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mammal of the mustelid family

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  • Nov 23, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about weasels

Latest podcast episodes about weasels

Real Coffee with Scott Adams
Episode 1571 Scott Adams: Lawyers, Criminals, Politicians, and Other Weasels Are In My Target Zone Today

Real Coffee with Scott Adams

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 57:50


My new book LOSERTHINK, available now on Amazon https://tinyurl.com/rqmjc2a Find my "extra" content on Locals: https://ScottAdams.Locals.com Content: Rittenhouse raised Democrat awareness of fake news Merck COVID pill trial Biden Admin resolved supply chain logjam Waukesha tragedy, no race filter? Ahmaud Arbery case, citizen's arrest Abbie Richards conspiracy chart ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ If you would like to enjoy this same content plus bonus content from Scott Adams, including micro-lessons on lots of useful topics to build your talent stack, please see scottadams.locals.com for full access to that secret treasure. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/scott-adams00/support

Coffee With Scott Adams
Episode 1571 Scott Adams: Lawyers, Criminals, Politicians, and Other Weasels Are In My Target Zone Today

Coffee With Scott Adams

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 57:50


Content: Rittenhouse raised Democrat awareness of fake news Merck COVID pill trial Biden Admin resolved supply chain logjam Waukesha tragedy, no race filter? Ahmaud Arbery case, citizen's arrest Abbie Richards conspiracy chart If you would like to enjoy this same content plus bonus content from Scott Adams, including micro-lessons on lots of useful topics to … The post Episode 1571 Scott Adams: Lawyers, Criminals, Politicians, and Other Weasels Are In My Target Zone Today appeared first on Scott Adams Says.

Real Coffee with Scott Adams
Episode 1564 Scott Adams: Weasels in the News Everywhere and I'll Show You Where They're Hiding

Real Coffee with Scott Adams

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 56:15


My new book LOSERTHINK, available now on Amazon https://tinyurl.com/rqmjc2a Find my "extra" content on Locals: https://ScottAdams.Locals.com Content: Biden negotiated, China won Rittenhouse jury, and update MSNBC Joy Reid, racist CNN Bakari Sellers, 4 lies in 15 seconds Rep. Cori Bush invented getting shot at? Fake news and fake fact-check on Bill Gates ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ If you would like to enjoy this same content plus bonus content from Scott Adams, including micro-lessons on lots of useful topics to build your talent stack, please see scottadams.locals.com for full access to that secret treasure. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/scott-adams00/support

Coffee With Scott Adams
Episode 1564 Scott Adams: Weasels in the News Everywhere and I’ll Show You Where They’re Hiding

Coffee With Scott Adams

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 56:15


Content: Biden negotiated, China won Rittenhouse jury, and update MSNBC Joy Reid, racist CNN Bakari Sellers, 4 lies in 15 seconds Rep. Cori Bush invented getting shot at? Fake news and fake fact-check on Bill Gates If you would like to enjoy this same content plus bonus content from Scott Adams, including micro-lessons on lots … The post Episode 1564 Scott Adams: Weasels in the News Everywhere and I'll Show You Where They're Hiding appeared first on Scott Adams Says.

Tony & Dwight
Weasel Van Shenanigans. Seriously, Scottie? Game Day. Send Beer Money! Jackyl's Jesse James.

Tony & Dwight

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 26:34


SheeShuus Tell All

JamStan segment has been discontinued, Astroworld deep dive, Clickbait, Questionettes are finally back, Britney Spears free at last, Paris Hilton is now married, Taylor Swift's Red (Taylors version) was released, Lady Gaga came through at the House of Gucci Red Carpet, Bravo news and RHOSLC. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/sheeshuustellall/support

Paisley Stage, Raspberry & Rhyme
Episode #151:Album Focus: Gutterball, ”Weasel”

Paisley Stage, Raspberry & Rhyme

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 36:16


On this episode, Jeff and Soraya continue their Album Focus series with a  look at Gutterball's 2nd release, "Weasel".

The Daily Derringer Podcast
Wonder Weasel. S.6 Ep. 41

The Daily Derringer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 26:52


The Daily Derringer Podcast - Thursday Nov 4th 2021 Check out more full episodes at Q107.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mother Earth News and Friends
Ep. 121 Keep Your Flock Safe From Predators

Mother Earth News and Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 41:54


In this episode, Jessica chats with author and poultry-keeper Gail Damerow about how to protect a flock from predators big and small. Find Gail at on her blog, www.GailDamerow.com. Books by Gail include What's Killing My Chickens?, Storey's Guide to Raising Chickens, The Chicken Health Handbook, The Chicken Encyclopedia, and Hatching & Brooding Your Own Chicks. To see more podcasts, visit our Mother Earth News and Friends page. Check out the MOTHER EARTH NEWS Bookstore for more resources to help you achieve your health and farming goals. Go to the MOTHER EARTH NEWS FAIR page for webinar and courses on everything from gardening to livestock management. 

Public Problems
Rabid Weasel Podcast Episode 34: Early Scary Memories

Public Problems

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 67:20


Happy Halloween! Do you remember the silly things that scared you as a child? Do you remember the first movie or show that frightened you? Maybe you saw or heard something that you were too young for? We will discuss all those memories and more!

The Swyx Mixtape
False Negatives [Steve Yegge]

The Swyx Mixtape

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 29:14


watch Steve Yegge's podcast https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7GurMGEDHUYTranscript[00:00:00] So this week we've been going through Steve yogis podcasts and his greatest hits his updated perspectives on the big clouds and what they're doing right. And what they're doing wrong. But the other thing that Steve is really well known for is his views on tech interviewing. And he's done in big tech interviews and quite a lot of them.  And we all know they're broken in some way, but it's often in very stark reminder of how broken it is. I think there are two anecdotes here. I want you to look out for, which is the first, the one on Jeff Dean. Just look out for that name. And second, the one on them reviewing their own packets and applying too high of a bar saying too many nos. There's a lot of false negatives in the industry.  Both false negatives and false positives. R a problem. Of course. And he's just some ways to handle them. But overall, I just think we, we deserve some reminder of how flawed it is when we do our own interviewing. I thought I had a bad run of it doing two interviews a week. And he did multiple a day, sometimes three at once. And i just think this is a fantastic story to go over So the thing about interviewing is it's a terrible signal. It's, it's better than a phone screen. And a phone screen is better than a resume screen. If you just look at someone's resume, how sure are you that they're good. I mean, in any, in any discipline, right? You know, you wanna, you wanna, you want an airplane, airline, pilot, you look at the resume. Will you just hire them based on the risk? Not usually. So the resume is, is your first filter. It's the first thing where you basically take a stack of resumes and there's an art to reviewing resumes and looking for people that are kind of trying to cover up, uh, things that, that, that, uh, they may not know. And they don't want you to know that they don't know. So they try to cover it up in their resume. So you can look for. Weasel words, and it's all kinds of things you need, but basically you're taking the resumes and you're, you're sorting them into two piles, right. That the keeps in the don't keeps and there's of course, the old running joke in the industry about how you want to take some resumes and just throw them in the trash can because you don't want to hire unlucky people. And so if you throw in the trashcan, that person was unlucky, but they do sort of the resumes into the I'm gonna follow up. And the ones that you just say pass. So writing a resume is really important. And part of, um, a book. Passing technical interviews would be on how to write a great resume. And this comes up again when you're writing your resume, so-called resume for what you've accomplished your company. When at time it's time to get promoted. So the art of resume writing never, never gets old. It never leaves you and is always an important part of your career. Being able to represent yourself. But that's a, that's just step one and it's a bad filter. You don't want to just base your decision on a resume. Would you marry somebody based on their race? Maybe, but probably you'd want to meet them first. Right? So the next step is a phone screen and everybody hates doing phone screens. I actually love doing phone screens. I, for some reason have, um, never really had an issue with them unless there's a bad connection or something, but a lot of people just hate talking on the phone and they even more hate having to ask people technical questions on the phone. So I often got stuck with phone screen duty at every company that I ever worked. Because you can actually do a pretty good job, not a great job, but a pretty good job of predicting whether they're going to pass their interviews based on my phone screen. Cause my phone screens would go for two hours if necessary to sort of, you know, get a comprehensive look at what this PR this candidate is good at because the general rule is like the longer you spend evaluating somebody than the better. Idea. You're going to have of whether they're going to work out. Long-term just like the longer you have a relationship with somebody before you decide whether to marry them or not the better you're going to know how that marriage is going to go. Most likely there is a point of diminishing returns and we'll talk about that. But by and large, The amount of vetting that we do in the industry today is nowhere near enough. And I'm going to, I'm going to talk about the consequences of that and how we, how we arrived at that conclusion. And so on in this, in this talk, but at a high level, I don't believe in interviewing anymore. I, I ha I'm a strong skeptic. I think that interviewing is so flawed. It's it re any company that really wants to get ahead of their competitors and succeed needs to spend some time re-inventing their interview process. And probably having people spend more time with candidates than they're spending today. It's, it's just not a very good signal. And I said that at Google once, uh, Google, I said it in, in an email, uh, replied on some public thread somewhere, um, in the early days, maybe 2008. And. Some director got mad at me and said, oh, we didn't like that. We didn't the [00:05:00] records in life that you said that you had, that you're a skeptic of the interview process. We were talking about a company that hires scientists. We're talking about a company that, you know, one of their models is speak truth to authority, and this director was an ass and, uh, he got what was coming to him eventually. At the time, you know, he was just like, well, everybody's upset because you're, you're, you know, you're questioning the sacred interview process. You farted in church is what he told me. And so, uh, and so I haven't really been able to tell people this for my entire career because they feel that it's undermining their, um, ability to attract the best. I guess, but the reality is if you marry somebody after dating him for four hours, you're probably going to get a surprise. Maybe it's a good surprise. Uh, but most surprises are not so good in that department. And interviewing is the same way. So if you're going to keep your interview. Uh, panels the exact same way that they've been doing it since Silicon valley was invented by the arse hole shot shot key. Uh, then, um, then you're going to need a better process for getting rid of people who are no good. You're you're going to need a, you're going to need to double down on your process for managing people out. That's actually how Amazon gets by and gets such great. They aggressively manage out under performance because they know that underperformers are gonna sneak in. And, uh, it's because the interview process is fluid. So it's just a best effort. The problem with the interview process is that it takes a lot of time. It's really miserable for engineers to do more than two or three interviews per week. And most companies try to cap it so that you're not talking to more than maybe two people per week. Okay. Or three, if they're really busy, uh, because it takes you. Uh, an hour out of your day to, to interview the person. And you may have a interview pre briefs where everybody gets together and maybe divides up what people are going to talk about. It's not recommended at some companies, but some companies do it anyway. And then you may have a post brief where everyone gets together and discusses a candidate afterwards. Also not recommend recommended. I could do a whole segment on Google's interview process and how it gets away from a lot of biases and little kids, soccer team situations where one person says, well, I didn't like him. And everyone was like, well, I didn't either because they don't want to rock the boat and all kinds of bad things can happen. Uh, so we can talk about that, but that's not what today is about today. It's just about just interviewing in general because what they found, this is a bit surprising, uh, is that, you know, cause Google hires a lot of statisticians. We're talking about people who are. World-class experts in their field. And since Google has this, you know, surfeit of, of statisticians, they can apply statistical methods to a variety of problem spaces. Google gets like a million plus resumes per year. And somebody has to go through all those resumes. It took me five applications to Google before they finally noticed my daughter's resume over a course of a year. I sent in one resume and then a couple months later I sent in another resume and a component's me and this went on until my fifth resume came in to Google and somebody looked at it and said, oh, we gotta get you in here for an interview. And I was like, great. You know, he could have done that like a year ago before the IEP. But whatever. So, uh, so they get a million resumes a year. That's a lot of data. That's a lot of statistical data. They do a lot of interviews. They do a lot of fun screens and they, and they add a lot of followup data, like performance data on everybody who got accepted. And so they can basically run a bunch of statistics and maybe even do experiments. They can set up special interview loops, where they set up conditions and control control groups and kind of try and see what happens when they try this or that to influence the interview process. Okay. Sounds pretty interesting. Right. And you probably think that they came up with a really, uh, really useful insights on how to conduct better interviews and the number one insight that they came up with and they shared this broadly with everybody and the, and they were just like, we're sharing this with you. We don't know what to do about it either. Was the, the result was they found out that there was zero correlation between your interview performance and your actual perform. Your, your interviews did not predict your performance. You could get a 4 0 4 us from every interviewer, the highest score, uh, at Google and wind up being a very mediocre performer or even a bad performer. And you could barely scrape by you by the skinnier teeth on your fifth application. Uh, and because I applied 55 times, but some people interviewed five times. I know one guy who actually got into Google. Fifth interview. He failed the first four and they make you wait six months. They're like, well, six months is long enough for you to go learn some stuff. So come back in six months, six more months. And he did that four times on the fifth time. K after, you know, two and a [00:10:00] half years have gone by, he finally got accepted to Google and he was a superstar. So you look at that and you say, well, okay, I've got some good anecdotes, but the statistics actually supported that. Basically your interview is now you're, you're either in or you're you're either in or out. And after that, your performance is, is it's not predictable from the interview. Another thing that they found, which was equally damning, I think no individual interviewer is better than any other interviewers when it comes to predicting whether the person will get hired or. And they specifically called out Jeff Dean. Uh, who's the number one engineer, not only at Google, but probably arguably in the whole world. And they said even Jeff Dean's interview scores were no better predictor than, than random of whether the person was going to get an offer. Which was kind of weird because everybody thinks they're really good at interviewing and it turns out no nobody's especially good at interviewing the best predictor was if around four people. All decided that they want to hire this person. And that's, that's, that's that's that's when you get the best signal. And once you start piling more than four on they, they, they found that the curve tapered off and immediately you hit diminishing returns. So, uh, starting at five interviewers, you're not getting any better information. And there are companies that I've been at where that have put people through, you know, 8, 9, 10, 11 interviews, 12 interviews. Trying to figure out is this person good or not? And they're just not getting any better information after the first four. That's the stark reality. And all these statistics basically backed up something that I had been fretting over and worrying about ever since I joined Google. Cause when I joined Google, of course, a bunch of people wanted to follow me there because, uh, I had a reputation. I was the Canary. When, when I left people, people were like, well, Either either the ship is seeking and we need to get off the ship or Steve's found something that's so much better that even though our current ship is good, this new one is something we've got to get into. And I had a reputation for that amongst my circle of friends of, you know, a hundred, a hundred plus people. And so a bunch of them tried to get in and they were good. Some of them were better than I was. And some of them were very clearly better versed in computer science than I was. They had contributed more. They were just better than me and they didn't get into Google and. And I knew right then that there was something seriously, seriously wrong with the process. Now, of course, we run into situations where, you know, I've said it before, why CEOs fail, they failed because they put their faith in the wrong people. And I've certainly done that myself in my career in recent times. I mean, it's very easy to do. Sometimes you're putting your faith in a person who might have all the qualifications on paper, but people just don't like. And there's nothing you can do about it, because if everybody hates you at your work, you're not going to be able to get stuff done no matter how good you are. So, you know, it's a problem because I I'm biased. And when I say the people who got turned away, uh, and I say they should have gotten jobs at Google and they got turned down by the interview process. You know, I am biased, you know, they're my friends. And in some cases, maybe I was wrong about them, but the ones that I'm thinking of, one on to, in their careers to become senior principal engineers at Amazon of which there are probably only 20 in existence, you know, or 25. And, and so these people are not slouches and they, they basically, you know, helped build the Amazon that you use today and they didn't get jobs. So, I guess one takeaway is if you interview at Google and you interview three or four times at Google and you don't get the job that doesn't actually mean that you weren't qualified to work at Google, it means you were what's called potentially. It potentially means you were a false negative, a false negative is where you, you do a test and the results of the test is no. And it should have been yet. So, for example, a false negative for, uh, an illness. If you take a test for COVID and they said, no, you don't have it, but you actually do have it. And the test dismissed it. That's a false negative, false negatives are, uh, you know, a huge, huge problem in the industry and their. Especially bad problem at Google. Google has probably a higher, false negative rate than maybe anybody else in the industry. Maybe Facebook, uh, since they got a lot of ex Googlers and they, they brought in a lot of people and they kind of copied a lot of Google's interview process. And so I'm sure Facebook has false negatives too. Uh, but those two are going to be the top. And false negatives really hurt. They really hurt the company. Like more than companies are willing to acknowledge they hurt because first of all, they've lost out on a great. And they just, the candidate showed up wanting to come and help the company and the candidate was great. Uh, but their interview process said, no, not great. So we're not going to hire them.  So that's that's problem. Number one is you is opportunity cost, but problem, number two is now that person is bitter and resentful because they know they're good enough to work at Google and they got turned down. And so now they start to hate Google and they start to bad mouth Google or Microsoft or whoever. [00:15:00] Did this, every company has false negatives and every company goes through this problem where they, they create enemies, Microsoft actually in the nineties. And I interviewed there once for an internship back when I was very early in college, so I didn't get the internship. And, uh, but they were, they were real jerks during the interview. At least Google was kind of nice, um, stressful, but nice in Microsoft, they were very arrogant and they would just sit there and make you struggle for 40 minutes without giving you any, any hints or indicators or anything. And it was just the way they ran things. And at Microsoft, they, they basically realized after 10 years of. They did some studies and they did some interviews with people out in the industry and they realized they were creating an army I'm fast army of people who hated Microsoft because of their terrible interview process, their experience that they had because people would, would be jerked around at the Microsoft interview and they would leave and they go, well, screw that company. And, uh, and, and screw the horse they wrote in on, and they go tell all their friends about it. And now everybody in the industry is like, well, Microsoft, a bunch of jerks, and this is such a big problem that it, it, it escalated all the way up to. You know, the senior executive levels and it was part of their corporate consciousness, you know, where they were like, oh no, we have an existential problem, which is we, we, we we've been screwing people over for a decade and now they're poisoned against us. And so they turned it around. They made a huge effort, a huge initiative to be nice to candidates during their interview so that even if they don't get the job, they still feel like they got a fair shot. And that in turn started, started to fix the problem of, of poisoning the well of candidates. So, you know, all, all very interesting. Right? What have we learned so far in my, uh, you know, 20 minutes of talking so far for this goes by fast, we've learned that interviewing is not a very good signal. There's a lot of false negatives. There are, um, a lot of interviewers out there who think they're really good at it, but statistics show that they're actually not. We've learned that if you do more than four interviews on a candidate, that you're wasting your time, because four is enough to tell you the right, the right answer. Uh, and of course the right answer is if you're not sure than, than Beaumont. Right, right. That's what everyone says. Is it though? I don't know. I don't know. Right. Maybe, maybe if in doubt you do hire them and then you fire them three months later, if they're just really, really, uh, out of their league, if they're, if they're underperforming, because the really the way it should work is is if they're close, because interviewing is just so flawed and cause false negatives are such a huge problem. Because it's opportunity costs plus it's poisoning the well, you know, not to mention the third problem with false negatives, in addition to in bettering everybody and losing you a great candidate, they go to one of your competitors. So no triple, triple whammy right there, uh, losing, turning away somebody who's really going to be actually do a good job at your company is really, really bad for your company. But companies are really scared of false positives. They're really scared that they're going to hire somebody who wasn't qualified. They're terrified of it. They would much rather have false negatives than false positives. And. Most of them can get away with it. Um, because well, they could up until recently because there were plenty of engineers out there and they could just keep, keep sifting through the pile until they get one that's just unambiguously a great candidate. And then they, then they're mediocre performers. Right. Because the whole, the whole thing is just, it's a mess. I don't know. I folks, I don't know what to tell you other than you need to do more than just interviews with somebody to really understand what their contribution is at the very least somebody should be tasked with finding a dossier on the person. Let me tell you a little bit about one thing that Google does. That's kind of cool that most other companies don't do it. It's called hiring committee and I was on a hiring committee for a long time. Hiring committee is this group of people that reviews the feedback from interviewers. So at Amazon and most other companies, the interviewers, the people who actually interviewed the candidate, they get together afterwards. Maybe it's immediately afterwards. Maybe it's later that day. Maybe it's the next day after it started to fade, it can kind of get kind of bad when a week goes by and you're like, oh, what did they do again? So at least take good notes after you interview someone. So they get together and they decide together as a group based on their experience with a candidate, should they hire them or not? That's how most companies work and it's actually terribly biased because, uh, these people biases. Like I mentioned a little kid's soccer team earlier, right. Where the ball shoots out and then the whole team runs after the ball. Somebody will say one thing and then everybody will just be like, oh yeah, this candidate sucks. Forget it. Forget everything. I, you know, yeah. They'll, they'll say, oh, I had a really good interview of the person, but don't pay too much. Don't read too much into it because of what Joe said. And so they wind up exacerbating the false negative. And in some cases, you know, they can sneak false positives through that way too, if you really [00:20:00] liked the candidate, but usually it's easier to say no. And so you get this false negative problem, a Google, what they do is everybody writes up their notes. You write up very detailed notes of what you asked the candidate and what their answers were. And you include if possible, any source code that they wrote as part of their. Or any drawings, they did everything. And you present that you, you, you put it into a system. And then later a hiring committee meets like once a week and they go through all of the interview results and they say, okay, let's decide who of these people are. And it's a really cool process because, uh, now you, you have no idea who the interviewer is, maybe, uh, and although you can get statistics on their, their, their past, on their distribution of yeses and nos or their scores. Right. And, uh, you know, one thing that they found is, is if people give. 2.0, meaning they're not sure, you know, I'm just going to punt. I didn't get a good enough signal in my interview. That's a useless interview in there a week. Interviewer, you should come out with a yes or no that lets you know, kind of seems obvious. And so they can, they can tweak and discount somebody. If somebody always says. They can say, well, this person does always say no. And they said no to this person over here who got hired and they're doing great. So they can discount it that way or they can discount it if the person is too easy and always says yes. So they have a little bit of leeway there in, in basically wiggling around. Uh, if one of the, one of the interviewers is really strong. Yes. Are really strong. But basically they don't know what's going on. They're blind. They just, they're just looking at feedback and deciding whether to hire the person or not. And it seems like a really, really cool process in principle because it gets rid of that bias of the individual interviewers, biasing, each other. There is a problem though. Okay. The recruiters because you work very, very closely with recruiters during this whole process. Tech recruiters, recruiters are great. I always say, be kind to your recruiter every day is be nice to your recruiter day because they are your partner. When it comes to getting great people into this company, the recruiter is the one representing the company. They're going to be the ones sweet talking to the candidate. They're going to be the ones telling the candidate. Oh, I'm so sorry that you didn't. You didn't get it, but you know, they thought very highly of you giving the, you know, the, the candidate, good experience recruiters can get you good resumes. They can, they can, they can, um, help sort of try to direct people your direction. If your team is hurting many, many, many reasons to be good to your recruiters. And a lot of people just treat them as administrators and they're just like, whatever, get that recruiter over here. And it's, it's, they're dumb. Those people are dumb. And they probably kick puppies. So anyway, uh, you're working with the recruiters and the recruiters came into us one day in hiring committee and they said we today, uh, before we review the resumes, we're going to do a little exercise. Okay. What we're going to do is we're going to present, we're presenting you. We're going to give you some packets to. These packets have been carefully selected. And what we're going to do, this is sort of a calibration exercise. We're going to see, we're going to try to see if, if you, uh, you know, if your results match with other results across the company. They gave us some story and they gave us a bunch of packets to review. And so we reviewed the packets. What's a packet, a packet is the candidates resume. Uh, and, uh, but they wouldn't show us the resume. They would only show us the interviewer's feedback. So we had to make our decision not based on the resume, but based on only what the interview was. Okay, fair enough. I mean, the interviewers give a lot of details. The resume almost doesn't matter anymore at that point, because what really, you know, what really matters is how did they do in the interview? Right? So we went through and we were out allowed to ask questions and they would go in and check the notes and stuff. But basically we were, we were doing this totally blind and we had to go in as a group and do our regular thing to decide whether or not to hire each one of these packets. And we ended up projecting 30 or 35% of them. We passed like 60%. If I remember correctly, it was, it was a, it was a pretty hefty number that we turned down and then the recruiters shared the results. They shared the secret with us. They, they, they let us in on the surprise, which was at the packets we were reviewing were ours. We were reviewing our own interview feedback and we had decided not to hire one-third of ourselves. And again, it did nothing, but disillusioned me even further, just, just leading new leave that this, this whole process is just it's garbage. It's speed dating. It's me making marriage decisions basically based on speed dating. And, uh, and I, and to this day, I think that the, the process is flawed. I understand why they do it. I get it. They do it because. It's a compromise. It's a compromise between how much time and resources are they willing to devote to it versus how good of a signal they're going to get? Because [00:25:00] it's really, really hard. Like I said, to, to participate in lots and lots of things. Amazon went through to get big, fast phase back in the early two thousands where they were just like, oh my God, we got a girl that crazy. We've got a bunch of, you know, funding and we've, we've got a bunch of things that we want to get done and we need a bunch of people fast, get big, fast GBF, and we're gonna, um, we're going to interview. They're crazy. And so we went through a couple of years at Amazon. I don't know if it's still like this. I hope not where, uh, we had to interview many, many people. Every day, not just, not just like many per week, but like I would get many interviews per day and we had to stay on top. You had to interview the people that would come up with interview questions and you had to write up your feedback and you had to, you know, do that between juggling your regular job, which was already hard. And then it got to the point where I was starting to get like double. So they would have me interviewing two different people in different conference rooms at the same time. And I'd be running back and forth, apologizing to the candidate saying, I'm sorry, I've got to run. I'll be back in five minutes, work on this problem. And I run to the other candidate. And then one time I actually got triple booked and I was running between three different rooms interviewing three different candidates. And it was just, it was untenable. It was ridiculous. And it was not a great candidate experience. And it certainly wasn't a great experience for us. And when I, for a few years, because we were just trying so hard to vet people and that's, that's all we had. It's. So, so you can try to throw the, you can try to scale up, but just making everybody work really, really hard, but that, that can lead to some serious burnout and really bad outcomes. And at that point you might as well just throw darts to figure out who you're going to hire. So, uh, so is there a better way? Well, yeah, there, there is actually a better way. This is Swyx here. So he goes on to talk about pair interviewing and internships, which I didn't think were very controversial. So I cut it out.  Don't believe too much in your interviewing process. Don't believe in it so much that you require somebody to go through 10 interviews. Cause it won't help. Don't believe that some of your interviewers are better than others because actually they're not. And, and that's been shown again and again, statistically at Google, they tried year after year. Uh, and, and, and don't believe that, um, that the, the, the interview performance, how well somebody does an interview, all that shows is how good they are. That's what we learned. We learned that, that if you do really relevant really well in an interview, then you can conclude beyond a shadow of doubt that this person is really good at interviewing, but they may not be any good at actually working and getting stuff. So do whatever you can to try to improve the quality of that signal. If you're on the interviewing side, you know, try to try to get, um, uh, you know, try to get two people into the room and do pair interviews and see how it works for your company and for your candidates. Because you're going to find that it's going to co. It's going to fix a lot of problems with bad interviewers, uh, and do your best to try to get the person, to try to understand what their actual work is like. Go look at their GitHub, go look at their, any, any projects that they got, where you can actually see. This is the dossier I started talking about earlier. Where you can see what the contributions are that got me, like I said, I got that, got me, my job at Google, my contributions, you know, in the form of, you know, what I did for my computer game was enough to sort of make a tie breaker and get me another round of interviews, you know, do that, do try to get a complete picture of the candidate because you know, you're forced be dates is not going to be enough. And then finally, maybe try to turn the. A little bit towards, remember how I said we didn't hire ourselves 30% of us. We decided not to hire, uh, you know, try to turn the novel a little bit, to be a little bit more forgiving and then have a process. By which you tell the candidate, you're in an evaluation period. And if after three months or six months, you know, you're not performing up to snuff, we're going to down level you, or we're going to find another role for you. Or unfortunately, we're going to have to, you know, find a way to get you a job at another company. Basically give you an opportunity. However, HR and recruiters say this, they have magic ways of saying it and don't ever let an engineer tell a person that they have to go. Cause they'll do a terrible job. Like I just did. But have a process for managing out your false positives. And then, and then you're just going to have, you're going to have better outcomes. You're going to have better people. You're going to have happier. People are going to have more productive teams and you're going to have a better candidate experience.

