Podcasts about Popular culture

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  • 708PODCASTS
  • 2,855EPISODES
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  • Jan 18, 2022LATEST
Popular culture

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Best podcasts about Popular culture

Show all podcasts related to popular culture

Latest podcast episodes about Popular culture

This Custom Life with Helen Stanley & Anthony Partridge
New season, new episode - new podcast! Welcome to the Car Cult

This Custom Life with Helen Stanley & Anthony Partridge

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 57:44


Automotive presenters and petrol heads Helen Stanley and Anthony Partridge revamp their podcast. The new series is about Cars in Popular Culture and it all kicks off with an introduction into the Pod. They talk about everything from Cult Jumpsuits to emotional support dogs and everything in between. Enjoy! (The video to this Ep can be found on Car Cult TV - Youtube).

30 to Life - Redefining the Black Experience
Ep 82: The Rise of Homeschooling and the Impact On Black Children with Dr. Khadijah Z. Ali-Coleman

30 to Life - Redefining the Black Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 62:46


In this episode, the guys chat with Dr. Khadijah Z. Ali-Coleman about her upcoming book Homeschooling Black Children in the US: Theory, Practice and Popular Culture. She breaks down her experience as a former homeschooling mother, the impact homeschool has on black children in America, and so much more. Tune in. More about our guest: Dr. Khadijah Z. Ali-Colemann. is a former homeschooling mother, cultural curator, community organizer, nationally recognized speaker, and writer. Her work centers the social and political life experiences, history, and culture of the people of the African diaspora. She is author of the children's bookMariah's Maraca's and has poetry and short stories in numerous books, including the 2020 anthology The Fire Inside: Poems and Stories from Zora's Den. Her academic work has been published in The Journal of Higher Education Politics & Economics, and the book Afrofuturism in Black Panther: Gender, Identity and the Remaking of Blackness. Her journalistic bylines have appeared in more than a dozen publications, including Ebony, Romper, The Grade, The Washington Informer and The Afro. She has been quoted in the media as a homeschooling expert, interviewed by Slate, Wired, The Washington Post, NBC and more. She is co-editor of the book Homeschooling Black Children in the US: Theory, Practice and Popular Culture. Learn more by visiting her website at KhadijahAli-Coleman.com Follow on Facebook Follow on Instagram Follow on Twitter Subscribe to YouTube Channel by clicking here LISTEN TO OUR PODCAST Contemporary Perspectives on Black Homeschooling --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/30tolifepod/support

Do The Kids Know?
...That We're Back?

Do The Kids Know?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 31:18


Transcript available here.Friends, foes, and folks in between, Prakash and Kristen are back with Season 3 of Do The Kids Know? Make sure to subscribe, rate, and review the show to help the algorithm work in our favour so that other kids can stay in the know. New episodes of Season 3 will air every other Wednesday (Monday on Patreon). Stay in the know!------Do The Kids Know? is a biweekly series of discussions between community workers, Prakash and Kristen, that unpack race, media, popular culture, and politics in KKKanada (That's Canada spelled with three K's) from an anti-colonial perspective.Our goal is to bring nuance to sensationalist media as well as to uncover the ways in which white supremacy, capitalism, and colonialism is shaping our movements and behaviours. Keep tuning in to be a part of the conversation… don't be a kid who doesn't know!Find us: @dothekidsknow (Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, TikTok)Email us: dothekidsknow@gmail.comTip us: patreon.com/dothekidsknowNewsletter: tinyletter.com/dothekidsknow Artwork by Daniela Silva (instagram.com/danielasilvatrujillo)Music by Steve Travale (https://stevetravale.com)DTKK is recorded on the traditional and unceded Indigenous lands of the Kanien'kehá:ka Nation. We are committed to working with Indigenous communities and leaders locally and across Turtle Island to fight for Indigenous rights, resurgence, and sovereignty. Until next time. Stay in the know~!Support the show (http://patreon.com/dothekidsknow)

The Cale Clarke Show - Today's issues from a Catholic perspective.
Faith, Film, and Fear w/ Andrew Petiprin

The Cale Clarke Show - Today's issues from a Catholic perspective.

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 49:06


Cale sits down with Andrew Petiprin, Fellow of Popular Culture at the Word on Fire Institute, to discuss his conversion from Anglicanism to Catholicism. Cale and Andrew also discuss the new Netflix show “Midnight Mass”. How can a Christian find balance in entertainment consumption? What did St. John Henry Newman mean by “heart speaks to heart”? Find out more about Andrew and the work he is doing at Word on Fire here: https://www.wordonfire.org/author/andrew-petiprin/ You can also find out more about Andrew at his website: https://andrewpetiprin.com/

SciFi Pubcast
SciFi Pubcast

SciFi Pubcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 61:36


Episode 90: 2021 SciFi & 2022 Incoming Content! Welcome to the SciFi Pubcast! Come for a drink but stay for the speculation.  We're talking about our favorite content of 2021 and what we are looking forward to seeing in 2022. It's a grab-bag episode! And Dr. Randal Graham joins us for the discussion which is always a howl! The audio quality of the call could have be better so we apologize. The Internet gods were having a rough day by the sounds of it. So grab a cocktail for this cold winter day and enjoy. This is the SciFi Pubcast.  Episode recorded on December 28, 2021 and released as a podcast, and uploaded to YouTube on December 29, 2021.  Show website: www.scifipubcast.space. Contact us: Email: management@scifipubcast.space Twitter Instagram Facebook Follow our staff's personal Twitter accounts at: Keri Simpson Derek Beebe Randal Graham Joel Welch Join our Discord Server! Here's an invite.  Here's the link to Derek Beebe's blog.  Here's the link to Dr. Randal Graham's novel, Beforelife, by ECW Press. And the sequel, Afterlife Crisis, is out now!  Music provided courtesy of Logan Rathbone. The SciFi Pubcast logo is by Jea Rhee. Widescreen photograph utilized for some podcast feeds, Pillar and Jets HH 901/902, used courtesy of NASA, ESA, and M. Livio and the Hubble 20th Anniversary Team (STScl). Photograph (iss065e001065) used for the header on our podcast website/YouTube used courtesy of NASA and the ISS. Listen Responsibly. Copyright 2021 Joel Welch. All rights reserved.

Is This Just Bad?
118: DisCon III

Is This Just Bad?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 94:09


In this episode, the Cosmologist recounts his trip to DisCon III to Professor Mouse. [Social Media]Email: isthisjustbad@gmail.comTwitter: https://twitter.com/isthisjustbadInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/isthisjustbad/Bucky Bear's IG: https://www.instagram.com/sgtbuckybearMad Moll's IG: https://www.instagram.com/madmollcosplay/

New Books Network
Mark S. Berlin, "Criminalizing Atrocity: The Global Spread of Criminal Laws Against International Crimes" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 58:01


Political Scientist Mark Berlin's new book, Criminalizing Atrocity: The Global Spread of Criminal Laws Against International Crimes (Oxford UP, 2020), examines the process through which laws against international crimes are established and integrated into the legal regimes of nations. One of the initial questions Berlin hoped to answer with his work was why do countries choose to pass and implement laws about genocide and atrocities—noting that there was no clear tracing of patterns around the world when he first started his research. It becomes clear that there are two prongs to this question, in terms of the answers: how do countries establish and integrate these laws, and why do they choose to do so. Criminalizing Atrocity outlines the answers to these questions, explaining that either countries take up a wholesale reform of their criminal codes, and in the process integrate laws against genocide and atrocities, or countries pass and implement specific laws targeted to atrocities and genocide. Berlin's research also indicates that the regime type or a regime's propensity for war do not matter in terms of how these laws are passed and put into action. While there has been codifications and work done in this realm of law for some time, much activity in this area followed World War II and the Nuremberg trials. Criminalizing Atrocity explores this postwar period, when experts in this realm were working to develop legal regimes to address genocide and atrocity crimes. While this postwar period brought some attention to these criminal codes, much more happened as the Cold War came to a conclusion and many countries integrated atrocity laws into their legal regimes. Berlin examines all of this through a multi-method approach, compiling extensive data on individual country's legal regimes as part of the research, alongside interviews, archival work, and analysis of primary sources. Criminalizing Atrocity will be of interest to a large cross section of scholars, including those who study international law, comparative politics, legal studies, genocide and war crimes, governmental reform, and historians. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in World Affairs
Mark S. Berlin, "Criminalizing Atrocity: The Global Spread of Criminal Laws Against International Crimes" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 58:01


Political Scientist Mark Berlin's new book, Criminalizing Atrocity: The Global Spread of Criminal Laws Against International Crimes (Oxford UP, 2020), examines the process through which laws against international crimes are established and integrated into the legal regimes of nations. One of the initial questions Berlin hoped to answer with his work was why do countries choose to pass and implement laws about genocide and atrocities—noting that there was no clear tracing of patterns around the world when he first started his research. It becomes clear that there are two prongs to this question, in terms of the answers: how do countries establish and integrate these laws, and why do they choose to do so. Criminalizing Atrocity outlines the answers to these questions, explaining that either countries take up a wholesale reform of their criminal codes, and in the process integrate laws against genocide and atrocities, or countries pass and implement specific laws targeted to atrocities and genocide. Berlin's research also indicates that the regime type or a regime's propensity for war do not matter in terms of how these laws are passed and put into action. While there has been codifications and work done in this realm of law for some time, much activity in this area followed World War II and the Nuremberg trials. Criminalizing Atrocity explores this postwar period, when experts in this realm were working to develop legal regimes to address genocide and atrocity crimes. While this postwar period brought some attention to these criminal codes, much more happened as the Cold War came to a conclusion and many countries integrated atrocity laws into their legal regimes. Berlin examines all of this through a multi-method approach, compiling extensive data on individual country's legal regimes as part of the research, alongside interviews, archival work, and analysis of primary sources. Criminalizing Atrocity will be of interest to a large cross section of scholars, including those who study international law, comparative politics, legal studies, genocide and war crimes, governmental reform, and historians. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books in Law
Mark S. Berlin, "Criminalizing Atrocity: The Global Spread of Criminal Laws Against International Crimes" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books in Law

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 58:01


Political Scientist Mark Berlin's new book, Criminalizing Atrocity: The Global Spread of Criminal Laws Against International Crimes (Oxford UP, 2020), examines the process through which laws against international crimes are established and integrated into the legal regimes of nations. One of the initial questions Berlin hoped to answer with his work was why do countries choose to pass and implement laws about genocide and atrocities—noting that there was no clear tracing of patterns around the world when he first started his research. It becomes clear that there are two prongs to this question, in terms of the answers: how do countries establish and integrate these laws, and why do they choose to do so. Criminalizing Atrocity outlines the answers to these questions, explaining that either countries take up a wholesale reform of their criminal codes, and in the process integrate laws against genocide and atrocities, or countries pass and implement specific laws targeted to atrocities and genocide. Berlin's research also indicates that the regime type or a regime's propensity for war do not matter in terms of how these laws are passed and put into action. While there has been codifications and work done in this realm of law for some time, much activity in this area followed World War II and the Nuremberg trials. Criminalizing Atrocity explores this postwar period, when experts in this realm were working to develop legal regimes to address genocide and atrocity crimes. While this postwar period brought some attention to these criminal codes, much more happened as the Cold War came to a conclusion and many countries integrated atrocity laws into their legal regimes. Berlin examines all of this through a multi-method approach, compiling extensive data on individual country's legal regimes as part of the research, alongside interviews, archival work, and analysis of primary sources. Criminalizing Atrocity will be of interest to a large cross section of scholars, including those who study international law, comparative politics, legal studies, genocide and war crimes, governmental reform, and historians. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/law

