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Banished by Booksmart Studios
The Sunshine State Descends into Darkness (Again)

Banished by Booksmart Studios

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 13:42


Worse than McCarthyism? In this episode of Banished, we explore the all-out assault on academic freedom in higher education in Florida. Turns out there's a long history of campus witch-hunts in the state. We spoke with Robert Cassenello (history professor at University of Central Florida), Paul Ortiz (history professor at the University of Florida), James Grossman (executive director of the American Historical Association) and Ellen Schrecker (professor emerita at Yeshiva University). Episode transcript available here. References & Links:* Will Florida's "Stop WOKE Act" Hold Up in Court?, Banished podcast episode, November 1, 2022. * Stacy Braukman, Communists and Perverts Under the Palms: The Johns Committee in Florida, 1956-1965, University Press of Florida, 2012. * Daniel Golden, “‘It's Making Us More Ignorant': Governor Ron DeSantis's anti-critical-race-theory legislation is already changing how professors in Florida teach,” Atlantic, January 3, 2023. * Karen L. Graves, And They Were Wonderful Teachers: Florida's Purge of Gay and Lesbian Teachers, University of Illinois Press, 2009.* Josh Moody, “DeSantis Aims to Turn Public College Into ‘Hillsdale of the South,'” Inside Higher Ed, January 11, 2023.* Emma Pettit, “The Inquisition: State intrusion on higher ed is nothing new. Decades ago, Florida lawmakers tried to purge campus ‘immorality,'” Chronicle of Higher Education, October 11, 2022.* Pettit, “‘Private Little Hell': A Florida committee once hunted for gay people on Florida's campuses. Sixty years later, the effects linger,” Chronicle of Higher Education, November 28, 2022. * Pettit, “A Florida University Is Quickly Assembling a List of Courses on Diversity. Why? DeSantis Asked,” January 3, 2023.* Victor Ray, “Florida Man Calls the Thought Police,” The Nation, January 11, 2022. * Christopher Rufo, "The Conservative Counter-Revolution Begins in the Universities,” YouTube, January 12, 2023. * Ellen Schrecker, “Yes, These Bills Are the New McCarthyism,” Academe Blog, September 12, 2021. * Schrecker, No Ivory Tower: McCarthyism and the Universities, Oxford University Press, 1986. * Adam Steinbaugh, “Why Florida's betrayal of the First Amendment to ‘Stop WOKE' should concern everyone, including conservatives,” November 29, 2022.* Cathy Young, “Ron DeSantis, Chris Rufo, and the College Anti-Woke Makeover,” The Bulwark, January 16, 2023.* United Faculty of Florida website; UFF Collective Bargaining Agreement* “The Committee,” documentary film about the Florida Legislative Investigative Committee (or “Johns Committee”) * Florida HB 7 (aka the Stop WOKE Act)* Florida HB 233 This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit banished.substack.com/subscribe

New Books in Sociology
Jennifer Forestal, "Designing for Democracy: How to Build Community in Digital Environments" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 40:04


Political Theorist Jennifer Forestal's new book is a fascinating exploration of contemporary democracy and how it operates in different spaces. Forestal's avenue into the question of democracy and the space in which it functions comes out of the idea of how spaces are designed and for what reasons. This idea of built environments—be they city centers in urban areas, software architecture, or the existence and width of sidewalks—contribute to how we, as individuals and community members, operate in those spaces. Forestal is paying particular attention to participatory democracy, where community members come together to solve problems collectively.  Designing for Democracy: How to Build Community in Digital Environments (Oxford UP, 2021)weaves together the concrete, the actual spaces where we can gather together or where we are pushed apart, and the theoretical, the way democracy, as a concept, draws on the will of the people to govern themselves. In examining democratic theory, Forestal integrates work from Aristotle, Alexis de Tocqueville, and John Dewey, all of whom provide frameworks for thinking about and understanding interactions between individuals and the effort to share responsibility to govern in common. Forestal unpacks the many ways that built environments guide our choices and behavior—from how the layout of a grocery store pushes us towards certain kinds of purchases, to the design of sidewalks or the absence of sidewalks as determining our public engagement or disengagement—and how this is an often overlooked or obscured exertion of power, especially political power. The power of the built environment trains us in a variety of ways, and this is an area where changing the design of the space in which we exist can also change our behavior and can shift our perspectives. Democratic theory is predicated on individuals acting together, and the space in which we do this contributes to the success of these efforts, or their fragmentation. Social media spaces are very much like the physical built environment, and Forestal examines three different social media spaces, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit, exploring how they are and are not hospitable spaces for democracy. Designing for Democracy: How to Build Community in Digital Environments is an original analysis of how physical and virtual spaces provide individuals with barriers or openings to engagement, and how these spaces can shift our behavior and our priorities. Ultimately, democracy is an idea that must be translated by real people in real spaces and places, and how we all engage with one another is not just important, it is the basis for the implementation of this concept of self-government. Lilly J. Goren is a professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of The Politics of the Marvel Cinematic Universe (University Press of Kansas, 2022), as well as co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books in Political Science
Jennifer Forestal, "Designing for Democracy: How to Build Community in Digital Environments" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 40:04


Political Theorist Jennifer Forestal's new book is a fascinating exploration of contemporary democracy and how it operates in different spaces. Forestal's avenue into the question of democracy and the space in which it functions comes out of the idea of how spaces are designed and for what reasons. This idea of built environments—be they city centers in urban areas, software architecture, or the existence and width of sidewalks—contribute to how we, as individuals and community members, operate in those spaces. Forestal is paying particular attention to participatory democracy, where community members come together to solve problems collectively.  Designing for Democracy: How to Build Community in Digital Environments (Oxford UP, 2021)weaves together the concrete, the actual spaces where we can gather together or where we are pushed apart, and the theoretical, the way democracy, as a concept, draws on the will of the people to govern themselves. In examining democratic theory, Forestal integrates work from Aristotle, Alexis de Tocqueville, and John Dewey, all of whom provide frameworks for thinking about and understanding interactions between individuals and the effort to share responsibility to govern in common. Forestal unpacks the many ways that built environments guide our choices and behavior—from how the layout of a grocery store pushes us towards certain kinds of purchases, to the design of sidewalks or the absence of sidewalks as determining our public engagement or disengagement—and how this is an often overlooked or obscured exertion of power, especially political power. The power of the built environment trains us in a variety of ways, and this is an area where changing the design of the space in which we exist can also change our behavior and can shift our perspectives. Democratic theory is predicated on individuals acting together, and the space in which we do this contributes to the success of these efforts, or their fragmentation. Social media spaces are very much like the physical built environment, and Forestal examines three different social media spaces, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit, exploring how they are and are not hospitable spaces for democracy. Designing for Democracy: How to Build Community in Digital Environments is an original analysis of how physical and virtual spaces provide individuals with barriers or openings to engagement, and how these spaces can shift our behavior and our priorities. Ultimately, democracy is an idea that must be translated by real people in real spaces and places, and how we all engage with one another is not just important, it is the basis for the implementation of this concept of self-government. Lilly J. Goren is a professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of The Politics of the Marvel Cinematic Universe (University Press of Kansas, 2022), as well as co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

The Modern Scholar Podcast
Inside the World of Academic Publishing

The Modern Scholar Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 64:41


Joyce Harrison is editor in chief at the University Press of Kansas, where she acquires books in military and intelligence studies and general-interest books about Kansas and the surrounding region. She has worked at several university presses during her career in publishing, acquiring in anthropology, religious studies, folklore, Black studies, German studies, and Appalachian studies, among other fields. Joyce has a B.A. in music from Towson University and an M.A. in musicology from the Eastman School of Music. She began the music history & theory PhD program at the University of Chicago but soon decided to change directions and pursue a career in publishing! These days Joyce is a dynamic presence in the academic publishing world, an advocate for authors, and an enthusiastic representative of the University Press of Kansas wherever she goes!

