Podcasts about North Carolina State University

Public research university in Raleigh, North Carolina, United States

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Latest podcast episodes about North Carolina State University

The Biblical Mind
Revelation 101: Leaving Behind Left Behind (Jason Staples)

The Biblical Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 38:44


"This is a revelation of how things are, not so much how things have been." -Jason Staples Modern Christians reading the Book of Revelation tend to filter it through the lens of popular fiction (such as the Left Behind series) and a very modern concept of its strange language and imagery. From the four horsemen, to the secret thunder in chapter 10, to the mixing of metaphors throughout the text, Revelation presents a challenge for modern readers. In this episode, Dr. Jason Staples (Assistant Teaching Professor at North Carolina State University) helps sort through the symbols in the Book of Revelation. By examining the historical context of late Second Temple Judaism, the genre of apocalypse, and key passages from the Hebrew Bible, the meanings of the symbols begin to emerge. Though many passages remain mysterious, even to trained scholars, the Book of Revelation communicates a message of central importance about the present Kingdom of God and the role of the church in the world. Jason Staples teaches in the areas of biblical literature, early Judaism and Christianity, and modern issues in ethics and religion. He is the author of The Idea of Israel in Second Temple Judaism: A New Theory of People, Exile, and Israelite Identity. In addition to his scholarly work, Jason has worked in sports media and voiceover narration. Show notes: 0:00 Signs and symbols 2:40 Understanding ancient reading norms 6:42 Finding context for Revelation in other literature 8:02 The Jewish experience in the 1st and 2nd centuries 14:16 Defining the apocalypse genre 19:40 Revelation and the Kingdom of God 23:31 Mystery and God's control 26:20 Reading the Hebrew Bible to understand Revelation 32:42 New Heavens and the New Earth Show notes by Micah Long

The Garden Question
076 – Growing & Understanding Grasses & Sedges - Shannon Currey

The Garden Question

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 53:40


Are you ready to try something new? Then grasses and sedges could be your next garden adventure.You will find the opportunities for creating a rich layered interesting garden that serves more than an ornamental function.Developing the whole ecological package. Improving the soil and developing a more aesthetically functionating garden are in your future.We all need better solutions for suppressing weeds and gardening under trees. This is episode 076 – Growing & Understanding Grasses & Sedges - Shannon CurreyShannon is a horticultural educator and consultant with Izel Native Plants.She began her work life as a social scientist and then changed her career pursuit to horticulture at North Carolina State University.Shannon joined Hoffman Nursery, a wholesale grower specializing in grasses, sedges, and other graminoids.She has shared her advanced knowledge of graminoids in articles published nationally.You will often find her speaking across the country to professional organizations, community groups, and at public gardens.Shannon currently serves on the Perennial Plant Association's Board of Directors and is on the North Carolina Plant Conservation Scientific Committee.She was honored in 2020 with the Libby Wilder Award from the North Carolina Nursery & Landscape Association.In 2022 she joined Izel Native Plants to expand their education and outreach efforts.Izel's unique sales model brings native plant wholesale growers' inventories directly to the end consumer.

Ask The Horse
Understanding Equine Insulin Resistance

Ask The Horse

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 59:03


Horses with insulin issues need to be managed carefully to live good-quality lives. Join our host, Shoshana Rudski, as she interviews Dr. Dianne McFarlane, of the University of Florida, and Dr. Vern Dryden, of Bur Oak Veterinary and Podiatry Services. You'll learn about the signs, causes, and treatment of insulin resistance in horses, and science-based steps you can take to combat it.   This podcast is sponsored by Wellness Ready. Dianne McFarlane, DVM, PhD, Dipl. ACVIM, is a professor and chair of the University of Florida's Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, in Gainesville. She has studied equine aging and age-related diseases for more than 20 years. She is most recognized for her work in equine endocrine diseases, including pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction and equine metabolic syndrome. McFarlane received her DVM from the University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine. She then completed a large animal internship at the University of Georgia, followed by a residency in equine internal medicine at North Carolina State University. McFarlane completed her PhD at the Atlantic Veterinary College, on Prince Edward Island, Canada, where she investigated the cause of equine pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction.Vern Dryden, DVM, CJF, APF, owns Bur Oak Sports Medicine and Lameness, in Lexington, Kentucky, and Wellington, Florida, where he focuses on individualized care for his patients. Dryden is also the co-founder and CMO of Wellness Ready, makers of the Wellness Ready Stall Side Insulin Test. After earning degrees from the University of Arizona and Oklahoma State Farrier School, Dryden completed his veterinary studies at Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine. He frequently lectures both nationally and internationally on podiatry care. At home, Dryden breeds and shows American Quarter Horses.

I AM BIO
Data Storage Crisis: DNA to the Rescue

I AM BIO

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 25:10 Very Popular


You might be surprised to learn that data storage currently requires huge amounts of land and energy, and we're running out of both. In this episode, we speak with a small group of researchers who are working to revolutionize the way we store the massive amounts of data we produce every day. Their solution: use DNA.Speakers:Emily Leproust, Twist BioscienceJeff Nivala, University of WashingtonKyle Tomek, DNAli Technologies

GES Center Lectures, NC State University
#4 – Joe Herkert - Lessons from Engineering Ethics for GES

GES Center Lectures, NC State University

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022


Lessons from Engineering Ethics for Genetic Engineering and Society Joe Herkert, D.Sc., Associate Professor Emeritus of Science, Technology and Society, NC State Abstract There is a long tradition of ethics in engineering practice with the first engineering codes of ethics appearing early in the 20th century, but as an academic sub-field engineering ethics only began to emerge in the 1970s. In most treatments, engineering ethics is grounded in the concept of engineering as a profession. Following a brief introduction of engineering ethics and professionalism, this presentation will focus on some key concepts of engineering ethics scholarship and teaching that might be useful in thinking about ethics in the context of genetic engineering and society. Among these are codes of professional ethics; the use of case studies; microethics and macroethics; engineering as social experimentation; and ethics as design. LINK TO POWERPOINT SLIDES Speaker Bio Joseph “Joe” Herkert, D.Sc., is Associate Professor Emeritus of Science, Technology and Society, North Carolina State University. He has also been a Visiting Scholar at NC State's Genetic Engineering and Society Center and was a Co-PI on the NSF Grant “Comparing Cultures of Responsible Innovation across Bioengineering Communities.” Herkert has been teaching engineering ethics and science, technology & society courses for more than thirty-five years. He is editor of Social, Ethical and Policy Implications of Engineering: Selected Readings (Wiley/IEEE Press, 2000) and co-editor of The Growing Gap Between Emerging Technologies and Legal-Ethical Oversight: The Pacing Problem (Springer, 2011), and has published numerous articles on engineering ethics and societal implications of technology in engineering, law, social science, and applied ethics journals and books. [Read more] GES Colloquium is jointly taught by Drs. Jen Baltzegar and Dawn Rodriguez-Ward, who you may contact with any class-specific questions. Please subscribe to the GES newsletter and Twitter for updates . Genetic Engineering and Society Center GES Colloquium - Tuesdays 12-1PM (via Zoom) NC State University | http://go.ncsu.edu/ges-colloquium GES Mediasite - See videos, full abstracts, speaker bios, and slides https://go.ncsu.edu/ges-mediasite Twitter - https://twitter.com/GESCenterNCSU GES Center - Integrating scientific knowledge & diverse public values in shaping the futures of biotechnology. Find out more at https://ges-center-lectures-ncsu.pinecast.co

Tuffy Talk
NC STATE VS. TEXAS TECH RECAP/DISCUSSION, The Tuffy Talk Live Show, 9/19/2022

Tuffy Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 73:45


Join us as we break down and discuss our thoughts on the NC State/Texas Tech game, along with how NC State can build off of this for the rest of this season.Please also go check out our sponsor Darby Electric,Website: www.darbyelectricllc.comPhone Number: 919-339-0062Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DarbyElectricLLCInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/darby_electric_llc/Please give this podcast a 5 Star Rating if you enjoyed the episode and want more of our weekly episodes!Don't forget to follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @TuffyTalkNow Enjoy!Run The Replay PodcastThe #1 source for NBA Top Shot & NFL All Day strategy, analysis, and news.Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifySupport the show

