast NotesPerfect North founder Clyde Perfect passed away in 2020. Here is his obituary.I mentioned that Indiana had several lost ski areas. Here’s an inventory. My 1980 copy of The White Book of Ski Areas lists nine hills in Indiana. Perfect North isn’t one of them (Paoli Peaks, the state’s other extant ski area, is). Here’s a closer look at two of the more interesting ones (you can view more trailmaps on skimap.org):Nashville AlpsHere’s the 2001 trailmap for Nashville Alps, which had a 240-foot vertical drop. The ski area closed around 2002, and the lifts appear to be gone.If anyone knows why Nashville Alps failed, please let me know.Ski StarlightThe White Book pegs this one with an amazing 554 vertical feet, which would make it taller than any ski area in Michigan’s Lower Peninsula. The map shows trails running along little ridgelines separated by valleys, which would have made this a really interesting spot on the rare occasions it snowed enough to ski the trees.Google maps suggests that this trailmap more or less reflects geologic reality. Here’s a YouTube video from a few years back, when the ski area was apparently for sale. The lifts were still intact (though likely unusable):The White Book says that this place had a double-double and two J-bars in 1980. Just 20 minutes from Louisville, this seems like the kind of little Midwestern spot that could boom with the right operators. The cost to bring it online would likely be prohibitive, however. As with most things in U.S. America, it would be the permitting that would likely kill it in the crib.The Storm publishes year-round, and guarantees 100 articles per year. This is article 70/100 in 2022, and number 316 since launching on Oct. 13, 2019. Want to send feedback? Reply to this email and I will answer (unless you sound insane). You can also email skiing@substack.com. Get full access to The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast at www.stormskiing.com/subscribe

Becker's Dental + DSO Review Podcast
Sonrava Health acquires Mid-Atlantic Dental Partners, Dental Care Alliance expands New York footprint

Becker's Dental + DSO Review Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 1:46


Riz Hatton shares the latest news on the Dental + DSO industry.

Protagonist Podcasts
Knights Who Say NISA - Independent Cup Preview Part 1

Protagonist Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 45:04


The Knights kick off their 2022 NISA Independent Cup coverage with a preview of the 5 Eastern regions: Great Lakes, Mid-Atlantic, Empire, Southeast, and Northeast.

The Modern Bar Cart Podcast
Episode 233 - Meated Whiskey with Matt Power of Tamworth Distilling

The Modern Bar Cart Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 56:47


In this flavorful conversation with distiller Matt Power of Tamworth Distilling, some of the topics we cover include: How the “House of Tamworth” series began as a research initiative designed to understand what the FDA considers “acceptable” flavoring ingredients, and snowballed into a passion project highlighting uncommon or underappreciated flavors and aromas. Why the “flavored whiskey” category has developed a slightly sub-par reputation, and what Matt and his team are doing to elevate this category. How Matt employs some serious technology - namely, a rotary evaporator - to isolate flavors and aromas from nature and infuse those compounds into their spirits in a very strategic way. We also sample the “Deerslayer” whiskey from the House of Tamworth collection, which was inspired partially by a german fermented sausage dish and partially by the aromas of hardwood smoke that you'll smell wafting on the breeze during a New Hampshire winter. Along the way, we cover other important topics like maple syrup infused with dead people, the seductive stink of the Corpse Flower, strategies for combatting invasive green crabs, and much, much more. This episode is brought to you by Near Country Provisions. If you live in the Mid-Atlantic and want to enjoy ethically raised (and delicious) meat from local farmers delivered to your door every month, then you need Near Country in your life. Head over to NearCountry.com and enter the code BARCART when you sign up for your subscription to receive 2 free pounds of bacon or ground beef in your first delivery.

Overshot: A Paintball Podcast
EP: 95 what happened with the saints? plus a Mid-Atlantic preview

Overshot: A Paintball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 64:48


On this episode we do a little catching up on what has been going on in the paintball word. we talk about what has been going on with the Latin saints as well as some of the lower rank teams that we are excited about.  we also dive into how we think some of the local teams will do at the up coming mid-Atlantic major. Enjoy and we will see you next time. Check out the sponsors for the podcast below:https://vulcanousa.com (Use code overshot10 for 10% off)https://www.dyzanasports.com/overshot (Use code overshot for 10%)https://www.evilgerbilpaintball.com (Use code overshot for 10%)Please support the show below:https://www.patreon.com/Overshotapaintballpodcast

Sargent Corporation
A TRUE Roadshow from Mid-Atlantic; Shout-outs; Lynyrd Skynyrd Winner!