Kickass Boomers
#119: Jami Carlacio says,"Do the thing that makes you Happy"!! What makes YOU Happy???

Kickass Boomers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 23:02


Jami Carlacio, PhD is a master-certified life coach, writer, writing consultant, and international public speaker. Spending about 25 years in academia as a scholar and professor teaching writing and literature, she has authored several  journal articles and book chapters on religion and black female social justice activists. Her most recent book is an edited collection entitled Activism in the Name of God: Religion and Black Feminist Public Intellectuals from the Nineteenth Century to the Present, which is available for pre-order from the University Press of Mississippi. She has also authored a book and a book chapter on the fiction of Nobel laureate Toni Morrison.  In 2018, Jami left the academy to pursue her spiritual calling. She attended Yale Divinity School, graduating in 2021 with a master of divinity degree. She has worked as a chaplain at two CT hospitals and as a university chaplain at Wesleyan University in Middletown, CT. She is currently pursuing certification as a spiritual director at the Spiritual Life Center in West Hartford, CT.   Jami came to life coaching—or life coaching came to her--after serious contemplation about next steps upon the completion of her most recent hospital chaplaincy position, and Spirit led her here. Jami coaches women who struggle with self-sabotaging behavior, who are re-evaluating their career choices, and who want to develop the self-confidence to choose healthy, affirming personal relationships. She also coaches clients who wish to use writing as a vehicle to express themselves more fully. She brings to her coaching practice her training in sexual assault crisis counseling; social justice chaplaincy; diversity, equity, inclusion, and anti-racism; trauma-informed coaching; and more than 20 years of personal experience in a 12-step recovery program. Connect with Jami: Website: https://empoweredlifecoaching.me/https://empoweredlifecoaching.me/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jamicarlacio/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/empoweredlifecoach7 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/empoweredlifecoach7/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/@empoweredlifecoaching Connect with Terry: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2658545911065461/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/terrylohrbeer/ Instagram: kickassboomers Twitter: @kickassboomers

New Books Network
Philippe-Richard Marius, "The Unexceptional Case of Haiti: Race and Class Privilege in Postcolonial Bourgeois Society" (UP of Mississippi, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 89:01


In The Unexceptional Case of Haiti: Race and Class Privilege in Postcolonial Bourgeois Society (University Press of Mississippi, 2022), Philippe-Richard Marius recasts the world-historical significance of the Saint-Domingue Revolution to investigate the twinned significance of color/race and class in the reproduction of privilege and inequality in contemporary Haiti. Through his ethnography, class emerges as the principal site of social organization among Haitians, notwithstanding the country's global prominence as a “Black Republic.” It is class, and not color or race, that primarily produces distinctive Haitian socioeconomic formations. When Marius arrived in Port-au-Prince to begin fieldwork for this monograph, to him and to legions of people worldwide, Haiti was axiomatically the first Black Republic. Descendants of Africans did in fact create the Haitian nation-state on January 1, 1804, as the outcome of a slave uprising that defeated white supremacy in the French colony of Saint-Domingue. Haiti's Founding Founders, as colonial natives, were nonetheless to varying degrees Latinized subjects of the Atlantic. They envisioned freedom differently than the African-born former slaves, who sought to replicate African nonstate societies. Haiti's Founders indeed first defeated native Africans' armies before they defeated the French. Not surprisingly, problematic vestiges of colonialism carried over to the independent nation.  Marius interrogates Haitian Black nationalism without diminishing the colossal achievement of the enslaved people of Saint-Domingue in destroying slavery in the colony, then the Napoleonic army sent to restore it. Providing clarity on the uses of race, color, and nation in sociopolitical and economic organization in Haiti and other postcolonial bourgeois societies, Marius produces a provocative characterization of the Haitian nation-state that rejects the Black Republic paradigm. Philippe-Richard Marius is assistant professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at the College of Staten Island (CUNY). Marius has conducted extensive fieldwork in Haiti. He is writer, producer, and codirector of the film A City Called Heaven. Aleem Mahabir is a PhD candidate in Geography at the University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Blues Disciples
Episode 205

Blues Disciples

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 60:39


With this podcast we again interview our friend Dr David Evans about his and Ms Marina Bokelman's new book Going Up The Country: Adventures in Blues Fieldwork in the 1960's from University Press of Mississippi.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 644 (12-19-22): From Roots to Branches, Trees and Water Interact

