Podcasts about Civil

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Best podcasts about Civil

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Latest podcast episodes about Civil

Series Podcast: This Way Out
This Way Out: Three Bishops: Two Obits, One Ovation!, Segment 1

Series Podcast: This Way Out

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021


There is no LGBTQ newscast on this week's program so that our "NewsWrap" crew could enjoy the U.S. Thanksgiving holiday weekend. On this special show, ally Bishop John Shelby Spong leaves a legacy of Episcopal inclusion, gay pop star turned Unity Fellowship founder Archbishop Carl Bean is memorialized, and Evangelical U.S. Lutherans install mainstream U.S. Christianity's first transgender bishop, Megan Rohrer! Hear each of them and their stories this week on a very special edition of "This Way Out": the world's audio oasis for queer news and culture.

Cualquier tiempo pasado fue anterior
Acontece que no es poco | El (antiguo) cementerio Civil de Madrid

Cualquier tiempo pasado fue anterior

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 13:06


Un cementerio civil es un cementerio tolerante con todas las personas, y a ese cementerio ha querido ir Almudena Grandes. Aclarar también que, aunque lo llamamos civil, ya no existe esa distinción desde la democracia. Por Nieves Concostrina.

Latter Day Lives - Talking with Latter Day Saints
Ep. 190 - Prof. David Moore - Int'l Law, Human RIghts, Foreign Relations, & Religious Liberty Expert

Latter Day Lives - Talking with Latter Day Saints

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 58:52


Professor Moore is a scholar of foreign relations law, international law, international human rights, and international development. Professor Moore has taught international law, international human rights, U.S. foreign relations law, civil procedure, legal scholarship, a plenary powers colloquium, and an international religious freedom clinic. As a teacher, he has been recognized with the University's R. Wayne Hansen Teaching and Learning Fellowship, the BYU Law Alumni Association Teacher of the Year Award, and the Student Bar Association First Year Professor of the Year Award. He is a member of the American Law Institute. As a human rights expert, Professor Moore serves on the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe's Moscow Mechanism. In 2020, he was elected to a brief term on the Human Rights Committee, a body of independent experts that oversees states' compliance with the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. Professor Moore also serves as an Associate Director of the International Center for Law and Religion Studies, which seeks to secure the blessings of religious freedom and belief for everyone. Between 2017 and 2019, Professor Moore served, variously, as the Acting Deputy Administrator and General Counsel of the U.S. Agency for International Development, the federal government's lead agency for international development and humanitarian assistance. From 2016 to 2017, he was the Associate Dean for Research and Academic Affairs at Brigham Young University Law School. He was a Visiting Professor at the George Washington University Law School from 2008 to 2009. Before joining BYU, Professor Moore clerked for Justice Samuel A. Alito, Jr. during the U.S. Supreme Court's 2007 Term. From 2003 to 2007, Professor Moore was an assistant and then associate professor at the University of Kentucky College of Law. He arrived at the University of Kentucky after researching and teaching at the University of Chicago Law School as an Olin Fellow from 2001 to 2003. From 2000 to 2001, Professor Moore clerked for Judge Samuel A. Alito, Jr. on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. From 1996 to 2000, he was an Honor Program trial attorney at the U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Division, Federal Programs Branch. Professor Moore is a summa cum laude graduate of Brigham Young University Law School, where he served as Editor in Chief of the Law Review and graduated first in his class. He received his BA from Brigham Young University, where he was a Benson scholar and graduated summa cum laude, with University Honors, and as co-valedictorian of his college. He and his wife Natalie are the parents of seven wonderful children

Civil Politics
Civil Politics (11/26/21): Deliberations

Civil Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 61:33


Further Reading:3 white men are found guilty of murder in the killing of Ahmaud Arbery - https://n.pr/2ZtUyykJury hits organizers of 'Unite the Right' rally with $26 mln verdict - https://reut.rs/3nTZBl4Beginning Music: Glenn Gould - Goldberg Variation #5Ending Music: Electronic - Getting Away With it (Instrumental)Remember to Register to vote! Mass Residents should go to: https://www.sec.state.ma.us/ele/For more Civil Politics visit our website, civilpoliticsradio.com and follow us on the socials! Facebook.com/civilpoliticsradio @CivilPoliticsFMDon't miss another episode - subscribe to our podcast (iTunes, Google Play, Spotify, and more!)Support Civil Politics by donating to the tip jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/civilpoliticsradioThis podcast is a member of the Planetside Podcast Network. Visit PlanetsidePodcasts.com to find other Planetside Productions!Send us your feedback online: https://pinecast.com/feedback/civilpoliticsradio/f49e8e8b-0b11-4dc8-8727-a0fc16e30bb1

Be With Me: 7 Minutes of Biblical Wonder
Civil DISobedience=spiritual Obedience S5e31 Acts4:19

Be With Me: 7 Minutes of Biblical Wonder

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 7:28


Peter and John wake up in prison after healing a lame guy with faith yesterday.  They do not know if this day will be their day of crucifixion.  It happened to the last guy that got arrested in Jerusalem.  Here's the good part:  standing with them is the previously lame, then leaping, now STANDING guy. He's there.  There have been three venue changes.  It didn't happen by accident.  Apparently the offense is the healing and preaching of Jesus' name, so my guess is that the lame guy was NOT arrested, he's there boldly, courageously.  He too, doesn't know if he is going to be crucified for this faith that is less than 24 hours old. Listen as we hear how HIS faith, HIS courage, HIS standing works to protect Peter.Also of note is the CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE we see from Peter and John to the authorities.  They yield to the Author of all authority when the given authorities prevent what is due the AUTHOR.  Spiritual obedience = Civil disobedience, at least in this case.  For all intents and purposes, Peter should have been crucified on this day.  He was not.  Listen and find out WHY.  It has to do with the lame guy who would just NOT GO AWAY.  Did you know you can subscribe to this podcast on Stitcher, or any other podcast provider?  A new episode tomorrow then magically drops in your queue.  Or, it can be emailed to you early in the morning if the Lord gives us another day.  bewithme.us to sign up or write at bewithme.us@gmail.com.

UCL Minds
Disruptive Voices - People and Cities

UCL Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 34:55


In this episode, Professor Nick Tyler (Department of Civil, Environmental & Geomatic Engineering, UCL Engineering) shares his vision of how cities are built, evolve, and how this process might include more creativity and humanity. Using perspectives from academia and the arts, Professor Tyler paints a picture of cities that puts people at the centre.

Marvel Cinematic Universe Podcast

Hawkeye is finally here! LEt's dig into the ins and outs of Clint's newwest adventure!Discord-https://discord.gg/TMzArTkcTaReddit-https://www.reddit.com/r/MCUCast/Bingers Assemble-https://www.strandedpanda.com/bingersSuperhero Ethics-https://www.strandedpanda.com/superhero-ethicsPandaVision-https://www.strandedpanda.com/pandavisionLegends and Libations-https://www.twitch.tv/strandedpandatvPatreonhttps://www.patreon.com/mcucast Livewatch Link!https://www.scener.com/strandedpandaLive Podcastshttps://www.twitch.tv/strandedpandatvJoin The Stranded Panda Community!https://www.strandedpanda.com/ Facebook Group:https://www.facebook.com/groups/spchat

Right Start Radio with Pastor Jim Custer
There is No Authority Except From God - Part 2 of 2

Right Start Radio with Pastor Jim Custer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021


God delegates some of His authority to government. Easy to understand; a little harder to apply, sometimes! The Apostles were quick to teach us that Christians should be good citizens, even if the government isn't good government. Civil authorities are under heaven's authority, ultimately. Now, in practice this principle gets tested. We'll need some Scriptural insight to work it out. Pastor Jim's in Romans 13 to finish his sermon, There is No Authority Except From God. Listen to Right Start Radio every Monday through Friday on WCVX 1160AM (Cincinnati, OH) at 9:30am, WHKC 91.5FM (Columbus, OH) at 5:00pm, WRFD 880AM (Columbus, OH) at 9:00am. Right Start can also be heard on One Christian Radio 107.7FM & 87.6FM in New Plymouth, New Zealand. You can purchase a copy of this message, unsegmented for broadcasting and in its entirety, for $7 on a single CD by calling +1 (800) 984-2313, and of course you can always listen online or download the message for free. RS11252021_0.mp3Scripture References: Romans 13:1-10

THINK+change Podcasts
TRAININGS: E50: Human Rights and Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waivers

THINK+change Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 20:51


This THINK+change podcast episode describes what Human, Civil, and Political Rights are; defines what it means to have rights removed, restricted, or suspended when enrolled on the Colorado HCBS Developmental Disability Waiver; reviews processes to protect individuals with an IDD; explains the Human Rights Committee (HRC) makeup within Comunity Centered Boards (CCB); clarifies what Informed Consent is; shares whom to complain/report to if a person's rights are unnecessarily restricted/suspended.