AgroDepende
156º AD - Critérios para definição de adubação

AgroDepende

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 75:30


Agro Depende 156 | Critérios para definição de adubação A realização de correção de ph e fertilidade de solo, continua sendo um dos principais gargalos que possuímos para atingir maiores produções, sendo algo ainda muito discutido e com grandes dúvidas. Buscando auxiliar na diagnose e na tomada de decisão de como fazer, se é necessário ou não, tanto a correção da acidez do solo como também a fertilidade, convidamos o Professor  e Pesquisador Dr. Luciano Gatiboni, que atua no sul dos EUA, como professor convidado na Universidade Estadual da Carolina do Norte e que possui vasto conhecimento sobre a fertilidade e manejo dos solos Brasileiro, sendo um dos membros da Comissão de atualização do manual de adubação e calagem do Rio Grande do Sul e Santa Catarina. Por isso, nesse episódio você vai entender:  - A importância de uma correta amostragem de solo; -  Nível Critico dos nutrientes do solo para as culturas; - A necessidade da diagnose para tomada de decisão: - Como ter a melhor eficiência na tomada de decisão de adubação e correção.   Host:   Cassiano Decker @cassianocsd             Eduardo Sebastiany @eduardo_sebastiany    Convidado:  Luke nasceu e foi criado em uma família de agricultores do sul do Brasil. Seguindo sua paixão pela agricultura, Luke obteve um Bacharelado em Agronomia, Mestre em Agronomia e Doutor em Ciências do Solo. Atuou como professor de Fertilidade do Solo na Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina, Brasil, por 15 anos. Trabalhou com calibração de testes de solo e recomendações de fertilizantes no sul do Brasil. Aconselhou mais de 30 estudantes de mestrado e doutorado e publicou mais de 130 artigos em periódicos revisados ​​por pares. Em 2019, Luke ingressou no Departamento de Culturas e Ciências do Solo da North Carolina State University como Professor Assistente e Especialista em Fertilidade do Solo e Gerenciamento de Nutrientes. Sua nomeação é de 50% de extensão, 30% de pesquisa e 20% de ensino. Sua paixão pela agricultura e pela fertilidade do solo está sempre crescendo.   Links do Convidado:    Instagram: @lgatiboni Twitter:@LGatiboni https://www.linkedin.com/in/luke-gatiboni-109a4b67/ https://gatiboni.wordpress.ncsu.edu/    Para contribuir com o podcast Agro Depende, indique esse podcast para um amigo que precisa saber mais sobre o Agro. 

New Books in Music
Emily Bingham, "My Old Kentucky Home: The Astonishing Life and Reckoning of an Iconic American Song" (Knopf, 2022)

New Books in Music

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 59:34


Any song as old and as familiar as “My Old Kentucky Home” is bound to have accrued many different meanings and an interesting history. Emily Bingham's book, My Old Kentucky Home: The Astonishing Life and Reckoning of an Iconic American Song (Knopf, 2022) delivers on the promise of its title. In this book Bingham uses the reception of “My Old Kentucky Home,” composed in 1853 by Stephen Foster, to consider how white Americans have constructed a story about the United States that washes away racism and silences the pain of enslavement and racialized violence. Bingham traces the journey of “My Old Kentucky Home” from a popular minstrel song written by an alcoholic Northerner to Lost Cause anthem to American patriotic hymn to a symbol of a reckoning over United States history that is still unfinished. She explains how Black Americans' responses to “My Old Kentucky Home” illuminates the challenges and contradictions of living within a racist system while also protesting it. Bingham also reveals the lengths to which some people will go in order to maintain an inauthentic history that conforms to a comforting national and even personal self-image. Kristen M. Turner is a lecturer in the music and honors departments at North Carolina State University. Her research centers on race and class in American popular entertainment at the turn of the twentieth century. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/music

New Books Network
Emily Bingham, "My Old Kentucky Home: The Astonishing Life and Reckoning of an Iconic American Song" (Knopf, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 59:34


Any song as old and as familiar as “My Old Kentucky Home” is bound to have accrued many different meanings and an interesting history. Emily Bingham's book, My Old Kentucky Home: The Astonishing Life and Reckoning of an Iconic American Song (Knopf, 2022) delivers on the promise of its title. In this book Bingham uses the reception of “My Old Kentucky Home,” composed in 1853 by Stephen Foster, to consider how white Americans have constructed a story about the United States that washes away racism and silences the pain of enslavement and racialized violence. Bingham traces the journey of “My Old Kentucky Home” from a popular minstrel song written by an alcoholic Northerner to Lost Cause anthem to American patriotic hymn to a symbol of a reckoning over United States history that is still unfinished. She explains how Black Americans' responses to “My Old Kentucky Home” illuminates the challenges and contradictions of living within a racist system while also protesting it. Bingham also reveals the lengths to which some people will go in order to maintain an inauthentic history that conforms to a comforting national and even personal self-image. Kristen M. Turner is a lecturer in the music and honors departments at North Carolina State University. Her research centers on race and class in American popular entertainment at the turn of the twentieth century. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Popular Culture
Emily Bingham, "My Old Kentucky Home: The Astonishing Life and Reckoning of an Iconic American Song" (Knopf, 2022)

New Books in Popular Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 59:34


Any song as old and as familiar as “My Old Kentucky Home” is bound to have accrued many different meanings and an interesting history. Emily Bingham's book, My Old Kentucky Home: The Astonishing Life and Reckoning of an Iconic American Song (Knopf, 2022) delivers on the promise of its title. In this book Bingham uses the reception of “My Old Kentucky Home,” composed in 1853 by Stephen Foster, to consider how white Americans have constructed a story about the United States that washes away racism and silences the pain of enslavement and racialized violence. Bingham traces the journey of “My Old Kentucky Home” from a popular minstrel song written by an alcoholic Northerner to Lost Cause anthem to American patriotic hymn to a symbol of a reckoning over United States history that is still unfinished. She explains how Black Americans' responses to “My Old Kentucky Home” illuminates the challenges and contradictions of living within a racist system while also protesting it. Bingham also reveals the lengths to which some people will go in order to maintain an inauthentic history that conforms to a comforting national and even personal self-image. Kristen M. Turner is a lecturer in the music and honors departments at North Carolina State University. Her research centers on race and class in American popular entertainment at the turn of the twentieth century. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/popular-culture

New Books in American Studies
Emily Bingham, "My Old Kentucky Home: The Astonishing Life and Reckoning of an Iconic American Song" (Knopf, 2022)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 59:34


Any song as old and as familiar as “My Old Kentucky Home” is bound to have accrued many different meanings and an interesting history. Emily Bingham's book, My Old Kentucky Home: The Astonishing Life and Reckoning of an Iconic American Song (Knopf, 2022) delivers on the promise of its title. In this book Bingham uses the reception of “My Old Kentucky Home,” composed in 1853 by Stephen Foster, to consider how white Americans have constructed a story about the United States that washes away racism and silences the pain of enslavement and racialized violence. Bingham traces the journey of “My Old Kentucky Home” from a popular minstrel song written by an alcoholic Northerner to Lost Cause anthem to American patriotic hymn to a symbol of a reckoning over United States history that is still unfinished. She explains how Black Americans' responses to “My Old Kentucky Home” illuminates the challenges and contradictions of living within a racist system while also protesting it. Bingham also reveals the lengths to which some people will go in order to maintain an inauthentic history that conforms to a comforting national and even personal self-image. Kristen M. Turner is a lecturer in the music and honors departments at North Carolina State University. Her research centers on race and class in American popular entertainment at the turn of the twentieth century. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in History
Emily Bingham, "My Old Kentucky Home: The Astonishing Life and Reckoning of an Iconic American Song" (Knopf, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 59:34


Any song as old and as familiar as “My Old Kentucky Home” is bound to have accrued many different meanings and an interesting history. Emily Bingham's book, My Old Kentucky Home: The Astonishing Life and Reckoning of an Iconic American Song (Knopf, 2022) delivers on the promise of its title. In this book Bingham uses the reception of “My Old Kentucky Home,” composed in 1853 by Stephen Foster, to consider how white Americans have constructed a story about the United States that washes away racism and silences the pain of enslavement and racialized violence. Bingham traces the journey of “My Old Kentucky Home” from a popular minstrel song written by an alcoholic Northerner to Lost Cause anthem to American patriotic hymn to a symbol of a reckoning over United States history that is still unfinished. She explains how Black Americans' responses to “My Old Kentucky Home” illuminates the challenges and contradictions of living within a racist system while also protesting it. Bingham also reveals the lengths to which some people will go in order to maintain an inauthentic history that conforms to a comforting national and even personal self-image. Kristen M. Turner is a lecturer in the music and honors departments at North Carolina State University. Her research centers on race and class in American popular entertainment at the turn of the twentieth century. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in the American South
Emily Bingham, "My Old Kentucky Home: The Astonishing Life and Reckoning of an Iconic American Song" (Knopf, 2022)

