Podcasts about Garlic

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Garlic

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Best podcasts about Garlic

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Latest podcast episodes about Garlic

All Of It
Local Chef Spotlight: Sam Sifton on 'The New York Times Cooking No-Recipe Recipes'

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 25:52


[REBROADCAST FROM March 15, 2021] Sam Sifton, food editor of The New York Times and founding editor of NYT Cooking, discusses The New York Times Cooking No-Recipe Recipes, the debut cookbook from the website and its app. The book has over 100 ideas for dishes meant to inspire -- all without specific measurements. Cooks are encouraged to add, subtract, and adapt the recipes to their own diets and palates.   Pasta PuttanescaAnchoviesGarlicOlive oilPastaCanned tomatoesOlivesCapersRed pepper flakesParmesan Sauté some anchovies and a lot of minced garlic in a lot of olive oil while your salted pasta water comes to a boil in a big pot. (How many anchovies? How many you got? I go for a minimum of four, and the same with cloves of garlic.) Add your pasta to the pot. When the fish are melted and the garlic's gone gold, add a large can of tomatoes and stir everything together. Let that simmer a while, and get a little thicker, then add the olives and capers, and red pepper flakes until it's as fiery as you like. Taste for salt and pepper. Keep simmering and, when the pasta is done to your liking, taste the sauce again, drain the pasta, and toss it with the sauce. Shower the dish with grated Parmesan and serve. Tip You can cook the dried pasta directly in the sauce if you like, adding a couple cups of water or chicken stock and covering the pan for 10 minutes or so, stirring occasionally. Reprinted from The New York Times Cooking No-Recipe Recipes. Text copyright © 2021 by Sam Sifton and The New York Times Company. Photographs copyright © 2021 by David Malosh and Food Styling by Simon Andrews. Published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of Random House, a division of Penguin Random House.

All Of It
Local Chef Spotlight: Carla Lalli Music on her Newest Cookbook

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 14:30


[REBROADCAST FROM October 20, 2021] James Beard Award-winning cookbook author Carla Lalli Music joins us to discuss her new book, That Sounds So Good: 100 Real-Life Recipes for Every Day of the Week. In the new cookbook, Lalli Music splits the recipes between weekday and weekend cooking so that you can make great food no matter how much time you have.   Fat Noodles with Pan-Roasted Mushrooms and Crushed Herb Sauce 4 to 6 servings This method of cooking mushrooms—by pan-roasting them, then finishing with browned butter—is incredibly effective, whether you're adding them to pasta or not. In the second step, the butter and aromatics wash a ton of flavor over the mushrooms, glossing them up. Kosher salt; freshly ground pepper6 garlic cloves, divided1 lemon½ cup extra-virgin olive oil, divided1 teaspoon mild chile flakes, such as Aleppo pepper1 shallot1 pound maitake mushroomsChunk of Parmigiano, for grating and serving2 cups lightly packed herbs (leaves and tender stems), such as parsley, mint, and/or arugula2 tablespoons unsalted butter1 pound wide pasta noodles, such as lasagnette or pappardelle Bring a large pot of water to a boil and season it very aggressively with salt (figure ¼ cup salt per 6 quarts water). Pick out the smallest garlic clove and finely grate it into a small bowl. Grate in the zest of the lemon, then stir in 2 tablespoons olive oil and the chile flakes. Season oil mixture with salt and pepper and set aside. Thinly slice the remaining 5 garlic cloves and the shallot. Trim the mushrooms; tear into bite-size pieces. Juice the zested lemon into a small bowl. Grate enough Parm to yield ¼ cup (save what's left for passing at the table). Set all aside. Add the herbs to the boiling water and cook until very softened, 2 minutes. (Cooking the herbs both mellows and deepens their flavor; they will have less fresh brightness but take on a richer, more vegetal flavor.) Use a mesh spider or tongs to remove the herbs and hold them under cold running water until cool enough to handle, about 10 seconds. Squeeze out as much excess liquid as possible. Thinly slice the herbs and stir them into the oil mixture. Taste and adjust with more salt and chile flakes, if desired. Set the herb sauce aside. Lower heat under the boiling water to maintain a simmer—you want to get your mushrooms going before starting the pasta. Heat a large Dutch oven over medium-high for 1 minute, then add 3 tablespoons olive oil and half the mushrooms. Cook, tossing, until the mushrooms are coated with oil, then cook, undisturbed, until browned on the underside, 2 to 3 minutes. Season with salt and toss, then cook, stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are browned all over and cooked through, 4 to 5 minutes more. Transfer mushrooms to a large plate and repeat with the remaining 3 tablespoons oil and mushrooms, then add these mushrooms to the first batch. Bring the water back to a boil. Melt the butter in the Dutch oven over medium heat until it foams, 15 to 30 seconds. Add the sliced garlic and shallot and cook until the garlic and butter are golden brown and the shallot is translucent, about 2 minutes. Return the mushrooms to the pot, along with any accumulated juices, and cook, tossing, until well combined. Lower the heat to keep warm. Meanwhile, add the pasta to the boiling water and cook, stirring occasionally, until very al dente, 2 to 3 minutes less than the time indicated on the package. Use a mesh spider to transfer pasta to the pot with the mushrooms, then add 1 cup of the pasta cooking liquid. Increase the heat to medium and cook, tossing energetically, until a sauce forms that coats the pasta, 2 minutes. Add the ¼ cup grated cheese, 1 tablespoon lemon juice, and another big splash of pasta water and cook, tossing, until cheese is melted and the sauce is clinging to the noodles, 1 to 2 minutes more. Add a few spoonfuls of herb sauce to the pasta and stir to combine. Serve with remaining herb sauce and more cheese at the table. -------------------------From the MarketMild chile flakesShallotTender herbsMaitake mushroomsWide pasta noodles Spin ItInstead of Aleppo pepper, use a smaller quantity of regular red pepper flakes or lots of blackReplace the shallot with ¼ onionThe herbs are truly interchangeable, in any ratio, and can include basil, chives, tarragon, and/or dill Use shiitake, oyster, and/ or cremini mushrooms instead of maitakeBig tubes like rigatoni or paccheri are good too-------------------------At HomeSalt and pepperGarlicLemonOlive oilParmigianoButter Spin ItA few dashes of sherry vinegar or white wine vinegar can replace the lemon juice and zestGrana Padano or pecorino can replace the Parm-------------------------Tall Pot AltIf you don't have a Dutch oven, use a large heavy skillet to cook the mushrooms and combine with the shallot and garlic. Scoop out 2 cups of pasta cooking liquid, then drain the pasta and return to the pot, and build your sauce from there. If the sauce gets tight or sticky, or the cheese clumps together, lower the heat and add more water than you think you should. Cook over low heat, stirring gently but constantly, until the cheese melts and the sauce is smooth. Reprinted from 'That Sounds So Goodby Carla Lalli Music.' Copyright © 2021 by Carla Lalli Music. Photographs copyright © 2021 by Andrea Gentl and Martin Hyers.Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Random House, a division of Penguin Random House LLC.

What You Should Read
You Should Read: Celebrity Memoirs! (With Kristine Kittridge)

What You Should Read

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 77:21


We're here to talk about our favorite celebrity memoirs! Topics include what makes a great one (SPOILER: it's gossip) and who we wish would write a tell-all book. We've got some great choices and all of our TBRs have significantly grown.Look for (most of) the books mentioned in this episode on Libro.fm by using our affiliate link. When you buy using this link, you are supporting the podcast! AND if you use our code WHATYOUSHOULDREAD at checkout you can get your first two books for the price of one. Currently reading: Julia: The House in the Cerulean Sea (TJ Klune)  and Yes & I Love You (Roni Loren) Kelly: You Can't Be Serious (Kal Penn) Rachael: The Matzah Ball (Jean Meltzer)Book News: Audiobooks:https://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/industry-news/publisher-news/article/87762-ai-comes-to-audiobooks.html PRH to get S&S? https://www.reuters.com/business/us-justice-dept-files-lawsuit-block-penguin-random-house-purchase-simon-schuster-2021-11-02/Amazon price fixing lawsuit: https://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/industry-news/libraries/article/87777-lawyers-argue-that-e-book-price-fixing-case-against-amazon-big-five-publishers-should-proceed.html Celeb Memoirs:Kristine: Open Book (Jessica Simpson), Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me (Mindy Kaling), Redefining Realness (Janet Mock) and Down the Rabbit Hole (Holly Madison)Julia: Will (Will Smith), This is Just My Face: Try Not to Stare (Gabourey Sidibe) and Where Am I Now (Mara Wilson)Kelly: Little Sister: My Investigation Into the Mysterious Death of Natalie Wood (Lana Wood) and This Will All Be Over Soon (Cecily Strong)Rachael: I Want to Be Where the Normal People Are (Rachel Bloom), Shout (Laurie Halse Anderson), Garlic and Sapphires (Ruth Reichl), I'm Talking as Fast as I Can (Lauren Graham), Hungry Heart (Jennifer Weiner) and Over the Top (Jonathan Van Ness) Follow What You Should Read: Twitter:                 @wysr_podcast Instagram:                 @wysr_podcast Goodreads:                 https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/115539912-what-you-should-read-podcast YouTube:                 https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCfNtid_b0R14otSPRZTkmQ www.whatyoushouldread.com

Dad's Kitchen
109: QUICK TIPS - Save Time at Thanksgiving with LODR

Dad's Kitchen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 5:24


The Law of Diminishing Returns isn't just for econ anymore. This simple quick tip will make your Thanksgiving dreams come true.

Bon Appétit Foodcast
What's Stanley Tucci Doing for Thanksgiving?

Bon Appétit Foodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 30:23


Who but Stanley Tucci could charm us on social media with his Negroni-making skills, eat his way through Italy for a documentary series, and publish a food-heavy memoir all during a global pandemic? He's had so much going on that we almost forgot that he's also a Hollywood star. The man/myth/legend gave us his best tips for entertaining in our November issue, and this week on the podcast, he sits down with editor in chief Dawn Davis to chat about his favorite Thanksgiving dishes, the gifts he insists on giving, and the pasta faux-pas that you NEED to avoid. Of course, when it comes to putting on a proper feast, we can't all be Stanley Tucci—but that doesn't mean we can't try. And for the hosts who need the most help, associate food editor Rachel Gurjar is back with a procrastinator's guide to cooking a Thanksgiving meal. Stuff we talk about in this episode:  Menu from Rachel Gurjar's Thanksgiving “Procrastinator” Newsletter Sahara Bohoskey's Marinated Peppers with Basil and Garlic recipe: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/peperoni Justin Lee's Crunchy Greens With Fat Choy Ranch recipe: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/crunchy-greens-with-fat-choy-ranch Gerardo Gonzalez's Beer-and-Orange-Marinated Roast Chicken recipe: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/beer-and-orange-marinated-roast-chicken Cheryl Day's Pineapple Upside-Down Cake recipe: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/pineapple-upside-down-cake-2 Claire Saffitz's Fridge-Dive Pesto Pasta recipe: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/fridge-dive-pesto-pasta Taste: My Life Through Food by Stanley Tucci: https://www.amazon.com/Taste-My-Life-Through-Food/dp/1982168013?asc_campaign=&asc_source=&asc_refurl=https://www.bonappetit.com/story/stanley-tucci-thanksgiving&ascsubtag=61770ed22aa62461f131c295&linkCode=sl1&tag=bapodcasts-20&linkId=46bc32f8e570b522cba622f8b07d6251&language=en_US&ref_=as_li_ss_tl Bon Appétit on what Stanley Tucci is doing for Thanksgiving: https://www.bonappetit.com/story/stanley-tucci-thanksgiving Science In the Kitchen and the Art of Eating Well by Pellgrino Artusi: https://www.amazon.com/Science-Kitchen-Lorenzo-Italian-Library/dp/0802086578?hvadid=312031138203&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=18077107301282618684&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1023191&hvtargid=pla-454049301060&psc=1&linkCode=sl1&tag=bapodcasts-20&linkId=47070fea873e0bf560251f361519cc31&language=en_US&ref_=as_li_ss_tl *(When you buy something through our links, we earn an affiliate commission.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Urban Farm Podcast with Greg Peterson
646: Loving Those Legumes

The Urban Farm Podcast with Greg Peterson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 38:15


646: Loving Those Legumes. A Chat with an Expert on Seeds. In This Podcast: This is the October 2021 Seed Saving Class with Bill McDorman discussing legumes.  Beans and peas are great to eat and also great for your soil. Incorporating them into your garden rotation is smart and delicious. Pollinators also love legumes so it's a win-win all around. Plant them along a wall or fence for a beautiful display of cascading leaves and fruit for easy picking. There is so much to love about legumes! At least ten times a year we have a live Seed Saving Class.  Join the class! Register anytime for the next event. Register Here for the Seed Saving Class with Live Q&A Bill McDorman is Executive Director of Rocky Mountain Seed Alliance, Ketchum, Idaho. He got his start in the bio-regional seed movement while in college in 1979 when he helped start Garden City Seeds. In 1984, Bill started Seeds Trust/High Altitude Gardens, a mail order seed company he ran successfully until it sold in 2013. Visit www.urbanfarm.org/lovinglegumes for the show notes on this bonus episode, and access to our full podcast library!

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.18.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 59:15