Top Texas Lawyers Podcast
Episode 38 - Astroworld, Rittenhouse, & Mandate Mashup

Top Texas Lawyers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 70:45


ASTROWORLD TRAGEDY, KYLE RITTENHOUSE CASE, & VACCINE MANDATE LEGALITY - In today's episode, Bryan and Sam discuss the recent tragedy at Astroworld the potential liabilities facing the various parties involved, the particulars of the Kyle Rittenhouse case and possible self-defense precedents at play, and the status of vaccine mandates being argued in the judiciary, as well as the end of Brittney Spears' conservatorship and the legal complications of the Erika Jane/Tom Girardi divorce. If you have any questions regarding today's episode, please contact Bryan or Sam at babercrombie@astxlegal.com or ssanchez@astxlegal.com. Bryan L. Abercrombie is a Board Certified family law attorney with extensive experience in domestic relations matters including trial, jury trial, appellate and collaborative law. He has been licensed to practice law for over 18 years and had handled a variety of legal matters during that time. This includes Family, Civil, Probate and other cases. He has experience is all aspects of domestic relations matters including trial, jury trial, mediation, appellate and collaborative cases. Samuel M. Sanchez is a Board Certified family law attorney and certified mediator who is licensed to practice in Texas and Florida. He was appointed by former Gov. Perry to the Board of Regents for Midwestern University. He has worked in Civil, Criminal, Estate Planning, and Juvenile Law and has an extensive background in high profile, press intensive litigation. Visit us at https://astxlegal.com Intro and Outro Music: Mouth (Sam's Song), courtesy of Crush Bouquet (used with permission from band) Listen/Buy: https://ztapes.bandcamp.com/track/mouth-sams-dream

Buchty
Rekruťák, civil, tank. Být vojákem není jen buzerace, nošení khaki a plazení se jehličím

Buchty

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 43:57


Zuzana a Ivana tentokrát ve studiu, které znamená svět, uvítaly vojáka z povolání Martina Krestu. Ten se moderátorkám snažil vylíčit, jaký je denní chleba někoho, kdo se tzv. oženil s armádou.

Wisconsin Life
Finding A Shoe In The Wall: Treasures Hiding In Our Homes

Wisconsin Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021


Anyone who's done serious renovation on an older home, ripping down lath and plaster, wrestling with stubborn two by fours and prying up floorboards, has probably harbored the fantasy of finding some kind of long-hidden treasure. Civil war medals, a moth-eaten bag of precious coins, possibly a secret diary full of scandalous confessions. Unfortunately, what is often discovered are crumbling foundations, rotted timbers and plumbing issues, if not a desiccated mouse or two. But sometimes a do-it-yourself-er finds a shoe. Author Ron Davis and WPR producer Brad Kolberg bring us the story.

Midnight Train Podcast
The Banana Massacre - Yep, bananas. Happy Thanksgiving 2021