New Books in the American South

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 59:34


Any song as old and as familiar as “My Old Kentucky Home” is bound to have accrued many different meanings and an interesting history. Emily Bingham's book, My Old Kentucky Home: The Astonishing Life and Reckoning of an Iconic American Song (Knopf, 2022) delivers on the promise of its title. In this book Bingham uses the reception of “My Old Kentucky Home,” composed in 1853 by Stephen Foster, to consider how white Americans have constructed a story about the United States that washes away racism and silences the pain of enslavement and racialized violence. Bingham traces the journey of “My Old Kentucky Home” from a popular minstrel song written by an alcoholic Northerner to Lost Cause anthem to American patriotic hymn to a symbol of a reckoning over United States history that is still unfinished. She explains how Black Americans' responses to “My Old Kentucky Home” illuminates the challenges and contradictions of living within a racist system while also protesting it. Bingham also reveals the lengths to which some people will go in order to maintain an inauthentic history that conforms to a comforting national and even personal self-image. Kristen M. Turner is a lecturer in the music and honors departments at North Carolina State University. Her research centers on race and class in American popular entertainment at the turn of the twentieth century. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-south

Weekly Space Hangout
Weekly Space Hangout — September 14, 2022: The Geology of Exoplanets with Dr. Paul Byrne

Weekly Space Hangout

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 62:52 Very Popular


The first suspected exoplanet was identified back in 1988, and was then confirmed in 1992. Since then, the rate at which detection/confirmations have been made has been increasing. And JWST has already directly imaged its first exoplanet! What data are we able to gather from here on Earth? What are we able to learn about these planets from the data collected? How does exoplanet geology compare with our own geology here on Earth? Let's find out as we welcome planetary geologist Dr. Paul Byrne, to the WSH. Paul Byrne received his B.A. in geology, and Ph.D. in planetary geology, from Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. He was a MESSENGER postdoctoral fellow at the Earth and Planets Laboratory of the Carnegie Institution for Science in Washington, DC, and an LPI postdoctoral fellow at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, Texas. He is an Associate Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis; before coming to WashU, he was an assistant and then associate professor at North Carolina State University. Paul's research focuses on comparative planetary geology—comparing and contrasting the surfaces and interiors of planetary bodies, including Earth, to understand geological phenomena at the systems level. Byrne's research projects span the solar system from Mercury to Pluto and, increasingly, to the study of extrasolar planets. He uses remotely sensed data, numerical and physical models, and fieldwork in analogue settings on Earth to understand why planets look the way they do.  Be sure to follow Paul on Twitter! **************************************** The Weekly Space Hangout is a production of CosmoQuest. Want to support CosmoQuest? Here are some specific ways you can help: Subscribe FREE to our YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/c/cosmoquest Subscribe to our podcasts Astronomy Cast and Daily Space where ever you get your podcasts! Watch our streams over on Twitch at https://www.twitch.tv/cosmoquestx – follow and subscribe! Become a Patreon of CosmoQuest https://www.patreon.com/cosmoquestx Become a Patreon of Astronomy Cast https://www.patreon.com/astronomycast Buy stuff from our Redbubble https://www.redbubble.com/people/cosmoquestx Join our Discord server for CosmoQuest - https://discord.gg/X8rw4vv Join the Weekly Space Hangout Crew! - http://www.wshcrew.space/ Don't forget to like and subscribe! Plus we love being shared out to new people, so tweet, comment, review us... all the free things you can do to help bring science into people's lives.  

Movers Mindset
Adam Dipert: Space juggling, physics, and changing your perspective

Movers Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 86:30


Adam Dipert is a Postdoctoral Research Scholar in Physics at North Carolina State University and has wowed audiences as a professional circus performer for nearly twenty years. He started studying human movement in weightlessness in preparation for his first parabolic flight in 2016, and since then he has logged countless hours exploring the frontiers of microgravity flow in pools, aerial harnesses, flotation tanks, wind tunnels, and airplanes. In addition to developing a new suite of dance moves for outer space, he has exercised remarkable restraint not asking NASA for permission to spin fire on the ISS. And you've become only eyes, because you now no longer have a way of sensing where your body is. And not only do you only become eyes, but you're also experiencing tunnel vision. And so when you enter weightlessness, and start to develop the skills which will be necessary to become a competent movement artist in that environment, you have to first figure out how to re inhabit your body and how to come back from just being eyes and realize that you have a head and find out where your arms are, and have some idea about where your arm is, say when it's behind your back because, you know, right now on Earth, probably everybody listening to this is on earth, waving your arm. Yeah, you put your arm behind your back and and what is it that tells you where your arm is? It's the tension in your shoulder, right? It's the torque in your arm, elbow. It's it's a lot of things that are all gravitationally oriented. And so you have to come with a totally new set of skills.~ Adam Dipert This episode is far out, and far ranging. Adam and I managed to coordinate a recording session with little advanced notice… and then we proceeded to go wide and deep on circus stuff, juggling, physics, mathematics, and movement in weightlessness. Finally, since I clearly cannot cram the visuals into the audio, you simply must float over to Adam's web site: TheSpaceJuggler.com Transcript for Adam Dipert: Space juggling, physics, and changing your perspective. -- Want to support Movers Mindset? Hi, Craig here :) Through a combination of hard work and luck I've gotten inside access to the brilliant minds and lives of people all over the world. Since 2015 I've tried to show respect and humility by giving back and sharing conversations through the Movers Mindset project. I've already been able to talk with over one hundred people, and have shared those conversations with thousands. I have a lot more work to do, but I need help. Like, share, rate, comment and tell your friends because that's priceless! The podcast has always been completely free to listen—please help me keep it that way by helping me cover the costs. I greatly appreciate your contributions through Patreon: https://patreon.com/moversmindset My personal mission is creating better conversations to spread understanding and compassion. And Movers Mindset is one of the things I do in service of my mission. Drop by https://constantine.name/ for my weekly email, my other podcasts, writing and more. Cheers!

The Good Dog Pod
Breed Differences in Pain Sensitivity

The Good Dog Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 26:58 Very Popular


We're joined by Rachel Caddiell, who is currently pursuing her PhD at North Carolina State University. Dr. Mikel Delgado interviews Rachel about her current research, all about whether there are any breed differences in sensitivity to pain, as well as the perception and education related to pain reception in veterinary medicine. Research has shown that both the general public and veterinarians have perceptions of pain sensitivity that are based on breed. Rachel's research is focusing in on determining whether there really are breed differences in pain sensitivity in addition to exploring when and how veterinary students adopt these perceptions of pain sensitivity. For more information on NC State's research (and participation opportunities) visit https://comparativebehavioralresearch.wordpress.ncsu.edu/ (this website). Listeners of The Good Dog Pod get 15% off the Good Dog merch store with the code GDP15. Go to https://shop.gooddog.com/ (shop.gooddog.com) to redeem this exclusive discount!

NHC Podcasts
Timothy L. Stinson, “The Evolution of Medieval Vengeance Narratives”

NHC Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 20:08


In 70 CE, the destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans led early Christians to claim that this event was an example of divine retribution for the death of Jesus. Narratives promoting this cause-and-effect story of vengeance circulated widely throughout Europe in the medieval period, with frequent alterations designed to appeal to local constituencies and to advance particular political and religious agendas. In this podcast, Timothy L. Stinson(NHC Fellow, 2021–22), associate professor of English at North Carolina State University, explores the way that these “vengeance narratives” were both perennial and adaptable. Although the medieval versions of these stories encouraged anti-Judaic bias and persecution, the template of such narratives persisted throughout later ages even while featuring different groups. By understanding how these stories were continuously transformed over time, we can develop a better sense of the way that they helped to shape religious and national forms of identity across Europe.

No-Till Farmer Podcast
How Much No-Till Is Worth, According To Rod Rejesus

No-Till Farmer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 38:57


For this episode of the No-Till Farmer podcast, brought to you by SOURCE by Sound Agriculture, we're joined by Rod Rejesus, who studies economics, land values and crop insurance for North Carolina State University. He and collaborators from other academic institutions authored and published a paper earlier this year showing increased land values corresponding with a 1% increase in no-till adoption at the county level.