Videos for Today: 1. DR Peter C. Gøtzsche Comments – 3 mins   2. PARENTS IN NY TAKE TO THE STREETS TO WARN IGNORANT PARENTS INJECTING THEIR CHILDREN WITH PFIZER SHOT   3, DANIEL NAGASE – EFFECTS OF CV VX ON THE IMMUNE SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT IN CHILDREN   4.The Great Narrative: A call to action speaker Freeke Heijman (start 3 min mark)    5. COMMERCIAL PILOT CODY FLINT: “I DON'T KNOW IF I WILL EVER BE ABLE TO FLY A PLANE AGAIN.”   6. Study, Experts: Vaccinated Are Spreading COVID-19 start 23 seconds in    7. RFK CLIP Start 50 seconds in    Everyone missed this one… vaccinated people are up to 9X more likely to be hospitalized than unvaccinated people Australian War Propaganda Keeps Getting Crazier Are we seeing some new form of Covid-19 Vaccine induced Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome? – Official Government data suggests the Fully Vaccinated are on the precipice of disaster as their Immune Systems are being decimated $285 Billion Tax Cut for the Rich Is Now 2nd Most Expensive Piece of Build Back Better Wall Street's Takeover of Nature Advances with Launch of New Asset Class  Court Deals New Blow to ‘Fatally Flawed' Biden Vaccine Mandates, But What Does That Mean?     Study: Sustainable eating is cheaper and healthier Oxford University, November 11, 2021 Oxford University research has today revealed that, in countries such as the US, the UK, Australia and across Western Europe, adopting a vegan, vegetarian, or flexitarian diet could slash your food bill by up to one-third. The study, which compared the cost of seven sustainable diets to the current typical diet in 150 countries, using food prices from the World Bank's International Comparison Program, was published in The Lancet Planetary Health. It found that in high-income countries: Vegan diets were the most affordable and reduced food costs by up to one third. Vegetarian diets were a close second. Flexitarian diets with low amounts of meat and dairy reduced costs by 14%. By contrast, pescatarian diets increased costs by up to 2%. “We think the fact that vegan, vegetarian and flexitarian diets can save you a lot of money is going to surprise people,” says Dr. Marco Springmann, researcher on the Oxford Martin Programme on the Future of Food. “When scientists like me advocate for healthy and environmentally-friendly eating, it's often said we're sitting in our ivory towers promoting something financially out of reach for most people. This study shows it's quite the opposite. These diets could be better for your bank balance as well as for your health and…the planet.” Miguel Barclay, author of the bestselling “One Pound Meals” series of cookbooks, says, “I definitely agree that cutting down your meat, or cutting it out completely, will save you money. I've written seven budget cookbooks and have costed up hundreds of recipes, and without doubt vegan and vegetarian meals consistently come in at a much lower price than recipes with meat.” The study focused on whole foods and did not include highly-processed meat replacements or eating at restaurants or takeaways. The study also found that in lower income countries, such as on the Indian subcontinent and in sub-Saharan Africa, eating a healthy and sustainable diet would be up to a quarter cheaper than a typical Western diet, but at least a third more expensive than current diets. To analyze what options could improve affordability and reduce diet costs, the study looked at several policy options. It found that making healthy and sustainable diets affordable everywhere is possible within the next 10 years when economic development, especially in lower income countries, is paired with reductions in food waste and a climate and health-friendly pricing of foods. “Affording to eat a healthy and sustainable diet is possible everywhere, but requires political will,” according to Dr. Springmann. “Current low-income diets tend to contain large amounts of starchy foods and not enough of the foods we know are healthy. And the western-style diets, often seen as aspirational, are not only unhealthy, but also vastly unsustainable and unaffordable in low-income countries. Any of the healthy and sustainable dietary patterns we looked at are a better option for health, the environment, and financially, but development support and progressive food policies are needed to make them both affordable and desirable everywhere.” The study, “The global and regional costs of healthy and sustainable dietary patterns: a modeling study,” is published in The Lancet Planetary Health on 10 November 2021. Country-level results are available here. Green One Pound Meals by Miguel Barclay is published on 30 December. It features planet-friendly recipes and includes tips and ideas for shopping smart and avoiding food waste. Meta-analysis concludes resveratrol beneficially modulates glycemic control in diabetics Zagazig University and Suez Canal University (Egypt), October 29 2021.  Findings from a meta-analysis of clinical trials published on October 16, 2021 in Medicina Clinica (Barcelona) revealed an association between supplementing with resveratrol and improvements in glycemic control. “Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a progressive meta-inflammatory disorder, which induces micro and macrovascular complications,” Ibrahim A. Abdelhaleem and colleagues wrote. “Resveratrol is a nutraceutical known to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.” “This systematic review and meta-analysis is the first to consider resveratrol's efficacy on glycemic and cardiometabolic parameters in patients with T2DM.” Sixteen randomized trials that included a total of 871 diabetic men and women were selected for the meta-analysis. The trials compared resveratrol to a placebo with or without concurrent antidiabetic medications or other drug treatment. Resveratrol doses of 500 milligrams or more were associated with lower fasting blood glucose, fasting serum insulin, insulin resistance, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and diastolic blood pressure in comparison with a placebo. Resveratrol was associated with a greater reduction in hemoglobin A1c (a marker of long-term glucose control) compared to a placebo in trials of three months duration. When HDL cholesterol levels were analyzed, resveratrol was superior to a placebo in trials of less than two months duration. Resveratrol was also associated with a reduction in systolic blood pressure compared to measurements obtained in the placebo group. Furthermore, triglycerides were lower in association with resveratrol in trials that lasted six to twelve months. “We concluded that resveratrol appropriately improved insulin sensitivity by decreasing insulin resistance, fasting blood glucose, fasting serum insulin, and hemoglobin A1c,” the authors concluded. “In addition, it improved other cardiometabolic parameters, including triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. The most appropriate glycemic control effect was fulfilled when consumed for at least one month with doses of 500 mg or more.” Exercise linked to better mental health Kaiser Permanente Research, November 11, 2021 Kaiser Permanente research published on November 11 in Preventive Medicine showed people who exercised more during the initial lockdown period of the COVID-19 pandemic experienced less anxiety and depression than those who didn't exercise. It also showed that people who spent more time outdoors typically experienced lower levels of anxiety and depression than those who stayed inside. More than 20,000 people participated in the survey-based study from 6 regions served by Kaiser Permanente across the United States, which included Hawaii, Colorado, Georgia, and the mid-Atlantic states, as well as Southern and Northern California. “What these study findings tell us is that even during an active pandemic or other public health crisis, people should be encouraged to be physically active to help maintain their physical and mental health,” said the study's lead author Deborah Rohm Young, PhD, the director of the Division of Behavioral Research for the Kaiser Permanente Southern California Department of Research & Evaluation. “Parks and other nature areas should remain open during public health emergencies to encourage outdoor physical activity.” In March 2020, COVID-19 developed into a worldwide pandemic. With no known treatment, public health officials attempted to reduce its spread by limiting human interactions through stay-at-home policies. Businesses temporarily closed or changed their practices to prevent the spread of the virus, affecting the economy and many people's jobs. These stressful factors, along with fewer opportunities to socialize with friends and family, increased symptoms of depression and anxiety for many people. Since it is known that physical activity and time spent in nature are associated with improved mental health, researchers at Kaiser Permanente in Southern California sought to determine how exercise and time outdoors was associated with people's mental health during the height of the pandemic. In April 2020, researchers sent a series of COVID-19 surveys to more than 250,000 participants in the Kaiser Permanente Research Bank — a collection of lifestyle surveys, electronic health record data, and biospecimens, which Kaiser Permanente members volunteered. People who reported COVID-19 symptoms were not included in this analysis, resulting in 20,012 respondents. They each completed at least 4 surveys between April and July 2020. White women older than 50 accounted for a high proportion of the respondents. Most respondents said they were retired and generally adhered to the “safer-at-home” orders during the period of the survey. The study found that: Reports of anxiety and depression decreased over time Anxiety and depression scores were higher for females and younger people, and lower for Asian and Black people compared with white respondents Participants who reported no physical activity reported the highest depression and anxiety compared to people who had exercised Spending less time outdoors was associated with higher depression and anxiety scores People who had increased their time outdoors the most reported the highest anxiety scores, but the research could not explain the finding “What we learned from these findings is that during future emergencies it will be important to carefully weigh the decisions to close parks and outdoor areas against the negative impact those closures may have on people's mental health,” said Dr. Young. Bedtime linked with heart health University of Exeter (UK), November 9, 2021 Going to sleep between 10:00 and 11:00 pm is associated with a lower risk of developing heart disease compared to earlier or later bedtimes, according to a study published today in European Heart Journal—Digital Health, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). “The body has a 24-hour internal clock, called circadian rhythm, that helps regulate physical and mental functioning,” said study author Dr. David Plans of the University of Exeter, UK. “While we cannot conclude causation from our study, the results suggest that early or late bedtimes may be more likely to disrupt the body clock, with adverse consequences for cardiovascular health.” While numerous analyses have investigated the link between sleep duration and cardiovascular disease, the relationship between sleep timing and heart disease is underexplored. This study examined the association between objectively measured, rather than self-reported, sleep onset in a large sample of adults. The study included 88,026 individuals in the UK Biobank recruited between 2006 and 2010. The average age was 61 years (range 43 to 79 years) and 58% were women. Data on sleep onset and waking up time were collected over seven days using a wrist-worn accelerometer. Participants completed demographic, lifestyle, health and physical assessments and questionnaires. They were then followed up for a new diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, which was defined as a heart attack, heart failure, chronic ischaemic heart disease, stroke, and transient ischaemic attack. During an average follow-up of 5.7 years, 3,172 participants (3.6%) developed cardiovascular disease. Incidence was highest in those with sleep times at midnight or later and lowest in those with sleep onset from 10:00 to 10:59 pm. The researchers analyzed the association between sleep onset and cardiovascular events after adjusting for age, sex, sleep duration, sleep irregularity (defined as varied times of going to sleep and waking up), self-reported chronotype (early bird or night owl), smoking status, body mass index, diabetes, blood pressure, blood cholesterol and socioeconomic status. Compared to sleep onset from 10:00 to 10:59 pm, there was a 25% higher risk of cardiovascular disease with a sleep onset at midnight or later, a 12% greater risk for 11:00 to 11:59 pm, and a 24% raised risk for falling asleep before 10:00 pm. In a further analysis by sex, the association with increased cardiovascular risk was stronger in women, with only sleep onset before 10:00 pm remaining significant for men. Dr. Plans said: “Our study indicates that the optimum time to go to sleep is at a specific point in the body's 24-hour cycle and deviations may be detrimental to health. The riskiest time was after midnight, potentially because it may reduce the likelihood of seeing morning light, which resets the body clock.” Dr. Plans noted that the reasons for the observed stronger association between sleep onset and cardiovascular disease in women is unclear. He said: “It may be that there is a sex difference in how the endocrine system responds to a disruption in circadian rhythm. Alternatively, the older age of study participants could be a confounding factor since women's cardiovascular risk increases post-menopause—meaning there may be no difference in the strength of the association between women and men.” He concluded: “While the findings do not show causality, sleep timing has emerged as a potential cardiac risk factor—independent of other risk factors and sleep characteristics. If our findings are confirmed in other studies, sleep timing and basic sleep hygiene could be a low-cost public health target for lowering risk of heart disease.” Garlic compounds may boost cardio health indirectly via gut microbiota National Taiwan University, November 6 2021 Allicin from garlic may prevent the metabolism of unabsorbed L-carnitine or choline into TMAO, a compound linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, says a new study from the National Taiwan University. TMAO – or trimethylamine N-oxide – has been known to be generated from dietary carnitine through metabolism of gut microbiota, and was recently reported to be an “important gut microbiota-dependent metabolite to cause cardiovascular diseases,” explained Taiwanese researchers in the Journal of Functional Foods . While antibiotics have been found to inhibit TMAO production, concerns over side effects and resistance have limited their use. This has led researchers to examine the potential of natural alternatives. New data indicated that carnitine-fed lab mice showed a “remarkable increase in plasma TMAO levels”, compared with lab mice fed a control (no carnitine). However, when allicin supplements were provided with the carnitine diet, TMAO levels were significantly reduced. “Surprisingly, the plasma TMAO levels in the mice of ‘carnitine diet + allicin' treatment group were as low as that of chow diet [control] group,” wrote the researchers. “This result indicated that the metabolic capacity of mice gut microbiota to produce TMAO was completely inhibited by allicin supplement even though provided with carnitine-rich environment in the gut. “It means the functional alteration of gut microbiota induced by carnitine diet can be prevented by addition of another substance with antimicrobial potential derived from food, such as allicin.” Garlic and heart health The study adds to the body of scientific literature supporting the potential heart health benefits of garlic and the compounds it contains. Consumer awareness of the health benefits of garlic, mostly in terms of cardiovascular and immune system health, has benefited the supplements industry, particularly since consumers seek the benefits of garlic without the odors that accompany the fresh bulb. The benefits have been linked to the compound allicin, which is not found in fresh garlic: It is only formed when garlic is crushed, which breaks down a compound called diallyl sulphide. Study details “This may offer an opportunity to take advantage of plants' delicately designed defense system against microorganisms, to protect ourselves by modulating gut microbiota to a healthier status,” wrote the researchers The Taiwanese researchers divided male C57BL/6(B6) mice into four groups: One group received only the control chow diet; the second group received the carnitine diet (carnitine added to drinking water at a level of 0.02%); the third group received the carnitine diet with supplemental allicin; and the final group received the control diet plus the allicin supplement for six weeks. Results showed that the second group (carnitine diet) had TMAO levels 4–22 times greater than those observed in the control group. However, these increases were attenuated in the carnitine + allicin group, said the researchers. “Our study suggests that antimicrobial phytochemicals such as allicin effectively neutralize the metabolic ability of TMAO production of gut microbiota induced by daily intake of L-carnitine,” wrote the researchers. “It may offer an opportunity for us to take advantage of plants' delicately designed defense system against microorganisms, to protect ourselves by modulating gut microbiota to a healthier status. “Our research also suggested that allicin and dietary fresh garlic containing allicin might be used as functional foods for the prevention of atherosclerosis,” they concluded. Drug used to prevent miscarriage increases risk of cancer in offspring University of Texas Health Science Center, November 9, 2021 Exposure in utero to a drug used to prevent miscarriage can lead to an increased risk of developing cancer, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth Houston). The study was published today in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. The drug, 17α-hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17-OHPC), is a synthetic progestogen that was frequently used by women in the 1950s and 1960s, and is still prescribed to women today to help prevent preterm birth. Progesterone helps the womb grow during pregnancy and prevents a woman from having early contractions that may lead to miscarriage. “Children who were born to women who received the drug during pregnancy have double the rate of cancer across their lifetime compared to children born to women who did not take this drug,” said Caitlin C. Murphy, PhD, MPH, lead author on the study and associate professor in the Department of Health Promotion and Behavioral Sciences at UTHealth School of Public Health in Houston. “We have seen cancers like colorectal cancer, pancreatic cancer, thyroid cancer, and many others increasing in people born in and after the 1960s, and no one really knows why.” Researchers reviewed data from the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan on women who received prenatal care between June 1959 and June 1967, and the California Cancer Registry, which traced cancer in offspring through 2019. Out of more than 18,751 live births, researchers discovered 1,008 cancer diagnoses were made in offspring ages 0 to 58 years. Additionally, a total of 234 offspring were exposed to 17-OHPC during pregnancy. Offspring exposed in the womb had cancer detected in adulthood more than twice as often as offspring not exposed to the drug – 65% of cancers occurred in adults younger than 50. “Our findings suggest taking this drug during pregnancy can disrupt early development, which may increase risk of cancer decades later,” Murphy said “With this drug, we are seeing the effects of a synthetic hormone. Things that happened to us in the womb, or exposures in utero, are important risk factors for developing cancer many decades after we're born.” A new randomized trial shows there is no benefit of taking 17-OHPC, and that it does not reduce the risk of preterm birth, according to Murphy. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration proposed in October 2020 that this particular drug be withdrawn from the market.

Epic Gardening: Daily Growing Tips and Advice

It's time to get your garlic in the ground! Join Jacques and Kevin as they riff on their strategy for the 2022 garlic season. Buy Birdies Garden Beds Use code EPICPODCAST for 5% off your first order of Birdies metal raised garden beds, the best metal raised beds in the world. They last 5-10x longer than wooden beds, come in multiple heights and dimensions, and look absolutely amazing. Click here to shop Birdies Garden Beds Buy My Book My book, Field Guide to Urban Gardening, is a beginners guide to growing food in small spaces, covering 6 different methods and offering rock-solid fundamental gardening knowledge: Order on Amazon Order a signed copy Follow Epic Gardening YouTube Instagram Pinterest Facebook Facebook Group

Nikoli's Kitchen
Quick Bites - Garlic Honey Mustard

Nikoli's Kitchen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 4:17


Hi everyone and thank you so much for checking out today's quick bite! I released this one a day late because of Veteran's Day here in the United States. Check out my recipe for garlic honey mustard- an absolute must for your sandwiches, fries, chicken tenders, and more! Thank you all so much for listening!   Featured Recipe for this Episode 2 c honey 1-1/2 c yellow mustard 1/2 c garlic, minced 2 T black pepper 2 T turmeric 1 t salt Combine all ingredients in a saucepan over mid heat. Stir until well-combined. Bring to a simmer and then remove from the heat- you don't really need to cook it, just bring it together. Yield- about 3-1/2 cups.  Approx 80 calories per 2 T serving.   Important Links (All links open in a new window) Main Website Subscribe on Patreon! Livestream for the Cure Join my Discord Community! Podcast RSS Feed Like my Facebook Page! Follow me on Twitter! Follow me on Instagram! Join my Facebook Group! Subscribe to my YouTube Channel! Follow me on Twitch!   Listen on Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Pandora TuneIn Radio iHeart Radio Spreaker PlayerFM Stitcher Podchaser   Guest Appearances Please check out my segment of Heather's podcast at https://justheathers.com/nicholas-haskins/. Thank you so much for having me on the show Heather! Watch me cook Keto Chocolate Chaffles LIVE with Tricia & Siana of 2 Girls on a Bench at https://www.twitch.tv/videos/1039494727! I was honored to sit down with Ashlee of the Rabbit Ears TV Podcast again to talk about all things Big Little Lies! Check it out at https://www.netflixnswill.com/rabbitears/2021/8/31/big-little-lies.   Credits "Daybreak," and "The Climb" from Music for Makers. Sign up and get a royalty-free song delivered to your inbox every Monday at www.musicformakers.com!