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 90:05


So we're gonna get into something a bit different this week. Not really truecrime, not unsolved, but definitely crazy. This is another one we got from a listener that we had no clue ever happened. While the official death toll of this incident is usually put at around 45, some estimates say it could be up to 2000. Those bodies are said to either have been dumped in the sea or buried in mass graves. So what was the incident about you ask? Well, long story very short… Bananas. We're gonna dive into what is simply known as the Banana massacre,  a crazy tale of a government squashing a banana strike with excessive force and what came after. Buckle up guys, here we go!   Before we start, I want to acknowledge the great sources of info for this episode. 90% of the information on this week's episode came from two amazing sources that had tons of info that we couldn't find anywhere else. First a paper by Jorge Enrique Elias Caro and Antonino Vidal Ortega on the website scielo.org was our source for the actual massacre info while an article called Rotten Fruit by Peter Chapman on the Financial Times website was our source for the company history.  So, let's start by talking about a fruit company. United Fruit company to be exact. United Fruit began life in the 1870s when Minor Cooper Keith, a wealthy young New Yorker, started growing bananas as a business sideline, alongside a railway line he was building in Costa Rica. Both ventures took off, and by 1890 he was married to the daughter of a former president of Costa Rica and owned vast banana plantations on land given to him by the state. The bananas were shipped to New Orleans and Boston, where demand soon began to outstrip supply.Keith teamed up with Andrew Preston, a Boston importer, and in 1899 they formed United Fruit. Bananas sold well for their tropical cachet: they were exotic, a luxury only affordable to the rich. But the rapidly rising output of United Fruit's plantations brought down prices. The company created a mass market in the industrial cities of the US north-east and Midwest. The once bourgeois banana became positively proletarian.   By the 1920s, United Fruit's empire had spread across Central America. It also included Jamaica, Cuba and the Dominican Republic. In South America the company owned chunks of Colombia and Ecuador. It came to dominate the European as well as the US banana markets with the help of its Great White Fleet of 100 refrigerated ships, the largest private navy in the world.   There are more than 300 varieties of banana, but United Fruit grew only one: the Gros Michel or ”Big Mike”. This variety suited most tastes; it was not too big or too small, too yellow or too sweet - if anything, it was a little bland. This was the forerunner of the transnational products we have today.           But mass production took its toll. In 1903, disease hit United Fruit's plantations in Panama. An array of pathogens kept up the attack, and the banana was discovered to have a genetic weakness. Its seeds are ill equipped for reproduction, so growers take cuttings from one plant to create another. The banana is a clone, with each inbred generation less resilient.    Although the banana was diseased, United Fruit marketed it as a product that exemplified good health. Banana diseases did not affect humans, and the fruit was said to be the cure for many ills: obesity, blood pressure, constipation - even depression. In 1929, United Fruit set up its own ”education department”, which supplied US schools with teaching kits extolling the benefits of the banana and the good works of the company. Meanwhile, United Fruit's ”home economics” department showered housewives with banana recipes.   One of United Fruit's most successful advertising campaigns began in 1944, designed to boost the banana's profile after its scarcity during the war. It featured Senorita Chiquita Banana, a cartoon banana who danced and sang in an exuberant Latin style. Senorita Chiquita bore a close resemblance to Carmen Miranda, the Brazilian entertainer who, in her ”tutti-frutti” hat, wowed Hollywood at the time. Sales soon regained prewar levels.   By the 1960s, the banana had become an inseparable accompaniment to the morning cereal of most American children. And today, in countries such as the US and Britain, it has ousted the apple as the most popular fruit. In the UK, figures indicate that more than 95 per cent of households buy bananas each week, and that more money is spent on them than on any other supermarket item, apart from petrol and lottery tickets.    Soooo sounds like a pretty typical big business rise to power by providing a wholesome treat to the people right? Wrong… There was more going on than almost everybody knew.    Over the years, United Fruit fought hard for low taxes and light regulation. By the beginning of the 20th century, troublesome anti-trust laws had been passed in the US to crack down on business behaviour such as price-fixing and other monopolistic practices. Taxes on large corporations were increased to fund welfare benefits in the US and fully fledged welfare states in Europe. But, with a centre of operations far from the lawmakers of Washington DC, United Fruit largely avoided all this.   The company also gained a reputation as being ruthless when crossed, and acted to remove governments that did not comply with its wishes. United Fruit had first shown its tough nature in the invasion of Honduras in 1911, which was planned by Sam ”The Banana Man” Zemurray, a business partner of United Fruit who later headed the company. Efforts by Zemurray and United Fruit to set up production in Honduras had been blocked by the Honduran government, which was fearful of the power it might wield. United Fruit was not so easily deterred. Zemurray financed an invasion, led by such enterprising types as ”General” (self-appointed) Lee Christmas and freelance trouble-shooter Guy ”Machine Gun” Molony. Thanks to United Fruit, many more exercises in ”regime change” were carried out in the name of the banana.   In 1941, the company hired a new consultant, Sigmund Freud's nephew, Edward Bernays, who had adapted the early disciplines of psychoanalysis to the marketplace. Bernays is known as the ”father of public relations” following his seminal 1928 book, Propaganda, in which he argued that it was the duty of the ”intelligent minority” of society to manipulate the unthinking ”group mind”. This, Bernays asserted, was for the sake of freedom and democracy.   United Fruit had become concerned about its image. In Central America, it was commonly known as el pulpo (the octopus) - its tentacles everywhere. In the US, United Fruit's territories were seen as troubled and forbidding. Under Bernays' guidance, the company began issuing a steady flow of information to the media about its work, rebranding the region as ”Middle America”.   America”.   In 1954, Bernays exercised his manipulative powers to get rid of the Guatemalan government. Democratically elected, it had taken some of United Fruit's large areas of unused land to give to peasant farmers. Bernays' response was to call newspaper contacts who might be amenable to the company view. Journalists were sent on ”fact finding” missions to Central America and, in particular, Guatemala, where they chased false stories of gunfire and bombs. In dispatches home, Guatemala became a place gripped by ”communist terror”.   The company looked, too, to friends in high places, both in the corridors of power and in the offices where the big decisions were made. During the Guatemalan crisis, John Foster Dulles, one of the world's most esteemed statesmen, was secretary of state. His brother, Allen Dulles, was head of the CIA. Both were former legal advisers to United Fruit. Together, the Dulles brothers orchestrated the coup that overthrew Guatemala's government in 1954.   Despite its ugly reputation, United Fruit often made philanthropic gestures.  Eli Black, chief executive of the United Fruit Company, played a part in coining the term ”corporate social responsibility” when, in reference to earthquake relief sent to Nicaragua in 1972, he extolled the company's deeds as ”our social responsibility”.  And in the 1930s, Sam Zemurray donated part of his fortune to a children's clinic in New Orleans. He later gave $1m to the city's Tulane University to finance ”Middle American'' research; he also funded a Harvard professorship for women. Philanthropy, however, did not prevent United Fruit's abuses, and, in the 1950s, the US government decided it had to act. The company's activities had caused such anti-US feeling in Latin America that leftwing revolutionaries such as Fidel Castro and Che Guevara had prospered. And so Washington began to take away some of United Fruit's land.   Ironically, Castro had benefited from the presence of United Fruit in Cuba. His father, a sugar planter, leased land from the company, and had made enough money to afford a good upbringing for his children. Guevara had fought both United Fruit and the CIA during the Guatemalan coup; he maintained thereafter that Latin America had no choice but ”armed struggle”. At New Year 1959, Castro and Guevara seized power in Cuba and kicked out the US-supported regime of Fulgencio Batista.   Like an ailing dictator, United Fruit lashed out - and nearly took the world with it. In 1961, it lent part of its Great White Fleet to the CIA and Cuban exiles in the US who were plotting to overthrow Castro. When the Bay of Pigs invasion failed, Castro, fearing another attack, ushered in armaments from the Soviet Union, prompting the missile crisis of 1962.   United Fruit battled on through the 1960s, its product ever more the victim of disease. Big Mike flagged, died and gave way to the dessert banana most of the developed world eats today, the Cavendish. It was said to be ”disease resistant”. Now that's dying, too.   Eli Black took over the company in 1970, imagining he could turn it back into the colossus it once was. The early 1970s, however, were a terrible period for the image of multinational corporations. Chief among them, oil companies made huge profits from the crisis after the 1973 Middle East war, to the inflationary ruin of rich and poor countries alike. United Fruit became an embarrassment. It was weak where others, such as the oil moguls, remained strong. When its stock market value crashed and regulators moved in, it looked like natural selection.   Early on Monday February 3 1975, a man threw himself out of his office window, 44 floors above Park Avenue, New York. He had used his briefcase to smash the window, and then thrown it out before he leapt, scattering papers for blocks around. Glass fell on to the rush-hour traffic, but amazingly no one else was hurt. The body landed away from the road, near a postal service office. Postmen helped emergency workers clear up the mess so the day's business could carry on.    This jumper was quickly identified as Eli Black, chief executive of the United Fruit Company.   It emerged that Black, a devout family man, had bribed the Honduran president, Oswaldo Lopez Arellano, with $1.25m to encourage him to pull out of a banana cartel which opposed United Fruit. The story was about to come out in the US press. United Fruit's Central American plantations were also struggling with hurricane damage and a new banana disease. Facing disgrace and failure, Black took his own life. His death was shocking, not least because he had the reputation of a highly moral man. Wall Street was outraged, the company's shares crashed and regulators seized its books to prevent ”its further violation of the law”. The company subsequently disappeared from public view and was seemingly erased from the collective mind.   After the fall of the Berlin Wall, in 1989, in a born-again spirit of globalisation, the world's main banana companies picked up the free-market banner once carried by United Fruit. The companies - Chiquita, Del Monte and Dole from the US, and Noboa from Ecuador - did not have anything like the force of United Fruit individually, but they were still a formidable presence. Together they were known to their critics, if not to themselves, as the ”Wild Bunch”.   In the 1990s, the US took its case to the World Trade Organisation, the new high court of globalisation. The companies protested that west European countries unfairly protected the producers of so-called ”Fairtrade” bananas in former European colonies through a complex system of quotas and licences. The Wild Bunch characterised this as revamped colonialism and outmoded welfare state-ism and, instead, promoted their own ”Free Trade” bananas.   In the new millennium, after what had become a general trade war, the Europeans backed down and agreed to concessions. They did so with some rancour, protesting that Washington had again allowed itself to be manipulated by narrow interests. Some spoke of a return of the ”old and dark forces”. They were thinking of United Fruit.   Ok so that's kind of a basic history of United Fruit company to get us going in the right direction to talk about one of the most brutal things they carried out on their workers. You've seen the connection they had and the power they had.. Pretty nuts for a fucking banana company.    On the evening of October 5, 1928, the delegates for Colombia's banana workers in Magdalena gathered to discuss their grievances. Among their concerns were their long hours and low pay; one worker, Aristides López Rojano, remembered: “We worked from six in the morning until eleven and then from one in the afternoon until six.... The contractor paid the salary and reserved up to thirty percent for himself.” Erasmo Coronel (the one wearing the bowtie in the group portrait) spoke in favor of a strike, and the others agreed. At around five in the morning on October 6, 1928, the workers issued the United Fruit Company a list of nine demands.   Stop their practice of hiring through sub-contractors   Mandatory collective insurance   Compensation for work accidents   Hygienic dormitories and 6 day work weeks   Increase in daily pay for workers who earned less than 100 pesos per month   Weekly wage   Abolition of office stores   Abolition of payment through coupons rather than money   Improvement of hospital services   The strike turned into the largest labor movement ever witnessed in the country until then. Radical members of the Liberal Party, as well as members of the Socialist and Communist Parties, participated.   The workers wanted to be recognized as employees, and demanded the implementation of the Colombian legal framework of the 1920s.   After U.S. officials in Colombia and United Fruit representatives portrayed the workers' strike as "communist" with a "subversive tendency" in telegrams to Frank B. Kellogg, the United States Secretary of State, the United States government threatened to invade with the U.S. Marine Corps if the Colombian government did not act to protect United Fruit's interests. The Colombian government was also compelled to work for the interests of the company, considering they could cut off trade of Colombian bananas with significant markets such as the United States and Europe.   As there was no agreement the Government militarized the zone. The newspaper "La Prensa" published the following:   "MORE TROOPS FOR THE BANANERA REGION. We have been informed that the leaving of the Commissioner sent by the Industry Ministry due to the existing conflict between the workers and the company has turned the situation critical. For this reason, the War Ministry ordered the concentration of more troops in Ciénaga. Therefore, yesterday night, a numerous contingent was dispatched from here on a special ship"   By the end of November the Magdalena Agriculture Society tried to find a solution to the situation. They named a Commission and along with the Chief of the Work Office and the workers' delegates would have a meeting with the UFC since the conflict was affecting everyone's interests. The multinational rejected meeting the Commission stating that the workers were out of the law. The representatives of the workers left for Ciénaga with the aim of convincing their fellow workers to abandon the region. They also demanded the arbitration as a last legal resort.   Social Party (PSR) founded in 1927 in Bogotá. The strike was also supported by the national and departmental union leaders ascribed to the Magdalena Workers Federation, the Magdalena Worker Union and the General Union of Workers of the Union Society (popularly known as the Yellow Union which integrated railway, port and construction workers of Santa Marta).   The first week of December everything was at a standstill, without a solution. The company hired a steamboat and brought 200 military men and took over the town hall without the mayor's authorization. To this respect the Ciénaga newspaper "Diario del Córdoba" noted:   "We do not know who ordered changing the town house into a campsite of troops, but we are certain that the municipality spokesman was not consulted for this illegal occupation. He would have certainly opposed it since there was no alteration of public order according to the norms in force. We see that the procedures here are "manu militari", without any consideration under the obvious alarm of these peoples, panic in society and business."   