IMPACT Podcast
IMPACT Podcast - Bill Nussey

IMPACT Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 52:26


Are you worried about our global hunger for energy?  Do you wonder if solar is a practical solution and will it develop quick enough for our exponential demands?   In his new book, Freeing Energy our guest today excites you about our furture, We are so happy to talk with Career Tech CEO, Clean Energy Distruptor and Author - Bill Nussey !   If you like what we are doing please like, share and subscribe to IMPACT   This episode is sponsored by: Hollyhock -  dedicated to helping create a better future via education and personal sharing.  www.hollyhock.ca     BIO:  Bill Nussey is a career tech CEO with three successful exits, including an IPO.  He has also been an investor with the venture capital firm Greylock. After IBM acquired his marketing tech company Silverpop in 2014, he was promoted to IBM's VP of Corporate Strategy, helping the CEO and SVPs set the company's overall strategy. As a CEO, his companies have raised more than $400 million, created thousands of jobs and billions in shareholder value.   In 2016, he left IBM to create the Freeing Energy Project. It began with his 2017 Ted talk then grew into 100+ articles and, most recently, the #1 ranked renewable energy podcast, The Freeing Energy podcast. On December 7 2021, all this came together in a book called Freeing Energy: How Innovators Are Using Local-scale Solar and Batteries To Disrupt the Global Energy Industry From the Outside In . It is the result of 320 interviews across several continents.   Bill received a degree in electrical engineering from North Carolina State University and an MBA from Harvard Business School.   CONNECT WITH BILL Email: Bill.Nussey@FreeingEnergy.com Web: FreeingEnergy.com Tel: 770-415-2093 Linkedin - in/BillNussey Twitter @FreeingEnergy FB /FreeingEnergy Insta @FreeingEnergy Ask for General Media Kit   #billnussey @FreeingEnergy #solarroof #solarenergy #Climatechange #Trillioin$business #Glogalenergy #disrupter #disruptenergy #localenergyrevolution #aeeworld #localenergy #solar #panels #solarinnovation #sunpower #venturecapital #cityofatlanta #renewableenergy  

Deep Dish Conversations
DDC S2: Will Acuff, Co- founder of Corner to Corner

Deep Dish Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 58:00


Will was born in Durham, NC, but grew up in Hudson, MA .He graduated from North Carolina State University and has his master's degree from Reformed Theological Seminary. He has been married to Corner to Corner's co-founder, Tiffany, for over 16 years, and they have two wonderful children, Raylan and Penelope. Will is passionate about the Grace of God through Christ, and how that grace invites us to live a life of sacrificial love toward our city and our neighbors. At Corner to Corner that love of neighbor takes the form of educational and economic equity, creating a city where all can thrive. Support DDC's educational and community impact by becoming a supporter: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=D9ZS6PAJHVJLC Website: https://www.deepdishconversations.com/ Follow on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/deepdishconvos Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/deepdishconvos/ Subscribe Via YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JeromeMooreCommunityChangers Original Release Date: 09/23/2021

Modern CTO with Joel Beasley
How A Liquid Metal Could Transform Soft Electronics with Michael Dickey, professor at North Carolina State University

Modern CTO with Joel Beasley

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 27:49


Today we're talking to Michael Dickey, professor at North Carolina State University; and we discuss the properties of the liquid metal element known as gallium; where gallium is being used in the marketplace; and how it could revolutionize efforts to reduce carbon dioxide in our atmosphere. All of this right here, right now, on the Modern CTO Podcast!

New Books Network
Mark Clague, "O Say Can You Hear?: A Cultural Biography of the Star-Spangled Banner" (Norton, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 63:00


The national anthem of the United States is familiar around the world from Olympic medal ceremonies and American patriotic celebrations. Like anything that is over 200 years old, the meaning of The Star-Spangled Banner has changed over time and the song has been the focus of controversy at different times in its history. What many people think they know about the anthem is as much myth and legend as it is fact.  Mark Clague explores many aspects of the song in his book, O Say Can you Hear? : A Cultural Biography of The Star-Spangled Banner (Norton, 2022). Francis Scott Key wrote the lyric to what would become the American national anthem around the time of a battle he witnessed during the War of 1812 between the United States and Britain. As was the custom at the time, he intended for the words to be sung to a pre-existent tune that potential performers would have known. By the time Congress officially named the song the US's anthem in 1931, it was merely ratifying what had already become a cultural tradition. The Star Spangled Banner has its detractors: the melody is difficult to sing, the words are hard to remember and militaristic. Francis Scott Key was a slaveholder and the word “slave” appears in the third verse. Clague takes on this seemingly straightforward history and more recent controversy by busting myths about the anthem, delving deep into the history of the song from its composition until the present, and highlighting some key performances that have helped to shape Americans' understanding of their country and themselves. The book is just one aspect of a larger public humanities project.  The website for the Star Spangled Music Foundation contains even more information on the anthem and its history including content suitable for educators working from Kindergarten to the college level and continues to be updated. Kristen M. Turner is a lecturer in the music and honors departments at North Carolina State University. Her research centers on race and class in American popular entertainment at the turn of the twentieth century. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in American Politics
Mark Clague, "O Say Can You Hear?: A Cultural Biography of the Star-Spangled Banner" (Norton, 2022)

New Books in American Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 63:00


The national anthem of the United States is familiar around the world from Olympic medal ceremonies and American patriotic celebrations. Like anything that is over 200 years old, the meaning of The Star-Spangled Banner has changed over time and the song has been the focus of controversy at different times in its history. What many people think they know about the anthem is as much myth and legend as it is fact.  Mark Clague explores many aspects of the song in his book, O Say Can you Hear? : A Cultural Biography of The Star-Spangled Banner (Norton, 2022). Francis Scott Key wrote the lyric to what would become the American national anthem around the time of a battle he witnessed during the War of 1812 between the United States and Britain. As was the custom at the time, he intended for the words to be sung to a pre-existent tune that potential performers would have known. By the time Congress officially named the song the US's anthem in 1931, it was merely ratifying what had already become a cultural tradition. The Star Spangled Banner has its detractors: the melody is difficult to sing, the words are hard to remember and militaristic. Francis Scott Key was a slaveholder and the word “slave” appears in the third verse. Clague takes on this seemingly straightforward history and more recent controversy by busting myths about the anthem, delving deep into the history of the song from its composition until the present, and highlighting some key performances that have helped to shape Americans' understanding of their country and themselves. The book is just one aspect of a larger public humanities project.  The website for the Star Spangled Music Foundation contains even more information on the anthem and its history including content suitable for educators working from Kindergarten to the college level and continues to be updated. Kristen M. Turner is a lecturer in the music and honors departments at North Carolina State University. Her research centers on race and class in American popular entertainment at the turn of the twentieth century. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in History
Mark Clague, "O Say Can You Hear?: A Cultural Biography of the Star-Spangled Banner" (Norton, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 63:00


The national anthem of the United States is familiar around the world from Olympic medal ceremonies and American patriotic celebrations. Like anything that is over 200 years old, the meaning of The Star-Spangled Banner has changed over time and the song has been the focus of controversy at different times in its history. What many people think they know about the anthem is as much myth and legend as it is fact.  Mark Clague explores many aspects of the song in his book, O Say Can you Hear? : A Cultural Biography of The Star-Spangled Banner (Norton, 2022). Francis Scott Key wrote the lyric to what would become the American national anthem around the time of a battle he witnessed during the War of 1812 between the United States and Britain. As was the custom at the time, he intended for the words to be sung to a pre-existent tune that potential performers would have known. By the time Congress officially named the song the US's anthem in 1931, it was merely ratifying what had already become a cultural tradition. The Star Spangled Banner has its detractors: the melody is difficult to sing, the words are hard to remember and militaristic. Francis Scott Key was a slaveholder and the word “slave” appears in the third verse. Clague takes on this seemingly straightforward history and more recent controversy by busting myths about the anthem, delving deep into the history of the song from its composition until the present, and highlighting some key performances that have helped to shape Americans' understanding of their country and themselves. The book is just one aspect of a larger public humanities project.  The website for the Star Spangled Music Foundation contains even more information on the anthem and its history including content suitable for educators working from Kindergarten to the college level and continues to be updated. Kristen M. Turner is a lecturer in the music and honors departments at North Carolina State University. Her research centers on race and class in American popular entertainment at the turn of the twentieth century. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Popular Culture
Mark Clague, "O Say Can You Hear?: A Cultural Biography of the Star-Spangled Banner" (Norton, 2022)

New Books in Popular Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 63:00


The national anthem of the United States is familiar around the world from Olympic medal ceremonies and American patriotic celebrations. Like anything that is over 200 years old, the meaning of The Star-Spangled Banner has changed over time and the song has been the focus of controversy at different times in its history. What many people think they know about the anthem is as much myth and legend as it is fact.  Mark Clague explores many aspects of the song in his book, O Say Can you Hear? : A Cultural Biography of The Star-Spangled Banner (Norton, 2022). Francis Scott Key wrote the lyric to what would become the American national anthem around the time of a battle he witnessed during the War of 1812 between the United States and Britain. As was the custom at the time, he intended for the words to be sung to a pre-existent tune that potential performers would have known. By the time Congress officially named the song the US's anthem in 1931, it was merely ratifying what had already become a cultural tradition. The Star Spangled Banner has its detractors: the melody is difficult to sing, the words are hard to remember and militaristic. Francis Scott Key was a slaveholder and the word “slave” appears in the third verse. Clague takes on this seemingly straightforward history and more recent controversy by busting myths about the anthem, delving deep into the history of the song from its composition until the present, and highlighting some key performances that have helped to shape Americans' understanding of their country and themselves. The book is just one aspect of a larger public humanities project.  The website for the Star Spangled Music Foundation contains even more information on the anthem and its history including content suitable for educators working from Kindergarten to the college level and continues to be updated. Kristen M. Turner is a lecturer in the music and honors departments at North Carolina State University. Her research centers on race and class in American popular entertainment at the turn of the twentieth century. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/popular-culture