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:11).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra InformationSourcesRelated Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 12-16-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of December 19 and December 26, 2022.  This episode is the last in a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. MUSIC – ~16 sec – instrumental. That's part of “Fair Meadows and Goodly Tall Trees,” by Timothy Seaman, of Williamsburg, Virginia, on his 2006 album, “Jamestown: On the Edge of a Vast Continent.”  Across that vast continent, from the Chesapeake Bay to forested western states, people recognize that “goodly tall trees,” as well as shorter trees and shrubs—in woods, parks, yards, and built areas—affect water resources in many important ways.  Have a listen to the music for about 30 more seconds and see if you can think of some of those ways. MUSIC  - ~30 sec – instrumental. If you thought of tree impacts on water supplies, aquatic habitat, or the physical or chemical quality of water, you're right!  Such impacts frequently provide benefits to humans, and those benefits are often called “ecosystem services.”  Here are five examples of water-related services that trees provide to human societies. 1.  Trees can slow or reduce stormwater runoff by intercepting precipitation, by transpiration (that is, the evaporation of water from leaves), and by increasing infiltration of water into the ground. 2.  Trees can improve water quality through reducing sediment inputs to waterways, when they slow runoff speed so that more sediment settles out, and when they hold soil in place at streamsides and in uplands. 3.  Trees can also improve water quality through uptake of plant nutrients that otherwise would remain in soil or water; excessive nutrients can degrade aquatic ecosystems and impair groundwater quality. 4.  Trees living on shorelines, and woody debris in waterways, provide food, habitat, and temperature regulation for aquatic ecosystems. And 5.  Trees can help reduce climate changes, with their many water-related aspects, through the uptake of carbon dioxide in photosynthesis and through reduction of human energy use by shading in hot weather and wind breaks in cold weather. In some cases, though, trees can have water-related impacts that are not positive for humans.  For example, tree use of water in some situations can reduce stream flows that provide water supplies, especially in summer; and in western states that depend on snowpack for water supply, trees may either increase or decrease the available snowpack, depending on several factors. Such circumstances remind us that trees exist for their own survival and reproduction, not for human benefit; nevertheless, those long-living, photosynthesizing, woody, and goodly tall beings do provide human beings with irreplaceable benefits. Thanks to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this episode's music, and we close out the episode—and our series on trees and shrubs—with the final 20 seconds of “Fair Meadows and Goodly Tall Trees.” MUSIC  - ~22 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of “Cripple Creek” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Virginia Water Radio thanks Kevin McGuire and Stephen Schoenholtz, both of the Virginia Water Resources Research Center and the Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation, for their help with this episode. “Fair Meadows and Goodly Tall Trees (Fingal's Cave),” from the 2006 album “Jamestown: On the Edge of a Vast Continent,” is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at https://timothyseaman.com/en/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 354, 2-6-17. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES (Photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) Trees planted along in riparian (streamside) zone of Stroubles Creek on the Virginia Tech campus in Blacksburg, Va. (Montgomery County), December 8, 2022.Trees planted beside a stormwater facility on the Virginia Tech campus in Blacksburg, Va., October 3, 2010.Sycamore trees along the James River in Buchanan, Va. (Botetourt County), December 27, 2008.Tree leaves providing a source of food and habitat for aquatic invertebrate animals in Pandapas Pond in Montgomery County, Va., January 4, 2009.Woody debris in Little Stony Creek in U.S. Forest Service's Cascades Day Use Area in Giles County, Va., July 10, 2014.Trees providing shade, stormwater runoff reduction, and other benefits in downtown Blacksburg, Va., June 13, 2013. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT WATER-RELATED BENEFITS OF TREES The following information is from the Virginia Department of Forestry, “Benefits of Trees,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/benefits-of-tree/, as of 12-19-22. “Trees in Forests: Forests are well known for providing a renewable source of wood products. Some products come from the trees themselves, while others, like mushrooms or medicinal herbs, come from the forested environment. In addition to lumber, paper, and a host of other products, forests provide benefits called ‘ecosystem services,' including filtering air to improve air quality; preventing soil erosion; supplying places for outdoor recreation; providing wildlife and pollinator habitat; sequestering and storing carbon; protecting water quality; offering scenic beauty.”  “Trees in Cities and Towns: Trees in urban areas and yards have value, too. Neighborhoods with lots of trees have lower crime rates, less air pollution, lower energy costs, and higher property values than those without trees. Walking among trees can improve health, and even viewing trees through a window can speed patient recovery times.” “Trees in Riparian [Streamside] Areas: Trees in riparian, or streamside, zones provide special ecosystem benefits, including: filtering runoff to remove pesticides, fertilizer, and other chemicals; preventing streambank erosion and keeping sediment out of the stream; shading streams to keep them cool for aquatic organisms; dropping organic matter that serves as food and microhabitat for aquatic organisms; [and slowing] water during storm events....reducing flood potential.”   (This image was also including in the Show Notes for Virginia Water Radio Episode 621, 3-21-22, the introductory episode in the series on trees and shrubs.)SOURCESUsed for AudioAlliance for the Chesapeake Bay, “Forests,” online at https://www.allianceforthebay.org/forests/. See also the Alliance's November 29, 2022, blog post about goal of planting 29,000 trees in 2022; and information on their 2022 Volunteer Tree-planting Relay, online at https://www.allianceforthebay.org/2022-volunteer-tree-planting-relay.Center for Watershed Protection, “Trees and Stormwater Runoff,” online at https://www.cwp.org/reducing-stormwater-runoff/. F. Stuart Chapin, III, et al., Principles of Terrestrial Ecosystem Ecology, Second Edition, Springer Science+Business Media, New York, N.Y, 2011.Chesapeake Bay Program, “Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/what/what-guides-us/watershed-agreement.  The 2014 Bay Watershed Agreement is online (as a PDF) at https://d18lev1ok5leia.cloudfront.net/chesapeakebay/Chesapeake-Bay-Watershed-Agreement-Amended.pdf; see the “Vital Habitats” section in “Goals and Outcomes” (page 8 of the document) for a statement of the desired “Outcomes” for forest buffers and tree canopy.Vincent Cotrone, “The Role of Trees and Forests in Healthy Watersheds,” Penn State Extension, August 30. 2022, online at https://extension.psu.edu/the-role-of-trees-and-forests-in-healthy-watersheds. Michael Kuhns, “Windbreaks for Energy Conservation,” National Urban and Community Forestry Council, September 10, 2019, online at https://trees-energy-conservation.extension.org/windbreaks-for-energy-conservation/. Colleen Meidt, “USU study finds big trees play a big role in preserving snowpack,” Utah Public Radio, May 5, 2022, online at https://www.upr.org/utah-news/2022-05-05/usu-study-finds-big-trees-play-a-big-role-in-preserving-snowpack. Danielle Rhea, “Benefits of Large Woody Debris in Streams,” Penn State Extension, March 1, 2021, online at https://extension.psu.edu/benefits-of-large-woody-debris-in-streams. Eryn E. Schneider et al., “Tree spatial patterns modulate peak snow accumulation and snow disappearance,” Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 441, pages 9-19, June 1, 2019; accessed through ScienceDirect, online at https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112718323776, 12-15-22 (subscription may be necessary for online access). Virginia Department of Forestry:“Benefits of Trees,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/benefits-of-tree/;“Benefits of Streamside Forests, online at https://dof.virginia.gov/water-quality-protection/learn-about-water-quality-protection/benefits-of-streamside-forests/;“My Trees Count,” online at https://vdof.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapSeries/index.html?appid=f41f85765879480cab068547645d9d8e(this Web site has information about tree-planting projects across Virginia). Timothy B. Wheeler and Jeremy Cox, Bay region loses ground in effort to increase urban tree canopy, Bay Journal, October 11, 2022.For Examples of Tree Issues and Efforts in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed &

music relationships new york university halloween earth education college water state fall change zoom living land goals research tech government management benefits walking search north america environment journal md normal natural va web dark tree humans rain climate change ocean animals witness principles snow roots types weather citizens effort agency trees alliance stream caves cities volunteers priority plants biology vol environmental bay ash images dynamic grade bio soil resource domestic conservation outcomes index charlottesville processes schneider woody pond chemical streams signature virginia tech asheville arial branches scales accent towns atlantic ocean life sciences interact natural resources govt maple forests buchanan williamsburg oaks neighborhoods compatibility relay colorful forestry photographs populations ls msonormal times new roman aquatic sections poison ivy tex watershed organisms chesapeake montgomery county freshwater second edition wg calibri chesapeake bay policymakers forest service sycamore earth sciences photosynthesis new standard shrubs acknowledgment blacksburg university press usu cambria math style definitions worddocument stormwater virginia department saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent sols punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves ar sa trackformatting lidthemeother x none lidthemeasian snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr msonormaltable latentstyles deflockedstate centergroup subsup undovr latentstylecount donotpromoteqf mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc wrapindent intlim narylim defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority fifteen minutes qformat lsdexception locked bmp james river semihidden unhidewhenused latentstyles table normal united states history environmental conservation energy conservation cripple creek name title name strong name normal name emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference name colorful list name intense reference name default paragraph font name colorful grid name book title name subtitle name light shading accent name bibliography name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name light grid name colorful shading accent name medium shading name colorful list accent name medium list name colorful grid accent name medium grid name subtle emphasis living systems kevin mcguire grades k forest ecology biotic space systems waterside name e cumberland gap arbor day foundation name list light accent dark accent colorful accent rhododendrons understory name date name plain text name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name list number name normal table name plain table name closing name no list name grid table light name signature name outline list name grid table name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name message header name table columns name list table name salutation name table list name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name normal indent name table web penn state extension forest resources name mention name hashtag name unresolved mention giles county audio notes msobodytext chesapeake bay watershed water center stormwater runoff utah public radio tmdl 20image bay journal virginia standards
Reading McCarthy
Episode 35: Crossing the border on ALL THE PRETTY HORSES with Allen Josephs

Reading McCarthy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 59:57


Episode 35 takes a first ride across the border with the novel that would elevate McCarthy's profile and career.  All the Pretty Horses won McCarthy the National Book Award following its publication in 1992 and was McCarthy's first best-selling novel. Our guest for this episode is Dr. Allen Joseph. A Hemingway scholar as well as a Cormackian, Allen Joseph is a past president of the Ernest Hemingway Foundation and Society and a past president of the South Atlantic Modern Language Association. He is the author of 15 books, including On Hemingway and Spain: Essays and Reviews 1979 – 2013; White Wall of Spain: The Mysteries of Andalusian Culture; and For Whom the Bell Tolls: Ernest Hemingway's Undiscovered Country. He has edited four critical editions of the poetry of Federico García Lorca and a book of translations of Lorca's poetry and prose, Only Mystery: Federico García Lorca's Poetry in Word and Image. He has published numerous articles on Spain and Hispanic culture in the Atlantic, the New Republic, the Virginia Quarterly, the North Dakota Quarterly, and New York Times Book Review, as well as many publications in scholarly journals. Additionally he has published numerous essays on McCarthy, some of which have been collected in  On Cormac McCarthy: Essays on Mexico, Crime, Hemingway and God, published by New Street in 2016. Recently, he has translated with his daughter poet Laura Juliet Wood the work of Spanish poet Fernando Valverde, and their translation of The Insistence of Harm appeared in 2019 from the University Press of Florida. Future projects include a thematic memoir, centered on Josephs' literary and taurine experiences from 1962 to the present. He is University Research Professor and Professor of Spanish at the University of West Florida where he has taught for more than five decades.  Thanks to Thomas Frye, who composed, performed, and produced the theme music and interludes for READING MCCARTHY.  The views of the host and his guests do not necessarily reflect the views of their home institutions or the Cormac McCarthy Society. To contact me, please reach out to readingmccarthy(@)gmail.com. Find us on Twitter and Facebook; the website is at readingmccarthy.buzzsprout.com, and if you'd like to support the show you can click on the little heart symbol at the top of the page to buy the show a cappuccino, or you can support us at www.patreon.com/readingmccarthy. Note: the first drop of this episode had a 10 second dead spot at about the 25:40 mark; that's been fixed.  If you still have it on your episode, either refresh or delete the episode and download again.Support the show

That Said With Michael Zeldin
A Conversation with Dr. Catherine Musemeche, Author, ‘Lethal Tides: Mary Sears and the Marine Scientists Who Helped Win World War II'

That Said With Michael Zeldin

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022 66:16


 Join Michael in his conversation with Dr. Catherine Musemeche as they discuss her new book, Lethal Tides: Mary Sears and the Marine Scientists Who Helped Win World War II, which explains how the science of oceanography helped US armed forced prepare for the battles in the Pacific. Mary and her team were the hidden figures behind some of the great successes of the Pacific campaign.GuestDr. Catherine MusemecheIt takes a decade of training to become a pediatric surgeon. Catherine Musemeche has been one for twenty years.Dr. Musemeche has been an associate professor of surgery at major medical schools and hospitals and has cared for thousands of critically ill and injured children from newborns to teenagers. Her books include:HURT: the inspiring, untold story of trauma explores the topic of injury from the viewpoint of doctors, rescuers, patients and their families. HURT walks us through the development of today's advanced trauma centers and demonstrates in graphic detail why they are essential in surviving complex injuries.SMALL: Life and Death on the Front Lines of Pediatric Surgery, Dr. Musemeche's riveting account of life as a pediatric surgeon published by University Press of New England in 2014 has been nominated for the PEN American/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Award.Dr. Musemeche is also the author of “Wake-Up Call,” which was excerpted on the NPR website and included in At the End of Life: True Stories of How We Die. Read an Interview about “Wake Up Call.”Catherine Musemeche is a guest contributor to the New York Times Motherlode column. Her essay, “Lessons,” appeared in the journal Creative Nonfiction, Sept. 2015.HostMichael ZeldinMichael Zeldin is a well-known and highly-regarded TV and radio analyst/commentator.He has covered many high-profile matters, including the Clinton impeachment proceedings, the Gore v. Bush court challenges, Special Counsel Robert Muller's investigation of interference in the 2016 presidential election, and the Trump impeachment proceedings.In 2019, Michael was a Resident Fellow at the Institute of Politics at the Harvard Kennedy School, where he taught a study group on Independent Investigations of Presidents.Previously, Michael was a federal prosecutor with the U.S. Department of Justice. He also served as Deputy Independent/ Independent Counsel, investigating allegations of tampering with presidential candidate Bill Clinton's passport files, and as Deputy Chief Counsel to the U.S. House of Representatives, Foreign Affairs Committee, October Surprise Task Force, investigating the handling of the American hostage situation in Iran.Michael is a prolific writer and has published Op-ed pieces for CNN.com, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Hill, The Washington Times, and The Washington Post.Follow Michael on Twitter: @michaelzeldinSubscribe to the Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/that-said-with-michael-zeldin/id1548483720

New Books in American Studies
Alison L. Gash and Daniel J. Tichenor, "Democracy's Child: Young People and the Politics of Control, Leverage, and Agency" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 63:35