Recipe of the Day
Chinese-Style Garlic Chicken

Recipe of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 2:54


Today's recipe is How To Cook Shrimp From Frozen.If you want to make sure that you always find out what today's recipe is, do one or all of the following:Subscribe to the Podcast,Text the word Dinner to 1-833-413-1352,Join the ROTD Facebook Group here  (this is a brand new group! You'll be a founding member!),Subscribe to get emails here.Here is a link to a great saucepan for making this recipe: #adSaucepanHave a great day! -Christine xo

Dr. Berg’s Healthy Keto and Intermittent Fasting Podcast
Use Aged Garlic for High Blood Pressure

Dr. Berg’s Healthy Keto and Intermittent Fasting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 3:15


Could the use of aged garlic for high blood pressure work just as well as some medications? Check this out. FREE COURSE ➜ ➜ https://courses.drberg.com/product/how-to-bulletproof-your-immune-system/ FREE MINI-COURSE ➜ ➜ Take Dr. Berg's Free Keto Mini-Course! ADD YOUR SUCCESS STORY HERE: https://bit.ly/3z9TviS Talk to a Dr. Berg Keto Consultant today and get the help you need on your journey (free consultation). Call 1-540-299-1557 with your questions about Keto, Intermittent Fasting, or the use of Dr. Berg products. Consultants are available Monday through Friday from 8 AM to 10 PM EST. Saturday & Sunday from 9 AM to 6 PM EST. USA Only. Dr. Eric Berg DC Bio: Dr. Berg, 51 years of age is a chiropractor who specializes in weight loss through nutritional & natural methods. His private practice is located in Alexandria, Virginia. His clients include senior officials in the U.S. government & the Justice Department, ambassadors, medical doctors, high-level executives of prominent corporations, scientists, engineers, professors, and other clients from all walks of life. He is the author of The 7 Principles of Fat Burning. Dr. Berg's Website: http://bit.ly/37AV0fk Dr. Berg's Recipe Ideas: http://bit.ly/37FF6QR Dr. Berg's Reviews: http://bit.ly/3hkIvbb Dr. Berg's Shop: http://bit.ly/3mJcLxg Dr. Berg's Bio: http://bit.ly/3as2cfE Dr. Berg's Health Coach Training: http://bit.ly/3as2p2q Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drericberg Messenger: https://www.messenger.com/t/drericberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drericberg/ YouTube: http://bit.ly/37DXt8C

Practical Prepping Podcast
Episode # 121, "Freezer-Friendly Foods"

Practical Prepping Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 20:15


Practical Prepping Podcast Episode # 121, "Freezer-Friendly Foods"Please share this episode with friends. Here is the direct link: https://practicalpreppingpodcast.buzzsprout.comIn this episode Krista discusses thirty two food items you may not know are freezer friendly, how to prepare them, and approximately how long they last.Here's the list:EGGS -- freeze whites and yolks separately, or scramble them -- 1 year.MILK -- plain, half n half, or buttermilk -- 3 mos.AVOCADO -- cut in half or mashed -- 6 mos.FLOUR -- 2 years.NUTS -- 2 years.HALLOWEEN CANDY -- 1 year.BUTTER -- 6 mos.COOKED PASTA -- drizzle in olive oil -- 2 weeks.BANANAS -- whole or peeled -- 6 mos.CORN ON COB -- blanch first -- 1 year.GARLIC -- whole or chopped -- 1 year.ONION -- chopped -- 1 year.COOKED RICE -- 6 mos.HUMMUS -- 3 mos.CHIPS -- 1 year.PEANUT BUTTER -- 9 mos.BROTH -- ice cube tray or freezer bag -- 1 year.PESTO -- 1 year.FRESH HERBS IN OLIVE OIL -- ice cube tray -- 2 years.TORTILLAS -- 8 mos.CHEESE -- shredded or block -- 6 mos.SOUR CREAM -- 6 mos.CREAM CHEESE -- 2 mos.GINGER ROOT -- peeled, minced -- 6 mos.PRE-MADE PBJ SANDWICHES -- 6 mos.GRAPES -- plain or sugared -- 1 yearLEMONS -- whole or sliced -- 4 mos.WINE -- use ice cube tray -- 1 year.PANCAKES AND WAFFLES -- 1 year.MASHED POTATOES -- 6 mos.RAW DOUGH -- pizza, pie crust, bread, cookie -- 3 mos.FROSTING -- canned -- 3 mos.You can support us at:www.buymeacoffee.com/practicalprepPractical PreppingWebsite: www.practicalprepping.infoEmail at info@practicalprepping.infoThe sponsors for this episode are:Jim Curtis Kniveshttps://www.facebook.com/JimcurtisknivesEmail Jim:  j.curtis7mm@yahoo.comAndProLine Designshttps://www.prolinedesigns.usEmail: info@prolinedesigns.usSt Jude Children's Research Hospitalwww.stjude.orgYou can purchase the book: "Practical Prepping For Everyday People"Click here:https://www.amazon.com/Practical-Prepping-Everyday-People-Emergencies/dp/B087H5TZMG/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=Krista+Lawley&qid=1633476638&s=books&sr=1-2Website design and hosting by ProLine DesignsCopyright 2021, Practical Prepping PodcastJoin us on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays for more episodes of Practical Prepping Podcast.

Recipe of the Day
Baked Brie with Garlic and Red Pepper

Recipe of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 4:24


Today's recipe is Baked Brie with Garlic and Red Bell Pepper.If you want to make sure that you always find out what today's recipe is, do one or all of the following:Subscribe to the Podcast,Text the word Dinner to 1-833-413-1352,Join the ROTD Facebook Group here  (this is a brand new group! You'll be a founding member!),Subscribe to get emails here.Here are the links to some of the items I talked about in this episode: #ad"Best Summer Weekends Cookbook" by Jane RodmellThin Rimmed Pizza PanHave a great day! -Christine xo 

Nikoli's Kitchen
Quick Bites - Garlic Honey Sriracha Sauce

Nikoli's Kitchen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 4:25


Hello everyone and welcome to your first off-season Quick Bite! Over the next few weeks I'll be dropping these shorter episodes every Thursday afternoon (EST) for your listening pleasure. First up, one of my favorite dipping sauces with a little sweet, a little heat, and A LOT of garlic... my garlic honey sriracha sauce! I hope you enjoy this recipe as much as I do! Thanks so much for listening!   Featured Recipe for this Episode 1 2-cup ball jar 1/2 c garlic, minced 1/4 c sriracha 1-1/2 c honey 1 T black pepper 1 T turmeric 1/2 t salt Combine all ingredients in the ball jar and shake or stir vigorously to combine. Serve over chicken tenders or anything that needs a little sweet & a little heat! Yield- 2 cups.  Approx 99 calories per 2 T serving.   Important Links (All links open in a new window) Main Website Subscribe on Patreon! Livestream for the Cure Join my Discord Community! Podcast RSS Feed Like my Facebook Page! Follow me on Twitter! Follow me on Instagram! Join my Facebook Group! Subscribe to my YouTube Channel! Follow me on Twitch!   Listen on Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Pandora TuneIn Radio iHeart Radio Spreaker PlayerFM Stitcher Podchaser   Guest Appearances Please check out my segment of Heather's podcast at https://justheathers.com/nicholas-haskins/. Thank you so much for having me on the show Heather! Watch me cook Keto Chocolate Chaffles LIVE with Tricia & Siana of 2 Girls on a Bench at https://www.twitch.tv/videos/1039494727! I was honored to sit down with Ashlee of the Rabbit Ears TV Podcast again to talk about all things Big Little Lies! Check it out at https://www.netflixnswill.com/rabbitears/2021/8/31/big-little-lies.   Credits "Daybreak," and "The Climb" from Music for Makers. Sign up and get a royalty-free song delivered to your inbox every Monday at www.musicformakers.com!

Sin And Gin
Episode 48: Worked To Death - Halloween Special

Sin And Gin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 111:14


Wassup Weenies! Welcome to another Halloween Special episode of Sin and Gin Podcast! in this episode we try to add "you little shit" to famous film quotes, Victor travels to 2007 and becomes OMalley again, we talk about Mr Graves Spookiness level, we talk about mastering the album, giving up on Inktober and Frankenjean constantly smelling of Garlic. We are honoured to have Count Factula with us to bring us facts about bubonic flea bombs, the great whisky fire, the first ever speeding ticket and the origin of the Halloween mask. We also discover Mr Custard. It wouldn't be a Halloween episode without Crowboys Haunted House 2: Worked To Death - Part 1. We play an action adventure role play where we spend a day at work, or is it that easy!? Also we do some incredible voice acting. Shit news brings us the latest stories about the man who carried 48 pints of beer, 30ft garden pirate ship, Americas largest disqualified pumpkin and the ancient crusader sword. We finish on a spooky Blank-O-Mattic where we discover a scary monster!!

Bright Side
Eat Garlic Every Day, And See What Happens to You

Bright Side

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 10:00


What Would Happen to Your Body if You Eat Garlic Raw Every Day. Garlic is a new superfood that we've been using for centuries, but only now realize all the benefits of this little plant. People shift to the organic lifestyle and make healthy eating a part of the everyday routine. Here are 5 amazing garlic benefits and the most effective way to get rid of garlic smell. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Keep Calm And Cauliflower Cheese
Roast Beef walk of shame,Garlic, Bike,Bell,Baguette.”Fire Side Chats!”.

Keep Calm And Cauliflower Cheese

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 40:26


Roast Beef walk of shame,Garlic, Bike,Bell,Baguette."Fire Side Chats!".

Row by Row Garden Show
Row by Row Episode 172: How To Be Successful Growing Garlic

Row by Row Garden Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 24:06


It's all about garlic!! A deep dive into the types of garlic, how to plant, best practices for growing, fertilizing, and more! Growing Garlic Nutrition and Health Benefits Garlic contains allicin, a sulfur compound with many health benefits: an ancient plant used for flavor, health, and medicine for 5,000 years with only a small number of calories. Studies have shown that the properties of garlic can help lower blood pressure, reduce your risk of heart disease, and boost your immune system. It also contains antioxidants that may help people avoid Alzheimer's disease and dementia. Types of Garlic There are over 600 named varieties, grouped into three types. Hard-Neck (ophioscorodon) (German White) Fewer but larger clovesEasier to grow in cold weatherStronger FlavorDoesn't store as wellHarder to braid Soft-Neck (sativum) (most grocery store bought is soft-neck) Stores the longestMild in flavorLarger bulbs and more clovesGrows best inr egions with mild wintersBest for braiding Elephant Actually, a leek.Grows largest of all typesHas the mildest flavorStores wellDoes not braid How To Grow Plant from "seed garlic" bulbs purchased or from the previous season. "Store" garlic is often sprayed with growth inhibitor.Seed garlic has not been sprayedSeperate the cloves, do not cut them up. Plant with blunt root facing down, pointed end facing up. You'll want to space cloves 4"-6" apart and 1"-2" deep. You should have fertile soil, well-draining is a must, pH neutral, and you should avoid planting where alliums have been planted the previous season. Organic fertilizers can help its condition if you want to take the extra step to support your growing garlic. Garlic prefers full sun, at least 6 hours of daily sunlight. Water 1" per week, let the soil dry between watering, you don't want to overwater! Fertilize every 2-3 weeks with Dr. Joe Fertilizing Tabs (raised beds) or with 20-20-20 and Microboost (In-ground) and keep the soil moist during fertilization. Har-neck garlic varieties produce scapes around the spring and summer, by removing them, you can encourage the production of larger bulbs. When To Harvest You can identify garlic bulbs that are ready to be pulled from the soil when you spot green leaves growing on the sides. Check to see if the leaves at the bottom of the stem are brown - if they are, your garlic should be ready to harvest! Before pulling your bulbs, take the time to loosen the soil around the plant. You can use a digging fork but make sure you insert it away from the bulb. Storing Your Garlic After Harvest Let your garlic cure after harvesting it by leaving it in a cool space with good ventilation. After this period is up, you can store your harvest in a cool, and dark spot. Your garlic should not be refrigerated. Soft-neck garlic lasts longer after being harvested than hard-neck garlic. With soft-neck garlic, you can expect your bulbs to stay in good condition for 9 months to 1 year. Alternatively, you can leave the tops on, braid your garlic, and hang them in strings. The key here is to never store them in an airtight container. Garlic bulbs should be kept in a place where they can continue to get airflow. Products of the Week: Root Pouch Complete Organic Fertilizer Dr. Joe Fertilizing Tablets Hanging Grow Light Watch the Complete Show on YouTube Below: https://youtu.be/oFlVbZg6s30

Weird AF News
Students strip and give lap dances to teachers. New Garlic Snot TikTok challenge might not be safe.

Weird AF News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 15:52


High School under investigation after students give faculty lap dances. People claim the Garlic Snot TikTok challenge might not be safe. Cash reward offered for missing recycling plant. // Weird AF News is the only daily weird news podcast hosted by a comedian because I believe your daily dose of weird af stories deserves a comedic spin. Show your SUPPORT by joining the Weird AF News Patreon where you'll get bonus episodes and other weird af news stuff http://patreon.com/weirdafnews  - WATCH Weird AF News on Youtube - https://www.youtube.com/weirdafnews - check out the official website https://WeirdAFnews.com and FOLLOW host Jonesy at http://instagram.com/funnyjones or http://twitter.com/funnyjones or http://facebook.com/comedianjonesy or http://Jonesy.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Health Mysteries Solved
104 My Most Up To Date Immune Protocol