New Books in Political Science
Mark S. Berlin, "Criminalizing Atrocity: The Global Spread of Criminal Laws Against International Crimes" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 58:01


Political Scientist Mark Berlin's new book, Criminalizing Atrocity: The Global Spread of Criminal Laws Against International Crimes (Oxford UP, 2020), examines the process through which laws against international crimes are established and integrated into the legal regimes of nations. One of the initial questions Berlin hoped to answer with his work was why do countries choose to pass and implement laws about genocide and atrocities—noting that there was no clear tracing of patterns around the world when he first started his research. It becomes clear that there are two prongs to this question, in terms of the answers: how do countries establish and integrate these laws, and why do they choose to do so. Criminalizing Atrocity outlines the answers to these questions, explaining that either countries take up a wholesale reform of their criminal codes, and in the process integrate laws against genocide and atrocities, or countries pass and implement specific laws targeted to atrocities and genocide. Berlin's research also indicates that the regime type or a regime's propensity for war do not matter in terms of how these laws are passed and put into action. While there has been codifications and work done in this realm of law for some time, much activity in this area followed World War II and the Nuremberg trials. Criminalizing Atrocity explores this postwar period, when experts in this realm were working to develop legal regimes to address genocide and atrocity crimes. While this postwar period brought some attention to these criminal codes, much more happened as the Cold War came to a conclusion and many countries integrated atrocity laws into their legal regimes. Berlin examines all of this through a multi-method approach, compiling extensive data on individual country's legal regimes as part of the research, alongside interviews, archival work, and analysis of primary sources. Criminalizing Atrocity will be of interest to a large cross section of scholars, including those who study international law, comparative politics, legal studies, genocide and war crimes, governmental reform, and historians. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books in Genocide Studies
Mark S. Berlin, "Criminalizing Atrocity: The Global Spread of Criminal Laws Against International Crimes" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books in Genocide Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 58:01


Political Scientist Mark Berlin's new book, Criminalizing Atrocity: The Global Spread of Criminal Laws Against International Crimes (Oxford UP, 2020), examines the process through which laws against international crimes are established and integrated into the legal regimes of nations. One of the initial questions Berlin hoped to answer with his work was why do countries choose to pass and implement laws about genocide and atrocities—noting that there was no clear tracing of patterns around the world when he first started his research. It becomes clear that there are two prongs to this question, in terms of the answers: how do countries establish and integrate these laws, and why do they choose to do so. Criminalizing Atrocity outlines the answers to these questions, explaining that either countries take up a wholesale reform of their criminal codes, and in the process integrate laws against genocide and atrocities, or countries pass and implement specific laws targeted to atrocities and genocide. Berlin's research also indicates that the regime type or a regime's propensity for war do not matter in terms of how these laws are passed and put into action. While there has been codifications and work done in this realm of law for some time, much activity in this area followed World War II and the Nuremberg trials. Criminalizing Atrocity explores this postwar period, when experts in this realm were working to develop legal regimes to address genocide and atrocity crimes. While this postwar period brought some attention to these criminal codes, much more happened as the Cold War came to a conclusion and many countries integrated atrocity laws into their legal regimes. Berlin examines all of this through a multi-method approach, compiling extensive data on individual country's legal regimes as part of the research, alongside interviews, archival work, and analysis of primary sources. Criminalizing Atrocity will be of interest to a large cross section of scholars, including those who study international law, comparative politics, legal studies, genocide and war crimes, governmental reform, and historians. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/genocide-studies

This Is For Us: An Asian American Podcast
What The Hell Are Christmas Stockings For? (Omicron takes over NYC right before the holidays, popular culture Christmas v.s Christian Christmas, Japanese people celebrate Christmas with KFC, & more) | [Barbershop Talk]

This Is For Us: An Asian American Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 39:25


With Christmas around the corner, today's Barbershop Talk is all about our experience with Christmas. We talk about what Christmas was like for us growing up, how Christmas in the East is much different from the West, how we celebrate it now, and our plans for this year. We break it all down in this fun episode. In this episode, we discuss:Timestamps:0:48 - Leo talks about getting Covid recently1:12 - New York experiencing a massive wave of Covid infections 2:40 - Leo is going to buffalo for Christmas with his girlfriend 3:15 - Christmas is different from Christian Christmas 3:58 - Leo talks about experiencing three different types of Christmas4:15 - Leo talks about celebrating Christmas in Hong Kong5:25 - In Asian culture, Christmas was more about holiday bonuses, holiday parties, and it was time not to spend time with family 5:58 - Eastern Christmas vs. Western Christmas is different 7:00 - Japan celebrates Christmas with a KFC meal 8 - Mike talks about what his Christmas was like 10:40 - What kind of tree did we have 12 - Growing up with sleet in Texas 13 - Leo describes his family experience with Christmas 14 - Christmas traditions were with girlfriends and friends 16 - Leo talks about converting to Christianity 18:35 - Feliz Navidad20:54 - Leo's first time learning about a Christmas stocking 22 - Mike never knew what the purpose of a Christmas stocking was 25 - Christmas has become this commercialized event that brings stress and problems 27 - Are you a hard person to shop hard?30 - What we're doing for Christmas this year 33 - Wearing Christmas attire for Christmas HOW TO RECEIVE EXTRA BENEFITS & CONTENT, BECOME A PATREON BELOW:https://www.patreon.com/asianmenswearSOCIAL MEDIA:The Asian Menswear Podcast -- @asianmenswearpodMike Tran -- @asianmenswearLeo Chan -- @levitatestyleCONTACT US:asianmenswearpodcast@gmail.comJOIN THE OFFICIAL ASIAN MENSWEAR COMMUNITY ON DISCORD:The Official Asian Menswear CommunitySupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/asianmenswear)

Is This Just Bad?
117: Booster

Is This Just Bad?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 61:43


In this episode, Professor Mouse and the Cosmologist discuss booster shots. Professor Mouse is also writing this episode description in a fugue state, so he doesn't remember anything else they talked about and cannot be bothered to find out. [Social Media]Email: isthisjustbad@gmail.comTwitter: https://twitter.com/isthisjustbadInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/isthisjustbad/Bucky Bear's IG: https://www.instagram.com/sgtbuckybearMad Moll's IG: https://www.instagram.com/madmollcosplay/

Turning Readers Into Writers
085 - Write The Artist's Way with Paulina Pinsky

Turning Readers Into Writers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 39:38


About Paulina:Paulina Pinsky is a writer and educator based in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. She received her MFA in Nonfiction Creative Writing from Columbia University, where she has been teaching comedy writing to high schoolers since 2017.  She received her B.A. in American Studies with a concentration in Media and Popular Culture from Barnard College, where she wrote her undergraduate thesis on Joan Rivers.  She is the co-author of IT DOESN'T HAVE TO BE AWKWARD, and, most notably, in October 2021 she was a finalist for Longridge Review's Barnhill Prize for her essay, “Other Mother”.  Additionally, she was a 2021 MacDowell fellow and has been published in Narratively, Human Parts, Columbia Journal, Slackjaw Humor, and HuffPo Women, among others. She is currently working on a memoir.Links mentioned in this episode:The Artist's WayPaulina PinskyDr. Drew Official Website | drdrew.comJoan RiversAmazon.co.uk : the artists way (abc.com)Book Editing Blueprint A Step-By-Step Plan To Making Your Novels Publishable Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREEDisclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/emmadhesi)

New Books in Political Science
Shamira Gelbman, "The Civil Rights Lobby: The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights and the Second Reconstruction" (Temple UP, 2021)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 50:33


Historically, how have marginalized and minority groups pushed the boundaries of representative government to pass legislation that benefits them? Political Scientist Shamira Gelbman, the Daniel F. Evans Associate Professor in Social Sciences at Wabash College, answers this question in her new book, The Civil Rights Lobby: The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights and the Second Reconstruction (Temple UP, 2021). Gelbman examines the history of The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights (LCCR) throughout the 1950s and 60s, teasing out the individuals who engaged in lobbying, advocacy, training, and other capacities to push civil rights legislation forward while also helping to block segregationist and white supremacy advocacy in Congress. Gelbman's case study of the LCCR uses archival and scholarly resources to paint a picture of the Civil Rights Movement's policy achievements by evaluating the role of lobbying and coalitional building. The Civil Rights Lobby: The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights and Second Reconstruction begins by exploring what it takes to create coalitional groups and the uniqueness of the political climate of the 20th century. The arguments about coalitional interest groups are presented alongside the informative history of the LCCR and the policy achievements of the Civil Rights Movement. Gelbman uses interest group theory to explain many of the teachings from this case study. Coalitional groups can often function as a “weapon for the weak,” and Gelbman takes notice of both the benefits of interest group lobbying as well as the setbacks of in-fighting between lobbyists in a broad coalition like the LCCR. The work of structuring the coalition, of working through different goals and approaches, is key in understanding the complicated process for moving forward with civil rights policy creation and implementation. The LCCR was made up of a wide array of groups and members, including a diversity of religious organizations, labor unions, and a constellation of civil rights organizations. Gelbman showcases the LCCR as an organization that mobilized professional and grassroots lobbying by distinguishing commonalities among the members to develop broad-based supports for legislators to pursue civil rights legislation. Shaina Boldt assisted with this podcast. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books in Public Policy
Shamira Gelbman, "The Civil Rights Lobby: The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights and the Second Reconstruction" (Temple UP, 2021)

New Books in Public Policy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 50:33


Historically, how have marginalized and minority groups pushed the boundaries of representative government to pass legislation that benefits them? Political Scientist Shamira Gelbman, the Daniel F. Evans Associate Professor in Social Sciences at Wabash College, answers this question in her new book, The Civil Rights Lobby: The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights and the Second Reconstruction (Temple UP, 2021). Gelbman examines the history of The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights (LCCR) throughout the 1950s and 60s, teasing out the individuals who engaged in lobbying, advocacy, training, and other capacities to push civil rights legislation forward while also helping to block segregationist and white supremacy advocacy in Congress. Gelbman's case study of the LCCR uses archival and scholarly resources to paint a picture of the Civil Rights Movement's policy achievements by evaluating the role of lobbying and coalitional building. The Civil Rights Lobby: The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights and Second Reconstruction begins by exploring what it takes to create coalitional groups and the uniqueness of the political climate of the 20th century. The arguments about coalitional interest groups are presented alongside the informative history of the LCCR and the policy achievements of the Civil Rights Movement. Gelbman uses interest group theory to explain many of the teachings from this case study. Coalitional groups can often function as a “weapon for the weak,” and Gelbman takes notice of both the benefits of interest group lobbying as well as the setbacks of in-fighting between lobbyists in a broad coalition like the LCCR. The work of structuring the coalition, of working through different goals and approaches, is key in understanding the complicated process for moving forward with civil rights policy creation and implementation. The LCCR was made up of a wide array of groups and members, including a diversity of religious organizations, labor unions, and a constellation of civil rights organizations. Gelbman showcases the LCCR as an organization that mobilized professional and grassroots lobbying by distinguishing commonalities among the members to develop broad-based supports for legislators to pursue civil rights legislation. Shaina Boldt assisted with this podcast. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/public-policy