Environmental Professionals Radio (EPR)
Hydrology, the Lumbee Tribe, and Kombucha with Dr. Ryan Emanuel

Environmental Professionals Radio (EPR)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 41:46


Welcome back to Environmental Professionals Radio, Connecting the Environmental Professionals Community Through Conversation, with your hosts Laura Thorne and Nic Frederick! On today's episode, we talk with Dr. Ryan Emanuel,  about Hydrology, the Lumbee Tribe and Kombucha. Ryan is an associate professor in the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University and was formerly a professor in the College of Natural Resources at North Carolina State University.  He is a hydrologist who also studies environmental justice and Indigenous rights in North Carolina.  Emanuel is an enrolled member of the Lumbee Tribe. Help us continue to create great content! If you'd like to sponsor a future episode hit the support podcast button or visit www.environmentalprofessionalsradio.com/sponsor-form Showtimes: 1:54 Nic & Laura talk about integrating a planner8:17  Interview with Dr. Ryan Emanuel Starts11:25  Hydrology16:57 The Lumbee Tribe27:56  KombuchaPlease be sure to ✔️subscribe, ⭐rate and ✍review. This podcast is produced by the National Association of Environmental Professions (NAEP). Check out all the NAEP has to offer at NAEP.org.Connect with Dr. Ryan Emanuel at https://www.linkedin.com/in/ryan-emanuel-49957510/Music CreditsIntro: Givin Me Eyes by Grace MesaOutro: Never Ending Soul Groove by Mattijs MullerSupport the show

New Books in American Studies
Mark Clague, "O Say Can You Hear?: A Cultural Biography of the Star-Spangled Banner" (Norton, 2022)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 63:00


The national anthem of the United States is familiar around the world from Olympic medal ceremonies and American patriotic celebrations. Like anything that is over 200 years old, the meaning of The Star-Spangled Banner has changed over time and the song has been the focus of controversy at different times in its history. What many people think they know about the anthem is as much myth and legend as it is fact.  Mark Clague explores many aspects of the song in his book, O Say Can you Hear? : A Cultural Biography of The Star-Spangled Banner (Norton, 2022). Francis Scott Key wrote the lyric to what would become the American national anthem around the time of a battle he witnessed during the War of 1812 between the United States and Britain. As was the custom at the time, he intended for the words to be sung to a pre-existent tune that potential performers would have known. By the time Congress officially named the song the US's anthem in 1931, it was merely ratifying what had already become a cultural tradition. The Star Spangled Banner has its detractors: the melody is difficult to sing, the words are hard to remember and militaristic. Francis Scott Key was a slaveholder and the word “slave” appears in the third verse. Clague takes on this seemingly straightforward history and more recent controversy by busting myths about the anthem, delving deep into the history of the song from its composition until the present, and highlighting some key performances that have helped to shape Americans' understanding of their country and themselves. The book is just one aspect of a larger public humanities project.  The website for the Star Spangled Music Foundation contains even more information on the anthem and its history including content suitable for educators working from Kindergarten to the college level and continues to be updated. Kristen M. Turner is a lecturer in the music and honors departments at North Carolina State University. Her research centers on race and class in American popular entertainment at the turn of the twentieth century. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in Music
Mark Clague, "O Say Can You Hear?: A Cultural Biography of the Star-Spangled Banner" (Norton, 2022)

New Books in Music

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 63:00


The national anthem of the United States is familiar around the world from Olympic medal ceremonies and American patriotic celebrations. Like anything that is over 200 years old, the meaning of The Star-Spangled Banner has changed over time and the song has been the focus of controversy at different times in its history. What many people think they know about the anthem is as much myth and legend as it is fact.  Mark Clague explores many aspects of the song in his book, O Say Can you Hear? : A Cultural Biography of The Star-Spangled Banner (Norton, 2022). Francis Scott Key wrote the lyric to what would become the American national anthem around the time of a battle he witnessed during the War of 1812 between the United States and Britain. As was the custom at the time, he intended for the words to be sung to a pre-existent tune that potential performers would have known. By the time Congress officially named the song the US's anthem in 1931, it was merely ratifying what had already become a cultural tradition. The Star Spangled Banner has its detractors: the melody is difficult to sing, the words are hard to remember and militaristic. Francis Scott Key was a slaveholder and the word “slave” appears in the third verse. Clague takes on this seemingly straightforward history and more recent controversy by busting myths about the anthem, delving deep into the history of the song from its composition until the present, and highlighting some key performances that have helped to shape Americans' understanding of their country and themselves. The book is just one aspect of a larger public humanities project.  The website for the Star Spangled Music Foundation contains even more information on the anthem and its history including content suitable for educators working from Kindergarten to the college level and continues to be updated. Kristen M. Turner is a lecturer in the music and honors departments at North Carolina State University. Her research centers on race and class in American popular entertainment at the turn of the twentieth century. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/music

The Cone of Shame Veterinary Podcast
COS - 157 - Pulmonic Stenosis In The Bulldog (HDYTT)

The Cone of Shame Veterinary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 25:18


Veterinary cardiologist Dr. Anna Mac joins us to discuss the case of Baguette, a 2 year-old english bulldog with brachycephalic airway disease and pulmonic stenosis. Dr. Mac covers the diagnostic workup, treatment options and likely outcomes. This is a common condition in a common breed... and you won't want to miss this episode! LINKS: Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine: https://vet.purdue.edu/ Dr. Andy Roark Exam Room Communication Tool Box Course: https://drandyroark.com/on-demand-staff-training/ What's on my Scrubs?! Card Game: https://drandyroark.com/training-tools/ Dr. Andy Roark Swag: drandyroark.com/shop All Links: linktr.ee/DrAndyRoark ABOUT OUR GUEST: Dr. McManamey (aka Dr. Mac) is a veterinary cardiologist. She received her degree of veterinary medicine from the University of Missouri. She then completed a rotating internship at the Ohio State University followed by an emergency and critical care internship at North Carolina State University. She finished her cardiology residency at North Carolina State University and became an ACVIM diplomate in 2021. Dr. Mac is currently an assistant clinical professor at Purdue University in Indiana. Cardiology is her favorite subject because it can be made as simple or as complex as needed. Furthermore, every animal has a heart and that means Dr. Mac gets to work with all kinds of species. Her areas of interest within cardiology are echocardiogram, congenital heart disease and interventional procedures, as well as emergency management of cardiac disease. She has a very supportive and patient husband along with three canine fur-children, one of which had a patent ductus arteriosus (of course).

Guys Who Do Stuff
Mike Jones - Photographer for NC State Football, Clients, and now...

Guys Who Do Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 31:58


Stuff In This Episode:  We talk with former Director of Creative Media for Football at North Carolina State University, Mike Jones, about what's next in his career and how he got to this point. Mike shares how it has been a life-long dream to work for the Charlotte Hornets, and the dream started as a player, then after he obtained a B.S. in Sport Management with a minor in Coaching from Liberty University in May 2018, it changed to being an agent. Shortly after that, he got experience with his first camera and fell in love with Photography.  Mike sought out mentors, worked hard, and created a career for himself as a creative, even though he struggled with that term. Mike shares stories of "making it happen" and working with celebrities. We discuss advice for creatives to make their dreams happen Be consistent. Do good work where you are at. You can get noticed. Network. Don't be afraid to seek help and take risks to make your dreams come true. It's Tuesday. To attract celebrity clients, you need to act like you've been there and not just "fan-girl" out. Links To Stuff We Talk About: Follow Mike on Instagram | Twitter | or his website at MikeJonesNC.com Episode Sponsor: This episode of The Guys Who Do Stuff is brought to you by The Studio Cary, your local neighborhood podcast studio. Connect with your audience. Grow your brand. Visit Podcast Cary Today for more info and booking.Help your friends who do stuff get unstuck, tell a better story, and have a good answer to the question, what are you doing today? If you like the Guys Who Do Stuff, visit GuysWhoDoStuff.com to subscribe for free, and you'll never miss an episode. And if you really like the Guys Who Do Stuff, we'd appreciate you telling a friend (maybe even two). 