Military roadblocks were displayed. Trains were searched and the army prevented strikers from using them33. Tension increased and temporary workers started to return to their hometowns. Military pressure blocked the communication systems and the mail, telephones, telegraph and even the press stopped working. The strikers seized the train from Ciénaga to the plantations and they prevented its exit during the day.   On December 3rd, the press was conscious of the extreme situation: The situation of the Banana Strike is worse than ever. Especially because of the uneasiness caused by the Governor's Office for having called the Army. Any kind of meeting was banned, as it was assumed that they questioned the state legitimacy and stability and the government decisions. This measure outraged workers, because some detentions took place in Ciénaga and they were justified by the police since some documents of an apparently communist campaign were confiscated.   From this moment on, American Diplomats started to worry for the security of the American employees up to the point that the Government of the United States sent a ship to Santa Marta for the protection of their citizens as was stated by the US ambassador in Bogotá. He made clear that it was not a war cruise. Anyhow, it was possible to confirm that in the ports of Ciénaga and Santa Marta war ships docked with the aim of reinforcing troops.    To break the strike, on December 2nd, a military contingent of 300 men arrived in Ciénaga from the interior of the country. The major of the zone considered that these soldiers would be better at facing the situation than those native of the region. At the same time that same day some municipalities protested against the disposition of the governor's office. The workers exodus continued, the general situation of commerce aggravated, many commercial houses closed and some of them stopped paying their debts alleging the scarce security conditions and low sales. Similarly occurred with the stores of the UFC which closed due to lack of business activity. There was a total lack of supplies of basic products in the banana zone.   With the excuse that in Ciénaga the strikers were committing all kinds of outrages, the army seized the train to mobilize troops to the different towns, preventing normal circulation; this information proved false and the train returned to Cienaga during the first hours of the next day. The community remained isolated and without the possibility to use the train as a transportation means. The train was used by the militaries for the surveillance of plantations.   A State of Siege declaration was expected and this increased tension among strikers who organized collective bodies in different locations to prevent the work of producers. Detentions continued. The train detention by the military and the impossibility to take bananas out due to the positions of the strikers and small landowners, the harvested fruit began to rot.   The Workers Union used the newspaper Vanguardia Obrera and other pasquinades to inform about their position and to keep public opinion updated. On December 5th, alleging that the strikers had managed to get weapons, the government decreed the State of Siege. This was not made public to the workers and for this reason they became more exacerbated.   A pressure mechanism used to obtain the support of merchants was the fact of creating solidarity to boycott the public market stores and other commercial firms if the transaction was not authorized by the Workers Union. This way, merchants could not sell if they did not have the "permission". To accomplish this policy the union had 5.000 workers acting as vigilantes. This situation led the UFC to ask the government if the State was in condition to protect its interests. The State response was dubious. In its effort to reach an equilibrium between the pressure of the company and that of the workers, it submitted a communication where it stated that it would analyse the situation and would take the corresponding steps.   The workers' unrest for not feeling the State support led them to radicalization of their protest and since that moment, seizures of banana farms took place in different municipalities. There were confrontations between land owners, the military and the workers. It is worth mentioning the events in Sevilla, where workers detained a group of soldiers.   As the tension increased with this last event the Ministry Council declared general alteration of public order on December 5th, and gave special faculties to Minister Arrazola to act as a mediator between the parties and positioned General Cortés Vargas as Civil and Military Chief. This intervention was justified by the economic losses of the socio-economic and political system of the nation because it had been estimated that up to that moment the losses exceeded one million dollars and given the fact that the fierce position of the workers had stopped communications and transportations and even there had been seizures in several localities and there was fear concerning the situation of Santa Marta.   The government sent information to the United Press as follows: "The government has decreed the State of Siege in the Province of Santa Marta where the workers of the United Fruit Company maintain a strike lasting several days. General Carlos Cortés Vargas has been appointed Civil and Military Chief". On the other hand, the national press and especially that of the capital announced: " there has never been a longer and more numerous strike in the country than this of the workers of Magdalena. Thirty-two thousand workers have been in total inactivity for more than thirty days in the banana region, there are no signs that this situation will have a favourable solution"   Events reached their peak in Ciénaga. The workers had concentrated for a pacific demonstration in the evening of the 5th of December. The Governor Nuñez Roca decreed the dispersion of the demonstration. The workers did not receive this well; they declared that authorities had taken this decision with the support of the UFC and the militaries without the presence of workers' representatives. This made clear to them that authorities were defending the interests of the Company and the local "bananacracy"and not theirs as Colombian workers. The concentration ended in a protest.   The militaries obeyed the orders of the Governor and it was authorized to follow orders and demand the workers to dissolve the demonstration as it was not authorized.   The text was read in the square and at the same time the troop took positions. There were approximately 1.500 strikers in the square.   The army gave the strikers 15 minutes to disperse and the workers' answer was a the massive agitation of the Colombian flags and shouts related to the workers movement. The army responded with drumbeats and the menace to repel the strikers. Three bugle warnings were given, but nevertheless the strikers remained in their positions. A deep silence reigned in the square and the menace of the army became an unfortunate reality when the shout "Shoot" was uttered. Rifles and machine guns were discharged against the defenceless and unarmed demonstrators. In minutes the ground of the square was tinted with blood.   Once the attack of the army against their own fellow citizens ended, the sight was dantesque. The cadavers, the wounded and their relatives were troubling scenes. These events took place at the dawn of December 6th: a brutal aggression against a workers' demonstration.   The news invaded the media and the first chronicles appeared with living information about the tragic balance of the events. The first report on the newspaper "La Prensa" from Barranquilla informed of 8 people killed and 20 wounded. After a week, the same newspaper mentioned 100 dead and 238 wounded. Meanwhile official sources and diplomatic communications signalled the number of people killed as being 1.000. This number, and along with other kind of testimonies collected, agree that the number of killings was over a thousand and that the militaries loaded the trains with the corpses and buried them in mass graves in inaccessible areas and up to the present times they have not been localized.   This repression caused a massive exodus of the terrified population. They abandoned the zone and migrated to different parts of the country for fear of military persecution and arrestment. Many of them left their scarce possessions behind.   National and international media widely covered this event. Both the UFC and the government tried to manipulate the information to protect their image. The press echoed and broadcasted the sometimes biased news, informing about "combats" between the army troops and the "revolutionaries" and that as a result of these combats, 8 "bandits" were killed and 20 were wounded. The War Ministry insisted that "in Magdalena there was no strike, but a revolution".   Other newspapers such as "La Prensa" from Barranquilla, issued their edition of December 8th in red characters as a reference to this event that brought mourning to the entire country and as a symbolic commemorative act.   Referring to a communication sent to the United Press, the War Ministry informed officially that in the attack of the strikers against the troops there had been 8 dead and 20 wounded and that in order to control the revolutionary outbreaks against state order, the immediate mobilization of more troops had been ordered. They would arrive from cities of the interior of the country. It also emphasised the position of the government that the workers' situation in Magdalena was delicate and that vigorous decisions had to be taken in order to solve this issue. It also informed that beside Ciénaga, other localities had to be intervened.   The Times from New York informed in a biased and extended way that the turmoil in the Colombian Banana Region was provoked by Mexican incendiaries, who had led the process of the Mexican Revolution, two decades earlier. It also gave details about the aspects of the banana strike that were consequences of the expiration of the Barco Concession .   At the same time the UFC issued a press communication to the New York agencies and the worldwide correspondents declaring: "the difficult situation experienced during the past days in the Colombian banana region, where the company has valuable interests, has quite improved in the last 24 hours and the dispatches sent from the scene, give rise to expectations for a prompt solution of the conflict surged between the workers and the company which ended in an extended strike of revolutionary nature".   While the American press provided biased information, trying to defend the multinational interests and that of their government, the national press analysed the situation with greater objectivity. The daily newspaper "El Tiempo" from Bogotá commented in an extended note that most of the claims of the strikers were righteous improvement of working conditions. Nevertheless, due to its conservative position, the editorial stated that they did not agree with the strike since they considered that the workers had a bad leadership and they made the leaders responsible for what had happened. They reminded the authorities that force is not the supreme reason as the only system to solve a conflict since violence is not a valid option to impose certain vindications.   In response to these events and as a protest for the massacre, several offices of the United Fruit and the railway were set on fire and destroyed. The hard situation caused by the army repression and the lack of jobs led to the assault of the company's stores where people seized food.    "It is not about fixing anyhow a difficult situation, it is about avoiding more critical events in the immediate future. Therefore we need a wise, prudent, political Colombian, who does not forget the circumstances regarding the conflict. Someone who does not forget how the United Fruit Company manipulates the political and civil life of Magdalena and who does not think it indispensable to send troops for hunting workers as animals. Someone who will not be hard and inflexible with them and subordinated and honey mouthed with the company agents"   After the massacre, the workers who managed to escape emigrated to other areas of the region and new versions of the events started to become public. It was the version of the defeated. This version informed the public opinion about the concentration in the Ciénaga square and not in farms as had been informed by authorities to justify the fact of not being able to notify the exact number of deaths.   On December 10th after a convulsed weekend, the headings announced "the revolutionaries' flee in stampede to the Sierra Nevada," "government troops completely defeated the strikers "; the War Minister informs that there were more deaths during the last combats". In general, the press informed about a revolutionary movement which confronted the military forces and that the army was responding with rigor, but that there had not been any excess on their part. The banana zone was returning to normal, as well as the train service between Ciénaga and Santa Marta and the steam boat service between Ciénaga and Barranquilla. They also informed that since public order had been reestablished, businesses had already opened and that the exodus of the population had ended.   General Cortés Vargas issued a decree through which the revolutionaries of Magdalena were declared a gang of outlaws. The decree consisted of three articles and in one section, as a justification, it was stated that the rebel strikers committed all kinds of outrages: arson in public and private property, pillage, interruption of telegraphic and telephonic communications, destruction of railways, assault of citizens who did not agree with their communist and anarchist doctrine. This was the justification for decreeing martial law to give security to citizens and to re-establish public order. On the other hand the workers' leaders and accessories should be prosecuted to face their responsibilities. And to finish, the public force was authorized to use their guns.   At the same time troops were sent to avoid the surviving strikers' flee to the Sierra Nevada and the Departament of Atlántico. To accomplish this all the towns neighbouring the banana zone were alerted. Numerous detentions occurred and the prisoners were sent to Ciénaga to be judged by a Martial Court.   Wow…. Fucking bananas caused all this shit… Well obviously not than JUST bananas but holy shit man.    So the crazy thing is United Fruit company continued to operate did so long after this incident until eventually after the the suicide of Eli Black things unraveled and the company went away. Or did it? Well it did not. In fact the company is now still a huge banana company called… Chiquita! But at least all that bullshit is on the past… Oh wait wait… No it's not!    While Chiquita is not actively massacring people, in 2007, it admitted to paying $1.7 million to the United Self-Defense Forces of Columbia (A.U.C.), a far-right paramilitary group responsible for thousands of killings and some of the worst massacres in Colombia. The A.U.C. was designated by the United States as a terrorist group at the time and Chiquita was forced to pay $25 million for violating counterterrorism laws. In particular, the A.U.C. targeted labor leaders, liquidated problem employees, and removed people from lands needed for cultivation.   “They are so bad that in 2001, even the Bush administration was forced to designate them as a terrorist organization,” said Terry Collingsworth, a Labor and Human Rights Attorney. He proceeds to say that multinational corporations had automatically aligned with the A.U.C. “They've made it safe for business here. That's what they do.” Collingsworth states, from his and his associates' reporting, that Chiquita likely paid much more than $1.7 million to the A.U.C.   Over much of the 20th century, banana companies like United Fruit effectively took over governments in countries like Guatemala and Honduras, leading to the countries' model being known as “banana republics”. A banana republic would describe politically unstable countries economically dependent on bananas as a sole export and product, and it has been diversified to include other limited-resource products. The CIA would strong-arm these governments to protect the business interests of banana companies at the expense of workers and people who lived in those countries, often propping up repressive regimes. With a historic priority of keeping the costs of bananas low, banana companies were willing to do whatever it took to keep prices low, from stifling labor movements, keeping wages low, and strong-arming governments. The United Fruit Company did it then, and Chiquita Brands does it now.   In 1999, President Clinton apologized to Guatemala, saying that “support for military forces and intelligence units which engaged in violence and widespread repression was wrong, and the United States must not repeat that mistake.” Movies:   Horror movies about killer food   https://screenrant.com/funniest-horror-b-movies-murderous-food/