Health Mysteries Solved

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 22:32


The Investigation As we head into cold and flu season during the second year of the pandemic, it's important to provide support for your immune system - especially if you have an autoimmune disease like Hashimoto's, Lupus, MS, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Type 1 Diabetes, Addison's, Grave's, and Celiac disease.  As someone with Hashimoto's and who works with a lot of people with Hashimoto's I've created a protocol that I have been updating month after month and here is my latest version. This protocol is great for overall immunity and best of all, it is absolutely safe and recommended if you have an autoimmune disease as well.    Herbs & Supplements to Avoid with Autoimmunity I always need to remind those with autoimmunity that the supplements you often hear about for supporting the immune system can do real damage if you have an autoimmune disease. These supplements stimulate the immune system. For those with autoimmunity, an overstimulated immune system can lead to flare ups.  Here are the commonly suggested supplements to avoid: Echinacea  Astragalus  Reishi (or other immune supporting mushrooms) Elderberry My Autoimmune-safe Immune Support Protocol Here are the things that I take to give me the best chance for avoiding the flu, colds and other viruses as well as how I use them to decrease symptoms if I do get sick. These are my go-to recommendations:    Vitamin C For general immune support, I usually recommend for an average, 150lb adult, a dosage of 1000 - 2000 mg of vitamin C per day. I personally use C+Biofizz from Designs for Health which you plop in water for a fizzy drink (if you prefer capsules, try their Stellar C). Please note that if you experience loose stools when taking vitamin C, you may want to try liposomal vitamin C because it helps the body absorb through the mucous membranes in your mouth first (just remember to keep it refrigerated.)  If you are already sick, vitamin C can be very helpful in decreasing recovery time from infections, cold, flu or other viruses. You can increase your daily dosage but make sure you divide it and take it over the course of the day. That might mean taking 500 to 1000 mg of C (it can be powder, liposomal or capsules) every 30-60 min to bowel-tolerance (until you get diarrhea which is when your body says it's saturated and had enough). You would then restart it later in the day or next day. Do this for a few days when you are sick. There is a ton of research about high dose vitamin C in helping fight infections. Alternatively, you could look at getting a vitamin C infusion through an IV for prevention or treatment.    Vitamin D Vitamin D is imperative for many different things but specifically supporting your immune health. Many people have low vitamin D and it tends to decrease during our shorter winter days here in the Northern Hemisphere.  You can determine how much vitamin D you need by checking your levels through a blood test. Ideally, you want to be in the range of 50-80 on that test (the lab range is wider, typically 30-100).  If you don't know your vitamin D levels (and you're not regularly supplementing) the typically recommended daily dose is 5,000, IU.  If you are already sick, you will want to make sure that you are also taking vitamin K with your vitamin D to prevent calcification of tissues and organs. You can either take a vitamin K supplement or a multivitamin with vitamin K.  I use Vitamin D Supreme which is a capsule but if you have issues with fat soluble vitamins, you could try a liquid form of vitamin D or, if you also struggle with energy issues, you could try Hi-Po Emulsi D3 from Designs for Health.    Zinc & Quercetin There has been a lot of talk about Zinc online and in the media lately as a great way to boost your immune system during the COVID pandemic and into cold and flu season. What many people don't realize is that Zinc mainly stays outside the cell and you want it inside the cell for optimal immune support. One natural way to do that is by taking it alongside Quercetin. I take Designs for Health's Quercetin and Nettles blend and I recommend 250 milligrams to about 500 milligrams daily.  Quercetin is something that I've added to my protocol a bit more recently because I'm seeing such great results. When combined with zinc, it's great for both prevention and also healing from infection. Please keep in mind that extended use of zinc can cause a copper deficiency so you want to make sure you are balancing these two minerals. If you are taking zinc for a long time, consider supplementing with copper or a multivitamin that contains copper. To be extra sure that you aren't deficient in copper (which can have serious health repercussions), a hair analysis will reveal both your copper and zinc levels. If you already have recent hair test results, you would want to look at, not just the individual zinc or the copper level, but actually, the ratio of the two. Ideally, the zinc to copper ratio should be right around 8. If your levels are lower than 8, then you can use more zinc. If you are above 8, you would need to supplement with copper.   Garlic (Allicin) This one is a favorite because it really works and I typically don't see any side effects. Garlic has both antiviral and antimicrobial properties which means it can work on bacteria, yeast and other bugs in addition to viruses.  For general immune support, I don't recommend it long-term (unless your practitioner has you on a specific protocol).  Instead, consider garlic for immune support when you've been around someone who's sick, you've been exposed to a virus or when you feel like you're coming down with something. It can be difficult to get enough garlic in food form so supplementing is best. There are many on the market but my absolute favorite is Allimax. It's a potent (and patented) allicin extract which has all the benefit with way way less of that garlic odor.  I recommend 4-6 capsules a day for the duration of illness or for a few days if exposed or feeling off. I also give this to my kids when they come home with a runny nose or they've been exposed to a virus and it's really fantastic.    SPM's and Liposomal Glutathione Two things I've added recently to my immune support protocol are SPM's and liposomal glutathione.  SPM's stands for Pro Resolving Mediators and they literally go in and resolve inflammation. I think it's one of my most favorite vitamins these days. SPM is great at dealing with all types of inflammation so the immune system is more balanced. I use 1 per day for overall immune support and balance and up to 6 per day if you are sick for about a week. What is really neat about SPM's is that I have found it to work really great for autoimmune flare ups such as Hashimoto's flares and any other up ticks in autoimmunity. You would take 6 per day for about 7-10 days and then can lower to 1-3 per day for maintenance. I use it myself and really love it. There are two brands that I recommend for SPM. The first is Metagenics SPM Active which is a bit more potent but also a bit more expensive. I also like Designs for Health's SPM Supreme, which is less expensive but because it has slightly less and you have to take a bit more of it.  Glutathione is a powerful antioxidant and immune balancer that you can take every day. I typically recommend a teaspoon a day but if you're sick, you can increase that to one teaspoon twice a day.  There are a lot of different brands to choose from and after trying pretty much everything out there, I use Apex's Trizomal Glutathione. I find it to be the most potent and best absorbed out of all of the ones that I've tried. And it tastes better than some of the other glutathione I've tried.  Fermented Beverages for Gut Health Our microbiome is another key for balancing the immune system so it's important to support gut health. One thing that I've been getting really good results from is a fermented beverage called R's Koso. This Japanese fermented drink is made from more than a hundred different vegetables, fruits, and plants. In other words, it's full of plant fibers to feed the bugs that help keep our gut flora happy. Often we eat the same things day in and day out but our gut health needs more variety to stay healthy which is why this drink is so great. You can try it out at rskoso.com and use the promo code INNA10 to save 10%    Liquid Silver (Silvercillin) This last supplement has been on my list for a while and I still love it. Silvercillin is a powerful antimicrobial and it can be used orally or topically. I recommend taking 1-2 TBSP orally a few times a day when you are sick or if you know you've been exposed. I don't recommend this for long term use but it's great to have around the house. You can even use it topically to treat rashes, burns, cuts and even acne.    Healthy Immune Habits Nasal Rinse One habit that I think really helps to support my immune system is nasal irrigation. Some of you may have heard of a neti pot for clearing your nasal passage. I use something similar called the NeilMed but I find it easier to use. I like to add a tablespoon of Silvercillin mixed into the distilled water and salt solution I use for my nasal irrigation. It's a really great way to boost antimicrobial activity.    Stress Reduction Another important habit to adopt to help support your immune system is to be aware of your stress levels. Your immune system can't function optimally if you are in a chronic stress state. So, take a minute to reduce your stress by taking a few breaths, reframing things or even looking out at the sky and nature. It can really help to quiet the stress response.    Save on Immune Boosting I have all the products on my practice website Complete Nutrition and Wellness. We have a coupon so that you can save 10% on all products by Designs for Health and that coupon can be used as many times as you like (not just on your first order). Just enter promo code DFH10 and checkout and always get 10% off any designs for health supplements.    Eliminating Health Mysteries Staying healthy or recovering your health quickly can happen when you have good protocols and I hope this helps you get through this cold and flu season with ease. Could this help someone in your life stay healthy too? Please share it with them.    Links: Suggested Products: C+Biofizz Stellar C Vitamin D Supreme liquid form of vitamin D Hi-Po Emulsi D3 Zinc  Quercetin and Nettles Blend  copper  multivitamin with copper Allimax Metagenics SPM Active Designs for Health's SPM Supreme rskoso.com Silvercillin   Thanks for Listening If you like what you heard, please rate and review this podcast. Every piece of feedback not only helps me create better shows, it helps more people find this important information. Never miss an episode -  Subscribe NOW to Health Mysteries Solved with host, Inna Topiler on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or Google Podcasts and remember to rate and review the show! Find out more at http://healthmysteriessolved.com   PLEASE NOTE All information, content, and material on this podcast is for informational purposes only and is not intended to serve as a substitute for the consultation, diagnosis, and/or medical treatment of a qualified physician or healthcare provider. Some of the links provided are affiliate links. This means we may make a very small amount of money should you choose to buy after clicking on them. This will in no way affect the price of the product but it helps us a tiny bit in covering our expenses. 

Minnesota Gardening Podcast
Grow Garlic in Minnesota

Minnesota Gardening Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 25:11


John Larson grows garlic at Linden Lars Farms in Miron, Minnesota. He joins us today to talk everything from purchasing garlic to plant, plant, harvesting, and storing. A great episode with a lot of Minnesota-specific info for you.

The Culinary Institute of America
Vegan Enchiladas with Tofu, Black Beans, and Zucchini

The Culinary Institute of America

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 1:24


These mouthwatering vegan enchiladas are packed with flavor and plant-based protein! Chef Toni Sakaguchi from The Culinary Institute of America stuffs them with Nasoya Plantspired's Garlic and Herb Toss'ables, black beans, zucchini, and butternut squash, then tops them with red chile enchilada sauce. You will love these deliciously smoky, hearty vegan enchiladas that are great for any meal of the week! Get the Vegan Enchiladas with Tofu, Black Beans, and Zucchini recipe here!

Your Place or Mine
Comedy, Catastrophes, and Creamy Garlic Chicken Sandwiches ft Will Attwood

Your Place or Mine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 49:17


Well hello there, babes. Welcome back to Your Place or Mine, hosted by Bae Savage. In this episode, we chat with one of Bae's favourite local comedians, Will Attwood.We talk about Will's history with acting and comedy, and some of the ridiculous experience's he's had both on and off stage. We talk about the thrill and terror of unexpected squirting and why you should always give a heads up. Listen in to a tinder date gone wrong that ended up with him driving a woman to a prison near Kingston, Ontario in the middle of the night.  Oh... and his obvious passion for creamy garlic chicken sandwiches. Find Will on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/wderaafgouin/.Want more? Head to https://www.baesavage.com/ and be sure to follow: https://www.instagram.com/baesavagexo/

The Stuart Bedasso Show
I Heart Sushi

The Stuart Bedasso Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 57:13


Nick Redanty from Watchmen Farm is back! He helps Dave deal with his tiny chiltipin crop, gets us ready for some serious garlic, and more. Are you ready for some weed tea? Melyssa has the recipe. We induct another bro into the 69 Hall of Fame. Don't forget to support us at www.StuartBedasso.com.

Bloomers in the Garden
October, 23 2021 - Holy Hydrangeas, Shrubs in Pots, Cover Crops, Kale and Cabbage, Garlic and Onion

Bloomers in the Garden

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 58:02


Len and Julio get a caller asking about cutting back hydrangeas. Another caller is having trouble with their lilac plant. Listen in to learn what went wrong. Cover crops enrich your soil, cuts down on weeds and much more! Learn how to best use ornamental kale and cabbage in your garden. Did you know now is the best time to plant garlic and onions?

Sober is Dope
Foods That Heal The Liver from Addiction

Sober is Dope

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 0:55


Medical Disclaimer: Sober is Dope! Podcast aims to improve the quality of life for people struggling with a substance use or mental health disorder with fact-based content about the nature of behavioral health conditions, treatment options and their related outcomes. We publish material that is researched, cited, edited and reviewed by licensed medical professionals. The information we provide is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider. Foods That Heal The Liver Some of the best foods and drinks that are good for the liver include: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323915#12-best-foods 1. Coffee. Share on Pinterest Drinking coffee offers protection against fatty liver disease. ... 2. Oatmeal. Consuming oatmeal is an easy way to add fiber to the diet. ... 3. Green tea. ... 4. Garlic. ... 5. Berries. ... 6. Grapes. ... 7. Grapefruit. ... 9. Prickly pear. 10. Fatty Fish 11. Nuts 12. Olive oil 13. Plant Based Foods 14. Milk Thistle Foods to avoid Foods to avoid In general, finding balance in the diet will keep the liver healthy. However, there are also some foods and food groups that the liver finds harder to process. These include: * Fatty foods: These include fried foods, fast food, and takeout from many restaurants. Packaged snacks, chips, and nuts may also be surprisingly high in fats. * Starchy foods: These include breads, pasta, and cakes or baked goods. * Sugar: Cutting back on sugar and sugary foods such as cereals, baked goods, and candies may help reduce the stress on the liver. * Salt: Simple ways to reduce salt intake include eating out less, avoiding canned meats or vegetables, and reducing or avoiding salted deli meats and bacon. * Alcohol: Anyone looking to give their liver a break should consider reducing their intake of alcohol or eliminating it from the diet completely. Each time your liver filters alcohol, some of the liver cells die. The liver can develop new cells, but prolonged alcohol misuse (drinking too much) over many years can reduce its ability to regenerate. This can result in serious and permanent damage to your liver. Medical Disclaimer: Sober is Dope! Podcast aims to improve the quality of life for people struggling with a substance use or mental health disorder with fact-based content about the nature of behavioral health conditions, treatment options and their related outcomes. We publish material that is researched, cited, edited and reviewed by licensed medical professionals. The information we provide is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider. Episode analytics --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/soberisdope/message

Dead Doctors Don't Lie Radio
Dead Doctors Dont Lie 22 Oct 2021

Dead Doctors Don't Lie Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 54:00


Monologue Dr. Joel Wallach begins the show today discussing the COVID 19 numbers of infections and deaths. Comparing the U.S. numbers with those from India. Although the U.S. population is about a third of that of India. There are alot more cases and deaths in the U.S. Doc asserts this is because they don't eat gluten in India. Pearls of Wisdom Doug Winfrey and Dr. Wallach discuss a news article regarding the health benefits of fermented garlic and honey. Garlic contains and active ingredient called allicin that helps address digestive and respiratory problems, immune issues and joint related diseases. Also has antibacterial and disease fighting properties. Callers Madrew has questions for a friend that is a type 2 diabetic with high blood pressure. Call Dr. Wallach's live radio program weekdays from noon until 1pm pacific time at 831-685-1080 or toll free at 888-379-2552.

All Of It
Carla Lalli Music's New Cookbook 'That Sounds So Good'

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 14:20


James Beard Award-winning cookbook author Carla Lalli Music joins us to discuss her new book, That Sounds So Good: 100 Real-Life Recipes for Every Day of the Week. In the new cookbook, Lalli Music splits the recipes between weekday and weekend cooking so that you can make great food no matter how much time you have.    Fat Noodles with Pan-Roasted Mushrooms and Crushed Herb Sauce 4 to 6 servings This method of cooking mushrooms—by pan-roasting them, then finishing with browned butter—is incredibly effective, whether you're adding them to pasta or not. In the second step, the butter and aromatics wash a ton of flavor over the mushrooms, glossing them up. Kosher salt; freshly ground pepper6 garlic cloves, divided1 lemon½ cup extra-virgin olive oil, divided1 teaspoon mild chile flakes, such as Aleppo pepper1 shallot1 pound maitake mushroomsChunk of Parmigiano, for grating and serving2 cups lightly packed herbs (leaves and tender stems), such as parsley, mint, and/or arugula2 tablespoons unsalted butter1 pound wide pasta noodles, such as lasagnette or pappardelle Bring a large pot of water to a boil and season it very aggressively with salt (figure ¼ cup salt per 6 quarts water). Pick out the smallest garlic clove and finely grate it into a small bowl. Grate in the zest of the lemon, then stir in 2 tablespoons olive oil and the chile flakes. Season oil mixture with salt and pepper and set aside.  Thinly slice the remaining 5 garlic cloves and the shallot. Trim the mushrooms; tear into bite-size pieces. Juice the zested lemon into a small bowl. Grate enough Parm to yield ¼ cup (save what's left for passing at the table). Set all aside.  Add the herbs to the boiling water and cook until very softened, 2 minutes. (Cooking the herbs both mellows and deepens their flavor; they will have less fresh brightness but take on a richer, more vegetal flavor.) Use a mesh spider or tongs to remove the herbs and hold them under cold running water until cool enough to handle, about 10 seconds. Squeeze out as much excess liquid as possible. Thinly slice the herbs and stir them into the oil mixture. Taste and adjust with more salt and chile flakes, if desired. Set the herb sauce aside.  Lower heat under the boiling water to maintain a simmer—you want to get your mushrooms going before starting the pasta. Heat a large Dutch oven over medium-high for 1 minute, then add 3 tablespoons olive oil and half the mushrooms. Cook, tossing, until the mushrooms are coated with oil, then cook, undisturbed, until browned on the underside, 2 to 3 minutes. Season with salt and toss, then cook, stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are browned all over and cooked through, 4 to 5 minutes more. Transfer mushrooms to a large plate and repeat with the remaining 3 tablespoons oil and mushrooms, then add these mushrooms to the first batch. Bring the water back to a boil. Melt the butter in the Dutch oven over medium heat until it foams, 15 to 30 seconds. Add the sliced garlic and shallot and cook until the garlic and butter are golden brown and the shallot is translucent, about 2 minutes. Return the mushrooms to the pot, along with any accumulated juices, and cook, tossing, until well combined. Lower the heat to keep warm. Meanwhile, add the pasta to the boiling water and cook, stirring occasionally, until very al dente, 2 to 3 minutes less than the time indicated on the package. Use a mesh spider to transfer pasta to the pot with the mushrooms, then add 1 cup of the pasta cooking liquid. Increase the heat to medium and cook, tossing energetically, until a sauce forms that coats the pasta, 2 minutes. Add the ¼ cup grated cheese, 1 tablespoon lemon juice, and another big splash of pasta water and cook, tossing, until cheese is melted and the sauce is clinging to the noodles, 1 to 2 minutes more. Add a few spoonfuls of herb sauce to the pasta and stir to combine. Serve with remaining herb sauce and more cheese at the table. -------------------------From the MarketMild chile flakesShallotTender herbsMaitake mushroomsWide pasta noodles Spin ItInstead of Aleppo pepper, use a smaller quantity of regular red pepper flakes or lots of blackReplace the shallot with ¼ onionThe herbs are truly interchangeable, in any ratio, and can include basil, chives, tarragon, and/or dill Use shiitake, oyster, and/ or cremini mushrooms instead of maitakeBig tubes like rigatoni or paccheri are good too-------------------------At HomeSalt and pepperGarlicLemonOlive oilParmigianoButter Spin ItA few dashes of sherry vinegar or white wine vinegar can replace the lemon juice and zestGrana Padano or pecorino can replace the Parm-------------------------Tall Pot AltIf you don't have a Dutch oven, use a large heavy skillet to cook the mushrooms and combine with the shallot and garlic. Scoop out 2 cups of pasta cooking liquid, then drain the pasta and return to the pot, and build your sauce from there. If the sauce gets tight or sticky, or the cheese clumps together, lower the heat and add more water than you think you should. Cook over low heat, stirring gently but constantly, until the cheese melts and the sauce is smooth. Reprinted from That Sounds So Goodby Carla Lalli Music. Copyright © 2021 by Carla Lalli Music. Photographs copyright © 2021 by Andrea Gentl and Martin Hyers.Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Random House, a division of Penguin Random House LLC.

F**kface
The Garlic Feet Taste Test // Andrew's a _______ Guy

F**kface

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 72:11


Geoff, Gavin, and Andrew talk about the legality of Michael Myers, what it will take to throw a ball at 80 mph, tasting garlic with things that aren't your tongue, and more. Want to contribute to bits? Email what you can do to ffacebits@gmail.com Sponsored by HelloTushy (http://hellotushy.com/face), Better Help (http://betterhelp.com/face ), and HelloFresh (http://hellofresh.com/face14 and use code face14).

How Good's Footy?
2021 AFL Post Season Trade Recap and The Garlic Dilemma

How Good's Footy?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 39:41


Join Duscher, Sean and Tom as they try to figure out what the point of this trade period was and deal with Mr Garlic Bread sniffing around the Geelong Football Club while asking the most important sporting question of all; How Good's Footy? Email us at howgoodsfooty@gmail.comYou can physically send us stuff to PO BOX 7127, Reservoir East, Victoria, 3073.Join our facebook group here or join our Discord here.Want to help support the show?Sanspants+ | Shop | TeesWant to get in contact with us?Twitter | Website | Facebook | RedditOr individually at;Sean | Tom | Duscher See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Coop with Meyer Hatchery
Pumpkins, Spice and Everything Nice!

The Coop with Meyer Hatchery

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 3:10


Let's take a Meyer Moment to talk about pumpkins, squash, and all things spice! Fall is officially in the air and the leaves are changing color. Many folks claim Autumn as their favorite season, and if you have ever seen chickens enjoying a pumpkin, it may very well be their favorite season too! Important Links: Pumpkin Spice Chickens Happy Hen Treats: Mealworm Spice BlendFresh Eggs Daily: Brewers Yeast with Garlic

The Beginner's Garden with Jill McSheehy
208 -- Garlic: What Can Go Wrong?

The Beginner's Garden with Jill McSheehy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 38:38


Trying to grow garlic?  Join me on today's episode as we talk about growing garlic and some things that could go wrong.   Show Notes: (*links below contain affiliate links, which means if you click through and make a purchase, we will earn a commission at no extra cost to you.) Garlic Masterclass $15 https://www.journeywithjill.net/garlicworkshop Jumpstart Challenge https://www.journeywithjill.net/jumpstart SoilKit provides everything you need to do a soil sample and receive reports from a lab that you can understand and includes recommendations to keep your garden healthy. All you need to do is: Collect Mail in Get results https://journeywithjill.net/soilkit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jFauqxX2mEU&t=63s For $5 off one soil test use the code JOURNEYWITHJILL good through 11/30/21 Organic REV The first thing to understand about REV is that it is not an ordinary humic acid product that is chemically-extracted from leonardite, lignite, or other coals. Rather, it is a 100% naturally-occurring carbon, humic acid & fulvic acid source - along with exceptionally high levels of naturally-occurring microbial biomass that can increase nitrogen efficiency by up to 25%. REV replaces depleted soil carbon & bacterial biomass - and absorbs nutrients to make them more readily available to plants via their root systems. Promo Code for 10% off JILL10 Kevin with Epic Gardening Garlic Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6rzORnBCfy4    

Isn't It Obvious
045 - We Love Pizza

Isn't It Obvious

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 28:41


Phillip proposes that frozen pizza is superior (within his ill-defined boundary conditions) over franchise pizza. K Sera agrees to a road trip to Mankato. Micah does not like Adam Sandler movies.   Show notes: Visit us a www.iiopodcast.fm, just for fun!   K Sera's After Thoughts: - It's been about a year since this recording and we have yet to take a road trip for pizza tasting. I feel cheated? Seems like my favorite pizza will forever remain a mystery to the masses. - Frozen pizza bonfire fun times is on the horizon, however! - Also, just because I am garlic sensitive doesn't make me undead. While I may be a lizard, I am definitely not a vampire! I love basking in the sun! Garlic sensitivity really sucks, because garlic is like… in everything delicious. As far as I've been able to determine, I have a fructan intolerance? The garlic and onion family give me a slew of painful issues that we don't need to go into detail about. Despite my struggle, I love onions and have discovered that if I cook them and don't eat too much in too short a period, I can avoid some of the more terrible symptoms. Also, if you look up the top foods high in fructans, you will get a list of my favorite fruits and vegetables. QAQ Why must these delicious things torment me so!? I'm still going to eat them. Just… maybe in smaller and rarer quantities.   Phil's After Thoughts: -I love frozen pizza and I could eat one every single day of my life. It would unfortunately be a very short life.

Conspirituality
73: Eating Disorders in Yogaland (w/Jason Nagata & Chelsea Roff)

Conspirituality

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 106:04


Meat is toxic. Dairy is toxic. Eggs? As dangerous as cigarettes. Garlic stokes the hormones. Avoid nightshades at all costs. Organic or bust. Eat according to your blood type. Eat according to your chronotype. Cacao resonates with the frequency of the sun, but never, ever add sugar to it. Sugar is toxic. Juice cleanses lead you to your highest self.  If you're exhausted already, so... Read More

The Allusionist
143. Hedge Rider

The Allusionist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 26:32


Today it's the etymologies you requested! And a few you didn't! We've got witches, wizards, warlocks; conjurers and cloves; wood shavings, nice gone nasty, and a whole lot more. Plus, a bold method of scaring away a ghost, if you must. Find out more about the topics covered in this episode at theallusionist.org/hedgerider. Sign up to be a patron at patreon.com/allusionist and as well as supporting the show, you get behind the scenes glimpses and bonus etymologies. The music is by Martin Austwick. Hear Martin's own songs at palebirdmusic.com or search for Pale Bird on Bandcamp and Spotify, and he's @martinaustwick on Twitter and Instagram.  The Allusionist's online home is theallusionist.org. Stay in touch at twitter.com/allusionistshow, facebook.com/allusionistshow and instagram.com/allusionistshow. Our ad partner is Multitude. To sponsor an episode of the show, contact them at multitude.productions/ads. This episode is sponsored by: • Acorn TV, the streaming service featuring hundreds of dramas, mysteries and comedies from around the world. Try Acorn TV free for 30 days, by going to Acorn.TV and using my promo code allusionist. (Be sure to type that code in lower case.)  • Bombas, makers of the most comfortable socks in the history of feet - and super-smooth undies and T-shirts too. Get 20 percent off your first purchase at bombas.com/allusionist. • Catan, the building and trading board game where no two games are the same. Allusionist listeners get 10 percent off the original base game at catanshop.com/allusionist. Support the show: http://patreon.com/allusionist See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Blind Hog and Acorn
Season 2, Episode #41~Not Bad, Not Bad...

Blind Hog and Acorn

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 28:27


Garlic is popping up after a couple weeks post-plantingA couple heifers are on their way to Kentucky.  Log splitter quit but was easily repaired by neighbor mechanic Fred (float needle was fouled) and Blind Hog was able to get back into action. A bit of rain fell as well,  2 -1/2" so far this month.Sam got skunked but at least THIS time he killed the varmint.  Good boy, Sam.  One less polecat to spray  you!It has been a pretty good week!

Flower Power Garden Hour
Flower Power Garden Hour 120: October To Do List

Flower Power Garden Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 22:50


In this episode, I discuss October garden To-Do tasks.  There is a big variety with a lot on the list, including: Continue clean up – pull out dead plants; remove lead, vegetable and fruit debris Use soil sulfur to drop pH Prune non-frost sensitive plants Cover succulents if chance of rain Add beneficial nematodes Plant perennials Buy bulbs…chill tulips 8-12 weeks Plant vegetables – fava beans, beets, bok choy, celery, swiss chard, collards, garlic, kale, kohlrabi, lettuce, mustards, peas, radishes, shallots, turnips Cover crops, including fava beans, clover Consider planting wildflower seeds – CA natives… clarkia, poppies Collect seeds off prior year plants   To ask questions for future shows, submit them at: Facebook Instagram email Marlene at marlenetheplantlady@gmail.com   Find Marlene over on YouTube, Instagram and Facebook

Inside Julia's Kitchen
Meet Sheldon Simeon

Inside Julia's Kitchen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 46:52


This week on Inside Julia's Kitchen, host Todd Schulkin welcomes chef, restaurateur and cookbook author Sheldon Simeon. Todd and Sheldon discuss the difference between Hawai'ian food and Hawai'i food, his new cookbook Cook Real Hawai'i and what we need to know about dishes like poke and saimin. As always, Sheldon shares his Julia Moment. Photo Courtesy of Sheldon SimeonHeritage Radio Network is a listener supported nonprofit podcast network. Support Inside Julia's Kitchen by becoming a member!Inside Julia's Kitchen is Powered by Simplecast. 

Going Off Track
#384 - Aaron Carnes

Going Off Track

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 94:26


Author of "In Defense of Ska", Aaron Carnes joined us this week to talk about his awesome, fun, and easy-read of a book that even the ska-uninterested will find worth checking out.

The Fire You Carry
057: Juan Huizar, From Picking Garlic At Age 9 In Central California To President Of Sage Real Estate.

The Fire You Carry

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 71:00


In this episode, we sit down with Juan Huizar. Juan's family is originally from Mexico, they made the move to the Central Valley of California when Juan was 4. Juan grew up with hard-working role models from his parents and began learning the benefits of that hard work at age 9 when he started picking garlic in the fields. He worked hard in school, got involved in wrestling, and carried on the family dream of education as he went off to college and graduated with a degree. Juan is now the President of Sage Real Estate out of Long Beach, is married, and has 2 daughters. This is a great story of a family's pursuit of the American Dream, don't miss it. Thank you to Facedown records and My Epic for the use of their song "Hail" in the show!https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dz2RZThURTUJuan's webinar he created for the listeners of this podcast that are interested in investing in real estate. https://www.sageregroup.com/buying-your-first-multifamily-property-or-apartment-building-a-guide-for-new-real-estate-investors/Watch this!https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EGuxvGcXl5Q&t=31Buy us a coffee!https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EGuxvGcXl5Q&t=31Buy a shirt!https://thefireyoucarry.threadless.com/Buy coffee from Fire Dept. Coffee and support us by using thefireyoucarry at checkout!https://www.firedeptcoffee.com/

MAIM TIME
#042 | Korea's National Foundation Day: Garlic and Tigers and Bears, Oh My!

MAIM TIME

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 35:37


#042: October 3 is Korea's National Foundation Day, Gaecheonjeol (개천절; 開天節). It celebrates the founding of the Korean people! Gaecheon means “Opening of Heaven.” It actually commemorates 2 dates: October 3 2457 BCE and October 3 2333 BCE. On October 3 2457 BCE, Hwanung 환웅, a son of a god of heaven came HARD upon the Earth like a GAWD, mate. That's gaecheon, the opening of Heaven. Later, Hwanung had sex with a woman who used to be a bear (we'll get to that later) and had a son, named Dangun Wanggeom, or Dangun. On October 3, 2333 BCE, Dangun founded the first Korean state of Gojoseon, meaning Old Joseon. We'll talk about Korea's Creation Myth and Dangun, the legendary founder and GAWD-king of Korea's first kingdom, Gojoseon. Is Korea really 5000 years old? Do Korean people come from ALIENS? Who gives af? Why should we give af or any f's at all? As with my previous episodes on heritage/culture… the short answer is you don't have to give af. You're an individual with your own volition and destiny. It's your own choice to care about your heritage or not. The long answer? Tune in and hear me ramble on and on! Support the show (http://maimtime.com/support)

Everything is Awesome with Jeff and KC
Episode 6: Fired For Garlic Breath

Everything is Awesome with Jeff and KC

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 110:40


In this episode, Rachel and Jeff go to town on a great many subjects, including Elizabethan hogs, childrearing, and oppression of all kinds.  Jeff Richardson on Facebook @eljefetacoma on twitter   Check out our website: http://awesomepod.squarespace.com   Listen to our other shows! Shattered Worlds RPG  and check out the livestream: twitch.tv/shatteredsworldsrpg The War for the Tower Twelfth Night Podcast by Rose City Shakespeare and coming eventually...   Electric Bard Villain V Villain   Drill down into the details!   putting books all over bed-slidey desk things like a hospital rolly table Elizabethan hog overheated brains ADHD , Autism, Chronic fatigue pacing yourself weaponized Catholocism education taking breaks for family loving pets poor parenting difficult jobs child-bearing age issues social engineering Enlightenment vs. education stranded worms altruism some animals are a***oles variations of the human species a Rachel Crazy Theory™ conformist competitives what the f** are rules? different brains for different skills helpful autistic traits doing stuff at night walking toe-first negative siestas oppression autistic persons of Jewish descent growing up in Hollywood the AIDS crisis intersectionalism demonstrating paradox asking questions questioning oppressors tests of whiteness competitive oppression ranking the first generation after birth control that's what a Boomer would say exposure to computers women in technology Mary Pickford women in computers we're always there in the beginning perception of oppression let's come together and oppress the one percent Maguffium and Technoplex Paul Stamets Too Funny to Fail Steven Colbert Steve Carrell Jon Stewart Dana Carvey Tool Time/Home Improvement toxic masculinity hurts itself getting fired for garlic breath Blizzard Update              

The joe gardener Show - Organic Gardening - Vegetable Gardening - Expert Garden Advice From Joe Lamp'l

Growing garlic in the home garden opens up the opportunity to experience an array of flavors that you will never find with store-bought garlic. Growing garlic is easy, but there are a few important things to know to have success. To share his expert advice on growing great garlic, my guest this week is Alley Swiss of Filaree Farm in Washington.

Live Like the World is Dying
S1E35 - Casandra on Food Preserveration

Live Like the World is Dying

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 58:35


Episode Notes Margaret talks to Casandra about canning, drying, and other means by which to preserve food. The host Margaret Killjoy can be found on twitter @magpiekilljoy or instagram at @margaretkilljoy. You can support her and this show on Patreon at patreon.com/margaretkilljoy. Transcript Margaret Hello and welcome to Live Like the World is Dying, your podcast for what feels like the End Times. I'm your host, Margaret Killjoy. And this episode we're going to be talking about food preservation and specifically canning and dried food storage and some other things. This podcast is a proud member of the Channel Zero Network of anarchist podcasts and here's a jingle from another show on the network. Duh daaaaa. Jingle One two, one two. Tune in for another episode of MaroonCast. MaroonCast is a down to earth Black radical podcast for the people. Our hosts, hip hop anarchist Sima Lee, the RBG and sex educator and crochet artists KLC, share their reflections on Maroons, rebellion, womanism, life, culture, community, trapped liberation, and everyday ratchet. They deliver fresh commentary with the queer, transgender, non-conforming, fierce, funny, Southern guls, anti-imperialist, anti-oppression approach. Poly ad and bullshit. Check out episodes of MaroonCast on Channel Zero National, Buzzsprout, SoundCloud, Google, Apple, and Spotify. All power to the people, all pleasure. Margaret Okay, if you could introduce yourself with your name, your pronouns, and then maybe a little bit about your experience with prepping, like, I don't know, if you like work for any prepping podcasts that people might like, if you want to shout them out, but also your experience a little bit about what we're going to be talking about today. Casandra Yeah, my name is Casandra and I use they or she pronouns. Um, I don't know, I've always been interested in foraging and gardening and preserving food and I happen to work for this really cool prepping podcast called Live Like the World is Dying. Margaret Casandra is our transcriptionist and we've been talking—I've been bugging them more and more about food preservation. And finally I was like, can I just have you on the podcast? And then you have to listen to the sound of your own voice as you transcribe it. And they said yes, which was nice of them. So okay, so most of your experience in terms of food preservation is canning, is that right? Salem Speaker 2 Yeah, that's—I think the two things that I do most are drying and canning, but I also do some fermenting and, like, salt preserving. Margaret Cool. Okay, well, let's talk about all of it. Do you want to talk about the different methods of food preservation and which ones are appropriate for which foods and what you like the most? Casandra Yes, I think there, there are two things that I think about when I'm deciding how to preserve something and one is, drying, for instance, is good for like really long-term storage. But—and it's also good because the food is lightweight, right? So it's very portable. But in my day to day life, I'm much more likely to use like canned food. So ease of use is another consideration when I'm deciding how to preserve something. And different food is best preserved in different ways. And that's something we can talk about when we get into canning especially a little bit later. Like acidity, how juicy something is, those things all come into play. Margaret Okay. Why preserve food? I mean, like, obviously, you could just go to the supermarket and buy the food instead of canning it or preserving in other ways. Like, I mean, that sort of—that part's sort of a joke. But what is it that appeals to you about DIY preservation of food, like what got you into it? Casandra Um, I live in the Pacific Northwest, and there are certain times of year where food is really abundant and accessible. And it just at a certain point seems silly to me to not take advantage of that if I could. You know, so if I have access to, you know, dozens of pounds of green beans once a year, why not can it instead of going out and buying it in the winter? Margaret Okay, so what are the methods of preserving food? You've mentioned some of them, but is it possible that we could get a list of just, like, what—there's canning, salting, pickling, drying, what am I missing? Smoking? Curing? Is that what you would call that? Casandra Yeah, I guess smoking and curing could—smoking is like a form of curing I think. Freezing. What else? Did we say fermenting already? Margaret No, we haven't put that one yet. Casandra Fermenting. Margaret Okay, should we just go through them and talk about why each one's great? Casandra Yes, yeah, we can definitely do that. It's hard to like, it's hard to talk about them all at once because they're all so different so... Margaret Yeah. Casandra Yeah. Margaret Well, so if possible, I mean, like—one of the things I'm really curious about is that, like, when you look at green beans, you're like, okay, green beans belong in a can. And then when you look at something else, you're like, oh, that belongs fermented. You know, hops, obviously. But what, um—is it just the different methods just work for different foods, if you like are working with meats you're mostly interested in curing them or freezing them or something? Like, how does all this work? How do you how do you decide? Casandra I decide based on what I like to eat most. So like, which preservation method I'm most likely to use because I'm not interested in wasting food. And then also just like, which is the most accessible to me. So for something like green beans, I don't know, I guess you could dry them, but I don't think that would taste particularly. good. So I want to preserve them in a way that tastes really good that I'm actually likely to use throughout the year. And then also space, I think space is a huge issue. So my pantry is only so large so there are certain things that it makes more sense for me to dry like nuts, right? I'm not going to can walnuts, though I suppose you could. I'm just going to dry them and store them in a bin. Margaret Does it just take up less space because there's like fewer individual jars taking up space. Casandra Mm hmm. Yeah, yeah. Definitely. Margaret Okay. What, um, what's like the easiest to get into and/or what's cheapest? Casandra Probably drying? Drying probably or salt curing because, you know, all you need to salt preserve something is salt. Margaret Okay. Casandra Um, but the drying as well. You know, you can sun dry or you can, like, create some trays for yourself and some airflow, you don't need a particular tool to dry something effectively. Margaret Okay, what, uh—you said that drying tends to make things last longest. Like, what's the kind of like, scale there? Okay, so like, because you were saying how, okay, so you're saying how it's hard to talk about all of them at once because each one has like all these different pros and cons. So I'm trying to, like get you to talk about the pros and cons of different ones. But so like, what's the, like, you know, hierarchy of how long food can last. Like I know, for example, in my own limited research into this, I'm like, oh, I can store dried beans, dried rice, etc., for like, 30 years, right? But I'm under the impression that canning has a shorter shelf life than that. And in my head, of course, like it would be, like, freezing, there's a long shelf life as long as you have electricity, and then like cured food, it's like maybe not as lonh. But this might be my, like, my my weird, like, obviously, like, storing meat isn't as good or something. You know, my own non-meat-eating bias which I will attempt to not bring into this particular episode of the show because everyone's gonna make up their own minds about what they want to eat. But so what, um, so if drying last longest, what last least long and what—where is everything else in the middle? Casandra Um, yes. I don't even know if drying last longest, honestly, because you hear about like, fermented or cured eggs that are found that are, you know, hundreds of years old and stuff—or like kimchi, like jars of kimchi that are still good after hundreds of years. So. Margaret Oh lord, okay. Casandra Yeah, yeah, so, you know, fermenting can be very long lived as well. But, but yeah, drying, as long as the thing stays dry and like bugs and mice don't get to it, as long as it's properly sealed, that's probably the longest—longest-term. And then the shortest—what would be the shortest? I think it's probably either canned or frozen. Like, food can be frozen for a long time—sorry—food can't be frozen for a long time but, like, it starts to taste like freezer at a certain point. So that's like my least favorite method, personally. Margaret What does that mean? Is that, like, I've heard that like if you store things in the freezer for a long time it starts to like take on the taste of everything around it. Or is there like a specific, like, just as the cell walls burst of frozenness and whatever—I don't know anything about the science of any of this. Casandra I don't know about the science of freezing. I'm not sure. I just know that, like, you know, if I lose a bag of green beans in the back of the freezer, a year and a half later the green beans don't really taste like green beans anymore. They kind of tastes like freezer. Margaret Okay. Casandra Which is gross. I don't want freezer beans. I'm also very anti-freezer just because we had—we had a, I guess a climate event here in February that knocked out power at my house for about 10 days. And so everything in the fridge in the freezer was compromised. And it sucked, and I lost a lot of food, and it was very stressful. But all of my canned goods and all of my dry goods were perfectly fine. Margaret That's a really important point. Casandra Yeah. Margaret I know that's, like, classic prepper style is to have the deep freeze in your garage full of, like, you know, ideally some deer or something like that. But it always seems like it just requires so much electricity to maintain. Casandra Yeah, and if, yeah. It's also—I mean, I think when we're talking about preparing for disasters, there's the preparing in place versus preparing to move. Um, and so something like freezing makes sense for preparing in place, but—and canning as well. But if you're preparing to move, then something like dried or cured makes more sense. Margaret Yeah. Casandra But even with freezing, like, when our power was out, I didn't thaw out frozen food and try to cook it over my wood stove, you know. It was much easier for me to just like open a can of soup that I had canned from the year before and warm it up. So even if I'm thinking about preparing in place, things like canning make more sense to me. Margaret Yeah. No, such a—being in place versus going—I don't really have anything deep to say about that, I just, I think about that a lot. And there's a reason that all the, like, food you put in your, like, go bag is usually, you know, dried backpacker meals where you add water or whatever, you know. Casandra Yeah. Which is good, in an emergency, but it's not super sustainable. So yeah. Margaret Yeah. At the beginning of the COVID crisis when I was, like, alone all the time and I didn't know what's happening so I just didn't go into town and I just, like, ate through my—ate through my own food stores. You know, I definitely was very reliant on canned goods, canned soups in particular. And then also, like, when I lived out of a backpack and traveled I did rely on cans then but I relied on cans, like, you know, I don't like carry two or three or something like cans of chili or something. This wasn't a DIY canning. This was, you know, Amy's chili. Casandra Right. And that's the other thing too is, like, Amy's chili in a tin can is—it's heavier than dried food, but it's sturdy. But I'm not gonna, like, put glass jars of food in a go bag, right? Margaret Yeah. Casandra That would be catastrophe waiting to happen. Margaret Yeah, I learned the hard way that, like, several times I tried, when I lived out of a backpack I always like want it to travel with, like, this jar of almond butter, but it was glass. Or for a while I decided I was gonna be that asshole who lived out of a backpack and had a brandy snifter. And when I say for a while I mean, like, 24 hours? Casandra 'Til it broke? Margaret Yeah. The jar of almond butter didn't last as long as that, and that was a little bit more of a desperate thing, because when I dropped it I was like, that's all the calories that I have on me. Casandra Oh, God. Yeah. Margaret And I genuinely don't remember—I remember looking at it and staring at it and being like, do I pull out shards of glass? Or do I just not eat? Oh, yeah, I'm just I don't remember which one I picked. Casandra Oh no. Margaret I'm alive so I probably picked not eating the almond butter. Okay, so that's a good point. So is it possible to can and non-glass jars? Like okay, my head like canning requires mason jars. Which people buy in bulk. And they're, like, not crazy cheap, but I haven't looked in a long time. Casandra I know that historically people have used tin cans, but maybe this is a conversation we could get into right now. But, like, modern food safety guidelines, everything I've read is glass jars. But the good news is, once you purchase the jar, this isn't—this isn't prepping like, you know, storing something away for 30 years and like stocking in bulk. This is, like, something that you do yearly and you're rotating through your food so you're reusing your supplies. Margaret Okay. Casandra Yeah. Margaret Which actually, probably—and now I'm just purely conjecturing—is like a better way to do any kind of prepping anyways, like, it's like reminding yourself that it's very rarely for the long haul. It's usually for situations like what you had happen where, you know, you lost power for 10 days. Casandra I mean even just part of your daily life. Like I'm—the main purpose of me doing things like canning and saving dry food is to eat throughout the year, not to prepare for disaster. But, you know, when there is a disaster I'm already prepared so, because it's just part of my daily life. Margaret Well and I guess that's like the yearly cycle that I mean, I grew up completely alienated from, you know, I ate the same things every season of the year. But that's not really the way that humanity evolved. Casandra Yeah. I mean, the nice thing about preserving food is that you don't have to eat the same things because you've preserved them for a different season. But it is cyclical, because, like, right now it's green bean season. So my weekends are canning green beans or tomatoes. And in a few months, it'll be nut season, so that's what I'm focusing on. But it gives me what I need for the rest of the year. Margaret Okay, so I'm going to try and make this a pun but it's not going to work very well. Let's get into the nuts and bolts—but there's no bolts and food—of this. And let's talk about canning. Let's talk about, like, how do you get started canning? What is canning? Like, you know, I mean, if—clearly it's not just the can of Amy's chili, it's something else. Casandra Yeah, so canning is preserving food in a glass jar, in liquid. And you're doing that by using heat and pressure to cook the food inside of it. Like, you're raising it to a particular temperature to destroy microbes and bacteria and things like that. And then it's also creating a vacuum seal. And that's what makes it shelf-stable. Margaret Okay. How do you do it? Casandra Hooray for shelf-stable food. There are different ways. So um, let's see. I think maybe I want to give my food safety spiel first before— Margaret Yeah. Okay, cool. Casandra So, yeah, so I worked in the food industry for a long time and I feel really comfortable with food safety. But I think that it's wise, if someone doesn't feel comfortable with food safety to, you know, do some research or learn from someone or take a class or something because botulism is fatal. However, canning is really safe if it's done properly. And so as long as you understand what properly mean, you're gonna be fine. And then the anecdote I like to give is that—Let's see—my my grandpa's mom—when I was learning to cat I was really nervous about food safety. And my grandpa was, like, don't worry about it because his mom used to can everything they ate in a two-tiered steam canter, which is just, like, outlandish. And she would do it on a wood stove, like, manually regulating the heat. And she would can everything from like meat to vegetables to fruit, which we'll learn in a second why that's absolutely insane. And, you know, she had 18 kids and none of them died of botulism. So— Margaret That's—I mean, by that number, one of them would have died of botulism. Even if someone—anyway, yeah. Casandra So I'm not saying like not to be safe, but just to know that, like, statistically you'll be okay, especially if you do what you're supposed to do. So. Margaret Okay, so take the warning seriously, is what your— Casandra Yeah, I think it was important for me to hear that like, no, really, you're gonna be okay. Because if you look at like the USDA website, or the like national—what's it called?—National Center for Home Food Preservation website. I swear, it's like every other paragraph, they're trying to scare you about botulism. Anyway, it feels like every other paragraph they're trying to warn you about botulism. And it feels really, like, anxiety-inducing. So it's something to be aware of but not to be afraid of, if that makes sense. Margaret What is botulism actually, do you know? Casandra Um, let's see. I think it's it's a bacteria that produces a toxin that is fatal. And the reason it's so scary is because most food spoilage you can see or smell, but botulism, you can't. Margaret Okay. Casandra Um, and it can even be fatal just with, like, skin contact. Margaret Oh, wow. Casandra Yeah, so it's it's very scary, but it—I don't know. I don't want to terrify people. Margaret Well, how do you not make it? Casandra Right. Margaret I was reading something that's like has something to do with, like, whether or not there's oxygen or something? Casandra Yep, yep. So it—botulism grows in an anaerobic environment, which means no oxygen. I think that's correct. I—so I learned from my grandma. That's the other part of the disclaimer. So the science is not something that I know a ton of out, which is fine. But the point is that if you follow proper, like, sterilization and follow recipes that are approved, you'll be fine. So you asked like three times what canning is and how to do it. So maybe— Margaret Yeah yeah yeah. Casandra Okay, so there are two different—there are three different types of canners. And they're used are different acidities. So the acidity of a food is important because the microorganisms in acidic food are killed at a lower temperature than non-acidic food. So for acidic food—and that means, like, fruits, pickled things that have like a vinegar brine—those are canned in a water bath canner or a steam canner. And then non-acidic foods like vegetables, meats, things like that are canned in a pressure canner because it helps them get to higher heat. Margaret Where do tomatoes fall in, are they acidic are they— Casandra So tomatoes are tricky because you—they're right on the edge of acidic and non-acidic. So if you add an acid to them, like lemon juice or citric acid, you can can them as if they're acidic, but if you don't, you have to put them in a pressure canner. And for a long time, whoever regulates canning shit, said that steam canning was not safe. Margaret Okay. Casandra But recently—I think it was Wisconsin University—some school in Wisconsin did a study and found that it is safe, which is great because I prefer it to waterbath canning, and it's how I learned to can. Margaret And it also, I mean was this, was the test subjects just all 18 of your great grandmother's children, or? Because I think that's a large enough sample size. Casandra I think so too. They also used the wood stove. No, so the difference between water bath canning and steam canning is water bath canning, you're just taking a big ass pot, and you're submerging your jars and water, and that's what creates the heat and the pressure and the vacuum seal. But it's really unwieldly because you're having to, like, deal with a big ass pot of boiling water. So steam canning is creating the same effect, but just with steam, so the amount of water you need is much smaller. So that's how I learned and that's what I prefer. It's very quick. And then pressure canning takes a special tool called a pressure canner. Margaret You can't just put it in a pressure cooker. Casandra No, but you can use your pressure canner for pressure cooking, if that makes sense. Margaret Okay. Casandra But pressure canners have—there are two different types, and don't ask me to explain the difference in detail because I won't be able to—but there's a weighted gauge canner and a dial gauge canner. And I believe what I use is a dial gauge. So it has this special gauge on top that tells you how much pressure you're creating within the canner. Margaret So is the basic idea that all this food goes into a jar, the lid goes on the jar, and then you're trying to create enough pressure and heat to both cook the food and seal it? How does it seal it? Like is it, like, creating like a pressure difference inside and outside? That's like sucking the lid down onto it, or? Casandra Yeah, yeah, that's my understanding. And it gets sciency especially with pressure canning because altitude impacts— Margaret Of course it does. Casandra Impacts the pressure in canning time. But that's why it's—so that's one of the benefits of following—let's talk about this actually, this will be useful. So, what makes a good canning recipe? Because it's important to follow good canning recipes. And they'll include things like how to make sure your food is acidic enough. They'll included chart based on altitude telling you what pressure you need, and also how long to can things. They'll tell you how and whether that changes depending on your jar size. So they'll outline everything like that in the recipe. So it's not, like, an equation you have to figure out every time you can a thing—unless you're changing altitude constantly, which would be, I don't know, adventurous. Margaret Would you say it would be jarring? Casandra Yes. Yes, it would be jarring. Yeah, once you know your altitude, it's very easy. And they're, like, companies like Bell jars put out entire books full of charts and recipes and things like that. Margaret Okay, is there something special about like—like, I've never canned anything, but at various points I've looked at how to do basically everything. And I remember when I was looking at canning and a long time ago, I think I got shy—I think I got scared away by the botulism thing, honestly. And it was like something about, like, if you use the spatula—you use like a rubber spatula when you put the food in the jar, and if you don't do it right then you like murder everyone you know. Casandra Yeah, so there are some basic safety considerations. So maybe let's, like, pretend we're canning something. Margaret Okay. Is it green beans? Casandra Yeah, let's can some green beans and we'll walk through the steps. So. So we're just canning plain green beans, which means that they're not acidic. So we're doing them in a pressure canner. So first you prep your food. So if we're prepping green beans, that means I'm snapping all the ends off. And I'm washing them and I'm, you know, I'm making sure none of them are, like, moldy or anything like that. And then I'm getting a pot going to prep my jars and my lids. The thing about jars is that they're glass. And the thing about glass is that if you put a hot thing into a cold glass thing, the glass thing will shatter, right? Margaret Yeah. Which is why you don't drink coffee out of mason jars. Well, people do, but why? Casandra But then they make the ones with the handles as if you're supposed to, you know? Margaret Yeah, that's a good point. Casandra Yeah, that's sketchy. Anyway, so sterilizing your jars and heating them up is sort of all done in the same step, you just toss everything in a big pot and put water in it, and you boil it for 10 minutes. Margaret Okay, and that's not the pressure canner, that's just a pot of water on the stove. Casandra Yep. And, you know, if you were to read like a canning website or something, they—people have all different methods for heating up and sterilizing their jars. I just think that that's like the quickest and the thing that I do because then they're both warm and sterile. So we're doing green beans. So, let's see, what I'm going to do next is take the jars out of the sterilized water. And I'm going to pack them full of these green beans. So we're putting all of our green beans in a jar, and we're doing something called raw packing, which means that the green beans are raw when I put them in the jar as opposed to cooked. And differrent recipes will tell you, you know what you should be doing. And then I pour warm liquid over them—in this case, it's just water—because if there are air gaps in the jar, that means that there's a chance air will get trapped, which you know, botulism and spoilage and things like that. But it also means there's a chance that the jars won't seal properly. Margaret Okay. Casandra Recipes, use something called headspace. So your recipe will specify how much headspace to leave in a jar. And that means the space between the top of your food and liquid and the top of the jar. And so they've timed their recipe based on the headspace. So if the recipe says 1/2in headspace but I leave, you know, an inch and a half, it probably won't seal because it's not in the canner long enough to like vacuum all have that air out. Does that make sense? Margaret Yeah. And then you murder everyone, you know? Casandra Hopefully they just won't seal and you try again. Botulism comes after the jar has sealed, and that's when things go poorly. Yeah, so anyway, so we've got our beans and our liquid in a jar. We wipe the rims of the jar because that's where the seal happens. So we want to make sure there's nothing like impeding that. Margaret Okay. Oh, like a little piece of dirt or something that would keep it from—or like a green bean stem. Casandra Yes, exactly. For things that are, like, chunkier, that's when your spatula technique comes in because you want to make sure there's there aren't any air pockets. Then you put your lids and your rings on. And then everything's really hot, so you make sure you use gloves and appropriate tools and load everything into your pressure canner with, I don't know, I think it's an inch of water. It depends on your canner. And then you seal it up and you start your canning. Margaret Are those, like, electric systems or they like stovetop, Casandra Stovetop, I've never seen an electric one, but I wouldn't be shocked if that existed. Margaret No I just didn't—I've never seen one of these things, so I struggle to visualize it. Okay, so it's in the pressure canner and we start, and then you leave it for some length of time that is specified in the recipe? Casandra Yep, yep. And, you know, different canners come with specific instructions to make sure that your weight is correct