Blue Collar Executive
When You Smell A Weasel, Lock Up Your Chickens

Blue Collar Executive

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 9:33


If you have chickens, you know that a critter in the area is a literal real concern.  However, this can also be true metaphorically for every aspect of life.  My Dad taught me this at a young age.  We didn't have chickens and I had never seen (or smelled) a weasel.  However, I knew exactly what he was talking about and this parable has helped me throughout my journey.  Our instinct is one of our greatest gifts, but also one of the easiest things to ignore.  When we really want something or someone we often suppress what our heart is telling us and when we do this it ends in regret 100% of the time!  So, when we smell or feel something isn't right, IT'S NOT and we should lock up our chickens!   "The best advice you will ever get comes from your instinct "

Public Problems
Rabid Weasel Podcast Episode 33: Ernest Scared Stupid (1991)

Public Problems

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 47:11


For people who grew up with Ernest, this movie may be considered a minor Halloween classic. But what if this is your first Ernest movie and you are seeing it as an adult?

Paleo Bites
Diictodon, the Two Weasel Tooth

Paleo Bites

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 22:23


(image source: https://prehistoricreatures.wordpress.com/2011/08/15/diictodon/) Host Matthew Donald and guest co-host Natasha Krech discuss Diictodon, a little gopher-like creature that, based on evidence, had burrows bigger than my current apartment. From the Late Permian, this 2-foot synapsid lived during the worst mass extinction in all of Earth's history, proving those post-apocalyptic stories right that the best way to survive is to hide underground. Except it still went extinct then, so maybe we're all screwed anyway. Want to further support the show? Sign up to our Patreon for exclusive bonus content at Patreon.com/MatthewDonald. Also, you can purchase Matthew Donald's dinosaur book "Megazoic" on Amazon by clicking here, its sequel "Megazoic: The Primeval Power" by clicking here, its third installment "Megazoic: The Hunted Ones" by clicking here, or its final installment "Megazoic: An Era's End" by clicking here. 

PodcastF1 – Los Garagistas
186 - Previo GP de Estados Unidos 2021

PodcastF1 – Los Garagistas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 34:36


Ya entrados en copas y sin el Weasel, los Garagistas platican sobre las noticias y chismes previos al Gran Premio de Estados Unidos: Dani Ric en un Nascar de Dale, el pique Max–Lewis, el Circuit of the Americas y el típico podio desinformado.  Salud. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/los-garagistas/message

Public Problems
Rabid Weasel Podcast Episode 32: Donnie Darko (2001)

Public Problems

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 67:27


For our third Halloween episode this October, we are discussing the story of Donnie Darko, a teenage boy who receives a warning from a man in a creepy bunny outfit that the world is going to end in 28 days.

The Rick Jensen Show
Rick Jensen presents Weasels on Left and Right using Colin Powell's corpse to promote their own agendas.

The Rick Jensen Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 22:58


As soon as Colin Powell died, NY Governor Hochul, Trump and NBC propagandist Andrea Mitchell use his death to promote their personal agendas. Rick says Mitchell's is probably the worst of them because she pretends to be an unbiased journalist and her claim is either professional malpractice or a blatant lie which, if not researched as Rick has done, would poison the minds of millions of Americans against their fellow human beings who are Republicans.

Public Problems
Rabid Weasel Podcast Episode 31: Halloweentown (1998)

Public Problems

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 44:48


Listeners of a certain age may have nostalgic memories of this film. Others may be confused at our inclusion of a Disney Channel movie in our Halloween series. Try to put yourself back into the mindset of a child during the Halloween season and give this film a try.

Taking Initiative
SKT - Conch Air: Episode 63

Taking Initiative

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 42:58


Correction: the party visits the Harpers for some interrogation.   Feel free to drop us a review on iTunes and cast Message to us over social media.   Get your free Idle Champions Gold Chest using the code LANE-KYPE-PARE. Code is valid from 10/18/2021 at 12:30 am ET thru 11/01/2021 at 12:30 am ET.   You can find "Taking Initiative" at: Website: takinginitiativepodcast.com Twitter: @TI_Pod Discord: https://discord.gg/VS7F3Hd Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/takinginitiativepodcast YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCwWvHLXdUS2G3RE7CRr71w   The original artwork for the logo was created by Caio Santos (@BlackSalander). The theme song was created by Neil Martin (@BardicMartin) of "The Lucky Die." Oppressive Gloom by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4174-oppressive-gloom License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   Deadly Roulette by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3625-deadly-roulette License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   Lost Time by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4005-lost-time License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   Grave Blow by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3821-grave-blow License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   Teller of the Tales by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4467-teller-of-the-tales License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   Marty Gots A Plan by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4992-marty-gots-a-plan License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   Villainous Treachery by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4588-villainous-treachery License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   Iron Horse by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3927-iron-horse License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   Pop Goes the Weasel by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4230-pop-goes-the-weasel License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   Faster Does It by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3741-faster-does-it License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license   Bardy - College of the Maestro Bard by Matthew Mercer Moose - UA Beast Conclave Ranger by Wizards of the Coast Mortimer - Holy Heart Fighter by Anne Gregersen (Aaralyn's Stolen Notes to Velea), Rogue Multiclass Surreal - Path of the Storm Herald Barbarian by Wizards of the Coast, Fighter Multiclass Xel - Way of Time Monk by Drew Tillman   All mentions to Dungeons and Dragons (D&D), including the 5e ruleset and the "Storm King's Thunder" module, refer to property owned by Wizards of the Coast (WotC). We do not own the rules or module. We just enjoy playing!

The Ten Minute Bible Hour Podcast - The Ten Minute Bible Hour
0491 - We All Know a Slimy, Gross, Disingenuous Weasel Question When We See It

The Ten Minute Bible Hour Podcast - The Ten Minute Bible Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 11:35


Thanks to everyone who supports TMBH at patreon.com/thetmbhpodcast You're the reason we can all do this together! Discuss the episode here Music written and performed by Jeff Foote.