New Books in History
Shamira Gelbman, "The Civil Rights Lobby: The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights and the Second Reconstruction" (Temple UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 50:33


Historically, how have marginalized and minority groups pushed the boundaries of representative government to pass legislation that benefits them? Political Scientist Shamira Gelbman, the Daniel F. Evans Associate Professor in Social Sciences at Wabash College, answers this question in her new book, The Civil Rights Lobby: The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights and the Second Reconstruction (Temple UP, 2021). Gelbman examines the history of The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights (LCCR) throughout the 1950s and 60s, teasing out the individuals who engaged in lobbying, advocacy, training, and other capacities to push civil rights legislation forward while also helping to block segregationist and white supremacy advocacy in Congress. Gelbman's case study of the LCCR uses archival and scholarly resources to paint a picture of the Civil Rights Movement's policy achievements by evaluating the role of lobbying and coalitional building. The Civil Rights Lobby: The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights and Second Reconstruction begins by exploring what it takes to create coalitional groups and the uniqueness of the political climate of the 20th century. The arguments about coalitional interest groups are presented alongside the informative history of the LCCR and the policy achievements of the Civil Rights Movement. Gelbman uses interest group theory to explain many of the teachings from this case study. Coalitional groups can often function as a “weapon for the weak,” and Gelbman takes notice of both the benefits of interest group lobbying as well as the setbacks of in-fighting between lobbyists in a broad coalition like the LCCR. The work of structuring the coalition, of working through different goals and approaches, is key in understanding the complicated process for moving forward with civil rights policy creation and implementation. The LCCR was made up of a wide array of groups and members, including a diversity of religious organizations, labor unions, and a constellation of civil rights organizations. Gelbman showcases the LCCR as an organization that mobilized professional and grassroots lobbying by distinguishing commonalities among the members to develop broad-based supports for legislators to pursue civil rights legislation. Shaina Boldt assisted with this podcast. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in African American Studies
Shamira Gelbman, "The Civil Rights Lobby: The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights and the Second Reconstruction" (Temple UP, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 50:33


Historically, how have marginalized and minority groups pushed the boundaries of representative government to pass legislation that benefits them? Political Scientist Shamira Gelbman, the Daniel F. Evans Associate Professor in Social Sciences at Wabash College, answers this question in her new book, The Civil Rights Lobby: The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights and the Second Reconstruction (Temple UP, 2021). Gelbman examines the history of The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights (LCCR) throughout the 1950s and 60s, teasing out the individuals who engaged in lobbying, advocacy, training, and other capacities to push civil rights legislation forward while also helping to block segregationist and white supremacy advocacy in Congress. Gelbman's case study of the LCCR uses archival and scholarly resources to paint a picture of the Civil Rights Movement's policy achievements by evaluating the role of lobbying and coalitional building. The Civil Rights Lobby: The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights and Second Reconstruction begins by exploring what it takes to create coalitional groups and the uniqueness of the political climate of the 20th century. The arguments about coalitional interest groups are presented alongside the informative history of the LCCR and the policy achievements of the Civil Rights Movement. Gelbman uses interest group theory to explain many of the teachings from this case study. Coalitional groups can often function as a “weapon for the weak,” and Gelbman takes notice of both the benefits of interest group lobbying as well as the setbacks of in-fighting between lobbyists in a broad coalition like the LCCR. The work of structuring the coalition, of working through different goals and approaches, is key in understanding the complicated process for moving forward with civil rights policy creation and implementation. The LCCR was made up of a wide array of groups and members, including a diversity of religious organizations, labor unions, and a constellation of civil rights organizations. Gelbman showcases the LCCR as an organization that mobilized professional and grassroots lobbying by distinguishing commonalities among the members to develop broad-based supports for legislators to pursue civil rights legislation. Shaina Boldt assisted with this podcast. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

New Books in Law
Shamira Gelbman, "The Civil Rights Lobby: The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights and the Second Reconstruction" (Temple UP, 2021)

New Books in Law

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 50:33


Historically, how have marginalized and minority groups pushed the boundaries of representative government to pass legislation that benefits them? Political Scientist Shamira Gelbman, the Daniel F. Evans Associate Professor in Social Sciences at Wabash College, answers this question in her new book, The Civil Rights Lobby: The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights and the Second Reconstruction (Temple UP, 2021). Gelbman examines the history of The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights (LCCR) throughout the 1950s and 60s, teasing out the individuals who engaged in lobbying, advocacy, training, and other capacities to push civil rights legislation forward while also helping to block segregationist and white supremacy advocacy in Congress. Gelbman's case study of the LCCR uses archival and scholarly resources to paint a picture of the Civil Rights Movement's policy achievements by evaluating the role of lobbying and coalitional building. The Civil Rights Lobby: The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights and Second Reconstruction begins by exploring what it takes to create coalitional groups and the uniqueness of the political climate of the 20th century. The arguments about coalitional interest groups are presented alongside the informative history of the LCCR and the policy achievements of the Civil Rights Movement. Gelbman uses interest group theory to explain many of the teachings from this case study. Coalitional groups can often function as a “weapon for the weak,” and Gelbman takes notice of both the benefits of interest group lobbying as well as the setbacks of in-fighting between lobbyists in a broad coalition like the LCCR. The work of structuring the coalition, of working through different goals and approaches, is key in understanding the complicated process for moving forward with civil rights policy creation and implementation. The LCCR was made up of a wide array of groups and members, including a diversity of religious organizations, labor unions, and a constellation of civil rights organizations. Gelbman showcases the LCCR as an organization that mobilized professional and grassroots lobbying by distinguishing commonalities among the members to develop broad-based supports for legislators to pursue civil rights legislation. Shaina Boldt assisted with this podcast. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/law

New Books in American Studies
Shamira Gelbman, "The Civil Rights Lobby: The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights and the Second Reconstruction" (Temple UP, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 50:33


Historically, how have marginalized and minority groups pushed the boundaries of representative government to pass legislation that benefits them? Political Scientist Shamira Gelbman, the Daniel F. Evans Associate Professor in Social Sciences at Wabash College, answers this question in her new book, The Civil Rights Lobby: The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights and the Second Reconstruction (Temple UP, 2021). Gelbman examines the history of The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights (LCCR) throughout the 1950s and 60s, teasing out the individuals who engaged in lobbying, advocacy, training, and other capacities to push civil rights legislation forward while also helping to block segregationist and white supremacy advocacy in Congress. Gelbman's case study of the LCCR uses archival and scholarly resources to paint a picture of the Civil Rights Movement's policy achievements by evaluating the role of lobbying and coalitional building. The Civil Rights Lobby: The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights and Second Reconstruction begins by exploring what it takes to create coalitional groups and the uniqueness of the political climate of the 20th century. The arguments about coalitional interest groups are presented alongside the informative history of the LCCR and the policy achievements of the Civil Rights Movement. Gelbman uses interest group theory to explain many of the teachings from this case study. Coalitional groups can often function as a “weapon for the weak,” and Gelbman takes notice of both the benefits of interest group lobbying as well as the setbacks of in-fighting between lobbyists in a broad coalition like the LCCR. The work of structuring the coalition, of working through different goals and approaches, is key in understanding the complicated process for moving forward with civil rights policy creation and implementation. The LCCR was made up of a wide array of groups and members, including a diversity of religious organizations, labor unions, and a constellation of civil rights organizations. Gelbman showcases the LCCR as an organization that mobilized professional and grassroots lobbying by distinguishing commonalities among the members to develop broad-based supports for legislators to pursue civil rights legislation. Shaina Boldt assisted with this podcast. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books Network
Shamira Gelbman, "The Civil Rights Lobby: The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights and the Second Reconstruction" (Temple UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 50:33


Historically, how have marginalized and minority groups pushed the boundaries of representative government to pass legislation that benefits them? Political Scientist Shamira Gelbman, the Daniel F. Evans Associate Professor in Social Sciences at Wabash College, answers this question in her new book, The Civil Rights Lobby: The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights and the Second Reconstruction (Temple UP, 2021). Gelbman examines the history of The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights (LCCR) throughout the 1950s and 60s, teasing out the individuals who engaged in lobbying, advocacy, training, and other capacities to push civil rights legislation forward while also helping to block segregationist and white supremacy advocacy in Congress. Gelbman's case study of the LCCR uses archival and scholarly resources to paint a picture of the Civil Rights Movement's policy achievements by evaluating the role of lobbying and coalitional building. The Civil Rights Lobby: The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights and Second Reconstruction begins by exploring what it takes to create coalitional groups and the uniqueness of the political climate of the 20th century. The arguments about coalitional interest groups are presented alongside the informative history of the LCCR and the policy achievements of the Civil Rights Movement. Gelbman uses interest group theory to explain many of the teachings from this case study. Coalitional groups can often function as a “weapon for the weak,” and Gelbman takes notice of both the benefits of interest group lobbying as well as the setbacks of in-fighting between lobbyists in a broad coalition like the LCCR. The work of structuring the coalition, of working through different goals and approaches, is key in understanding the complicated process for moving forward with civil rights policy creation and implementation. The LCCR was made up of a wide array of groups and members, including a diversity of religious organizations, labor unions, and a constellation of civil rights organizations. Gelbman showcases the LCCR as an organization that mobilized professional and grassroots lobbying by distinguishing commonalities among the members to develop broad-based supports for legislators to pursue civil rights legislation. Shaina Boldt assisted with this podcast. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Our Two Cents
A BIG Catchup!

