Podcasts about RSA

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Latest podcast episodes about RSA

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
Christmas road safety appeal launched today

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 7:31


Prof Denis Cusack and Sam Wade from the Road Safety Authority discuss ways of improving safety on our roads as the RSA launches its Christmas road safety appeal.

RSA Events
How to save democracy in a divided world

RSA Events

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 45:30


From Roe v Wade and Black Lives Matter to gun control and immigration, US politics in 2022 looks as partisan as ever, with debates framed in moralistic terms and parties focusing on mobilising the faithful rather than wooing the sceptical. People increasingly write one another off instead of seeking to win one another over. In this age of continued polarisation, democracy looks close to breaking point.But while it's easy to fall into despair, there are grounds for hope, if we look close enough. Across America, there are those working round the clock to heal wounds, bridge divisions, change minds and create new political possibilities. Best-selling author Anand Giridharadas takes us to the frontline of this new battle, introducing us to the activists, politicians, educators and citizens striving to build more inclusive movements, and answer the urgent question: how can democracy be saved, and who is going to save it?#RSApersuadersBecome an RSA Events sponsor: https://utm.guru/udI9xDonate to The RSA: https://utm.guru/udNNBFollow RSA Events on Instagram: https://instagram.com/rsa_events/Follow the RSA on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RSAEventsLike RSA Events on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rsaeventsofficialJoin our Fellowship: https://www.thersa.org/fellowship/join

Cloud Security Podcast by Google
EP99 Google Workspace Security: from Threats to Zero Trust

Cloud Security Podcast by Google

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 22:54


Guests: Nikhil Sinha, Group Product Manager, Workspace Security Kelly Anderson, Product Marketing Manager, Workspace Security Topics: We are talking about Google Workspace security today. What kinds of threats do we have to care about here? Are there compliance-related motivations for security here too? Is compliance in the cloud changing? How's adoption of hardware keys for MFA going for your users, and how are you helping them?  Is phishing finally solved because of that?  Can you explain why hardware security FIDO/WebAuthn is such a step function compared to, say, RSA number generator tokens?  Have there been assumptions in the Workspace security model we had to change because of WFH? And what changes with RTO and permanent hybrid? Resources: Google BeyondCorp Enterprise “Make zero trust a reality with Google Workspace security solutions” Next 2022 video “2021: Phishing is Solved?” (ep40) “Zero Trust: Fast Forward from 2010 to 2021” (ep8)

RSA Events
How our social connections impact our economic mobility

RSA Events

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 60:51


Raj Chetty, professor of public economics at Harvard University will share the findings from research analysis of Meta data on the relationship between the social connections of individuals and economic mobility in the US. Research led by Harvard's Opportunity Insights used large-scale privacy-protected social network datasets to study social capital in neighbourhoods, schools and colleges.Professor Chetty is joined by Lucy Makinson, head of policy at the Behavioural Insights Team (BIT) to explore the findings in more detail.What are the key implications in this US data for other countries and regions? How can these findings be further developed, and policy recommendations suggested to help improve social connectivity and economic mobility? What interventions could be made to enable these actions – and do they extend to the services themselves?The UK leg of this work is being taken forward by a coalition of partners including the RSA, BIT and Neighbourly Lab.#RSAconnectBecome an RSA Events sponsor: https://utm.guru/udI9xDonate to The RSA: https://utm.guru/udNNBFollow RSA Events on Instagram: https://instagram.com/rsa_events/Follow the RSA on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RSAEventsLike RSA Events on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rsaeventsofficialJoin our Fellowship: https://www.thersa.org/fellowship/join

Real Synthetic Audio For iTunes

This week rather than making Sunday all about "must get RSA posted immediately!" I took some time to work on some personal IT projects around the house. Trust me, when you have a DJ who is also a data and backup hoarder (see my 2 drive loss disasters in the early 2000s) storage and infrastructure around the house is a chore. These days about finding more low power components so my 2 servers in house use as little electricity as possible. But thats all done, so it's time to get a great new RSA to you! This weeks show includes tracks from Simon Carter & Fabsi, Soman, Lights Of Euphoria, davanTage, Sea Of Sin, Helalyn Flowers, Beyond Border, and Matt Hart. Matt Hart - Terraform (Blue Ant)Simon Carter & Fabsi - Witch Hit (Possessed)Soman - Divine (Too Much Of All)Lights Of Euphoria - Man And MachinedavanTage - Take Shelter (Elektrostaub)Sea Of Sin - Shine A Light (The New Division)Helalyn Flowers - Halos (Aesthetische)Beyond Border - Modern Love (N-Frequency) http://synthetic.org/https://www.instagram.com/djtodd242/https://twitter.com/djtoddrsahttps://www.youtube.com/c/RealSyntheticAudio