and your pressure is correct and things like that. So I won't, like, try to detail that out because it depends on the tool you're using. But assuming your weight and your pressure are correct, then you just set your timer once it's up to pressure and leave it in. Margaret Okay. Is this, like, are they usually like around an hour, or is this like three days? Or what's— Casandra It depends on the food and how acidic it is. So something like meat takes, let's see, like the the bone broth recipe I use—the canning recipe—takes like an hour and a half in the pressure. But something like tomato sauce takes 15 minutes. Margaret Oh, because it's so acidic? Casandra Yep. Margaret Okay. Cool. Casandra You know, that means that, like, on tomato day, I can get through a bunch of batches but on broth canning day I can't, so. Margaret Yeah. What about tomato bone broth canning? Nevermind. Okay. Casandra The lesson is not to—not to combine recipes. Margaret See, I think that this is, like—you know, I've never been like a baker. I've technically baked things, but I'm not very good at following directions specifically. My mom isn't any good at this either. I hope my mom isn't—I have no idea if my mom's listening to the podcast. You know, it's like, I'll start a recipe and then somewhere along the way, maybe halfway, three quarters of the way through, I'm just going to do something different. I don't know why. And so I've always been a terrible baker. So maybe canning isn't the food preservation method that I'm specifically going to get into. Casandra I'm in the same way though. Margaret Okay. Okay. Casandra And here's the thing. So like, with—there are so many fancy canning recipes. Like bourbon peach preserves, and—you know, like, people get ridiculously fancy. And those are never the recipes I use because I would be tempted to experiment. So when I—personally when I'm canning, I'm just canning, like, the most basic ingredients so that—like plain, just in water, I don't even use salt. So when it's time for me to cook later in the year, I can experiment because I haven't, you know, I haven't, like, made all of my beans into different like fancy bean recipes already. They're just plain beans. I don't know if that makes sense, but... Margaret No, no, no, that makes sense. Okay, I think you've sold me on canning—this is—I mean, clearly our job is to sell me on each of these things, one after the other. Okay, so canning is good for something that you're going to cycle through at home. And so that's something that you grow or get access to at one time of year, so you can have access to it at another time of year. And you said you can also, like, can soups—is like the next level up of like the classic bachelor thing where you make a whole bunch of soup on Sunday and put it in the freezer and then just, like, eat that soup all week. Casandra I mean, I do that. So I—soup is why I can, because my kid loves soup and that's just like what we eat during the winter. So I'll get off work and forget to have planned anything. So I'll just open a jar of broth and a jar of stew meat and a jar of potato—you know, I just throw it all into a pot. But that's like seven quarts of food into a single pot, so I think I'm doing both. Margaret Okay. Casandra So we have soup for a week, but it's from pre-canned food. Margaret There's—I really wish I was on my puns and jokes better today. But somewhere there's a soup for our family joke. Casandra I'm sure there is. Margaret Hopefully someone will just tell it to me later on Twitter in a way that is either very charming or very annoying. Casandra You'll have to send it to me. Margaret Okay, so that kind of covers canning. Now everyone who's listened is capable of making up their own recipes and so let's move on from there to—what's next? What do you like the most after canning? Casandra Drying. Margaret Drying. Okay. Casandra What do you want to know about drying, Margaret? Margaret Well, I mean, okay, so like, I feel like there's two parts to it. And maybe I'm totally wrong about this, but there's both the, like, drying of the food and then the storing of the dried food. Does that seem like? Casandra And then the preparing of the dried food. Margaret Oh, yeah, no cooking is totally beyond anything. Casandra It's not like a can where you can just open it and heat it up. Margaret Yeah, you're right. Yeah, I mean, it's like—oh, so that means I should probably just make canned beans. I've always felt like a terrible prepper because I'm, like, I have all these like dried beans. Then I'm like, I hate soaking beans. I definitely just eat canned beans. Casandra See, that's why I do both. So I get my, like, 50 pound bags of black beans, right? And I keep them in five gallon buckets. But then I rotate through them. So I will can large batches of them. So I'm only having to think about soaking them once, right? And then the cans and then I buy more dry beans to replace the ones I used, and then I have cans. Does that make sense? Margaret Yeah. So you can soaked beans, not dried beans, right? Casandra Yeah, well, they're dried and then you soak them so—and it's actually, going through the soaking process and then pressure cooking, essentially, makes them more digestible. So, I don't know. It's my favorite. Margaret Okay. Yeah. Cuz like, it's like, one of the reasons I've given—it's really, I mean, people have probably noticed that I haven't done a lot of episodes about food. And it's not because I, like, think that like this other stuff is cooler. It's because, like, food growing, preservation, and preparation, like, intimidate the hell out of me. And, you know, I'm convinced that I can't grow anything because—I said this in like one of the last episodes—because I tried to plant a pine tree when I was a kid and I failed or whatever, you know. And I'm really excited to get to talk about this, basically, even though it's very embarrassing that I'm, like, in my mind I'm like, oh, yeah, when you soak beans overnight they always—you soak them forever and they always end up still just a little bit, a little bit crunchy. Casandra Because you still have to cook them. Margaret Well, yeah. But—ah, and then the pressure cooker being the way to—okay. Casandra But we were talking about drying food. Margaret Yes. Right. Okay, so yeah, so okay. So there's three different parts to it, there's the drying of the food, the storing of the dried food, and the the preparation of the dried food. Let's not too much get into the preparation of the dried food today. But let's talk about the, like, the drying and the storing. And I'm really sad about this storing because it's the only thing that I've, like, done any of at all and done some research about. So. Casandra You probably know much more than me about the storage, but— Margaret Only in that I took a lot of notes like last week. Casandra Oh Good! Margaret But okay, how do you dry food? Casandra Um, so I use just a really cheap food dehydrator, like the cheapest one I could find on Amazon. There are really fancy dehydrators you can get. You don't have to buy a dehydrator at all, you can just, you know, set things out on trays and rotate them and, like, put a fan near them so there's airflow. Margaret When you say set things out, you mean like in the sun? Casandra Um, I guess if you want it sun dried, but I—in general, if I'm preserving food, I try to keep it out of sunlight. Margaret Okay, that makes sense. Casandra That's maybe—we didn't talk about canning and how long things are shelf stable, but generally, if food is exposed to sunlight, it affects its shelf stability. So. Margaret Okay. Casandra Um, but yeah, airflow is the—temperature and airflow are the major factors for drying food. So, especially if something's very juicy, you want it to be lower temperature with lots of airflow because if the outside of it dries before the inside, it's bad news. I guess it can cause mold for whatever's on the inside if it doesn't fully dry, but if it does fully dry, it means that like, say you're drying cranberries or something, they're rockhard instead of that, like, nice, tender, dryness. I can speak. So yeah, most of hydrators will come with like settings for different types of food. And you can look those up online as well. Like which foods need more heat, which foods want less heat. Margaret How much does humidity affect this? Like I—where I live it's basically I live inside a cloud. All of the South is just a cloud for all of the summer and so, like, I can't even dry clothes on the line unless they're in the direct sunlight. So I assume I would have to use—I would have to use one of these, like, what are they, electric? The ones that you're talking about? Casandra Yeah, I imagine so. I live in a not humid place. So I haven't had to think about that. Also storage, I imagine that you probably have more trouble with food storage. Margaret I do. Casandra Yeah. But, you know, then there are things that apparently great if you have a higher humidity, like—what I'm sure you're super interested in—salt curing meat is, apparently a higher humidity is better so— Margaret Oh, really? Casandra There's that. Margaret I wonder what I can salt cure. Casandra Right? Margaret Just slabs of seitan. It sounds terrible. Okay. Casandra The things that that I mostly dry are nuts and seeds because I grow a lot of sunflowers and also I live in the Pacific Northwest. So it's, like, filbert and walnut territory, acorn territory. Margaret Do you have to prepare—the only one of these things I know anything about is acorns. And I know that you have to do a lot of work to get the tannins out of acorns. You do that before you drive them in this case? Casandra You know, I've actually heard—and I'm planning to try this this year—but I've heard that it's actually quicker to get the tannins out if you dry them first because then, when you introduce water to flush the tannins out, it can, like, fully saturate the nut meat. Margaret Okay. Casandra Does that make sense? So you're getting rid of all the moisture first, and then when you introduce fresh water to the nuts, it can penetrate into the like flesh. Margaret Okay. Because yeah, it takes forever to flush acorns. Casandra It does. If you—I mean, you have a stream, so that would be much, much less time intensive. For folks who don't know, acorns are delicious, but only if they're not full of tannins. Margaret Which is like, what, a natural preservative or something that's in them that, in order to human edible, you have to get rid of. Casandra Yeah, I mean, there are tannins and lots of food. It's the thing that makes sour food sour or like astringent food astringent, but, you know, the amount that's in the average acorn can give you a tummy ache. Margaret Okay, so is this, like, is this one of the ways that you would—because I assume basically all the nuts I eat in my life are, like, dried nuts, right? Because I'm not going around eating fresh nuts. So this is like one of the main ways, if you wanted to make the nuts that you grow taste like the nuts people are used to eating, you would dry them first in this way, right? Casandra Like acorns or just? Margaret Oh sorry. I was going back to like, you know, the other nuts? Casandra Yeah, yeah. Margaret Cashews. I don't know. You didn't say cashews, I was just thinking about cashews. Because I like cashews. Casandra I think cashews are actually way different. Have you seen a cashew plant? Margaret All of the nuts look really weird in the wild. I struggle to understand them. This is the most embarrassing episode I'll ever put out. It's just like, I'm this crazy person who lives in the woods. And I don't know anything about plants. Casandra Because cashew is part of a fruit, right? It's not, like, in a hard shell like a walnut. Anyway. Let's not talk about cashews. Margaret Let's not talk about cashews. I'll pretend like I know what filberts are and talk about them. Casandra A filter is just—I think it's actually a different species than a hazelnut, but it's what we call hazelnuts here. Margaret Okay, cool. Casandra So like filberts and walnuts, things that have a hard shell that you crack the shell open, and then—you can eat it fresh. It's delicious, fresh. But if you want to store it, you just dry it. Margaret Okay. Casandra And some nuts you dry in the shell like walnuts, but some you don't have to. Margaret Okay. And so drying is like a little bit simpler. It's like— Casandra Yeah. Margaret If you're drying walnuts, you look at the article that says "this is how you dry walnuts," and you put them in your dryer and you dry them. Casandra I mean, I don't even put nuts in a dryer, because they're already so dry. Margaret You just leave them out. Casandra Yeah, I just—like, I put a blanket on the floor in front of my fireplace in the winter and just have a, like, mound of nuts that I— Margaret Cool. Casandra Like, rotate. So, but if you're doing something that's, like, quicker to spoil, I guess, like fruit or vegetables, than a dehydrator might be the solution for you. Margaret Okay, how long—like, what are some of the advantages of drying food? I mean, obviously, like, certain foods, like nuts and things, like that's like almost, like, the way that you you store them, right? But it's like, I don't know a ton about, like, dried fruits—I suppose I know fruits a bit—but like dried vegetables, and, you know, is this, uh, like, how long do they last? Like, what is good about this method? Casandra I think it's good because it's smaller so it's easier to store, right? It's also lighter. So that goes back to our conversation about, you know, preparing to be on the move as opposed to being stationary. For things that are snackable it's nice to have snacks, so like dried fruits, dried seeds, things like that. Um, I—there are a few vegetables that I routinely dry because I routinely use them. Garlic is one. I guess alliums. Can we call the allium family of vegetable? Garlic and onions are two of them because I don't really can them. You could ferment them, especially fermented garlic is really popular, I just don't do it. Um, but, like, the number of times I've gone to make soup in the winter and not had garlic or onions is embarrassing. But if I have them dried, I can just toss in a handful and it's delicious. Margaret Okay, but like, so if you dry—how long does dried fruit last? How long do dried vegetables last? Like, is it, like, good enough to last you—kike most of these food preservation methods are sort of, like, meant to kind of get you until—set you up so that the next time—until the next harvest of the same thing. Is that kind of the general idea, like, so that you have this thing that lasts, like, hopefully almost a year, or? Casandra Oh, they can last—I mean, I have like dried onions, dried plums in my pantry that have been there for two years and are perfectly good. The thing about, like, everything other than canning, is that if something goes bad, you can see it or smell it. So it's good until it, you know, it's good until you can see or smell that it isn't good anymore. And that depends on, you know, how you've stored it. Do you put—is it in direct sunlight? Is it totally dry? Is it in a hot place? A cool place? Things like that. But it lasts a long time. That's a really vague answer. I think you were looking for something more specific. Margaret I mean, it's fine. We don't have to have, like, a chart—an audio chart of, like, you know, column A, the fruit, column B, how long it lasts with each different method. Okay, that's how you would organize the data anyway. Casandra It seems like there should be more to it, right? Like, there should be more to talk about with dried food. But it's so simple. You just— Margaret Yeah. Casandra But storage you wanted to talk about and I feel like you probably know more about storage can I do. Margaret Well, only because, like, I came into this with this "I don't know how to make food" thing, right? And, you know, I just remember a couple years ago a food scientist friend of mine was like—this was maybe like four or five years ago—was like, hey, I'm not saying it's gonna happen, but the supply chain on food is looking a little bit precarious this year, or whatever. So I was like, okay, I'm gonna just start having some, like, five gallon buckets of like beans and rice around. And that was probably what started me on the journey that you're all along for with me today. And so I just would go and buy, you know, basically prepper food, right? Ideally, the ones with like the least markup or whatever, but just, you know, five gallon buckets or huge cans of stuff that's like freeze dried or whatever and it's like meant to last 30 to 50 years on a shelf. And so I was doing that. And—but then I realized as I started to kind of, like, scale this, and more people are asking me for my recommendation. And I don't want to just be like, oh, go to Amazon, because that's the main place to buy Augason Farm stuff, you know—ans go for this company I don't know anything about. And instead realized, was like, well, there has to be a way to just, like, put rice in a five gallon bucket. It's like not quite as easy as that. You can do that and that'll last for a fairly long time, again, depending on your conditions, especially humidity and sunlight, as you mentioned, and oxygen is actually one of the biggest ways that, like, long shelf life foods go bad. And so the thing I've been researching, and I'll probably make a YouTube video about in the next week or so, is how to store dried goods for like long term storage, which is less the like—I feel like, in my head, there's like two tiers of food storage. And there's the more important one, which is what you're talking about and the, like, the things that you can cycle through and to get you through any given interruption. And then there's the sort of deep storage stuff where, I don't know, I don't see a reason for most people not to have, like, a month or two of food sitting in five gallon buckets in their basement, you know, that just sit there and you can pass them on to your kids. And—who will be like, really? Why are you giving this to me? But—actually, that's very optimistic to think that they won't immediately understand the need for such things. Casandra Right. Margaret And I like to imagine that will be around for 30 to 50 years from now. That seems optimistic, but I like it. So long term food storage, you can make beans and rice and many other things last 30-50 years. And the main way going at the moment—there's a lot of different ways to do it—but basically it's like the main way that people are doing right now and in prepper world, and it's mostly, I think pioneered by the Mormons. A lot of the information you can get about this—and if you live in Utah, apparently there're these stores will they'll just sell you really cheap beans and rice, and some of them are open to people who aren't in the church. But you basically, you put them into mylar bags, which are plastic bags with like an aluminum layer—which isn't technically the definition of mylar but, like, when you say mylar bag, it's what you mean—and you heat seal the bags. You put in the dried food, and then you put in oxygen absorbers. I always thought you put in desiccant because I think that humidity all of the time. The instruments that I built last year, some of them aren't even playable right now because the warping because the stupid humidity. I don't understand how a mountain dulcimer was invented in Appalachia and has such a thin soundboard. Anyway. So, but you don't put in desiccants necessarily—actually, in general, you don't. It actually seems to be contraindicated. But instead you put in oxygen absorbers that are sized to the size of bag, and you got to do it kind of quick, because obviously when you open up the oxygen absorber starts absorbing oxygen. And what it is is like little iron fillings that are absorbing that are oxidizing and making rust, I think, and they're in little sealed packets that air can go in, but rust pellets can't come out. You drop it in, you heat seal the bag, you can either get like a little flash sealer for like 25 bucks, or you can use a household iron, or you can use a hair—you know, it's like, I have a feeling that people making these things don't actually do this because I've seen people say straightening iron or curling iron. But um, you can seal it with heat. And then it is sealed. And then that doesn't keep like animals and stuff out, so then you put it in a bucket. So really, long story short, you take a mylar bag, at least five mil thick—mil is not millimeter, it's, I don't know, .001 or something, I don't remember. Millionth of an inch or 1,000th of an inch or something. You put in the oxygen absorber, you heat seal it, you put it in the bucket, and you're good. And it seems kind of simple. And it's a lot cheaper per five gallon bucket of beans and rice then going and getting the pre made stuff. Casandra Yeah. Margaret But being able to do it with stuff that you dry yourself—again, like, different things are gonna last different lengths of time. And oh, and you can only do this with stuff that's, like, less than 10% water content. You know, it has to be like way more dried. So you can't just like put in your, like, dried fruit and stuff. It's like almost all like rice and beans and oats and other things. And then there's like weird stuff where like brown rice is actually harder to preserve than white rice because brown rice has, like—which is much better, of course, in general—has more stuff, like more oils in it that can go bad. That's what I've learned, but you should correct me if that's what you're about to do. Casandra No, no, I was just gonna say I've heard of people—or I've seen something called dry canning. I haven't actually tried it. But it's something similar, except you're using jars and you're using an oven to, yeah, create a seal—a hot seal on the jars. And it's supposed to make dried food last longer. I've never personally understood the purpose of things like that just because I rotate. So it's just like a part of my life and routine. But yeah. Margaret Just having some deep storage, you know, like—but okay, this actually makes me—why are mason jars clear? Because isn't sunlight the enemy of, like, all food preservation? Casandra Yeah, I guess so I honestly—I have no idea. They make fancy, like, tinted jars, but they're much more expensive. I imagine it's just because it's more expensive to make tinted glass. But like traditionally you're not keeping your jars on a shelf in direct sunlight. You're keeping them, like, in your basement or your root cellar or something like that. Margaret Okay, so we've been talking almost an hour, and obviously there's still several methods of food preservation left, but maybe we won't go into the details about any of the other ones—unless, is, like, is there like one more that you want to like quick like shout out? Like hey, look how great salting is, or pickling, or, I don't know. Casandra Yeah. I mean, fermenting and pickling is amazing. And that's, like, an episode in and of itself. And I think that it's really like trendy right now, so probably accessible for people to find information on. And then salt preserving and sugar—I can't eat sugar, so I don't do sugar preserving. But those two methods are surprisingly simple. And I'm just beginning to experiment with salt preserving, but I love it. So, I dunno. Check it out. Margaret Is it just like you take the thing and you pack it in salt and then you're like, it's good. Casandra Kinda, yeah. Kinda, yeah. Margaret That's cool. Casandra I mean, there's more to it than that, but basically. Margaret Okay, well, I don't know. You've sold me on far more food preservation instead of just looking at it from this, like—you know, as much as I want to like try and sell you on deep storage, I think that that's like the far and away least useful aspect and like the one that ties most into, like, the bunker mentality that I supposedly shit talk all the time. You know, and so this, like, this—these methods of cycling through appeal quite a bit to me. Is there any—are there any like last thoughts on food preservation or anything else about any of this that you want to you want to bring up? Casandra Just that once you start digging into it, you'll probably be shocked by how many things you can can from, you know, butter to water. So. Margaret Wait, really? Casandra To whole chickens. So it's pretty flexible and pretty fun once you get the basic down. Canned water. Margaret I'm laughing about the canned chicken because I'm imagining, like, the chicken like coming out and running away when you opening up the can 15 years later. Alright, well, thanks so much for coming on the podcast. And also, you know, thanks for helping make the show accessible. And, I don't know, I really appreciate that, and I appreciate all the work that you've done with that. Casandra You're welcome. I'm dreading transcribing this, but I will do it. So. Margaret I appreciate it. Thank you so much for listening. I hope you got out of this as much as I did. I didn't know anything. I mean, well I didn't know anything compared to what I now know. And I'm excited to eat green beans, I mean, prepare green beans. No, I'm mostly just excited to eat green beans. I really like green beans. I'm really glad that was the example food we used. If you liked this episode or this podcast, you should tell people about it and tell people about it on the internet. Well, tell about it in real life. But if you tell people about it on the internet, all the like weird algorithms will like make other people know about it if you like, and comment, and subscribe, and do all the stuff. And you can also support me directly on Patreon. My Patreon is patreon.com/margaretkilljoy. And there's a bunch of like zines and other things up there. And they're behind a paywall, but if you live off of less money than we make off of the Patreon, then you should just message us and—or me, I guess, on any social media platform, and I will give you access to all the content for free because the main point is to put out content and I really just appreciate everyone's support helps me do that. And in particular, I want to thank Sean and Hugh and Dana, Chelsea, Eleanor, Mike, Starro, Cat J, the Compound, Shane, Christopher, Sam, Natalie, Willow, Kirk, Hoss the dog, and Nora. And also I would be remiss not to tell you that I have a book available for pre-order. AK Press is republishing a new edition of my book, A Country of Ghosts, which is an anarchist utopian book. And if you're listening to this podcast, you probably have like a vague idea of what I'm talking about when I talk about anarchy like that. But if you don't, or if you do, you might like this book, A Country of Ghosts. And if you hate the government and capitalism, you might like it. And if you hate the government but like capitalism, or if you like capitalism but hate the government, then I would challenge you to read this book anyway, because you might learn that both of those are very interrelated things and you're kind of only doing it halfway and you have to destroy the Ring of Power and it must be—don't be a Boromir. You should throw the Ring of Power into the—into the fires of Mount Doom. Anyway, you should tell me about the fun foods that you all prepare, because I will be jealous. Or I'll start canning my own foods and I'll talk to you all soon. Find out more at https://live-like-the-world-is-dying.pinecast.co