This is Just a Phase
Episode 28 - John “Jughead” Pierson (Mitochondriacs, Jughead's Basement, EIB, Screeching Weasel)

This is Just a Phase

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 78:03


On this episode I have the honor of chatting with a huge influence on me - John “Jughead” Pierson of the bands The Mitochondriacs, Even in Blackouts, The Mopes, and Screeching Weasel, as well as from his amazing podcast Jughead's Basement: Lo-Fi Interviews w/ Hi-Fi Guests. We chat about the formation of the Mitochondriacs w/ members of fellow Chicago band Kobanes, his approach to interviewing guests on his podcast, some funny stories of his time in Screeching Weasel, stepping out as the leader and songwriter in Even in Blackouts, his experience performing in theater groups over the majority of this life, and so much more. So sit back and get energized by this episode of TIJAP. *** songs included in this episode are The Mitochondriacs songs - “I Want It All,” “Love,” “But Sometimes,” and “Hate,” as well as the Even in Blackouts' “It's All I Can Do,” their cover of Screeching Weasels' “Hey Suburbia,” and “Dear Resonance.” --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Corn Nation: for Nebraska Cornhuskers fans
Five Heart Podcast Episode 247: Prove It

Corn Nation: for Nebraska Cornhuskers fans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 55:15


This week on the Five Heart Podcast, Jon and Greg look back at the 56-7 win over Northwestern last week. How'd the offense perform? How about that defense? And how nice was it to not have to rely on special teams (though 84 yards per punt average is pretty nifty)? Looking ahead at Michigan, how do the Huskers stack up? Well let's look at the #9 and undefeated Weasels. Winners over Western Michigan, Washington (who the week prior lost to FCS Montana), Northern Illinois, Rutgers, and - let's face it - an atypical Wisconsin team. They've held their opponents to no more than 17 points, and seem to have "the guy" at quarterback for the first time in Jim Harbaugh's tenure. But have they really beaten anyone of consequence? They remind me of some of the Husker teams of the Pelini era that started off 5-0 or 6-0 while playing lower non-conference opponents and lesser Big XII competition. Then they get on the big stage and we see what they truly are. That's how I'm hoping this week's game goes. That the Huskers expose Michigan. Dare I say Nebraska's losses to top-5 Oklahoma and top-20 Sparty are more impressive than what the Weasels have accomplished so far. But that's why they play the game. And Jon hit the nail on the head and inadvertently provided the title of this episode: Prove It. It's time for Nebraska to show the world, on another primetime stage, that last week's 56-7 win over a Pat Fitzgerald defense was not a fluke, but a big step forward for Scott Frost's Huskers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Inside Indiana Sports Breakfast with Kent Sterling
Indianapolis Colts - Good injury news from Frank Reich! JT must be fed! Chuck Pagano is a weasel!

Inside Indiana Sports Breakfast with Kent Sterling

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 17:28


Rock the house! Kwity whining! and Khari the fight to Baltimore! Two Colts back at practice, and the other has Paye-d the price to play and might be good to go! Big 10 Media Days are here, and tomorrow we will here from IU's Mike Woodson and Purdue's Matt Painter their their championship dreams! Colts on Monday Night Football bugs me for four reason - the first three are in the podcast. The fourth is because Sunday will be boring! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-kent-sterling-show/support

Screaming in the Cloud
DevelopHer and Creating Success for All in Tech with Lauren Hasson

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 33:07


About LaurenLauren Hasson is the Founder of DevelopHer, an award-winning career development platform that has empowered thousands of women in tech to get ahead, stand out, and earn more in their careers. She also works full-time on the frontlines of tech herself. By day, she is an accomplished software engineer at a leading Silicon Valley payments company where she is the architect of their voice payment system and messaging capabilities and is chiefly responsible for all of application security.Through DevelopHer, she's partnered with top tech companies like Google, Dell, Intuit, Armor, and more and has worked with top universities including Indiana and Tufts to bridge the gender gap in leadership, opportunity, and pay in tech for good. Additionally, she was invited to the United Nations to collaborate on the global EQUALS initiative to bridge the global gender divide in technology. Sought after across the globe for her insight and passionate voice, Lauren has started a movement that inspires women around the world to seek an understanding of their true value and to learn and continually grow.  Her work has been featured by industry-leading publications like IEEE Women in Engineering Magazine and Thrive Global and her ground-breaking platform has been recognized with fourteen prestigious awards for entrepreneurship, product innovation, diversity and leadership including the Women in IT Awards Silicon Valley Diversity Initiative of the Year Award, three Female Executive of the Year Awards, and recognition as a Finalist for the United Nations WSIS Stakeholder Prize.Links: DevelopHer: https://developher.com The DevelopHer Playbook: https://www.amazon.com/DevelopHer-Playbook-Simple-Advocate-Yourself-ebook/dp/B08SQM4P5J TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: You could build you go ahead and build your own coding and mapping notification system, but it takes time, and it sucks! Alternately, consider Courier, who is sponsoring this episode. They make it easy. You can call a single send API for all of your notifications and channels. You can control the complexity around routing, retries, and deliverability and simplify your notification sequences with automation rules. Visit courier.com today and get started for free. If you wind up talking to them, tell them I sent you and watch them wince—because everyone does when you bring up my name. Thats the glorious part of being me. Once again, you could build your own notification system but why on god's flat earth would you do that?Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate: is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards, while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other, which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at Honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability, it's more than just hipster monitoring. Corey: You could build you go ahead and build your own coding and mapping notification system, but it takes time, and it sucks! Alternately, consider Courier, who is sponsoring this episode. They make it easy. You can call a single send API for all of your notifications and channels. You can control the complexity around routing, retries, and deliverability and simplify your notification sequences with automation rules. Visit courier.com today and get started for free. If you wind up talking to them, tell them I sent you and watch them wince—because everyone does when you bring up my name. Thats the glorious part of being me. Once again, you could build your own notification system but why on god's flat earth would you do that?Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Jellyfish. So, you're sitting in front of your office chair, bleary eyed, parked in front of a powerpoint and—oh my sweet feathery Jesus its the night before the board meeting, because of course it is! As you slot that crappy screenshot of traffic light colored excel tables into your deck, or sift through endless spreadsheets looking for just the right data set, have you ever wondered, why is it that sales and marketing get all this shiny, awesome analytics and inside tools? Whereas, engineering basically gets left with the dregs. Well, the founders of Jellyfish certainly did. That's why they created the Jellyfish Engineering Management Platform, but don't you dare call it JEMP! Designed to make it simple to analyze your engineering organization, Jellyfish ingests signals from your tech stack. Including JIRA, Git, and collaborative tools. Yes, depressing to think of those things as your tech stack but this is 2021. They use that to create a model that accurately reflects just how the breakdown of engineering work aligns with your wider business objectives. In other words, it translates from code into spreadsheet. When you have to explain what you're doing from an engineering perspective to people whose primary IDE is Microsoft Powerpoint, consider Jellyfish. Thats Jellyfish.co and tell them Corey sent you! Watch for the wince, thats my favorite part.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. A somewhat recurring theme of this show has been the business of cloud, and that touches on a lot of different things. One thing I've generally cognizant of not doing is talking to folks who don't look like me and asking them questions like, “Oh, that's great, but let's ignore everything that you're doing, and instead talk about what it's like not to be a cis-gendered white dude in tech,” because that's crappy. Today, we're sort of deviating from that because my guest is Lauren Hasson, the founder of DevelopHer, which is a career development platform that empowers women in tech to get ahead. Lauren, thanks for joining me.Lauren: Thanks so much for having me, Corey.Corey: So, you're the founder of DevelopHer, and that is ‘develop-her' as in ‘she'. I'm not going to be as distinct on that pronunciation, so if you think I'm saying ‘developer' and it doesn't make intellectual sense, listener, that's what's going on. But you're also a speaker, you're an author, and you work on the front lines of tech yourself. That's a lot of stuff. What's your story?Lauren: Yeah, I do. So, I'm not only the founder-developer, but I'm just like many of your listeners: I work on the front lines of tech myself. I work remotely from my home in Dallas for a Silicon Valley payments company, where I'm the architect of our voice payment system, and I up until recently was chiefly responsible for all of application security. Yeah, and I do keep busy.Corey: It certainly seems like it. Let's go back to, I guess, the headline item here. You are the founder of DevelopHer, and one thing that always drives me a little nutty is when people take a glance at what I do and then try and tell the story, and then effectively mess the whole thing up. What is DevelopHer?Lauren: So, DevelopHer is what I wish I had ten years ago—or actually nine years ago. It's an empowerment platform that helps individual women—men, too—get ahead in their careers, earn more, and stand out. And part of my story, you know, I have the degrees from undergrad in electrical engineering and computer science, but I went a completely different direction after graduating. And at the end of the Great Recession, I found myself with no job with no technical skills, and I mean, no job prospects, at all. It was really, really bad, ugly crying on my couch bad, Corey.And I took a number of steps to get ahead and really relearn my tech skills, and I only got one offer to give myself a chance. It was a 90-days to prove myself, to get ahead, and teach myself iOS. And I remember it was one of the most terrifying things I've ever done. And within two years, I not only managed to survive that 90-day period and keep that job, but I had completely managed to thrive. My work had been featured in Apple's iOS7 keynote, I'd won the company-wide award at a national agency four times, I had won the SXSW international Hackathon, twice in a row.And then probably the pinnacle of it all is I was one of 100 tech innovators worldwide invited to attend the [UKG 00:03:41] Innovation Conference. And they flew me there on a private 747 jet, and it was just unreal. And so I founded DevelopHer because I needed this ten years ago, when I was at rock bottom, to figure out how to get ahead: how do I get into my career; how do I stand out? And of course, you know there's more to the story, but I also found out I was underpaid after achieving all of that, that a male peer was paid exactly what I was paid, with no credentials, despite all of the awards that I won. And I went out and learned to negotiate, and tripled my salary in two years, and turned around and said, “I'm going to teach other women—and men, too—how to get real change in their own life.”Corey: I love hearing stories where people discover that they're underpaid. I mean, it's a bittersweet moment because on the one hand it's, “Wait, you mean they've been taking advantage of me?” And you feel bad for people, but at the same time, you're sort of watching the blindfold fall away from their eyes of, “Yeah, but it's been this way, and now you know about it. And now you're in a position to potentially do something about it.” I gave a talk at a tech conference a few years back called “Weasel your Way to the Top: How to Handle a Job Interview” and it was a fun talk.I really enjoyed it, but what I discovered was after I'd given it I got some very direct feedback of, “That's a great talk and you give a lot of really useful advice. What if I don't look like you?” And I realized, “Oh, my God, I built this out of things that worked for me and I unconsciously built all of my own biases and all of my own privilege into that talk.” At which point I immediately stopped giving it until I could relaunch it as a separate talk with a friend of mine, Sonia Gupta, who does not look like me. And between the two of us, it became a much stronger, much better talk.Lauren: It's good that you understand what you were bringing to the table and how you can appeal to an even larger audience. And what I've done is really said, “Here's my experience as a woman in tech, and here's what's worked for me.” And what's been surprising is men have said, “Yeah, that's what I did.” Except for I put a woman in tech spin on it and… I mean, I knew it worked for me; I have more than quintupled my base salary—just my base salary alone—in nine years. And the results that women are getting from my programming—I had one woman who earned $80,000 more in a single negotiation, which tells me, one, she was really underpaid, but she didn't just get one offer at $80,000 more; she got at least two. I mean, that changed her life.And I think the lowest I've heard is, like, $30,000 difference change. I mean, this is, this is life-changing for a lot of women. And the scary thing is that it's not just, say it's $50,000 a year. Well, over ten years, that's half a million dollars. Over 20 years, that's a million, and that's not even interest and inflation and compounding going into that. So, that's a huge difference.Corey: It absolutely is. It's one of those things that continues to set people further and further back. One thing that I think California got very right is they've outlawed recently asking what someone's previous compensation was because, “Oh, we don't want to give someone too big of a raise,” is a way you perpetuate the systemic inequality. And that's something that I wish more employers would do.Lauren: It's huge. I know the women and proponents who had moved that forward; some of them are personal friends of mine, and it's huge. And that's actually something that I trained specifically for is how to handle difficult questions like, “How much are you currently making?” Which you can't legally get asked in California, although it still happens, so how do you handle it if you still get asked and you don't want to rule yourself out? Or even worse—which they still can ask—which is, “How much do you want to make?”And a lot of times, people get asked that before they know anything about the job. And they basically, if you give an answer upfront, you're negotiating against yourself. And so I tackle tough things like that head-on. And I'm very much an engineer at heart, so for me, it's very methodical; I prepare scripts in advance to handle the pushback that I'm going to get, to handle the difficult questions. Without a doubt, I know all of my numbers, and that's where I'm getting real results for women is by taking the methodical approach to it.Corey: So, I spent my 20s in crippling credit card debt, and I was extremely mercenary, as a result. This wasn't because of some grand lost vision or something. Nope. I had terrible financial habits. So, every decision I made in that period of my life was extraordinarily mercenary. I would leave jobs I enjoyed for a job I couldn't stand because it paid $10,000 more.And the thing that I picked up from all of this, especially now having been on the other side of that running a company myself, is I'm not suggesting at any point that people should make career decisions based upon where they can make the most money, but that should factor in. One thing we do here at The Duckbill Group, in every job posting we put up is we post the salary range for the position. And I want to be clear here, it is less than anyone here could make at one of the big tech unicorns or a very hot startup that's growing meteorically, and we're upfront about that. We know that if money is the thing you're after and that is the driving force behind what you're going for, great; I don't fault you for that.This might not be the best role for you and that's perfectly okay. I get it. But you absolutely should know what your market worth is so you can make that decision from a place of being informed, rather than being naive and later discovering that you were taken advantage of.Lauren: So, I want to unpack just a couple things. There's just so many gold nuggets in that. Number one, for any employer listening out there, that is such a great best practice, to post the range. You're going to attract the right candidates when you post the right range. The last thing you want is to get to the end of the process to find out that, hey, you guys were totally off, and all the time invested could have been avoided if you'd had some sort of expectation set, upfront.That said, that's actually where I start with my negotiation training. A lot of people think I start with the money and that it's all about the money. That's not where I start. The very first thing I train women, and the men who've taken it, too, on the course is, figure out what success looks like to you. And not just the number success, but what does your life look like? What does your lifestyle look like? What does it feel like? What kinds of things do you do? What kinds of things do you value?Money is one of those components, but it's not all. And here's the reason I did that: because at a certain point in my life, I only got out at—broke even out of debt, you know, within the last five years. That's how underpaid I was at the time. But then once I started climbing out of debt, I started realizing it's not all about money. And that's actually how I ended up in my dream position.I mean, I'm living out how I define success today. Could I be making a lot more money at a big tech unicorn? Yeah, I could. But I also have this incredible lifestyle; it's sustainable. I get on apps like Blind and other internet forums, and I hear just horror stories of people burning out and the toxic cultures they work with. I don't have that at all. I have something that I could easily do for the next 50 years of my life if I live that long.But it's not by accident that I'm in the role that I'm in right now. I actually took the time to figure out what success looks like to me, and so when this opportunity came along—and I was looking at it alongside other opportunities that honestly paid more, I recognized this opportunity for what it was because I'd put in the work up front to figure out what success looks like to me. And so that's why what you guys are saying, “Hey, it's a lifestyle that you guys are supporting and mission that you're joining that's so important.” And you need to know that and do that work up front.Corey: That's I think what it really comes down to is understanding that in many cases… in fact, I'm going to take that back—in all cases, there's an inherent adversarial nature to the discussions you have about compensation with your employer or your prospective employer. And I say ‘adversarial' not antagonistic because you are misaligned as far as the ultimate purpose of the conversation. I'm not going to paint myself as some saint here and say that, oh, I'm on the side of every person I'm negotiating against, trying to get them to take a salary that's less than they deserve. Because, first, although I view myself that I'm not in that position, you have to take that on faith from me, and I think that is too far of a bridge to cross. So, take even what I'm saying now from the position as someone who has a vested interest in the outcomes of that negotiation.I mean, we're not one of those unicorn startups; we can't outbid Netflix and we wouldn't even try to. We're one of those old-fashioned businesses that has taken no investment and we fund ourselves through the magic of revenue and profitability, which means we don't have a SoftBank-sized [laugh] war chest sitting in the bank that we can use to just hurl ridiculous money at people and see who pans out. Hiring has to be intentional and thoughtful because we're a very small team. And if you're looking for something that doesn't align with that, great; I certainly don't blame you. That isn't this, and that's okay, I'm not trying to hire everyone.And if it's not going to work out, why wouldn't we say that upfront to avoid trying to get to all the way at the end of a very expensive interview process—both in terms of time and investment and emotionally—only to figure out that we're worlds apart on comp, and it's never going to work.Lauren: A hundred percent agree. I mean, I've been through it on both ends, both as someone who is being hired and also as a hiring manager, and I understand it. And you need to find alignment, and that's what negotiation is all about is finding an alignment, finding something where everyone feels like they're winning in the situation. And I'm a big proponent—and this is going to go so counterculture—I think a lot of people overlook a lot of opportunities that are just golden nuggets. I think there's a lot of idol worship of the big tech companies.And don't get me wrong; I'm sure they pay really well, great opportunity for your career, but I think people are overlooking a lot of really great career opportunities to get experience, and responsibility, and have good pay and lifestyle. And I'm a big proponent and looking for those golden nuggets rather than shooting for one of the big tech unicorns.Corey: And other people are going to have a very different perspective on that, and that is absolutely okay. So, tell me a little bit more about what it is that DevelopHer does and how you go about doing it because it's one thing to say, “Oh, we help women figure out that they are being underpaid,” but there's a whole lot of questions that opens up because great. How do you do that?Lauren: I do a number of things. So, it's not all about pay either. Part of it's building your value, building your confidence, standing out, getting ahead. DevelopHer started, actually, as a podcast. Funny story; I wanted to solve the problem of, we need more technical women as visible leaders out there, and I said, “Where are the architects? Where are the CTOs? Where are the CSOs?”And I didn't think anyone would care about me. I mean, I'm not Sheryl Sandberg; I'm not [laugh] the CEO of Facebook. Who's going to listen to me? And then I was actually surprised when people cared about my own story, about coming back from being underpaid and then getting back into tech and figuring out how to stand out in such a short amount of time. And other women were saying, “Well, how did you do it?”And it wasn't just women; it was men, too, saying, “Hey, I also don't know how to effectively advocate for myself.” And then it was companies saying, “Hey, can you come in and help us build our internal bench, recruit more women to come work for us, and build our own women leaders?” And then I've started working with universities to help bridge the gap before it even starts. I partnered with major universities to license my program and train them, not only how do you negotiate for what you're worth, for your first salary, but also how do you come in and immediately make an impact and accelerate your career growth? And then, of course, I work with individual women.I've talked about I have a salary negotiation course that's won a couple awards for the work, the results that it's getting, but then I just recently wrote a book because I wanted to reach women and men at scale and help them really get ahead. And this was literally my playbook. It's called The DevelopHer Playbook. And it's, how did I break into tech? And then once I was in tech, how did I get ahead so quickly? And it's not rocket science. And that's what I'm working on is training other people do it. And look, I'm still learning; I'm still paving my own path forward in tech, myself.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Jellyfish. So, you're sitting in front of your office chair, bleary eyed, parked in front of a powerpoint and—oh my sweet feathery Jesus its the night before the board meeting, because of course it is! As you slot that crappy screenshot of traffic light colored excel tables into your deck, or sift through endless spreadsheets looking for just the right data set, have you ever wondered, why is it that sales and marketing get all this shiny, awesome analytics and inside tools? Whereas, engineering basically gets left with the dregs. Well, the founders of Jellyfish certainly did. That's why they created the Jellyfish Engineering Management Platform, but don't you dare call it JEMP! Designed to make it simple to analyze your engineering organization, Jellyfish ingests signals from your tech stack. Including JIRA, Git, and collaborative tools. Yes, depressing to think of those things as your tech stack but this is 2021. They use that to create a model that accurately reflects just how the breakdown of engineering work aligns with your wider business objectives. In other words, it translates from code into spreadsheet. When you have to explain what you're doing from an engineering perspective to people whose primary IDE is Microsoft Powerpoint, consider Jellyfish. Thats Jellyfish.co and tell them Corey sent you! Watch for the wince, thats my favorite part.Corey: I feel like no one really has a great plan for, “Oh, where are you going next in tech? Do you have this whole thing charted out?” “Of course not. I'm doing this fly by night, seat of my pants, if I'm being perfectly honest with you.” And it's hard to know where to go next.What's interesting to me is that you talk about helping people individually—generally women—through your program, but you also work directly with companies. And when you're talking about things like salary negotiation, I think a natural question that flows from that is, are there aspects of what you wind up talking to individuals about versus what you do when talking to companies that are in opposition to each other?Lauren: Yeah, so that's a great question. So, the answer is there are some progressive companies that have brought me in to do salary negotiation training. Complete candor, most companies aren't interested. It's my Zero-To-Hero DevelopHer Playbook program which is, how do you get ahead? How do you build your value, become an asset at the company?So, it's less focused on pay, but more how do you become more valuable, and get ahead and add more value to the company? And that's where I work with the individuals and the companies on that front.Corey: It does seem like it would be a difficult sell, in most enterprise scenarios, to get a company to pay someone to come in to teach their staff how to more effectively [laugh] negotiate their next raise. I love the vision.Lauren: It has happened. I also thought it was crazy, but it has happened. But no, most of my corporate clients say, “We not only want to encourage more women into tech, but we already have a lot of women who are already in our ranks, and we want to encourage them to really feel like they're empowered and to stand out and reach the next levels.” And that's my sweet spot for corporate.Corey: Somewhat recently, I was asked on a Twitter Spaces—which is like Clubhouse but somehow different and strange—did I think that the privilege that I brought to what I do had enabled me to do these things, being white, being a man, being cis-gendered—speaking English as my primary language was an interesting one that I hadn't heard contextualized like that before—and whether that had advantaged me as I went through these things? And I think it's impossible to say anything other than absolutely because it's easy to, on some level, take a step back and think, “Well, I've built this company, and this media platform, and the rest. And that wasn't given to me; I had to build it.” And that's absolutely true. I did have to build it, and it wasn't given to me.But as I was building it, the winds were at my back not against me. I was not surrounded by people who are telling me I couldn't do it. Every misstep I made wasn't questioned as, well, you sure you should be doing this thing that you're not really doing? It was very much a fail-forward. And if you think that applies to everyone, then you are grievously mistaken.Lauren: I think that's a healthy perspective, which is why I consider you one of developers in my strongest allies, the fact that you're willing to look at yourself and go, “What advantages did I have? And how might I need to adapt my messaging or my advice so that it's applicable to even more people?” But it's also something I've experienced myself. I mean, I set out to help women in tech because I'm in women in tech myself. And I was surprised by a couple of things.Number one, I was surprised that men were [laugh] asking me for advice as well. And individuals and medicine, and finance, and law, in business not even related to tech, but what I'm really proud of that I didn't set out to build because I didn't feel qualified, but I'm really glad that I've been able to serve is that there were three populations that I've been really able to serve, especially at the university level. Number one, international students who, you mentioned yourself, English might not be their first language, but they're not familiar with the US hiring and advancement and pay process, and I help normalize that. And that's something that I myself in the benefit of, having been born here in the US. People who, where English isn't their first language; you think it's hard enough to answer, “Why do you think you should be promoted?”Or, “How much do you think you should make for this role? What do you want?” In your first language? Try answering it in your third, right? And then when I'm really proud of is, especially at the university level, I've been really able to help students where they're first-generation college students, where they don't have a professional mentor within their immediate family.And providing them a roadmap—or actually, the playbook to how to get ahead and then how to advocate for yourself. And these were things that I didn't feel qualified to help, but these are the individuals who've ended up coming and utilizing my program, and finding a lot of benefit from that. And it made me realize that I'm doing something bigger than I even set out to do, and that is very meaningful to me.Corey: You mentioned that you give guidance on salary negotiation and career advancement to not just women, but also men, and not just people who are in tech, but people who are in other business areas as well. How does what you're advising people to do shift—if at all—from folks who are women working in tech?Lauren: So, that's the key is it really doesn't shift. What I'm teaching are fundamentals and, spoiler alert, I teach grounding yourself in data, and knowing your data, and taking the emotion out of the process, whether you're trying to get ahead, to stand out, to earn more. And I teach fundamentals, which is five-point process.Number one, you got to figure out what success looks like to you. I talked a little bit about that earlier, but it's foundational. I mean, I start with that because that alone changed my life. I would still be pursuing success today and not have reached it, but I'm living out how I defined success because I started there.Then you got to really know your worth. Absolutely without a doubt, know how much you're worth. And for me, this was transformational. I mean, eye-opening. Like you said earlier, the blindfold coming off. When I saw for a fact how much employers paid other people with my skill sets, it was a game-changer for me. And so I—without a shadow of a doubt, I use four different strategies, multiple resources in each strategy to know comprehensively how much I'm worth.And then I teach knowing your numbers. It's not an emotional thing; it's very much scientific, so I talked about knowing your key numbers, your target, your ask, and your walk away, and those are all very dependent on your employment and financial situation, so it's different from person to person. And then I talk about—and this is a little different than what other people teach—is I talk about finding leverage, what you uniquely bring to the table, or identifying companies where you uniquely add value, where you can either lock in an offer or negotiate a premium.And then I prepare. I prepare. Just like you prepare for an interview, I prepare for a negotiation, and if I'm asking for the right amount of money, I am going to be prepared for pushback and I want to be able to handle that, and I don't want to just know it on the fly; I want to have scripts and questions prepared to handle that pushback. I want to be prepared to answer some of the most difficult questions that you're going—get asked, like we talked about earlier.And then the final step is I practice over and over and over again, just like a sporting event. I am ready to go into action and get a great thing. So, those are the fundamentals. I've marketed to women in tech because I'm a woman in tech and we don't have enough women in tech, and women are 82 cents on the dollar in tech, but what I found is that doctors were using the same methodology. I wasn't marketing it to them. Lawyers, business people, finance people were using it because I was teaching such fundamentals.Corey: Taking it one step further, if someone is listening to this and starting to get a glimmering of the sense that they're not where they could be career-wise, either in terms of compensation, advancement, et cetera, what advice would you have for them as far as things to focus on first? Not to effectively extract the entire content of your course into podcast form, but where do they start?Lauren: Yeah. So, you start by investing in yourself and investing in the change that you want. And that first investment might be figuring out how much you're worth, you know, doing that research to figure out how much you're worth. And then going out and learning the skills. And look, I have a course, I have a book that you can use to get ahead; if I'm not the right fit, there are a ton of resources out there. The trick is to find the best fit for you.And my only regret as I look back over the last 10, 15 years of my career is that I didn't invest in myself sooner and that I didn't go out and figure out how much I was worth, and that I—when they said, “Well, you're just not there yet,” when I asked for more money, that I believed them. And that was on me that I didn't go out and go, “I wonder how much I'm worth?” And do the research. And then, I regret not hiring a career coach earlier. I wish I'd gotten back into tech sooner.And I wish that I had learned to negotiate and advocate for myself sooner. But my knack, Corey—and I believe things happen to me for a reason—is my special skills is I take things that were meant not necessarily intentionally to harm me, but things that hurt me, I learned from them, I turn it around in the best way possible, and then I teach and I create programs to help uplift other people. And that's my special skill set; that's sort of my mission and purpose in life, and now I'm just trying to really exploit it and make this into a big movement that impacts millions of lives.Corey: So, what's next for you? You've built this platform, you've put yourself out there, you've clearly made a dent in the direction that you're heading in. What's next?Lauren: [laugh]. I am looking to scale. I'm just like any company; I've really focused on delivering value proof of concept. What a lot of people don't realize is not only did I build DevelopHer in quote, “my spare time,” but I did this without any outside investors. I funded it at all myself, built it on my own sweat equity—Corey: [laugh]. That one resonates.Lauren: Yeah. [laugh]. I know you know what that feels like. And so for me, I'm focused on scale: bringing in more corporate partners; bringing in more university clients, to scale and bridge the gap before it even starts; and scaling and reaching more women and men and anyone who wants to figure out how to get ahead, stand out, and earn more. And so the next year, two years are really focused on scale.Corey: If people want to learn more about what you do, how you do it, or potentially look at improving their own situations, where can they find you?Lauren: I am online. Go to developher.com. I have resources for individuals; I have a book, which is a great, cost-effective way to learn a lot.I have an award-winning negotiation course that helps you go out and earn what you're truly worth, and I have a membership to connect with me and other like-minded individuals. If you're a company leader, I work with companies all the time to train their women—and men, too—to get ahead and build their value. And then also, I work with universities as well to help bridge the gender wage gap before it starts, and builds future leaders.Corey: And we will, of course, include links to that in the [show notes 00:27:55]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. I really appreciate it.Lauren: Corey, thank you so much for having me, and I really mean it. You know, Corey is a strong ally. We connected, and I am glad to count you as not only my own ally but an ally of DevelopHer.Corey: Well, thank you. That's incredibly touching to hear. I appreciate it.Lauren: I mean it.Corey: Thank you. Sometimes all you can say to a sincere compliment is, “Thank you.” Arguing it is an insult, and I'm not that bold. [laugh].Lauren: That's actually really good advice that I give women is, so many times, we cut down our own compliments. And so that's a great example right there, and it is not just women who sometimes I have a challenge with it; men, too. When someone gives you a compliment, just say, “Thank you.”Corey: Good advice for any age, in any era. Lauren Hasson, founder of DevelopHer, speaker, author, frontline engineer some days. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice and an insulting comment telling me that my company is never going to succeed if I don't attempt to outbid Netflix.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Will & Woody
⚡️MINI: How to weasel your way out of an argument