La Loupe
Mission : Plein emploi

La Loupe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 16:45


La mission a été fixée (et acceptée) par Emmanuel Macron lui-même : atteindre le plein emploi d'ici la fin du quinquennat. Pour la remplir, tous les moyens sont bons, de l'escape game à la réforme du RSA. Impossible ? Réponses dans cet épisode avec Béatrice Mathieu, cheffe du service Economie de L'Express.Retrouvez tous les détails de l'épisode ici et inscrivez-vous à notre newsletter.L'équipe :Écriture : Charlotte BarisPrésentation : Xavier YvonMontage : Mathias PenguillyRéalisation : Jules KrotAlternante : Marion GalardMusique et habillage : Emmanuel Herschon / Studio TorrentCrédits image : Philippe Huguen / AFPLogo : Anne-Laure Chapelain / Thibaut ZschieschePour nous écrire : laloupe@lexpress.fr Hébergé par Acast. Visitez acast.com/privacy pour plus d'informations.

Karraker & Smallmon
Dome Authority board member Dave Spence

Karraker & Smallmon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022


Dave joins Randy, Carey & Brooke to talk about what's been going on with the money from the lawsuit vs. the Rams/NFL, how much money can be built up with the new accounts the money has now been invested in, the planned usage for these funds to benefits the RSA & region, how much money was lost with the feet-dragging leading up to the shift, the different hopes for the different parts of the STL area, using these funds to solve problems now vs. a longer-term plan with bigger gains from the investment/interest, if it's worth it for some of this money to be put back into the stadium, and his favorite memories from the Kirkwood-Webster Groves Turkey Day game.

RSA Events
2022 RDI Address

RSA Events

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 65:06


Our capacity to survive, adapt and flourish relies on designing a future that is concurrently sustainable and resilient. Whereas sustainability is accepted as a key tenet of good design, resilient design is still in its infancy seeking greater understanding and definition.Dame Jo da Silva RDI has earned global recognition as an engineer who has applied her knowledge and design expertise to improve safety, promote inclusivity, and enhance resilience of communities, cities, and infrastructure globally. Her talk will focus on her personal journey and growing understanding of what resilience means in practice based on her experiences working with vulnerable communities, ‘building back better' following crises and exploring what makes cities resilient.Prior to the Address, 5 new Royal Designers for Industry (RDI) and 4 new Honorary Royal Designers for Industry will be welcomed to the Faculty.The title ‘Royal Designer for Industry' is awarded annually by the RSA to designers of all disciplines who have achieved sustained design excellence, work of aesthetic value and significant benefit to society.The RDI is the highest accolade for designers in the UK. Only 200 designers can hold the title. Non-UK designers may become honorary Royal Designers.The ‘Royal Designers' are responsible for designing the world around us, enriching our cultural heritage, driving innovation, inspiring creativity in others and improving our quality of life.  #RSARDIBecome an RSA Events sponsor: https://utm.guru/udI9xDonate to The RSA: https://utm.guru/udNNBFollow RSA Events on Instagram: https://instagram.com/rsa_events/Follow the RSA on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RSAEventsLike RSA Events on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rsaeventsofficialJoin our Fellowship: https://www.thersa.org/fellowship/join 

RSA Events
How we let Grenfell happen

RSA Events

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 41:43


The Grenfell Tower disaster was the worst residential fire in Britain since World War II and it didn't have to happen. The fire climbed up cladding as flammable as solid petrol. Fire doors failed to self-close. There was no alarm to warn sleeping residents and no evacuation plan. As smoke seeped into their homes, all were told to ‘stay put' and 72 people would lose their lives.Five years on, many of the resulting public inquiry's recommendations remain unmet. Many high-rise buildings have yet to have the same dangerous cladding removed. Peter Apps is deputy editor of Inside Housing and the only journalist to have followed the story of Grenfell from the start. At the RSA, he looks at how such a disaster could take place in the wealthiest borough in the wealthiest city in one of the wealthiest countries in the world and asks: what needs to be done to prevent a tragedy like Grenfell from ever happening again?#RSAhousingBecome an RSA Events sponsor: https://utm.guru/udI9xDonate to The RSA: https://utm.guru/udNNBFollow RSA Events on Instagram: https://instagram.com/rsa_events/Follow the RSA on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RSAEventsLike RSA Events on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rsaeventsofficialJoin our Fellowship: https://www.thersa.org/fellowship/join