Girls Who Do Stuff
Feed Drop: Guys Who Do Stuff

Girls Who Do Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 32:26


Stuff In This Episode:  We talk with former Director of Creative Media for Football at North Carolina State University, Mike Jones, about what's next in his career and how he got to this point. Mike shares how it has been a life-long dream to work for the Charlotte Hornets, and the dream started as a player, then after he obtained a B.S. in Sport Management with a minor in Coaching from Liberty University in May 2018, it changed to being an agent. Shortly after that, he got experience with his first camera and fell in love with Photography.  Mike sought out mentors, worked hard, and created a career for himself as a creative, even though he struggled with that term. Mike shares stories of "making it happen" and working with celebrities. We discuss advice for creatives to make their dreams happen Be consistent. Do good work where you are at. You can get noticed. Network. Don't be afraid to seek help and take risks to make your dreams come true. It's Tuesday. To attract celebrity clients, you need to act like you've been there and not just "fan-girl" out. Links To Stuff We Talk About: Follow Mike on Instagram | Twitter | or his website at MikeJonesNC.com Episode Sponsor: This episode of The Guys Who Do Stuff is brought to you by The Studio Cary, your local neighborhood podcast studio. Connect with your audience. Grow your brand. Visit Podcast Cary Today for more info and booking.Help your friends who do stuff get unstuck, tell a better story, and have a good answer to the question, what are you doing today? If you like the Guys Who Do Stuff, visit GuysWhoDoStuff.com to subscribe for free, and you'll never miss an episode. And if you really like the Guys Who Do Stuff, we'd appreciate you telling a friend (maybe even two). 

Me, Myself, and AI
Big Data in Agriculture: Land O'Lakes' Teddy Bekele

Me, Myself, and AI

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 21:12


You might have seen Land O'Lakes' dairy products on store shelves without giving much thought to how they got there, but that's something CTO Teddy Bekele thinks about every day. While the farmers and agricultural retailers of Land O'Lakes work to produce the cooperative's products, starting from the seeds used to grow animal feed, Teddy Bekele is focused on supporting agriculture's “fourth revolution” — one that's embracing technologies like artificial intelligence. On this episode of the Me, Myself, and AI podcast, Teddy explains how Land O'Lakes uses predictive analytics and AI to help farmers and other agricultural producers be more productive and make better decisions about the business of farming. Read the episode transcript here. Me, Myself, and AI is a collaborative podcast from MIT Sloan Management Review and Boston Consulting Group and is hosted by Sam Ransbotham and Shervin Khodabandeh. Our engineer is David Lishansky, and the coordinating producers are Allison Ryder and Sophie Rüdinger. Stay in touch with us by joining our LinkedIn group, AI for Leaders at mitsmr.com/AIforLeaders. Read more about our show and follow along with the series at https://sloanreview.mit.edu/ai. Guest bio: Teddy Bekele is the CTO of Land O'Lakes, leading the organization's digital transformation by leveraging existing and emerging technologies to discover, implement, and deliver solutions and ecosystems. Previously, Bekele served as vice president of ag technology for WinField United. Bekele holds an MBA from Indiana University and a bachelor of science degree in mechanical engineering from North Carolina State University. His community leadership includes serving as chair of the Minnesota Broadband Task Force and the Federal Task Force on Precision Ag Connectivity, and as a board member for Stella Health, Genesys Works Twin Cities, and the Minnesota Technology Association. We encourage you to rate and review our show. Your comments may be used in Me, Myself, and AI materials. We want to know how you feel about Me, Myself, and AI. Please take a short, two-question survey.

Well Rounded Leaders
Steve Mellor: Competitiveness, Success & Your Leadership

Well Rounded Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 47:29


EPISODE HIGHLIGHTS:Steve's Background & Competitive Approach to SportsTransition from Division 1 Athlete to Division 1 CoachLeadership in an Individual Sport within a Team FrameworkMotivating Athletes to Be Leaders Over TimeAchieving Full PotentialWho Has Had the Biggest Leadership Impact on StevePower of WordsThe Freedom to FailThe Career Competitor Podcast Launches Steve's New CareerCoaching to the "Optimal Self"The First and Final 30Steve's New Book, "Shock The World"Top 5 Most Competitive AthletesSteve's LinkedIn Profile:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/steve-mellor-88966056/Steve's Website:  https://www.careercompetitor.comPre-order Steve's Book, Shock The World:  https://checkout.square.site/buy/FG43BJCYW67WAUDKISXKYRXTony's LinkedIn Profile:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/tonydjax

Industrial Hemp Grower's Digest
Dr. David Suchoff with the FFAR Hemp Consortium and North Carolina State University

Industrial Hemp Grower's Digest

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 28:40


The Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research's hemp research consortium is doing great work for the industrial hemp industry. FFAR, as it's known, is bringing the best and brightest to do coordinated research on hemp and Dr. David Suchoff at NC State is helping to lead the way. Want to know more about the National Hemp Growers Cooperative and our commitment to building wealth for our members through regenerative agriculture and sustainable development? https://nationalhempcoop.us/ (Check out our website) to learn more.

Faith. Family. Fulfillment.
Ep31: Releasing Control and Letting God Guide You

Faith. Family. Fulfillment.

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 41:12


Avery Vester, is the oldest of Suzanne and Chris's three daughters. She is a 2022 graduate of North Carolina State University's College of Design with a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Design Studies. She recently began working on her Masters of Divinity from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. She plans to focus on Women's Ministry upon completion of her degree. She is also the founder of "Fearfully & Wonderfully Avery" a faith based clothing company currently in it's birthing stages.   Listen to this uplifting Faith. Family. Fulfillment. episode with Avery Vester about her woman's ministry studies and Christian upbringing. Here is what to expect on this week's show: - Avery's experience growing up with a strong faith foundation, and what lead her into joining ministry. - Taking time to pray and unwind in your day, focusing on what is most important in your life. - Avery's experience as an older sister, and how she positively influenced her younger sisters throughout their lives.   Connect with Avery: Instagram- @averyvester Facebook- @averyvester Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Food Safety Matters
Ep. 125. Dr. Conrad Choiniere: Moving 'Closer to Zero' Through Collaboration

Food Safety Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 75:26


Conrad Choiniere, Ph.D., is the Director of the Office of Analytics and Outreach at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN). Dr. Choiniere provides executive leadership for a broad portfolio of scientific and regulatory functions including risk and decision analysis, social and behavioral sciences, epidemiology, biostatistics and informatics, education and outreach, and food defense. Dr. Choiniere currently co-leads a core element of FDA's New Era of Smarter Food Safety focused on fostering and supporting food safety culture across the food system. He also chairs FDA's Toxic Elements Working Group, which prioritizes the Administration's efforts to reduce exposures to lead, arsenic, and other heavy metals from foods to the greatest extent feasible. Dr. Choiniere holds a Ph.D. in Agricultural and Resource Economics from the University of Maryland and a B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering from Johns Hopkins University.  Kruti Ravaliya, M.S., Consumer Safety Officer in the Division of Produce Safety at FDA's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, joined the Division of Produce Safety as an Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) Fellow in July 2013, and transitioned to be a Consumer Safety Officer in April 2015. She has been involved with the Division of Produce Safety in a variety of ways, most significantly in developing the Supplemental and Final Agricultural Water Quality provision in the Produce Safety Rule. She earned her M.S. degree in Food Science, with minors in Biotechnology and Food Safety, at North Carolina State University in 2013, and a B.S. degree in Food Science and Spanish from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, in 2007. Previously, Ms. Ravaliya worked in food product development with the International Food Network. In this episode of Food Safety Matters, we speak with Kruti [22:16] about: FDA's recent updates to Subpart E of the Produce Safety Rule, including the recently extended compliance dates for pre-harvest agricultural water requirements The nuances of microbial quality testing for water, and why it is a “tool within the grower's toolbox,” rather than a requirement for growers How stakeholder feedback has informed FDA's updates to its regulation of pre- and post-harvest agricultural water Ways in which FDA intends to partner with state and local officials to educate and train growers on compliance with the Proposed Agricultural Water Rule We also speak with Conrad [33:47] about: His work within FDA's Toxic Elements Working Group and its considerations when assessing the risk to public health from toxic elements in certain foods How scientific advancements and regulatory changes over time have affected actual and detected levels of toxic elements in the U.S. food supply Actions that growers and manufacturers can take to reduce the uptake of toxic elements into foods, and to ensure that toxic elements are not introduced at the production level FDA's intent to collaborate with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and industry to develop and disseminate guidance regarding preventive controls for toxic elements in food production The purpose of action levels in signaling to industry the importance of monitoring and finding solutions for reducing certain contaminants FDA's “cycle of continual improvement” approach in its Closer to Zero initiative, including four key steps to understanding and mitigating the health risk of toxic elements in baby foods Why it is crucial to consider nutrition when setting action levels The importance of FDA's collaboration with USDA in expanding upon and executing the goals of its Closer to Zero initiative FDA's current and future work to understand and reduce the presence of toxic elements in food, including the agency's sampling activities, its intent to target cadmium and arsenic, and other initiatives Key achievements of FDA's Toxic Elements Working Group since its inception in 2017 The importance of collaborating with relevant agencies and industry stakeholders to find appropriate solutions for the not-so-simple task of reducing toxic elements in the U.S. food supply. News and Resources: USDA FSIS Declares Salmonella an Adulterant in Breaded, Stuffed Raw Chicken Products [5:14]FDA Shares Updates on Cyclospora Action Plan [8:20] FDA Plans to Continue Remote Regulatory Assessments [10:52] FDA Releases New Dashboard for Laboratory Accreditation for Analyses of Foods Program [WEBINAR] FDA's Smarter Tools—How Remote Regulatory Assessments Help Ensure Food Safety FDA has more information on its website about the agency's continued work to address toxic elements in the food supply. Learn more about FDA's programs referenced in the podcast: Closer to Zero Action Plan for Baby Foods Ongoing Total Diet Study Monitoring Nutrients and Contaminants in Foods Eaten by People in the U.S. Advice about Eating Fish for Those Who Might Become or are Pregnant or Breastfeeding and Children Ages 1–11 Years Toxic Elements in Food and Foodware, and Radionuclides in Food Compliance Program Food Safety Insights Column, Bob Ferguson Focusing Ahead—Processors' Priorities for the Near Term [17:37] We Want to Hear from You! Please send us your questions and suggestions to podcast@food-safety.com

The Takeaway
Black People Are Finding Their Ancestors Through Centuries-Old Newspaper Ads

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 22:28


Between 1820 and 1860, as the cotton industry in the United States boomed, about one million enslaved people were forcibly relocated from states in the upper South to the plantations of the Deep South. Historians call this the Second Passage, echoing the first forced migration of the Middle Passage. After the Civil War, these newly-emancipated people tried to reunite their families. Thousands of them placed advertisements in their local newspapers, providing as many details as they could about when they last saw their loved ones and who they were sold to. One ad placed by Henry Anderson in the Indianapolis Freeman in 1895 began, "I would like to find my people." Many of these families were never reunited. But their messages are being collected and archived by historians and genealogists, and archives like the Last Seen Project and the Georgetown Memory Project are now helping their descendants find their people. In the segment you can hear professional voice artists from the Last Seen Project reading ads and messages, placed of 19th century Black Americans who were searching for family after the end of legal American slavery. Rachel Swarns, contributing writer at the New York Times and an associate professor of journalism at NYU, joined us to discuss her recent reporting on people who are using archives to find their ancestors who had been enslaved. Dr. Blair Kelley, an associate professor of history at North Carolina State University and incoming director of the Center for the Study of the American South at the University of North Carolina, also joined and she's done some of her own research into her own lost ancestors. 

The Real P3
Dalton Obermier

The Real P3

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 44:04


This is the final part of our series featuring the swine research presented at the ASAS national meeting held in Oklahoma back in June. Our guest for this episode is Dalton Obermier, who grew up on an acreage in York, Nebraska in which he was fortunate enough to show horses, cattle, and pigs at the local, state, and national levels. 4H and FFA consumed most of his younger years which soon after transitioned into animal science once he got to college. He received a bachelor's degree in animal science in 2018 from UNL, M.S. in 2020 from North Carolina State University, and now he is working on his Ph.D. in animal breed and genetics back at UNL. His research focuses on sow longevity traits and the development of phenotypes using Nutrack, an advanced computer vision system.

Up To Date
New K-State president pushes for more agricultural innovation

Up To Date

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 17:02


Earlier this year, Richard Linton became president of Kansas State University after a decade as dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at North Carolina State University.

Modern CTO with Joel Beasley
Soft Robots Navigating Mazes Without Human Guidance with Jie Yin, Associate Professor at North Carolina State University

Modern CTO with Joel Beasley

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 23:52


Today we're talking to Jie Yin, associate professor at North Carolina State University; and we discuss Jie's autonomous noodle-shaped robot, the blueprints of soft robotics, and the impact that this research could have on the world. All of this right here, right now, on the Modern CTO Podcast!

The Garden Question
071 – Success with Naturalistic Plantings – Jared Barnes, Ph.D.

The Garden Question

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 67:53


Naturalistic planting design begins with understanding what roles certain plants play in nature. One of the most useful concepts in a plants' survival strategy is learning how to classify it on the Grimes Triangle. This is a new concept for me. I don't remember every hearing about this classification system or how it works.   We talk about this and more in this episode 071 – Success with Naturalistic Plantings with our guest Jared Barnes, Ph.D.  Dr. Jared started gardening when he was five years old. Since then, he has enthusiastically pursued how to best cultivate plants and cultivate minds. He currently fulfills those passions as an award-winning associate professor of horticulture at Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches, TX.   He obtained his Ph.D. in horticultural science from North Carolina State University in Raleigh, NC. He interned at The Scott Arboretum of Swarthmore College.  By traveling around the US and to eleven countries he has gained national and global horticulture perspectives.   Jared educates the public with his weekly newsletter Plant-Ed and his monthly podcast Plantastic all found on his website Meristeam.  His passion has been recognized by peers in interviews in Organic Gardening, Greenhouse Grower, AmericanHort Connect, Ken Druse's Real Dirt, and Nursery Management.  His articles have appeared in The American Gardener, Fine Gardening and Carolina Gardener.

The Garden Question
071 – Success with Naturalistic Plantings – Jared Barnes

The Garden Question

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 67:53


Naturalistic planting design begins with understanding what roles certain plants play in nature.One of the most useful concepts in a plants' survival strategy is learning how to classify it on the Grimes Triangle.This is a new concept for me. I don't remember every hearing about this classification system or how it works.  We talk about this and more in this episode 071 – Success with Naturalistic Plantings with our guest Jared Barnes, Ph.D. Dr. Jared started gardening when he was five years old. Since then, he has enthusiastically pursued how to best cultivate plants and cultivate minds. He currently fulfills those passions as an award-winning associate professor of horticulture at Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches, TX.   He obtained his Ph.D. in horticultural science from North Carolina State University in Raleigh, NC. He interned at The Scott Arboretum of Swarthmore College.  By traveling around the US and to eleven countries he has gained national and global horticulture perspectives.   Jared educates the public with his weekly newsletter Plant-Ed and his monthly podcast Plantastic all found on his website Meristeam.  His passion has been recognized by peers in interviews in Organic Gardening, Greenhouse Grower, AmericanHort Connect, Ken Druse's Real Dirt, and Nursery Management.  His articles have appeared in The American Gardener, Fine Gardening and Carolina Gardener.

The Cone of Shame Veterinary Podcast
COS - 155 - Causes And Treatments For Hypoglycemia In Dogs (HDYTT)

The Cone of Shame Veterinary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 20:32


Hypogylcemia trips veterinarians up in a number of ways. It has a variety of causes and some can be more challenging to pinpoint than others. In this episode, Veterinary Medical Internist Dr. Andrew Woolcock joins Dr. Andy Roark to discuss the case of a young hypoglycemic yorkie, before expanding the conversation to discuss hypoglycemia in general. This discussion covers causes of hypoglycemia, appropriate diagnostic workups, and practical treatment approaches. LINKS https://www.vet.purdue.edu GSD Shorthanded Virtual Conference: https://unchartedvet.com/gsd-shorthanded/ Dr. Andy Roark Exam Room Communication Tool Box Course: https://drandyroark.com/on-demand-staff-training/ What's on my Scrubs?! Card Game: https://drandyroark.com/training-tools/ Dr. Andy Roark Swag: drandyroark.com/shop All Links: linktr.ee/DrAndyRoark ABOUT OUR GUEST: Dr. Woolcock is a veterinary internist. He's from the Midwest and did his schooling at Michigan State University, where he graduated with his DVM. After an internship at North Carolina State University, Dr. Woolcock completed a residency in small animal internal medicine at the University of Georgia. He joined the faculty at Purdue University in 2015, and is currently an Associate Professor of Small Animal Internal Medicine. Dr. Woolcock loves the complex puzzles that internal medicine patients present, and loves working with students as they put the pieces together. He loves all-things-medicine, because physiology is so fascinating, but he especially gravitates toward immune-mediated diseases and endocrinology. Dr. Woolcock enjoys his clinical practice, but also his research in oxidative stress, and the scholarship of teaching and learning. When he's not at work, Dr. Woolcock is likely watching old movies with his husband and their dog, Auggie (not sure of what breed he is, so they invented one for him – a Miniature Fluftoffee).

Ask The Horse
Feeding Senior Horses

Ask The Horse

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 61:00 Very Popular


Good nutrition and a balanced diet are important for all horses, but do senior horses have special requirements to consider? Join our host, Shoshana Rudski, as she interviews Dr. Shannon Pratt-Phillips, of North Carolina State University, and Dr. Kelly Vineyard, of Purina Animal Nutrition . You'll learn about the nutritional requirements of senior horses, feeding the older horse with dental issues, how to help your senior gain weight, and much more! This podcast is sponsored by Purina Animal Nutrition.About the Experts: Shannon Pratt-Phillips, PhD, received her Master of Science from the University of Kentucky and her Doctor of Philosophy from the University of Guelph, focusing on equine nutrition and exercise physiology. Pratt-Phillips joined the faculty at North Carolina State University in 2006, where she currently teaches equine nutrition in the Department of Animal Science. She is the director of the Distance Education Animal Science Programs, which includes the Master of Animal Science program, and her field of research focuses on glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, obesity, and laminitis prevention and management in horses.Kelly Vineyard, MS, PhD, is a Senior Nutritionist, Equine Technical Solutions, with Purina Animal Nutrition. She is responsible for providing expert technical nutrition advice and insights in a variety of areas, including veterinarian and customer nutrition consultation, new product innovation and research, sales and dealer training, and social media activity. Since 2008, Vineyard has been directly involved in the research and development for numerous Purina Horse Feed products and supplements, including the recently patented Purina Equine Senior and Senior Active ActivAge technology. Vineyard earned her BS in Animal and Dairy Sciences from Auburn University and her MS and PhD in Animal Sciences with a focus on Equine Nutrition from the University of Florida. Her doctorate research focused on the effects of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on immune function in horses, and she received the Innovative Research award from the American Society of Animal Science for this work. Vineyard is a frequent publisher and lecturer on equine nutrition with expertise in omega-3 fatty acids, immune function, and performance horse nutrition. Her published work includes articles in the Journal of Animal Science and the Journal of Equine Veterinary Science and a chapter in the textbook Equine Applied and Clinical Nutrition. She has been involved with horses for most of her life and is a USDF bronze and silver medalist in dressage, earning both with her off-track Thoroughbred, The Roman Knows.

Here We Are
Human Factors w/Anne McLaughlin

Here We Are

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 62:10


Today I am speaking with Anne McLaughlin, who is a psychology professor at North Carolina State University. We discuss her book "All Too Human", which takes a look at applied Human Factors. Human Factors may be a lesser known field within psychology but its implications become obvious once realized. Huge thanks to Chris of Hygge Production House for filming this episode. Thank you for watching and being an inquisitive being.

BlockHash: Exploring the Blockchain
Hamdee Khader - Co-founder of DeVo Protocol

BlockHash: Exploring the Blockchain

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 29:02


This week on episode 264 of the BlockHash Podcast, we have Co-founder Hamdee Khader to talk about DeVo Protocol. Hamdee is the Co-founder of DeVo protocol. He earned his JD/MBA from the University of North Carolina. Graduated summa cum laude from North Carolina State University and has experience working at leading Fortune 500 companies including Citrix, MetLife, and NextEra Energy. DeVo tokenizes the $2.3T philanthropy sector, substantially rewarding token holders and eliminating many inefficiencies, such as the lack of transparency allowing donors to see where their donations are being spent, rewards for philanthropy stakeholders like volunteers, and the ability for stakeholders to intercommunicate in a trustless format. The podcast is available on… Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/blockhash-exploring-the-blockchain/id1241712666 Amazon Music: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/6dc84ee4-845b-4bea-b812-b876daab2c7e/BlockHash-Exploring-the-Blockchain Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/4AGqU8qxIYVkxXM4q2XpO1 Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy9iNmNhNWM0L3BvZGNhc3QvcnNz Website: www.blockhashpodcast.com On Social Media… Website: https://devoprotocol.org/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/devoprotocol/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/devoprotocol/ Find Brandon Zemp & the podcast on Social Media… Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theblockhash/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zempcapital/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/zempcapital Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theblockhash LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/brandonzemp Sign up for the "Future Economy" newsletter… Newsletter: https://futureeconomy.memberful.com/join

Marketplace Tech
The debate over political bias in the tech sector has reached your spam folder

Marketplace Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 6:08 Very Popular


Following backlash from Republican leaders, the Federal Election Commission is giving the OK to a pilot program from Google that would allow authorized political committees or campaigns to bypass Gmail’s spam filters and go directly into a user’s inbox. Google came up with the program after the GOP accused the company of disproportionately shunting Republican campaign emails to spam, citing a recent study from North Carolina State University. “Marketplace Tech’s” Kimberly Adams spoke with Ashley Gold, a tech and policy reporter for Axios, about the details of that study, the pilot program and more.

Marketplace All-in-One
The debate over political bias in the tech sector has reached your spam folder

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 6:08


Following backlash from Republican leaders, the Federal Election Commission is giving the OK to a pilot program from Google that would allow authorized political committees or campaigns to bypass Gmail’s spam filters and go directly into a user’s inbox. Google came up with the program after the GOP accused the company of disproportionately shunting Republican campaign emails to spam, citing a recent study from North Carolina State University. “Marketplace Tech’s” Kimberly Adams spoke with Ashley Gold, a tech and policy reporter for Axios, about the details of that study, the pilot program and more.

Big Picture Science
Rip Van Winkle Worm (rebroadcast)

Big Picture Science

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 54:00 Very Popular


Your shower pipes are alive. So are your sinks, books, and floorboards. New studies of our homes are revealing just what species live there – in the thousands, from bacteria to flies to millipedes. Meanwhile, life keeps surprising us by popping up in other unexpected places: the deep biosphere houses the majority of the world's bacteria and the Arctic tundra has kept worms frozen, but alive, for 40,000 years. We embrace the multitude of life living on us, in us, and – as it turns out – in every possible ecological niche. Most of it is harmless, some is beneficial, and it's all testament to the amazing diversity and adaptability of life. In addition, the hardiest organisms suggest where we might find life beyond Earth. Guests: Rob Dunn – Professor of applied ecology at North Carolina State University and at the Natural History Museum at the University of Copenhagen. Author of “Never Home Alone: From Microbes to Millipedes, Camel Crickets, and Honeybees, the Natural History of Where We Live.” Lynn Rothschild – Astrobiologist and synthetic biologist at the NASA Ames Research Center. Karen Lloyd – Environmental microbiologist and associate professor at the University of Tennessee. Originally aired January 21, 2019 Featuring music by Dewey Dellay and Jun Miyake Big Picture Science is part of the Airwave Media podcast network. Please contact sales@advertisecast.com to inquire about advertising on Big Picture Science. You can get early access to ad-free versions of every episode by joining us on Patreon. Thanks for your support!   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Artist Soapbox * Local Artists on Creative Process
167: Incorporating anti-racist practices into writing workshops and joyful creation with writer, Isabel O'Hara Walsh

Artist Soapbox * Local Artists on Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 37:06 Transcription Available


Isabel O'Hara Walsh leads writing workshops through thehttps://www.redbudwriting.org ( Redbud Writing Project). Redbud offers classes virtually and around the Triangle on topics like Writing the Novel, Experimental Fiction, and one that Isabel and I talk about, Joyful Creation – how to get your writing juices flowing when staring at that blank page. Isabel shares about their experience incorporating anti-racist practices into the workshop and feedback processes. An important resource in helping to shape this framework is the book The Anti-Racist Writer's Workshop: How to Decolonize the Creative Classroom by Felicia Rose Chavez. Chavez's book challenges, in her words, “art's politics of power and privilege” and lays bare the ways that traditional – read: white-supremacist – methods of running workshops work to silence the voices of writers of color and writers with other marginalized identities.  Isabel and Mara Thomas also discuss another Artist Soapbox favorite when it comes to rethinking the feedback process: Liz Lerman's Critical Response Process. Lerman's work helps tailor the feedback process to help the creator retain agency over their work and create an environment where they get the feedback they're actually looking for rather than an onslaught of unfiltered opinions. BIO: Isabel O'Hara Walsh (she/they) is a writer, teacher, and practicing witch. A graduate of the MFA program in fiction at North Carolina State University, Isabel teaches fiction writing at the Redbud Writing Project, has published short stories in Pastel Pastoral and The Metaworker, and is at work on her second novel. Through her business https://www.edgewisewitch.com/ (EdgeWise Witch), Isabel offers transformative 1-1 and group work sessions that incorporate Tarot, writing, and other ritual to clarify the right path forward for her clients. SOCIAL MEDIA: IG: @isabeloharawalsh  Website: redbudwriting.org | www.edgewisewitch.com MENTIONED IN THE EPISODE: https://www.antiracistworkshop.com/ (The Anti-Racist Writing Workshop: How to Decolonize the Creative Classroom by Felicia Rose Chavez) https://lizlerman.com/critical-response-process/ (Critical Response Process) by Liz Lerman LISTEN TO ASBX AUDIO DRAMAS:https://artistsoapbox.org/masterbuild