Our Two Cents

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 91:40


This week is a bit delayed but we do talk about our current show recommendations. We also discuss Marvel's Eternals movie as well as the first three episodes of Hawkeye.Twitter: @Our2CPodcastInstagram: our_two_cents_podcastMusic from https://filmmusic.io'Cold Funk' by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com)License: CC BY (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

Rejected Religion Podcast
RR Pod E17 P1 Roundtable with Pádraic E. Moore and Ewoud van Rijn - The 'Esoteric Turn' in Contemporary Art: Connection and Communication

Rejected Religion Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 59:13


In Part 1, Pádraic and Ewoud both talk about their backgrounds and their own interests in the esoteric/occult, and then we move on to talk more about the inspiration for 'The Great Invocation' (Garage Rotterdam), plus Ewoud's inspiration for his own installation there. We talk more about the Theosophical Society as a movement and how it relates to contemporary art; we talk about Kurt Seligmann and the surrealists' viewpoints on art, magic, and the potential of the human mind; and Ewoud discusses an experience he had in the search for a new form of art practice. PROGRAM NOTESPádraic E. Moore - Website: Padraic MooreAcademia.edu page: Pádraic E. Moore | UCD Ireland - Academia.eduArticle "A Mystic Milieu: Johannes Itten and Mazdaznan at Bauhaus Weimar": A Mystic Milieu - Articles – bauhaus imaginista (bauhaus-imaginista.org)Twitter: Páḋraic E. Moore (@M0REM00REM0RE) / TwitterEwoud van Rijn -Website: ewoud van rijnAcademia.edu page: Ewoud van Rijn | KABK Royal Academy of Art The Hague - Academia.eduArticle "Playing with the Other in the Beyond": (PDF) Playing with the Other in the Beyond | Ewoud van Rijn - Academia.eduInstagram: Ewoud van Rijn (@ewoudvanrijn) • Instagram-foto's en -video'sGarage Rotterdam, The Netherlands; "The Great Invocation" Exhibition: Catalogue | The Great Invocation (garagerotterdam.nl)Kurt Seligmann -The Mirror of Magic (innertraditions.com)Kurt Seligmann 1900-1962 : Leben und Werk. by Hauser, Stephan E.: Very Good Hardcover (1997) First edition. | Roe and Moore (abebooks.com)Paintings of Kurt Seligmann (surrealism.website)Essays by Grazina Subelyte in collected works - "Kurt Seligmann, Surrealism, and the Occult" in- EBOOK: Surrealism Occultism And Politics Book PDF EPUB TUEBL MOBI (findfullebook.com)"Spectrality and the Dance of Death in the Art of Kurt Seligmann" in - Black Mirror 2 – elsewhere – Fulgur PressInfo Grazina Subelyte: Grazina Subelyte - The CourtauldSelected Articles and Books"The Other Side" by Lars Bang Larsen: The Other Side by Lars Bang Larsen — fine print (fineprintmagazine.com)"Coming Forth by Night: Contemporary Art and the Occult" by Dr. Marco Pasi: (PDF) Coming Forth by Night. Contemporary art and the occult | Marco Pasi - Academia.eduSuzi Gablik -The Reenchantment of Art: Gablik, Suzi: 9780500276891: Amazon.com: BooksHas Modernism Failed?: Suzi Gablik: 9780500284841: Amazon.com: Books Artists Mentioned in the Podcast -Redfern Barrett, AA Bronson and Angus Cameron - Witches: Hunted, Appropriated, Empowered, Queered [Second Edition] - Printed MatterLes Complices - Witches: hunted, appropriated, empowered, queeredLinda Stupartchiara fumaiOther Reference Material -The Rosicrucian Enlightenment (archive.org)The Theosophical Enlightenment (S U N Y Series in Western Esoteric Traditions): Godwin, Joscelyn: 9780791421529: Amazon.com: BooksTheme Music: Daniel P. SheaOther Music: Stephanie Shea 

New Books in Sociology
Chun-Yi Peng, "Mediatized Taiwanese Mandarin: Popular Culture, Masculinity, and Social Perceptions" (Springer, 2021)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 66:20


Mediatized Taiwanese Mandarin: Popular Culture, Masculinity, and Social Perceptions (Springer, 2021) explores how language ideologies have emerged for gangtaiqiang through a combination of indexical and ideological processes in televised media. Gangtaiqiang (Hong Kong-Taiwan accent), a socially recognizable form of mediatized Taiwanese Mandarin, has become a stereotype for many Chinese mainlanders who have little real-life interaction with Taiwanese people. Using both qualitative and quantitative approaches, the author examines how Chinese millennials perceive gangtaiqiang by focusing on the following questions: 1) the role of televised media in the formation of language attitudes, and 2) how shifting gender ideologies are performed and embodied such attitudes. This book presents empirical evidence to argue that gangtaiqiang should, in fact, be conceptualized as a mediatized variety of Mandarin, rather than the actual speech of people in Hong Kong or Taiwan. The analyses in this book point to an emerging realignment among the Chinese towards gangtaiqiang, a variety traditionally associated with chic, urban television celebrities and young cosmopolitan types. In contrast to Beijing Mandarin, Taiwanese Mandarin is now perceived to be pretentious, babyish, and emasculated, mirroring the power dynamics between Taiwan and China. Chun-Yi Peng is an Associate Professor at Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY. His primary research interests are in the fields of sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology. Li-Ping Chen is Postdoctoral Scholar and Teaching Fellow in the East Asian Studies Center at the University of Southern California. Her research interests include literary translingualism, diaspora, and nativism in Sinophone, inter-Asian, and transpacific contexts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books Network
Chun-Yi Peng, "Mediatized Taiwanese Mandarin: Popular Culture, Masculinity, and Social Perceptions" (Springer, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 66:20


Mediatized Taiwanese Mandarin: Popular Culture, Masculinity, and Social Perceptions (Springer, 2021) explores how language ideologies have emerged for gangtaiqiang through a combination of indexical and ideological processes in televised media. Gangtaiqiang (Hong Kong-Taiwan accent), a socially recognizable form of mediatized Taiwanese Mandarin, has become a stereotype for many Chinese mainlanders who have little real-life interaction with Taiwanese people. Using both qualitative and quantitative approaches, the author examines how Chinese millennials perceive gangtaiqiang by focusing on the following questions: 1) the role of televised media in the formation of language attitudes, and 2) how shifting gender ideologies are performed and embodied such attitudes. This book presents empirical evidence to argue that gangtaiqiang should, in fact, be conceptualized as a mediatized variety of Mandarin, rather than the actual speech of people in Hong Kong or Taiwan. The analyses in this book point to an emerging realignment among the Chinese towards gangtaiqiang, a variety traditionally associated with chic, urban television celebrities and young cosmopolitan types. In contrast to Beijing Mandarin, Taiwanese Mandarin is now perceived to be pretentious, babyish, and emasculated, mirroring the power dynamics between Taiwan and China. Chun-Yi Peng is an Associate Professor at Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY. His primary research interests are in the fields of sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology. Li-Ping Chen is Postdoctoral Scholar and Teaching Fellow in the East Asian Studies Center at the University of Southern California. Her research interests include literary translingualism, diaspora, and nativism in Sinophone, inter-Asian, and transpacific contexts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in East Asian Studies
Chun-Yi Peng, "Mediatized Taiwanese Mandarin: Popular Culture, Masculinity, and Social Perceptions" (Springer, 2021)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 66:20


Mediatized Taiwanese Mandarin: Popular Culture, Masculinity, and Social Perceptions (Springer, 2021) explores how language ideologies have emerged for gangtaiqiang through a combination of indexical and ideological processes in televised media. Gangtaiqiang (Hong Kong-Taiwan accent), a socially recognizable form of mediatized Taiwanese Mandarin, has become a stereotype for many Chinese mainlanders who have little real-life interaction with Taiwanese people. Using both qualitative and quantitative approaches, the author examines how Chinese millennials perceive gangtaiqiang by focusing on the following questions: 1) the role of televised media in the formation of language attitudes, and 2) how shifting gender ideologies are performed and embodied such attitudes. This book presents empirical evidence to argue that gangtaiqiang should, in fact, be conceptualized as a mediatized variety of Mandarin, rather than the actual speech of people in Hong Kong or Taiwan. The analyses in this book point to an emerging realignment among the Chinese towards gangtaiqiang, a variety traditionally associated with chic, urban television celebrities and young cosmopolitan types. In contrast to Beijing Mandarin, Taiwanese Mandarin is now perceived to be pretentious, babyish, and emasculated, mirroring the power dynamics between Taiwan and China. Chun-Yi Peng is an Associate Professor at Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY. His primary research interests are in the fields of sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology. Li-Ping Chen is Postdoctoral Scholar and Teaching Fellow in the East Asian Studies Center at the University of Southern California. Her research interests include literary translingualism, diaspora, and nativism in Sinophone, inter-Asian, and transpacific contexts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

New Books in Chinese Studies
Chun-Yi Peng, "Mediatized Taiwanese Mandarin: Popular Culture, Masculinity, and Social Perceptions" (Springer, 2021)

New Books in Chinese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 66:20


Mediatized Taiwanese Mandarin: Popular Culture, Masculinity, and Social Perceptions (Springer, 2021) explores how language ideologies have emerged for gangtaiqiang through a combination of indexical and ideological processes in televised media. Gangtaiqiang (Hong Kong-Taiwan accent), a socially recognizable form of mediatized Taiwanese Mandarin, has become a stereotype for many Chinese mainlanders who have little real-life interaction with Taiwanese people. Using both qualitative and quantitative approaches, the author examines how Chinese millennials perceive gangtaiqiang by focusing on the following questions: 1) the role of televised media in the formation of language attitudes, and 2) how shifting gender ideologies are performed and embodied such attitudes. This book presents empirical evidence to argue that gangtaiqiang should, in fact, be conceptualized as a mediatized variety of Mandarin, rather than the actual speech of people in Hong Kong or Taiwan. The analyses in this book point to an emerging realignment among the Chinese towards gangtaiqiang, a variety traditionally associated with chic, urban television celebrities and young cosmopolitan types. In contrast to Beijing Mandarin, Taiwanese Mandarin is now perceived to be pretentious, babyish, and emasculated, mirroring the power dynamics between Taiwan and China. Chun-Yi Peng is an Associate Professor at Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY. His primary research interests are in the fields of sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology. Li-Ping Chen is Postdoctoral Scholar and Teaching Fellow in the East Asian Studies Center at the University of Southern California. Her research interests include literary translingualism, diaspora, and nativism in Sinophone, inter-Asian, and transpacific contexts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/chinese-studies

New Books in Communications
Chun-Yi Peng, "Mediatized Taiwanese Mandarin: Popular Culture, Masculinity, and Social Perceptions" (Springer, 2021)

New Books in Communications

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 66:20


Mediatized Taiwanese Mandarin: Popular Culture, Masculinity, and Social Perceptions (Springer, 2021) explores how language ideologies have emerged for gangtaiqiang through a combination of indexical and ideological processes in televised media. Gangtaiqiang (Hong Kong-Taiwan accent), a socially recognizable form of mediatized Taiwanese Mandarin, has become a stereotype for many Chinese mainlanders who have little real-life interaction with Taiwanese people. Using both qualitative and quantitative approaches, the author examines how Chinese millennials perceive gangtaiqiang by focusing on the following questions: 1) the role of televised media in the formation of language attitudes, and 2) how shifting gender ideologies are performed and embodied such attitudes. This book presents empirical evidence to argue that gangtaiqiang should, in fact, be conceptualized as a mediatized variety of Mandarin, rather than the actual speech of people in Hong Kong or Taiwan. The analyses in this book point to an emerging realignment among the Chinese towards gangtaiqiang, a variety traditionally associated with chic, urban television celebrities and young cosmopolitan types. In contrast to Beijing Mandarin, Taiwanese Mandarin is now perceived to be pretentious, babyish, and emasculated, mirroring the power dynamics between Taiwan and China. Chun-Yi Peng is an Associate Professor at Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY. His primary research interests are in the fields of sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology. Li-Ping Chen is Postdoctoral Scholar and Teaching Fellow in the East Asian Studies Center at the University of Southern California. Her research interests include literary translingualism, diaspora, and nativism in Sinophone, inter-Asian, and transpacific contexts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/communications