Tore Says Show
Wed 16 Nov: A Tore Interview With AniaK Of Poland

Tore Says Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 77:17


Tore gets into the higher levels of foreign policy in her discussion with Polish host Ania. They start with Tore's background, but are soon onto the CAA, Brittany and Hunter, Sean Penn's bodyguards, clones, disguises, and then the Ukraine war and Crimea. But wait there's more. Tore examines RSA networking, global coms, the uniparty, her SOS run, and some Ohio politics in this dense cerebral display. Run time is 1 hour and 16 minutes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Root Causes: A PKI and Security Podcast
Root Causes 256: What Is Harvest and Decrypt?

Root Causes: A PKI and Security Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 19:32


As we prepare for the reality of quantum computers breaking RSA and ECC, a keenly important concept to understand is "Harvest and Decrypt." The practical impact of Harvest and Decrypt is that for secrets with a reasonable lifespan, the quantum computer threat is much closer than you might think, including as early as today. In this episode we explain why that's the case and how this attack is likely to roll out.

Polarised
The gamification of work

Polarised

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 34:40


In this thought-provoking interview series from the RSA, Matthew Taylor, puts a range of leading thinkers on the spot - from writers to business leaders, politicians to journalists - by asking for big ideas to help build effective bridges to our new future. Games developer and writer, Adrian Hon, believes creeping gamification in our workplace, our schools, even our government, is increasingly being used as a way to profit from and coerce us. Adrian joins Matthew to explain why, in a tech-driven world, we often have no choice but to play - and why losing can incur heavy penalties. Adrian Hon is the CEO and founder of Six to Start, co-creator of the world's most successful smartphone fitness game, Zombies, Run! Other games Adrian has designed, like We Tell Stories, have won awards including Best of Show at SXSW and been displayed at MOMA and the Design Museum. Adrian's latest books is, 'You've Been Played: How Corporations, Governments and Schools Use Games to Control Us All'. A Tempo & Talker production for the RSA. In this time of global change, strong communities and initiatives that bring people together are more invaluable than ever before. The RSA Fellowship is a global network of problem solvers. We invite you to join our community today to stay connected, inspired and motivated in the months ahead. You can learn more about the Fellowship or start an application by clicking here.    

RSA Events
Journeys through food, faith and culture

RSA Events

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 50:29


Black African communities have had a seismic impact across British culture, sports, politics, and more. Immigration from countries like Nigeria, Ghana and Zimbabwe has created many vibrant communities across Britain, especially in London. Across food, faith, and culture, the nation's capital has become a melting pot of ideas of what it is to be Black, African, and British. What can the eclectic nature of African London teach us about ties that bind immigrant communities together and to their home countries? How are these communities shaped by ongoing racial discrimination between White and Black communities and between Black Africans and Afro-Caribbeans?  At the RSA, writer, editor and restaurant critic, Jimi Famurewa shares stories of time spent immersed in the culture, tradition, food, and politics of Black African London and explores what this can teach us about the nature of modern London, modern Britain, and modern diaspora life.#RSAjourneysBecome an RSA Events sponsor: https://utm.guru/udI9xDonate to The RSA: https://utm.guru/udNNBFollow RSA Events on Instagram: https://instagram.com/rsa_events/Follow the RSA on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RSAEventsLike RSA Events on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rsaeventsofficialJoin our Fellowship: https://www.thersa.org/fellowship/join 

Screaming in the Cloud
The Quest to Make Edge Computing a Reality with Andy Champagne