The News with Shepard Smith
Air Travel Surge, Rising Gas Prices & Pharmacy Opioid Verdict

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 50:11


A federal jury has held CVS, Walgreens and Walmart liable in the U.S. opioid crisis. It was the first time pharmacy companies had completed a trial to defend themselves in a drug crisis that has killed a half-million Americans over the past two decades. Civil rights attorney David Henderson reports the jury in the trial over Ahmaud Arbery's death began deliberations today. Arbery was shot and killed while he was jogging near his home in south Georgia last year. Sara Nelson, president of the Association of Flight Attendants, discusses the issue of unruly passengers and how crew are expected to deal with them this holiday season. The White House announced it's tapping the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) in an effort to provide consumers relief from rising gas prices. The national average for gas prices has leveled off around $3.41 per gallon, according to AAA. That's up $1.29 over last year at this time and about $0.81 over 2019 prices. Plus, CNBC's Kate Rogers reports that some companies are allowing workers to get paid every day, even though it comes at small cost.

The Hartmann Report
OUR NATION'S TRAUMA AND FINDING A WAY TO HEAL

The Hartmann Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 57:52


Civil & Human Rights activist Joe Madison is on day 16 of a hunger strike for voting rights. - Will he survive? He is the host of The Joe Madison Show weekdays on SiriusXM. Conversations with Great Minds - Mary Trump - The Reckoning: Our Nation's Trauma and Finding A Way to Heal.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Engineering Career Coach Podcast
TECC 260: Top Skills All Engineers Need to Excel in for Their Careers

The Engineering Career Coach Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 25:59


In this episode, we talk to Pamela A. Scott, an executive coach to CEOs and business owners, focusing on communication, managing people, leadership, and emotional intelligence. You might have seen some of the inspirational articles she has authored on The Engineering Management Institute blog before. She's also been a guest speaker for EMI's program, The Civil […] The post TECC 260: Top Skills All Engineers Need to Excel in for Their Careers appeared first on Engineering Management Institute.