New Books in Gender Studies
Chun-Yi Peng, "Mediatized Taiwanese Mandarin: Popular Culture, Masculinity, and Social Perceptions" (Springer, 2021)

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 66:20


Mediatized Taiwanese Mandarin: Popular Culture, Masculinity, and Social Perceptions (Springer, 2021) explores how language ideologies have emerged for gangtaiqiang through a combination of indexical and ideological processes in televised media. Gangtaiqiang (Hong Kong-Taiwan accent), a socially recognizable form of mediatized Taiwanese Mandarin, has become a stereotype for many Chinese mainlanders who have little real-life interaction with Taiwanese people. Using both qualitative and quantitative approaches, the author examines how Chinese millennials perceive gangtaiqiang by focusing on the following questions: 1) the role of televised media in the formation of language attitudes, and 2) how shifting gender ideologies are performed and embodied such attitudes. This book presents empirical evidence to argue that gangtaiqiang should, in fact, be conceptualized as a mediatized variety of Mandarin, rather than the actual speech of people in Hong Kong or Taiwan. The analyses in this book point to an emerging realignment among the Chinese towards gangtaiqiang, a variety traditionally associated with chic, urban television celebrities and young cosmopolitan types. In contrast to Beijing Mandarin, Taiwanese Mandarin is now perceived to be pretentious, babyish, and emasculated, mirroring the power dynamics between Taiwan and China. Chun-Yi Peng is an Associate Professor at Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY. His primary research interests are in the fields of sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology. Li-Ping Chen is Postdoctoral Scholar and Teaching Fellow in the East Asian Studies Center at the University of Southern California. Her research interests include literary translingualism, diaspora, and nativism in Sinophone, inter-Asian, and transpacific contexts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

Scott Radley Show
Is Canada's economy back? Will we return to sports without fans in the stands? & Is the popularity of foreign TV shows & movies here to stay?

Scott Radley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 40:30


The federal government's economic statement included Chrystia Freeland saying that the economy is back but is it really? Guest: Marvin Ryder, Associate Professor of Marketing, DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University - We're seeing a lot of positive COVID-19 tests in the sports world which has been leading to postponed games and multiple players being unavailable for games at a time. Could this lead to leagues having to shutdown temporarily again or will we see the return of games without fans in the stands? Guest: Dr. Michael Naraine, Assistant Professor of Sports Business, Brock University - We've seen a big rise in the popularity of foreign TV shows and movies but are they here to stay or has their popularity in North America merely been a quirk of the COVID-19 pandemic? Guest: Robert Thompson, Director, Bleier Center for Television & Popular Culture; Trustee Professor of Television, Radio and Film See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

New Books in American Studies
Robert B. Talisse, "Sustaining Democracy: What We Owe to the Other Side" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 67:39


Robert Talisse's new book, Sustaining Democracy: What We Owe to the Other Side (Oxford UP, 2021) is, in a certain sense, a continuation of his work from his previous book, Overdoing Democracy: Why We Must Put Politics in its Place (Oxford University Press, 2019). As we discuss during the podcast conversation, Sustaining Democracy explores the conundrum or tension that may well be inherent in democracy, the conflict between holding fast to our beliefs about what we think is just and appropriate for society, and giving our political opponents the respect they deserve even if we disagree with their beliefs about justice. This is tricky, especially in our polarized political world, but Talisse argues that it is the very polarization that we need to pay attention to, since there are two kinds of polarization, external and internal. We have become used to the external polarization within democracy, which does not solve the problem, but it has become regularized to cast our political opponents as an “enemy” who does not, in fact, support justice and equality—on whichever side of the aisle one sits. This is the warped perspective that is applied by many to those with whom they politically disagree. Sustaining Democracy also exposes the growing anti-democratic, hierarchical shifts that have transpired within political groups. As noted throughout the book, Talisse highlights the need for internal reflection, especially among those who are on the “same side,” so that the political dynamics among like-minded citizens don't devolve into opinion policing and echo chambers. Part of the concern here is the inclination within these political groupings towards homogeneity and conformity. This is belief polarization—and it pushes in undemocratic directions. Talisse, in a somewhat contrarian approach, wants to determine if the solution to democracy's problems is not, in fact, more democracy, as has often been suggested. The solution may be to move away from the political fray for a time, to reflect on ideas and issues on one's own, and to then re-enter the political community. This is a lively and frustrating thesis, and the conversation and the book reflect these overlapping tensions and considerations about democracy, deliberation, and political engagement. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in Politics
Robert B. Talisse, "Sustaining Democracy: What We Owe to the Other Side" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 67:39


Robert Talisse's new book, Sustaining Democracy: What We Owe to the Other Side (Oxford UP, 2021) is, in a certain sense, a continuation of his work from his previous book, Overdoing Democracy: Why We Must Put Politics in its Place (Oxford University Press, 2019). As we discuss during the podcast conversation, Sustaining Democracy explores the conundrum or tension that may well be inherent in democracy, the conflict between holding fast to our beliefs about what we think is just and appropriate for society, and giving our political opponents the respect they deserve even if we disagree with their beliefs about justice. This is tricky, especially in our polarized political world, but Talisse argues that it is the very polarization that we need to pay attention to, since there are two kinds of polarization, external and internal. We have become used to the external polarization within democracy, which does not solve the problem, but it has become regularized to cast our political opponents as an “enemy” who does not, in fact, support justice and equality—on whichever side of the aisle one sits. This is the warped perspective that is applied by many to those with whom they politically disagree. Sustaining Democracy also exposes the growing anti-democratic, hierarchical shifts that have transpired within political groups. As noted throughout the book, Talisse highlights the need for internal reflection, especially among those who are on the “same side,” so that the political dynamics among like-minded citizens don't devolve into opinion policing and echo chambers. Part of the concern here is the inclination within these political groupings towards homogeneity and conformity. This is belief polarization—and it pushes in undemocratic directions. Talisse, in a somewhat contrarian approach, wants to determine if the solution to democracy's problems is not, in fact, more democracy, as has often been suggested. The solution may be to move away from the political fray for a time, to reflect on ideas and issues on one's own, and to then re-enter the political community. This is a lively and frustrating thesis, and the conversation and the book reflect these overlapping tensions and considerations about democracy, deliberation, and political engagement. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/politics-and-polemics

New Books Network
Robert B. Talisse, "Sustaining Democracy: What We Owe to the Other Side" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 67:39


Robert Talisse's new book, Sustaining Democracy: What We Owe to the Other Side (Oxford UP, 2021) is, in a certain sense, a continuation of his work from his previous book, Overdoing Democracy: Why We Must Put Politics in its Place (Oxford University Press, 2019). As we discuss during the podcast conversation, Sustaining Democracy explores the conundrum or tension that may well be inherent in democracy, the conflict between holding fast to our beliefs about what we think is just and appropriate for society, and giving our political opponents the respect they deserve even if we disagree with their beliefs about justice. This is tricky, especially in our polarized political world, but Talisse argues that it is the very polarization that we need to pay attention to, since there are two kinds of polarization, external and internal. We have become used to the external polarization within democracy, which does not solve the problem, but it has become regularized to cast our political opponents as an “enemy” who does not, in fact, support justice and equality—on whichever side of the aisle one sits. This is the warped perspective that is applied by many to those with whom they politically disagree. Sustaining Democracy also exposes the growing anti-democratic, hierarchical shifts that have transpired within political groups. As noted throughout the book, Talisse highlights the need for internal reflection, especially among those who are on the “same side,” so that the political dynamics among like-minded citizens don't devolve into opinion policing and echo chambers. Part of the concern here is the inclination within these political groupings towards homogeneity and conformity. This is belief polarization—and it pushes in undemocratic directions. Talisse, in a somewhat contrarian approach, wants to determine if the solution to democracy's problems is not, in fact, more democracy, as has often been suggested. The solution may be to move away from the political fray for a time, to reflect on ideas and issues on one's own, and to then re-enter the political community. This is a lively and frustrating thesis, and the conversation and the book reflect these overlapping tensions and considerations about democracy, deliberation, and political engagement. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Political Science
Robert B. Talisse, "Sustaining Democracy: What We Owe to the Other Side" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 67:39


Robert Talisse's new book, Sustaining Democracy: What We Owe to the Other Side (Oxford UP, 2021) is, in a certain sense, a continuation of his work from his previous book, Overdoing Democracy: Why We Must Put Politics in its Place (Oxford University Press, 2019). As we discuss during the podcast conversation, Sustaining Democracy explores the conundrum or tension that may well be inherent in democracy, the conflict between holding fast to our beliefs about what we think is just and appropriate for society, and giving our political opponents the respect they deserve even if we disagree with their beliefs about justice. This is tricky, especially in our polarized political world, but Talisse argues that it is the very polarization that we need to pay attention to, since there are two kinds of polarization, external and internal. We have become used to the external polarization within democracy, which does not solve the problem, but it has become regularized to cast our political opponents as an “enemy” who does not, in fact, support justice and equality—on whichever side of the aisle one sits. This is the warped perspective that is applied by many to those with whom they politically disagree. Sustaining Democracy also exposes the growing anti-democratic, hierarchical shifts that have transpired within political groups. As noted throughout the book, Talisse highlights the need for internal reflection, especially among those who are on the “same side,” so that the political dynamics among like-minded citizens don't devolve into opinion policing and echo chambers. Part of the concern here is the inclination within these political groupings towards homogeneity and conformity. This is belief polarization—and it pushes in undemocratic directions. Talisse, in a somewhat contrarian approach, wants to determine if the solution to democracy's problems is not, in fact, more democracy, as has often been suggested. The solution may be to move away from the political fray for a time, to reflect on ideas and issues on one's own, and to then re-enter the political community. This is a lively and frustrating thesis, and the conversation and the book reflect these overlapping tensions and considerations about democracy, deliberation, and political engagement. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books in Sociology
Robert B. Talisse, "Sustaining Democracy: What We Owe to the Other Side" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 67:39