Sargent Corporation

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 10:22


A very brief but heartfelt podcast, literally recorded on the road, in Justin Porter's truck as Tasha, Eric and I wrapped up a whirlwind Mid-Atlantic tour across three states!  Great Shout-outs; Lynyrd Skynyrd concert ticket winner!

Weather Wise
E22: Summer Solstice 2022

Weather Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 19:13


Meteorologist Ulises Garcia joins Chief Meteorologist Rich Wirdzek this week to talk about the Summer Solstice. Even though the official onset of summer has just occurred, several bouts of heat have already impacted Delmarva and the Mid-Atlantic. They discuss how the heat has not only been an issue for many other parts of the country, but globally as well, with recent record high temperatures across Europe.

Chesapeake Uncharted
Season 2 Trailer: Tropical Storm Agnes at 50

Chesapeake Uncharted

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 3:53


Fifty years ago, “America's Estuary” was beginning to show signs of ecological collapse. But outside of a handful of environmentalists and academics, few people took much note. When a seemingly harmless tropical storm charged up from the Gulf of Mexico, few people took much note of that either. But within a few wild and tragic days in June of 1972, Tropical Storm Agnes changed the way people thought about the Chesapeake Bay and the power of storms in the Mid-Atlantic. This is the story of how Agnes ushered in a dark new era for the Bay -- an era we're still living in.

The Nonprofit Exchange: Leadership Tools & Strategies
What's So Scary About Asking For Money?

The Nonprofit Exchange: Leadership Tools & Strategies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 35:12


What's So Scary About Asking For Money? Interview with Susan Kahan Fundraising is a necessary part of any nonprofit organization. There is an art and a science to it, and at the end of the day, it is about building relationships with your donors and giving them an opportunity to support the cause you all care so much about With more than a decade of working in the nonprofit sector, Susan Kahan is passionate about the power of philanthropy and helping organizations meet and exceed their goals to fulfill their missions. Based in Chicago, Susan has experience working with major gifts, mid-level donors, planned giving, capital campaigns, and creating and executing fundraising strategies and events. Beyond Chicago, Susan has worked across the Midwest, New England, and the Mid-Atlantic, and she brings her knowledge and expertise from these special communities to each of her current projects and clients. A relationship builder and people connector, Susan was also involved in grassroots political mobilizations and encouraging citizens to get involved in the political process with their voice and their financial support. Prior to founding Sapphire Fundraising Specialists, Susan held fundraising and management roles at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs and the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC). Susan graduated from the George Washington University in Washington, DC with a major in Communication and a double minor in Political Science and Business Administration. More information at https://www.sapphirefundraisingspecialists.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The FEMA Podcast
Episode 93: Remembering Hurricane Agnes on the 50th Anniversary of the Storm

The FEMA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 37:32


On this episode, FEMA remembers Hurricane Agnes on the 50th Anniversary of the storm by looking back at the impacts to the Mid-Atlantic and looking ahead to predicting the future effects of hurricanes in the region. We discuss how Hurricane Agnes shaped the field of emergency management and the how emergency managers today are still using lessons that were learned from the storm.

Short Term Rental Secrets Podcast
Ep 104 - How to Use Private Lending For Your Short Term Rentals

Short Term Rental Secrets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 44:17


Alex Breshears is an owner and cohost of short term rentals in the Mid-west and Mid-Atlantic. She also does private lending, where she lends money to active investors to acquire property, pay for renovations, or even the start-up costs associated with short term rentals. She has offered to lend money to other investors in her network for some of these start-up costs, in exchange, she will run the property until the loan is paid back, so private lending actually helped build her cohosting business. Alex also uses yield arbitrage, and take equity out of the properties she owns, and puts that money to work to help cover the expenses of the property without having to worry about guest stays solely covering the expenses of the properties. https://www.linkedin.com/company/lend2live-learning-llc/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/investpassively2liveactively/ https://www.facebook.com/Lend2LiveLearning/ https://www.instagram.com/investpassive2liveactive/ http://www.lend2live.com/