Political Scientists Alison Gash and Dan Tichenor have a new book, Democracy's Child: Young People and the Politics of Control, Leverage, and Agency (Oxford UP, 2022), that centers children and young people within the study of democratic politics, filling in a bit of a gap in the literature, especially in political science literature. Gash and Tichenor note in their research that young people are central in so many policy areas but are often not integrated into the policy discussions or applications. As sketched out in Democracy's Child, young people are often leveraged within our politics and our political discourse. They have been used as symbols and positioned as in need of protection—or at least some of them have been presented as being in need of protection. Tichenor and Gash dive into the idea of childhood itself, which is a more recent concept—developing over the past 150 years—and how this contextualization of young people is a significant point of political conflict. It is difficult to clearly define “young people”—since this may include children, youth, young adults, teenagers, or some constellation of each of these categories. So, while Gash and Tichenor center their research on young people, they note that who is encompassed within that term often shifts and changes depending on the political issue or policy debate. Democracy's Child dives into three specific areas to examine the role, place, and capacity of young people. These three areas are control, leverage, and agency, as noted in the subtitle of the book itself. Control, which guides the reader through the first section of the book, explores the autonomy of young people, or the ways in which they are managed and controlled by policy, by the state, and by adults in context of policy. This section examines differing theories about young people and how autonomous or constrained they are based on different policies and political demands. The next part of the book focuses on how policies often leverage young people to reach specific outcomes. Thus, in this context, young people are often used by competing groups or policy makers to drive towards particular outcomes. The final section looks at agency, specifically how young people have advocated for outcomes on their own, or at odds with those who are working towards separate outcomes but in the name of young people. This is a fascinating study of democratic politics, policy, and an entire group of people who are both the center of political and policy outcomes and are often seen as such but rarely actually integrated into the dialogue and discussion. Lilly J. Goren is a professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of The Politics of the Marvel Cinematic Universe (University Press of Kansas, 2022), as well as co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

The Band: A History
Interview: Jude Warne

The Band: A History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 68:43


The Band: A History sits down with writer, columnist and author Jude Warne to discuss her recent essay on The Band's 1970 studio album Stage Fright, which is part of a larger scholarly study of The Band entitled Rags and Bones: An Exploration of The Band published by the University Press of Mississippi. You can find Rags and Bones: An Exploration of The Band here and visit Jude's website here.

The Band: A History
Interview: Jude Warne

The Band: A History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 66:13


The Band: A History sits down with writer, columnist and author Jude Warne to discuss her recent essay on The Band's 1970 studio album Stage Fright, which is part of a larger scholarly study of The Band entitled Rags and Bones: An Exploration of The Band published by the University Press of Mississippi.You can find Rags and Bones: An Exploration of The Band here and visit Jude's website here.

The Lily Pod
an interrogation of rape culture & re-defining consent

The Lily Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 21:41


***This episode is released as part of a university project for SSDB 425: Ethics in Community Engagement at Concordia University***This week's episode centers around an interrogation of the principal elements of rape culture, drawing from the work of scholars who aim to understand the structure, functioning, and reinforcement of a culture of sexual violence. In it, we will explore the nuances of understanding consent, relations, and agency within spaces, structures, and dynamics of coercion, all in attempts to re-work understandings of consent within a culture of naturalized violence. Sexual Violence Resources National (Canada)https://endingviolencecanada.org/sexual-assault-centres-crisis-lines-and-support-services/MTL basedhttps://centredesfemmesdemtl.org/en/personal-support/psychosocial-support/https://www.cvasm.org/en/https://sexualviolencehelpline.ca/cvasm-1/our-organizationhttps://www.hoodstock.ca/ReferencesHenry, N., & Powell, A. (Eds). (2014). Preventing Sexual Violence: Interdiscplinary Approaches to Overcoming a Rape Culture. Palgrave Macmillan.Johnson, D., & Johnson, N. (2021). An Empirical Exploration Into the Measurement of Rape Culture. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 36(1-2), 70-95. https://doi.org/10.1177/0886260517732347Morgan, C. (2022). Visions for Justice and Critiquing Consent: On Taking Performativity Out of Performance. Journal of Consent-Based Performance 1(2), 80-110.Radtke, L., Barata, P., Senn, C., Thurston, W., Hobden, K., Newby-Clark, I., & Eliasziw, M. (2020). Countering Rape Culture with Resistance Education. In D. Crocker, J. Minaker, & A. Nelund (Eds.), Violence Interrupted: Confronting Sexual Violence on University Campuses. McGill-Queen's University Press.

The Big Rhetorical Podcast
Episode 118: Rhetoric and Guns

The Big Rhetorical Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 66:33


Episode 118 of TBR Podcast features and interview with the editors and contributors to Rhetoric and Guns. Rhetoric and Guns is now available from the University Press of Colorado/Utah State University Press. For more information on TBR Podcast visit thebigrhetoricalpodcast.weebly.com and follow us @thebigrhet.

Military Historians are People, Too! A Podcast with Brian & Bill
S2E19 David Silbey - Cornell University

Military Historians are People, Too! A Podcast with Brian & Bill

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 67:03


Today on The Pod we talk with David Silbey! David is the associate director of the Cornell in Washington program and a senior lecturer at Cornell University. He joined Cornell after spending the first decade of his career at Alvernia University in Reading, Pennsylvania, where he reached the rank of associate professor. David received his BA in History from Cornell University and his MA and PhD in History from Duke University. David has published numerous book chapters and articles, but his ability to produce books and edited volumes is enviable. His work includes The British Working Class and Enthusiasm for War, 1914-1916 (Taylor & Francis), A War of Empire and Frontier: The Philippine-American War, 1899-1902 (Hill & Wang), and The Boxer Rebellion and the Great Game in China: A History (Hill & Wang). His latest book is The Other Face of Battle: America's Forgotten Wars and the Experience of Combat, which he co-authored with friend-of-the-pod Wayne E. Lee, Anthony E. Carlson, and David L. Preston (Oxford University Press). In 2023, our friends at the University Press of Kansas will publish Wars Civil and Great: The American Experience in the Civil War and World War I, a volume David edited with Kanisorn Wongsrichanalai. David is a TV star! He has appeared on The Science Channel, the BBC, The National Geographic Channel, The History Channel, and A&E. He is also generous in his service to the military history community. He is a Trustee of the Society for Military History and former Chair of the SMH Education Committee and created the SMH mentoring program for graduate students. He was National Security Fellow at The Jamestown Project at Harvard University from 2005-2007. Since 2018, David is the Series Editor for Battlegrounds: Studies in Military History at Cornell University Press, which Bill says is an "awesome" series that complements rather than competes with Modern War Studies at the Univesity Press of Kansas! Join us for a great chat with the ever-positive David Silbey. We complain about vampire students but then move on to discuss The Police, being an academic brat, the Bedlam reading room at the Imperial War Museum, and being a series editor. Check it out! Rec.: 10/06/2022

The Front Row Network
Classics-A Front Row Seat-Interview with Nancy Olson Livingston

The Front Row Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 60:01


Front Row Classics is proud to welcome Nancy Olson Livingston this week. Ms. Livingston sits down with Brandon to discuss her remarkable life as told in her upcoming memoir, "A Front Row Seat: An Intimate Look at Broadway, Hollywood, and the Age of Glamour". The book chronicles her life, career and marriages to Alan Jay Lerner and Alan Livingston. Her life reads like a road map to the arts and politics of the 20th Century. Ms. Livingston tells Brandon many amazing stories regarding encounters with such figures as William Holden, John Wayne, JFK, Walt Disney and The Beatles. "A Front Row Seat: An Intimate Look at Broadway, Hollywood, and the Age of Glamour" will be available later this month wherever books are sold from University Press of Kentucky. Nancy Olson Livingston was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role in Sunset Boulevard (1950). She has appeared in several films, including Union Station (1950), Battle Cry (1955), Pollyanna (1960), The Absent-Minded Professor (1961), and Airport 1975 (1974). She has also starred in three plays on Broadway: Tunnel of Love, Send Me No Flowers, and Mary, Mary, and guest-starred in a number of television shows. She lives in Beverly Hills, California.    

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 640 (10-31-22 Halloween Special): A Water-related Halloween-themed Tree Quiz

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:22).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Image Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-28-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio, with a special episode for Halloween 2022.  This episode is part of series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. SOUND – ~5 sec and fade - Tree creaking in wind. Creaking wood is often part of a scary Halloween soundscape of dark forests or old houses.  Does that creaking have anything to do with water?  That's one of five questions this episode poses, challenging you to make connections among Halloween, tree parts, and water.  After each question, you'll have about three seconds of some Halloween music to consider your answer.  Good luck, and I hope you do TREE-mendously. No. 1.  Scary human skeletons are a common Halloween feature.  In humans and other animals, skeletons support the body.  What part of trees, through which water and nutrients are transported, functions as the trees' structural support?  MUSIC - ~3 sec.  That's the xylem, also called the wood, which makes up the bulk of a tree trunk. No. 2.  Blood is a featured in many a frightful Halloween scene or costume.  Blood is a water-based fluid that humans and other animals use to transport oxygen, energy molecules, and other biochemicals to body parts.  What part of the tree carries energy molecules and other biochemicals to tree parts?  MUSIC - ~3 sec.  That's the phloem, which makes up a relatively thin layer just under a tree's bark. No. 3.  Ghosts or other specters are often depicted in white or black.  How do light and dark colors affect water in a tree?  MUSIC - ~3 sec.  Dark colors in or around trees absorb more solar radiation and therefore can increase temperature.  The light color or some trees, such some birches, can help reduce this effect.  Temperature, along with humidity, affects water movement into and out of trees, particularly by affecting transpiration, that is, the evaporation of water from plant parts. No. 4.  Wind whistling through trees is weather people often associate with Halloween nights.  How does wind affect the water in a tree?  MUSIC - ~3 sec.  Wind can increase transpiration both by bringing drier air to leaves and by moving away air that has absorbed moisture from the leaves. And no. 5.  Back to creaking wood.  How does water or dryness affect sounds in wood?  MUSIC - ~3 sec.  In wooden houses, creaking can result from temperature and humidity changes that swell or shrink the wood.   In trees, a crackling or popping sound—detected by scientists using microphones placed next to tree trunks—can result from air bubbles within the tree trunk, caused by tree dehydration.  Incidentally, frequent creaking sounds in trees may be an indicator of weak tree structure, so a creaking tree sometimes not only sounds scary but also is reason to be wary. I hope your Halloween this year and in years to come includes fun and functional trees along with adequate good water for them and for you.  We close with the full 50 seconds of the Halloween music you've heard during the questions.  Here's “A Little Fright Music,” composed for Virginia Water Radio by Torrin Hallett, currently with the Symphonic Orchestra of the State of Mexico. MUSIC – ~50 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of “Cripple Creek” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Virginia Water Radio thanks Kevin McGuire, Virginia Water Resources Research Center, and Eric Wiseman, Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation, for their help with this episode. The wind and creaking tree sounds were recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on October 5, 2014. “A Little Fright Music” is copyright 2020 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  As of October 2022, Torrin is the associate principal horn of the Symphonic Orchestra of the State of Mexico.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 601, 10-31-21.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing this music especially for Virginia Water Radio. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGE (Unless otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) A strange “face” seems to peer out from the stump of a downed willow tree at the Virginia Tech Duck Pond in Blacksburg, October 10, 2022. SOURCES Used for Audio Pete and Ron's Tree Service [Tampa, Fla.], “Sounds Your Tree Could Make and Their Causes,” online at https://www.prtree.com/blog/2021/3/15/sounds-your-tree-could-make-and-their-causes. Maya Wei-Haas, “What Does a Dying Forest Sound Like?”;  Smithsonian Magazine, April 21, 2016, online at https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/what-does-dying-forest-sound-180958859/. Baird Foundation Repair [Texas], “Why Do Houses Creak?” online at https://www.bairdfoundationrepair.com/why-do-houses-creak/. Steven G. Pallardy, Physiology of Woody Plants, Third Edition, Elsevier/Academic Press, Burlington, Mass., 2008. Peter Scott, Physiology and Behaviour of Plants, John Wiley & Songs, Ltd., West Sussex, England, 2008. John R. Seiler, John W. Groninger, and W. Michael Aust, Forest Biology Textbook, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Va., 2022, online at https://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/forbio/, as of 10-11-22.  Access requires permission of the Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation, online at https://frec.vt.edu/; phone (540) 231-5483. Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension, “How Trees Grow,” online at https://agrilife.org/treecarekit/introduction-to-tree-care/how-trees-grow/. University of California-Santa Barbara, “Science Line: Why do black objects absorb more heat (light) than lighter colored objects?  What do wavelengths have to do with it?”; online at https://scienceline.ucsb.edu/getkey.php?key=3873. For More Information about Trees and Shrubs in Virginia and Elsewhere Arbor Day Foundation, “Tree Guide,” online at https://www.arborday.org/trees/treeguide/index.cfm. Center for Watershed Protection, “Trees and Stormwater Runoff,” online at https://www.cwp.org/reducing-stormwater-runoff/. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/critters?s=&fieldGuideType=Plants+%26+Trees&fieldGuideHabitat=. eFloras.org, “Flora of North America,” online at http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1. James P. Engel, “Shrubs in the Understory,” February 2012, online at http://www.whiteoaknursery.biz/essays/ShrubsinUnderstory.shtml. Oscar W. Gupton and Fred C. Swope, Trees and Shrubs of Virginia, University Press of Virginia, Charlottesville, 1981. Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, “Trees and Water,” Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, pages 13-18, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49367.   (A Virginia Cooperative Extension version of this article—“Trees and Water,” by Sanglin Lee, Alan Raflo, and Jennifer Gagnon, 2018—with some slight differences in the text is available online at https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/pubs_ext_vt_edu/en/ANR/ANR-18/ANR-18NP.html.) Penn State Extension, “Trees, Shrubs, and Groundcovers Tolerant of Wet Sites,” prepared by N. Robert Nuss, and reviewed and revised by Scott Guiser and Jim Smellmer, October 2007, online at https://extension.psu.edu/trees-shrubs-and-groundcovers-tolerant-of-wet-sites. Plant Virginia Natives, “Virginia Native Shrubs—Backbone of Our Landscape,” undated, online at https://www.plantvirginianatives.org/virginia-native-shrubs. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, Forests of Virginia, 2018, Resource Update FS-264, Asheville, N.C., 2020; available online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59963. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, “State and Private Forestry Fact Sheet—Virginia 2022,” online (as a PDF) at https://apps.fs.usda.gov/nicportal/temppdf/sfs/naweb/VA_std.pdf. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Climate Change Resource Center, “Forest Tree Diseases and Climate Change,” online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/ccrc/topics/forest-disease. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Natural Resources Conservation Service, “PLANTS Database,” online at https://plants.usda.gov. Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=start&search=Search. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage, online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/.   See also “The Natural Communities of Virginia: Ecological Groups and Community Types,” online (as a PDF) at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/natural-communities/document/comlist07-21.pdf. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia's Forests,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/.  Some of the useful pages at that site are the following:“Benefits of Trees,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/benefits-of-tree/;“Common Native Trees of Virginia,” 2020 edition, online (as a PDF) at https://dof.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/Common-Native-Trees-ID_pub.pdf;Tree and Forest Health Guide, 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://dof.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/Tree-and-Forest-Health-Guide.pdf;“Trees for Clean Water Program,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/urban-community-forestry/urban-forestry-community-assistance/virginia-trees-for-clean-water-grant-program/;“Virginia Statewide Assessment of Forest Resources,” November 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.stateforesters.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/2020-VA-Statewide-Assessment.pdf;“Tree Identification,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/tree-identification/. Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program, Virginia Cooperative Extension and Virginia Tech College of Natural Resources and Environment, online at https://forestupdate.frec.vt.edu/. Virginia Forest Products Association, online at https://www.vfpa.net/. Virginia Native Plant Society, online at http://vnps.org/. Alan S. Weakley, J. Christopher Ludwig, and John F. Townsend, Bland Crowder, ed., Flora of Virginia, Botanical Research Institute Press, Ft. Worth, Tex., 2012.  Information is available online at The Flora of Virginia Project, http://www.floraofvirginia.org/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Plants” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on trees and shrubs. Introduction to trees and water – Episode 621, 3-21-22.American Sycamore – Episode 624, 4-11-22.American Witch Hazel – Episode 639, 10-24-22.Ash trees – Episode 376, 7-10-17 and Episode 625, 4-18-22.Early spring wildflowers in woodlands – Episode 573, 4-19-21.Fall colors and their connection to water movement in trees – Episode 638, 10-10-22.“Fifteen Minutes in the Forest” video podcast series – Episode 637, 9-26-22.Forest lands and work in Virginia – Episode 623, 4-4-22. Maple trees – Episode 503, 12-16-19. Photosynthesis – Episode 602, 11-8-21. Poison Ivy and related plants, including the shrub Poison Sumac – &