Will & Woody

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 11:37


Public Problems
Rabid Weasel Podcast Episode 30: House Of 1000 Corpses (2003)

Public Problems

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 78:22


For our first episode of this October Halloween themed series, we are discussing House of 1000 Corpses! This feature length film debut of heavy metal musician Rob Zombie was loved by many horror fans but dismissed as "torture porn" by many others. It was one of the first in a new wave of extremism in the genre and is still divisive among fans today. Listen in to hear our thoughts and then give us yours!

Public Problems
Rabid Weasel Podcast Episode 29: A Clockwork Orange (1971)

Public Problems

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 70:11


What happens when one of the greatest ever filmmakers creates one of the most controversial movies of all time? This is a film you won't forget anytime soon.

Mildly Heroic
Episode 35 - Visions of Phaendar | Pop Goes the Weasel

Mildly Heroic

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 237:35


Having found some surviving rangers within the tower at Fort Trevalay, spirits are high, and the group decides to continue clearing out the other floors of the tower before resting. However, it doesn't take long before they find themselves once again in a tough spot, this time facing a nasty looking troll and his two pets...Join us as we play through Paizo's Pathfinder Adventure Path, Ironfang Invasion, with Jason as Gamemaster, Brandon as Jessup (human bard 7), Justin as Frampton (human unchained rogue 7), Josh as Aaidan (human ranger 7), and Sarah as Kieran (human sorcerer 5/dragon disciple 2).Background audio provided by Syrinscape (https://syrinscape.com).

For Kids By Kids Podcast
PIANO TUESDAY | POP GOES THE WEASEL

For Kids By Kids Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 1:19


All around the cobbler bench, the monkey chased the weasel, POP GOES THE WEASEL!!! SUPPORT OUR PODCAST: anchor.fm/forkidsbykids/support ----------------------------------------------------- Poshmark For a limited time, use code GORGEOUSGURLS at checkout to save $10! https://poshmark.com Honey https://bit.ly/ForKidsHoney Smile Direct Club https://bit.ly/ForKidsSmile Merch! https://bit.ly/baconline ------------------------------------------------------ PODCAST SURVEY : https://bit.ly/3b3bwDg Email us : AlvinandAlana@Gmail.com If your birthday is coming up, fill out the information here : https://bit.ly/3aUmivr Visit our website at : https://bit.ly/2zVkBkP Follow us on Instagram at : https://bit.ly/2xuK9o1 Visit our about.me page https://bit.ly/3f9IVQ5 For Business Inquires only; Email Us at : ForKidsByKidsPodcasts@Gmail.com ----------------------------------------------------- DISCLAIMERS & DISCLOSERS We provide our podcast for entertainment and promotional purposes only. It is your responsibility to evaluate the accuracy, timeliness, completeness, or usefulness of the content, instructions, and advice contained in our episodes. The For Kids By Kids Podcast is not liable for any loss or damage caused by your reliance. Some of the links provided are a result of our participation in the affiliate advertising programs designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to affiliated links. Thanks for your support! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/forkidsbykids/message

Inspirational Talks with LaDonna Marie
Ep. 39 Inspirational Talks with LaDonna Marie and Special Guest Terrence "Weasel" Smith

Inspirational Talks with LaDonna Marie

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 44:48


Terrence is an  author of Three books, Movie producer and he have his own Bitter Sweet Grind Clothing Line.  Be sure to check out his movie on YouTube called Second Chance By  Betrayal. Follow him on IG at @authortws. You can also donate at $BitterSweetGrind for his annual Backpack Drive. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/inspirationaltalks/support

Valley Boys Podcast
#054: Old Man Weasel

Valley Boys Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 56:06


The boys talk about stealing perscription medicine, destroying a Walmart on a hotwired forklift, and Amazon drone delivered cocaine

Friday Night Wine Fight
Round 52 - Nursery Rhymes

Friday Night Wine Fight

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 53:39


This week the girls take aim at Nursery Rhymes...Bianca opened this episode with the origins of Nursery Rhymes.  She then divulged the meaning and origin behind Baa Baa Black Sheep, Rock-a-bye Baby, Ladybird  Ladybird, Pop Goes the Weasel, and Goosey, Goosey Gander. Amy went fuzzy tail deep this week and dissected Ring a Ring a Rosie. This was an interesting one as all the girls thought they knew the origins of this nursery rhyme. Turns out they all had it wrong! Sarah brought the episode to a close with Mary Mary quite contrary, three blind mice,  London bridge is falling down, and Humpty Dumpty. We say it every week however we really want to hear from our listeners. If you have a topic you want us to take aim at, please hit us up at the links below:FacebookTwitterInstagramTumblrOr email us at - fridaynightwinefight@gmail.comHead on over to the blog: https://fridaynightwinefight.blogspot.com/ for accompanying content.Episode edited by BiancaTheme music by Joseph McDade https://josephmcdade.com/musicSupport the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/fnwfpodcast)

Public Problems
Rabid Weasel Podcast Episode 28: Tales from the Crypt (1972)

Public Problems

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 74:22


Before the HBO Tv Series and before George Romero's Creepshow, Amicus Productions made this anthology adaptation of five stories from the classic 1950's EC horror comics. Join us as we review each segment, pick our favorites and compare the stories to source material!