Place to Be Nation Wrestling
NWA Crock & Roll #43: April 1986, Part 4

Place to Be Nation Wrestling

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 91:41


On an angle heavy episode 43 of NWA Crock and Roll, Shawn, The Doctor and Shiff (Calum saw a Wahoo match was scheduled to open the show and conveniently couldn't make it  ) close out April '86. Topics discussed include; a total reset after Crockett Cup setting up the next few months, two amazing all time angles with Flair/Morton and Americas Team/The Midnight Express with Jim Cornette, a Dusty promo that rivals Hard Times, a hidden gem match from Mid Atlantic, The Road Warriors not being able to read, write or know what match they are having or when, the greatest Saturday night show ever up to this point and close with the Territory Spotlight segment going to Japan featuring another hidden gem match between Ted Dibiase taking on Tenryu.

The Deep-Sea Podcast
024 – The pelagic deep sea with Tracey Sutton

The Deep-Sea Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 59:05


https://www.armatusoceanic.com/podcast/024-pelagic   We have a confession to make. We talk a big game about how we are busting myths, tackling deep-sea tropes and showing the deep ocean as it really is… but we have been guilty of one of the big ones. The deep sea is not just the bottom! Most of the deep sea, in fact, most of the habitat of this planet is the huge open 3D environment of open water or ‘pelagic' water. In this staggering volume the planets largest migration takes place twice a day. Animals are locked in an evolutionary arms race, using their own light to deceive and trick. Finding a meal is rare, finding a mate is rare and life is without boundaries. These factors have led to some truly wild evolution. We also tackle a couple of listener questions: Whatever happened to the word ‘nictoepipelagic' which seems to have vanished from scientific writing? We also discuss parasites in the deep sea, how can they find a specific host when the animals are so spread out? We hear from Don about hunting for the 'deep scattering layer' (DSL) before we even knew what it was and find out where Larkin has been from her new vessel on the Gulf of Mexico.   In recent news we cover Edith Widder and her new book Below the Edge of Darkness, underwater GPS through the power of a pong, following the yellow brick road to meet the deep-sea wizard and some lovely new footage of a highfin dragonfish. We also find ourselves talking about how the deep sea is portrayed in children's books and learn that apparently zesty citrus and floral smells are associated with the deep ocean… who knew?!   Feel free to get in touch with us with questions or you own tales from the high seas on: podcast@armatusoceanic.com We'd love to actually play your voice so feel free to record a short audio note!   We are also on Twitter: @DeepSeaPod, @ArmatusO Facebook: ArmatusOceanic Instagram: @deepsea_podcast, @armatusoceanic   Read the show notes and find out more about us at: www.armatusoceanic.com   Glossary Abyssopelagic – open water 4-6 km (13,000 to 20,000 ft) deep Aphotic zone – depths deeper than life penetrates Bathypelagic – also known as the midnight zone, open water roughly 1-4 km (3,300-13,000 ft) deep Benthic – associated with the bottom, how we usually think about the deep sea Deep Scattering Layer (DSL) – a ‘false bottom' created on sonar by huge numbers of open water animals Dragonfish – deep-sea predators of the family Stomiidae Dysphotic zone – the depth that light still penetrates but photosynthesis is becoming unviable Euphotic zone – the surface and well illuminated zone Hadalpelagic – open water >6 km deep Mesopelagic – also called the twilight zone, starts where 1% of light reaches and ends where there is none, roughly 200-1,000 m (656-3,280 ft) deep Myctophids – Lanternfish, fish responsible for the biggest carbon movements on the planet Nictoepipelagic – The wink on the open sea. Great word for these vertical migrators Pelagic – open ocean, away from the shore and the bottom Photic zone – the depth that light penetrates Vertical migration – the twice daily migration of deep-sea animals up to the surface to feed   Links Tracey's lab website The synthesis paper of a decade of research into the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Open access Carbon export model for mesopelagic fishes in the Gulf of Mexico   Rosetta stoned by TOOL Youtube Spotify   Edith Widder Eye in the ocean Edith's new book Vox podcast   Underwater GPS   Yellow-brick Road Live stream Best-of reel   Dragonfish and the Video   Rainbowfish discovers the deep sea   Deep Dive into Deep Sea   Larkin's YouTube channel and Instagram   Credits Theme – Hadal Zone Express by Märvel Logo image Some of Thom's pics from the Mid-Atlantic

The Modern Bar Cart Podcast
Episode 232 - Vanishing Spirits: The Art of Whisky with Ernie Button

The Modern Bar Cart Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 78:11


In this stimulating conversation with photographer and whisky enthusiast Ernie Button, creator of The Art of Whisky, some of the topics we discuss include: How Ernie married his way into a love for Scotch, and how that fondness turned to wonder and curiosity one night when he was about to put his whisky glasses into the dishwasher. The collaborative approach that Ernie took to explore this subject, pulling in fluid dynamics physicists at Ivy League Universities, and even resulting in a published paper in an academic journal. What it takes to coax the “fingerprint” out of each spirit he photographs, and why these images appear molecular, or planetary, or nebular in shape and structure. By way of illustration, we look at a few images from The Art of Whisky, which help to showcase the ways in which whisky scatters and reflects light. We also dig into some of the chemical forces responsible for these phenomena, in Ernie's experience, including the influence of charred oak barrels, cask finishes, and peat. Along the way, we discuss exciting developments in the rice whisky world, an encounter with barrel-aged Botanist Gin, why grape-based spirits are just the ABSOLUTE WORST for photography, and much, much more. This episode is brought to you by Near Country Provisions. If you live in the Mid-Atlantic and want to enjoy ethically raised (and delicious) meat from local farmers delivered to your door every month, then you need Near Country in your life. Head over to NearCountry.com and enter the code BARCART when you sign up for your subscription to receive 2 free pounds of bacon or ground beef in your first delivery.

Rocky Balboa Cheesesteak Fun Hour
Episode 117 - Mike Miss Out, Girardi In...to the Guillotine

Rocky Balboa Cheesesteak Fun Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 90:36


In this episode we discuss the abrupt departure of Mike Missanelli from the sports radio landscape. Do we care? Not really, but we don't care about much. After that we discuss those dreadful Phillies and Matt has an 18th century solution: the guillotine. Later on, we hear from the SUMA (Seagull Union of the Mid-Atlantic), discuss Dirty Mike's disgusting cracked tooth, Nick gives us his top QBs heading into 2022 (for some reason) and we share a whole lot of laughs. Please send this podcast to just ONE person. Follow us: @MattRBCFHPod @NukRBCFHPod @DirtyMikeRBCFH . . . Philadelphia sports, Sixers, Phillies, Flyers, Eagles, Comedy

The Green Building Matters Podcast with Charlie Cichetti
Vice President of Sales for Fujitsu General America, Dennis Stinson