Robert Talisse's new book, Sustaining Democracy: What We Owe to the Other Side (Oxford UP, 2021) is, in a certain sense, a continuation of his work from his previous book, Overdoing Democracy: Why We Must Put Politics in its Place (Oxford University Press, 2019). As we discuss during the podcast conversation, Sustaining Democracy explores the conundrum or tension that may well be inherent in democracy, the conflict between holding fast to our beliefs about what we think is just and appropriate for society, and giving our political opponents the respect they deserve even if we disagree with their beliefs about justice. This is tricky, especially in our polarized political world, but Talisse argues that it is the very polarization that we need to pay attention to, since there are two kinds of polarization, external and internal. We have become used to the external polarization within democracy, which does not solve the problem, but it has become regularized to cast our political opponents as an “enemy” who does not, in fact, support justice and equality—on whichever side of the aisle one sits. This is the warped perspective that is applied by many to those with whom they politically disagree. Sustaining Democracy also exposes the growing anti-democratic, hierarchical shifts that have transpired within political groups. As noted throughout the book, Talisse highlights the need for internal reflection, especially among those who are on the “same side,” so that the political dynamics among like-minded citizens don't devolve into opinion policing and echo chambers. Part of the concern here is the inclination within these political groupings towards homogeneity and conformity. This is belief polarization—and it pushes in undemocratic directions. Talisse, in a somewhat contrarian approach, wants to determine if the solution to democracy's problems is not, in fact, more democracy, as has often been suggested. The solution may be to move away from the political fray for a time, to reflect on ideas and issues on one's own, and to then re-enter the political community. This is a lively and frustrating thesis, and the conversation and the book reflect these overlapping tensions and considerations about democracy, deliberation, and political engagement. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

Is This Just Bad?
116: Jury Duty

Is This Just Bad?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 78:28


In this episode, Professor Mouse and the Cosmologist discuss Jury Duty, Avengers: Endgame, and other things.[Social Media]Email: isthisjustbad@gmail.comTwitter: https://twitter.com/isthisjustbadInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/isthisjustbad/Bucky Bear's IG: https://www.instagram.com/sgtbuckybearMad Moll's IG: https://www.instagram.com/madmollcosplay/

Long Story Short
Long Story Short, I Wanna be a Carefree Black Girl

Long Story Short

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 73:48


This week Skye and Amanda read Carefree Black Girls: A Celebration of Black Women in Pop Culture by Zeba Blay and discuss how negative stereotypes and identities continue to follow us women through everyday life, pop culture, and beyond. Listen in as the two discuss what they consider their definition of a carefree girl by using examples of Black women in pop culture who have shown them what it means to show up as their true selves, take up space and have fun while doing it. Amanda finds inspiration to practice being more carefree in particular areas of her life while challenging her prior programming that might dimmed this light. Skye discusses how she plans on continuing to be carefree and recognizes the areas that she has questioned herself for the sake of "not being too much". Both hosts ultimately commit to a new goal which is to live a joyous life regardless of any adversity.Books mentioned in this week's episode are linked to our Bookshop.org shop*Carefree Black Girls: A Celebration of Black Women in Popular Culture by Zeba BlayThis week's ‘Bout That Action! highlight is: The Bronx is ReadingDonate to The Bronx is Reading Bookstore fund to help bring a children's bookstore to the area.Check out what Skye & Amanda have been loving this week: Thoughts of a Colored Man on BroadwaySupport Long Story Short and Local Bookstores: Libro.FM - get two audiobooks for the price of one when you use the code LSSPODCAST when signing up for your first month of membership. Long Story Short Hotline: (646) 543-6232Follow us online:Instagram: @LongStoryShortPodTwitter: @LSSpodcastFacebook: @LongStoryShortPodEmail: info.longstoryshortpod@gmail.com*Purchasing books through Bookshop.org earns Long Story Short a small commission.

New Books Network
Amy Fried and Douglas B. Harris, "At War with Government: How Conservatives Weaponized Distrust from Goldwater to Trump" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 62:44


Political Scientists Amy Fried (University of Maine) and Douglas B. Harris (Loyola University Maryland) have a new book, At War with Government: How Conservatives Weaponized Distrust from Goldwater to Trump (Columbia UP, 2021), that looks at the question of distrust within American politics and how that distrust has moved from healthy skepticism to a weapon to be used to divide citizens and undermine the entire governmental system in the United States. Part of this is an historical examination, starting with the basic skepticism about power that was present in North America even before the Founding period. But the thrust of the book traces this distrust of government over the past half century, and highlights how it has become more overt, and more of a rhetorical tool used, in particular, by members of the Republican Party and the conservative movement. Fried and Harris explain how this narrative of distrust in government has been used as an organizing umbrella for the contemporary Republican Party, as the strategic glue that holds together social conservatives, economic conservatives and libertarians, and national security hawks. This is the same organizing umbrella that was also implemented by politicians, especially in the use of the Southern Strategy, to pull the southern states into the Republican coalition over the past half century. This weaponization of distrust has been used, as the authors, note, in four different areas that can be seen again and again across historical periods during the last fifty years; these four areas include building organization, winning elections, securing policy gains, and moving functional power into the political institutions when they are controlled by the GOP. This use of distrust has also been woven into the conservative political identity, pulling in racial components and advocacy against the government itself to continue to build this political coalition. Fried and Harris make use of a lot of different archival sources to examine and explain how conservative elites have used this distrust strategically to help turn out voters, build the political organization, and construct a rhetorical narrative that indicts the American political system. At War with Government: How Conservatives Weaponized Distrust from Goldwater to Trump helps to explain not only the rise of Donald Trump, but also the asymmetrical polarization in which voters now find themselves in the U.S. system, and how Trump and those who preceded him capitalized on American distrust of and skepticism towards government. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Amy Fried and Douglas B. Harris, "At War with Government: How Conservatives Weaponized Distrust from Goldwater to Trump" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 62:44


Political Scientists Amy Fried (University of Maine) and Douglas B. Harris (Loyola University Maryland) have a new book, At War with Government: How Conservatives Weaponized Distrust from Goldwater to Trump (Columbia UP, 2021), that looks at the question of distrust within American politics and how that distrust has moved from healthy skepticism to a weapon to be used to divide citizens and undermine the entire governmental system in the United States. Part of this is an historical examination, starting with the basic skepticism about power that was present in North America even before the Founding period. But the thrust of the book traces this distrust of government over the past half century, and highlights how it has become more overt, and more of a rhetorical tool used, in particular, by members of the Republican Party and the conservative movement. Fried and Harris explain how this narrative of distrust in government has been used as an organizing umbrella for the contemporary Republican Party, as the strategic glue that holds together social conservatives, economic conservatives and libertarians, and national security hawks. This is the same organizing umbrella that was also implemented by politicians, especially in the use of the Southern Strategy, to pull the southern states into the Republican coalition over the past half century. This weaponization of distrust has been used, as the authors, note, in four different areas that can be seen again and again across historical periods during the last fifty years; these four areas include building organization, winning elections, securing policy gains, and moving functional power into the political institutions when they are controlled by the GOP. This use of distrust has also been woven into the conservative political identity, pulling in racial components and advocacy against the government itself to continue to build this political coalition. Fried and Harris make use of a lot of different archival sources to examine and explain how conservative elites have used this distrust strategically to help turn out voters, build the political organization, and construct a rhetorical narrative that indicts the American political system. At War with Government: How Conservatives Weaponized Distrust from Goldwater to Trump helps to explain not only the rise of Donald Trump, but also the asymmetrical polarization in which voters now find themselves in the U.S. system, and how Trump and those who preceded him capitalized on American distrust of and skepticism towards government. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in American Studies
Amy Fried and Douglas B. Harris, "At War with Government: How Conservatives Weaponized Distrust from Goldwater to Trump" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 62:44


Political Scientists Amy Fried (University of Maine) and Douglas B. Harris (Loyola University Maryland) have a new book, At War with Government: How Conservatives Weaponized Distrust from Goldwater to Trump (Columbia UP, 2021), that looks at the question of distrust within American politics and how that distrust has moved from healthy skepticism to a weapon to be used to divide citizens and undermine the entire governmental system in the United States. Part of this is an historical examination, starting with the basic skepticism about power that was present in North America even before the Founding period. But the thrust of the book traces this distrust of government over the past half century, and highlights how it has become more overt, and more of a rhetorical tool used, in particular, by members of the Republican Party and the conservative movement. Fried and Harris explain how this narrative of distrust in government has been used as an organizing umbrella for the contemporary Republican Party, as the strategic glue that holds together social conservatives, economic conservatives and libertarians, and national security hawks. This is the same organizing umbrella that was also implemented by politicians, especially in the use of the Southern Strategy, to pull the southern states into the Republican coalition over the past half century. This weaponization of distrust has been used, as the authors, note, in four different areas that can be seen again and again across historical periods during the last fifty years; these four areas include building organization, winning elections, securing policy gains, and moving functional power into the political institutions when they are controlled by the GOP. This use of distrust has also been woven into the conservative political identity, pulling in racial components and advocacy against the government itself to continue to build this political coalition. Fried and Harris make use of a lot of different archival sources to examine and explain how conservative elites have used this distrust strategically to help turn out voters, build the political organization, and construct a rhetorical narrative that indicts the American political system. At War with Government: How Conservatives Weaponized Distrust from Goldwater to Trump helps to explain not only the rise of Donald Trump, but also the asymmetrical polarization in which voters now find themselves in the U.S. system, and how Trump and those who preceded him capitalized on American distrust of and skepticism towards government. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in Politics
Amy Fried and Douglas B. Harris, "At War with Government: How Conservatives Weaponized Distrust from Goldwater to Trump" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 62:44


Political Scientists Amy Fried (University of Maine) and Douglas B. Harris (Loyola University Maryland) have a new book, At War with Government: How Conservatives Weaponized Distrust from Goldwater to Trump (Columbia UP, 2021), that looks at the question of distrust within American politics and how that distrust has moved from healthy skepticism to a weapon to be used to divide citizens and undermine the entire governmental system in the United States. Part of this is an historical examination, starting with the basic skepticism about power that was present in North America even before the Founding period. But the thrust of the book traces this distrust of government over the past half century, and highlights how it has become more overt, and more of a rhetorical tool used, in particular, by members of the Republican Party and the conservative movement. Fried and Harris explain how this narrative of distrust in government has been used as an organizing umbrella for the contemporary Republican Party, as the strategic glue that holds together social conservatives, economic conservatives and libertarians, and national security hawks. This is the same organizing umbrella that was also implemented by politicians, especially in the use of the Southern Strategy, to pull the southern states into the Republican coalition over the past half century. This weaponization of distrust has been used, as the authors, note, in four different areas that can be seen again and again across historical periods during the last fifty years; these four areas include building organization, winning elections, securing policy gains, and moving functional power into the political institutions when they are controlled by the GOP. This use of distrust has also been woven into the conservative political identity, pulling in racial components and advocacy against the government itself to continue to build this political coalition. Fried and Harris make use of a lot of different archival sources to examine and explain how conservative elites have used this distrust strategically to help turn out voters, build the political organization, and construct a rhetorical narrative that indicts the American political system. At War with Government: How Conservatives Weaponized Distrust from Goldwater to Trump helps to explain not only the rise of Donald Trump, but also the asymmetrical polarization in which voters now find themselves in the U.S. system, and how Trump and those who preceded him capitalized on American distrust of and skepticism towards government. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/politics-and-polemics

New Books in Political Science
Amy Fried and Douglas B. Harris, "At War with Government: How Conservatives Weaponized Distrust from Goldwater to Trump" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 62:44