Aspen Ideas to Go
The Most Important Rule for a More Civil Thanksgiving: No Eye Rolling (Rebroadcast)

Aspen Ideas to Go

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 28:57


Current political fault lines are fracturing American society as people grow farther apart from one another due to differing beliefs and opinions. We often see people we disagree with as caricatures, and think we can never reconcile our differences. Yet despite that sense of contradiction we are much closer to each other than we think. To bridge the divide, we have to strengthen the bonds that make us human. In this special Thanksgiving conversation, Krista Tippett longtime host of the radio program “On Being,” and Harvard professor Arthur Brooks who writes the “How to Build a Life” column for The Atlantic, discuss ways we can share our humanity and work towards re-creating politics and civil society. Their discussion is part of Unfinished Live, an online event series produced in collaboration with Aspen Ideas partner, Unfinished. Learn more at www.unsfinished.com

Boletim Folha
Desemprego no Brasil é o dobro da média mundial

Boletim Folha

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 4:59


Polícia Civil diz ter identificado 7 dos 8 mortos pela polícia no Complexo do Salgueiro. E maioria do STF confirma decisão sobre implantação de renda básica em 2022.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Series Podcast: This Way Out
This Way Out: Trans Teens Stand & Cassata Transcends & global LGBTQ news!, Segment 1

Series Podcast: This Way Out

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021


Ryan Cassata's musical present transcends his past; gay artist Richard Amsel is the answer to “Who Said That?” in a “Rainbow Minute”; bullied trans teens in Georgia and Wisconsin defy high school bullies; Thailand's top court pushes marriage equality to lawmakers, the I.O.C. changes the game for trans and intersex Olympians, the U.S. Health Department kills Trump era religious bias, Russian authorities axe an LGBTQ film fest website, and a notoriously homophobic Australian town turns a rainbow leaf! Those stories — and more this week — when you choose "This Way Out": the world's audio oasis for queer news and culture.

The News with Shepard Smith
Thanksgiving Travel, Jan 6th Subpoenas & WI Parade Tragedy

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 49:13


A Wisconsin man was arrested and accused of driving a red SUV into a crowd at a Waukesha Christmas parade on the city's Main Street yesterday. CNBC's Valerie Castro reports on the suspect who was booked on suspicion of five counts of intentional homicide according to the Waukesha Police Chief. Civil rights attorney David Henderson reports on the closing arguments in the case of the three men who were involved in the death of Ahmaud Arbery. Ahead of Thanksgiving, TSA officials say they have already screened the most passengers through U.S. airports since the pandemic started. CNBC's Phil Lebeau reports from O'Hare International airport ahead of the busy holiday travel week. The House committee investigating the January 6th insurrection has issued five more subpoenas to witnesses, including Roger Stone and Alex Jones. Plus, CNBC's Kate Rogers reports on a ‘smash-and-grab' operation to ransack high-end stores in the San Francisco area.

Civil Politics
Civil Politics (11/19/21): Attack on Gosar

Civil Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 58:43


Further Reading:How ‘Let's Go Brandon' became code for insulting Joe Biden - https://bit.ly/32hDhJFHouse censures Rep. Gosar for violent video in rare rebuke - https://bit.ly/3HEkfNCOklahoma governor grants clemency, spares Julius Jones' life - https://bit.ly/3kLEPSDBeginning Music: Glenn Gould - Goldberg Variation #5Ending Music: Electronic - Getting Away With it (Instrumental)Remember to Register to vote! Mass Residents should go to: https://www.sec.state.ma.us/ele/For more Civil Politics visit our website, civilpoliticsradio.com and follow us on the socials! Facebook.com/civilpoliticsradio @CivilPoliticsFMDon't miss another episode - subscribe to our podcast (iTunes, Google Play, Spotify, and more!)Support Civil Politics by donating to the tip jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/civilpoliticsradioThis podcast is a member of the Planetside Podcast Network. Visit PlanetsidePodcasts.com to find other Planetside Productions!Send us your feedback online: https://pinecast.com/feedback/civilpoliticsradio/cf23a986-997d-4322-8651-dfffa79852f8

Velshi
Not Guilty on All Counts

Velshi

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 80:13


Ali Velshi is joined by defense attorney Danny Cevallos, former federal prosecutor Paul Butler, retired Police Captain Sonia Pruitt, Congresswoman Gwen Moore, Congressman Don Bacon, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Nikole Hannah Jones, Dr. Nahid Bhadelia, Republican strategist Rick Tyler, The Washington Post's Eugene Scott, and NBC's Antonia Hylton, Meagan Fitzgerald, and Liz McLaughlin.

Our Body Politic
Honoring the Emanuel Nine, What We Can Do about Information Disorder, and Critical Race Theory as a Political Football

Our Body Politic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 50:21


Host Farai Chideya talks about the power of forgiveness with Sharon Risher, whose relatives were among the Mother Emanuel shooting victims. Michael Arad, the architect behind the new memorial to the Emanuel Nine, discusses the collaborative process of designing an homage to the congregation. Civil rights leader Rashad Robinson talks about the final report from the Aspen Institute's Commission on Information Disorder. On Sippin' the Political Tea, Karen Attiah of the Washington Post and Khiara Bridges of UC Berkeley examine the way politicians use Critical Race Theory to win elections.EPISODE RUNDOWN0:15 A family member of those slain at Emanuel AME Church in 2015 on the recent settlement by the Department of Justice12:36 Architect Michael Arad on building a memorial honoring the “Emanuel Nine”19:14 Civil rights leader Rashad Robinson on the Aspen Institute's report on information disorder31:30 Sippin' the Political Tea: columnist Karen Attiah and law professor Khiara Bridges examine the impact of critical race theory on our politics right now

The News with Shepard Smith
Covid Boosters, Winter Olympics Boycott & Constitution Auction

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 49:42


House Democrats have moved closer to holding a long-awaited floor vote on President Joe Biden's social safety net and climate package, with party leaders formally kicking off debate in the full chamber. With winter looming and Covid-19 cases rising, the FDA is expected to authorize Pfizer's booster shot for all adults. CNBC's Meg Tirrell reports The CDC is expected to meet Friday to discuss boosters. Civil rights attorney David Henderson reports on the trial over the death of Ahmaud Arbery, as the defendant who shot him faces cross-examination on the witness stand. CNBC's Phil LeBeau reports on a new Consumer Reports study that looks at the most and least reliable cars on the market. Are there too many bells and whistles in today's new automobiles? CNBC's Steve Kovach reports on ConstitutionDAO, a group that has raised millions of dollars in cryptocurrencies to buy a copy of the U.S. Constitution. Plus, CNBC's Kayla Tausche reports on President Biden's comments that he's considering a diplomatic boycott of the Beijing Winter Olympics.

Crime Talk with Scott Reisch
Alex Murdaugh Wants Some Civil Cases DISMISSED - Travis McMichael Takes the Stand... Let's Talk About It!

Crime Talk with Scott Reisch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 40:03


Alex Murdaugh Wants Some Civil Cases DISMISSED - Travis McMichael Takes the Stand... Let's Talk About It!

Make It Plain with Mark Thompson
Black Women and Allies Take Action

Make It Plain with Mark Thompson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 32:10


On Tuesday, Mark spent the day attended the 8th gathering of Black women and allies, brought together by the National Coalition on Black Civic Participation's Black Women's Roundtable and the National Council of Negro Women. We'll hear from two movement leaders and speakers to kick things off: Melanie Campbell, President and CEO of the National Coalition on Black Civic Participation and convener of Black Women's Roundtable; and Clayola Brown, Civil, Human and Women's Rights Director for the AFL-CIO. They're followed by one-on-one conversations with Congresswoman Shontel Brown of Ohio, who was elected to replace HUD Secretary Marcia Fudge; Jotaka Eaddy, Host of "Speak Sis" on the Oprah Winfrey Network and founder of #WinWithBlackWomen; Marc Morial, President of the National Urban League; Derrick Johnson, President of the NAACP. Executive Producer: Adell Coleman Producer: Brittany Temple Distributor: DCP Entertainment For additional content: makeitplain.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The News with Shepard Smith
Ahmaud Arbery Trial Begins, Biden Promotes EVs & Cryto Goes Mainstream

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 50:10


The man who killed Ahmaud Arbery, Travis McMichael, delivered emotional testimony in Georgia today as his defense attorney questioned him. Meanwhile, the jury in the Kyle Rittenhouse trial asked to rewatch several videos from the night of the Kenosha shooting. Civil rights attorney David Henderson discusses the nuances of both cases. President Joe Biden visited an electric vehicle plant in Detroit earlier today to showcase a new fleet of vehicles as he proposes billions of dollars in incentives in the Build Back Better plan. CNBC's Phil LeBeau explains the details of the incentives. And Singapore-based crypto.com officially bought the naming rights to the Staples Center in Los Angeles for an estimated $700 million. CNBC's Kate Rooney breaks down the crypto industry's push into popular culture as more celebrities and athletes begin to embrace cryptocurrencies.