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Watching Classic Movies
Talking Queen of Technicolor: Maria Montez in Hollywood with Author Tom Zimmerman

Watching Classic Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 32:45


My guest, Tom Zimmerman is the author of The Queen of Technicolor: Maria Montez in Hollywood. Montez was a unique star, imperious, but warm, not known for her acting ability, but skilled in committing completely to a role, whether in a skimpy costume for the six legendary Neverland films she made for Universal, or in a grittier setting, such as for her more noirish European roles. We talked about the magnetism, determination, and integrity of this remarkable woman. The Queen of Technicolor: Maria Montez in Hollywood by Tom Zimmerman, is a publication of University Press of Kentucky. There are links to several places where you can purchase the book on their website. Films discussed: Boss of Bullion City (1940) (Maria's first role) South of Tahiti (1941) (Maria's breakout sarong role) The Universal Studios Neverland Films (not discussed individually): Arabian Nights (1942) White Savage (1943) Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves (1944) Cobra Woman (1944) G*psy Wildcat (1944) Sudan (1945) Tangier (1946) Pirates of Monterey (1947) Wicked City (1949) Portrait of a Killer (1949) The show is available on Spotify, PocketCasts, Breaker, Stitcher, Anchor, Google, Radio Public, and YouTube. Watching Classic Movies podcast is also available on Apple Podcasts! If you are enjoying the show, please give it a 5-star review and share it with your friends. Like the podcast? Want to hear more frequent episodes? Subscriptions are as low as 99 cents a month, click on the Support button here. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/k-cruver/support

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 639 (10-24-22): A Halloween Season Salute to the Witch Hazel Plant