DLWeekly Podcast - Disneyland News and Information
DLW 202: Our Upcoming Trip and Emmie Part 2

DLWeekly Podcast - Disneyland News and Information

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 99:19


This week, Magic Key holders get a spooky fun perk, some Happy Haunts are coming to entertain in Downtown Disney, FastPass has almost disappeared from the parks, we talk about our upcoming trip to the parks and finish talking with Emmie, and more! Please support the show if you can by going to https://www.dlweekly.net/support/. If you want some DLWeekly Swag, you can pick some up at https://www.dlweekly.net/store/. Book your travel through ConciEARS at no extra cost to you! Be sure to mention that you heard about ConciEARS from DLWeekly at booking! If you want some awesome headwear or one of a kind items, be sure to visit our friends over at All Enchanting Ears! You can use the promo code DLWEEKLY10 to get 10% off your order! News: Extended hours for the parks haven't returned yet, but Magic Key Holders can experience something almost as good. From September 20th through October 7th, Magic Key Holders can ride Haunted Mansion Holiday after park closing for an additional hour Mondays through Thursdays! A valid park reservation and proof of Magic Key will be required to ride. – https://www.disneyfoodblog.com/2021/09/16/the-exclusive-way-to-ride-haunted-mansion-holiday-in-disneyland/ Six Happy Haunts have taken leave from the Haunted Mansion Friday through Sunday evenings though Halloween! The SCAREolders, a six person a cappella group will entertain guests in Downtown Disney, with favorites like “I Put a Spell on You” and other tributes to Disney villains. – https://disneyparks.disney.go.com/blog/2021/09/downtown-disney-district-is-frightfully-delightful-during-halloween-time-at-disneyland-resort/ As we reported on previously, the PhotoPass services has moved from Main Street Photo Supply in Disneyland and Kingswell Camera Shop in Disney California Adventure to the exterior part of the Disneyland Newsstand. The new location is labeled as “Photo Concierge” and will be the single location for photo services. The old locations inside the parks will be repurposed for more merchandise. – https://www.micechat.com/302565-dateline-disneyland-jessica-rabbit-covers-up-as-lightning-lane-moves-in-at-disneyland/ A once state of the art system is almost completely gone from the parks. The FastPass machines have been removed from most if not all locations where they were previously installed in order to prepare for the launch of Genie+ and Lightning Lane. The new services will be offered through the Disneyland App only, so the old machines are no longer necessary. Some of the locations have been repurposed as shaded vending locations, while others are left empty for the time being. – https://www.micechat.com/302565-dateline-disneyland-jessica-rabbit-covers-up-as-lightning-lane-moves-in-at-disneyland/ The annual Gay Days Anaheim event took place over the weekend and drew quite a few LGBTQ++ guests and allies. Disney offered some rainbow food and merchandise options around the parks to celebrate. There was a Mickey Rainbow Cookie, Rainbow Cotton Candy, Rainbow Cake, and a Rainbow Parade Tumbler. – https://www.micechat.com/302565-dateline-disneyland-jessica-rabbit-covers-up-as-lightning-lane-moves-in-at-disneyland/ Guests sightseeing in Town Square at the beginning of Main Street might notice something new. The gates to the crowd overflow corridor near the Mad Hatter have been repainted to say “Welcome Friends” with “Disneyland Main Street, USA” and “Town Square Established 1955” above and below. – https://www.micechat.com/302565-dateline-disneyland-jessica-rabbit-covers-up-as-lightning-lane-moves-in-at-disneyland/ Some unannounced changes started to take place in a popular attraction in Toon Town last week. Jessica Rabbit will be taking over a different role in the attraction as the story is updated to better reflect today's mentality. Jessica will now be a Private Eye keeping an eye on the Weasels who are on a crime spree in Toon Town. Her busty character will be more modest with a trenchcoat covering her up, and her character has already been removed from the trunk of a car in the attraction. Imagineers are working on the updates outside of park hours to not close the attraction. No word on when the updates will be complete. – https://www.micechat.com/302565-dateline-disneyland-jessica-rabbit-covers-up-as-lightning-lane-moves-in-at-disneyland/ A more subdued color scheme has come to part of New Orleans Square. The former Le Bat en Rouge shop has transformed from the deep rouge color to a new green and gold that is reminiscent of Princess and the Frog. There is still no official word on what will go into this location, but MiceChat guesses that it will be a Princess and the Frog themed shop of some sort. – https://www.micechat.com/302565-dateline-disneyland-jessica-rabbit-covers-up-as-lightning-lane-moves-in-at-disneyland/ On Friday, October 1st, Walt Disney World will celebrate its 50th anniversary. To go along with the celebration, ABC will be presenting “The Most Magical Story on Earth: 50 Years of Walt Disney World.” Disney Legend Whoopi Goldberg will host the show, which will feature performances from Christina Aguilera and Halle Bailey from Cinderella Castle. The special will look at the past, present, and future of the resort with never before seen footage. The special will air at 10pm eastern, and will be on Hulu the next day, with Disney+ coming later. – https://dlnewstoday.com/2021/09/teaser-released-for-the-most-magical-story-on-earth-50-years-of-walt-disney-world-special-coming-to-abc/ With the 50th anniversary of Walt Disney World coming up in less than 2 weeks, the president of Walt Disney World, along with the Global Ambassador for “The World's Most Magical Celebration,” dedicated the Disney Fab 50 golden sculptures of Mickey Mouse and Minnie Mouse to cast members past, present, and future. The Fab 50 are 50 sculptures that were created of Disney characters to be placed all around Disney World for the 50th celebration. A plaque was also placed near the Mickey and Minnie sculptures commemorating the event. – https://disneyparks.disney.go.com/blog/2021/09/honoring-the-heart-of-our-magic-cast-members-of-past-present-and-future/ As we reported on last week, the infrastructure in the water to support Fantasmic! at Disneyland was being worked on, which is great news! This week, the platforms in World of Color lagoon have been raised and are being worked on. The projection housings we reported on being dismantled months ago still haven't returned. Hopefully this is a good sign that World of Color might make a return before the end of the year. Unfortunately, there is no official word on when either Fantasmic! or World of Color might be returning. – https://dlnewstoday.com/2021/09/photos-world-of-color-fountains-uncovered-for-refurbishment-at-disney-california-adventure/ A new Oogie Boogie popcorn bucket is now available for purchase in Disney California Adventure. For $11, guests can pick up this bucket, decorated with Oogie Boogie surrounded by the Headless Horsemen, Jack-o'-lanterns, and other Halloween icons. Some DCA attractions are also in the background of the bucket. – https://dlnewstoday.com/2021/09/photos-new-oogie-boogie-popcorn-bucket-available-at-disney-california-adventure/ Disneyland was able to fulfil the final wish of a longtime annual passholder and Star Wars fan who was killed in the line of service in Afghanistan last month. Marine Corporal Hunter Lopez told his parents before he deployed that if anything happened, he wanted to be buried with the lightsaber he built in Disneyland in 2019. The family couldn't bear to part with the saber that he built, so they went to Disneyland to build a replica. Friends who work for the Riverside County Sheriff's Department and are members of Club 33 arranged to have a private Savi's Workshop session to create the saber. While dining in Club 33, the family was presented with an American flag that flew over Disneyland and framed in a plaque in honor and memory of Hunter, presented by Disneyland Security Vice President Dan Hughes. – https://www.ocregister.com/2021/09/20/disneyland-pays-tribute-to-fallen-u-s-marine-killed-in-afghanistan-airport-attack/ Discussion Topic: Tage and Teresa talk about Oogie Boogie Bash and their upcoming trip. DLWeekly Meetup will be at the Tangaroa Terrace on Sunday, September 26th at noon.

Yo, Is This Racist?
Here We Are, Your Favorite Weasels

Yo, Is This Racist?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 43:35


Tawny and Andrew discuss the major lack of diverse winners at the Emmys, despite a large number of people of color attending and performing at the show. They also have a conversation about appropriation.  Later, they answer listener questions about podcast editing and confronting a roommate.  Leave a voicemail with your questions at 323-389-RACE and subscribe to Tawny and Andrew's bonus podcasts at suboptimalpods.com! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Jason and Deb Full Show
The Morning X with Jason Dick and Friends - Hour 1 - Who Doesn't Remember The Weasel?

Jason and Deb Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 15:55


We discuss a potential Lil Nas X collaboration with the Teletubbies, the Longhorns and Cowboys getting big wins, and Are You Smarter Than Emily about MTV trivia. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Plat Cast
Plat Cast Ep.126: "And Weasel!"

Plat Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 72:40


If y'all haven't seen "The Suicide Squad" yet, it's perfectly fine if you want to stop listening to us long enough to check it out. Please do. For Polka-Dot Man....and Weasel! For this week's discussions, the boys talk about the possibility of a Resident Evil 4 Re-Make, Zack cracks open a few cans of "PlayStation SPAM", and Dillan talks about his psychedelic trip through "Psychonauts 2"! Grab your pokla-dot suits, your psycho goggles, and whatever else you need to get weird, and let's talk about some vidja games y'all! Topics for this episode include: Naughty Dog's Potential Multiplayer Game Yakuza Creative Director Leaving SEGA? Our First Look at the New Resident Evil Film If you're able to, please consider supporting the show by kicking just even $1 a month to our Patreon, which can be found at: www.patreon.com/PlatCast Be sure to follow us on Twitter for show updates and crazy PlayStation themed goofs! twitter.com/PlatCast Opening and closing soundtrack credits go to Kamex, PLEASE go check out their YouTube channel at: www.youtube.com/channel/UCUem8ytyhczNMEsuHTv2M5A

Vietnam Veteran News with Mack Payne
Episode 2152 – Wild Weasels – First in Last Out

Vietnam Veteran News with Mack Payne

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 13:11


Episode 2152 of the Vietnam Veteran News Podcast will feature a story about the Wild Weasels who were the first in and last out over North Vietnam supporting strike missions by American aircraft. The featured story comes from the Aviationists … Continue reading → The post Episode 2152 – Wild Weasels – First in Last Out appeared first on .

90 Under 90
Pauly Shore Is Dead

90 Under 90

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 101:35


Week 2 of Requestember brings us this request from @RealMrTapWater on Twitter: the 2003 indie that's just barely more than a home movie, "Pauly Shore Is Dead" directed by the Weasel himself.  Ian Simmons returns to talk about the movie which seems to close the book on the Weasel persona indefinitely.  Whether that's a good thing or a bad thing is up to you.

Public Problems
The Rabid Weasel Podcast Episode 27: Cloverfield (2008)

Public Problems

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 84:36


Godzilla meets...The Blair Witch Project? Before the found footage subgenre was completely overdone, it seemed like an interesting idea. Did this new take on the giant monster loose in the city story inspire awe and terror, or just motion sickness?

KPFA - Against the Grain
Weasel Words of 21st Century Capitalism

KPFA - Against the Grain

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 59:58


Writa Writes and Reads with Rita Mattia

A tale of tails ... and of married life in an elegant antebellum home in Richmond, Virginia. This story appears in Rita Mattia's book, “Trying Stuff.”  Copies are available from her publisher, www.marinermedia.com

The Damage Report with John Iadarola

The US completes its troop withdrawal from Afghanistan. Representative Madison Cawthorn calls 1/6 rioters “political hostages”. Sidney Powell walks out of an Australian interview. Pandemic unemployment aid winds down as delta cases surge. Co-Host: Wosny LambreGuest: Manny Fidel See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Public Problems
The Rabid Weasel Podcast Episode 26: The Ring (2002)

Public Problems

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 85:20


When this Hollywood remake of a Japanese ghost story was released, it was a phenomenon. Twenty years later, we take a look back to see if the reaction was justified. Note: Due to some internet issues, you may hear a few moments of audio issues. Sorry about that. Remember, we are recording from opposite sides of the planet!

Nick Flanagan, Weakly
Weasels Can Be Cute Too

Nick Flanagan, Weakly

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 20:06


Nick talks about excuses actually being reasons and his continued life on an island. Contact NFW at weaklypodcast@gmail.com Support NFW at www.ko-fi.com/nickflanagan

The Tea With Dr. V
Understanding Washington Weasels and Crypto Economics with Guest Anthony Scaramucci

The Tea With Dr. V

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 40:56


Anthony “The Mooch” Scaramucci joins Dr. V to discuss how pride and ego can lead to horrid decisions. He also breaks down how crypto is not as complicated as we think and how his marriage was saved at the last minute. Also included is his hardcore take on putrid politicians who are into self-service, not serving the public. Listen to his career and love advice that may help you avoid pink slips and divorces.Scaramucci's PodcastScaramucci's TwitterDr. V's Website

Secret Histories of Nerd Mysteries
Secret Histories of Nerd Mysteries: Ep.59 SHoNM Goes to the Movies #10 Space Jam 2: A New Legacy & THE Suicide Squad

Secret Histories of Nerd Mysteries

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 88:11


Hey everyone!  How do you like that new intro for “Goes to the Movies”?  We think it's pretty swell.  Once Brenda's done dunking on Wendy's breakfast, our two intrepid hosts tackle Space Jam 2, trying to unravel its complex lore, trying to figure out if Don Cheadle exists as a person in this universe, trying to forget that Rick & Morty have spoken lines in this film.  Following that is THE Suicide Squad.  We talk about Shark.  We talk about Rat.  We talk about the other rat (Weasel).  It's a wild time to be had. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Two Ewes Fiber Adventures
Ep 168: Gamp Weaving and Spinning Weasels...We Learn Some New Words