Rádio Gaúcha
Ederson Bilhan, Titular Da Delegacia De Polícia Civil De Farroupilha - 17/11/2021

Rádio Gaúcha

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 14:42


Ederson Bilhan, Titular Da Delegacia De Polícia Civil De Farroupilha - 17/11/2021 by Rádio Gaúcha

CQ on Congress
Equal Time with Mary C. Curtis: 'What has come of America?'

CQ on Congress

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 29:51


Civil rights leader and National Urban League president and CEO Marc Morial says he is "damn worried" about the state of American democracy. Mary C. Curtis sits down with Morial to talk about voting rights, Infrastructure, the filibuster and so much more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Equal Time with Mary C. Curtis
'What has come of America?'

Equal Time with Mary C. Curtis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 29:06


Civil rights leader and National Urban League president and CEO Marc Morial says he is "damn worried" about the state of American democracy. Mary C. Curtis sits down with Morial to talk about voting rights, Infrastructure, the filibuster and so much more.

The News with Shepard Smith
Rittenhouse Verdict, Covid Pill & Biden's Social Spending Bill

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 50:10


CNBC's Kayla Tausche reports on President Biden's efforts to promote his bipartisan infrastructure bill by traveling around the country to tout its benefits. Today, the tour began in New Hampshire. Democrats are now turning their attention to pushing the Build Back Better plan, which focuses on social spending and climate change. CNBC's Steve Liesman reports on where Americans are spending their money, even as inflation spikes in some areas of the economy. Civil rights attorney David Henderson discusses jury deliberations in the murder trial of Kyle Rittenhouse in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Pfizer submitted its application to the Food and Drug Administration for emergency authorization of its Covid-19 treatment pill, saying it reduces hospitalization and death by 89% when administered with a common HIV drug. Plus, new hope for more than 6 million Americans living with Alzheimer's and a mad scramble in space as Russia conducts an anti-satellite missile test.

Así las cosas
Grupo civil organizado, respuesta a extorsión en Michoacán: México Evalúa

Así las cosas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 11:18


Empresarios plataneros de la zona costera cambiaron policía por guardias civiles, tras vivir secuestros y horrores: Periodista Heriberto Paredes

Civil Defense Radio
Economic Threats with Lani Elliott

Civil Defense Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 33:58


This episode of Civil Defense Radio we discuss the economic threats our nation faces today; threats like massive federal overspending, supply chain slowdowns, the impacts of communist insurgencies within our institutions, corporations and government. This was an easy going and fun conversation with Professor Lani Elliott. Links Breaking the Conflict Trap: Civil War and Development Policy (https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/13938?locale-attribute=en)PRITZKER MILITARY Museum & Library presents: Front & Center with John Callaway: The Global Economic Crisis: What Does It Mean for U.S. National Security? https://www.pritzkermilitary.org/whats_on/pritzker-military-presents/front-center-john-callaway-global-economic-crisisGuest Resources Civil Defense Radio Information Website: https://www.civildefenseradio.com/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CivilDefenseRadio Telegram: Civil Defense Radio ChannelMeWe: Civil Defense RadioYouTube: Civil Defense Radio ChannelAdvertisersGlobal Partnershttps://prestonschleinkofer.vcardinfo.com/GSTelecom APP InformationGSTelecom is a blockchain secure email, text, and voice app powered by G999 digital tokensThis video is a short intro to this service: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vRtRvjiVZVcGSTelecom Apps (Remember, these apps literally run on the blockchain, and you must have G999 crypto tokens to pay for use. You may purchase the coins from a number of exchanges, or through the Global Partners link here: https://gspartners.global/register?sponsor=preston230 )Android:https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=block.chain.chatiPhone:https://apps.apple.com/tt/app/gstelecom-by-g999-blockchain/id1547577247NOTE: Civil Defense Radio is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. This site also participates in other affiliate programs and is compensated for referring traffic and business to these companies

Series Podcast: This Way Out
This Way Out: Milk Sets Sail & Locker Room Reality & global LGBTQ news!, Segment 1

Series Podcast: This Way Out

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


TWORadio@aol.com (Overnight Productions, Inc.) Mon, 15 Nov 2021 17:58:39 PST http://www.radio4all.net/index.php/program/110571&133256 no

South Sudan In Focus  - Voice of America
South Sudan in Focus - November 15, 2021

South Sudan In Focus - Voice of America

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 30:00


More than 40,000 residents in South Sudan's Jonglei State capital Bor are now able to get clean water after a water station in the area reopened. The station was closed by flooding two months ago; Civil society and women's rights activists in Sudan are condemning Saturday's attacks on protesters in Khartoum by security forces. At least six people died and more than 29 were injured

From Plum Creek With Love: A Little House on the Prairie Podcast
“One day you're gonna be nice to me. We may both be dead and buried, but you're gonna be nice - at least civil.” The Long Road Home S2 Ep 16

From Plum Creek With Love: A Little House on the Prairie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 42:57


When Charles and Mr. Edwards arrive in Mankato with their fresh crop ready to sell, they are greeted with the news that this is a Bumper crop. Which sounds like great news but sadly, it's not. Unsure how to make ends meet, these two sign up for a freighting job that pays really well but can also be categorized as "high risk". Just how high of a risk? Enough to merit a $5,000 insurance policy paid to the heirs of accident victims. It's not like Charles, Mr.Edwards and another Hired hand named Murphy are left all on their own. There's Henry Hill, a man who has done this work a few times already. And although Henry Hill has plenty of experience with transporting this explosive material, Murphy doesn't feel comfortable working with a man who looks like that (His words, not mine). But, Henry Hill says men like Murphy stopped bothering him the day he was born and reckons it's only a 10 day job and can put up with it for that time. This caravan sets out on a slow trek that involves keeping a close eye for rocks and chuckholes, rising temperatures, down trees and even robbers. Meanwhile, Caroline, Grace Snider Edwards, and all the children are at home waiting for these men to make it back. Will Charles and Mr. Edwards reconsider their lives as famers since it never seems to be working out for them? Will we ever get to meet Henry Hill again? Why is Murphy a jerk even though he might have dealt with prejudices in his own life too?

Brooklyn Magazine: The Podcast
What's next for Maya Wiley?

Brooklyn Magazine: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 46:15


Civil rights attorney Maya Wiley did not win the race for Gracie Mansion. The next mayor will be Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams. But Wiley had a strong showing in her first-ever run for office and enhanced her own profile as a champion for the causes she holds dear, from police reform to affordable housing and beyond. We discuss her mayoral race and what it was like being thrown into the political gauntlet. A former top counsel for Mayor Bill de Blasio, she reflects on the outgoing mayor's legacy and what she hopes an Adams administration might be able to accomplish. And we'll get into what she's thinking about doing next.   Brooklyn news and views you can use: bkmag.com Email: hello@bkmag.com Follow along on Facebook: Brooklyn Magazine Twitter: @brooklynmag Instagram: @brooklynmagazine Follow Brian Braiker on Twitter: @slarkpope

Civil Politics
Civil Politics (11/12/21): News From the COPA Cabana

Civil Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 58:12


Further Reading: COP26: Denmark and Costa Rica launch ambitious alliance to phase out oil and gas - https://bit.ly/3Dcl91jWhat Happened at COP26 on Wednesday: China and U.S. Say They'll ‘Enhance' Climate Ambition - https://nyti.ms/3Dbqrdl‘We've made history': Flint water crisis victims to receive $626m settlement - https://bit.ly/3C8lHE0Owen Paterson: Conservative MP resigns amid UK lobbying scandal - https://bit.ly/3oo8pP6 Beginning Music: Glenn Gould - Goldberg Variation #5Ending Music: Electronic - Getting Away With it (Instrumental)Remember to Register to vote! Mass Residents should go to: https://www.sec.state.ma.us/ele/For more Civil Politics visit our website, civilpoliticsradio.com and follow us on the socials! Facebook.com/civilpoliticsradio @CivilPoliticsFMDon't miss another episode - subscribe to our podcast (iTunes, Google Play, Spotify, and more!)Support Civil Politics by donating to the tip jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/civilpoliticsradioThis podcast is a member of the Planetside Podcast Network. Visit PlanetsidePodcasts.com to find other Planetside Productions!Send us your feedback online: https://pinecast.com/feedback/civilpoliticsradio/2a4e1b36-852c-41a1-b856-46c7a457ed8d