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 46:56


About AndyAndy is on a lifelong journey to understand, invent, apply, and leverage technology in our world. Both personally and professionally technology is at the root of his interests and passions.Andy has always had an interest in understanding how things work at their fundamental level. In addition to figuring out how something works, the recursive journey of learning about enabling technologies and underlying principles is a fascinating experience which he greatly enjoys.The early Internet afforded tremendous opportunities for learning and discovery. Andy's early work focused on network engineering and architecture for regional Internet service providers in the late 1990s – a time of fantastic expansion on the Internet.Since joining Akamai in 2000, Akamai has afforded countless opportunities for learning and curiosity through its practically limitless globally distributed compute platform. Throughout his time at Akamai, Andy has held a variety of engineering and product leadership roles, resulting in the creation of many external and internal products, features, and intellectual property.Andy's role today at Akamai – Senior Vice President within the CTO Team - offers broad access and input to the full spectrum of Akamai's applied operations – from detailed patent filings to strategic company direction. Working to grow and scale Akamai's technology and business from a few hundred people to roughly 10,000 with a world-class team is an amazing environment for learning and creating connections.Personally Andy is an avid adventurer, observer, and photographer of nature, marine, and astronomical subjects. Hiking, typically in the varied terrain of New England, with his family is a common endeavor. He enjoys compact/embedded systems development and networking with a view towards their applications in drone technology.Links Referenced: Macrometa: https://www.macrometa.com/ Akamai: https://www.akamai.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andychampagne/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Forget everything you know about SSH and try Tailscale. Imagine if you didn't need to manage PKI or rotate SSH keys every time someone leaves. That'd be pretty sweet, wouldn't it? With Tailscale SSH, you can do exactly that. Tailscale gives each server and user device a node key to connect to its VPN, and it uses the same node key to authorize and authenticate SSH.Basically you're SSHing the same way you manage access to your app. What's the benefit here? Built-in key rotation, permissions as code, connectivity between any two devices, reduce latency, and there's a lot more, but there's a time limit here. You can also ask users to reauthenticate for that extra bit of security. Sounds expensive?Nope, I wish it were. Tailscale is completely free for personal use on up to 20 devices. To learn more, visit snark.cloud/tailscale. Again, that's snark.cloud/tailscaleCorey: Managing shards. Maintenance windows. Overprovisioning. ElastiCache bills. I know, I know. It's a spooky season and you're already shaking. It's time for caching to be simpler. Momento Serverless Cache lets you forget the backend to focus on good code and great user experiences. With true autoscaling and a pay-per-use pricing model, it makes caching easy. No matter your cloud provider, get going for free at gomomento.co/screaming That's GO M-O-M-E-N-T-O dot co slash screamingCorey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I like doing promoted guest episodes like this one. Not that I don't enjoy all of my promoted guest episodes. But every once in a while, I generally have the ability to wind up winning an argument with one of my customers. Namely, it's great to talk to you folks, but why don't you send me someone who doesn't work at your company? Maybe a partner, maybe an investor, maybe a customer. At Macrometa who's sponsoring this episode said, okay, my guest today is Andy Champagne, SVP at the CTO office at Akamai. Andy, thanks for joining me.Andy: Thanks, Corey. Appreciate you having me. And appreciate Macrometa letting me come.Corey: Let's start with talking about you, and then we'll get around to the Macrometa discussion in the fullness of time. You've been at an Akamai for 22 years, which in tech company terms, it's like staying at a normal job for 75 years. What's it been like being in the same place for over two decades?Andy: Yeah, I've got several gold watches. I've been retired twice. Nobody—you know, Akamai—so in the late-90s, I was in the ISP universe, right? So, I was in network engineering at regional ISPs, you know, kind of cutting teeth on, you know, trying to scale networks and deal with the flux of user traffic coming in from the growth of the web. And, you know, frankly, it wasn't working, right?Companies were trying to scale up at the time by adding bigger and bigger servers, and buying literally, you know, servers, the size of refrigerators. And all of a sudden, there was this company that was coming together out in Cambridge, I'm from Massachusetts, and Akamai started in Cambridge, Massachusetts, still headquartered there. And Akamai was forming up and they had a totally different solution to how to solve this, which was amazing. And it was compelling and it drew me there, and I am still there, 22-odd years in, trying to solve challenging problems.Corey: Akamai is one of those companies that I often will describe to people who aren't quite as inclined in the network direction as I've been previously, as one of the biggest companies of the internet that you've never heard of. You are—the way that I think of you historically, I know this is not how you folks frame yourself these days, but I always thought of you as the CDN that you use when it really mattered, especially in the earlier days of the internet where there were not a whole lot of good options to choose from, and the failure mode that Akamai had when I was looking at it many years ago, is that, well, it feels enterprise-y. Well, what does that mean exactly because that's usually used as a disparaging term by any developer in San Francisco. What does that actually unpack to? And to my mind, it was, well, it was one of the more expensive options, which yes, that's