Two Ewes Fiber Adventures

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 73:21


The Summer Spin ends in less than a month so we discuss knitting with handspun. Plus, we have great prizes for the Spin In provided by the Three Green Sisters and we have our Patreon Pattern Giveaway. Show notes with full transcript, photos, and links can be found in the podcast section of our shop website: TwoEwesFiberAdventures.com. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Subscribe on Android or Subscribe on Google Podcasts Three Green Sisters prizes: Grand prize is an 18 by 18 pillow using fabric designed by Cheri Magnusson. They are very interested in supporting this new fabric designer who is the shepherd of an Icelandic flock in Maine.  In addition to the pillow, they are generously providing their Patty style bag as a prize. One will be used for the Summer Spin-In and one will be drawn from a thread we'll post in the Ravelry group.  They are offering Fiber Adventurers a coupon code EWES2 for 15% off until the end of the year. They also make custom loom totes, spinning wheel carriers and spindle and heddle bags, along with one of a kind styles. Take a look at what Suzanne and other 3 Green Sisters are offering in their 3 Green Sisters Etsy shop. We talk about Cheri Magnuson who has created fabric that will be in one of the prizes. She is a shepherd who had become a fabric designer. Coldstream_Ice Spoonflower fabric shop. Marsha's Projects Atlas (Ravelry link) by Jared Flood using Navia Tradition. The pattern is also available at his website. I finished the colorwork yoke and the neckband and washed and blocked the sweater before finishing the bottom and sleeve ribbing. Now I'm worried it is too small. I need to get my brother over as soon as possible to try on the sweater so I know what my next step will be. I discussed a technique for knitting with three colors in one row that my friend told me about. Unfortunately, I cannot find a YouTube video demonstration but I will describe it. You knit the row with the dominant color and one background color, slipping the stitches that are the second background color. When you finish the row, you knit the row again but this time you knit the second background color stitches you slipped, and slip all the dominant color and first background colors. Hope that makes sense. I also picked up a skein winder or spinning weasel from our listener Nanci (Nan4Nan). It was lovely to meet Nanci and so generous of her to pass along the skein winder. It does not have a brand name on it so if listeners know, please pass on that information. I've been watching YouTube videos to learn how to use it. Kelly's Projects I have been knitting dishcloths at night and weaving during the day. I had a previously wound warp for the Huck Color and Weave project from the Jane Stafford guild. I decided to put it on the loom.  Huck is a weave structure with floats. You can have horizontal floats along with plain weave on the front, you can have vertical floats along with the plain weave, or you can have both vertical and horizontal floats that make a kind of lace. Color and weave refers to alternating colors in both the warp and the weft. Depending on the sequence of light and dark threads (LDLD… or LDDL-LDDL… or DLDDL-DLDDL…) the colors will interact with each other to form interesting patterns. A gamp is a sampler that allows you to systematically pair every weft choice with every warp choice.  It was my first time warping back to front on the floor loom. I used the instructions from season one of the guild. It was easy to wind on by myself! Robert doesn't really enjoy helping me wind on. Once it was on the loom I got obsessed and wove it off in about 4 days. I did 4 different gamps and then I just played. The gamps became napkins (they were a good size for that) and the rest of the sampling became dishtowels.  The fabric really changes when it is washed and curved sections become visible.  I'm not ready to do another one of these lace projects, but I got inspired to put a stash busting baby blanket on the loom.  Spinning Topic--Handspun sweaters Kelly: Laceweight camel and silk featherweight sweater, Funky grandpa sweater, Orcas Run sweater, Dark and Stormy, Dark Green Forest sweater. Four are natural colored (one of them with overdyed stripes). The current one is overdyed. The yarns  are:  Two ply--one ply camel and one ply silk for a laceweight yarn. Spun first, then decided what to do with it. Featherweight sweater. Medium fine wool (breed unknown) (Charlotte) two ply fingering weight. Spun first, then decided what to do with it. Funky Grandpa sweater. CVM bulky two ply--spun on purpose for the sweater. Orcas Run sweater Targhee lamb three ply (worsted to aran)--spun for a sweater, chose sweater based on gauge. Dark and Stormy sweater. CVM three ply in a sport weight--started spinning first, then decided to make a sweater and selected based on gauge. Dark Green Forest Sweater. Also used Charlotte carded with a little bit of brightly dyed silk noil to make a vest for Robert. Yarn is a heavy, dense 2-ply that is probably aran weight or larger (early spinning). The vest is quite large (gauge swatch? no!) and you can see stripes of the various natural colors of Charlotte in it from uneven carding.  Marsha: I have made two sweaters with my handspun. Both were combo spin methods. Beeline by Heidi Kirrmeier. For this sweater I dyed the roving in really bright colors.  Simple Summer Tweed Top Down V-Neck by Heidi Kirrmeier. All the roving I bought at shows and did not dye any. Lots of fiber types...wools, silk, alpaca. Really fun to spin all the different fibers, With both sweaters I did not alternate skeins on the body, but I did alternate for the sleeves. Patreon Pattern Giveaway! Patrons get a pattern of their choice up to $8.00. Contact Kelly with your pattern selection!  Summer Spin In - Ends September 6th Less than a month to go! Prizes from Three Green Sisters Full Transcript of show: Marsha 0:03 Hi, this is Marsha Kelly 0:04 and this is Kelly. Marsha 0:05 We are the Two Ewes of Two Ewes Fiber Adventures. Thanks for stopping by. Kelly 0:10 You'll hear about knitting, spinning, dyeing, crocheting, and just about anything else we can think of as a way to play with string. Marsha 0:17 We blog and post show notes at Two Ewes Fiber Adventures dot com. Kelly 0:22 And we invite you to join our Two Ewes Fiber Adventures group on Ravelry. I'm 1hundredprojects, Marsha 0:29 and I am betterinmotion. Kelly 0:31 We are both on Instagram and Ravelry. And we look forward to meeting you there. Both 0:36 Enjoy the episode. Marsha 0:43 Good morning, Kelly. Kelly 0:44 Good morning, Marsha. I thought we would be ready to go early. And then I got going doing the dishes and looked at the clock and went oh my gosh. It's time to record. Marsha 0:57 I know. Well a little late start for me too. I was a little late today. So but here I am I have a cup of coffee. Kelly 1:03 All right. Marsha 1:04 I have to just before we get into-- well, we always have our first you know 20 minutes of non fiber related conversation. Here's my non fiber related conversation. I had some friends over last night for dinner. And one of the women that came does not like dogs. And she especially does not like poodles. Kelly 1:26 Like actively doesn't like dogs? Not just isn't a dog person? Marsha 1:30 She's not a dog person. And she's she's afraid of them. And kind of leery of them, I think not flat out afraid. But she just doesn't like them and would prefer not to be around them. And she especially does not like poodles. And she especially doesn't like black poodles. What do I have? Kelly 1:46 Yes. Okay. Marsha 1:47 And the. And the reason she doesn't and I can understand this, the reason why she doesn't like them is that she some family member has poodles and they jump on her. So I understand that. And so I know this about her and so whenever... So anyway, I won't make this a long story. So when they arrived, I had Enzo on leash, even though he doesn't jump on people. He does want to go over and say hi. And some people don't like that. And so, and that's fair. So I just, when they came to the door, I had him on his leash, and kept him on a short leash. And then we went out in the backyard to sit and have a drink and, and then I said-- Well, I left them out there. There's some other people there too. But I I said I had to go in because the timer went off and the food was ready. I had to go get it out and put it on the table. And I said, you guys just sit there. I'll just do this on my own. That's fine. And I told Enzo, he's down on the patio and I'm up on the deck and I use the hand signal down and stay. And they gasp because he does it and I'm like I'm 15 feet away. And and I go in the house and I get the casserole out and I toss the salad, I slice the bread and I open the wine and come back out and he's still sitting there. 15 minutes later. Kelly 2:07 What a good boy. Yes. Marsha 2:14 What a good boy. And that's why we train our dogs, right? Like, I Kelly 2:58 yeah, so they can live with us. Marsha 3:08 Yeah. And then they can be around people who are not comfortable around dogs too. You know, that's, I said to you that as why I wanted all the training that I was going to do with Enzo. The whole purpose is I wanted him to be a good representative of, you know, a good ambassador for dogs and his breed. Because it does seem like with poodles that some people really like poodles, and some people don't like poodles, they've had bad experiences with them. I don't know why. I mean, I don't you know, he's, I think he's fine. But it's all about training. Really, you know, it's just, it's not the dog. It's the dog owner. But anyway, they were very impressed. I was even I was impressed. I know, I wasn't saying I was, I kind of figured Kelly 4:00 You were proud of him. Marsha 4:02 I was proud of him. Yeah, I wasn't surprised. I was proud of him. And he and and they were like kind of surprised, too, you know, and so I yeah, so anyway, Training pays off. Yeah. Kelly 4:14 Yeah, it does. My niece has a new rescue Pitbull. And she's been working really hard with her. And she, you know, like any dog that you don't have from puppy hood. And some that you do have from puppyhood? Marsha 4:28 Yeah, really! Kelly 4:29 You know, she has some things that she needs to-- some challenges that she needs to work on. And, and so she's been, you know, texting me and stuff and, and she texted me the other day about a good event. You know, how something that worked kind of like what you were talking about, not not anything as big. Because she's still you know, in the baby step stage. I think she's had her two and a half or three months about the same amount of time we've had Beary, a little less. But she texted me to say, Oh, this worked and it was so great and it's so nice to have a dog that does things that fit into my life. And, you know, so anyway, I thought that was really cool to hear. It's nice when they are able to, they're able to be a part of your life because they know how to act. Marsha 5:14 Yeah. And the thing is, like I mean, I knew he would stay there. So I wasn't-- that wasn't what I was concerned about. But I, I, I don't normally have to do that, like on a Saturday when, you know, my brother comes over and Kim and Gary and they usually because they they're used to dogs, they're used to Enzo. They're not afraid of him or, and I can't say she's afraid of him, that's too strong. She just doesn't want to be around dogs. She just doesn't like him. And so when you have somebody like that you want-- you're extra careful about how your dog behaves. Kelly 5:48 Right. Marsha 5:48 So that's why I was I normally on a Saturday night I don't have to make him on a down stay right when I go in the house because I just go in the house because there's other people you know, watching him and usually he just goes and lays down anyway on his own. But no, I was I was really proud of him, his behavior. And then when we came in the house and had dinner, you know, he just went lay down in the entrance hall and like and how can you not like a dog that's just a flat dog? Kelly 6:16 Right. Marsha 6:17 looking beautiful. Or just spread eagle on the in the middle of the living room floor, you know, ignoring you. So a good a good ambassador. Kelly 6:27 Yeah. Marsha 6:27 So should we talk projects or? Kelly 6:32 Yeah, let's go ahead. Actually, before we talk projects, let's talk a little bit about the prizes. Marsha 6:37 Oh, yeah. Kelly 6:37 For the spin-in. So we have been talking about them, just sort of generally. But I want to talk a little bit more specifically about the three green sisters prizes that they've offered us very generously. So there's a grand prize that is an 18 by 18 inch pillow. And it's made from fabric that's designed by a woman named Cheri Magnussen, and she's a shepherd of Coldstream Icelandic sheep in Maine. And she was an engineer and she's retired and has been, you know, living her dream, she says of, of being a shepherd with these Icelandic sheep. So I'll read a little bit from her bio in a minute, but. So three green sisters has met her and is interested in supporting her work that she's now doing. Because she's had to stop. She's had to stop, you know, stop doing doing the shepherding work. She has a few older sheep that she's keeping, but but she's not able to keep breeding sheep and working with sheep. So anyway, so let me tell you a little bit about Cheri Magnussen, again Coldstream Icelandic sheep in Maine. Her farm she says Kelly 7:55 "My farm has been a journey filled with unspeakable joy and grief so raw, I felt as if my heart was being torn apart. The year my first lambs were born, my son took his own life. I'm still grieving within. There are still times when sorrow washes over me like the waves of a cold dark winter sea. As I awaited this year's lambs, my heart was full of expectation. Joy filled my heart as the lambs grew within my ewes ever expanding bellies. Now lambs are playing and bouncing about and hope has welled up in me again, and life has promised." Kelly 8:25 So she started her journey with sheep with that combination of, of sadness and hope. And now, she's actually been diagnosed with congestive heart failure, and so she's had to stop working the sheep but she's begun doing fabric design and she says, "My fabric design began just a few months ago, I watched a design show where people made their own fabric. It's like a light turned on in me, I can do that! I see designs in everything, the woodland streams, flowers, skies and of course, my sheep. So using the forest, a mossy log, some gnarly roots wrapped around rocks that I can work with, and I have some of the proceeds that I received from my designs are donated to suicide prevention and shelters, both human and animal." Kelly 9:11 So she's now doing this fabric design. And the three green sisters have met her and are are using some of her fabrics for their bags. And then they also have this pillow that they've offered with the with the sheep fabric. So that's one of the prizes. And let me just tell you, I put a link to Spoonflower in the show notes Marsha, and I... In particular, the Coldstream Icelandic shop, but what a rabbit hole! Oh my gosh. I had heard about Spoonflower before, but Marsha 9:51 as you're talking, I'm looking at it. So this is dangerous. Okay. Kelly 9:55 Yeah, we'll have to have a conversation about Spoonflower when we're done with this. So Getting back to our prizes. So we have the pillow. And then addition, in addition to the pillow, three green sisters are also generously providing their Patty style bag as prize. And we're going to have one of them for the summer spin in. And then one of them, I thought it would be nice for the people who are not participating in the summer spin to also have an opportunity to go check out their Etsy shop and have a possibility of winning. So I'll put a thread up in the Ravelry group where I'll have you go and look at her shop and answer some question, some prompt. So I'll put a thread there that I will have just a regular giveaway thread. And then we'll have one of these bags as a prize for the summer spin-in. And then in addition to that, they're also offering us a coupon code for 15% off and this goes all the way to the end of the year. The coupon code is EWES2 and it's all caps. That's the coupon code. And so you can use that for 15% off and they have free shipping in the US on most items. They also make loom totes and spinning wheel carriers. I know you talked about the bag you bought Marsha, I think maybe you you accidentally bought a spinning wheel carrier! It's so large. [laughing] Marsha 11:18 I think I did [laughing] Kelly 11:19 yeah. And then they also have spindle bags and bags for your heddles. Those of you who have rigid heddle looms. And so they have lots of variety on there. Three green sisters Etsy shop. So coupon code, EWES2 for 15% off in that shop. So thank you to the three green sisters for supporting our spin in again this summer. We only have a-- we have less than a month to go. Marsha 11:53 I know! Well, I have to talk about that. Kelly 11:55 The summer has gone by so fast. Marsha 11:58 I know. Where I am in the process. But anyway, we'll talk about that when we get to projects. Yeah. Kelly 12:04 By the way, have you ever seen Spoonflower before? Marsha 12:08 No, I have not. And I'm, as I say I'm looking at it now. And it's Kelly 12:13 so you can design a fabric and then once you design-- the premise of it, you can design a fabric and then once you design the fabric, you can also make it available for other people to purchase. But you can find fabric with anything on it. Honest to God, anything. Marsha 12:32 So I can find something with poodles. Kelly 12:34 Oh, it's quite I'm sure you could find a million things with poodles. So this morning I put in-- I was trying to find her shop, just without going to look up the link. And so I just put in Icelandic for example. And there's fabric with four breeds of Icelandic dogs on it. Like that's, that's very niche. Marsha 12:55 Yeah, Kelly 12:56 There's millions of fabrics with puffins. There's fabrics with the the country of Iceland. There's... What are they called? runes, the the characters you know, that like letters? Marsha 13:12 Oh. Right! Kelly 13:12 I think they're called--are they called runes? I don't know that sounds right, Marsha 13:17 yeah. Kelly 13:18 Anyway, they're, they're the language characters like the alphabet. They have, I mean, put in something and you can find-- I'm pretty sure you can find a fabric that has something to do with that thing. You know, my my most recent obsession of fountain pens and ink, I'm sure you could find fabrics with that. Just anything you're interested in. Somebody has a fabric, and if you can't find it, you could design your own! Marsha 13:46 Design my own. So I'm looking at-- Oh, and here's-- Okay, we are getting off topic now and are down a rabbit hole! But I just put in poodle. The style that that Cheri is using is, it's like that mirrored image kind of thing. So it looks like you know, when you look through like a kaleidoscope? Kelly 14:11 Yes, Marsha 14:11 that's kind of what it looks like? And she-- some of her fabric, she has sheep in there. And then you can sort of make them out and so but just now I was looking at poodles. And there is a poodle. Like that thing where you're looking through the kaleidoscope so you see the poodle upside down and backwards. So there's all kinds of poodle fabric, so yeah, yeah. Anyway, very, very fun. Kelly 14:38 It makes me want to sew something. Marsha 14:41 Yeah. Oh my god. So cute. Yeah. Oh, here's one with the black poodle. And lattes, a black poodle and lattes. Kelly 14:49 There you go. Marsha Marsha 14:51 What's the connection there. Kelly 14:56 That would make a cute knitting bag. You could sew yourself a knitting bag with poodles. Marsha 15:00 Yes. Here's a very stylized one. Oh, interesting. Kelly 15:07 Okay, so this is enough. This is an audio podcast. We can't be showing you pictures of all these different fabrics. But...But take a look. If you have not ever gone down the rabbit hole of Spoonflower proceed at your own risk. Marsha 15:24 Well, and I looked at Cheri's fabrics, and she has really interesting fabric. They're beautiful colors. And they're very sort of geometric that like I, like I say, it's like you're looking through a kaleidoscope. That's how, yeah, very, very interesting. Kelly 15:40 Yeah, some of them, you have to really look at them more closely to see that they're actually sheep, that the fabric is created from, from sheep. So very interesting and a cool, a cool project that she has now to do. Designing fabric. Instead of her shepherding duties. And she says "My focus now is writing books and designing fabrics. This is not difficult for me and brings me so much joy. I foresee many years of design and writing ahead of me." So yeah, take a look at her shop in particular. It's Coldstream Ice Spoonflower fabric shop. We'll have it in the show notes. But also just dig around in Spoonflower for a while. You'll be inspired, I'm sure. Even if you don't sew you'll be inspired. All right. So what are you knitting on Marsha? Marsha 16:36 Well, right now I'm sitting here knitting on-- in fact I just was rustling the paper. It's called Simple shawl. It's I've been working on it for, Kelly 16:47 I don't know, three years? Marsha 16:49 Three years! Anyway, so I'm just just knitting on that. And so there's not much more to report on that. I'm just, I've talked about that in the past. So I won't discuss that. But I'm doing that. I'm now far enough along I'm doing the border, there's some-- the whole shawl is garter stitch, and then you do a border. I've done one row of eyelets, and I'm just knitting a row, and then I'm going to start another row of eyelets. Okay, and then you do a, I do a little bit and then you do a Picot bind off. But that's what I'm working on. Marsha 17:23 But let me just say about spinning. I have been spinning a little bit every night. But it suddenly dawned on me. Oh my goodness. It's gonna end! This contest is going to end. Oh my God! The summer spin-in is ending on September 6, I have to get my myself moving on this project. So I've got two bobbins are complete. And I've done a quarter of the third bobbin of the brown and I'm spinning them to do the three ply. So I'm going to get moving on that. Because I have to. Because I have a deadline now. Kelly 18:00 Yeah. Marsha 18:01 The other project I just want to talk about is I've been working on the color work sweater the Atlas by Jared Flood I'm making for my brother. I finished all the color work. And Kelly, remember last time we talked I was having to figure out how to trap the floats. With continental stitch, I had to look that up. Kelly 18:22 Right. Marsha 18:22 The next thing I-- issue I had is that there are several-- I think the whole pattern repeat the whole pattern of color work is 42 rows. Of that about 10 you actually have three colors in the row. Marsha 18:36 Yeah. Marsha 18:37 Oh, and so I wasn't sure. We had a whole conversation in the last episode about color dominance. And but what do you do if you have you know, you have your dominant color. And then you have two other colors that-- we were calling them the submissives. They're actually called the background colors, I should say. That's what they're really called. But if you have two background colors, how do you manage that? Because I can understand the concept of you know, you have your dominant in your left hand and your background color in your right hand. But if you have two background colors, how do you handle it? And so the first row I had, I just would, you know, of those two background colors I would just drop one and pick up the other one and drop one and pick up the other one. Well, what happens is then, it keeps twisting your balls of yarn, your the yarn coming off the ball keeps twisting and twisting. So you then have to spend all this time undoing it, untwisting it. And so we, Kim and I, had a trip planned down to the Portland area. And in the car I was talking to her about it. Telling her this because I was working on my sock because I can't work because I have to... I thought there must be a technique. I'm gonna have to go on YouTube and figure out technique and she said, there is a technique! And I don't know what it's called. And I in before the show we post, I'll see if I can find a tutorial about this. But basically, what you do is you have your dominant color in your left hand, and you pick one of the background colors. And you do the pattern with just those two colors. When you get to a stitch that is supposed to be the third color or it'd be the the background color that you're not knitting with. You just slip that stitch. And so you work all the way around just using the dominant and the first background color, slipping the stitches that are the second background color. Then when you get to the end of the row, you finish that you then go and you knit with only the second background color, the one that you did not knit with the first pass through, and you knit those slipped stitches, and you slip the other stitches that you knit. Does that make sense? Kelly 21:01 Yes. So you're, so you're knitting two of the three colors. You're knitting with... you leave those other stitches just slipped. And then you go back and you knit them separately. So, your one row... to do one round, you have to go around twice. Right? Marsha 21:17 So the row, you have to knit the row twice. Kelly 21:18 That's cool Marsha 21:20 It's very cool. And then there's not this issue with the yarn twisting and having to do all this yarn management. The other thing, and I think this is more important, is with the way I was doing it, where you were drop a, color pick up a color, is I believe it throws off your tension. And so-- because you're not getting any kind of rhythm. And I think that I... and I can tell a difference in that row that I did one row, quote unquote, wrong way, Kelly 21:49 Interesting Marsha 21:50 because there really is no wrong way, but differently, differently. And so if you do it, this technique that she suggested, your tension is better. I think there's less chance of pulling the yarn too tight. That's all. I'll see if I can find a YouTube tutorial about this. Because I think it's brilliant. Kelly 22:13 That is cool. Yeah, yeah. That's very cool. Marsha 22:19 So now that I say all of this, about tension, so as I finished the color work, I finished the neckline, and then I washed and blocked it. And I think this is where I'm going to say is because I don't do color work. I've not done very much. And this is like a given you know, it doesn't give the way... Kelly 22:42 Yeah, Marsha 22:43 if you're just using one color, right, right. And so I, my brother needs to come and try the sweater on before I go any further. Because so now basically the body and the sleeves are almost done, I just have to have him try it on and figure how long to make the sleeves. Because now I remember I did a provisional cast on the bottom of the sweater and the sleeves. So now I have to just pick up those stitches and knit down the correct length for him. And so he does to come in try it. He needs to come and try the sweater on. Kelly 23:15 And you have the sleeves. I mean, the body is almost all done. You just have to put like, if it needs any additional length plus the ribbing, right? And the sleeves, the same thing, right? They're already... Marsha 23:26 Right Kelly 23:26 approximately sleeve length. And you just need to see if you need to add in anything and put on the ribbing.? Marsha 23:32 Right. But I'm a little concerned that it's going to be small, because that that that color work has really no give. Not like the bottom, you know, like Kelly 23:42 Yeah, Marsha 23:43 Do you know what I'm saying? so it feels... and also you know, it's it's heavier too. Like that any time you do a sweater like that it's going to be Kelly 23:51 kind of like three layers of yarn. Marsha 23:53 Yeah. So I don't know, I'm a little concerned. But I also I have to remember he likes things more slim fitting. Yeah, he's also male, so he doesn't have breasts. So even though I try it on and I'm like, ugh! I tried it on, I'm like, I don't know. When he tries it on, it's gonna be completely different because he has a completely different body than I do. Marsha 24:14 Right. Marsha 24:15 So and I do have gauge so... And it's... let's see. He's 38 and this is 41 inches. So he wanted about three inches of ease, his other sweater has three inches of ease. So it should be fine. Right? Kelly 24:32 Right, It just feels different. Marsha 24:34 It feels Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Kelly 24:37 Well, I will be interested to see how, how it fits on him and how he likes it. What would be your alternative? If it's too tight? Would you go back and do a larger needle size or you really couldn't add stitches, right? Because it's... Maybe I shouldn't even bring it up. Sorry, I shouldn't even bring this up! [laughing] Marsha 25:00 Well, I, I'm laughing because I thought about this. It's like, What do I do? If it doesn't fit? What do I do? One thing is I can just finish it and give it to somebody that it fits and make him another sweater. The other option is just to rip the whole thing out and make the larger size. Kelly 25:21 But the bottom part would fit. Marsha 25:24 In theory... Kelly 25:25 okay. Marsha 25:26 Allegedly, I don't know. You know. Or I just rip out the color work and do the color work again. Kelly 25:36 Yeah, like the first time you do something? Marsha 25:38 Yeah. Like it's, it's like, you know, you burn the first pancake? Kelly 25:41 Yeah. And you're more tense. And yeah, you're gauge might be different. Yeah. Marsha 25:48 So you know, maybe it's something that I do I if it doesn't fit... I'm just thinking what my... Is it maybe I rip it out and I go up a needle size or because the body was knit on sevens and the yoke the color work was on eight. Kelly 26:08 Yeah, Marsha 26:09 I don't know. listeners can weigh in, I guess the first thing is find out if it fits? Kelly 26:14 Yeah. I mean, we're, I really shouldn't have even said anything because I'm borrowing trouble. There are enough things wrong in the world without me manufacturing something that hasn't even happened. Marsha 26:30 I have just that... This just popped into my head Kelly. This is now off topic, but about listeners weighing in. The one thing we do need to address and I forgot that we need to address this in this episode. In the last episode I started the conversation at some point I said to you, about how you had not left your property. And Pat one of our listeners and good friend of ours commented in the thread. "Didn't you go visit Marsha?" Kelly 26:58 Yeah. [laughing] Marsha 27:03 So it must not have been It must not have been a very memorable trip. [laughing] Kelly 27:06 I know. It was very fast. Fast. Yeah. totally forgotten. Yeah. Marsha 27:11 That's why we forgot. Yeah. And I'm the one that said.... I think I'm the one that said you had not left your property. Kelly 27:16 Yeah. And to be fair to myself when I was thinking about leaving the property, and when I talked about going to visit, going to you know, visit a colleague's house. I haven't driven.Llike the trip to Seattle, I didn't drive. I just sat as a passenger. I honestly have not driven probably more than five miles at a time. You know, myself behind the wheel of the car. Yeah, I've, you know, I've gone places with Robert, not very many. But I have gone places with Robert, but actually putting myself behind the wheel of the car on the freeway. You know, for a significant length of time? More than five or 10 minutes to get to the store? It was weird. It was a weird feeling to be in the car for that long driving myself. Marsha 28:03 Yeah. Yeah. Kelly 28:04 So to be fair to myself, that was what I was thinking of but yes, it is true. I do leave the property. Marsha 28:12 So, but I had to laugh when Pat said that. Because our listeners, our listeners hold us accountable. Kelly 28:21 We can't get away with anything.[laughing] Marsha 28:25 And also, they pay attention. Kelly 28:27 Yes, they do. Marsha 28:31 So funny anyway, so that's it for me for projects. I don't have much more going on in that. That's it. Kelly 28:39 Well, I didn't have much going on. But this morning, because I felt a little bit guilty and because I really didn't have anything to knit while we were recording. I did actually get the yarn wound up. And I'm started on the sleeve of my my sweater the Dark Green Forest pattern that I'm doing. Marsha 29:04 Oh right. So we have to talk about this. Well, yes, Kelly 29:07 I'm gonna I've gone about... 