Podcast appearances and mentions of Joan Jett

American rock musician and actress

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Hammer + Nigel Show Podcast
Is This Anything?

Hammer + Nigel Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 7:21


The "There I Ruined It" guy imagined what Pearl Jam sounds like to people who don't like the band.  Ozzy Osbourne and Joan Jett will appear in Workday's Super Bowl ad.   An adult woman out of New Jersey was caught posing as a high school student after four days of attending classes. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Rock of Nations with Dave Kinchen
Inside The Hits: #DesmondChild On Working With #BonJovi, #Aerosmith, #KISS, #JoanJett & More!

Rock of Nations with Dave Kinchen

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 31:49


We begin this mini-series with a combined look back at two interviews (2019 and 2020) that we did with internationally renowned hitmaker #DesmondChild, who talks about co-writing “Livin' On A Prayer” with #BonJovi, “Dude (Looks Like A Lady)” and “Angel” with #Aerosmith, “I Was Made for Lovin' You” with #PaulStanley for #KISS and so much more. Check it out!

Bill and Frank's Guilt-Free Pleasures
Rod Stewart: ”Downtown Train” (with Rich Terfry)

Bill and Frank's Guilt-Free Pleasures

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 69:58 Transcription Available


We are thrilled to have Rich Terfry join us for this episode. Rich has been the host of CBC Radio 2's "Drive" since 2008. Besides his work for CBC Music, Rich is a published author who is also known as Buck 65 - a Juno-winning alternative hip hop artist. Today we examine Rod Stewart's glorious cover of Tom Waits' "Downtown Train." Links: Our Mixtape Tom Waits Original Rod Stewart Version Patty Smythe Version Bob Seeger Version Boy Meets Girl Version Buck 65 Bandcamp Page You can find us on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Masadon, and our website. You can email us at BandFGuiltFree@gmail.com, too. Here is our Spotify playlist featuring every song we've featured. Our theme music is by the incredibly talented Ian McGlynn.   Transcript (best read on our website)   Intro Music Frank: [0:22] So today on Bill and Frank's Guilt-Free Pleasures, we have a Chicken or the Egg song. Was it Downtown Train that inspired Rod Stewart's love of model trains? Or was it his love of model trains that inspired him to cover this song? That's what we're kind of looking at a little bit. Well, not at all, but that's a it's a philosophical question that that I believe needs to be asked. And also today we're really excited to have a guest with us today, Rich Terfry who some of you may know from CBC Radio 1.  Rich Terfry: [0:59] Radio 2, CBC Music as we refer to it now. Frank: [1:07] Radio 2. Yes, sorry. Yeah. So Rich Terfry has been good enough to join us today and talk about this song. And I know that you're on the radio and everything, but I can tell you're a little bit intimidated with our $25 mic stands and our towels for soundproofing, but we encourage you just to be yourself here today. Rich Terfry: [1:23] Sorry, yeah. [1:23] I'll do my best. This is much nicer than my setup at work here, so. Frank: [1:27] I'm not saying a whole lot for CBC are we? So yeah today we're looking at Downtown Train by Rod Stewart but before we talk about Downtown Train by Rod Stewart, we need to talk about Downtown Train by Tom Waits, because he was the guy that wrote the song and originally recorded it back in 1985. Bill: [1:49] Right, and that was on his Rain Dogs album, which is his most popular album, at least until... It's hard to tell... Frank: [1:57] And at least until Scarlett Johansson did her cover album, right? Bill: [2:00] Right, right, right. Rich Terfry: [2:01] Certainly a classic. Yeah. And often when people talk, Tom Waits, one of if not the first album that tends to come up in conversation. Frank: [2:12] I think it's probably maybe the most accessible. Maybe so. Yeah. Rich Terfry: [2:15] Maybe so. Bill: [2:16] Our friend Eric Stewart, no relation to Rod, sent, I asked him, I sent him a text far too Bill: [2:24] late last night asking why he's a big Tom Waits fan and asked him to tell me why Downtown Train works so well on Rain Dogs and he said I think because in the first three quarters of the album he makes the listener work so hard to find the melody that when you finally get to something that's even close to a radio song it comes as a relief. Consonance is only pleasing in the presence of dissonance. Frank: [2:49] I understood 70% of those words. Rich Terfry: [2:52] Yeah, I think the simple way to put it is that Rain Dogs is kind of a weird record. And then in a strange way, Downtown Train is a sore thumb. Because all of a sudden, here's like a pretty straight up standard, you know, good old structured pop song in the midst of all this weirdness. Bill: [3:39] There's talk that this was sort of like rock star bait, that there's rumors that Tom Waits had finally got his publishing to himself, and that they said that this song was put out there to sort of um... Lure. Yes. Rich Terfry: [3:51] Lure a bigger artist to, you know, specifically for the purpose of covering it. Bill: [3:59] Yeah. And allowing him to take some time off. Apparently the cover, one version I read was that allowed Tom Waits to take a couple years off to raise his kids. Yeah. Rod Stewart's version is it put in a pool. That's about to be quite a pool if it's 1989 royalties, I would think. Frank: [4:10] Yeah, I just thought it was, yeah. Rich Terfry: [4:38] So I've read a few Tom Waits biographies, none of which he kind of participated in the writing of, because I don't think that's really what he does. But some people very close to him believe that, that he was really doing that, that he was specifically trying to create cover bait, basically, with this song, and maybe a few others that he's written. Just, you know, throw in the potential hits out there, just waiting for someone to take the bait and make them some money. Bill: [5:10] If Rod Stewart wants to cover one of our podcasts... Frank: [5:12] Hey, put on American songbook like 47 or whatever he's on right now. Rich Terfry: [5:19] But don't forget, you know, Tom Waits, so the first chapter, if you will, of his career was very different from where he ended up in the 80s with this trilogy of records. Really, right? People talk about rain dogs, Swordfish Trombones and Frank's Wild Years is sort of a trilogy where he really started to experiment, started to become the guy that ultimately he became and sort of is now. But before that in the 70s, although it was still a little different from you know kind of what might have been on the pop charts, he was more of a songsmith less the experimenter back then. So he had this in He knew how to write a song. Always did, I would say. Bill: [6:05] And so you have Bob Seeger hearing this and saying, this is my ticket. Frank: [6:11] Before that, Patty Smythe did a cover of it too. She covered and recorded and released it in 87. Bill: [6:14] Oh yeah, yeah you're right. Frank: [6:19] It made it on the charts, I think it charted at 93. Of all the covers that I've heard, I'm gonna say that hers is my favorite. Bill: [6:28] That's tough for you, because I know Rod Stewart means so much. Frank: [6:33] He has a big spot in my heart. [6:59] Then that brings up the whole Bob Seeger controversy, right? So the story that I read anyways was that Bob Seeger recorded the song and he was gonna record an entire album surrounding the song and that was his idea and he played it for Rod Stewart and then like a month after that Rod Stewart just recorded Downtown Train just as a one off to add on to a greatest hits compilation. Rich Terfry: [7:30] And managed to release it before Bob Seeger was able to. Frank: [7:34] Yeah, so Bob's like laboring on this entire album, which is built around Downtown Train. And Rod's just like, Here's a one off and I'm going to release it on my on my greatest hits here. So I don't know, like, so it caused a rift between the two them because they were friends and now they're foes. Rich Terfry: [7:54] Yeah, they say Bob Seeger was genuinely ticked, and kind of felt like Rod Stewart's move kind of ruined it for him. Frank: [8:02] Yeah, yeah. Bill: [8:03] And it was the end of Seeger's had this big run until around 87, 88, I think. He actually scored a number one, the song called Shakedown on the Beverly Hills Cop 2 soundtrack. Frank: [8:14] Oh, yeah, that's right. Bill: [8:15] And it looked like, how is that number one? I remember hearing, I thought it was one of those awful throw offs they put on movie soundtracks. Or like, okay, there's one song like Shakedown, who's that? You know, as a kid, but I guess it went to number one. I should probably re-listen to it. But he was seeing Downtown Train, I think, either as a transition or like as, a big move for him as an artist. The story I heard is he told Rod Stewart about the song but hadn't played it for him and get this he told to him on a train. Rich Terfry: [8:44] The plot thickens. Thanks for watching! Bill: [8:47] And then yeah now Rod Stewart's version and I I kind of believe him he's like oh I don't remember. Frank: [8:47] Layers upon layers. Bill: [8:53] That and it's believable to me that Bob Seeger might have been pouring out his heart and Rod Stewart at this stage of his life might not have been paying close attention, but he's got a lot of women coming in and out of different rooms and his autobiography sound like he was quite a wild man even at his age then. Frank: [9:12] Well, yeah. Bill: [9:13] Here's the tough part. Rod Stewart was 44 years old when he recorded this. Frank: [9:20] Okay. Bill: [9:20] We are 45. Frank: [9:23] I've missed my downtown train year. Bill: [9:26] You did, and  Rod Stewart, by the time he was doing Downton Train, had a whole entire career. Frank: [9:31] Yeah, I've had a career. I've had a number of careers. and just keep losing them because of gross incompetence. Bill: [9:32] Are we familiar with the story of how Rod Stewart claims that he heard the song for the first time? Rich Terfry: [9:38] I don't know if I am either. Bill: [9:49] Well, I got it from his autobiography and some mean-spirited writer online said "his autobiography"  or "whoever wrote his autobiography." He was just saying he didn't write his autobiography. Frank: [10:04] Well Rod Stewart doesn't write his own songs either so why would he write his autobiography? Bill: [10:09] Well, he did. He can write a song. Frank: [10:10] He can write his own songs. No, he can. Bill: [10:11] This is the great. I guess this this sort of marked a moment where he changed directions a bit. At least they talk about this. I'll just retell it. I was gonna read it, then I realized it's too long. So his manager came in, I think it was his manager, came in with a tape player. So this is 1989. Plays Tom Waits, Downtown Train for him. And he says to Rod Stewart, holds his hand up and says, don't speak. Plays it. Rod Stewart is listening. Plays the whole entire Downtown Train. Tom Waits stops it. And then he says, don't speak. And he plays it again. Third time. Don't speak. plays it again now Rod Stewart is singing along with it he's like I want this the song has become mine or I want to sing this song and I want to put it on the album but he's saying that's the first time he heard of the song so of, course Bob Seeger's like we talked about this on the train but Rod Stewart. Frank: [11:01] The train. That all makes sense now. Models, model trains, trains. There's a Venn diagram for Rod Stewart's life. Bill: [11:03] Might have been thinking model trains or models in general and so was yeah yeah. [11:11] Well this is the perfect song for him. Rod Stewart said his eight-year-old son Rich Terfry: [11:15] Yeah. Bill: [11:17] came into the room and says, what was that awful sound? Who is that guy singing? And Rod Stewart would say, well, Tom Wait's voice, although he loves Tom Wait's voice, this is an acquired taste. Frank: [11:28] Yeah. It's kind of, it's a pop voice. Bill: [11:28] Whereas Rod Stewart's is like a mild coffee. Rich Terfry: [11:35] Both got a bit of whether you'd call it gravel or gruff or scratchiness though, there is a quality to a degree, you know, Tom Waits is kind of cranked up to 11 but. Frank: [11:49] Yeah, yeah. Tom Waits is like a coal fire. Rich Terfry: [11:51] You're right. And you could argue that at least, you know, at times in his catalog that Bob Seeger dabbled in a little bit of that as well. and so I've wondered if I don't know the question popped into my to my head when you know Tom Waits is lay in this trap was he thinking specifically like you know I'll set this one out there for the gravelly voiced bros wait till they hear. Frank: [12:20] Yeah, because because at that, because at the time, like that would be 85. Right? So like Bruce Springsteen is a huge popularity. And then just follow the road down there was. Rich Terfry: [12:22] This. Frank: [12:31] Springsteen, Brian Adams, Rod Stewart, like they all have that, sort of gruffness in their voice. Rich Terfry: [12:38] They hear Tom Waits and think I can shine this up just enough. Frank: [12:41] Yeah, Tom Waits, the godfather of gravel. Rich Terfry: [12:44] Yeah. Yeah. Bill: [12:45] And the Destroyer of Friendships, I guess too. Because if he hadn't put that out, maybe Bob Seeger would still be buddies with Rod. Frank: [12:48] Oh, yeah. [12:52] They recorded an album Rod and Bob. Rich Terfry: [12:54] That was good. Yeah. Bill: [12:58] All right, so we got this. This is released on his Storytellers album, The Greatest Hits. So I thought I kept looking for it on an album. They released a demo of it, or an early version of this on his Vagabond album from 91, the Deluxe edition. It's actually surprisingly different in a way that it sounded a little closer to Tom, Waits. Yeah, Rodster's, yeah, his voice was like, he had a bit more rasp, but it was like phlegmy. Rich Terfry: [13:22] There's no way I can do that. Bill: [13:29] Rasp which really disgusted me. As I listened to it, I realized I do have issues. Clear that comes up. Yeah, yeah, I turn the taps on if someone's using a bathroom too close to me. So it's a. [14:12] So his early version actually sounded closer to Waits or at least it seemed like something that he would been used to the Tom Waits version And then maybe was still in that zone, but then I don't not sure how much Trevor Horn had to I mean, he's the producer, But he takes it and brings it into full rod or at least full late 80s rod. Yeah. Frank: [14:32] Yeah, okay. Yeah. Yeah, what's a Oh, that's right. Yeah, he was on we talked about what the do they know it's Christmas. Bill: [14:34] We've talked Trevor Horn before He's the guy in the bugles with the thick glasses? Frank: [14:44] Right? Yeah. So, and researching the song. Yeah, you're looking you're looking Rod Stewart does his version and the, guy playing the slide guitar is Jeff Beck on this version and I diving like back deeper as far as Wikipedia was gonna take me I didn't know that Rod Stewart played with Jeff Beck like post yard birds no is before faces let me find it here oh yeah Stewart he he joined the Jeff. Bill: [15:07] Was it in Faces? Were they in Faces? No. Frank: [15:17] Beck group which is a super original name as a vocalist and sometimes songwriter So yeah, I guess he did write songs. Bill: [15:25] ... You heard Every Picture Tells a Story? [15:27] It's off on the side here, but Every Picture Tells a Story by Rod Stewart is phenomenal. Like, as an album. Frank: [15:34] Okay, when was that album? That was... 71. Okay. Bill: [15:35] Like 1971. It's so good that it makes it tough to listen to his later stuff just, because of Rod Stewart's capability as a singer and what direction he could have gone in that he he picked a path that was easy money and an easy easy living, but he had he had a lot of grit and. Rich Terfry: [15:57] Chutzpah. Bill: [16:00] Yes, he had a lot of chutzpah. Rich Terfry: [16:02] You know, I don't know if this is the right moment to interject this, but I find that in the story of both of the versions of this song that we're looking at today, the guest, guitarist really comes up as a big part of the story on both. Because famously, Keith Richards contributed to the Rain Dogs album, but it was GE Smith, who was the Saturday Night Live band leader who played the guitar on Tom, Waits' Downtown Train, who as far as you know guitar slingers mid-80s you know kind of would have been one of the the top top guns out there and so I you know you got to think Rod Stewart's probably thinking we're gonna have to bring in a real hot guitar player on this one who you know when you're talking legendary, guitarists you don't you don't get too far down the list before before Jeff Beck's name pops up. Frank: [16:57] Okay, cool. I did not know that GE Smith because GE Smith I was always introduced like my only knowledge of him was honestly from the Saturday Night Live band And that was it. And I was just like, who's this long haired skeleton? Like, why is he in charge of the band? Rich Terfry: [17:10] Yeah yeah he was you know kind of a studio guy I think you know I'm sure he probably made some records as well but he was a kind of a studio guitarist played on a lot of records I wouldn't be able to rhyme off you know kind of the, discography here and now but I know he played on some records but yeah interesting that you know they both brought in some you know some big guns to play the solos on these songs. Bill: [17:37] When I think about those two songs, like the Downtown Train, Tom Waits version, I think about that guitar. Because that guitar really, it's kind of crying and it makes you feel that sort of longing. [17:59] And when I think of Rod Stewart's Downtown Train, I don't think anything about the guitar. I'd have to re-listen to think about that guitar again. I can just think of Rod Stewart, saying oh baby and and making sounds and I'd never think about the guitar but interesting, I wonder how Jeff Beck felt about it. Frank: [18:16] Oh, they're buds. I think he enjoyed it. Bill: [18:18] Yeah, that's true. Okay. Frank: [18:37] I know that growing up that I had heard Rod Stewart because my dad probably had an eight track back in the day or or like you know 81 in the back seat of the Oldsmobile or whatever and we're he's playing something by Rod Stewart but I remember my sister got Gasoline Alley which was, his second album she got the tape for Christmas and it was like 1990 1991 so it would have been in around the same time that Downtown Train comes out and I'm wondering if that kind of inspired her, to like look back at his catalog and start picking up some of his music and stuff like that. But, I remember her specifically getting the tape for Christmas and like my dad and my aunt is just like Rod Stewart's like who's listening to him still because he's been around since the mid-60s. Like he's been around for a good chunk of time. Rich Terfry: [19:31] Yeah, and I would think a little bit before my time, I suppose, but the peak of his solo pop stardom, I mean, I think, you know, the average person might think, you know, kind of "do you think I'm sexy" is maybe peak, you know, Rod Stewart, which at that point would have been the better part of 10 years in the rear view mirror sort of thing. Frank: [19:45] Yeah, that Maggie Mae and all that. Yeah. Rich Terfry: [19:53] Yeah. Yeah. All that, yeah. Bill: [19:54] Now you have right before it, so 89 for me, because I'm grade six then, and I grew up listening to a lot of Elvis and Amy Grant. That was kind of, those were our two big ones. So I wasn't, yeah it was. Frank: [20:08] Oh, I'm just, I'm just picturing the duet in my mind right now. Bill: [20:11] I know if only Elvis had lived long enough he'd be, he'd definitely be doing Christian rock. So. Rich Terfry: [20:17] Alright. Bill: [20:18] I know Rod Stewart through music videos and so Forever Young came out before this. Yes. And then this little heart of mine was like released before this and this was on the greatest hits. Frank: [20:23] Yes. Yeah. Oh, yeah. Bill: [20:28] And it was the second time he did this little heart of mine. I loved it. Frank: [20:32] Yeah. Yeah. Bill: [20:33] Yeah, and then this came out and it was like wow, this is amazing So I mean Canada loved it because it went to number one. I'm pretty sure in Canada. Frank: [20:40] Yeah, downtown train went to number one in Canada and three in the states. Bill: [20:44] And it also like I started looking at his previous songs and so in Canada They often went to number one up to downtown trains. So This Old Heart of Mine went to number one I think Forever Young did really well too. So we loved Rod Stewart even in the 80s periods. Rich Terfry: [20:59] I wish I could recall this specifically, but sometime around this time, as I recall, my mom went to see him live. Okay. Yeah, so she really, and I don't have memories of her being a big time, Rod Stewart fan earlier on. Funny enough, she was actually a big Elvis fan. And I can kind of, of remember some other stuff that she would have been into late 70s, early 80s. But I think, funny enough, this 80s era Rod is where it really grabbed her. She went to see him live. I remember her, coming home from the concert that night and telling the stories of him kicking soccer balls into the, into the crowd and, you know, loving that. So that would have been in Halifax. I wish I could remember specifically what year that would have been, but I'm thinking it was right around this time. Frank: [21:52] Yeah, because I think Out of Order and then The Vagabond Heart. I think there is a bit of a maybe a bit of a resurgence. Like maybe there's a little dip and then a little bounce back at the end of the 80s, right? Bill: [22:04] In his autobiography, he talked as though he had to prove himself with Downtown Train, but I don't get it at all because he already had Forever Young and a couple other songs in the, tank. So if it's proving yourself a year after a hit, it seems weird now in our era of 2023 where, I don't know, you could go years without doing something, you're still kind of an it. But yeah, he claimed it sort of gave new life to his career. In a lot of ways, this period pads his, his live performance career. As he goes through this, now he's becoming this touring thing that can make tons of money, I think. Frank: [22:42] What's crazy to me right now is like from the beginning of his career to like when he released this album, Storytellers, that's a smaller period of time than it is from the release of that album to now and he's still releasing music. Because it's been 30 years, well 33 years now. Bill: [23:01] Holy cow. Frank: [23:02] Since that album came out, since that first greatest hits package. Bill: [23:05] Right. And he was younger than us then, than we are now. You got that math right? I'm working through this, I got issues, it's okay. Frank: [23:12] Yes. I think so. You're the math teacher. Yeah. So listening to like Rod's version versus Tom's version and I'm gonna speak about them using just their first names. Bill: [23:17] And he changed it. Frank: [23:27] Because I feel like they're familiar to me right now and and even the the covers that like Patti Smythe did and then because eventually Bob Seeger did release a cover version I think in 2011. Bill: [23:40] He didn't like his version. So all the complaining, he's listened to it and said, I don't like it and then changed it and did a new vocal and put in backup singers. Frank: [24:18] So I found the Patty Smythe and the Bob Seeger version a little more faithful to the original in terms of the music that starts off with the guitar, warble, whale, whatever it is you want to call that. But Rod Stewart comes in, it's a little softer, a little more orchestral. And in, my mind, what he's trying to do is he he started it slow. And he's just he's going for that build because he knows how to write a pop song he knows how to do well maybe this is Trevor Horn right. Bill: [24:47] Right, but this is what his voice needs to climb that mountain. Frank: [24:52] But uh yeah yeah so it's it starts off slow and it's really soft and everything and then by the end it like he's full rod. Rich Terfry: [25:00] But yeah, the arrangement on Rod Stewart's version is the most, for lack of a better term, radio-friendly. Cut down on the intro, kind of get to it, get into it a little quicker, kind of sand off some of the edges a little bit. Although strangely, the long sort of coda at the end, which is unusual for a hit song. I'm guessing maybe when it was played on the radio, there might have been some fading going on, for that whole thing. Frank: [25:30] The DJ is talking over the end of the song. Yeah, it's almost uncomfortable. Rich Terfry: [25:32] Yeah, because that is a little unusual, I must say. That's the part of the song that surprises me. That's where this version gets almost a little bit experimental, because it goes on so long. We were listening earlier, it's like, this is almost weird how long this is going on for. Bill: [25:47] It was an awkward moment for all three of us. Rich Terfry: [25:50] But otherwise, it is a very, you know, polished and cleaned up arrangement of this song, as we discussed earlier. The spotlight is somewhat taken off the guitar. And Rod Stewart's very much the star of the show on this version of it. And it really does build in a way that Tom Waits version doesn't quite have that steady upward trajectory. Frank: [26:19] It doesn't have it doesn't seem like it has a peak. It just sort of it's that it's a slow burn. Yeah Rod Stewart's version like when you hit that musical bridge and I'm assuming it's a bridge right like you're a musician you can explain do you do you know what a bridge is can you explain what a bridge is to us. Rich Terfry: [26:24] Right. [26:32] Let's call it a bridge. [26:36] I usually just simply think of it as like, sort of an instrumental passage in a song that is kind of in the middle of the song rather than at the beginning or the end. And so it's usually bridging between, say, a verse and a chorus or a chorus and a next verse or something to that effect. But yeah, usually just like an instrumental passage in the middle of the song. Frank: [26:59] OK, so I think we were right. And every every time we were asking what a bridge was. we have an answer. Yeah, yeah. Or we just end the podcast. I think that was the whole idea. The podcast was determined what a bridge was. Bill: [27:04] We finally have a succinct answer that we will now be just hitting when you ask this question next time. We'll just hit play. Rich Terfry: [27:16] . . Frank: [27:20] Well, thank you, Rich, for being on the last episode of Bill of Frank's guilt free pleasures. But but that bridge because it's climbing, climbing, climbing the entire song. But that bridge. Rich Terfry: [27:24] . Frank: [27:31] Like it takes it up like a steep ramp at that point. And then it comes to that end where he goes full Stewart. Bill: [27:53] I've written down here about my misheard lyrics. I was reading the lyrics. I'm like, that's not what I heard when I would listen to the Rod Stewart version. And I think the reason is, the Tom Waits version, there's this loneliness, longing. I don't think it's creepy, but it's certainly about someone watching somebody else and waiting to see someone he's in love with, but is never going to talk to on a train. And he's a loner who sits on a train waiting for the same person to come on that train and he's there kind of following her and whatever life she leads. At, least that's what I had in my head and all the other people, the Brooklyn girls who are there, going off to go out to clubs or whatever was going on then. That's what I hear when I hear the Tom Waits version. Now the Rod Stewart version, I have no sense that this guy's a loner, or that there's any chance that she's not going to get together with him. So when I read the lyrics, I just hear it differently like there's a line so the beginning was outside another yellow moon, Has punched a hole in the nighttime mist I climbed through the window and down to the street. I'm shining like a new dime, That's Tom Waits, but when I was a kid, I don't know if you thought this but I'm like, oh Rod Stewart, He's shining like a new diamond because yeah, because Rod Stewart's a diamond. Frank: [29:11] That's what I heard too, yeah. Bill: [29:13] I keep listening back and I only hear diamond because it's Rod Stewart and he's worth a ton of money, But the dime is super depressing. So this is the Tom Waits who makes rings out of spoons, right, for somebody to get married, whereas Rod Stewart has big diamonds. Rich Terfry: [30:05] You know, and interestingly, although you could say that in the context of the Rain Dogs album that Tom Waits sort of, you know, cleans things up a little bit on Downtown Train, we talked about it being a bit of a sore thumb. And it's true, you see it in the lyrics as well as, you know, the instrumentation that's happening, the arrangement and everything else. But there, you know, just a few little, Tom Wait-isms in there, even the mere mention of a carnival in the lyrics and you know maybe this comes from you know knowing too much about these these two individuals. I can imagine Tom Waits hanging out at a carnival. I don't picture Rod Stewart kind. [30:47] Of roaming around a fairgrounds you know just soaking up the vibes and then although Tom Waits is a California guy he spent some years in New York you know recording these albums and exploring some new musical ideas. And so knowing that he was living in New York at the time, him mentioning the Brooklyn Girls and so on, like yeah, checks out. Somehow, I don't know, Rod Stewart in Brooklyn, kind of scrappy Rod Stewart, the performances is great and he delivers and so it's believable in that sense. But when you really kind of get in there and you take a close look at the lyrics, I don't I don't know if I'm buying. First of all, Rod Stewart, I'm always imagining a subway train rather than a commuter interstate train or whatever. Rod Stewart riding the F train or whatever in New York. I don't see it, let alone in Brooklyn. Frank: [31:51] Unless he like rent it out for himself and that's about it, right? Rich Terfry: [31:54] Yeah, right. Maybe. And then like I said, hanging out at the carnival grounds. Frank: [32:01] Yeah, right. Maybe. Rich Terfry: [32:01] You know, not so sure. But it is interesting. And to me, that's the one real Tom Waits tell in the lyrics, you know, because he had a thing for all things carnival. Frank: [32:09] Yeah. [32:13] Yeah. Well, and it comes through on that rain dogs album, too, because there's a lot of like carnival sounds on it right? Rich Terfry: [32:16] Yeah. [32:16] Oh, sure does. Yeah, absolutely. Bill: [32:19] And it's like the dark corners of a carnival, even though I imagine everything's circular in a carnival, but there's always darkness somewhere in a corner and there's Tom. Rich Terfry: [32:26] Oh, the sideshow is where that's where Tom's hanging out. Frank: [32:30] Yeah yeah yeah that's where the freak shows are yeah yeah yeah yeah. [32:40] The opening line is something that I really love. Outside of another yellow moon has punched a hole than a nighttime mist. And I like that. It's very similar to me to Bruce Coburn's Lovers in a Dangerous Time, where he says you got to kick at the darkness till it bleeds daylight. Like, it's very visceral, the lyric, and you can imagine it, you can see it happening, you can see an action actually happening, you can like see the moon punching through the miss or it's almost a violent act but there's beauty in that violence. Rich Terfry: [33:12] It's a beautiful line. I mean, there's real poetry in these lyrics, and I would say more so than your average pop song, even by 80s standards. And so I must say, for me, for as much as I admire Tom Waits as a pop song, to see a few times in his career, his songs being covered and being turned into hits, surprises me in a real pleasant way because you know often you don't get this level of poetry in a number one hit pop song. Maybe from a Bruce Coburn the odd person who's that kind of writer but and so maybe this really says something about you know Rod Stewart's talent that he's able to make something that you know might otherwise be utterly inaccessible for most people in Tom Wade's hands turns into as big a hit as it could possibly be in Rod Stewart's hands where everyone loves it. Yeah. Basically. Bill: [34:08] This is why I have no animosity to this song. Like I might make fun of Rod Stewart once in a while, but I will listen to this song the whole way through. And even those last 40 seconds. But there is something about him bringing Tom Waits to the masses. So for me as a kid, I didn't know Tom Waits. He was terrifying. There's a video with him on a tricycle and he had devil horns. Rich Terfry: [34:28] "I Don't Want To Grow Up." Bill: [34:30] It was on Much. Yeah, I did. I couldn't, I just turned the station. I couldn't watch that, but this I could. And then years later, when I grew up, sometime in my mid 30s, I finally was ready to listen to Rain Dogs. Like, oh wow, this is fantastic. But it really, if it wasn't for this, I wouldn't have got there. Rich Terfry: [34:48] Yeah. Maybe it's worth mentioning, I don't know about you, Frank, but I only, like you, I only became a Tom Waits fan later. I heard the Rod Stewart version first. I became familiar anyway with the Rod Stewart version before I did the Tom Waits version. Is that the same for you? Frank: [35:03] Oh, same here. Yeah, yeah. 100% I kind of knew who Tom weights was a little bit but really didn't get into understanding him. I don't still don't think I understand him. But but like, yeah, gaining an appreciation until our friend, Eric Stewart. Like, because he's such a big fan and like he plays stuff and he's just like, Oh, geez, this is good. And you listen to his like, Oh, geez, this is really good. So you start digging into it a little bit more. You were talking about that misheard lyric and there's another one. Rich Terfry: [35:17] But gaining some appreciation. Frank: [35:37] That in the Rod Stewart version, I always heard it as when I see you tonight on a downtown train. And that was a certainty. It's like when I see you because you're going to be there and I'm going to be there. But the line will I see you tonight? It just. Bill: [35:43] Yes. Frank: [35:52] Odd. It turns it right around on its head, right? And it just makes it even more sad I guess it's it's but it's so beautiful. Rich Terfry: [35:58] Right, more longing and... Bill: [36:10] Christmas night while I was listening to this song. I'm like, oh I kept hearing it seeing Will I'm like, no, it's gotta be when like you said I wrote down Rod Stewart's going to win the girl So when he sees her he's going to see her and they and they're going to be together if they're not already. Frank: [36:25] Yeah, it's a certainty. Rich Terfry: [36:26] Whereas with the Tom Waits version I absolutely assume he won't. Frank: [36:29] Yeah, well exactly. Bill: [36:31] Oh yeah, he's never talked to her. Rich Terfry: [36:32] Yeah, this is, there's much more distance. Bill: [36:45] So second verse, maybe second verse is short. The downtown trains are full, full of all them Brooklyn girls, trying so hard to break out of their little worlds. And then this line here kind of confuses me. You wave your hand and they scatter like crows. They have nothing that'll ever capture your heart. They're just thorns without the rose. Be careful of them in the dark. [37:39] Rod Stewart's pronunciation of dark really throws me off whenever I'm saying like he I kind of wish Trevor Horn's like no Could you say dark again? It's kind of a weird our thing going on, So who's scouring my crows? Are they the Brooklyn girls? Frank: [37:53] Yeah, I think so. Because they don't have anything to offer. That this is my take on it. Like, sorry, not that they don't have anything to offer. But there's nothing of interest to, him at that point, because he's, you know, looking for that girl that he's looking for on that downtown train. That's my take. I don't know, you guys? Rich Terfry: [38:15] I've always just loved the image and like you were saying with the first line of the song it just really conjures a strong image in my mind I've never really been able to get past that to even think about it too much I just love that image. Bill: [38:28] Rod Stewart said that Tom Waits can do imagery so well as a songwriter and then Rod Stewart's like, I have to work on that, which is classic Rod Stewart sort of like, I gotta work on that. Frank: [38:40] It's like I try. Bill: [38:40] And then he said, I just write from the heart. That's what I do. I'm like, you're such a... Frank: [38:44] This is why I love Rod Stewart so much because he's all feeling. That's all I am. Bill: [38:48] He's all feeling. But the thorns without the rose, it's such a great image. And I like what you say, that Rich is like, just the image being there is enough. Like I can't really pierce through it. There's a little bit of thorn imagery there, but I don't totally know, but that what he paints there, is something that's true. Frank: [39:09] Yeah. [39:09] Yeah. Yeah, yeah. Bill: [39:11] If that makes sense. And there's a little line before, if I was the one you chose to be your only one. [39:19] Oh baby, can you hear me now? Can you hear me now? Frank: [39:22] Oh yeah, yeah, yeah. Bill: [39:23] So with Ron Rod Stewart saying, Oh baby, it's not like Tom White saying, Oh baby, where it's just, let's sort of the walk away from it, but his old baby is like, okay so you're getting you're getting you're getting with it. Frank: [39:34] You're getting the girl. [39:48] Well then then you jump into the the the course, which is, you, know, will I see you tonight on a downtown train? Every night every night is just the same on a downtown train. I like I like it. It's it's a good little course. It does its job and everything and that question of will will I see you tonight? I really like that reading through the lyrics as opposed to listening to the lyrics and understanding what the actual lyric was it like you said it just adds that longing. Rich Terfry: [40:38] It's, in my experience, rare touching on what you just mentioned, Frank, where reading the lyrics of a pop song gives you a whole other rewarding experience often. Otherwise, with a lot of pop songs, it really does nothing to heighten your experience of it. If anything, it might even drag it down. It's like, oh, these lyrics are terrible. Frank: [41:00] Yeah. Rich Terfry: [41:00] It's all just, a lot of songs are just carried by the melody. And the melody of this song is very, very strong as well. and I think that's what makes, I think you could argue anyhow, the chorus of this song memorable is the melody of it is so great. But it's true that there's a lot of people out there don't even really pay a lot of attention to lyrics, but if you're one such person and you do decide one day to look them up and, you read them, you're going to be floored. Whereas a lot of pop songs, they're not really going to give you a lot to sink your teeth but there's a lot going on here. Frank: [41:31] Well, I mean, you would have been similar to us like today, like with everything streaming and all of that. You just listen to songs. But when I was really getting into music in the 90s, you had CDs and you had CD cases. And that was my favorite thing to do was open up, check out the artwork and follow along with the lyrics, with the songs and then try and experience them that way. And you're absolutely right. you gain a better appreciation of the song. Rich Terfry: [41:58] And I think that, you know, I lament that a little bit for, you know, sort of younger generations today. Although it's easy enough, you know, everything's on online, it's easy enough to Google lyrics, but it's not always necessarily a part of the experience when you're streaming. It's not right there like it is if you're, you know, kind of, you know, playing a CD and you have the case in your hands or for that matter, you know, on an LP or something like that. There's that function if you're using Apple Music where if you, you know, tap a couple things and you can bring up the lyrics, but it's sort of a little bit of effort to do. But I sometimes wonder if young people are really, you know, spending time with lyrics of songs the way we used to automatically because the experience you described I think was a fairly universal one. I think everyone loved doing that. Frank: [42:46] Yeah, yeah, yeah. And there was always the because there are different types of CD cases to like there's the there's the book, then there's the ones that would just fold out lengthwise. Rich Terfry: [42:55] Fold. [42:55] Poster, sure. Never get it right. Frank: [42:56] And then there was the ones that folded out almost into a poster and then trying to fold those back where it was just terrible. Bill: [43:02] "Fully Completely." I remember looking like what? Oh, come on. That's not how you put lyrics on a sheet Don't be crazy and then REM would come out with like a booklet and then you just realize they're Michael Stipe pictures and that. Frank: [43:08] Yeah. Bill: [43:14] Made me so angry. We're like you could have put the lyrics on I still don't know what you're saying. Rich Terfry: [43:19] I don't think he wanted you to know what he was saying, But that's a whole other discussion right there. Bill: [43:22] Yeah, yeah. Frank: [43:24] Well, I bet the there's the third verse we can we can go we talked about it a little bit but it's like the I know your window and I know it's late. Bill: [43:26] Alright Frank, we hitting every single lyric on this song? Frank: [43:38] I know your stairs and your doorway, which I think could be taken as creepy. But again, there's, there's from Tom Waits, like from his perspective, it's like, I don't find it creepy. find it sad. [44:23] Yeah, he's because he's going there and he's. Bill: [44:25] It makes me think a little bit of Taxi Driver, a little bit, which is a little more creepy. But when Rod Stewart says it, I'm like, well, of course, because he's going there. to date her, yeah. Rich Terfry: [45:07] Now, in my mind, I see those lines, that verse. And it adds a little intrigue to the song, because I start to wonder, oh, is there actually a bit of an established relationship here? He's been to her house. Maybe there's more going on in this relationship than first meets the eye. Maybe. It's just, in my mind, raised as a question. Could go either way. Maybe there's more familiarity there there than we've been led to believe to this point or yeah there it is a little creepier than we first thought where he's you know the creepin' is going beyond the train and it's you know. Frank: [45:49] So we kind of talked about this a little bit before when we were listening to the song, but but what's your favorite part in the song? the Rod Stewart version. Rich Terfry: [46:00] Well I'll say something controversial okay and let me give you a little context before I say this, I'm dropping a bomb here. I know you know this, but I'm a Tom Waits fan. And I like a lot of his recent work. Although I would probably say my three favorite, Tom Waits albums is this trilogy that is sort of before us here today, Rain Dogs, Swordfishtrombones, and Frank's Wild Years. Frank: [46:32] Which I don't think he really captured all of my wild years in that album, but you know. Rich Terfry: [46:37] Who could? No, really. In one album. But I'm the type of guy, the weirder Tom Waits gets, the more I like him. And if I was listening to, I hate to say this, but if I'm listening to Rain Dogs in the car, there might be days where a downtown train comes on. I might skip it. Bill: [47:01] This is shocking. Rich Terfry: [47:03] So, where I'm going with this, my point is, me being the kind of music listener that I am, for as strange as it is, the unusual coda at the end of Rod Stewart's version is where it starts to get interesting for me. It's like, oh, what's going on here? He's got a little trick up his sleeve here. He's not the one trick pony that maybe you might, paint him as. It's like, oh, now wait a minute. And was he inspired by Tom Waits to, you know, kind of explore some more interesting terrain at the end of the song. And maybe it's safer to kind of put it at the end. But I get excited when something makes me raise an eyebrow a little bit. I like when someone's willing to go there a little bit or experiment a bit. So although I can appreciate what, he did with the song, where he took it, that he turned it into a hit, it's interesting to compare in contrast his voice, his vocal chops to Tom Waits. But I'm actually intrigued. If Rod Stewart walked in the door right now, and I could ask him one question about the song, I'd be like, what's the deal with the outro on the song? To me, that's super interesting. Frank: [48:11] Yeah, okay, cool. Bill: [48:39] Most controversial moment in our podcast history. I think there no one has ever picked the the final coda Yeah, my favorite part of the rod stewart song is the party's not singing. Rich Terfry: [48:50] Well, how do you like them apples? Bill: [48:51] Let's do that. Yeah. Frank: [48:53] Well, that's my favorite part, too, except it's that musical bridge. Bill: [48:56] Oh, wow. [48:56] Okay, oh, is it after the carnival and heart attacks? is that rhythm? Okay. Frank: [49:01] Yeah, yeah, yeah, because there's a like a 30 second bridge there and the guitars coming in and it's a little orchestral and cinematic. And like it was always climbing, climbing, climbing. but that's when it gets steep. Rich Terfry: [49:09] Yeah, sure, absolutely. [49:14] And I should also mention, I'm a big time Jeff Beck Yardbirds fan. In terms of pure riffage, I'd probably pick him over a lot of guys, if not everybody. And so his inclusion on the song, that's pretty cool to me as well. Yeah. Frank: [49:58] Bill, favorite part? Bill: [49:59] I gotta say, when he says, oh baby, can you hear me now? Can you hear me now? I think that really is it. I just assumed he said it over and over throughout the song. He must have. Yeah, I like the Rod Stewart-isms. Yeah. Frank: [50:12] Yeah, yeah, yeah. Well, it makes it his own. Rich Terfry: [50:13] And that's exactly what I was about to say. Yeah, that's that right there is where he... It's interesting the story you were telling when he was first listening to it and there a moment came where he felt that he was taking ownership of the the song and right there is where he sort of delivered on that promise. Frank: [50:33] So we usually jump into categories towards the towards the last third of the podcast. So I've prepared rich. Should we do our mixtapes? You have a mixtape? I'm gonna let you guys go first and then I'll finish things off I have about 12 songs that I potentially. Bill: [50:42] Oh, good. Yeah. [50:50] Oh, wow. Okay, I got a low list, but I like a guest going first. And we didn't mention this at the beginning, but Richard Fry's, AKA Buck65 for listeners, especially our Canadian listeners who will know. And so when I hear the word mixtape, I know, you know, not like I'm intimidated in a good way. Rich Terfry: [51:10] Well, and although I had a little known fact, I too covered a Tom Waits song once. I should say maybe more than once, but in 99 I released an album called Man Overboard and the original, it might be most fair to say demo version of that album, included a, cover of Singapore by Tom Waits, which didn't make the final cut of the album. And then live, I used to do a very deep cut Tom Wait song, called Tabletop Joe. But anyhow, yes, this is my whole thing, putting these mixed tapes together. And so I gave it some thought. Should we jump into it here? I find it, I bet you guys have found the same thing, is that this song, Rod Stewart's version of this song, routinely pops up on these lists, a bunch of them, on the internet of songs you didn't know were covers. Now to me, that's an interesting enough category. God knows I've talked about that sort of thing on my radio show plenty. But with this particular case, there's more to it than just that. I think it fits into an even smaller category. And I wish there was more of this, where you have here. [52:32] Big-time bonafide mainstream pop star bringing into you know the spotlight and the mainstream consciousness what at best we might call sort of a cult figure. [52:50] Right? Tom Waits I mean you know he's not nobody but in in particular when we're looking at an album like Rain Dogs you know you ask the next person that walks down the street hey ever heard Rain Dogs? I'll put 50 bucks on them saying no. So know he's he's not I don't know if you could call Tom Waits a household name. I think of him in, particular the parts of his catalog that I love the most. To me I almost think of him as an underground type character, certainly a cult figure, and if not in the strictest definition of it, if you look at his body of work and maybe what inspired him and what he was interested in he's He's certainly coming from the deeps, you know what I mean? So maybe at best you could argue that he was an experimenter and whatever else who had more success with it than a lot of others. But nevertheless, I think that here we have a case where sort of, I'm trying to think of the most fair word I can use, but maybe a slightly more fringy musician is being brought into the mainstream. because a lot of the other songs that you would find on those lists of songs you didn't know were covers aren't necessarily that. I'm trying to think of a good example, but if you look at. [54:12] I Love Rock and Roll by Joan Jett, the Arrows, who wrote and recorded the original version, were a fairly successful band in their own right. And you see a lot of that on those sorts of lists. So this situation got me thinking of other cases where this was the case. case and I really wish that there were more examples of it because to me it's super interesting and exciting and more often you see it the other way around where and hopefully this isn't too, flippant a way to put it but where like an indie band will do kind of an ironic cover of some big, pop it that happens all the time sometimes it makes me roll my eyes but this is much more interesting and and the stakes are a little higher where a big time pop star will take a more obscure fringy, culty, whatever, however you want to describe it, person and cover them. So I came up with a couple examples and I don't know if they're quite as strong as today's example but I'll throw out there and this one is very similar parallel I would say Eric Clapton's version of Cocaine by JJ Kale. [55:23] JJ Cale, if you're going to compare anyone to Tom Waits, you know, if you're going to put anyone else in a category, maybe it's a guy like JJ Cale and Rod Stewart and Eric Clapton. I mean, not that, far off, right? So it's a very, very close, you know, kind of thing. Now, I don't know if you, know that The Tide is High by Blondie is a cover, but the original version of that song was by a, relatively small, certainly on an international level. [55:58] It was a Jamaican band called the Paragons, and I don't think they really had any success outside of Jamaica at all. Bill: [56:03] Wow, okay, I didn't know this either. Rich Terfry: [56:05] Really super interesting to me that the guys in Blondie even knew this song. Someone would really have to know their stuff, to know the Paragons and maybe this song in particular. To my knowledge, and I could be wrong about this, have to look it up but I don't even know I have the out the Paragon's album I don't know if their version was even ever released as a single so to me it extra super interesting maybe a real classic and one that does turn up on these lists fairly often the birds version of turn turn turn or whatever by, Pete Seeger right so you're taking something from a you know I guess a slightly more fringy genre, you know, kind of deep folk music and turning it into a big pop hit. I got a couple other good ones. This one is another fairly well-known case, but Roberta Flax, Killing Me Softly, is a cover of an extremely little-known song. What's her name? Lori Lieberman, I think, who originally, you know, singer, LA singer-songwriter, kind of played at the Troubadour, it never really became famous. The story goes that Roberta Flack just heard it, kind of on a total fluke and loved it. And then of course there's the whole other wave, the Fugees, Yeah. covering it again decades later and making it a hit all over again. Frank: [57:29] Because I remember we did, I forget which song it was, but it was a cover song. And then I said, you know, famous cover songs, where the the cover is more popular than the original. And I said, Fuji is covering Roberta Flack. And then afterwards, finding out that it was Laura Lieberman or just, I was wrong on the podcast. And that never happens. I've never said anything that was infactual on the podcast. Rich Terfry: [57:53] Yeah, yeah, yeah, sure. Bill: [57:55] Yeah, we can insert it. Don't worry. No one will know. Rich Terfry: [57:59] I'll throw out one more for you and then I'll and then I'll pass the mic as you. [58:05] Will. No, no, no. But and this one is a little more obscure, but a great example of what I'm talking about, I suppose. But What a Man by Salt and Pepper is, basically a cover. You might argue that it's like an interpretation, but it's, pretty darn close to a cover of a sort of a soul song by a woman named Linda Lindell. Let me double check that. I did write it down because I want to be sure, but I'm pretty sure it's Linda Lindell. Yes, Linda Lindell. It was just released as a 45, just sort of a one-off single. I don't even know if Linda Lindell ever recorded a full-length album. So not well-known, pretty obscure figure, of course. and Salt and Pepper had a bunch of hits. That might have been their biggest one. That was a big old hit. So, and you know, certainly another case where songs you didn't know were covers. And super interesting that, you know, this one sort of turns the tables a little bit in that, you know, we're talking about what was like, you know, kind of a soul song. Fairly sort of, you know, mainstream in its presentation, but then here's a hip hop group doing it. That in itself is a bit of a rarity, a hip hop group kind of taking on a cover. [59:26] But nevertheless, at this point in their career, Sal and Pepper, they were big pop stars, very well established, and like I said, they turned that into a big hit. So that was the first thing that popped into mind for me was, again, I don't know if it's the exact right word, but fringier artists being brought into the mainstream with a cover, because that doesn't happen a lot. In fact, those were really the only examples of that that I could find. I'm sure there are more, and if anyone can think of more, I'd love to hear them, because this is the sort of thing that really excites me. Frank: [1:00:01] Right into the right please someone write us please someone tell us something yeah but it's really cool because there's all sorts of like musical gems out there that no one knows about. Rich Terfry: [1:00:04] Yes. Drop us a line. Frank: [1:00:16] Like or sorry I shouldn't say no one but there it's not as well known and then these pop stars are are bringing them out to the forefront. And sometimes these artists can gain a second life because of it. Rich Terfry: [1:00:29] Now in the early days of rock and roll, this happened all the time, of course, right? So you think like Elvis doing, well practically every song Elvis did the early days of his career was a cover of a song recorded by some lesser known, usually a blues artist or R&B artist or something like that. But I digress. Bill: [1:00:49] I gotta say this is a big moment for me just as a radio listener because Rich Terfry does the (is it called the drive?) from about (is it three to seven?) okay so three to seven on CBC Radio Two. Rich Terfry: [1:00:57] Yeah. Bill: [1:01:03] And i would listen to it around i think is it around six o'clock that you would do the deep dive like on a friday or is it okay last hour of the show and there'd be this deep dive and. Rich Terfry: [1:01:09] Yeah, right. last hour of the show. Bill: [1:01:14] And it was my favorite part. And so- Well, the stories. Oh, it is great. Frank: [1:01:15] Oh yeah. Well the stories. Bill: [1:01:18] And so even if it was having a bad day at work and I knew I had to be leaving at six to go home, but I knew I could get this. And that was like my favorite part of the show. So I always wanted to find these deep dives. Like, so the one day you did a deep dive, on a tragically hip album, because you did every album. That's right. And so it was on Phantom Power and I was, didn't want to come out of the car, because I knew I wouldn't be able to find it because I'm like, there's gotta be, so I go online, rich to fry deep dives, like they're not available, I want like, you know, maybe a box set, it would be great for me personally or for the world, but we just got our own personal deep dive. Frank: [1:01:54] Yeah, which is fantastic. Rich Terfry: [1:01:55] Yeah, man. Bill: [1:01:56] Yeah, so that leads to my couple songs. I may be jumping on Frank's toes here, maybe, but because we think similarly, and this was the easiest way to do this, was originally I was thinking of train songs, But then I thought of songs that were like the vibe in Tom Waits, but then were covered so that they were kind of cheesier, but I couldn't, it wasn't coming up for me. So I ended up thinking of a couple train songs that were so similar. Because we were 12, I only have like three. So the most obvious one for me is Downbound Train by Bruce Springsteen, because it sounds so similar, downbound and downtown. And there's that longing and depression within the song that is kind of in the Tom Waits song. Well, there's something more joyous, even in the Tom Waits version, compared to the Bruce Springsteen. [1:02:55] But thinking of Rod Stewart's cover as very Rod Stewart, this is almost like Bruce Springsteen going, more Bruce Springsteen than usual to me in the song. Like sometimes he mutters his lines in a way that Ben Stiller would imitate Bruce Springsteen. So I liked the song. And so that was one. There was another one called Downbound Train by Chuck Berry, which was about the devil taking a guy to hell. Okay. And then there was another one called Night Train. There's a Bruce Cockburn one, which I love, but I went with the James Brown version because it was a bit more upbeat. Frank: [1:03:28] So I went straight planes trains and automobiles. That's the theme of my of my uh, well, it's modes of transportation. Bicycle Race by Queen. This has nothing to do with any sort of feel. It's just this is the theme. Modes of transportation. Fast Car by Tracy Chapman. Oh, I know right. Rich Terfry: [1:03:47] Modes of transport. Bill: [1:03:48] So, I'm going to go ahead and do a little bit of a, That's okay. Frank: [1:03:54] Midnight train to Georgia, Gladys Knight in the Pips, Pink Cadillac, Bruce Springsteen. Bill: [1:04:00] Very good. Frank: [1:04:02] Runaway Train, Soul Asylum, Aeroplane by Bjork, Get Out of My Dreams Get Into My Car by Billy Ocean, and then we are going to finish it off with Hands by Jewel. Bill: [1:04:16] Oh, no, no. You don't, that's not funny. And no, you don't walk in your hands somewhere. No, not funny. No. Frank: [1:04:17] Okay, okay, we won't put jewel on we'll put Train In Vain by The Clash. Rich Terfry: [1:04:26] You. Bill: [1:04:33] That's a good call. We haven't talked about another iconic performer we bring up most episodes. Frank: [1:04:40] The patron saint of Bill and Frank's Guilt-Free Pleasures. Yeah. Rich, your opinion. Could Michael Bolton sing this song? Rich Terfry: [1:04:48] Hmm oh downtown train yes I think so. Frank: [1:04:53] I think so, too. Rich Terfry: [1:04:54] I feel like I didn't even need to think about it long I can hear it in his voice almost immediately. Frank: [1:04:59] Especially at the end, like after that bridge that when when he's just repeating the chorus at the end, and he just sort of brings it up. That's when Michael Bolton destroys the world though, though, where he goes full Bolton and just ends the world. Bill: [1:05:11] Oh, yeah, and that Michael Bolton in 1989 is is a then is that when we got? Frank: [1:05:17] Oh, this is right in the that's right in the meat of the Michael Bolton sandwich. So I have in front of me here the the Grammys, for best male pop vocal performance, because Downtown Train was nominated in 1991. Lost to Roy Orbison's Pretty, woman. But Michael Bolton was on that list, Georgia on my mind. The year before Michael Bolton won for How Am I Supposed to Live Without You. The subsequent year, Michael Bolton wins 1992 for, When a Man Loves a Woman. But I'm looking at the list of the. Rich Terfry: [1:05:52] Right. How could he not? Frank: [1:05:56] Songs that were nominated in 91. Oh my goodness, how do you pick? So Roy Orbison wins for Pretty Woman. Another Day in Paradise, Phil Collins, Georgia on my mind, Michael Bolton. I Don't Have the heart James Ingram who's critically under appreciated in my mind Stormfront by Billy Joel and then Downtown Train by Rod Stewart 1991 I think was I think. Bill: [1:06:18] 1991? I thought this song came out in 89. Frank: [1:06:22] Was released in 90. Bill: [1:06:24] Oh right, because they would release it for so long. I got this all wrong. Rich Terfry: [1:06:27] Grammys are often, you know, a little behind. Bill: [1:06:29] Oh yeah, yeah sure. Yeah, that's right. So this comes out in 1990. Oh wow, I gotta to re- rethink about how I heard the song for the first time. I'm 14 then. That's a whole other world. Frank: [1:06:38] Yeah, that's a that's a different world. [1:06:40] Anyways, yeah, 100%. This could have been a Michael Bolton song. Could this be a Hallmark movie? Could easily become a creepy Hallmark movie. Bill: [1:06:51] Hallmark after dark. Rich Terfry: [1:06:52] Does Hallmark do creepy movies? Frank: [1:06:56] Yeah, I don't like them. Rich Terfry: [1:06:59] I mean, you know, there's some sort of romance, obviously, at the heart of this thing. So from that standpoint, like I said, if you went with the interpretation I've had where the third verse comes along, you think, oh, wait a minute, maybe these people, maybe these two know each other. Maybe it's the early days of a relationship or something, you know, in which case, maybe. But I'm with you in that, you know, it's more Scorsese, even, but Taxi Driver vibes, that hallmark. And if a hallmark movie set in New York, you know, it's like. Bill: [1:07:28] Yeah, I don't think that downtown train is taking them out to the country to like find themselves. Frank: [1:07:33] No, exactly. Rich Terfry: [1:07:38] Upper West Side, not Brooklyn. Frank: [1:07:40] Yeah, yeah. What other categories do we have? Bill: [1:07:44] You know. [1:07:44] I just thought out the top of my head when I was listening to the ending that you could do a pretty good floor routine To this song with that final moments. Yeah. Oh no with the with the thing with the. Rich Terfry: [1:07:54] Rhythmic gymnastics. [1:07:55] Yeah. Bill: [1:07:55] With the yeah yeah rhythmic gymnastics would work especially at the final moments where everyone's watching them the final sway. Rich Terfry: [1:08:01] And you're thinking just based on the gestures I'm seeing here, the ribbon. Bill: [1:08:04] Yeah it's all ribbon yeah yeah maybe some leaping it could be yeah I don't. Rich Terfry: [1:08:06] Yeah. It's all ribbon. Okay. [1:08:10] Maybe something like that. Thank you. Bill: [1:08:12] Know why I do this on a podcast but I'm I sometimes will talk with my hands yeah. Frank: [1:08:15] Can see if you can see Bill right now he's he's rhythmically flailing his arms about. Bill: [1:08:19] Yeah, yeah, yeah. Frank: [1:08:38] So we're bringing the the episode to a close and rich we just yeah thanks so much for bringing yourself and your knowledge and the insight not just to the song but musically in general and most especially telling us what a bridge is so that ended, over a year long debate in our minds. Rich Terfry: [1:08:58] I almost hate to ruin it for you, but this is fun. Have me by again sometime. I'd love to. Frank: [1:09:04] This would be fantastic. Yeah. And we want to thank the listeners for sticking it out right to the end. And, you know, we know you have it on your phones and on your computers and all that other sort of stuff. And you listen to it to the podcast wherever you are. And just wondering, will we see you tonight on a downtown train? Bill: [1:09:29] Thank you for listening to Bill and Frank's Guilt-Free Pleasures.  

Big Fat Five: A Podcast Financially Supported by Big Fat Snare Drum
Stacy Jones' (Miley Cyrus, American Hi-Fi, Matchbox Twenty) Top 5 Influential Records

Big Fat Five: A Podcast Financially Supported by Big Fat Snare Drum

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 61:04


This week's guest is Stacy Jones … a hell of a drummer, front man, guitarist, singer, producer and musical director. He is currently the musical director AND drummer for Miley Cyrus, the primary songwriter / singer / rhythm guitarist for American Hi-Fi and the drummer for Matchbox Twenty and Letters to Cleo. As a Musical Director, he's also worked with Olivia Rodrigo, Demi Lovato, The Chainsmokers, Logic and Ryan Tedder, Noah Cyrus, Troye Sivan, 5 Seconds of Summer, Broods and many more. And to list off a few more names he's worked with- Veruca Salt, Madonna, Everclear, Avril Lavigne, Ariana Grande, Joan Jett, The Flaming Lips, Sheryl Crow, Butch Walker…I mean…yeah. Get out your notepads for this one ya'll. This dude not only HOLDS the drum seat, but he HIRES drummers so he knows what works and what WILL GET YOU PAID. SORRY FOR THE CAPS! I can't say enough good things about him. Please enjoy the 5 records that shaped Stacy Jones into the drummer he is today.  For more information on Big Fat Snare Drum, check out www.bigfatsnaredrum.com and follow us on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and TikTok.

F-Stop Collaborate and Listen - A Landscape Photography Podcast
298: Matt Palmer - 2019 Australian Photographer of the Year

F-Stop Collaborate and Listen - A Landscape Photography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 75:50 Very Popular


It is often the ultimate dream for nature and landscape photographers to open and run their own gallery and doing so is often filled with a heap of questions that don't always have easy answers. Talking about these realities with photographers that have already gone down this path is one way to learn more about it before investing tens of thousands of dollars on your own gallery opening. This week on the podcast I was joined by Aussie photographer Matt Palmer. Matt was the Australian Professional Photographer of the Year in 2019 and won the Natural Landscape Photography Awards Project in 2021. Before entering the landscape scene, Matt previously photographed in commercial, portrait, wedding, sporting and music genres. Matt was documenting some of the world's biggest musicians such as Metallica, Pearl Jam, TOOL, Nick Cave, Joan Jett and hundreds more. His work is usually instilled with a strong sense of justice and spans several genres. He lives in Bright, Australia, where he runs a gallery with his partner, Mieke Boynton. Matt and I had a great chat covering a wide variety of subjects, so sit back, relax, and enjoy our conversation. On this week's episode, we discuss: Matt's journey into landscape photography, Matt's rough childhood and how it shaped him as a photographer, Photographing in projects, Choosing and submitting photographs and projects to competitions, Judging competitions, How to handle negativity, Running a landscape photography gallery, Business models for galleries, Pricing work for a gallery, Matt's YouTube channel, Matt Talks Photography, And a lot more! Other topics/links discussed on the podcast this week: Support the podcast on Patreon. Join me over on Nature Photographer's Network and use the code "FSTOP10" for a 10% discount! Matt & Mieke's Gallery, Alpine Light. Wirestock. Natural Landscape Photography Awards. Join us on Patreon for our bonus conversation where Matt and I discuss Visual Hierarchies and composition. Here is who Matt recommended on the podcast this week: Mieke Boynton. Paul Hoelen. Ricardo Da Cunha. Chris Saunders. Tony Hewitt. I love hearing from the podcast listeners! Reach out to me via Instagram, Facebook, or Twitter if you'd like to be on the podcast or if you have an idea of a topic we can talk about. We also have an Instagram page, a Facebook Page, and a Facebook Group - so don't be shy! We also have a searchable transcript of every episode! Thanks for stopping in, collaborating with us, and listening. See you next week. P.S. you can also support the podcast by purchasing items through our B+H affiliate link.

Get Judged!
Episode #109 - Lady & The Tramp (The Brady Bellychick story)

Get Judged!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 63:17


Shakey takes his shot and it bleeds like a girl becoming a woman,  the fitness challenge month of January, contention in the ranks, handful of Lindor's for a midnight shake, gave ourselves diabeeedus, how far you are from your dick is your indicator of how fat you are, moving motivation, Joan Jett came to make logs and given knives without pennies, Christmas story movie 3rd, Christmas tranny, does anyone on this podcast follow any advice? Joan Jett's best advice - Cook Clean and Dance, Shakey did the splits - yup he did, try this just snort it, you should go for a drink, sleep every year at NYE, blow for the weekend? Belize trip, 2 are dead, 120k in lawyer help, coke smoke meth, whisky and blood on the white shirt out, Sup Essay, don't be a Narc, Shakey - D Trump, Richard Simmons, Britney Spears. Jakey - Bob Barker, Clint Eastwood, Jimmy Carter - Jakey - Phillie - Shakey - Bengals - Shakey - Colorado - Jakey - Tampa Bay - Jake - Cardinals - Shakey - Padres - Shakey - Bennifer Break Up - Jakey - Ryan and Blakley - Jake - PGA demise to LIV - Shakey - NFL broke wide open with insider better with owners - Shakey - Asia is gonna get a massive avalanche or tsunami - Jakey - record amount of tornadoes category five - JOW - just sank and didn't swim - Shakey killed mom holding hands, control the speed or snap the neck, 14 year old in sweatpants, Confused yet?If you like to  judge us just by listening - you should really go over to the Tick Tock and watch us make a fool of our selves. @getjudgedpodcast on all platforms. Dust off those gavels and get judging.  Comment, subscribe, DM, wave, poke, like, send nudes - whatever you want to do - just do something you lazy POS

RTL2 : Pop Rock Party
MIX4 - Joan Jett, The Weeknd, The Jam dans RTL2 Pop-Rock Party (31/12/22)

RTL2 : Pop Rock Party

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 121:47


Joan Jett Vs Queen - I Love Rock And Roll Vs We Will Rock You The Weeknd - Sacrifice Lizzo - About Damn Time Gayle - Abcdefu Ed Sheeran - Celestial Kate bush - Running Up That Hill (Jet Boot Jack Remix) Dermot Kennedy - Kiss Me Moby & Nicola Sirkis - This Is Not Our World (Ce N'Est Pas Notre Monde) George Ezra - Green Green Grass (Sam Feldt Remix) Calvin Harris & Justin Timberlake & Pharrell Williams - Stay With Me (Kenwork Nu Disco Mix) Maneskin - Supermodel Lewis Capaldi - Forget Me (Remix) Imagine Dragons - Sharks Eurythmics - Sweet Dreams (Steve Angello Remix) Depeche Mode - Just Can't Get Enough Yazoo - Don't Go The Human League - Don't You Want Me Frankie Goes to Hollywood - Relax Softcell - Tainted Love OMD - Enola Gaye Ed Sheeran - Shivers OneRepublic - I Ain't Worried Lil Nas X - Star Walkin' The Weeknd - Less Than Zero Pink - Irrelevant Elton John & Dua Lipa - Cold Heart (Pnau Remix) Lizzo - Juice [...]

Bonus Track Sonar
Heroínas del rock

Bonus Track Sonar

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 51:45


En el cumpleaños 76 de Patti Smith, Alfredo Lewin recuerda a la la "madrina del punk" repasando a grandes heroínas de la música y el rock: Blondie, Heart, Joan Jett y muchas más.

Arroe Collins
Marc Myers Releases The Book Anatomy Of 55 More Songs

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 9:49


Following his 2016 smash hit Anatomy of a Song, hailed by the Los Angeles Times as "a first-rate playlist.A rich history of both the music industry and the baby boomer era," acclaimed music journalist Marc Myers collects fifty-five new oral histories of iconic songs based on his popular Wall Street Journal column in ANATOMY OF 55 MORE SONGS: The Oral History of Top Hits that Changed Rock, R&B, and Soul (Grove Press; Pub Date: December 6, 2022; $27 hardcover; ISBN-13: 978-0-8021-6020-1). Songs that sell the most copies become hits, but some of those hits become something more-iconic recordings that not only inspire a generation but also change the direction of music. In ANATOMY OF 55 MORE SONGS, music journalist and historian Marc Myers tells the story behind fifty-five rock, pop, R&B, country, and soul-gospel hits through intimate interviews with the artists who wrote and recorded them. Part oral history, part musical analysis, ANATOMY OF 55 MORE SONGS ranges from Creedence Clearwater Revival's "Bad Moon Rising" to Dionne Warwick's "Walk On By," The Beach Boys' "Good Vibrations," and Black Sabbath's "Paranoid." Bernie Taupin recalls how he wrote the lyrics to Elton John's "Rocket Man;" Joan Jett remembers channeling her rage against how she had been unfairly labeled and treated as a female rocker into "Bad Reputation;" and Ozzy Osbourne, Elvis Costello, Bob Weir, Sheryl Crow, Alice Cooper, Roberta Flack, John Mellencamp, Keith Richards, Carly Simon, and many others reveal the emotions and technique behind their major works. Through an absorbing chronological, song-by-song analysis of the most memorable post-war hits, ANATOMY OF 55 MORE SONGS provides a sweeping look at the evolution of pop music between 1964 and today. This book will change how you listen to music and evaluate the artists who create it.

Arroe Collins Like It's Live
Marc Myers Releases The Book Anatomy Of 55 More Songs

Arroe Collins Like It's Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 9:49


Following his 2016 smash hit Anatomy of a Song, hailed by the Los Angeles Times as "a first-rate playlist.A rich history of both the music industry and the baby boomer era," acclaimed music journalist Marc Myers collects fifty-five new oral histories of iconic songs based on his popular Wall Street Journal column in ANATOMY OF 55 MORE SONGS: The Oral History of Top Hits that Changed Rock, R&B, and Soul (Grove Press; Pub Date: December 6, 2022; $27 hardcover; ISBN-13: 978-0-8021-6020-1). Songs that sell the most copies become hits, but some of those hits become something more-iconic recordings that not only inspire a generation but also change the direction of music. In ANATOMY OF 55 MORE SONGS, music journalist and historian Marc Myers tells the story behind fifty-five rock, pop, R&B, country, and soul-gospel hits through intimate interviews with the artists who wrote and recorded them. Part oral history, part musical analysis, ANATOMY OF 55 MORE SONGS ranges from Creedence Clearwater Revival's "Bad Moon Rising" to Dionne Warwick's "Walk On By," The Beach Boys' "Good Vibrations," and Black Sabbath's "Paranoid." Bernie Taupin recalls how he wrote the lyrics to Elton John's "Rocket Man;" Joan Jett remembers channeling her rage against how she had been unfairly labeled and treated as a female rocker into "Bad Reputation;" and Ozzy Osbourne, Elvis Costello, Bob Weir, Sheryl Crow, Alice Cooper, Roberta Flack, John Mellencamp, Keith Richards, Carly Simon, and many others reveal the emotions and technique behind their major works. Through an absorbing chronological, song-by-song analysis of the most memorable post-war hits, ANATOMY OF 55 MORE SONGS provides a sweeping look at the evolution of pop music between 1964 and today. This book will change how you listen to music and evaluate the artists who create it.

Music Buzzz Podcast
Ep. 56: Kasim Sulton (Utopia, Meat Loaf, Joan Jett, Todd Rundgren & more)

Music Buzzz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 40:48


ABOUT KASIM SULTON:Bassist, keyboardist & vocalist Kasim Sulton. Best known for his work with the band Utopia where Sulton sang lead on 1980's "Set Me Free," Utopia's only top 40 hit in the U.S. and as a solo artist, Sulton hit the Canadian top 40 in 1982 with "Don't Break My Heart".Sulton has been a frequent collaborator, bassist and singer on many of Todd Rundgren's projects and solo tours, was a member of Joan Jett and the Blackhearts in the late 80's and has also toured or recorded with Blue Oyster Cult, Meat Loaf, Hall & Oates, Cheap Trick, Patty Smyth, Indigo Girls, Steve Stevens, Richie Sambora & Patti Smith among others. ABOUT THE PODCAST:Candid discussions with and about those behind the scenes in the music business including industry veterans representing the segments of: Musician, Design & LiveABOUT THE HOSTS:All three Music Buzzz Podcast hosts (Dane Clark, Hugh Syme and Andy Wilson) have spent their careers working with the biggest names in entertainment and have been, and still are, a fly on the wall.

Arroe Collins
Marc Myers Releases The Book Anatomy Of 55 More Songs

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 9:49


Following his 2016 smash hit Anatomy of a Song, hailed by the Los Angeles Times as "a first-rate playlist.A rich history of both the music industry and the baby boomer era," acclaimed music journalist Marc Myers collects fifty-five new oral histories of iconic songs based on his popular Wall Street Journal column in ANATOMY OF 55 MORE SONGS: The Oral History of Top Hits that Changed Rock, R&B, and Soul (Grove Press; Pub Date: December 6, 2022; $27 hardcover; ISBN-13: 978-0-8021-6020-1). Songs that sell the most copies become hits, but some of those hits become something more-iconic recordings that not only inspire a generation but also change the direction of music. In ANATOMY OF 55 MORE SONGS, music journalist and historian Marc Myers tells the story behind fifty-five rock, pop, R&B, country, and soul-gospel hits through intimate interviews with the artists who wrote and recorded them. Part oral history, part musical analysis, ANATOMY OF 55 MORE SONGS ranges from Creedence Clearwater Revival's "Bad Moon Rising" to Dionne Warwick's "Walk On By," The Beach Boys' "Good Vibrations," and Black Sabbath's "Paranoid." Bernie Taupin recalls how he wrote the lyrics to Elton John's "Rocket Man;" Joan Jett remembers channeling her rage against how she had been unfairly labeled and treated as a female rocker into "Bad Reputation;" and Ozzy Osbourne, Elvis Costello, Bob Weir, Sheryl Crow, Alice Cooper, Roberta Flack, John Mellencamp, Keith Richards, Carly Simon, and many others reveal the emotions and technique behind their major works. Through an absorbing chronological, song-by-song analysis of the most memorable post-war hits, ANATOMY OF 55 MORE SONGS provides a sweeping look at the evolution of pop music between 1964 and today. This book will change how you listen to music and evaluate the artists who create it.

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Music Buzzz Ep. 56: Kasim Sulton (Utopia, Meat Loaf, Joan Jett, Todd Rundgren & more)

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 40:48


ABOUT KASIM SULTON:Bassist, keyboardist & vocalist Kasim Sulton.Best known for his work with the band Utopia where Sulton sang lead on 1980's "Set Me Free," Utopia's only top 40 hit in the U.S. and as a solo artist, Sulton hit the Canadian top 40 in 1982 with "Don't Break My Heart".Sulton has been a frequent collaborator, bassist and singer on many of Todd Rundgren's projects and solo tours, was a member of Joan Jett and the Blackhearts in the late 80's and has also toured or recorded with Blue Oyster Cult, Meat Loaf, Hall & Oates, Cheap Trick, Patty Smyth, Indigo Girls, Steve Stevens, Richie Sambora & Patti Smith among others. ABOUT THE PODCAST:Candid discussions with and about those behind the scenes in the music business including industry veterans representing the segments of: Musician, Design & LiveABOUT THE HOSTS:All three Music Buzzz Podcast hosts (Dane Clark, Hugh Syme and Andy Wilson) have spent their careers working with the biggest names in entertainment and have been, and still are, a fly on the wall.

El sótano
El sótano - Las 100 favoritas de 2022 (VI); especial versiones - 22/12/22

El sótano

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 59:00


La sexta y última entrega de nuestro repaso a 2022 a través de 100 canciones favoritas está dedicada a algunas de las versiones del año que más nos han gustado. (Foto del podcast; JD McPherson por Joshua Black Wilkins) Playlist; (sintonía) KATE CLOVER “These boots are made for walkin’” (Nancy Sinatra) JOHNNY CASINO y XABI GARRE con BISCUIT “Heart full of soul” (The Yardbirds) LORD ROCHESTER “Tiger feet” (Mud) JD McPHERSON “Lust for life / Sixteen” (Iggy Pop) VOIDIOTS “Stab your back” (The Damned FREDDIE DILEVI “Poison heart” (Ramones) FUNDACIÓN FRANCISCO FRANKENSTEIN “Voy a ser un drogata” (Ramones) GEOFF PALMER “Brooklyn babe” (Dee Dee King) GENERADOR “No voy más lejos” (Leño) LOS PERLAS “Hola mi amor” (Junco) THE RUNAWAY LOVERS “Viva Viva RnR” (Chuck Berry) PJ HARVEY and TIM PHILLIPS “Run on” (The Golden Gate Quartet) KURT BAKER and BEBE BUELL “Blood and roses” (The Smithereens) PELIGRO! “I love rocknroll” (Joan Jett) DOCTOR EXPLOSION “El paleto” (Sandford Clark) PABLO SOLO “Open up, summertime” (John Simon) TY SEGALL “Don’t lie” (The Mantles) Escuchar audio

The Brutally Delicious Podcast
A Casual Conversation with Derek Day & Griffin Tucker of Classless Act- Season 4 Ep. #111

The Brutally Delicious Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 20:25


Derek Day & Griffin Tucker of Classless Act chat about playing stadium shows this past summer with Motley Crue, Poison, and Joan Jett, playing the Taylor Hawkins tribute show and thier new EP, "Welcome To The Acoustic Show." --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/brutally-delicious/message

Arroe Collins
Marc Myers Releases The Book Anatomy Of 55 More Songs

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 9:49


Following his 2016 smash hit Anatomy of a Song, hailed by the Los Angeles Times as "a first-rate playlist.A rich history of both the music industry and the baby boomer era," acclaimed music journalist Marc Myers collects fifty-five new oral histories of iconic songs based on his popular Wall Street Journal column in ANATOMY OF 55 MORE SONGS: The Oral History of Top Hits that Changed Rock, R&B, and Soul (Grove Press; Pub Date: December 6, 2022; $27 hardcover; ISBN-13: 978-0-8021-6020-1). Songs that sell the most copies become hits, but some of those hits become something more-iconic recordings that not only inspire a generation but also change the direction of music. In ANATOMY OF 55 MORE SONGS, music journalist and historian Marc Myers tells the story behind fifty-five rock, pop, R&B, country, and soul-gospel hits through intimate interviews with the artists who wrote and recorded them. Part oral history, part musical analysis, ANATOMY OF 55 MORE SONGS ranges from Creedence Clearwater Revival's "Bad Moon Rising" to Dionne Warwick's "Walk On By," The Beach Boys' "Good Vibrations," and Black Sabbath's "Paranoid." Bernie Taupin recalls how he wrote the lyrics to Elton John's "Rocket Man;" Joan Jett remembers channeling her rage against how she had been unfairly labeled and treated as a female rocker into "Bad Reputation;" and Ozzy Osbourne, Elvis Costello, Bob Weir, Sheryl Crow, Alice Cooper, Roberta Flack, John Mellencamp, Keith Richards, Carly Simon, and many others reveal the emotions and technique behind their major works. Through an absorbing chronological, song-by-song analysis of the most memorable post-war hits, ANATOMY OF 55 MORE SONGS provides a sweeping look at the evolution of pop music between 1964 and today. This book will change how you listen to music and evaluate the artists who create it.

Arroe Collins
Marc Myers Releases The Book Anatomy Of 55 More Songs

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 9:49


Following his 2016 smash hit Anatomy of a Song, hailed by the Los Angeles Times as "a first-rate playlist.A rich history of both the music industry and the baby boomer era," acclaimed music journalist Marc Myers collects fifty-five new oral histories of iconic songs based on his popular Wall Street Journal column in ANATOMY OF 55 MORE SONGS: The Oral History of Top Hits that Changed Rock, R&B, and Soul (Grove Press; Pub Date: December 6, 2022; $27 hardcover; ISBN-13: 978-0-8021-6020-1). Songs that sell the most copies become hits, but some of those hits become something more-iconic recordings that not only inspire a generation but also change the direction of music. In ANATOMY OF 55 MORE SONGS, music journalist and historian Marc Myers tells the story behind fifty-five rock, pop, R&B, country, and soul-gospel hits through intimate interviews with the artists who wrote and recorded them. Part oral history, part musical analysis, ANATOMY OF 55 MORE SONGS ranges from Creedence Clearwater Revival's "Bad Moon Rising" to Dionne Warwick's "Walk On By," The Beach Boys' "Good Vibrations," and Black Sabbath's "Paranoid." Bernie Taupin recalls how he wrote the lyrics to Elton John's "Rocket Man;" Joan Jett remembers channeling her rage against how she had been unfairly labeled and treated as a female rocker into "Bad Reputation;" and Ozzy Osbourne, Elvis Costello, Bob Weir, Sheryl Crow, Alice Cooper, Roberta Flack, John Mellencamp, Keith Richards, Carly Simon, and many others reveal the emotions and technique behind their major works. Through an absorbing chronological, song-by-song analysis of the most memorable post-war hits, ANATOMY OF 55 MORE SONGS provides a sweeping look at the evolution of pop music between 1964 and today. This book will change how you listen to music and evaluate the artists who create it.

TV Guidance Counselor Podcast
TV Guidance Counselor Episode 557: Marc Sheffler

TV Guidance Counselor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 80:28


This week Ken welcomes comedian, actor, and writer Marc Sheffler to the show. Ken and Marc discuss Columbia, Daylight Savings Time, going to New York first so you can learn things before going to California, doing stand up in the late '60s, London Lee, going from driver to opener, Last House on the Left, the Borscht Belt, just wanting to do it once, being the start of the aluminum siding world, Pittsburgh,  hiring the Three Stooges for your 10th Birthday party, being anointed into show biz by Moe, Curly Joe Diritta, Roger Ebert's review of Last House on the Left, David Hess, picking up girls, lying about being a script writer, being in ads, snakes on a bus, moving to LA with money in the bank, and apartment and a car, Being There, Tim Thomerson, getting up at the Comedy Store, Mitzy Shore, David Letterman, Robin Williams, Marc Summers, Jimmy Walker, How Bugs Bunny Won the West, why Warner Bros stopped having live action wrap arounds on recycled Looney Tunes specials, Co-Ed Fever, how amazing Heather Thomas is, Du-beat-e-o, Joan Jett, Marsha Warfield, smoking pot, Richard Pryor, Johnny Dark, Steve Ladesberg, opening for Tower of Power in 1977, Charles in Charge, Harry and the Hendersons, producing Everything Is Relative, the 1988 Writer's Strike, doing an impression of Brett Goldstein, living in England, Ted Lasso, Lee Lacey, the wonder of improv, and the weird weird world of stand up comedy.

Booked On Rock with Eric Senich
"Anatomy of 55 More Songs: The Oral History of 55 Hits That Changed Rock, R&B, and Soul"/Marc Myers [Episode 100]

Booked On Rock with Eric Senich

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 62:55


Following his 2016 smash hit “Anatomy of a Song”, acclaimed music journalist Marc Myers has collected fifty-five new oral histories of iconic songs from his popular Wall Street Journal column.Songs that sell the most copies become hits, but some of those hits become something more—iconic recordings that not only inspire a generation but also change the direction of music. In “Anatomy of 55 More Songs”, based on his column for the Wall Street Journal, music journalist and historian Marc Myers tells the story behind fifty-five rock, pop, R&B, country, and soul-gospel hits through intimate interviews with the artists who wrote and recorded them. Part oral history, part musical analysis, “Anatomy of 55 More Songs” ranges from Creedence Clearwater Revival's “Bad Moon Rising” to Dionne Warwick's “Walk On By,” The Beach Boys' “Good Vibrations,” and Black Sabbath's “Paranoid.” Bernie Taupin recalls how he wrote the lyrics to Elton John's “Rocket Man;” Joan Jett remembers channeling her rage against how she had been unfairly labeled and treated as a female rocker into “Bad Reputation;” and Ozzy Osbourne, Elvis Costello, Bob Weir, Sheryl Crow, Alice Cooper, Roberta Flack, John Mellencamp, Keith Richards, Carly Simon, and many others reveal the emotions and technique behind their major works. Through an absorbing chronological, song-by-song analysis of the most memorable post-war hits, “Anatomy of 55 More Songs” provides a sweeping look at the evolution of pop music between 1964 and today. This book will change how you listen to music and evaluate the artists who create it. Marc Myers is a regular contributor to the Wall Street Journal, where he writes about music and the arts. He is the author of the critically acclaimed books “Anatomy of a Song”, “Why Jazz Happened”, and “Rock Concert”. You can hear Mark talk about that book in episode 31 of Booked On Rock. Marc also posts daily at JazzWax.com, a three-time winner of the Jazz Journalists Association's award for Jazz Blog of the Year. Purchase a copy of "Anatomy of 55 More Songs: The Oral History of 55 Hits That Changed Rock, R&B, and Soul" through Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Anatomy-55-More-Songs-History/dp/0802160204/refListen to a playlist of the music discussed in this episode at Marc Myers' official website: https://marcmyers.comListen to Marc Myers in episode 31 of Booked On Rock: https://open.spotify.com/episode/7FqROfsQrbSFPagSJQxAhSThe Booked On Rock Website: https://www.bookedonrock.comFollow The Booked On Rock with Eric Senich:FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/bookedonrockpodcastTWITTER: https://twitter.com/bookedonrockINSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/bookedonrockpodcastSupport Your Local Bookstore! Find your nearest independent bookstore here: https://www.indiebound.org/indie-store-finderContact The Booked On Rock Podcast:thebookedonrockpodcast@gmail.comThe Booked On Rock Music: “Whoosh” & “Nasty” by Crowander (https://www.crowander.com)

ASBURY PARK VIBES PODCAST
CLASSLESS ACT ... WELCOME TO THE SHOW! [EPISODE 127]

ASBURY PARK VIBES PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 37:03


The fast-rising, high-octane LA-based rock and roll band – Classless Act – will be pumping out the hits from their debut album Welcome To the Show this Wednesday, Dec 14th at the Wonder Bar in Asbury Park, NJ! Formed in 2018 and before their first album was even released, these crazy-talented musicians were asked to join the biggest tour of last summer ... The Stadium Tour with Mötley Crüe, Def Leppard, Poison, and Joan Jett & The Blackhearts! Their music has been labeled “the future of rock n' roll;” and Derek Day (vocals), Chuck McKissock (drums), Dane Pieper (guitar), Griffin Tucker (guitar), and Franco Gravante (bass) have been dubbed “hard rock's new elite.”We got the chance yesterday to chat with Derek and Chuck where we found out what it was like for them to collaborate with Vince Neil (Mötley Crüe) and Justin Hawkins (The Darkness) on two of their singles, what it's like to play in huge stadiums, how the flame for music was ignited in them as kids, and how surprises feed their creativity when writing music. Classless Act is currently releasing five (5) acoustic versions of their Welcome To The Show singles, of which the final will be shared on December 16th. Tune in to our podcast to meet the band and get hyped for their show tomorrow in Asbury Park where they open for Giovannie & The Hired Guns! Tickets can be purchased right here!!Podcast opening music by Connor Bracken & The Mother Leeds Band

The Mistress Carrie Podcast
BONUS EPISODE - Bret Michaels

The Mistress Carrie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 20:17


Bonus EpisodeBret Michaels is the lead singer of Poison, and the head of the Bret Michaels 'empire'. Having just come off the road with Def Leppard, Motley Crue, and Joan Jett on the hugely successful 'Stadium Tour', Bret is announcing next summers biggest bash... Parti Gras 2023. He checked in with Mistress Carrie to talk touring, Fenway Park, winter weather, launching the Parti-Gras 2023 tour, Tunnel to Towers, Holiday Gifts, East Coast attitudes, sports, parallel parking, his new song 'Back in the Day', and so much more!See Parti-Gras 2023 in Mansfield MA July 21, 2023Check out the custom playlist for this Bonus Episode here!Find Bret Michaels online:WebsiteTwitterInstagramFacebookYouTubeTikTokFind Poison Online:WebsiteTwitterInstagramFacebookYoutubeFind Mistress Carrie online:Official WebsiteThe Mistress Carrie Backstage Pass on PatreonTwitterFacebookInstagramYouTubeCameoPantheon Podcast Network

No Name Music Cast
Episode 93 - Women who Rock Part 2

No Name Music Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 68:40


Here in Episode 93 of the No Name Music Cast, it is Joy's turn to pick the topic and it's Part 2 of Women who Rock!We talk about Mary Ford, Lita Ford and Joan Jett to name only a few legendary female artists.We look into the meaning of Piccadilly, we once again talk about Cliff Richard's sandwich and Joy gets confused about Millimeters!Thanks for listening, and don't forget to 'Like' our page on Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/NoNameMusicCast/And Follow us on Twitter!https://twitter.com/NoNameMusicCast

Behind the Song
How Joan Jett embraced her "Bad Reputation"

Behind the Song

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 14:52


“Bad Reputation” is a song Joan Jett wrote while being rejected over and over by people in the music business, after realizing that she herself had gotten a bad reputation simply by being in her scandalously young former band, The Runaways. She and her producer, Kenny Laguna, were turned down so many times by record labels in the US, in fact, that they finally decided to take matters into their own hands to release her debut solo album. Dig into the very rock ‘n roll story of Joan Jett's rise from LA teen rocker to a platinum-selling member of the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame in this episode of the Behind The Song podcast. Watch the video episode and subscribe to the Behind The Song Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/@behindthesongpodcast Host: Janda Lane Music Producer: Christian Lane

Drum Channel Podcast
S2 E33 - Sandy Gennaro

Drum Channel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 48:17


Hi everyone, Billy A here; welcome to the Drum Channel Podcast. As drummers, time is a powerful word; In playing and especially in life. Our guest today, the drummer/author Sandy Gennaro understands the importance of timing in life and has written an inspiring book combining his music career with life lessons titled ”Beating The Odds: In Business & Life.” Sandy and I chat about the book, our long-time-friendship, his music career with The Monkees, Cyndi Lauper, Joan Jett, Benny Mardones, the legendary Bo Didley and his advice breaking down the importance of B.E.A.T.S. Enjoy!  Black Friday special! Subscribe to Drum Channel with the code BILLY30 for 30% off! www.DrumChannel.com

Drum Channel Podcast
S2 E32 - Rikki Rockett

Drum Channel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 61:07


Welcome to this week's Drum Channel Podcast. Billy A here with my guest Rikki Rockett, co-founder, drummer, and bonafide rock star of the past three decades with the band Poison. One of the few groups from the 80s era with all original members, Rikki and Poison, sold over 50 million records. They recently wrapped up the most extensive stadium tour of the year, with Motley Crue, Def Leppard, and Joan Jett.  Rikki and I talk about the music business, and how almost two years of the tour being postponed finally happening, his career with Poison, the best news, a clean-bill of health as a six-year cancer survivor and more.  Please welcome my good buddy Rikki Rockett to Drum Channel. Enjoy! 

Chuck Shute Podcast
Derek Day & Franco Gravante (Classless Act)

Chuck Shute Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 26:04 Transcription Available


Derek Day & Franco Gravante are the singer and bass player of the hard rock band Classless Act. The band recently opened shows on the Stadium Tour alongside Motley Crue, Def Leppard, Poison and Joan Jett. They have an album out now titled “Welcome to the Show” and an acoustic EP coming out soon as well as a club tour. We discuss all this in the interview along with how the band formed, the advice they got from the stadium bands and more!  00:00 - Intro 00:37 - Band Introductions & Instruments 01:20 - Next Tour & Stadium Tour 02:43 - Origin of Band & Chemistry 04:05 - New Album "Welcome to the Show" 04:45 - Band Early Days 06:40 - Up & Coming Bands & LA Scene 08:04 - Acoustic Album 09:26 - Writing Music 11:18 - "On My Phone" & Technology 12:35 - Negativity on Social Media 14:12 - Vince Neil, Tommy Lee & Bob Rock 16:03 - Advice From Stadium Tour Bands 18:20 - Taylor Hawkins Tribute Show 20:42 - DMC of Run DMC 21:09 - Big Stars, Kindness & Alice Cooper 22:55 - Upcoming Shows 24:28 - The Innocent Project 25:07 - Outro Classless Act website:https://classlessact.com/The Innocent Project website:https://innocenceproject.org/Chuck Shute website:http://chuckshute.com/Support the showThanks for Listening & Shute for the Moon!

Music Notes with Jess
Ep. 161 - Weird Al Top 10 Parodies

Music Notes with Jess

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 36:07


"Weird Al" Yankovic been rewriting popular songs' lyrics. Getting closer to his debut album's 40th anniversary, a satirical biopic got released on Roku: Weird: The Al Yankovic Story, starring Harry Potter actor Daniel Radcliffe. Covering all bases, I countdown 10 of Weird Al's parody songs, and background of the original songs they're adapted from. Theme Song: "Dance Track", composed by Jessica Ann CatenaPlaylist: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/5ECpXusXXnmPr59SSwqWr9?si=6fd6d572f09a4f04&pt=05174f1901f8a48523974110a850130210. "Another One Rides the Bus" (1980-1981, 1983)https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tZkouut-9RQOriginal song: "Another One Bites the Dust" - Queen (1980)https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rY0WxgSXdEE9. "Smells Like Nirvana" (1992): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FklUAoZ6KxYOriginal song: "Smells Like Teen Spirit" - Nirvana (1991-1992)https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hTWKbfoikeg8. "I Love Rocky Road" (1983): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=beTsDOBRs8IOriginal song: "I Love Rock 'N Roll" - Joan Jett & The Blackhearts (1981)https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wMsazR6Tnf87. "Amish Paradise" (1996): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lOfZLb33uCgOriginal song: "Gangsta's Paradise" - Coolio feat. L.V. (1995)https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fPO76Jlnz6c6. "My Bologna" (1979, 1983): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SHNeIjiTwpIOriginal song: "My Sharona" - The Knack (1979): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bbr60I0u2Ng5. "Perform This Way" (2011): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ss_BmTGv43MOriginal song: "Born This Way" - Lady GaGa (2011): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wV1FrqwZyKw4. "Fat" (1988): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t2mU6USTBREOriginal song: "Bad" - Michael Jackson (1987-1988): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sd4SJVsTulc3. "Like a Surgeon" (1985)https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=notKtAgfwDAOriginal song: "Like a Virgin" - Madonna (1984): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s__rX_WL1002. "Eat It" (1984): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZcJjMnHoIBI"Beat It" - Michael Jackson (1982-1983): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRdxUFDoQe01. "White & Nerdy" (2006): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N9qYF9DZPdw"Ridin'" - Chamillionaire feat. Krayzie Bone (2006): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CtwJvgPJ9xw     Weird Al discography: https://open.spotify.com/artist/1bDWGdIC2hardyt55nlQgG?si=2p89Mm0zRHyURjJaCbTQNwRoku biopic link: https://therokuchannel.roku.com/lp/weirdTonight Show interview: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mSQm6pDBiYw&t=308sClassroom Instruments Medley: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s9WOyUtcE5ARelated Episodes: Episode 52 - Eddie Van Halen Top 10 Riffs: https://www.spreaker.com/episode/41403576Ep. 105 - Lady GaGa Top 10: https://www.spreaker.com/episode/47007731Ep. 112 - Britney Spears 20: https://www.spreaker.com/episode/47784060Ep. 113 - Annie/MJ The Musical/West Side Story: https://www.spreaker.com/episode/47885459Ep. 158 - "Queen"'s "Face It Alone": https://www.spreaker.com/user/jesscatena/ep-158-queens-face-it-aloneEp. 159 - Thriller: Then and Now: https://www.spreaker.com/user/jesscatena/ep-159-thriller-then-now

Michael's Record Collection
Episode 85: Guitarist Jimi Bell of Autograph and House of Lords

Michael's Record Collection

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 64:23


Guitarist Jimi Bell has had a busy 2022. A member of two top-notch rock bands, House of Lords and Autograph, plenty of his new music is hitting the streets. House of Lords' new release, Saints and Sinners, dropped Sept. 16, and Autograph's new album, Beyond, will become available on Nov. 18. Both records are on Frontiers Music. Jimi was gracious enough to talk to me about both of these fine, new albums, his musical background, how he came to open for Joan Jett and then appear in a movie with her, his invention (the Shred Neck), and much more. Find out more about Jimi's various projects at https://www.jimibell.com/. Reminder: You can support independent podcasting by becoming a Michael's Record Collection Patreon subscriber starting at only $2 per month (50 cents an episode...or less!) at the MRC Patreon page. Supporter benefits escalate at each level, providing more value the more you support the show. For example, you will know about interviews in advance and some levels can submit questions for the artists, come on the show to co-host, enter prize drawings, and more.  Please hit the like button and leave a rating/review on Apple Music or the Goodpods app if you consume this podcast on those platforms. You can read my Michael's Record Collection newsletter for free by signing up at michaelsrecordcollection.substack.com. Follow MRC on Twitter (@MikesRecords), like it on Facebook, and follow on Instagram. Have questions or comments or want to suggest a topic? Hit me up at michaelsrecordcollection@gmail.com.

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Rock is Lit Vault Bonus Episode: Jennifer Haupt on Lost Dreams and the Publishing Experience

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 9:30


Episode 10 of Rock is Lit features Jennifer Haupt's novel ‘Come As You Are', a story set against the backdrop of the Seattle grunge scene of the early 1990s. In this outtake from that interview, I talk with Jennifer about lost and deferred dreams—for the characters in her novel and for herself—and the difference in her reaction to publishing her first novel and this one. Listen to Episode 10, then check out other bonus material in the Rock is Lit Vault, including my full, uncut interview with Charles R. Cross about Kurt Cobain, and outtakes from my interview with Nabil Ayers about his memoir, ‘My Life in the Sunshine', and his experience meeting Joan Jett back in the day. MUSIC AND MEDIA THAT APPEAR IN THE EPISODE IN ORDER OF APPEARANCE:“All Apologies” by Nirvana“About a Girl” by NirvanaLINKS: Jennifer's website, https://www.jenniferhaupt.com/Jennifer on Twitter, @Jennifer­­_HauptJennifer on Instagram, @jenniferhauptauthor Christy Alexander Hallberg's website, https://www.christyalexanderhallberg.com/Christy Alexander Hallberg on Instagram, @christyhallbergChristy Alexander Hallberg on Twitter, @ChristyHallbergChristy Alexander Hallberg on YouTube, https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfSnRmlL5moSQYi6EjSvqagRock is Lit Vault, https://www.christyalexanderhallberg.com/rockislitvault

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Rock is Lit Vault Bonus Episode: Nabil Ayers on 'My Life in the Sunshine' and Rockin' With Joan Jett

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 11:53


Episode 10 of Rock is Lit features Jennifer Haupt's novel ‘Come As You Are', a story set against the backdrop of the Seattle grunge scene of the early 1990s. Nabil Ayers, author of the memoir ‘My Life in the Sunshine' and co-founder of Seattle's iconic record store Sonic Boom, shares his memories of that pivotal moment in music history in the full episode. Here are two outtakes from my interview with Nabil, in which he talks about his new memoir about his efforts to connect with his father, the funk, soul, and jazz legend Roy Ayers, and Nabil's experience meeting Joan Jett when his band opened up for her back in the day.Check out other bonus material from Episode 10 in the Rock is Lit Vault, including my full, uncut interview with Charles R. Cross about Kurt Cobain, and outtakes from my interview with Jennifer Haupt about her novel ‘Come As You Are'. MUSIC AND MEDIA THAT APPEAR IN THE EPISODE IN ORDER OF APPEARANCE:“Everybody Loves the Sunshine” by Roy Ayers“Running Away” by Roy Ayers“I Hate Myself for Loving You” by Joan Jett & the BlackheartsLINKS: Nabil's website, https://www.nabilayers.com/Nabil on Twitter, @nabilayersNabil on Instagram, @nabilayersLink to Nabil's ‘Rolling Stone' article on Nirvana's OK Hotel show, “The Night Nirvana Changed Everything,” https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-features/nirvana-smells-like-teen-spirit-first-performance-1154128/Link to Nabil's ‘The Stranger' article on Soundgarden, https://www.thestranger.com/music/2017/05/18/25153388/soundgarden-will-never-be-the-first-seattle-band-anyone-mentions-but-for-me-soundgarden-was-the-first-band-that-changed-everything Christy Alexander Hallberg's website, https://www.christyalexanderhallberg.com/Christy Alexander Hallberg on Instagram, @christyhallbergChristy Alexander Hallberg on Twitter, @ChristyHallbergChristy Alexander Hallberg on YouTube, https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfSnRmlL5moSQYi6EjSvqagRock is Lit Vault, https://www.christyalexanderhallberg.com/rockislitvault

Late Boomers
Music, Sports & Pop Culture with Andy Frye

Late Boomers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 43:39


What do Shaq O'Neal, the Smashing Pumpkins and Forbes Magazine have in common? Author, Journalist and Pop Culture Expert Andy Frye! Think about the sports and music icons you'd like to meet today then take a trip down memory lane with his time travel novel Ninety Days in the Nineties and hang with the bands and sports figures of the 1990s. It will be a blast!

Suburban Underground
Episode 340 - Radio Songs

Suburban Underground

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 60:33


This week's show is full of radio songs.  All songs are full of songs about the radio.  Artists you can look forward to hearing are: Teenage Bottlerocket, Modest Mouse, Nik Kershaw, Jet, The Suburbs, Fountains Of Wayne, Thomas Dolby, Teenage Fanclub, Joan Jett & the Blackhearts, The Kinks, The Rollers, Bubblegum Lemonade, Stiffed, The Hooters, The Clash.   On the Air on Bedford 105.1 FM Radio      *** 5pm Friday ***      *** 10am Sunday ***      *** 8pm Monday *** Stream live at http://209.95.50.189:8178/stream Stream on-demand most recent episodes at https://wbnh1051.podbean.com/category/suburban-underground/ And available on demand on your favorite podcast app! Twitter: @SUBedford1051  ***  Facebook: SuburbanUndergroundRadio   *** Instagram: SuburbanUnderground   ***  

Stuck In The Middle - A Gen X Podcast

What is up, Slackers?! While it has often been said that rock music has been a male dominated industry, there have been so many amazing women who have broken through the glass (rock?) ceiling. On this episode I discuss some of my favorites, with the simple parameters of:1. The music needed to have been composed in my lifetime OR 2. Created by actual Gen X artists. As it turns out, some of the GREAT female voices of all time come from our generation, and frankly, I'm not surprised. But rest assured, I don't ignore some of the superstars of my youth and their prominent places in the pantheon of musical greats. Be forewarned, I only discuss artists that would be defined as “rock”, “metal”, "punk" or “alternative” musicians.Who are your favorite female rockers? Let me know in the comments or on social media!

The Mistress Carrie Podcast
Ash Costello from New Years Day

The Mistress Carrie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 48:50


Episode #126 SummaryCheck out the custom playlist for Episode #126Ash Costello the lead singer from New Years Day checked in with Mistress Carrie on a day off from touring in Savannah Georgia to talk Halloween, women in rock, Elvira, Joan Jett, touring, marriage, being Italian, social media, raspy voices, and much more.Find New Years Day Online:FacebookTwitterInstagramWebsiteYoutubeFind Ash Costello Online:TwitterFacebookInstagramFind Mistress Carrie Online:Official WebsiteThe Mistress Carrie Backstage Pass on PatreonTwitterFacebookInstagramYouTubeCameoTikTok

What the Riff?!?
1981 - December: Joan Jett & the Blackhearts “I Love Rock-n-Roll”

What the Riff?!?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 34:46


I Love Rock 'n Roll is the first album by Joan Jett & the Blackhearts, and the second solo album by Joan Jett.  Born as Joan Marie Larkin, Joan Jett got her start in the music industry as a teenager when her family moved to the Los Angeles area and divorced shortly thereafter.  She was a founding member of the all-girl band The Runaways at the age of 16.Jett began her solo career in England in 1979, where she recorded songs with some of the members of the Sex Pistols.  Later that year she returned to Los Angeles where she connected with a songwriter and producer named Kenny Laguna.  Laguna would relocate Jett to Long Beach, New York, and assist her with both her first solo album and the formation of the Blackhearts.The group spent a year touring and building up a following in the New York Area before releasing I Love Rock 'n Roll.  This album would be a mixture of original songs and covers, and the title track would spend 7 weeks at the top of the U.S. charts.  The album was a commercial success, selling 10 million copies, and is Jett's most successful album to date. (I'm Gonna) Run AwayRob starts us off with the second track on the album, a deeper cut, and an original song written by Jett and Laguna.  It has a punk feel, as does much of the album, and the lyrics reflect a break-up.Crimson and CloverThis cover of a song originally performed by Tommy James and the Shondells alternates between a slow and fast tempo, but maintains a hard rock edge throughout, unlike the more psychedelic aspects of the original.  Jett was questioned about her choice not to change the pronouns in the lyrics from female to male, and she commented simply that the change in lyrics would make the song not rhyme.Summertime Blues Eddie Cochran co wrote and performed this song in 1958.  Joan Jett & the Blackhearts speed this one up and give it a punk edge.  It was not originally on the album, but appeared as the B-side to a single from Jett's prior solo album “Do You Wanna Touch Me  (Oh Yeah).”  It would appear on the album as a bonus track when released on CD.  I Love Rock 'n RollThis title track is the big hit, and is also a cover originally performed by The Arrows in 1975.  Jett first heard the song while touring with The Runaways, and she recorded an early version of the song with members of the Sex Pistols in 1979.  It was the number 3 song on the U.S. charts for the year of 1982. ENTERTAINMENT TRACK:Street Life by Randy Crawford (from the motion picture “Sharkey's Machine”)This action film featured a stunt involving a plunge out of the Peachtree Plaza hotel, the tallest building in Atlanta at the time. STAFF PICKS:Jealous Lover by Rainbow Bruce starts off the staff picks with the lead-off track from a 4-song EP of the same name.  Frontman Joe Lynn Turner and guitarist Ritchie Blackmore wrote this song.  Turner wrote the lyrics in about 5 minutes, inspired by an argument he had with Blackmore, which made him think about a fight he'd recently had with his girlfriend.  “And it's hard to discover you're like any other jealous lover.”Young Turks by Rod Stewart  Brian features the first US single from Stewart's eleventh album, Tonight I'm Yours. The song tells the story of two young lovers who run away from their parents to make their own way.  Interestingly the phrase “young turks” never appears in the lyrics.  The video included an early example of break dancing.Marie Marie  by The BlastersWayne brings us a rockabilly song, or as The Blasters would describe it, “R&B in cowboy boots.”  The song tells the story of a guy who is told to leave a family's daughter alone, and so he sings to her as he is leaving.  I Love You by Climax Blues BandRob's staff pick is a soft rock hit.  It tells the story of a guy who is rescued by the love of his wife.  It is the second biggest hit by the Climax Blues Band after  Couldn't Get It Right.  It hit number 12 on the Billboard Hot 100. INSTRUMENTAL TRACK:September Fifteenth by Pat Metheny & Lyle MaysThis jazz instrumental was a feature of "Jazz Flavors" on radio station 94Q in Atlanta in December of 1981.

The Imbalanced History of Rock and Roll
Bent News #32: Bono On U2's Plans, Mick Mars Hangs Up Touring Shoes, An Honor for Motown & more!

The Imbalanced History of Rock and Roll

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 12:45 Very Popular


Oh it's bent alright! Dig in for these hot pretzel-like stories:-Bono explains why U2 is ditching their new album!-Motley Crue's Mick Mars retires from touring!-Chrissie Hynde announces new Pretenders record!-Music Cares to honor Berry and Smokey!-Stadium Tour Part 2 announced, and more!!! We have fantastic sponsors of our podcast, please visit their web sites, and support those who make the show go:Boldfoot Socks   https://boldfoot.comCrooked Eye Brewery   https://crookedeyebrewery.com/Don't forget that you can find all of our episodes, on-demand, for free right here on our web site: https://imbalancedhistory.com/ 

Saved by the Spell
Witch Aesthetic with Special Guests Amanda Yates Garcia & James Vincent

Saved by the Spell

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 59:16


It's the time of the Season... Witches are all over the media. Do the clothes make the Witch? On today's special episode, I have not 1 but 2 special guests who have brilliant perspectives on honoring your look and magic and what it means to fit in or stand out. Amanda Yates Garcia @oracleofla and James Vincent @jvincentmakeup join me on Saved by the Spell to discuss Witch Aesthetics, Croning, and Connection to magic and self-protection through the physical embodiment of self-expression. While offering some sage younger self-advice.  Special Guest Bios: Amanda Yates Garcia is a writer, witch, and the Oracle of Los Angeles. Her work has been featured in The New York Times, The London Times, CNN, BRAVO, as well as a viral appearance on FOX. She has led rituals, classes and workshops on magic and witchcraft at UCLA, UC Irvine, MOCA, The Hammer Museum, LACMA, The Getty and many other venues. Amanda hosts monthly moon rituals online, and the popular Between the Worlds podcast, which looks at the Western Mystery traditions through a mythopoetic lens. Her book, Initiated: Memoir of a Witch, received a starred review from Kirkus and Publisher's Weekly and has been translated into six languages.  https://oracleoflosangeles.com/ (https://oracleoflosangeles.com/) IG @oracleofla As Director of Education and Artistry for The Makeup Show and The Powder Group, James Vincent is fortunate enough to work with makeup lines and makeup artists at all levels of the industry. Over the years James' passion for the art of makeup encompasses nearly every genre of makeup artistry. From film and theatre, to television and celebrity work, editorial and runway work. James' expertise also includes training and product development positions and guest artist spots for such companies as MAC, YSL, Sephora, Tom Ford Beauty, Ardency Inn,  Make Up For Ever and recently Rihanna's Fenty Beauty with Kendo Brands. James now focuses his career on working internationally in fashion, editorial and artistry development. In fashion James has collaborated with diverse designers such as Ashton Michael, Charlotte Ronson and Chris Habana as has seen him as key artist for fashion shows in every major fashion city. James' work in the music industry spans genres with such legendary musicians as Lady Gaga, Florence and the Machine, Courtney Love, Amy Winehouse, Joan Jett and The Foo Fighters. James has had the pleasure to work with leading ladies like Liv Tyler, Reese Witherspoon and Jane Fonda, James has also been privileged enough to work with men who have made a mark including President Barack Obama.Having worked with photographers including Alexander Thompson, Mike Ruiz and David Lachapelle James work has been seen on in magazines including ID, V, Paper, Wonderland, and Italian Vogue.  James is currently the Beauty Editor for On Makeup Magazine and Galore Magazine. He contributes to countless blogs and publications including  Refinery 29. He has been featured on numerous television shows as a beauty expert such as NBC's The Today Show, CBS This Morning and NY1.  Nylon Magazine, The New York Times and WWD have named James as a “Makeup Artist to Watch”. https://www.jamesvincentmakeup.com/ (https://www.jamesvincentmakeup.com/) IG @jvincentmakeup

Sound, Sobriety and Success with Matt Pinfield

Guitarist and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee with Joan Jett and the Blackhearts, Ricky Byrd, shares stories from his incredible rock career and how he became a Recovery Troubadour using music to inspire people struggling with addiction.   On this episode, Ricky talks to Matt about: How he got into rock music and his very first performance Growing up in NYC and the clubs he frequented in 70s His struggles with substance use and how 1 drink could lead to a night full of hard drugs and mistakes The near-death experience that scared him into recovery Joining different support groups and the importance of community for recovering addicts Playing benefit shows and discovering how his music could help and inspire people Becoming a Recovery Troubadour and substance abuse counselor Recording the recovery albums Clean Getaway and Sobering Times to spread recovery messages And More To learn more about Ricky and his projects, visit www.Rickybyrd.com This episode is sponsored by The Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Centers – one of the oldest residential drug and alcohol rehab programs. ARC is a non-profit and was hit hard financially as a result of COVID. For more information, and to donate or sign up for their quarterly newsletter, visit https://tinyurl.com/SalArmyARC.   About Ricky Byrd Rock and Roll Hall of Fame member, guitarist /singer- songwriter Ricky Byrd (inducted in 2015 with Joan Jett and The Blackhearts), has had a career in music  spanning over 40 years. Byrd has recorded and played with Roger Daltrey, and toured with Ian Hunter and Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes respectively. He has also been blessed to have had the chance to, at one time or another, share the stage with music royalty including Paul McCartney, Ringo, Alice Cooper, Bruce Springsteen, Steven Van Zandt, Joe Walsh, Mavis Staples, Dion, Brian Wilson, Smokey Robinson, Jimmy Page, Graham Nash, and Elvis Costello…to name just a few.   Ricky Byrd is now a Recovery Troubadour and Keynote Speaker using music, lyrics and his experience, strength, and hope to inspire change to those struggling with addiction. Byrd is first and foremost - a man living in long-term recovery. With over 30 years of sobriety, Byrd has channeled his experiences to assist those struggling with drug and alcohol addiction.  Earning his CASAC T (Certified Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counselor) credentials and CARC (Certified Addiction Recovery Coach) credentials, Byrd leads recovery music groups at detox and treatment centers, as well as serving as keynote speaker at various events nationally. Additionally, Byrd has organized / participated in concert events, music outreach sessions, and prevention programs.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Around the Galaxy - A Star Wars Fan Talkshow

Star Wars fans know Amanda Deibert as the author of Issues 1 and 4 of the brand new Dark Horse Comics series Hyperspace Stories.www.ATGcast.comPatreon.com/ATGcastYouTube.com/ATGcast@ATGcastFacebook.com/StreamingStarWarsAmanda Deibert is an author, screenwriter, and bestselling comic book & graphic novel writer. Her newest book, the daily guided gratitude journal, YOU ALREADY HAVE THE ANSWERS from Chronicle Books is currently available for pre-order. Amanda's comic book writing includes multiple DC Super Hero Girls graphic novels, a story in the New York Times I #1 Bestseller Love is Love, Serving Up Justice featuring Serena Williams and Wonder Woman, Flash Facts, Wonder Woman Agent of Peace, Teen Titans Go!, Wonder Woman '77, Batman and Harley Quinn, DC's The Doomed and the Damned, Wonderful Women of History, and Sensation Comics Featuring Wonder Woman, for DC Comics, Hyperspace Stories for Lucas Film/Disney/Darkhorse comics and multiple stories in John Carpenter's Tales for A Halloween Night volumes 2, 3, 4, 5 , & 6 for Storm King Comics, Red Sonja Black, White, Red for Dynamite, Work for a Million for McClelland & Stewart and more.Amanda's television work includes writing for the animated series He-Man and The Masters Of The Universe for Netflix as well as work for CBS, SyFy, OWN, PIVOT, HULU and 4 years as writer for former Vice President Al Gore's international climate broadcast, 24 Hours of Reality.When she's not working she is enjoying time with her wife, illustrator Cat Staggs, and their daughter in their Los Angeles home. (c) 2022 Pete in the Seat Studios

Backstage Pass Radio
S3: E:13 - Kirstie Kraus - Flowers Bloom Where They Are Planted

Backstage Pass Radio

Play Episode Play 26 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 57:56 Transcription Available


Date: October 19, 2022Name of podcast: Backstage Pass RadioEpisode title and number:  S3: E13: Kirstie Kraus - Flowers Bloom Where They Are PlantedArtist Bio -She's thirsty for love and magic, for joy and sunshine. She's thirsty for compassion and authenticity. And more than anything, she's thirsty for anything that sets her soul on fire.Kirstie Kraus carries her thirst in her songwriting, in her live shows, and in her everyday connection with other kindred spirits. Nowhere is her appetite more quenched than on a stage in front of her fans, appropriately named “Thirsties”. Her confidence naturally shines under the bright lights, taking concertgoers on a well-defined path of self-discovery and bliss. Her writing infuses her own transparent journey with others' experiences to create sustainable lyrics and catchy melodies.The result is a perfect blend of country, funk, blues, and rock because, with Kirstie, there are no boundaries. There's only the process of “letting go” and letting the song tell you what it wants to be. ​It will also tell you WHERE it wants to be and for an intuitive deep thinker like Kirstie, that place is Nashville. Three years ago, the Wisconsin native made the move to Music City and having heavily toured the summer before with her Midwest band, Thirsty Jones, Kirstie made the decision to really focus on honing her craft in town. She immediately began demoing out songs for her upcoming full-length record and playing established Nashville venues, like the Listening Room Café and the Bluebird. She also leaned into the production side of her album, gaining great insight from her then producer about arrangements, vocal styling, and mixing. Her first Nashville based single, “Delusional” (2018) fancies a sassy 80s funk groove while 2019's “Gotta Do” pulls in early 2000s Shania vibes. “Silver”, her July 2020 release, possesses the licks of Joan Jett and attitude of Avril Lavigne, proving that she's not a one lane roadmap.Sponsor Link:WWW.ECOTRIC.COMBackstage Pass Radio Social Media Handles:Facebook - @backstagepassradiopodcast @randyhulseymusicInstagram - @Backstagepassradio @randyhulseymusicTwitter - @backstagepassPC @rhulseymusicWebsite - backstagepassradio.com and randyhulsey.comArtist Media Handles:Website - www.kirstiekraus.comInstagram  - https://www.instagram.com/kirstiekrausFacebook - https://www.facebook.com/kirstiekrausTwitter - https://twitter.com/kirstiekrausCall to actionWe ask our listeners to like, share, and subscribe to the show and the artist's social media pages. This enables us to continue pushing great content to the consumer. Thank you for being a part of Backstage Pass RadioYour Host,Randy Hulsey 

Pod Sematary
258 - Halloween 6 (1995) & Halloween Ends (2022)

Pod Sematary

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 124:55


Get more at patreon.com/podsematary! Read our afterthoughts for this episode at https://twitter.com/PodSematary/status/1582134931198615552 CW: Rape, Incest, Suicide, Domestic Violence It's Halloween Week on Pod Sematary! Chris & Kelsey watch some pretty bad Halloween movies, unfortunately. There is yelling. The Classic Film: Halloween 6: The Curse of Michael Myers (1995) "Six years after Michael Myers last terrorized Haddonfield, he returns there in pursuit of his niece, Jamie Lloyd, who has escaped with her newborn child, for which Michael and a mysterious cult have sinister plans” (IMDb.com). It happened. We've been mostly forgiving of the Halloween sequels, but 6—with its magic runes and nonsense plot—is absolutely the worst. The Modern Film: Halloween Ends (2022) "The saga of Michael Myers and Laurie Strode comes to a spine-chilling climax in this final installment of this trilogy” (IMDb.com). Despite giving us something we didn't know we needed (a smiling Laurie Strode), Halloween Ends decides to cap off the entire series by being mostly about some brand new character you don't like killing a bunch of other people you don't like. Audio Sources: "Awakening: Part 1" (Gargoyles S01E01) produced by Disney Television Animation "Halloween" (1978) produced by Compass International Pictures, et al. "Halloween 6: The Curse of Michael Myers" produced by Miramax, et al. "Halloween Ends" produced by Blumhouse Productions, et al. "Jay & Silent Bob Strike Back" produced by View Askew Productions, et al. "Léon: The Professional" produced by Gaumont, et al. "Liar Liar" produced by Universal Pictures & Imagine Entertainment "Science Fiction/Double Feature" written by Richard O'Brien & Richard Hartley and performed by Joan Jett and the Blackhearts "Split" produced by Universal Pictures, et al.