Political Scientists Amy Fried (University of Maine) and Douglas B. Harris (Loyola University Maryland) have a new book, At War with Government: How Conservatives Weaponized Distrust from Goldwater to Trump (Columbia UP, 2021), that looks at the question of distrust within American politics and how that distrust has moved from healthy skepticism to a weapon to be used to divide citizens and undermine the entire governmental system in the United States. Part of this is an historical examination, starting with the basic skepticism about power that was present in North America even before the Founding period. But the thrust of the book traces this distrust of government over the past half century, and highlights how it has become more overt, and more of a rhetorical tool used, in particular, by members of the Republican Party and the conservative movement. Fried and Harris explain how this narrative of distrust in government has been used as an organizing umbrella for the contemporary Republican Party, as the strategic glue that holds together social conservatives, economic conservatives and libertarians, and national security hawks. This is the same organizing umbrella that was also implemented by politicians, especially in the use of the Southern Strategy, to pull the southern states into the Republican coalition over the past half century. This weaponization of distrust has been used, as the authors, note, in four different areas that can be seen again and again across historical periods during the last fifty years; these four areas include building organization, winning elections, securing policy gains, and moving functional power into the political institutions when they are controlled by the GOP. This use of distrust has also been woven into the conservative political identity, pulling in racial components and advocacy against the government itself to continue to build this political coalition. Fried and Harris make use of a lot of different archival sources to examine and explain how conservative elites have used this distrust strategically to help turn out voters, build the political organization, and construct a rhetorical narrative that indicts the American political system. At War with Government: How Conservatives Weaponized Distrust from Goldwater to Trump helps to explain not only the rise of Donald Trump, but also the asymmetrical polarization in which voters now find themselves in the U.S. system, and how Trump and those who preceded him capitalized on American distrust of and skepticism towards government. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

Scarytales
La Llorona & The Tragic Story of Andrea Yates

Scarytales

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 48:34


Shout out to special guest, Whitney, for bringing us the story of La Llorona this week! Beware the wailing woman who lurks by water at night to drown her unsuspecting victims. Sadly, there is a true crime case with unfortunate parallels to the legend of the “wailing woman.” In 2001, Andrea Yates made headlines for drowning all 5 of her children in the bathtub. Sources: -https://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood/2019/04/la-llorona-real-mexican-legend-curse-of-la-llorona-movie -https://allthatsinteresting.com/la-llorona -https://www.oprah.com/omagazine/andrea-yates-a-cry-in-the-dark -https://www.cnn.com/2013/03/25/us/andrea-yates-fast-facts/index.html -https://allthatsinteresting.com/andrea-yates -https://murderpedia.org/female.Y/y/yates-andrea.htm -There Was A Woman: La Llorona from Folklore to Popular Culture by Domino Renee Perez

Chasing Immortality
Rasputin: The Man Who Can't Be Killed

Chasing Immortality

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 63:38


Works CitedAzar, Helen. “TIME TRAVEL WITH ROMANOV FAMILY: CHILDREN'S ISLAND.” Theromanovfamily.Com, 18 June 2015, www.theromanovfamily.com/the-alexander-palace-and-park.Ball, Jacqueline. “Should Dogs Be Prescribed for Chronic Pain? | Physician's Weekly.” Www.Physiciansweekly.Com, Physician's Weekly, 14 Oct. 2014, www.physiciansweekly.com/should-dogs-be-prescribed-for-chronic-pain/#:%7E:text=Research%20shows%20that%20being%20in,often%20results%20from%20chronic%20pain.Bezrutczyk, Destiny, and Theresa Parisi. “Speedball (Heroin & Cocaine) Abuse And Recovery.” Addiction Center, 30 Mar. 2021, www.addictioncenter.com/drugs/heroin/speedball.Biographics. “Grigori Rasputin: The Devil Incarnate.” YouTube, uploaded by Simon Whistler, 21 Jan. 2019, www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZOHQwzA0bM.Biography. “Rasputin.” Biography, 13 Dec. 2019, www.biography.com/political-figure/rasputin#:%7E:text=After%20failing%20to%20become%20a,his%20political%20influence%20was%20minor.Bouchard, Anthony. “The Science Behind How Cyanide Kills You.” LabRoots, 13 Sept. 2017, www.labroots.com/trending/videos/11035/the-science-behind-how-cyanide-kills-you.Clinical Knowledge Network. “Cupid's Chemical Addiction – the Science of Love | Clinical Knowledge Network.” CKN, Clinical Knowledge Network Queensland, 2017, www.ckn.org.au/content/cupid%E2%80%99s-chemical-addiction-%E2%80%93-science-love#:%7E:text=High%20levels%20of%20dopamine%20and,eat%20and%20can't%20sleep.Cohut, Maria. “Simply Being with Someone You Love Can Lessen Physical Pain.” Medical News Today, 28 Aug. 2019, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326168#Partners-presence-can-reduce-acute-pain.Cult of Weird. “Rasputin's Penis: The Mythical, Magical Manhood of Russia's Mad Monk.” Cult of Weird, 5 Feb. 2021, www.cultofweird.com/curiosities/rasputin-penis.Cutler, Max. “5 Times Rasputin Should Have Died.” Parcast, 9 Aug. 2016, www.parcast.com/blog/2016/8/9/5-times-rasputin-should-have-died.Dennison, Tracy, and Steven Nafziger. “Micro-Perspectives on 19Th-Century Russian Living Standards.” Social Science History Association, 2017, pp. 1–50. web.williams.edu, web.williams.edu/Economics/wp/nafzigerMicroLivingStandards_WilliamsWorkingPaper_Nov2007.pdf.Dickinson, Sophie. “Grigori Rasputin Myths Busted: Murder, Height, and Where Is His Penis?” Metro, 21 Feb. 2021, metro.co.uk/2021/02/21/grigori-rasputin-myths-busted-murder-height-and-where-is-his-penis-14115851.Ėtkind, Aleksandr. “Russian Sects Still Seem Obscure.” Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History, vol. 2, no. 1, 2001, pp. 165–81. Crossref, doi:10.1353/kri.2008.0056.Harkup, Kathryn. “Poisoned, Shot and Beaten: Why Cyanide Alone May Have Failed to Kill Rasputin.” The Guardian, 9 May 2017, www.theguardian.com/science/blog/2017/jan/13/poisoned-shot-and-beaten-why-cyanide-may-have-failed-to-kill-rasputin.Harris, Carolyn. “The Murder of Rasputin, 100 Years Later.” Smithsonian Magazine, 27 Dec. 2016, www.smithsonianmag.com/history/murder-rasputin-100-years-later-180961572.Hasic, Albinko. “5 Myths and Truths About Rasputin.” Time, 29 Dec. 2016, time.com/4606775/5-myths-rasputin.Heatherington, Kimberley. “History on Screen: The Fall of the Romanov Dynasty at the Russian Embassy Carmel Institute of Russian Culture & History Hosts Screening of Silent Film Masterpiece.” American University, American University Washington DC, 4 Mar. 2018, www.american.edu/cas/carmel/news/the-fall-of-the-romanov-dynasty.cfm.“How Not To Die From A Stabbing.” YouTube, uploaded by BBC Three, 21 Dec. 2017, www.youtube.com/watch?v=l5Jx3EsdFGQ.Janos, Adam. “What Was It Like to Die of Cyanide Poisoning at Jonestown?” A&E, 26 Feb. 2018, www.aetv.com/real-crime/jonestown-how-did-it-feel-to-die-of-cyanide-poisoning.Keim, Brandon. “How Love Makes (Some) Pain Go Away.” Wired, 3 June 2017, www.wired.com/2011/06/love-reduces-pain.Lindsay Holiday. “Tsarina Alexandra Feodorovna Romanov of Russia.” YouTube, uploaded by Lindsay Holiday, 12 Jan. 2021, www.youtube.com/watch?v=-KHlajTb4OE.Medicosis Perfectionalis. “Cyanide Poisoning.” YouTube, uploaded by Medicosis Perfectionalis, 21 Jan. 2019, www.youtube.com/watch?v=UbkYCrLXHNk.---. “Cyanide Poisoning Diagnosis and Treatment.” YouTube, uploaded by Medicosis Perfectionalis, 22 Jan. 2019, www.youtube.com/watch?v=FMMsSzGXJ9A.“Morphine (Injection) | Michigan Medicine.” University of Michigan Medicine, www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/d00308v1. Accessed 2 Apr. 2021.Myers, Steven Lee. “‘Rasputin' Unravels the Myths of the ‘Mad Monk.'” The New York Times, 29 Dec. 2016, www.nytimes.com/2016/12/29/books/rasputin-biography-douglas-smith.html.National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH). “CDC | Facts About Cyanide.” Center For Disease Control, Center For Disease Control, 4 Apr. 2018, emergency.cdc.gov/agent/cyanide/basics/facts.asp.Omidi, Maryam. “Cult of the Weird: Six of Russia's Strangest Museums.” The Calvert Journal, 7 Apr. 2014, www.calvertjournal.com/articles/show/2247/six-of-russias-strangest-museums.“Opium Side Effects.” Good Rx, www.goodrx.com/opium/side-effects.Parikh MD, MBA, Arpan. “Cocaine: How It Works, Effects, and Risks.” WedMD, 9 Feb. 2021, www.webmd.com/mental-health/addiction/cocaine-use-and-its-effects#1.Robakidze, Julia. “The Violent End of Rasputin – Details of His Fateful Last Night.” The Vintage News, 1 Oct. 2019, www.thevintagenews.com/2018/09/06/rasputin.Romanovs100. “Tsarina's Routine: How to Avoid Royal Duties.” YouTube, uploaded by Romanovs 100, 15 July 2018, www.youtube.com/watch?v=IUXECaR0_qM.Serial Killers Documentaries. “Anna Anderson, the Imposter of Grand Duchess Anastasia Romanov.” YouTube, uploaded by Serial Killers Documentaries, 9 Aug. 2020, www.youtube.com/watch?v=pa-oZfKvnC0.Simple History. “Rasputin, the Man Who Wouldn't Die (Strange Stories).” YouTube, uploaded by Simple History, 13 Oct. 2018, www.youtube.com/watch?v=JXdbseRz0lc.Smith, Andrea. “Palace Once Owned by Executed Russian Tsar Undergoes Two-Billion-Ruble Renovation.” Lonely Planet, 29 Oct. 2019, www.lonelyplanet.com/articles/alexander-palace-reopening.Team, Wellness. “How You Can Ease Your Aches and Pain With Meditation.” Health Essentials from Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland Clinic, 18 Dec. 2020, health.clevelandclinic.org/how-you-can-ease-your-aches-and-pain-with-meditation/#:%7E:text=%E2%80%9CMeditation%20can%20help%20your%20brain,you'll%20feel%20less%20pain.TED-Ed. “History vs. Vladimir Lenin - Alex Gendler.” YouTube, uploaded by TED-Ed, 7 Apr. 2014, www.youtube.com/watch?v=9N8hsXQapjY.---. “The Mysterious Life and Death of Rasputin - Eden Girma.” YouTube, 7 Jan. 2020, www.youtube.com/watch?v=4dEf1ep3O9I.“The First Russian Sex Museum Will Exhibit Rasputin's Penis.” Way to Russia Guide, 7 Aug. 2009, waytorussia.net/news/2004-04/russian-sex-museum.html.The Infographics Show. “Anastasia – Did She Really Escape The Massacre?” YouTube, uploaded by Infographics Show, 1 June 2020, www.youtube.com/watch?v=0dLBDyxueY8.“The Romanov Palaces of St Petersburg | Destination Guides | Corinthia St Petersburg.” Corinthia, www.corinthia.com/st-petersburg/discover-st-petersburg/the-romanov-palaces-of-st-petersburg. Accessed 2 Apr. 2021.“The Winter Palace.” Hermitage Museum, Hermitage Museum, www.hermitagemuseum.org/wps/portal/hermitage/explore/buildings/locations/building/B10. Accessed 28 Mar. 2021.Twilley, Nicola. “Can Hypothermia Save Gunshot Victims?” The New Yorker, 9 July 2019, www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/11/28/can-hypothermia-save-gunshot-victims.von Holdinghausen. “Tsarskoie Selo, Alexander Palace, OTMA Etc, Late Summer 2018.” YouTube, uploaded by von Holdinghausen, 12 Oct. 2018, www.youtube.com/watch?v=UCllVDoRPo0.Waters, Derek. “Rasputin's Journey to St. Petersburg.” Comedy Central, uploaded by Drunk History, 30 Jan. 2018, www.cc.com/video/6s0lbs/drunk-history-rasputin-s-journey-to-st-petersburg.Wikipedia contributors. “Grigori Rasputin in Popular Culture.” Wikipedia, 31 Mar. 2021, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grigori_Rasputin_in_popular_culture#Comedy.