Misfits and Mysteries
Beans Garlic & Brad Pitt is a Vampire

Misfits and Mysteries

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 46:21


Howdy Misfits, this week Steve definitively proves that Brad Pitt is in fact a vampire. Watch out for the Brad Pitt is a Vampire blog with all my evidence and visuals! Emmy then takes us down a rabbit hole of her own. Did you know that sea monkey's were invented by the Nazis? I sure as hell didn't. Finally Emmy closes us out with her very own compelling conspiracy about the Lost City of Atlantis. We're sad to announce that Emmy will be leaving the podcast after next episode. Please subscribe to the podcast for updates. Steve will be keeping the show going on his own with a slightly different format so please bear with me while I figure out the new format of the show. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Beginner's Garden with Jill McSheehy
4 Reasons Garlic Bulbs Were Small at Harvest

The Beginner's Garden with Jill McSheehy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 9:24


Disappointed in bulb size after all your hard work?  Join me today as I give you a few tips to increase the size of your garlic bulbs. Show Notes: (*links below contain affiliate links, which means if you click through and make a purchase, we will earn a commission at no extra cost to you.) Live Garlic Workshop September 23rd, 2021 10AM CST $15.00 Space is limited https://journeywithjill.net/garlicworkshop Vegetable Gardening for Beginners Book: https://amzn.to/3kZXFDu Connect with Jill: Sign up for Friday Emails: https://journeywithjill.net/gardensignup Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thebeginnersgarden/ Beginner's Garden Shortcut FB Group: https://facebook.com/groups/beginnersgarden/ Link to Beginner's Garden Podcast past episodes: https://journeywithjill.net/podcast

Dr. Berg’s Healthy Keto and Intermittent Fasting Podcast

Discover these incredible benefits of garlic for your liver. DATA: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27584700 ADD YOUR SUCCESS STORY HERE: https://bit.ly/3z9TviS FREE COURSE: https://bit.ly/3tFipFK FREE MINI-COURSE ➜ ➜ Take Dr. Berg's Free Keto Mini-Course! Talk to a Dr. Berg Keto Consultant today and get the help you need on your journey (free consultation). Call 1-540-299-1557 with your questions about Keto, Intermittent Fasting, or the use of Dr. Berg products. Consultants are available Monday through Friday from 8 AM to 10 PM EST. Saturday & Sunday from 9 AM to 6 PM EST. USA Only. Dr. Eric Berg DC Bio: Dr. Berg, 51 years of age is a chiropractor who specializes in weight loss through nutritional & natural methods. His private practice is located in Alexandria, Virginia. His clients include senior officials in the U.S. government & the Justice Department, ambassadors, medical doctors, high-level executives of prominent corporations, scientists, engineers, professors, and other clients from all walks of life. He is the author of The 7 Principles of Fat Burning. Dr. Berg's Website: http://bit.ly/37AV0fk Dr. Berg's Recipe Ideas: http://bit.ly/37FF6QR Dr. Berg's Reviews: http://bit.ly/3hkIvbb Dr. Berg's Shop: http://bit.ly/3mJcLxg Dr. Berg's Bio: http://bit.ly/3as2cfE Dr. Berg's Health Coach Training: http://bit.ly/3as2p2q Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drericberg Messenger: https://www.messenger.com/t/drericberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drericberg/ YouTube: http://bit.ly/37DXt8C

Dr. Berg’s Healthy Keto and Intermittent Fasting Podcast

You should definitely start adding garlic to your meals! This is why. Cancer Survivor Interview: https://youtu.be/wiGVsUtCZwI https://youtu.be/KaeLvHZHKcY DATA: https://www.spandidos-publications.com https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov ADD YOUR SUCCESS STORY HERE: https://bit.ly/3z9TviS FREE COURSE: https://bit.ly/3tFipFK FREE MINI-COURSE ➜ ➜ Take Dr. Berg's Free Keto Mini-Course! Talk to a Dr. Berg Keto Consultant today and get the help you need on your journey (free consultation). Call 1-540-299-1557 with your questions about Keto, Intermittent Fasting, or the use of Dr. Berg products. Consultants are available Monday through Friday from 8 AM to 10 PM EST. Saturday & Sunday from 9 AM to 6 PM EST. USA Only. Dr. Eric Berg DC Bio: Dr. Berg, 51 years of age is a chiropractor who specializes in weight loss through nutritional & natural methods. His private practice is located in Alexandria, Virginia. His clients include senior officials in the U.S. government & the Justice Department, ambassadors, medical doctors, high-level executives of prominent corporations, scientists, engineers, professors, and other clients from all walks of life. He is the author of The 7 Principles of Fat Burning. Dr. Berg's Website: http://bit.ly/37AV0fk Dr. Berg's Recipe Ideas: http://bit.ly/37FF6QR Dr. Berg's Reviews: http://bit.ly/3hkIvbb Dr. Berg's Shop: http://bit.ly/3mJcLxg Dr. Berg's Bio: http://bit.ly/3as2cfE Dr. Berg's Health Coach Training: http://bit.ly/3as2p2q Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drericberg Messenger: https://www.messenger.com/t/drericberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drericberg/ YouTube: http://bit.ly/37DXt8C

The Dave Chang Show
Chicken-Fried Steak, Garlic Knots, and Green Tea | My Opinion Is Fact

The Dave Chang Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 60:03


Dave is joined by Chris, Isaac, and Noelle “the Snackmaster” Cornelio to share the behind-the-scenes chaos of booking guests for this very podcast (0:36) before opining on several culinary topics (14:51). Hosts: Dave Chang and Chris Ying Guest: Noelle Cornelio Producer: Isaac Lee Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Allusionist
141. Food Quiz

The Allusionist

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 28:48


Quiz time! Samin Nosrat and Hrishikesh Hirway of Home Cooking podcast join to deliver questions about food etymology, as well as what are the two words that make a dance track, and whether 'za' is an acceptable abbreviation for 'pizza'. Play along and keep track of your score using the interactive scoresheet at theallusionist.org/foodquiz. For the rest of September 2021, you can stream the London Podfest performance of the new Allusionist live show, full of eponyms, music and planets. Link is at theallusionist.org/events. Sign up to be a patron at patreon.com/allusionist and as well as supporting the show, you get behind the scenes glimpses, and discounted tickets for the Allusionist live show. The music is by Martin Austwick. Hear Martin's own songs at palebirdmusic.com or search for Pale Bird on Bandcamp and Spotify, and he's @martinaustwick on Twitter and Instagram.  The Allusionist's online home is theallusionist.org. Stay in touch at twitter.com/allusionistshow, facebook.com/allusionistshow and instagram.com/allusionistshow. Let me know what you scored in the quiz! Our ad partner is Multitude. To sponsor an episode of the show, contact them at multitude.productions/ads. This episode is sponsored by: • Bombas, makers of the most comfortable socks in the history of feet - and super-smooth undies and T-shirts too. Get 20 percent off your first purchase at bombas.com/allusionist. • Squarespace, your one-stop shop for building and running a good-looking, good-acting website. Go to squarespace.com/allusionist for a free trial, and get 10 percent off your first purchase of a website or domain with the code ALLUSIONIST.  Support the show: http://patreon.com/allusionist See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.