2-4-6-8 rows. I've got almost eight rows, and I don't I don't see a bad stripe. Unknown Speaker 29:20 Oh, this is good news. Kelly 29:21 So I think that might be good news. There's a little bit I mean, I see some but I'm alternating skeins. And so we'll see. I think it might work. Marsha 29:33 And um, the other thing we talked about too and we did not talk about this in the podcast in the last episode, but after we finished recording, I said if there is a strong variation, can you just knit the whole sweater and then over dye it? Remember we had that conversation? Kelly 29:50 Yes, yeah. Marsha 29:51 And like just doing a very low percentage solution of like the terracotta or another color or something and and that might even it out. We had that conversation. But Kelly 30:02 yeah, so I think... I mean, I will I'm not going to pass judgment yet. I don't want to jinx myself. But I do feel like it's, it's... I do feel like it seems to be working. Okay. Marsha 30:19 Okay. Kelly 30:19 Again, I haven't gotten... sometimes you can't tell til you... Actually, sometimes you can't tell until you take a picture for Instagram. [laughing] Marsha 30:27 Yes. Yes. Kelly 30:28 And so, so we'll see. But I am working on it right now. And, and so it's back in the rotation. It's got, you know, when you have to wind yarn and join on, pick up the stitches, so that it was just sitting in a bag because of that. But I have, now I've done those things. And so it's back in the rotation. It's in a place where I can grab it at night and knit on it. I had been knitting dish cloths at night when I needed something to knit. So yeah, I'm back working on this sweater. This is again, the Dark Green Forest sweater. And the pattern designer. Oh, here it is. Christina Koerber Reith, strikhauseit is her Ravelry name, I think. So that's going well. But the other thing I did that was really super fun was I did a weaving project. So right after we recorded I last week, I-- not that same day, but maybe the next day--I decided Oh, you know what I really want to do? I have this warp that I've wound already that's ready to go, I should put it on the loom. And my original thought was I should put it on the loom, you're gonna laugh, so that I can have something that I can just take a break from prepping for classes, and go weave for a little bit. Or once classes start, I can take a break from you know, the first week of classes hecticness and go weave for a little bit. I have this on the loom. So I put it on the loom. It's a huck color and weave project from the Jane Stafford guild, season five, which is this year's season. And I had hesitated about it because I really didn't like the look of her sample that she did with the two high contrast yarns, a black and a white. And then she calls it a zinger. And she had this green, this lime color. She called it Pale Limette as the zinger. And I just really, I know I get to choose my own colors, but but that just didn't speak to me in the, in the, in the videos, and so I wasn't really excited about it. And also I think of huck as a solid color, like beige table linens. Huck is a lace, a lace design, a woven lace. So I always think of it as like beige, you know, that's kind of the color I think of doing, an all solid. So anyway, finally, I decided, let's just put this on the loom and do it. Get out of your comfort zone. And I had warped it already, I had chosen not quite as high contrast as hers. But I did use white and gray. It's actually a kind of a steel blue-gray color, and white. And then I used red as the contrast color. So I put it on the loom and got it all--it took not so long to thread it. I warped back to front for the first time, which was really cool. Well, for the first time on the floor loom. I think I might have done it at some point on the table loom. But anyway, it it worked out really well. I didn't have to get Robert to help me. Which, you know, winding on-- Do you remember that part of the process where one of us is holding all the yarn threads and the other one is winding it onto the loom? He does not like helping with that process. So, so it was nice to have a technique that I could use and and successfully wind it on myself. So the way you work front to back is normally I would sit at the front of the loom and I would thread it through the reed. You know that's that the part where you that you beat with, and then I would thread it through the heddles and then once it was threaded through those two things, I would then tie it onto the back end wind and on. So while you're winding it's having to go through the reed and through the heddles. Right? And tangles can happen, which is what Robert doesn't like. It just-- I think it offends his sensibilities of order. He feels like if I was doing it right it would just wind on with no tangles, Marsha 35:04 But another way of looking at it is the reed and the... it's it's putting it in order. Kelly 35:12 Exactly. Right, exactly. Marsha 35:14 He has to look at it a different way. Yeah. Yeah. Kelly 35:19 So this way weaving or warping back to front, what you do is you skip, you skip over the--you don't put it through the reed, you don't put it through the heddles, you stick it on this thing on the top of your loom called a raddle. So you like kind of line them up in a semi organized way, more than semi organized like a three quarters organized way. And then you wind it on to the back beam, where it's just going through this thing that's not enclosed. It's just like, basically, it's a, it's a long stick with nails poking up from it. And you have like four threads, four or five threads in each little slot. And so it's just going through that, so there's a lot less potential for tangling. So anyway, you wind it on, you have this--there's more to it than that. But that's the idea, you wind it all onto the back first. And then once it's all wound onto the back, then you thread going the other direction. So you sit at the-- I sat at the back of my loom and threaded through the heddles and then through the reed. Some people sit at the front of the loom and pull it forward through the heddles and then through the reed. But I can get closer to things if I sit at the back of my loom. So that's what I did, I sat at the back of my loom and and put it forward. So anyway, I had not done that before on the big loom, the the four harness floor loom. It was very successful. And then so then I started weaving and of course, you know what happened then is I just kept weaving till I was done. I became obsessed. I really did. [laughing] Kelly 37:02 So Huck is a structure that has well like your floats in colorwork. You have you know, those yarn, yarns that are floating on the back? Well in huck you have floats, but they're on purpose. And they're part of the design. So you have these floats floating horizontally across the surface of the fabric. You have plain weave, your regular woven fabric, but you also have these floats floating across the surface of the fabric horizontally. Or you can have plain weave, and floats floating vertically across the surface of the fabric. And basically, if you look at the fabric, on`e side has one and one side has the other so it depends on what's your front, right. So if you have horizontal floats on the front of your fabric, on the back of your fabric you're gonna have vertical floats. Marsha 37:52 So I'm I'm looking on Ravelry at the fabric. And look, but the floats are relatively short. They look like they go over maybe like three or four, threads? Yes, like three or four threads? Kelly 38:05 Yeah, it depends on the way that you-- It depends on the way that you thread it, you know the pattern that you're using. But yeah, it goes i think in this one, it went over 3 or five, I think it went over three or five. Marsha 38:21 Yes, because some are shorter that I see. They're three, Yes. Kelly 38:25 Okay, so this was a sampler, so it had a little bit of each. And then there's another fabric that you can make that's called Huck lace, where you have floats, you have both floats at the same time. And so it makes a really lacy open fabric. And so the the project for this was to do something called a gamp. And a gamp is where you can-- Well, let me let me stop and go back a little bit. So the other thing, the thing I really objected to about this project, and I was leery of, was this thing called color and weave. And color and weave is where you alternate colors in some kind of color sequence. So you alternate colors in the warp. But you also alternate colors in the weft while you're weaving. So you might have a sequence of colors where you go light, dark, dark, light, and you just keep going that pattern over and over again. Or light, dark, light, dark, light, dark, light, dark, alternating, and that's the pattern. So some kind of sequence of lights and darks that you're repeating over and over and over. Again, so they're you know, there's a lot of different sequences that you can use, right? I mean, make them up! You can just combine lights and darks in any kind of way. Well, what what we were doing in this project was something called a gamp, which allows you to systematically pair sequences in the warp--all the different combinations that you have in your project--with the sequences in the weft, all the different combinations. So if your warp is going light, dark, light, dark, light, dark, light, dark, you can have your weft then also doing light, dark, light, dark, light, dark, but then you can also have your weft doing something else. And so I had, I don't know, like five different sequences. And then I paired them with the same five sequences in all different combinations. Marsha 40:21 Okay, so let me go back. And so that's why-- is that why it sort of looks like it's forming squares? Kelly 40:28 Yeah, it's like, okay, each one of those squares is a different combination of the different sequences. Marsha 40:35 Okay, yeah. Kelly 40:36 And that's called a gamp. And you can do that with the sequences, you can also do it just with colors. So like you have yellow in your warp. And then you can pair it with yellow in your weft, blue in your weft, red in your weft, green in your weft, and you can see all the different combinations, what they do with each other. And so, so there's all kinds of different gamps in weaving where you can test things. So that's what I did, I made, I made three different gamps. And then because they, you know, I was following a pattern. When I got done with the pattern, I had something that was not dish towel size, which is what I like to make. But turns out it was like napkin size. So what I did was I made I made-- I'm going to make them into napkins, these gamps. So yeah, and then I made a couple of dish towels. So I had fun. It's not my favorite look, it's a little busy, I think. Kelly 40:38 um, well, let me say I like it. I. But I like I guess I like busy. Well, I like color too. I understand what you're saying about you like, you don't like high contrast? Kelly 41:48 Yeah, Marsha 41:48 I'm probably-- well, I don't know enough about weaving. So I'm going to say something. Bear in mind. I don't really know what I'm talking about. But I wonder if she has used the high contrast so you can see the difference between the different sequences in the pattern, right? Is that why? Kelly 42:04 Yeah, because the whole idea of this project was not to make something. The idea of the project, well, it was to make something, it was to make gamps. And then you would keep a set of gamps in your studio so that you can then go look at them for inspiration, and say, oh, which one would I like to put into this project? Oh, I really like the way this little square looks. Okay, I'm going to use this. What was this? This was this combination paired with that combination. Okay, now I know what I'm going to put in my project. Kelly 42:34 And I didn't want to do that. I don't want to have a pile of gamps. I wanted to make napkins or something you know, that I can use. And I can still go and look at them. If I keep them, I can still go and look at them. But yeah, but that's the idea is you were making something that you could then use as a sample to see what you'd like to do in your next project. Yeah, so. So that it does make sense that that's why you would do the high contrast, because you can see, you can see better, not only can you see what, what's going to happen, but you can also see better to look at it and say what, wait, what was this combination? Again? You know, if your colors are so close, you might have a harder time figuring out what was I did in this little square? So I mean, you could label everything. She has these beautifully labeled gamps that she shows us on the on the, you know, the videos, they tell you just what it was in the warp and what it was in the weft. And, you know, that yeah, they're teaching tools, right? So she has them all really well laid out. And, and I just want to weave dishtowels! Marsha 43:53 Well, I I sort of, I understand. It's like I, I like to make something that's useful. Mm hmm. The idea of making something. I understand why you make something that's a sample, right, I understand that. But I still would like to be able to use it in some way. You know, yeah, I get that desire. Kelly 44:13 If I were maybe more of a weaver or, or if I did weaving to make things for sale, or like she you know, if I was a weaver for my job, maybe I would make a bunch of gamps and have them there for inspiration when I needed to kind of come up with an idea for a project. I don't know. I'm not there yet, where I want to make things, gamps just to have gamps. But I did-- I mean, I did make a couple. I do have a sample, a sampler from one of the other episodes, that is just hanging in the studio off the side of the shelf. So I guess I'm kind of there, not quite there But I don't think I'll ever wear it as a scarf. Yeah, it's just hanging as a decoration. So Marsha 45:05 Well these are-- it's very pretty, I think. Kelly 45:07 Thank you! Yeah, it was fun and and then when you wash it... Ao the pictures you're seeing are unwashed. I now have pictures of them washed, which changes it because instead of being vertical and horizontal threads, all sort of stiff, and burlap-y in places, they all sort of nestle into each other, and you get these nice curves. So you get some interesting curved designs in your, in your weaving that you wouldn't get you know, you don't see until you wash it. So I'll put up the before and after pictures in my project page, because I that I think is really cool, how it changes. So and then once I got done with that, the other project that I have is that I just wound a warp for baby blanket. My cotton-- the all the cotton yarn was sitting there in the studio as I was weaving, and I kept looking at it and thinking I should do something with this spirit yarn. And so last night I I just wound it. It's not on the loom or anything. It's just a warp chain that's sitting on the... sitting on the... changed in form from being yarn and balls in a bag to being yarn in a warp chain on the shelf. But now, when I'm ready to weave again, I have, you know... That part of the process is done and I can just start by putting it on the loom. Marsha 46:32 Mm hmm. Kelly 46:33 So those are my two. Those are my projects. I was pretty industrious this week. Pretty, I should say, obsessed this week. With the weaving. Marsha 46:41 Yes. Well, they're pretty. Kelly 46:43 Thank you Marsha 46:44 Someday, maybe. Well, I always say this. That when things calm down here, project wise. House project wise? This winter weave along coming up I will. Maybe I'll actually weave something. Kelly 46:58 Yeah, I it's another another rabbit hole. Marsha 47:01 Well, and I don't have as much yarn now because I got rid of so much. Did you see that? This is just a side note. Did you get the picture of my yarn stash. Kelly 47:10 Yes, I did. It looks very well organized. Marsha 47:13 I should put a picture of it in the show notes. I I have everything now in boxes organized by weight. I have like three, you know those bags that like down comforters come in. I have three of those, and two have the yarn from the two trips to Scotland. And the third one has the yarn that I purchased on the trip to Iceland. But I--when I sent you the picture, I think my comment was there's absolutely no reason for me to buy any yarn ever again. But I will! And the other thing I did do Kelly is I because I had all these little boxes. They're sort of like the size of like a shoe box. They hold about six skeins of fingering weight yarn approximately. And then I had like, again, like those plastic bags that sheets come in or whatever I have like the quantities of yarn, like if I have a quantity of for a sweater, and the sweater I know that I'm gonna make I printed out the pattern and I stuck it in that project in that bag with that yarn. So I'll know what I was planning. Kelly 48:28 yeah, Marsha 48:29 And then the other thing too is I have a lot of unfinished projects. Like I have the skull and the rabbit. And I bought yarn to do to knit a poodle. And remember, I started that color work tea cozy, it was sheep. I've not finished it and they're all stuffed in bags, you know that all stuffed in the closet. And so I took those out and I put each one in its own little box and labeled it. So now I see them. And so hopefully I'll get back to working on them. And yeah, and not let them just languish because, you know, out of sight out of mind. Kelly 49:04 Yeah, it's inspiring when you see it. I mean, the floor of my studio has just-- I brought down. I don't know why I did. But I brought down the bags. They're the same comforter, kind of bags. Of cotton yarn that I had upstairs and I brought them down, and I put them in the studio. I don't even remember why I brought them down. Maybe because I was trying to figure out what I was going to do for that color and weave. Maybe at that time I brought them. Anyway, I haven't put them away. They're still sitting there. So the whole time I was weaving they were sitting there, right. So you could just call it a mess because I haven't put stuff away. But because I hadn't put it away and I could see it, the whole time I was weaving I was kind of in the back of my mind mulling over what I could do, and kind of getting inspired. So yeah, for me that that is very definite. The fact I have to have things in sight. So and it's true even in other parts of my life, the desktop on my computer, most people look at it and go, Oh my God. In fact, I, when I first started doing zoom, and I didn't know how to make it so that the students couldn't see my whole desktop. Before I learned, you know, how you can, how you can manage that, I took all the things on my desktop, and I just dumped them all in one folder. To put them away, because I didn't want them put away put away. I just wanted them temporarily put away like you run around your house grabbing things to put in the closet. And then you just shut the closet door when guests are coming. That's what I did with my desktop on my computer, because I normally have a lot of things out. And the reason they're out is so I don't forget to use them, you know, have them out for a purpose. They're not just sitting there on my desktop for no reason. So some things are... And some things that sometimes I go through and I clean out, I get rid of stuff that I don't need anymore. I or I do put it in a particular place. But if I need to, if I want to save something, it's like, oh, I automatically save it to my desktop. And then I figure out what I want to do with it. So. So the out of sight out of mind thing for me is really bad. I like to have everything out where I can see it. I can see why you Marsha 51:23 Yeah, but that does not... I have to say I will take a picture and post it in the show notes of how I've got everything organized. I will say though, it is not the fleeces that I have. Right? That was another place. So there's another that's another whole Kelly 51:42 Well, that's a different stash. Marsha 51:45 Yeah. Yes and you know what I've always anyway always said about my stashes, you can't think of it like is... Everybody seems to be sort of embarrassed or feel guilty about their stashes and like it's it's, you know, a painter wouldn't say that about their paints. That's what we have to remember. It's like artists supplies, our supplies. Yeah, it's our supplies. Yeah. But anyway, okay. Kelly 52:09 So Marsha, we have a spinning topic for this week. And what I wanted to talk about this week was our handspun, the knits that we've done from our handspun and just kind of, is there anything in particular that people might be interested to know about them? So I'm gonna just talk about my sweaters. And then you can talk about the stuff that you've knit with your, with your handspun the very first handspun sweater that I knit, was the featherweight. And I, I had this yarn, it was laceweight, probably laceweight. I used camel, one of the plies was camel and one of the plies was silk. I actually spun that yarn without knowing what I was going to do with it. And then and then once I had it, I thought oh, I I think I can make one of those featherweight sweaters. So that's what I did with that one. And that was interesting to knit with because it was so light. And that sweater is nice, because it's really super light. Yeah, I mean that the featherweight sweater was designed to be. It's a Hanna Fettig pattern, I think. It was designed to be light. But then using laceweight yarn using such thin yarn for it. And then also the fact that it's camel, not wool-- and silk. It's just a super, super lightweight sweater, but really warm. I like that sweater a lot. And then another sweater that I knit, where I did not spin the yarn particularly for a sweater-- in fact, I've spun the yarn for a blanket and then I never made a blanket was the Funky Grandpa sweater that was a second one that I knit out of hanspun. And I used--it's mostly natural color. But some of the some of the yarn was over dyed and that was the idea was I was going to make a striped blanket with the gray yarn and the overdyed. And so that was the that Funky Grandpa sweater with the stripes. It has stripes down the sleeves and stripes on the body. Both of those were two plies. I know you spin--the sweaters you've made have been three plies, right? Marsha 54:22 Yeah, they've all been three plies. I'm not sure why but they all have. Kelly 54:27 Well, three ply yarn is nice. Nice and round. And so yeah, so I can see why why you would do that. I think because I made the yarn before I decided what to do with it. They particularly were two ply. Marsha 54:42 What I what I like about the, well, the featherweight is the camel and silk that is very lightweight because it's laceweight. Right? Because that's what you just said. But the Funky Grandpa I don't know what weight would you say that yarn is. not worsted. It's like DK or sport? Kelly 55:00 It's probably fingering weight to maybe sport in some places. It's very uneven. So there were places in the sweater where I was afraid. Like, oh my gosh, this is so thin. It's going to look holey. Yeah, moth eaten before it's even done! Because it was, you know, it was my... It was a fairly early spinning. It was not. It was not spun in recent years. I knitted it not that long ago, but it was spun....Well, it was done more than 15 years ago, because I spun most of it, I think, I spun maybe all of it at the last house. Marsha 55:42 Okay, yeah. Well, what I was gonna say about it, though, it's very lightweight. It's a very light feeling sweater, you know, and I and I don't know if that's because it's it's the wool or if that's because it's two ply, but my sweaters are more dense, kind of. I don't know if that's my spinning technique. I don't know if that.. Kelly 55:58 I think it's the type of prep. I think it's more the type of yarn and the preparation of the fiber. Because all of well, the the funky grandpa sweater, the one I'm knitting on right now...actually, I think all of my sweaters have been from fleeces. So it's all been carded preparation. None of it's been from top, you know, commercial top, which gives you a much smoother yarn. But also more dense yarn. Marsha 56:33 All I have to talk about, I have handspun I've made some socks for Ben. I've made a couple hats out of handspun. But I say I really only made two sweaters. Both of them were spun with a roving, commercially prepared roving, and one the first one was corriedale top, which is very smooth and and then the second one remember I combined different fibers. I had different wools I had silk and I had alpaca. Kelly 57:03 Oh, yeah. Marsha 57:04 Which also is going to make a denser. I think the alpaca and silk is just gonna make it denser. You know? Kelly 57:10 Yeah. So yeah, so they're different, you know, different styles of yarn will give you a different different sweater, all of my sweaters...Let's see the other sweater. I am just thinking about what else I have. Oh, the bulky, the bulky CVM that I made the Orcas Run sweater. Yeah, that's a that was a carded preparation. And so a light, kind of a light yarn, real puffy. And then I have that targhee lamb, three ply. That's the first one I did with the three ply was that one that I did last summer, for the summer spin in. That the brown, the Dark and Stormy made from the brown targhee lamb, that one I actually spun on purpose for the sweater, and then the Orcas Run. That's that big Cowichan style sweater. I also spun that one on purpose for that sweater. So there have been a couple of of sweaters where I actually spun the yarn, particularly for the sweater but most of mine have been yarn I spun and then later decided to make a sweater out of. And the same thing with this one that I'm working on. Now when I started spinning the CVM, and this one is a is a three ply-- This is the first-- Oh, this is the second three ply. This is about a sport weight, I think this Dark Green Forest that I'm doing now in the terracotta color. I started spinning that yarn without having any idea what I was going to do with it. And so I had several skeins of it and then I thought oh, I guess I can make a sweater. So that's when I started, you know. I think I I finished up the skeins knowing that I was going to make a sweater but when I started most of the spinning I had no idea what I was going to do with the yarn once I was done. Marsha 59:04 Yeah. Well I have to say my two sweaters that I made I knew I was gonna, I wanted I wanted a sweater quantity. But I didn't know what sweater it was and then... I say this is the beauty of Ravelry as you don't need to know. You don't have to spin to the pattern because I just did a swatch and figured out my gauge and then I started looking for sweaters and that gauge and then something that would--a sweater that was mostly just stockinette that did not have a lot of patterning in it. Because the combo spins are the pattern kind of. Right? all the different coloring. I didn't-- they would-- that would-- you know any kind of lace or cables we get lost in that. So yeah, so then... So anyway, but I'll say the two patterns its kind of funny because the two sweaters that I made one--The first one was called Beeline and that's interesting. It's a top down raglan sleeve pullover and I think it's called Beeline because it has-- it does have I say lace detail. It's not really lace it just yarn overs that makes these little holes that run from a sort of like the like on either side of your hip. You know, I take it back. They run from under your arms, and they go in an angle down to the front of the sweater. So has this detail. And I figured it was not--it's not like having lace or cabling, its just a little tiny detail. So it's not super noticeable. I think if it had been a solid color would be more noticeable. But Beeline and then the second one I did was the pattern is Simple Summer Tweed Top Down. And both of them... Kelly 1:00:51 That name! Marsha 1:00:53 I know, that name. Both of them I realized today when I was making the notes are by Heidi Kirmaier. I didn't realize that. But nice patterns. But that's what's so great about Ravelry is that if you have a yarn you do a swatch, do your measurement, and then you can figure out a sweater based on that gauge. Yeah, yeah. So easy to find a pattern. Kelly 1:01:18 Well, yeah, because I was... For the Dark and Stormy and for this one, I had an idea of what pattern I thought I might use. But then once I once I did my gauge swatch, there was no way I could use that pattern. So I did the same thing you did. Make a gauge swatch and then go searching. But in the back of my mind, I had a pattern. Like this is a like fingering, the one I'm knitting now is like a sport weight, you know, maybe fingering to sport weight. And I thought, oh, here's a sport weight sweater that I really like. But I didn't have the right gauge. So I had to go searching for something else. Oh, I should say. We talked a little bit about beginner yarn. And you know, people wanting to make things with their, with their first yarn. And that, you know, you had made a hat that weighed five pounds. Marsha 1:02:13 Yes. Kelly 1:02:14 So I wanted to say I was thinking about this and I thought oh, I should talk about Robert's vest. So I made a vest for Robert. Same yarn as my... same fleece as the Funky Grandpa. So it was a very early fleece and I made yarn out of it. And it was so dense, and also thick, you know. It was a probably an Aran weight yarn, maybe bigger in some places. And I found a vest pattern and of course at that time, you know, this is the probably the late 90s early 2000s I you know, just started knitting and I found a pattern that I wanted to make because I didn't know anything about gauge swatching really. so I didn't gauge swatch. I just thought, Oh yeah, I have this. It looks like the size of regular yarn. Like in my head You know, there was a size of yarn like regular yarn, probably worsted weight was my thought process. But you know, yarn had a regular size. [laughing] And so this looks like regular sized yarn. So I I can make a vest out of this. I got the pattern. I got the needles that they said and I knit him this vest. And it was a... it's a it's a gray yarn, two ply. And when I carded the wool I put little pieces of silk noil that I had dyed there's a bright pink and a bright turquoise and a dark blue in there and so that was there... little specks you know, like little little dots. Pops of color in the yarn. So I made him this vest. It's so heavy and dense. And he likes it. He wears it but it's also so big. Like its huge on him. Because I didn't know anything about gauge I just knit. You know, knit the pattern and look like it was right so anyways, I like it and he looks good when he wears it. But when I feel it you know it's like No wonder he's so hot. He's like, I can't wear this very often because it makes me so hot. And no wonder he's so hot. It's like wearing a bulletproof vest. Marsha 1:04:37 Well as you say imagine how hot it would be if it had sleeves. Kelly 1:04:39 Exactly, exactly. Yeah. So but it's but it looks nice. It looks nice on him. He wears it. He'll wear like a lot of times he'll wear it on Christmas Eve or you know if we go out in the winter time, if we go out to dinner somewhere he wheres that vest and it's gotten it's gotten quite a lot of quite a lot of wear. But yeah, it it definitely was a different yarn than what I'm what I'm spinning now. So anyway, I thought this would be kind of a fun thing to just think about all the different sweaters that that we've made and you know if there was anything about them that maybe would be helpful for people. Thinking about what they're going to going to do with their with their yarn. Marsha 1:05:27 Yeah, I did look up-- for some reason I thought with the the two sweaters that I made because they're combo spins, I thought I had alternated skeins on the body. I did not. I just knit. Which I was surprised. I mean, I was looking at them, turned the sweaters inside out this morning to look at them and and no evidence and I went I looked at my show notes and no, I don't mention it. So I don't think I did alternate skeins on the body. I did alternate skeins on the sleeves though, because there was more striping going on. Because you know you're talking about a much smaller circumference circle for