Nihongo Master
S8E14: How Japanese Popular Culture Took The World By Storm!

Nihongo Master

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 17:14


Communication and Media Studies (Video)

Moderator Wendy Eley Jackson speaks with Gareth Crocker about his film-making process for the South African television show, Shadow. Crocker discusses various elements of the series, including his decision to shoot in his hometown of Johannesburg to lend authenticity to location, the process of collaborative writing with his friend and co-creator, seeking feedback from diverse voices to craft genuine characters, and acknowledging the room for growth. He also spoke on internet bandwidth issues in some parts of the country and the accessibility of Netflix. Series: "Carsey-Wolf Center" [Humanities] [Show ID: 37611]

New Books Network
Dennis C. Rasmussen, "Fears of a Setting Sun: The Disillusionment of America's Founders" (Princeton UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 54:34


When Americans conjure the image of the signing of the Constitution of the United States, they often think about the various paintings that depict the Founders looking to George Washington on the dais at the convention. It is this snapshot of history that embodies Americans' perceptions of the Founders and their conviction in the creation of the great nation. What Americans fail to understand about America's Founding is the overwhelming anxieties that many of the Founders experienced, especially as they lived in the new republic that they had created. Not only did they find themselves anxious about the future of the new country, but many were also explicitly pessimistic about the future that they noted in so much of their later writings and letters. Dennis C. Rasmussen, in his new book Fears of a Setting Sun: The Disillusionment of American Founders, addresses this gap in research on the American Founding, and on the Founders themselves. Washington, Hamilton, Adams, Jefferson, and Madison all wondered whether the system they had worked to establish, build, and defend would live beyond their own generation. In Fears of a Setting Sun: The Disillusionment of America's Founders (Princeton UP, 2021), Rasmussen explores the enduring arguments made by George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, and John Adams that convinced them of America's inevitable demise. Modern Americans conceptualize the founding of the United States as an isolated moment in time, and rarely consider the reality of how the Founders spent the remainder of their lives putting the Constitution to work. Rasmussen places the founders' fears in context of the ongoing chaos of the late 1700's where other countries were facing revolution, treason, and anarchy. Fear of a Setting Sun's purpose is not to disregard the founders' optimism in the system they created, and in fact the book heralds James Madison's lifelong optimism and belief that the American experiment would prevail—though he is at odds with the other major Founders in this regard. Fear of a Setting Sun explores the Founders' disillusionment in order to provide a fuller meaning of American constitutionalism and the value that is formed in its implementation. Rasmussen provides a perspective that changes what scholars and the general public believe and know about the founding of the republic, the historical stakes at the time of the founding, and how the Founders generally grew more pessimistic over time about the potential for the new republic to achieve its great potential. This book will be of interest to political scientists, historians, students and scholars of the founding period and the ideas and personalities that dominated the early days of the American republic. Shaina Boldt assisted with this podcast. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in American Studies
Dennis C. Rasmussen, "Fears of a Setting Sun: The Disillusionment of America's Founders" (Princeton UP, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 54:34


When Americans conjure the image of the signing of the Constitution of the United States, they often think about the various paintings that depict the Founders looking to George Washington on the dais at the convention. It is this snapshot of history that embodies Americans' perceptions of the Founders and their conviction in the creation of the great nation. What Americans fail to understand about America's Founding is the overwhelming anxieties that many of the Founders experienced, especially as they lived in the new republic that they had created. Not only did they find themselves anxious about the future of the new country, but many were also explicitly pessimistic about the future that they noted in so much of their later writings and letters. Dennis C. Rasmussen, in his new book Fears of a Setting Sun: The Disillusionment of American Founders, addresses this gap in research on the American Founding, and on the Founders themselves. Washington, Hamilton, Adams, Jefferson, and Madison all wondered whether the system they had worked to establish, build, and defend would live beyond their own generation. In Fears of a Setting Sun: The Disillusionment of America's Founders (Princeton UP, 2021), Rasmussen explores the enduring arguments made by George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, and John Adams that convinced them of America's inevitable demise. Modern Americans conceptualize the founding of the United States as an isolated moment in time, and rarely consider the reality of how the Founders spent the remainder of their lives putting the Constitution to work. Rasmussen places the founders' fears in context of the ongoing chaos of the late 1700's where other countries were facing revolution, treason, and anarchy. Fear of a Setting Sun's purpose is not to disregard the founders' optimism in the system they created, and in fact the book heralds James Madison's lifelong optimism and belief that the American experiment would prevail—though he is at odds with the other major Founders in this regard. Fear of a Setting Sun explores the Founders' disillusionment in order to provide a fuller meaning of American constitutionalism and the value that is formed in its implementation. Rasmussen provides a perspective that changes what scholars and the general public believe and know about the founding of the republic, the historical stakes at the time of the founding, and how the Founders generally grew more pessimistic over time about the potential for the new republic to achieve its great potential. This book will be of interest to political scientists, historians, students and scholars of the founding period and the ideas and personalities that dominated the early days of the American republic. Shaina Boldt assisted with this podcast. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in History
Dennis C. Rasmussen, "Fears of a Setting Sun: The Disillusionment of America's Founders" (Princeton UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 54:34


When Americans conjure the image of the signing of the Constitution of the United States, they often think about the various paintings that depict the Founders looking to George Washington on the dais at the convention. It is this snapshot of history that embodies Americans' perceptions of the Founders and their conviction in the creation of the great nation. What Americans fail to understand about America's Founding is the overwhelming anxieties that many of the Founders experienced, especially as they lived in the new republic that they had created. Not only did they find themselves anxious about the future of the new country, but many were also explicitly pessimistic about the future that they noted in so much of their later writings and letters. Dennis C. Rasmussen, in his new book Fears of a Setting Sun: The Disillusionment of American Founders, addresses this gap in research on the American Founding, and on the Founders themselves. Washington, Hamilton, Adams, Jefferson, and Madison all wondered whether the system they had worked to establish, build, and defend would live beyond their own generation. In Fears of a Setting Sun: The Disillusionment of America's Founders (Princeton UP, 2021), Rasmussen explores the enduring arguments made by George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, and John Adams that convinced them of America's inevitable demise. Modern Americans conceptualize the founding of the United States as an isolated moment in time, and rarely consider the reality of how the Founders spent the remainder of their lives putting the Constitution to work. Rasmussen places the founders' fears in context of the ongoing chaos of the late 1700's where other countries were facing revolution, treason, and anarchy. Fear of a Setting Sun's purpose is not to disregard the founders' optimism in the system they created, and in fact the book heralds James Madison's lifelong optimism and belief that the American experiment would prevail—though he is at odds with the other major Founders in this regard. Fear of a Setting Sun explores the Founders' disillusionment in order to provide a fuller meaning of American constitutionalism and the value that is formed in its implementation. Rasmussen provides a perspective that changes what scholars and the general public believe and know about the founding of the republic, the historical stakes at the time of the founding, and how the Founders generally grew more pessimistic over time about the potential for the new republic to achieve its great potential. This book will be of interest to political scientists, historians, students and scholars of the founding period and the ideas and personalities that dominated the early days of the American republic. Shaina Boldt assisted with this podcast. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in African American Studies
Efrén O. Pérez, "Diversity's Child: People of Color and the Politics of Identity" (U Chicago Press, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 53:05


Political Scientist Efrén Pérez's new book, Diversity's Child: People of Color and the Politics of Identity (U Chicago Press, 2021), explores the term and category “people of color” and how this grouping has been used within politics, but also how it is has been used by those who are classified as people of color. Pérez examines group identity, language and public opinion, and implicit cognition to explain how marginalization of non-white groups can form a collective group identity that is interchangeable for the individual. Diversity's Child fills in a rather substantial gap in research about racial and ethnic identity in the United States by surveying people of color about how they think and feel about racial disparities that impact them as well as other groups that are often categorized as people of color. Part of what Pérez finds in the multi-method approach is that politics can be seen as a solution to the inequality that many of those within this broad umbrella category experience and understand. Pérez's training and research in both political science and political psychology allows him to bring together these connected social science threads and frameworks in exploring the understanding of broad group identity as well as intergroup identity. Diversity's Child: People of Color and the Politics of identity both conceptualizes and analyzes the identity of people of color by developing meaningful measurements and using Social Identity Theory to examine connections to differing identities. Pérez's work also thinks through the evolving demographic shifts in the United States, exploring the projection that white Americans will become the minority population by 2050, and what the political ramifications are for the new majority minority. Although the term “people of color” has been used to identify Black, Latino, and other races for some time, Pérez research examines how these groups that are often pulled together under this common identity actually share in this broader category, and whether there are commonalities and concerns across ethnic, racial, and national identities. He does this by gathering data through opinion surveys, experiments, content analysis of newspapers and congressional archives, and in-depth interviews. Pérez's research indicates that a person's “color” identity exists and can be measured, and that identifying as a person of color shapes how minorities view themselves and their position within the political system. Diversity's Child introduces a new perspective into the ongoing conversation about shifting political demographics, and elaborates on how the people of color identity has the capacity to mobilize groups and shape American politics. Pérez's research also indicates how and where this umbrella category can essentially come undone—how the unifying qualities can be undermined by intergroup antagonisms. As he notes in our discussion, the research that highlights the capacity to bring together African Americans, LatinX Americans, and Asian Americans under the title of “people of color” also has within it the fissures and factions that can disconnect these groups from each other and from shared political pursuits. Shaina Boldt assisted with this podcast. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies