Podcasts about emeritus professor

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

Honorary title for professors who want to stay active in scholarship following retirement

  • 687PODCASTS
  • 1,150EPISODES
  • 46mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 21, 2021LATEST

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about emeritus professor

Show all podcasts related to emeritus professor

Latest podcast episodes about emeritus professor

The Forum
Sarah Bernhardt: Queen of stage and screen

The Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 39:40


Whether photographed in a coffin or depicted on an Art Nouveau poster, the French actor Sarah Bernhardt knew exactly how to get maximum publicity. Although her first outings on the stage were unremarkable, she refined her skills and rose to become the leading actor of her generation and a world-famous name. Her life off-stage was a further source of endless fascination, her eccentric and occasionally arrogant behaviour only adding to her allure. Her critics saw her as manipulative and hackneyed. For her admirers, seeing Bernhardt ‘die' on stage was a moment to be treasured for ever. Today we might find the late 19th-century acting style captured on film and sound recordings affected. But her legacy is being re-evaluated, as a woman who took control of her own destiny. Bridget Kendall charts Sarah Bernhardt's life and career with John Stokes, Emeritus Professor of Modern British Literature at King's College London, who's published widely on theatre history, including The French Actress and Her English Audience; Victoria Duckett, Senior Lecturer in Screen and Design at Deakin University in Melbourne and the author of Seeing Sarah Bernhardt: Performance and Silent Film; and Sharon Marcus, the Orlando Harriman Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. Her 2019 book The Drama of Celebrity is an exploration of the processes that propel a figure such as Sarah Bernhardt to global fame. Produced by Fiona Clampin for BBC World Service [Image: Posters showing Sarah Bernhardt as Camille in La Dame Aux Camelias (Lady of the Camellias) by Alphonse Mucha. Credit: (left to right) Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images, DeAgostini/Getty Images]

New Books in Intellectual History
Onora O'Neill, “Kant, Applied” (Open Agenda, 2021)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 91:41


Kant, Applied is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Onora O'Neill, Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at the University of Cambridge and a crossbench member of the House of Lords. After intriguing insights into Onora O'Neill's path to becoming a Kant scholar, this wide-ranging conversation explores how Kant's philosophy is relevant for many thorny issues in our contemporary social world, from human rights to patient consent to corporate transparency and more. Howard Burton is the founder of the Ideas Roadshow, Ideas on Film and host of the Ideas Roadshow Podcast. He can be reached at howard@ideasroadshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in Biography
Onora O'Neill, “Kant, Applied” (Open Agenda, 2021)

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 91:41


Kant, Applied is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Onora O'Neill, Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at the University of Cambridge and a crossbench member of the House of Lords. After intriguing insights into Onora O'Neill's path to becoming a Kant scholar, this wide-ranging conversation explores how Kant's philosophy is relevant for many thorny issues in our contemporary social world, from human rights to patient consent to corporate transparency and more. Howard Burton is the founder of the Ideas Roadshow, Ideas on Film and host of the Ideas Roadshow Podcast. He can be reached at howard@ideasroadshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

New Books Network
Onora O'Neill, “Kant, Applied” (Open Agenda, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 91:41


Kant, Applied is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Onora O'Neill, Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at the University of Cambridge and a crossbench member of the House of Lords. After intriguing insights into Onora O'Neill's path to becoming a Kant scholar, this wide-ranging conversation explores how Kant's philosophy is relevant for many thorny issues in our contemporary social world, from human rights to patient consent to corporate transparency and more. Howard Burton is the founder of the Ideas Roadshow, Ideas on Film and host of the Ideas Roadshow Podcast. He can be reached at howard@ideasroadshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in German Studies
Onora O'Neill, “Kant, Applied” (Open Agenda, 2021)

New Books in German Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 91:41


Kant, Applied is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Onora O'Neill, Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at the University of Cambridge and a crossbench member of the House of Lords. After intriguing insights into Onora O'Neill's path to becoming a Kant scholar, this wide-ranging conversation explores how Kant's philosophy is relevant for many thorny issues in our contemporary social world, from human rights to patient consent to corporate transparency and more. Howard Burton is the founder of the Ideas Roadshow, Ideas on Film and host of the Ideas Roadshow Podcast. He can be reached at howard@ideasroadshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/german-studies

TopMedTalk
Talks to Lee Fleisher | TopMedTalk at the ASA

TopMedTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 29:13


Welcome to TopMedTalk's exclusive - as live - coverage of The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) annual general meeting; join Desiree Chappell, TopMedTalk's lead presenter, Sol Aronson, tenured Professor, Duke University speak with their guest, Lee Fleisher, Emeritus Professor of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, University of Pennsylvania.

Smart People Podcast
Bill Schutt - What We Can Learn from the Heart

Smart People Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 33:20


Bill Schutt is an Emeritus Professor of Biology at LIU Post and a research associate at the American Museum of Natural History. Bill received his Ph.D. in zoology from Cornell and held a post-doctoral fellowship at the AMNH where he received a Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Grant. He has also published over two dozen peer-reviewed articles.Bill's newest book, Pump: A Natural History of the Heart, is available now!Support the Show - Become a Patron!Help us grow and become a Patron today: https://www.patreon.com/smartpeoplepodcastDonate:Donate here to support the show!

New Books in Sociology
Denis McQuail, “Perspectives on Mass Communication” (Open Agenda, 2021)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 112:16


Perspectives on Mass Communication is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Denis McQuail (1935-2017), who was Emeritus Professor at the University of Amsterdam and Visiting Professor at the University of Southampton. He is widely considered to be one of the most influential scholars in the history of mass communication studies. This wide-ranging conversation provides detailed insights into how examining the media, and in particular mass media, necessarily involves a careful, probing look at our societal values; the concepts, metrics and ideas that McQuail developed to measure the sociological influence of the media; the critical role of journalism in society and more. Howard Burton is the founder of the Ideas Roadshow, Ideas on Film and host of the Ideas Roadshow Podcast. He can be reached at howard@ideasroadshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books Network
Denis McQuail, “Perspectives on Mass Communication” (Open Agenda, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 112:16


Perspectives on Mass Communication is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Denis McQuail (1935-2017), who was Emeritus Professor at the University of Amsterdam and Visiting Professor at the University of Southampton. He is widely considered to be one of the most influential scholars in the history of mass communication studies. This wide-ranging conversation provides detailed insights into how examining the media, and in particular mass media, necessarily involves a careful, probing look at our societal values; the concepts, metrics and ideas that McQuail developed to measure the sociological influence of the media; the critical role of journalism in society and more. Howard Burton is the founder of the Ideas Roadshow, Ideas on Film and host of the Ideas Roadshow Podcast. He can be reached at howard@ideasroadshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

7am
Everything wrong with Australia's nuclear submarine deal

7am

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 15:25


Australia has entered into a new trilateral military alliance with the United Kingdom and the United States, called AUKUS.The partnership was sealed with the announcement that Australia would, for the first time, construct and operate a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines. The new deal has been criticised by former Prime Minister Paul Keating and national security experts. It's also led to increasing tension between Australia and a number of other countries.Today, Emeritus Professor of Strategic Studies at the Australian National University and contributor to The Saturday Paper Hugh White on why this new submarine deal puts Australia at risk, and what we should be doing instead.Guest: Emeritus Professor of Strategic Studies at the Australian National University and contributor for The Saturday Paper Hugh White.Background reading: From the submarine to the ridiculous in The Saturday PaperStay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Study
Ep. 49: Ha'azinu - Biblical Poetry feat. Robert Alter

The Study

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 27:24


Robert Alter, Professor in the Graduate School and Emeritus Professor of Hebrew and Comparative Literature at the University of California at Berkeley, and award winning translator of the Torah joins Rabbi Adam and Raviv  to discuss why the Torah ends in a poem. We'll discuss what clues this poem gives us about the ways in which people communicated and how they used language at the time the torah was written, and even their views on monotheism and the way judaism was practiced. Professor Alter is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, the Council of Scholars of the Library of Congress, and is past president of the Association of Literary Scholars and Critics. Professor Alter has published 24 books unpacking the poetry and prose of ancient literature.

Stroke Alert
Stroke Alert September 2021

Stroke Alert

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 31:18


On Episode 8 of the Stroke Alert Podcast, host Dr. Negar Asdaghi highlights two articles from the September 2021 issue of Stroke: “Risk of Fractures in Stroke Patients Treated With a Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor” and “Carotid Plaques From Symptomatic Patients Are Characterized by Local Increase in Xanthine Oxidase Expression.” She also interviews Drs. Jukka Putaala and Markku Kaste about their article “Should Tenecteplase be Given in Clinical Practice for Acute Ischemic Stroke Thrombolysis?”. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         1) Are we ready to say goodbye to our old friend alteplase and replace it with a new one, tenecteplase, for acute stroke thrombolysis? 2) Does treatment of depression with SSRIs increase the risk of fractures in stroke patients? 3) When it comes to carotid intervention, should we continue offering treatment based on the degree of luminal stenosis, or are there better biomarkers in the horizon? These are some of the questions that we'll tackle in today's podcast. We're covering the best in Stroke. Stay with us. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Welcome back to Stroke Alert Podcast. My name is Negar Asdaghi. I'm an Associate Professor of Neurology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and your host for the monthly Stroke Alert Podcast. For the September 2021 podcast, we have an exciting program where we discuss some of the controversies in stroke therapies. The September issue also contains a Focused Update with a set of articles and comprehensive reviews on the topic of genetics and stroke, organized by Professor Martin Dichgans, which I encourage you to review in addition to our podcast today. Later in today's podcast, I have the pleasure of interviewing Drs. Putaala and Kaste, from Helsinki Institute, to help us with a burning question of whether there's enough evidence now to use tenecteplase instead of alteplase for ischemic stroke thrombolysis. But first with these two articles. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Over a third of stroke survivors either have depressive symptoms or a formal diagnosis of depression. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs, are the mainstay of depression treatment and the most common antidepressants prescribed in the U.S. In addition, in 2011, we had the results of the FLAME trial suggesting that early poststroke treatment with fluoxetine, a commonly prescribed SSRI, improves motor recovery and functional independence in stroke patients with motor deficit. Though these results were not replicated in the subsequent larger FOCUS trial, the use of SSRIs poststroke dramatically increased over the past decade. So what are the side effects of using SSRIs poststroke? It's a known fact that adult stroke survivors are more likely to experience bone fracture, and that there's some evidence that SSRIs may increase this risk. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, in the current issue of the journal, Dr. Graeme Hankey and Joshua Jones, from Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Western Australia, in Perth, and colleagues aimed to answer this question with a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials that included an SSRI treatment for an adult patient with a previous hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke and included incident fractures, either as a primary or secondary study outcome, amongst other criteria. So they found four randomized controlled trials that fulfilled their research criteria. Three of them looked at the effects of fluoxetine, used at a dose of 20 mg per day for six months duration, on functional recovery and outcomes after stroke. And one trial, which has studied neuroregeneration in vascular protection by citalopram, either at a 10 mg or 20 mg daily dose also for six months duration, in patients with acute ischemic stroke. So three studies included with fluoxetine and one study included citalopram. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, what they found was that although the risk of falls, seizures and recurrent stroke were not statistically increased with SSRI treatment, it was actually a significant increased risk of fractures with a risk ratio of 2.36 in patients treated with SSRI as compared to the placebo. Now, how the SSRIs will increase the risk of fractures is still unknown. There are multiple postulated mechanisms that are discussed in the paper, such as SSRIs potentially increasing spastic motor activity, causing orthostatic hypotension, dizziness, delayed reaction time or temporary imbalance or sleep disorders. But the most important mechanism to keep in mind is the possibility of SSRIs lowering bone mineral density. It's also important to note that the duration of exposure to SSRIs is an important predictor of factors. It's worth noting that the usual SSRI exposure in patients with the primary diagnosis of depression is a lot longer than the exposure time in these trials. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, what are the top two takeaway points for stroke physicians? Number one: Fluoxetine and citalopram SSRIs, used for six months poststroke, double the risk of fracture as compared to placebo in this meta-analysis. Number two: While the mechanism of this association is still debated, fracture prevention should be an important discussion point when considering prescribing an SSRI to stroke patients. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         We all know that carotid disease is a major cause of ischemic stroke. Now we have to keep in mind that the bulk of the literature in carotid disease are practically concentrated on the association between the degree of luminal stenosis and the risk of recurrent stroke. So, in practice, we constantly counsel and discuss risk of future ischemia in symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid disease based on the degree of stenosis that's less than 50%, or between 50% to 70%, or over 70%. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         But what if we learn that some plaques can be active despite causing small or little stenosis? And conversely, some may be active despite being very large. There seems to be a growing literature that much of the recurrent strokes are occurring in destabilized plaques. And it turns out that there are actually biomarkers that could cause this destabilization, and we can actually measure them. Xanthine oxidase, or XO, is one of these biomarkers. XO is a key enzyme involved in degradation of purine into uric acid. Now I'm trying to simplify a complex subject here. Xanthine oxidase oxidizes the conversion of hypoxanthine into xanthine and xanthine into uric acid. Along the way, it also does create a whole bunch of reactive oxygen species such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, which can create tissue damage. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Now, how is XO and serum uric acid levels related to carotid disease? Well, it turns out that XO is enhanced in carotid arteries with evidence of atherosclerosis. Better yet, in animal models, inhibition of XO is associated with reduction in progression of atherosclerosis. So, in the current issue of the journal, Drs. Morsaleh Ganji and Valentina Nardi, from Departments of Cardiovascular Medicine and Anatomic Pathology of Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and colleagues set out to investigate whether carotid plaques from symptomatic patients had increased expression of xanthine oxidase than their asymptomatic counterparts. So, what they did was they looked at 88 patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic or asymptomatic carotid disease, part of the routine clinical practice, and then measured the XO expression by immunohistochemical staining in CA obtained specimens. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         In addition, they collected a number of serum samples and other demographics and vascular risk factors from the participating patients. They found four major findings in their paper. Number one: XO expression was indeed higher in symptomatic carotid arteries. Number two: Symptomatic patients had a higher serum uric acid levels. Number three: Higher XO expression was inversely associated with the serum levels of HDL. Number four: The symptomatic plaques had higher amount of macrophages expressing XO. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Very interesting, but these findings were irrespective of the actual degree of luminal stenosis. In fact, the asymptomatic carotid plaques patients, as routine practice dictates, had a higher degree of luminal stenosis, but they had lower expression of XO and other associated findings. So what did we learn from this study? Well, there seems to be a strong association between certain biomarkers, in this case xanthine oxidase, and symptomatic state of carotid plaques, suggesting that perhaps in future we'll have other ways of measurements that may help us decide on carotid intervention rather than just the symptomatic state of the artery and the degree of stenosis. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         It's been over 25 years since alteplase was approved as the thrombolytic agent of choice for treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke. But in the past decade, tenecteplase, a genetically modified variant of alteplase with regulatory approval for treatment of ST-segment–elevation, myocardial infarction, has gained interest as an alternative reperfusion therapy for treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke. Whether tenecteplase is ready to completely replace alteplase in clinical practice is certainly a burning question faced by the stroke community today. This was the subject of a lively debate at the most recent and entirely virtual 2021 International Stroke Conference, where a panel of experts reviewed the current evidence regarding the use of tenecteplase in acute ischemic stroke, examining data from animal models, preclinical studies to dose escalation studies and randomized trials, directly comparing tenecteplase with alteplase, as well as the collective clinical experience to date with this thrombolytic agent. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         The proponents of change point out the many advantages of tenecteplase over alteplase, including its ease of use, increased fibrin specificity, longer half-time and its non-inferiority to alteplase in the head-to-head trials. On the other hand, the opponents caution stroke physicians, drawing attention to the inherent issues with the already completed clinical trials of tenecteplase, and argue that more data is needed before tenecteplase is considered as a thrombolytic agent of choice in routine clinical practice. Continuing on this debate in the September issue of the journal as part of the Controversies in Stroke series, Drs. Jeffrey Saver and May Nour provide opposing views to Drs. Dawn Kleindorfer and Mollie McDermott on the present evidence and current guidelines around tenecteplase use in acute ischemic stroke. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Acting as moderators, the senior authors of paper, Dr. Jukka Putaala, Head of Stroke Unit at Neurocenter, Helsinki University Hospital, and Dr. Markku Kaste, Emeritus Professor of Neurology at the University of Helsinki and past chairman of Neurocenter, Helsinki University Hospital, in Finland, provide us with the balancing remarks on the issue. I'm joined today by Professors Putaala and Kaste to give us an overview on the debate of tenecteplase versus alteplase. Is it time to make the switch? Good morning from sunny Florida and good afternoon to you both in Finland. Thank you for joining us on the podcast. I hope the weather is as beautiful in Helsinki today as it is here in Miami. Dr. Jukka Putaala:           Here it is not as warm as you have, but we have had a really beautiful summer, and at the moment, although it is also autumn, temperature is around 20 Celsius, so it's just great. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         It's great to have you both. The paper outlines a generally recognized criteria to support the use of any new pharmacotherapy. Can you please start us off by reviewing the components of this criteria and tell us, please, how many checkmarks does TNK get on this checklist when considered as a reperfusion therapy in acute ischemic stroke? Dr. Jukka Putaala:           These eight criteria include a well-characterized mechanism of action; strong preclinical data; evidence of benefits and safety in a closely related clinical condition, which here is myocardial infarction; important practical advantages over existing agents; the clinical efficacy in how the patient has demonstrated in randomized trials; and endorsement by national practice guidelines. Also, support from regulatory authorities. And finally, clinical effectiveness, which has demonstrated in routine care. We think that tenecteplase for acute ischemic stroke meets actually all of these eight criteria. But we could also think that a smaller number of criteria will be enough to satisfy or meet, would be sufficient. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Perfect. So definitely many important steps, starting with the basics all the way to post-marketing clinical experience. Markku, now over to you. Can you remind us about the mechanism of action of tenecteplase? And what are some of the similarities and differences in terms of pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetics with alteplase? Dr. Markku Kaste:           So alteplase catalyze plasminogen cleavage to plasmin and, in turn, degrades fibrin in thrombi, yielding clot lysis. TNK, compared to alteplase, is 14-fold greater fibrin activity and 80 times higher resistance to plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, which means it has a longer half-life, which is a major advantage. Patients need only one injection. In case you're compared to alteplase, when you had to have third dose injection and then one-hour infusion, which delay the care of patient, if the patient need thrombectomy. So it takes an hour for the infusion before patient can be transferred to thrombectomy, and time matters in brain infarction. So the faster you are, the better it is for patients. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Perfect. So more fibrin specificity, as you mentioned, and longer half-time for TNK. And in addition, TNK is not a new drug. In fact, there is over two decades' worth of experience with this in cardiology. Can you also tell us about this? And also some of the preclinical and animal studies that make TNK a potential candidate as a thrombolytic therapy in stroke? Dr. Markku Kaste:           In animal studies, both in vitro model of mural platelet deposits under arterial flow and a rabbit model using extracorporeal arterial-venous shunts, TNK was more potent, showing benefits up to three hours versus one hour when alteplase was used. So, it's a major benefit already in animal experiments and in the code team, of course, it will be transferred in clinical practice. So, in myocardial infarctions, in three randomized trials, including our 17,000 patients, TNK showed significant reduction for bleeding rates and similar intracerebral hemorrhage rates and 30-day mortality. Dr. Markku Kaste:           So, these facts support the use of TNK, also in ischemic stroke, the results from myocardial infarction, some steady encouraging. Although we have to keep in mind that myocardial infarction is very homogeneous disease, it's arterial occlusion, while ischemic stroke can be caused by the local occlusion just like myocardial infarction, but also from artery-to-artery thrombi or from a cardiac emboli. And these three [inaudible 00:17:43] mechanisms generate different kind of thrombi, so we need a better drug than alteplase, which really is effective, whatever is the etiology of the occlusion of brain artery. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Right. Thank you. Jukka, now over to you. Before we review the data from randomized trials of tenecteplase, can you please tell us about some of the practical advantages of tenecteplase over alteplase? We're comfortable with alteplase. Why should we make the switch? Dr. Jukka Putaala:           The key practical advantages arise from the fact that tenecteplase can be given as one single dose; it takes only one minute. And if you compare that to alteplase, you'll have to give the bolus first, and then following the bolus is 60 minutes infusion. And that also has many advantages in clinical practice, for example, if you have a patient with large vessel occlusion in a remote hospital, which is not thrombectomy-capable, you can give tenecteplase and then put the patient in the ambulance and transfer swiftly the patient to the thrombectomy center. While, when using alteplase, you have to start infusion, which you have to have the nursing staff that is capable of monitoring the infusion and taking care of any complications arising during the infusion and so forth. Dr. Jukka Putaala:           With tenecteplase, you can immediately transport the patient to a thrombectomy site after the bolus without any infusion-capable paramedics staff. Another practical advantage is that by using tenecteplase, you avoid the potential gap between the bolus and the infusion, which means that there is at least several minutes or longer gap in four out of five patients treated with alteplase. You can also think the other scenarios during this coronavirus era, and you have 15 patients with suspected or very fast coronavirus infection. By using bolus, you don't need to put nurses in the same room with the patients many times with the infusion if you use alteplase. Instead, you can use tenecteplase, it's only one single bolus, and you can go away and you don't have to be exposed to potential coronavirus infection. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, many important advantages, as you mentioned. It seems very reasonable, then, to use tenecteplase in routine practice if it is indeed non-inferior to alteplase. Jukka, what dose of tenecteplase should be used for treatment of acute ischemic stroke patients? And we're definitely excited to hear about the head-to-head trials with tenecteplase versus alteplase. Dr. Jukka Putaala:           Well, the trial, the dose is 0.25 mg/kg or 0.4 mg/kg. It depends if you have LVO, if you review the evidence what we have now available, you have to use the lower dose in LVO patients. But you can use the higher dose in non-LVO patients. All of this arises from the evidence we have available right now. So, basically, five randomized trials have been completed, to date, comparing tenecteplase with alteplase in acute ischemic stroke. And shortly, if they pull out these five trials and compare primary outcome, which is modified Rankin Scale 0 to 1 versus prior, which means excellent outcome. Dr. Jukka Putaala:           So, when pulling out these five trials, 58% percent of patients rates excellent outcome versus 55% of alteplase, and this satisfied the criteria for non-inferiority. Regarding safety and secondary outcomes, major intracranial bleeding, mortality, this meta-analysis according to five trials shows similar results for tenecteplase and alteplase. You have to consider some details of this trial. I think Markku was going to quickly review some of the details of the science and doses used in these trials later on. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, yes, this sounds great for tenecteplase, but so now over to you, Markku. As Jukka mentioned, do we hear a "not so fast for tenecteplase"? Is the current data enough to say goodbye to alteplase entirely and completely turn over to tenecteplase? What are some of the issues with the already completed trials? Dr. Markku Kaste:           It's not today, we cannot say goodbye to alteplase. As Jukka referred to those trials, there's no reason to go into these really deep details because the trials are quite small compared to ordinary clinical randomized trials studying stroke care. Like I don't want to give neuroprotection agents, for example. One larger trial was, let's say, reasonably well designed. But as to say that most of these trials are not really double-blind randomized clinical trials. And so the results which can be generated is not as reliable as double-blind trials because, of course, there are reasons, I mean, colleagues randomizing cases may think that, OK, a randomizing case and I'm not totally convinced about TNK. And I think this gentleman or this lady really needs effective thrombolytic agents, so I give alteplase, while if another patient with a mild symptom, same physician may think, OK, this stroke patient will recover no matter what, so let us randomize the patient. Dr. Markku Kaste:           So, it means these kind of unbalanced randomization provides data which is not really reliable. We had to have lots double-blinded randomized trials before it's time to say goodbye, if this double-blinded randomized trial verified that TNK beats alteplase. And, of course, we need also meta-analysis of those advanced trials, and these things can take time, although many guidelines, like AHA guidelines, European Stroke Organization guidelines, Chinese guidelines, Indian guidelines, they, in a way, how do you say, might recommend use of TNK, but I think we need more reliable scientific evidence before it's time to say goodbye to alteplase. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, Jukka, Markku already alluded to this. I wanted you to review this for our listeners, the national practice guidelines and drug regulatory authority guidelines around the globe with regards to the issue of tenecteplase versus alteplase. Dr. Jukka Putaala:           Yeah, actually, already American, European, Chinese, Australian and Indian guidelines are recommending tenecteplase into the guidelines, which were recently published in 2019, between 2019 and 2021. What we can read from the guidelines is that tenecteplase can be considered over alteplase. But we have to remember that the strength of the recommendation will remain weak at present and quality of evidence is by the facts that we discussed of these five completely randomized trials and meta-analysis pulling out the data. Qualitative evidence remains slow, and, therefore, the wording in the guidelines is that it may be reasonable to choose or consider alteplase. Tenecteplase might be considered as an alternative to alteplase in certain conditions. Dr. Jukka Putaala:           The recommendations are a little bit mixed in the guidelines, but generally, in large vessel occlusions, the guidelines say that you could consider TNK over alteplase or even that you should consider TNK over alteplase in large vessel occlusion before proceeding to thrombectomy. However, in cases without large vessel occlusion, the statements are more mixed and they say tenecteplase might be considered or even that alteplase is preferred over tenecteplase until we have more evidence. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Thank you, Jukka. Markku, what should be our final takeaway message for the practicing stroke physicians at this point considering the use of tenecteplase in routine practice?   Dr. Markku Kaste:           Before your paper has been accepted and published in high-quality journal, it takes weeks, mostly it takes months, even a half a year. While in Stroke Conference, you get the most recent data, which is, let's say, generated last week or even the same day. So, when you want to really provide high-quality care of your patient, keep you updated. And then it's best for you and her, and it's better, of course, for your patient. International Stroke Conference and also European Stroke Conference, they are excellent places to get the most recent, yet unpublished, reliable information. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Professors Jukka Putaala and Markku Kaste, thank you for summarizing a large body of evidence for our listeners. We're definitely excited to learn how tenecteplase will ultimately stand against the old competitor and perhaps learn that both may be reasonable thrombolytic options, depending on the specifics of the clinical setting. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         And this concludes our podcast for the September 2021 issue of Stroke. Please be sure to check the September table of contents for the full list of publications, including two special reports on consensus recommendations from the 11th STAIR Consortium, that is, Stroke Treatment Academic Industry Roundtable. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         The first report is intended to enhance patient, clinician and policymaker comprehension at modified Rankin Scale findings in clinical trials and quality improvement initiatives. The second report from the STAIR Consortium is on top priorities for cerebroprotective studies, an important manuscript where the roundtable considered and presented a new paradigm for evaluation of putative therapies that may work together with recanalization treatments to improve outcome after ischemic stroke, with special attention to using the correct nomenclature, such as replacing the term "neuroprotection" with "cerebroprotection" when the intention of an investigation is to demonstrate that a new treatment benefits the entire brain, rather than neurons alone. Or replacing the term "time window" with "tissue window" or "target window" when selecting patients for recanalization therapies to enhance the notion that various elements of the neurovascular unit show vulnerability to ischemia evolving over different time scales in different brain regions. An important paradigm shift in ways we think of the brain under ischemic attack. With that, we invite you to continue to stay alert with Stroke Alert. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         This program is copyright of the American Heart Association, 2021. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more, visit AHAjournals.org.

The Forum
Algorithms: From the ancients to the internet

The Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 39:20


Hidden from view, complex to understand and often controversial, algorithms are at the heart of computer coding that underpins modern society. Every time we search the internet, every time we pay by credit card, even the romantic partners suggested to us by online dating sites – they're all powered by algorithms. And their reach is growing all the time, as some societies use them to automate decisions regarding criminal justice, mortgage applications and job recruitment. The history of algorithms is surprisingly ancient, stretching back to the Babylonian empire where large societies required a systematic way to count and order different aspects of citizens' lives. Today some people are questioning their use, as some algorithms have been shown to replicate bias and there are fears that algorithms have the potential to undermine democracy. Bridget Kendall is joined by Ramesh Srinivasan, Professor in the Department of Information Studies at the University of California Los Angeles and the author of Beyond the Valley: How Innovators around the World are Overcoming Inequality and Creating the Technologies of Tomorrow; the French computational scientist, consultant and entrepreneur Aurélie Jean, who's published From the Other Side of the Machine: A scientist's journey in the land of algorithms; and Ian Stewart, Emeritus Professor of Mathematics at Warwick University who's written more than 120 books on aspects of mathematics and science. Produced by Fiona Clampin for the BBC World Service [Image: Digital data and binary code. Credit: Yuichiro Chino/Getty Images]

Life & Faith
The Boy Who Keeps On Living

Life & Faith

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 29:10


Sociologist John Carroll unpacks the ongoing appeal of the Harry Potter series. ------- Nearly a quarter of a century after the publication of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, J. K. Rowling's story of the “boy who lived” continues to capture the imaginations of children - and adults.  The Harry Potter effect, it's claimed, got kids reading again, got kids' books selling at greater volumes, and made it possible for writers to produce longer novels for younger readers.  John Carroll, Emeritus Professor of sociology at La Trobe University, makes a bigger claim: that Harry Potter makes Rowling the greatest contributor to the public good of the last 20 years.  In this episode, he makes his case to Simon Smart. This conversation is for you if you're a Harry Potter fan - but also if you're not! It ranges from the materialism of our age and our death avoidance to the difference between a hero and a saviour, the importance of vocation, and our deep desire to live in an enchanted world. “That's quite explicit in the Harry Potter books. I mean, the ordinary people, everyone knows, are called Muggles, and they're mugs. Their lives are boring. Harry's forced adopted family for the first 11 years of his life is terrified by basically the meaningless of its own existence. And in a sense, I think what's going on here is a warning to children: adulthood is at risk of being just like that, beware! The magic, the enchantment is in danger of going out of life.” ------ Links: John Carroll, “Harry Potter & the teller of truth”, The Australian, 10 July 2021 Wizarding World, Kids React to Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone

That Sober Guy Podcast
TSG Ep381 - Can Some People Moderate Their Drinking? - Dr. Joseph R. Volpicelli

That Sober Guy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 47:54


Dr. Joseph R. Volpicelli is Emeritus Professor of Psychiatry at The University of Pennsylvania, founder of the Volpicelli Center in Plymouth Meeting, PA, and Executive Director of the Institute of Addiction Medicine. His research led to the discovery of naltrexone to treat alcohol addiction, an FDA-approved medicine used worldwide to reduce alcohol craving and relapse. https://volpicellicenter.com For more information click HERE - https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://twitter.com/OrexoABpubl__;!!IHJ3XrWN4X8!dsPNJusxmvw22sZvDJLqOJUOneXrXIYsZ3aBVvjt5JoIe--lmmNPkGh1pO1VxC2k6DfA7w$ If you're interested in starting vorvida®, use the coupon code MBG2021 to purchase vorvida® for 40% off the retail price.   Follow Us On Instagram @thatsoberguypodcast   Join That Sober Guy Podcast Locals Community!   How to Navigate the first 90 Days of Sobriety Digital Course   Want to Be a Guest on The Podcast? Click Here to Apply   That Sober Guy Merch Store   Be sure to check us out at www.ThatSoberGuy.com   Contact Us   Download the Locals App on IOS   Download the Locals App on Google Play   Looking for an online meeting?   Check out the daily 4th Dimensioners Online AA Meeting at 9PM EST/6PM PST Every Night!   Log in early and stay late for the Meeting before and after the Meeting!   Meet Format; Discussion of AA Literature nightly and a speaker every Saturday.  Go To: www.ZoomAAMeetings.com (https://us04web.zoom.us/j/432316244) (Must Log Into a Free Zoom.us Account to Access)   Access from any phone, PC, or iPad  Phone Access 312-626-6799   Meeting ID 432 316 244   Go to www.thatsoberguy.com/gethelp to find a meeting in your local area and other resources   National Suicide Prevention Lifeline - 1-800-273-TALK (8255)     Thanks to our Sponsors:   http://www.dailyaaemails.com/        

Woman's Hour
Coughing; Rafia Zakaria; Rosie Jones; Population and climate; Cressida Dick

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 57:23


Thanks to Covid, coughing in public has joined the ranks of socially-unacceptable behaviours. Anecdotally there seems to have been a decline in coughing in theatre audiences since Covid came on the scene. This suggests that loud, irritating throat clearances may not have been necessary physical responses to obstructions after all. Emma talks to Dr Kim Dienes from Swansea University about the social side of coughing and tips for suppressing that irritating tickle. Pakistani-American author Rafia Zakaria has written a new book called Against White Feminism. A critique of 'whiteness within feminism' she says feminism has become a brand, not a movement. She wants to 'take it back.' Working on behalf of domestic violence victims as a lawyer and human rights activist for years, she says race is the biggest obstacle to true solidarity among women. Rafia joins Emma to discuss. It is understood that the first female Metropolitan Police Commissioner, Cressida Dick, has been offered two more years in the role. Both the home secretary, Priti Patel, and the London mayor, Sadiq Khan, are said to support plans for her to continue to lead London's police force. But seven influential people who say they have been subjected to Met Police corruption and incompetence have signed an open letter in the Daily Mail today calling for her removal. Among the signatories were Baroness Doreen Lawrence, Lady Brittan and the former Conservative MP Harvey Proctor, whose home was raided in March 2015 by Operation Midland detectives, in response to false allegations of historic child abuse made by Carl Beech - who is now in prison for 18 years for perverting the course of justice and fraud. Emma asks Harvey why he wants Cressida Dick's resignation. There are 7.9 billion people living on the planet. But why is human population discussed so little when it comes to the climate crisis? That's a question listeners Sue and Martin want answers to, and that Tim Dyson, Emeritus Professor of Population Studies at the London School of Economics is going to help untangle. He talks to Emma about the facts behind global population growth, the trends in family size, and why having fewer children isn't going to help alleviate the immediate pressures of the climate crisis. Edie Eckhart is 11 years old, from Bridlington in Yorkshire and has cerebral palsy. Like a lot of other 11 year olds this September, she's starting at secondary school. Edie is the main character in a new children's book, ‘The Amazing Edie Eckhart' written by comedian Rosie Jones, who tells Emma why she wanted to create a young disabled heroine.

Real Science Exchange
Journal Club Edition #1 Reviewing RP-Lysine and Silage Cover studies

Real Science Exchange

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 57:34


Guests: Dr. Bill Weiss, The Ohio State University; Dr. Paul Kononoff, University of Nebraska, and Journal of Dairy Science Editor-In-Chief. Co-host: Dr. Clay Zimmerman, BalchemWe're excited to introduce a new segment into our podcast rotation; The Journal Club. Styled after the traditional journal clubs convened at universities across the US, we'll take a closer look at some of the newest research being published. Once a month we will welcome Dr. Bill Weiss, Emeritus Professor from The Ohio State University, to the pub table where we will discuss selected papers that were recently published. To gain additional insight and liven up the discussion, we'll also invite the authors to join us whenever possible.Dr. Bill Weiss introduced two papers that the guests would discuss throughout the episode. “Effects of rumen-protected lysine and histidine on milk production and energy and nitrogen utilization in diets containing hydrolyzed feather meal fed to lactating Jersey cows” published in June 2020 by Dr. Morris and Dr. Kononoff at the University of Nebraska. The second “Effect of sealing strategy on the feeding value of corn silage for growing dairy heifers” published in March 2021 from a lab at State University of Maringá in Brazil. (1:37)Dr. Bill Weiss discussed the first paper about feather meal. He explained that feather meal is a bargain feed, however, you get more nutrients for a cheaper product. The research was also done on Jersey cattle instead of Holsteins which is unique as there is not as much research done on Jersey cattle. (7:06)Dr. Paul Kononoff discussed feed bypass sources and milk performance while feeding feather meal within his study. He also discussed the variance in feed composition, for example, dry matter content, crude protein, and crude fat differences of feather meal. (11:17)Dr. Paul Kononoff discussed a theory that one of his grad students (who was also an author on the paper) brought to his attention about methane production relating to rumen-protected lysine. (29:21)Dr. Bill Weiss discussed the second study about feeding corn silage to dairy heifers. He explained the silage sealing and feeding processes used within the study. (41:11)Dr. Paul Kononoff discussed palatability and animal behavior as it relates to the silage study. A producer has to consider the economics of affecting feed intake with picky animals. Is the saved cost worth a loss in intake? (47:06)Chart Referenced as Table 7 on page 11 of the paper. If you want one of our new Real Science Exchange t-shirts, make sure to screenshot your rating, review, or subscription, and email a picture to anh.marketing@balchem.com. Include your size and mailing address, and we'll get a shirt in the mail to you.Please subscribe and share with your industry friends to bring more people to join us around the Real Science Exchange virtual pub table.This podcast is sponsored by Balchem Animal Nutrition and Health.

Thinking Allowed
The Changing Nature of Crime

Thinking Allowed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 28:19


The changing nature of crime: What do current day thieves, gangsters and dealers say about their ‘business' and how its evolved over time? How strict a division is there between the 'respectable' and the 'illicit' world? To what extent are our notions of crime rooted in Hollywood myth making about sharp suited gangsters rather than the more mundane reality? Laurie Taylor explores these questions with Richard Hobbs, Emeritus Professor of Criminology at the University of Essex and author of a new study which analyses the essence of illegal capitalism, from anonymous warehouse thieves to exalted underworld figures such as the Krays. They're joined by Tuesday Reitano, Deputy Director of the Global Initiative Against Transnational Organized Crime, whose research highlights the impact on Covid 19 on the illegal economy. She finds that shortages, lockdowns and public attitudes have brought the underworld and upperworld closer together allowing criminals to taking advantage of the virus, finding new routes for illegal commodities, from narcotics to people. Producer: Jayne Egerton

Highlights from Moncrieff
Games People Played: A Global History of Sport

Highlights from Moncrieff

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 7:14


Professor Wray Vamplew, Emeritus Professor of Sports History at the University of Stirling in Scotland, joined Sean on the show... Listen and subscribe to Moncrieff on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts or Spotify.    Download, listen and subscribe on the Newstalk App.     You can also listen to Newstalk live on newstalk.com or on Alexa, by adding the Newstalk skill and asking: 'Alexa, play Newstalk'.

Today with Claire Byrne
Europe's hottest year on record

Today with Claire Byrne

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 11:04


John Sweeney, Emeritus Professor and Climatologist, Maynooth University, on what has to happen next

Stats + Stories
Comparing and Contrasting Professions | Stats + Short Stories Episode 199.25

Stats + Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 14:46


Talking about statistics with my journalism colleagues is the basis of what brings this show together. But speaking about, and communicating statistical work with journalists, and understanding our interdisciplinary relationship in the era of fake news and misinformation is more important than ever. That's the focus of this week's episode of Stats and Short Stories with guest Kevin McConway. Kevin McConway is an Emeritus Professor of Applied Statistics at the Open University in the UK, where he taught statistics, mainly to adult students in a wide range of disciplines. He has researched collaboratively across natural and social science. Kevin has developed a strong interest and involvement in statistics in the media. In particular, he was an adviser for eleven years and an occasional contributor to the BBC radio program More or Less, which aims to support the public understanding of numbers in the news. He has worked with and helped train journalists in understanding and communicating statistics, often through the UK's Science Media Centre where he is a member of the advisory committee. He tweets on @kjm2.

TopMedTalk
The Editors in Chief Forum | EBPOM 2021

TopMedTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 48:24


An exclusive chance to hear from the editors in chief of the major journals in our field discussing the big issues of 2021; 'The Journal of Perioperative Medicine', 'Anesthesiology', 'The British Journal of Anaesthesia', 'Anesthesia & Analgesia' and 'Anaesthesia'. This piece was initially presented at Evidence Based Perioperative Medicine (EBPOM)'s 2021 online conference as part of the POCAPALOOZA. Make sure you check out www.ebpom.org now for more details on our other conferences this year. Presented by Mike Grocott, Professor of Anaesthesia and critical care at the University of Southampton and co-editor in Chief of the Journal of Perioperative Medicine with his guests, Evan Kharasch, Professor and Vice Chair for Innovation in the Department of Anesthesiology at Duke University, and Director of Academic Entrepreneurship in Duke University School of Medicine, Editor in Chief of 'Anesthesiology', Hugh Hemmings, Senior Associate Dean for Research, Professor and Chair of Anesthesiology at Weill Cornell Medicine and the Editor in Chief of the 'British Journal of Anaesthesia', Jean-Francois Pittet, Professor, University of Alabama, Department of Anesthesiology, Editor in Chief of 'Anesthesia & Analgesia', Andy Klein, Cardiothoracic Anaesthetist at Royal Papworth Hospital in Cambridge and Editor in Chief of 'Anaesthesia' and Lee Fleisher, Emeritus Professor of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, University of Pennsylvania, co-editor in Chief of the Journal of Perioperative Medicine.

Witness History
John Maynard Keynes

Witness History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 13:10


The economist John Maynard Keynes transformed 20th century economic policy. Considered one of the great minds of his age, his seminal work The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money, sought to diagnose and find solutions to the misery and mass unemployment of the Great Depression. For decades his ideas were central to economic policy adopted across the western world and have made a comeback after the financial crash of 2008. Alex Last presents rare recordings of Keynes from the BBC archive and speaks to Lord Skidelsky, Emeritus Professor of Political Economy at Warwick University and biographer of Keynes. Photo :John Maynard Keynes, the famous economist pictured at his home in London, 1929 (Getty Images)

10% Happier with Dan Harris
#372: The Science of Making and Keeping Friends | Robin Dunbar

10% Happier with Dan Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 63:00


Friendship might not necessarily be something you've considered to be an urgent psychological and physiological issue. On this show, we spend a lot of time exploring how the quality of our relationships determines the quality of our lives and our health. Sadly, in many ways, it's harder than ever to make and keep friends.  With loneliness and disconnection on the rise, it's clear that our society just wasn't constructed for social connection. And recent data suggests we're in a friendship crisis, with many of us reporting that we have fewer close friendships than ever. Our guest today is Robin Dunbar, an Emeritus Professor of Evolutionary Psychology at Oxford University and the author of numerous books on the development of Homo sapiens. Dunbar is perhaps best known for formulating “Dunbar's number,” which is a measurement of the number of relationships our brain is capable of maintaining at any one time. He is a world-renowned expert on human relationships, and has a ton of fascinating research findings and practical tips for upping your friendship game. In this conversation, we dive into the science behind human relationships, the upsides and downsides of maintaining friendships on social media, the viability of friendships across gender lines, and what science says you can do to compensate if you feel you are currently lacking in close friendships.  Download the Ten Percent Happier app today: https://10percenthappier.app.link/install Full Shownotes: https://www.tenpercent.com/podcast-episode/robin-dunbar-372

10% Happier with Dan Harris
#372: The Science of Making and Keeping Friends | Robin Dunbar

10% Happier with Dan Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 66:45


Friendship might not necessarily be something you've considered to be an urgent psychological and physiological issue. On this show, we spend a lot of time exploring how the quality of our relationships determines the quality of our lives and our health. Sadly, in many ways, it's harder than ever to make and keep friends.  With loneliness and disconnection on the rise, it's clear that our society just wasn't constructed for social connection. And recent data suggests we're in a friendship crisis, with many of us reporting that we have fewer close friendships than ever. Our guest today is Robin Dunbar, an Emeritus Professor of Evolutionary Psychology at Oxford University and the author of numerous books on the development of Homo sapiens. Dunbar is perhaps best known for formulating “Dunbar's number,” which is a measurement of the number of relationships our brain is capable of maintaining at any one time. He is a world-renowned expert on human relationships, and has a ton of fascinating research findings and practical tips for upping your friendship game. In this conversation, we dive into the science behind human relationships, the upsides and downsides of maintaining friendships on social media, the viability of friendships across gender lines, and what science says you can do to compensate if you feel you are currently lacking in close friendships.  Download the Ten Percent Happier app today: https://10percenthappier.app.link/install Full Shownotes: https://www.tenpercent.com/podcast-episode/robin-dunbar-372

New Books Network
Chris Frith, “In Search of a Mechanism: From the Brain to the Mind” (Open Agenda, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 90:31


In Search of a Mechanism: From the Brain to the Mind is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Chris Frith, Emeritus Professor of Neuropsychology at University College London and Honorary Research Fellow at the Institute of Philosophy, School of Advanced Study, University of London. After an interesting exploration of how Chris Frith became interested in the study of schizophrenia, this detailed conversation examines topics such how our understanding of schizophrenia has evolved, the role of dopamine, how the brain works, the brain's predicting role, the phantom limb phenomenon, how the brain and mind link up, how culture affects the brain and much more. Howard Burton is the founder of the Ideas Roadshow, Ideas on Film and host of the Ideas Roadshow Podcast. He can be reached at howard@ideasroadshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Psychology
Chris Frith, “In Search of a Mechanism: From the Brain to the Mind” (Open Agenda, 2020)

New Books in Psychology

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 90:31


In Search of a Mechanism: From the Brain to the Mind is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Chris Frith, Emeritus Professor of Neuropsychology at University College London and Honorary Research Fellow at the Institute of Philosophy, School of Advanced Study, University of London. After an interesting exploration of how Chris Frith became interested in the study of schizophrenia, this detailed conversation examines topics such how our understanding of schizophrenia has evolved, the role of dopamine, how the brain works, the brain's predicting role, the phantom limb phenomenon, how the brain and mind link up, how culture affects the brain and much more. Howard Burton is the founder of the Ideas Roadshow, Ideas on Film and host of the Ideas Roadshow Podcast. He can be reached at howard@ideasroadshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/psychology

Health Check
Impact of wildfires

Health Check

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 31:45


Claudia Hammond and her studio guest global health journalist Sarah Boseley discuss the health impact of the fires that are raging in many places including Southern Europe and the US. Lizzie Crouch reports on the longer term physical and mental effects of fires on people who experienced them in Colorado last year. Two reports, from the Netherlands and the US, are published this week that highlight the lack of women in drug trials for heart disease. Heart disease is often thought to be more common in men than women but that isn’t the case and new drugs need to be tested on women as well as on men. As the Olympics comes to an end Claudia talks to Adrian Bauman, Emeritus Professor of Global Health at the University of Sydney, about if there is any legacy for the general public in terms of increased exercise and fitness. He has just published a paper in The Lancet exploring this question – and the answer is a no. And Sarah Boseley and Claudia discuss the case of Marburg Disease in Guinea, the first to be reported in West Africa. Presenter: Claudia Hammond Producer: Deborah Cohen (Picture: People run away from a forest fire in the Milas district of Muğla province, Turkey on 3rd August 2021. Photo credit: Ali Balli/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images.)

Stories of our times
Thinking Straight (Pt 1): Conversion

Stories of our times

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 37:57


Attempts at conversion therapy are taking place across the country: in village churches, Harley street clinics and counsellors treatment rooms. In this first episode of a seven-part-series, reporter Emily Sargent goes undercover to explore the extremely secretive practice. This podcast was brought to you thanks to the support of readers of The Times and The Sunday Times. Subscribe today and get one month free at: thetimes.co.uk/storiesofourtimes. If you, or someone you know, has been affected by the issues raised in this episode, the following organisations can help:Switchboard provides an information, support and referral service for anyone who needs to consider issues around their sexuality.Phone: 0300 330 0630 (10am-10pm).Samaritans is available for anyone struggling to cope and provide a safe place to talk 24 hours a day.Phone: 116 123Guests: - Jayne Ozanne, director and founder, Ozanne Foundation; chair, Ban Conversion Therapy Coalition.- Dr Qazi Rahman, senior lecturer, King's College London.- Michael King, Emeritus Professor, University College London.Host: Emily Sargent, journalist.Clips: ITV News, Instagram: @xoutloudeuropeofficial, X-OUT-LOUD Europe, BFI, BBC. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Stats + Stories
Sounding Human When Talking About Statistics | Stats + Stories Episode 198

Stats + Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 33:41


Communicating statistics effectively can be a difficult task it can sometimes be hard to know how much information someone needs in order to understand a particular set of numbers. Jargon can be another stumbling block to clearly communicating what a statistical finding means. Communicating stats clearly is the focus of this episode of Stats and Stories with guest Kevin McConway Kevin McConway is Emeritus Professor of Applied Statistics at the Open University in the UK, where he taught statistics, mainly to adult students in a wide range of disciplines. He has researched collaboratively across natural and social science. Kevin has developed a strong interest and involvement in statistics in the media. In particular he was as adviser for eleven years and an occasional contributor to the BBC radio program More or Less, which aims to support the public understanding of numbers in the news. He has worked with and helped train journalists in understanding and communicating statistics, often through the UK's Science Media Centre where he is a member of the advisory committee. He tweets on @kjm2.

Today with Claire Byrne
Vaccine Inequality

Today with Claire Byrne

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 13:33


Professor Ruairi Brugha, Emeritus Professor of Public Health and Epidemiology at the RCSI

Everyday Wellness
Ep. 161 The Nutritional Battlefield & Debunking Chronic Diseases: How Most Food Has Become Poison with Dr. Robert Lustig

Everyday Wellness

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2021 56:25


I am happy to have Dr. Robert Lustig joining me today! He is an Emeritus Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Endocrinology and a Member of the Institute for Health Policy Studies at UCSF. Dr. Lustig is a neuroendocrinologist with expertise in metabolism, obesity, and nutrition. He is one of the leaders of the current “anti-sugar” movement that is changing the food industry. Dr. Lustig graduated from MIT in 1976 and received his M.D. from Cornell University Medical College in 1980. He also received his Masters of Studies in Law (MSL) degree at the University of California, Hastings College of the Law in 2013. He is the author of the popular books Fat Chance (2012), The Hacking of the American Mind (2017), and the recently-released book Metabolical: The Lure and the Lies of Processed Food, Nutrition, and Modern Medicine. Many people assume that any food sold in the grocery store is healthy. But the truth is that most of the food-like substances that people are consuming today are far from real, and they do not metabolically support either a healthy body or a healthy lifestyle. Dr. Lustig lived in the ecosystem of modern medicine for forty years. Then, after doing some research, he saw that the data he was generating did not conform to the party line. So, in 2007, he started speaking out about what he thought to be the biggest problem in nutrition- sugar. Stay tuned to find out how Dr. Lustig is debunking modern medicine and chronic disease, and learn what you can do to navigate the modern-day nutritional battlefield. IN THIS EPISODE YOU WILL LEARN: What Dr. Lustig discovered when he started doing research. Why Dr. Lustig wrote his first book, Fat Chance. The difference between nutrition and food science. How most food has become poison. Why the concept of calories should be disregarded. Dr. Lustig talks about leptin resistance and explains what you can do to overcome it. Why eighty-eight percent of Americans have metabolic dysfunction. Dr. Lustig explains what we need to eat to have a healthy diet. Dr. Lustig shares his proposed definition of healthy. The importance of fiber. The problem with Big Pharma. Dr. Lustig explains why food subsidies do not make sense. Connect with Cynthia Thurlow Follow on Twitter, Instagram & LinkedIn Check out Cynthia's website  Connect with Dr. Lustig On his website  Get his new book here!  On Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter 

Economics Explained
Political legitimacy with Prof. Phillip LeBel

Economics Explained

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 57:31


In EP98 on political legitimacy, host Gene Tunny interviews  Prof. Phillip LeBel, the author of a book published earlier this year by Brown Walker Press titled: Risk and the State: How Economics and Neuroscience Shape Political Legitimacy to Address Geopolitical, Environmental, and Health Risks for Sustainable Governance.  Phillip LeBel is Emeritus Professor of Economics at Montclair State University, NJ. With a career combining academic research and teaching with professional consulting, Professor LeBel has accumulated a record of economic expertise in a variety of domestic and international fields. Over the years, he has lived in and/or worked in 30 countries, including Africa, East Asia, Central America, and Latin America.  

Psychoanalysis On and Off the Couch
Large Groups, Diplomacy, and Psychoanalysis with Vamik Volkan, MD

Psychoanalysis On and Off the Couch

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2021 48:43


"Thousands or millions of people who will never meet each other sharing certain sentiments - these sentiments have historical, cultural and linguistic backgrounds. When I started this, of course, conflicts between large groups have certain realistic aspects as you can imagine: political, personal and legal ones, but underneath those I figured out that everything is in the name of maintaining and protecting one's large group."    Episode Description: Dr. Volkan begins by describing his experience of loss and conflicted mourning as a stimulus for his life-long study of large group phenomena and its application to international diplomacy. We review his concepts of 'chosen trauma' and 'chosen glory' as they function to emotionally collapse time for large groups seeking to intergenerationally transmit a sense of collective entitlement. Dr. Volkan gives examples of how his understanding of large group phenomena has informed and impacted diplomatic negotiations. We conclude with his sharing his view of both the progress that psychoanalysis has made over the past half century and some of his concerns for its future.    Our Guest: Vamık Volkan, MD is an Emeritus Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Virginia, a former president of the International Society of Political Psychology, the Virginia Psychoanalytic Society, the American College of Psychoanalysts and the Emeritus President of the International Dialogue Initiative (IDI). He applied a growing theoretical and field-proven base of knowledge to issues such as ethnic tension, racism, transgenerational transmissions, leader-follower relationships, and other aspects of national and international conflict. He was a member of the International Negotiation Network (INN) under the directorship of former President Jimmy Carter (1989-2000). He was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize five times with letters of support from 27 countries. Dr. Volkan is the author, co-author, or editor of sixty books.    Recommended Readings:  Volkan, V.D. (2006, 2019). Killing in the Name of Identity: A Study of Bloody Conflicts. Durham, NC.: Pitchstone.    Volkan, V. D. (2013). Enemies on the Couch: A Psychopolitical Journey Through War and Peace. Durham, NC: Pitchstone Publishing.    Volkan, V. D. (2015). A Nazi Legacy: A Study of Depositing, Transgenerational Transmission, Dissociation and Remembering Through Action. UK: Karnac.    Volkan, V. D. (2017). Immigrants and Refugees: Trauma, Perennial Mourning, and Border Psychology. UK: Karnac.    Volkan, V. D. (2020). Large-Group Psychology: Racism, Societal Divisions, Narcissistic Leaders and Who We Are Now. UK: Phoenix.    Volkan, V. D. (2021). Sexual Addiction and Hunger for Maternal Care: Psychoanalytic Concepts and the Art of Supervision. UK: Phoenix. 

New Books in Intellectual History
James Robert Brown, “Plato's Heaven: A User's Guide” (Open Agenda, 2021)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 89:25


Plato's Heaven: A User's Guide is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and James Robert Brown, Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at the University of Toronto. This wide-ranging conversation addresses a central theme in current philosophy: Platonism vs. Naturalism and provides accounts of both approaches to mathematics. The Platonist-Naturalist debate over mathematics is explored in a comprehensive fashion and also sheds light on non-mathematical aspects of a dispute that is central to contemporary philosophy. Thought experiments stand as a fascinating challenge to the necessity of data in the empirical sciences. Are these experiments, conducted uniquely in our imagination, simply rhetorical devices or communication tools or are they an essential part of scientific practice? This book also surveys the current state of this debate and explores new avenues of research into the epistemology of thought experiments. Howard Burton is the founder of the Ideas Roadshow, Ideas on Film and host of the Ideas Roadshow Podcast. He can be reached at howard@ideasroadshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books Network
James Robert Brown, “Plato's Heaven: A User's Guide” (Open Agenda, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 89:25


Plato's Heaven: A User's Guide is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and James Robert Brown, Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at the University of Toronto. This wide-ranging conversation addresses a central theme in current philosophy: Platonism vs. Naturalism and provides accounts of both approaches to mathematics. The Platonist-Naturalist debate over mathematics is explored in a comprehensive fashion and also sheds light on non-mathematical aspects of a dispute that is central to contemporary philosophy. Thought experiments stand as a fascinating challenge to the necessity of data in the empirical sciences. Are these experiments, conducted uniquely in our imagination, simply rhetorical devices or communication tools or are they an essential part of scientific practice? This book also surveys the current state of this debate and explores new avenues of research into the epistemology of thought experiments. Howard Burton is the founder of the Ideas Roadshow, Ideas on Film and host of the Ideas Roadshow Podcast. He can be reached at howard@ideasroadshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

The Ancients
Life in Sparta

The Ancients

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 24:08


A legendary city-state in Ancient Greece, we associate Sparta with fierce warriors in battle. But what about the everyday? In this second episode with Professor Stephen Hodkinson, we discuss the eating habits, training and even kingship of Sparta. Stephen is Emeritus Professor of Ancient History at the University of Nottingham.Part 1 - The Truth About Spartan Society: https://podfollow.com/the-ancients/episode/f08dc2f18e4fabe1ecf7ee5bd91d88bc44b2f2b2/view See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Five Questions
Lawrence Blum

Five Questions

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 26:34


I ask the philosopher Larry Blum five questions about himself. Lawrence Blum is Emeritus Professor of Philosophy and Distinguished Professor of Liberal Arts and Education at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. He is the author of several books including, most recently, “Integrations: The Struggle for Racial Equality and Civic Renewal in Public Education” (2021).

Big Picture Science
New Water Worlds (rebroadcast)

Big Picture Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 50:31


New Water Worlds The seas are rising. It's no longer a rarity to see kayakers paddling through downtown Miami. By century's end, the oceans could be anywhere from 2 to 6 feet higher, threatening millions of people and property. But humans once knew how to adapt to rising waters. As high water threatens to drown our cities, can we learn do it again. Hear stories of threatened land: submerged Florida suburbs, the original sunken city (Venice), and the U.S. East Coast, where anthropologists rush to catalogue thousands of low-lying historical and cultural sites in harm's way, including Jamestown, Virginia and ancient Native American sites.   But also, stories of ancient adaptability: from the First American tribes of the Colusa in South Florida to the ice age inhabitants of Doggerland. And, modern approaches to staying dry: stilt houses, seawalls, and floating cities. Guests: Jeff Goodell– Journalist and author of “The Water Will Come: Rising Seas, Sinking Cities, and the Remaking of the Civilized World” Brian Fagan– Archaeologist and Emeritus Professor of Anthropology, University of California Santa Barbara, and author of many books including “The Attacking Ocean: the Past, Present, and Future of Rising Sea Levels”  David Anderson– Professor of Anthropology, University of Tennessee.  His team's PLOS ONE paper is “Sea-level rise and archaeological site destruction.” His DINAA site can be used to generate maps of where people were living in the past, up to ca. 15,000 years ago.   Originally aired August 27, 2018  

The Ancients
The Romans in Brittany, with Sir Barry Cunliffe

The Ancients

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2021 36:39


It was one of the most powerful empires in history, leaving marks and remnants across the globe, but in this episode we are looking specifically at the impact of the Romans on Brittany. Tristan was joined once again by Sir Barry Cunliffe, who takes us through the Roman occupation of Brittany, the response of the residents, and the impact on both cultures. From slaves and wine, to fish sauce and rebellion, this is an intriguing look into the character of Brittany and the realities of a Roman occupation. Emeritus Professor at the University of Oxford, Sir Barry Cunliffe is the author of Bretons and Britons: The Fight for Identity. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
The Importance and Future of Archaeology: a personal view with John Barrett - Arch and Ale 40

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 34:50


Archaeology & Ale is a monthly series of talks presented by Archaeology in the City, part of the University of Sheffield Archaeology Department's outreach programme. It's our honour to welcome Professor John Barrett speaking on the 'The Importance and Future of Archaeology: a personal view.' This talk took place on June 16th in-person and online via Google Meets. John is an accomplished archaeologist with many decades of experience. He graduated from the University of Wales (University College Cardiff) and taught at the Universities of Leeds and Glasgow before joining the University of Sheffield in 1995. John was appointed to a Chair in Archaeology in 2001, was Head of Archaeology 2002-2006, Dean of Arts 2007-2008, and Acting Head of Department of Biblical Studies 2009-2011. In 2005, he was invited as a Visiting Professor to the University of Heidelberg and has served on the various UK and overseas advisory boards in connection with commercial, museum and university-based archaeology. He is currently an Emeritus Professor at Sheffield's Department of Archaeology. John is currently involved in several research projects and writing programmes. John continues to be interested in designing new archaeological methodologies that are theoretically sound and capable of empowering field archaeologists. He hopes that this will engage the wider community to participate in the archaeological investigation of historical processes. In this talk, John will speak on his views about the future of commercial, academic, and community archaeology. In addition, he discusses the study's history and the contribution that archaeology can make to the ongoing climate crisis. John Barrett, the Uni of Sheffield https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/archaeology/our-people/academic-staff/john-c-barrett Save Sheffield Archaeology https://sites.google.com/view/save-sheffield-archaeology/home Please sign our Petition! https://www.change.org/p/university-of-sheffield-save-sheffield-s-archaeology-department For more information about Archaeology in the City's events and opportunities to get involved, please email archaeologyinthecity@sheffield.ac.uk or visit our website at archinthecity.wordpress.com. You can also find us on Twitter (@archinthecity), Instagram (@archaeointhecity), or Facebook (@archinthecity) ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

Simon Ward, The Triathlon Coach Podcast Channel
The simple truth about optimal health and how to achieve it

Simon Ward, The Triathlon Coach Podcast Channel

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 104:01


The papers, internet, and magazines are all full of the latest guidance on how to lose weight, stay fit, live longer, etc. Unfortunately, a lot of the headlines are just clickbait, and rather than clarifying the situation to make it easier for the person in the street to understand. Even I feel confused sometimes, and I'm supposed to know what I'm doing. I can't think of a better way to get to the real truth than to talk to a man who has spent his life researching these topics. Today's guest is Michael Gleeson, Emeritus Professor of Exercise Biochemistry at Loughborough University. He retired in 2016 after 40 years of research and teaching mostly related to the diet, metabolism, health, and performance of athletes. He had a particular interest in the effects of diet and exercise on the function of the immune system and is a Past-President of the International Society of Exercise and Immunology (ISEI). He has provided advice on minimising risks of infection and nutritional strategies to maintain immune function to numerous sports clubs and organisations. He has co-authored several books on exercise biochemistry, sports nutrition, and exercise immunology, and he's published over 200 research papers in scientific and medical journals. He is still an active science writer and in 2020 he released a series of healthy lifestyle guidebooks: Eat, Move, Sleep, Repeat; Beating Type 2 Diabetes, and The Pick'n Mix Diet written for the benefit of public health. When you speak with someone like Mike you start to realise that there are a small number of simple life guidelines that are pretty easy for us all to follow and we talk about these and more, as we discuss: The concept of optimal health – it's more than just the absence of illness Lifestyle behaviours you can change to achieve optimal health (basically amending your habits in relation to exercise, nutrition, sleep quality, and sleep hygiene) How to eat a healthy diet How regular exercise can combat chronic disease (CHD, T2D, etc)  How much and what sort of exercise is best to get the health benefits.  What is the best type of exercise for fat burning? The best way to lose excess weight (fat) without sticking to one boring diet for weeks on end  Why sleep is important for health and how to improve your sleep quality How to avoid common illnesses including COVID19 The advantages of a multi-diet plan for effective, healthy, weight loss To follow Mike you can find him on: His personal website: The Prof4Health: Facebook: Professor Michael Gleeson Twitter: @profmikegleeson Prof Gleeson's published books include: Sport Nutrition co-authored with Professor Asker Jeukendrup. Eat, Move, Sleep, Repeat Beating Type 2 Diabetes The Pick'n Mix Diet written for the benefit of public health.  Some interesting podcasts with Mike: Podcast with Mark Foster of Loughborough University about "Can supplements boost your immune system?" recorded May2020.  Podcast about Beating Type 2 Diabetes with nutritionist Matt Gardner recorded April 2021.  Podcast about immuno-nutrition with the Marathon Medic, Amy Boalch released 10th May 2021.  If you're interested in some of the research around the topics we discussed today, Mike suggested the following papers: COVID-19 Nutrition, immunity and COVID-19. BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health  The COVID-19 pandemic and physical activity.  EXERCISE, NUTRITION AND IMMUNITY Consensus statement: Immunonutrition and exercise.  The anti-inflammatory effects of exercise: Mechanisms and implications for the prevention and treatment of disease.  How much is too much? (Part 2) International Olympic Committee consensus statement on load in sport and risk of illness.  Recommendations to maintain immune health in athletes. HEALTHY EATING Fruit and vegetable intake and the risk of cardiovascular disease, total cancer and all-cause mortality: A systematic review and dose-response metaanalysis of prospective studies.  Growing older with health and vitality: a nexus of physical activity, exercise and nutrition.  EXERCISE AND DIETS FOR WEIGHT LOSS Determination of the exercise intensity that elicits maximal fat oxidation.  Effects of popular diets without specific calorie targets on weight loss outcomes: Systematic review of findings from clinical trials.  “Calories in, calories out” and macronutrient intake: The hope, hype and science of calories.  Calorie for calorie, dietary fat restriction results in more body fat loss than carbohydrate restriction in people with obesity. SUPPLEMENTS A toast to health and performance! Beetroot juice lowers blood pressure and the O2 cost of exercise.  Is there an optimal vitamin D status for immunity in athletes and military personnel?  Vitamin D and the athlete: Current perspectives and new challenges.  Probiotics supplementation for athletes - clinical and physiological effects.  SLEEP AND HEALTH Evidence of disturbed sleep and increased illness in overreached endurance athletes.  Sleep duration and risk of type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of prospective studies. Take a 30 day trial in my SWAT Inner Circle for just £1. Watch this video for more information. Purchase a copy of my High Performance Human e-book featuring more than 30 top tips on how to upgrade your life. If you would like to help offset the cost of our podcast production, we would be so grateful.  Please click here to support the HPH podcast.  Thank you! Visit Simon's website for more information about his coaching programmes.  Links to all of Simon's social media channels can be found here.  For any questions please email Beth@TheTriathlonCoach.com.

History's Most
41. History's Most Controversial Crisis (ft. Stuart Ball)

History's Most

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 142:25


In this episode, we are joined by Stuart Ball, Emeritus Professor of Modern History at Leicester University, for a discussion about Britain's 1931 budget crisis, and the formation of the National Government. We take a look at the political situation in Britain in the years before, the people involved in the crisis, the critical moments during it, and the fascinating years afterward; including the creation of a National Government, and the landslide victory of that National Government in the October general election. Thanks so much to Stuart for coming on the show! Our Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/historysmost Our Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/729271677922830 Thank you to our Executive Producers: Tom McCool, Justus Ebel, Jeremy Marcoux, and Tony Turrin, to all our Patrons, and to all our listeners.

The Gardenangelists
We Went Down a Few Rabbit Holes

The Gardenangelists

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 31:46


Carol and Dee discuss another flower type—corymbs—played a game of "is it too late" for the vegetable garden and discussed the bee waggle dance!  A few links:An episode of Oklahoma Gardening with Dee talking about daylilies  is now on YouTube. Info on Yarrow varieties tested by  the Chicago Botanic Garden  Info on Yarrow varieties from  Rozanne and Friends®.Rabbit hole! Blog post by the Wandering Botanist, Kathleen Keeler, Emeritus Professor, Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Plant Story - Yarrow,  Achillea millefolium, a plant species complex.On the Bookshelf:My Summer in a Garden, by Charles Dudley WarnerAnother Rabbit Hole! The Bee Waggle Dance Info: Honey Bee Waggle Dance & Hive Type Perspectives by Two Bees in a Podcast • A podcast on Anchor,  plus TED talk by Margaret Couvillon from Virginia TechEmail us at TheGardenangelists@gmail.com  For more info on Carol and her books, visit her website.  Visit her blog May Dreams Gardens.For more info on Dee and her book, visit her website.  Visit her blog Red Dirt Ramblings.Affiliate links to purchase any of our books:The 20-30 Something Garden Guide: A No-Fuss, Down and Dirty, Gardening 101 for Anyone Who Wants to Grow Stuff, by Dee NashPotted and Pruned: Living a Gardening Life, by Carol J. MichelHomegrown and Handpicked: A Year in a Gardening Life, by Carol J. MichelSeeded and Sodded: Thoughts from a Gardening Life, by Carol J. MichelCreatures and Critters: Who's in Your Garden, by Carol J. MichelThe Christmas Cottontail: A Story for Gardeners of All Ages, by Carol J. Michel

Scientific Sense ®
Prof. Lesley Rogers, Emeritus Professor at the University of New England, Australia

Scientific Sense ®

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 63:19


Survival with an asymmetrical brain: Advantages and disadvantages of cerebral lateralization, Development and function of lateralization in the avian brain, A right antenna for social behavior in honeybees, and A function for the bicameral mind Prof. Lesley Rogers is emeritus professor at the University of New England in Australia. She is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science and has made significant contributions to the understanding of brain development and behavior, especially the lateralization of the brain in non-human animals. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/scientificsense/message

Today with Claire Byrne

Ian Robertson, Emeritus Professor of Psychology at Trinity College and Author of 'How Confidence Works'

TopMedTalk
POCApalooza West | EBPOM London 2021

TopMedTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 33:04


Presenting 2021's POCApalooza West; the annual tradition continues in the wake of last year's hugely successful international gathering of perioperative practitioners; hear how the rest of the world is handling the COVID-19 crisis, how the connectivity between patients and practitioners is improving and how one of TopMedTalk's favourite contributors is now taking perioperative medicine to the heart of healthcare in the USA. Featuring Desiree Chappell, Monty Mythen and their guests, Lee Fleisher, Emeritus Professor of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, University of Pennsylvania, Sol Aronson, Professor Emeritus, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina and Carol Peden, adjunct Professor at USC and Pennsylvania and current Chair of The American Society of Anesthesiology's Brain Health Initiative.

New Books Network
Christopher Grey, "Brexit Unfolded: How No One Got What They Wanted (and Why They Were Never Going To)" (Biteback, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 49:52


In 2020-21, the UK left first the EU and then the 30-nation European Economic Area. Much of the impact has been masked by the coronavirus pandemic but, as that lifts, there will be profound effects on patterns of employment, national strategic positioning, political cleavages and even on the continued cohesion of the kingdom itself. This did not have to be the case. Short of never leaving the EU, there were less disruptive exit models available. Why weren't they taken and why did the Brexit process radicalise between 2016 and 2019? These are the questions Christopher Grey explores in Brexit Unfolded: How No One Got What They Wanted (and Why They Were Never Going To) (Biteback, 2021). Emeritus Professor of Organisation Studies at Royal Holloway, University of London, Chris Grey previously taught at Leeds, Cambridge and Warwick and is the author and co-author of nine other books. He stumbled into the Brexit debate during the referendum campaign and started writing a blog (Brexit and Beyond) that soon turned into a must-read - propelling him into the front rank of Brexitologists and earning @chrisgreybrexit 54,000 Twitter followers. *The author's own book recommendations are Heroic Failure: Brexit and the Politics of Pain by Fintan O'Toole (Apollo, 2019) and A Question Of Loyalties by Allan Massie (Canongate Books, 2002 - first published in 1989) Tim Gwynn Jones is an economic and political-risk analyst at Medley Global Advisors. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Audible Bleeding
Device Safety and the FDA with Drs Ronald Fairman and Carmen Johnson

Audible Bleeding

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2021 34:11


We are excited to share our discussion with Dr. Carmen Johnson and Dr. Ronald Fairman from the Food and Drug Administration on the approval processes and the post-market surveillance of medical devices.  Dr. Carmen Gacchina Johnson is the Assistant Director, Vascular & Endovascular Devices at the Food and Drug Administration. She has a Ph.D. in Bioengineering and has been with the FDA since 2012. Her area of expertise is in cardiovascular devices.  Dr. Ronald Fairman is an Emeritus Professor of Surgery and former Chief of the Division of Vascular Surgery at the University of Pennsylvania, as well as a former President of the Society for Vascular Surgery. He is speaking to us today in his role as Medical Officer on the Vascular and Endovascular Devices Team (VEDT) A History of Medical Device Regulation & Oversight in the United States MedWatch Forms for FDA Safety Reporting Virtual two-day meeting of the CDRH Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee in Quarter4 of 2021 To sign up for news about device approvals, recalls, and other FDA actions and announcements, we recommend subscribing to CDRH News.   ** Leadership Development Program Applications are open and due by July 16, 2021 **   What other topics would you like to hear about? Let us know more about you and what you think of our podcast through our Listener Survey or email us at AudibleBleeding@vascularsociety.org. Follow us on Twitter @audiblebleeding  Learn more about us at https://www.audiblebleeding.com/about-1/ and #jointheconversation.

Woman's Hour
Weekend Woman's Hour: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Arooj Aftab, Reclaiming sexist language

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2021 56:42


How possible is it to actually earn a living from sport? The latest BBC Elite British Sportswomen's Survey found that four out of five elite British sportswomen feel they are not paid enough compared to their male counterparts and more than 60% of UK's top female athletes make less than £10,000 a year. On the other hand revenue generated by women's sport in the UK is set to grow to £1bn a year by 2030 – up from £350m a year currently – making it one of the fastest growing sectors in the sports industry. The Women's Sports Trust says the key to unlocking this impressive growth will be the increased visibility of female athletes and teams. Emily Defroand is a Great Britain and England Hockey player, Zarah El-Kudcy is a Trustee at the Women's Sports Trust and the Head of Commercial partnership development at Formula 1, and Dr Ali Bowes is a senior lecturer in the Sociology of Sport at Nottingham Trent University. Lord Michael Heseltine, who was Deputy Prime Minister in the mid-nineties, says he's had to attend a House of Lords course to do with what's right and what's wrong when it comes to conduct between colleagues, especially between men and women. The training is called "Valuing Everyone". The House of Lords has been very firm about this online course on inappropriate behaviour and prejudice, saying all peers must attend. Lord Heseltine was sent a reminder that he MUST complete it, which seems to have aggravated him a great deal. He's here, and so is Wera Hobhouse, Lib Dem MP. In the House of Commons, the course isn't mandatory for MPs. Language – and the way we use it – is forever changing. We explore how the word ‘bitch' and other similar words with a sexist history are being reclaimed and reinvented by women to mean something positive. Chante Joseph is a social media creative and writer. Jacqueline Springer is a Black music and culture journalist. Helen Taylor is an Emeritus Professor of English at the University of Exeter. Why, after decades of social progress is motherhood still so much harder than it needs to be? Why aren't we honest about the realities of being a mother? These are just two of the themes explored in a trio of books about motherhood that have just been published. It's not as if these questions haven't been asked before. There is a rich vein of literature from Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex through to Adrienne Rich's classic study Of Woman Born, Juliet Mitchell's A Women's Estate , Jane Lazarre's The Mother Knot and many more. And many second wave feminists fought hard for the rights of mothers on both sides of the Atlantic. And yet very little, if any progress, has been made according to this new crop of authors. Elaine Glaser is the author of Motherhood: A Manifesto, Pragya Agarwal is the author of (M)otherhood: On the Choices of Being a Woman, and Marina Fogle co-presents the podcast 'As Good As It Gets?' Arooj Aftab is a Pakistani composer, based in Brooklyn. She joins Anita to talk about her music and influences from jazz and Qawwali to Jeff Buckley and Abidi Parveen. She explains how grief has shifted the tone of her music to ‘heavy metal harp', and discusses her latest album, Vulture Prince, which honours and reimagines centuries-old ghazals, a form of South Asian poetry and music that she grew up listening to with her family. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is the author of novels including 'Purple Hibiscus', 'Half of a Yellow Sun', which won the Orange Prize (now called the Women's Prize for Fiction), and 'Americanah', which won the US National Book Critics Circle Award. Chimamanda has also delivered two landmark TED Talks: The Danger of A Single Story, and We Should All Be Feminists, which started a worldwide conversation about feminism and was published as a book in 2014. She has now written a more personal book. On 10 June 2020 her father died suddenly in Nigeria. A self-confessed daddy's girl, she has now remembered her father in a tribute, 'Notes on Grief'. Her mother has since also died. How do you deal with double heartbreak?