The Be More Today Show
EP 81: "Purpose Driven PT" featuring founder/owner of Civil Physical Therapy Dr. Clifford Civil

The Be More Today Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 60:20


Dr. Clifford Civil was born and raised in Brooklyn, NY. As a young boy growing up in the urban community of Flatbush, Brooklyn, he had a natural attraction to athletics and sports, but enjoyed basketball the most. He played basketball recreationally throughout the years, but played football for a short stint in high school prior to relocating from New York to the metro-Atlanta area of Georgia. Dr. Civil grew up in a loving and nurturing, yet strict, Caribbean household which highly influenced his continuous pursuit of higher learning and a profession in healthcare. In 2010, he earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Exercise Science from Georgia State University in Atlanta, GA. Soon after in 2013, he earned his Doctor of Physical Therapy degree from SUNY Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn, NY. Dr. Civil gels together his affinity for movement and his natural compassion for others in the care of his patients. Dr. Civil has several years of extensive experience treating patients in private clinics with various orthopedic and sports related injuries. In addition, he has years of experience providing physical therapy for patients in their homes. Lastly, Dr. Civil is also experienced with fitness and wellness training dating back to 2010 when he was formally certified as a Health Fitness Specialist by the American College of Sports Medicine. Dr. Civil is the founder and owner of his own firm titled Civil Physical Therapy, which he originally started in 2017, but did not truly break ground until 2020. Civil PT was created with the main objective of providing a healthcare delivery model that's convenient, results-driven, tailor-made, and most-of-all, patient-oriented. In addition to treating patients and managing his company, he enjoys learning new skills, reading, completing D.I.Y. projects, traveling and exploring new places/cultures, and staying active by regularly exercising. Dr. Civil believes in spreading love the Brooklyn way. He takes a sincere interest in others and is passionate about giving back. For more information visit www.civil-pt.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/bemoretoday/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bemoretoday/support

The Carl Nelson Show
Dr. Randall Kennedy, Professor Griff & Attorney A.Dwight Petitt l The Carl Nelson Show

The Carl Nelson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 148:01


Griff will talk about the setup, security, insurance crowd control issues, and more. Before Griff, Civil rights and Criminal Defense attorney A.Dwight Petitt discusses the Kyle Rittenhouse trial. Getting us started Harvard Law Professor Dr. Randall Kennedy talks about his book, Race Crime & the Law. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The News with Shepard Smith
Inflation Surge, Cargo Crisis & Vaccinating Kids

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 49:39


Inflation across a broad swath of products that consumers buy every day was even worse than expected in October, hitting its highest point in more than 30 years, according to the Labor Department. CNBC's Courtney Reagan reports on the surge in prices. Civil rights attorney David Henderson discusses the events today in the murder trial of Kyle Rittenhouse. He is on trial for shooting three people and killing two in Kenosha, Wisconsin, last year. The largest ports in America are still facing a major cargo crisis. Last month, 58 ships were waiting to anchor in San Pedro's Bay, now that number has grown to at least 78. CNBC's Diana Olick reports on the climate summit in Glasgow, Scotland, where record rainfall is damaging some of the country's most famous tourist attractions. About 900,000 kids ages 5 to 11 have received their first dose of Pfizer's Covid-19 vaccine since U.S. regulators cleared the shots last week. The University of Washington's Dr. Vin Gupta reports on the progress.

WallBuilders Live! with David Barton & Rick Green
Civil Stewardship: Duties Vs. Rights - With David Barton

WallBuilders Live! with David Barton & Rick Green

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 27:00


The Lifestyle Investor - investing, passive income, wealth
055: Become a Global Citizen to Grow Your Wealth and Freedom with Andrew Henderson

The Lifestyle Investor - investing, passive income, wealth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 58:58


Today, I'm speaking with Andrew Henderson, the world's most sought-after expert on offshore tax planning, second passports, and global citizenship. As the Founder of Nomad Capitalist, he helps successful entrepreneurs and investors legally reduce their tax bill, create a Plan B, and grow their wealth globally. In this conversation, we talk all about why geography is no longer a limitation for investors who are willing to follow Andrew's advice to “go where you're treated best.” What does that mean exactly? Well, it's not only about reducing your taxes. While that's a part of it, it's also about choosing how you spend your hard-earned money, mitigating risks, and creating a backup plan that gives you and your family peace of mind. It's about diversifying, optimizing, and taking control over all aspects of your life, so you can experience true freedom. Don't worry, we dive deeper into all of this during our conversation. And to be clear, becoming a global citizen doesn't necessarily mean you have to live abroad. While it's certainly an option with many benefits, Andrew's strategies can help you take advantage of all the great things that are happening in the countries around you—regardless of where you decide to live. So, if you want to keep more of your own money, become a citizen of the world, and experience true freedom, don't miss my conversation with Andrew Henderson! Here's just some of the things we get into: Diversify your wealth by “planting flags” in different countries. Go where you're treated best—and it won't always be your home country. The psychological reasons most people are too afraid to move abroad. The goal and desire to have personal freedom and choice. What is Civil asset forfeiture? Why you need a Plan B residency more than ever. The benefits of owning real estate in foreign countries. Some of the best countries for residency and citizenship. Thoughts around cryptocurrency. The EKG Formula—enhance your freedom, keep more of your wealth, and grow what you have Solutions for those who choose to live in their home country. How to get citizenship for different countries. Want the Full Show Notes? To get access to the full show notes, including audio, transcripts, and links to all the resources mentioned, visit JustinDonald.com/55 Get the Lifestyle Investor Book! To get access to The Lifestyle Investor: The 10 Commandments of Cashflow Investing for Passive Income and Financial Freedom visit JustinDonald.com/book Rate & Review If you enjoyed today's episode of The Lifestyle Investor, hit the subscribe button on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Castbox, Google Podcasts, iHeart Radio, or wherever you listen, so future episodes are automatically downloaded directly to your device. You can also help by providing an honest rating & review. Reviews go a long way in helping us build awareness so that we can impact even more people. THANK YOU! Connect with Justin Donald Facebook YouTube Instagram LinkedIn Twitter

America's Heroes Group
Ep. 202 - Navy agrees to reassess 'bad paper' discharges in pending lawsuit settlement PTSD

America's Heroes Group

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 20:50


Rob Howard  - US Navy Veteran and President/CEO of Zodiac Solutions, LLC Douglass L. Applegate, Esq  - Iraq Retired Colonel US Marine Corps and Trial Lawyer specializing in Civil and Criminal Litigation in CONUS, Asia, Middle East, and South America

Democracy Now! Audio
Democracy Now! 2021-11-05 Friday

Democracy Now! Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 59:00


Civil rights attorney Ben Crump on the trial of Kyle Rittenhouse in Wisconsin and the three men being tried in Georgia for killing Ahmaud Arbery; Youth activists take to the streets of Glasgow, outside the COP26 U.N. climate summit, to demand world leaders do more to avert a climate catastrophe. Get Democracy Now! delivered right to your inbox. Sign up for the Daily Digest: democracynow.org/subscribe

Democracy Now! Video
Democracy Now! 2021-11-05 Friday

Democracy Now! Video

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 59:00


Civil rights attorney Ben Crump on the trial of Kyle Rittenhouse in Wisconsin and the three men being tried in Georgia for killing Ahmaud Arbery; Youth activists take to the streets of Glasgow, outside the COP26 U.N. climate summit, to demand world leaders do more to avert a climate catastrophe. Get Democracy Now! delivered right to your inbox. Sign up for the Daily Digest: democracynow.org/subscribe

Democracy Now! Audio
Democracy Now! 2021-11-05 Friday

Democracy Now! Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 59:00


Civil rights attorney Ben Crump on the trial of Kyle Rittenhouse in Wisconsin and the three men being tried in Georgia for killing Ahmaud Arbery; Youth activists take to the streets of Glasgow, outside the COP26 U.N. climate summit, to demand world leaders do more to avert a climate catastrophe. Get Democracy Now! delivered right to your inbox. Sign up for the Daily Digest: democracynow.org/subscribe