Superduperstitious
Episode 146 – A Taxidermied Tube Sock Weasel

Superduperstitious

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2021 54:20


The back half of August Around the World brings the show to Ecuador, where the animals are plentiful and the term “big boned” has a whole new meaning!Jake pays a visit to some archeological sites of varying credibility to find lost golden libraries and curious skeletons. You don't have to be 42 feet tall to laser a cave out of a mountain, but it helps. Then Wyatt walks through the possibilities of an unknown species (or two!) lurking in the rain forest. A predatory cat would probably be more successful in all black, but one does want a hint of color.EPISODE DESCRIPTION OVER. Listen to the show and sign up for the friggin' Patreon!EPISODE LINKSAll-purpose show links: https://superduperstitious.com/linksHelp Lebanon: https://helplebanon.carrd.co/Help Haiti: http://www.haitiemergencyrelief.org/support-our-work/Help Afghanistan: https://www.npr.org/2021/08/17/1028483700/help-afghanistan-refugeesFour Phantoms email: fourphantomsbeer@gmail.comFour Phantoms website: https://www.fourphantoms.net/Four Phantoms store: https://four-phantoms-brewing-company.square.site/Four Phantoms on Untappd: https://untappd.com/FourPhantoms/beerJake's storiesNew Infinity Explorers logo: https://bit.ly/3zb0oB2Lost metallic library of la Cueva de los Tayos: https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/cueva-de-los-tayosMóricz on his cave discovery: https://sagacreativa.com/en/tayos-cave-the-library-of-metal-books/GIANT SKELETONS FOUND: https://bit.ly/3y8SGGeArticle on Russell Dement: https://bit.ly/2W5DflvBut that's maybe fake, too: https://bit.ly/3gFHD1JWyatt's storyThe Macas mammal: https://cryptidarchives.fandom.com/wiki/Macas_mammalAngel Morant Forés: http://karlshuker.blogspot.com/2009/06/angel-and-his-amazing-technicolor-dream.htmlCoastal jaguars of Ecuador: https://www.intechopen.com/chapters/56151Marc van Roosmalen: https://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2007/06/01/multiple-new-species-of-large-3Feline vision: https://www.livescience.com/40459-what-do-cats-see.html See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Canon Balls Podcast
James Gunn, Guardian of the DCEU - Canon Balls #55

Canon Balls Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 82:50


We talk the second Suicide Squad (2021) known by some as Suicide Squad 2 directed by James Gunn, how much Idris Elba and John Cena improve the movie, and who was funnier - Polka Dot Man or Weasel.  https://linktr.ee/CanonBallsPodcast