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:15).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImageExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-21-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of October 24 and October 31.   This revised episode from Halloween 2014 is part of a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. SOUNDS – ~9 sec What better than an Eastern Screech-Owl calling eerily from a dark woods to conjure up a Halloween landscape? But for this Halloween season episode, consider a much quieter, but still mysterious, part of that landscape: the American Witch Hazel plant.  This shrub or small tree—a native in Virginia and throughout the eastern United States—has two noteworthy water connections.  First is the use of its forked twigs in “dowsing,” “divining,” or “water witching” to try to find groundwater, a centuries-old practice that some people still follow.  In fact, the “witch” in the plant's common name may derive from an old English word that means “bend,” apparently referring to the plant's flexible twigs and, perhaps, to the belief that a dowsing rod will bend toward groundwater.  Second, extracts from the plant's bark and leaves have long been used—medicinally and cosmetically—as an astringent, that is, a substance used to dry fluids and shrink tissues. Besides its reputed water-finding ability and its established fluid-drying uses, American Witch Hazel is also remarkable for its unusual blooming time.  Bright yellow flowers appear in fall and can continue into December, often seen beside fruits from the previous season.  When those fruits ripen, seeds are forcibly ejected some distance, leading to yet another possible origin of the plant's name: that people attributed to witchcraft the mysterious sound of those far-flung seeds hitting the ground. From its name, to its uses, to its unusual flowering and fruiting, Witch Hazel offers botanical treats far beyond Halloween season's creepy screeches. SOUND – 3 sec – Screech-Owl We close a musical observation about how seeing a cold-weather flowering tree can inspire human resilience.  Here's about 50 seconds of a song called “Witch Hazel,” by Tom Gala, from his 2011 album, “Story After Story.” MUSIC - ~53 sec – Lyrics: “I am looking at Witch Hazel blooming in a garden—the bright yellow flowers in the middle of wintertime.  And I tell my heart be strong like the Witch Hazel flower, and you will not be injured by this dark and trouble time.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 238, 10-31-14. The Eastern Screech-Owl sound was recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on the night of August 12, 2013. “Witch Hazel,” from the 2011 album “Story After Story,” is copyright by Tom Gala, used with permission.  More information about Tom Gala is available online at https://open.spotify.com/artist/0kG6YXrfGPB6lygJwOUNqO. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGE An American Witch Hazel plant in Blacksburg, Va., blooming on October 13, 2022. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT WATER DOWSING The following information is quoted from the U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/What is Water Dowsing?”; online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topics/water-science-school/science/water-dowsing. “'Water dowsing' refers in general to the practice of using a forked stick, rod, pendulum, or similar device to locate underground water, minerals, or other hidden or lost substances, and has been a subject of discussion and controversy for hundreds, if not thousands, of years. “Although tools and methods vary widely, most dowsers (also called diviners or water witches) probably still use the traditional forked stick, which may come from a variety of trees, including the willow, peach, and witchhazel.  Other dowsers may use keys, wire coat hangers, pliers, wire rods, pendulums, or various kinds of elaborate boxes and electrical instruments. “In the classic method of using a forked stick, one fork is held in each hand with the palms upward.  The bottom or butt end of the ‘Y' is pointed skyward at an angle of about 45 degrees.  The dowser then walks back and forth over the area to be tested.  When she/he passes over a source of water, the butt end of the stick is supposed to rotate or be attracted downward. “Water dowsers practice mainly in rural or suburban communities where residents are uncertain as to how to locate the best and cheapest supply of groundwater.  “Because the drilling and development of a well often costs more than a thousand dollars, homeowners are understandably reluctant to gamble on a dry hole and turn to the water dowser for advice.” What does science say about dowsing? “Case histories and demonstrations of dowsers may seem convincing, but when dowsing is exposed to scientific examination, it presents a very different picture.  The natural explanation of ‘successful' water dowsing is that in many areas underground water is so prevalent close to the land surface that it would be hard to drill a well and not find water.  In a region of adequate rainfall and favorable geology, it is difficult not to drill and find water! “Some water exists under the Earth's surface almost everywhere. This explains why many dowsers appear to be successful.  To locate groundwater accurately, however, as to depth, quantity, and quality, several techniques must be used.  Hydrologic, geologic, and geophysical knowledge is needed to determine the depths and extent of the different water-bearing strata and the quantity and quality of water found in each.  The area must be thoroughly tested and studied to determine these facts.”SOURCES Used for Audio John-Manuel Adriote, “The Mysterious Past and Present of Witch Hazel,” by The Atlantic, November 6, 2012, online at http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2012/11/the-mysterious-past-and-present-of-witch-hazel/264553/.American Water Surveyors, “Water Witching: A Brief History,” by Gerald Burden, December 26, 2015, online at https://wefindwater.com/water-witching-a-brief-history/. Arbor Day Foundation, “Witchhazel/Hamamelis virginiania,” online at https://www.arborday.org/trees/treeguide/TreeDetail.cfm?ItemID=940. eFloras.org, “Flora of North America/Hamamelis,” online at http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=114541. Encyclopedia Britannica, “Hamamelidaceae plant family,” online at https://www.britannica.com/plant/Hamamelidaceae.  Oscar W. Gupton and Fred C. Swope, Trees and Shrubs of Virginia, University Press of Virginia, Charlottesville, 1981. Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center [Austin, Tex.], “Plant Database/Hamamelis virginiana,” online at https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=havi4.Sarina Smith, “The Wonders of Witch Hazel,” February 4, 2020, Haverford College [Pennsylvania] Arboretum, online at https://www.haverford.edu/arboretum/blog/wonders-witch-hazel. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Natural Resources Conservation Service, “PLANTS Database/American witchhazel,” online at https://plants.usda.gov/home/plantProfile?symbol=HAVI4. U.S. Geological Survey/Water Science School, “Water Dowsing,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topics/water-science-school/science/water-dowsing. Alan S. Weakley, J. Christopher Ludwig, and John F. Townsend, Bland Crowder, ed., Flora of Virginia, Botanical Research Institute Press, Ft. Worth, Tex., 2012.  Information is available online at The Flora of Virginia Project, http://www.floraofvirginia.org/.For More Information about Trees and Shrubs in Virginia and Elsewhere Center for Watershed Protection, “Trees and Stormwater Runoff,” online at https://www.cwp.org/reducing-stormwater-runoff/. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/critters?s=&fieldGuideType=Plants+%26+Trees&fieldGuideHabitat=. James P. Engel, “Shrubs in the Understory,” February 2012, online at http://www.whiteoaknursery.biz/essays/ShrubsinUnderstory.shtml. Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, “Trees and Water,” Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, pages 13-18, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49367. Penn State Extension, “Trees, Shrubs, and Groundcovers Tolerant of Wet Sites,” prepared by N. Robert Nuss, and reviewed and revised by Scott Guiser and Jim Smellmer, October 2007, online at https://extension.psu.edu/trees-shrubs-and-groundcovers-tolerant-of-wet-sites. Plant Virginia Natives, “Virginia Native Shrubs—Backbone of Our Landscape,” undated, online at https://www.plantvirginianatives.org/virginia-native-shrubs. Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension, “How Trees Grow,” online at https://agrilife.org/treecarekit/introduction-to-tree-care/how-trees-grow/. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, Forests of Virginia, 2018, Resource Update FS-264, Asheville, N.C., 2020; available online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59963. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, “State and Private Forestry Fact Sheet—Virginia 2022,” online (as a PDF) at https://apps.fs.usda.gov/nicportal/temppdf/sfs/naweb/VA_std.pdf. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Climate Change Resource Center, “Forest Tree Diseases and Climate Change,” online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/ccrc/topics/forest-disease. Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=start&search=Search. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Program, online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/.  See also “The Natural Communities of Virginia: Ecological Groups and Community Types,” online (as a PDF) at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/natural-communities/document/comlist07-21.pdf. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia's Forests,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/.  Some of the useful pages at that site are the following:“Benefits of Trees,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/benefits-of-tree/;“Common Native Trees of Virginia,” 2020 edition, online (as a PDF) at https://dof.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/Common-Native-Trees-ID_pub.pdf;“Trees for Clean Water Program,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/urban-community-forestry/urban-forestry-community-assistance/virginia-trees-for-clean-water-grant-program/;“Virginia Statewide Assessment of Forest Resources,” November 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.stateforesters.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/2020-VA-Statewide-Assessment.pdf;“Tree Identification,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/tree-identification/. Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program, Virginia Cooperative Extension and Virginia Tech College of Natural Resources and Environment, online at https://forestupdate.frec.vt.edu/. Virginia Forest Products Association, online at https://www.vfpa.net/. Virginia Native Plant Society, online at http://vnps.org/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Plants” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on trees and shrubs. Introduction to trees and water – Episode 621, 3-21-22. American Sycamore – Episode 624, 4-11-22. Ash trees – Episode 376, 7-10-17 and Episode 625, 4-18-22. Early spring wildflowers in woodlands – Episode 573, 4-19-21. Fall colors and their connection to water movement in trees – Episode 638, 10-10-22. “Fifteen Minutes in the Forest” video podcast series – Episode 637, 9-26-22. Forest lands and work in Virginia – Episode 623, 4-4-22. Maple trees – Episode 503, 12-16-19. Photosynthesis – Episode 602, 11-8-21. Po