The Green Building Matters Podcast with Charlie Cichetti

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 29:23


Dennis Stinson is the Vice President of Sales for Fujitsu General America, a global manufacturer with distributors in local communities across the United States, Canada and the Caribbean and he brings over 30 years of industry experience.    Dennis leads a team of sales professionals, selling well over $300M of Fujitsu products. At Fujitsu, Dennis has held the responsibilities of Regional Sales Manager in the Mid-Atlantic and The Director of National Accounts. Prior to joining Fujitsu, Dennis spent his career as a Manufacturer's Representative representing various Manufacturer's in the HVAC industry throughout the Mid-Atlantic region. Dennis earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration from Millersville University of Pennsylvania.   Show Highlights   Paybacks that bring emotion and economics into mandates.  A look back on Dennis' sales career.  The growth and momentum in the HVAC market. Resources and websites to assist with common sense and compliance. Managing changes to efficiency ratings for HVAC equipment in different regions.  A glance at refrigerants 123, 134 and the impact of the 2015 mandates in equipment for specific industries.  Challenge between energy efficiency, giving more control to occupants, and more comfort overall.  Hybrid workspaces Balancing Temperature vs Wallet Comfort Zoning for Comfort The mindset shifts from (normal) sales to consultative sales. The three motivators of sustainability.   “When you take a look at a business opportunity or a proposal for a project, you don't have to have the best solution. You're never always going to have the best solution. You have to have a reasonable solution that everybody involved can stick their thumbs up and say, ‘Yeah, that makes sense for me, my company, my people, and my client.'”  -Dennis Stinson    Click here for the transcript! Dennis Stinson's Show Resource and Information LinkedIn The Ride of a Lifetime: Disney CEO Outliers Patrick M. Lencioni  The Ideal Team Player Death by Meeting The Blue Ocean Strategy book  Connect with Charlie Cichetti and GBES Charlie on LinkedIn Green Building Educational Services GBES on Twitter Connect on LinkedIn Like on Facebook Google+ GBES Pinterest Pins GBES on Instagram   GBES is excited our membership community is growing. Consider joining our membership community as members are given access to some of the guests on the podcasts that you can ask project questions. If you are preparing for an exam, there will be more assurance that you will pass your next exam, you will be given cliff notes if you are a member, and so much more. Go to www.gbes.com/join to learn more about the 4 different levels of access to this one-of-a-kind career-advancing green building community!   If you truly enjoyed the show, don't forget to leave a positive rating and review on iTunes.  We have prepared more episodes for the upcoming weeks, so come by again next week! Thank you for tuning in to the Green Building Matters Podcast!   Copyright © 2022 GBES

How Did They Do It? Real Estate
SA445 | Investing in Community and Residents: A Strong Foundation of Success in Multifamily with Sia Senior

How Did They Do It? Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 30:30


Want to hear more stories of successful multifamily investing? You're always on the right show as a fantastic guest Sia Senior joins us to share her secrets to better operating a multifamily apartment business. This episode highlights finding deals and growing a real estate portfolio while having your W2 job, building relationships with residents, and a strong sense of community, so stay tuned. Key Takeaways To Listen ForBenefits of having an active income from a W2 job while investing passivelyAdvice on effectively managing a family, full-time job, and business life simultaneouslyHow to make more profit on flips and manage your own rental propertiesTips for better communication with your tenantsWays to find more deals and opportunities in multifamilyWhat makes a successful real estate investor?Resources Mentioned In This EpisodeFree Apartment Syndication Due Diligence Checklist for Passive Investor About Sia SeniorSia Senior is a full-time real estate investor. She started investing in real estate in 2005 while she was a high school math teacher. Her husband and her house-hacked their first property, flipped 8 properties, and bought properties to hold long-term for the next 17 years. They currently self-manage 20+ units (single-family and small multifamily). Their portfolio also consists of a 16-unit asset acquired through a JV partnership and 134 units as an LP.   Arrowhead Capital is a real estate firm that acquires multifamily assets in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast. They are committed to providing their investment partners with excellent opportunities which allow them to passively create generational wealth and enhance the apartment communities of their residents.  Through her work in real estate, she has learned that  1) success comes from being patient and consistent and 2) as investors, they have the ability to positively impact the lives of their residents. She has experienced the highs and lows of the real estate market but their commitment to stick to their acquisition criteria and to buy when the numbers work has helped them succeed financially. They are also intentional about their engagement with their residents so that they know that they care about them and their families.Connect with SiaWebsite: Arrowhead CapitalFacebook Group: Sage & Steward REILinkedIn: Sia Senior, MBATo Connect With UsPlease visit our website: www.bonavestcapital.com and please click here, to leave a rating and review!SponsorsGrow Your Show, LLCThinking About Creating and Growing Your Own Podcast But Not Sure Where To Start?Visit GrowYourShow.com and Schedule a call with Adam A. Adams.

Talking Elite Fitness
Sounds of the Mid Atlantic CrossFit Challenge

Talking Elite Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 81:55 Very Popular


Sean and Tommy talk with Spencer Panchik, Cole Sager, Brooke Wells, Baylee Rayl, Saxon Panchik, Justin Cotler, Danielle Brandon and Noah Ohlsen on the eve of the first day of competition at the Mid Atlantic CrossFit Challenge.