generally not a terrible thing, and also that it felt relatively stodgy, for lack of a better term, where it felt like updating things through an API was more of a JSON API—namely a guy named Jason—who would take a ticket, possibly from Jira if they were that modern or not, and then implement it by hand. I don't believe that it is quite that bad these days because, again, this was circa 2012 that we're talking here. But how do you view what Akamai is and does in 2022?Andy: Yeah. Awesome question. There's a lot to unpack in there, including a few clever jabs you threw in. But all good.Corey: [laugh].Andy: [laugh]. I think Akamai has been through a tremendous, tremendous series of evolutions on the internet. And really the one that, you know, we're most excited about today is, you know, earlier this year, we kind of concluded our acquisition of Linode. And if we think about Linode, which brings compute into our platform, you know, ultimately Akamai today is a compute company that has a security offering and has a delivery offering as well. We do more security than delivery, so you know, delivery is kind of something that was really important during our first ten or twelve years, and security during the last ten, and we think compute during the next ten.The great news there is that if you look at Linode, you can't really find a more developer-focused company than Linode. You essentially fall into a virtual machine, you may accidentally set up a virtual machine inadvertently it's so easy. And that is how we see the interface evolving. We see a compute-centric interface becoming standard for people as time moves on.Corey: I'm reminded of one of those ancient advertisements, I forget, I think would have been Sun that put it out where the network is the computer or the computer is the network. The idea of that a computer sitting by itself unplugged was basically just this side of useless, whereas a bunch of interconnected computers was incredibly powerful. That today and 2022 sounds like an extraordinarily obvious statement, but it feels like this is sort of a natural outgrowth of that, where, okay, you've wound up solving the CDN piece of it pretty effectively. Now, you're expanding out into, as you say, compute through the Linode acquisition and others, and the question I have is, is that because there's a larger picture that's currently unfolding, or is this a scenario where well, we nailed the CDN side of the world, well, on that side of the universe, there's no new worlds left to conquer. Let's see what else we can do. Next, maybe we'll start making toasters.Andy: Bunch of bored guys in Cambridge, and we're just like, “Hey, let's go after compute. We don't know what we're doing.” No. There's a little bit more—Corey: Exactly. “We have money and time. Let's combine the two and see what we can come up with.”Andy: [laugh]. Hey, folks, compute: it's the new thing. No, it's more than that. And you know, Akamai has a very long history with the edge, right? And Akamai started—and again, arrogantly saying, we invented the concept of the edge, right, out there in '99, 2000, deploying hundreds and then to thousands of different locations, which is what our CDN ran on top of.And that was a really new, novel concept at the time. We extended that. We've always been flirting with what is called edge computing, which is how do we take pieces of application logic and move them from a centralized point and move them out to the edge. And I mean, cripes, if you go back and Google, like, ‘Akamai edge computing,' we were working on that in 2003, which is a bit like ancient history, right? And we are still on a quest.And literally, we think about it in the company this way: we are on a quest to make edge computing a reality, which is how do you take applications that have centralized chokepoints? And how do you move as much of those applications as possible out to the edge of the network to unblock user performance and experience, and then see what folks developers can enable with that kind of platform?Corey: For me, it seems that the rise of AWS—which is, by extension, the rise of cloud—has been, okay, you wind up building whatever you want for the internet and you stuff it into an AWS region, and oh, that's far away from your customers and/or your entire architecture is terrible so it has to make 20 different calls to the data center in series rather than in parallel. Great, how do we reduce the latency as much as possible? And their answer has largely seemed to be, ah, we'll build more regions, ever closer to you. One of these days, I expect to wake up and find that there's an announcement that they're launching a new region in my spare room here. It just seems to get closer and closer and closer. You look around, and there's a cloud construction crew stalking you to the mall and whatnot. I don't believe that is the direction that the future necessarily wants to be going in.Andy: Yeah, I think there's a lot there. And I would say it this way, which is, you know, having two-ish dozen uber-large data centers is probably not the peak technology of the internet, right? There's more we need to do to be able to get applications truly distributed. And, you know, just to be clear, I mean, Amazon AWS's done amazing stuff, they've projected phenomenal scale and they continue to do so. You know, but at Akamai, the problem we're trying to solve is really different than how do we put a bunch of stuff in a small number of data centers?It's, you know, obviously, there's going to be a centralized aspect, but there also needs to be incredibly integrated and seamless, moves through a gradient of compute, where hey, maybe you're in a very large data center for your AI/ML, kind of, you know, offline data lake type stuff. And then maybe you're in hundreds of locations for mid-tier application processing, and, you know, reconciliation of databases, et cetera. And then all the way out at the edge, you know, in thousands of locations, you should be there for user interactivity. And when I say user interactivity, I don't just mean, you know, read-only, but you've got to be able to do a read-write operation in synchronous fashion with the edge. And that's what we're after is building ultimately a platform for that and looking at tools, technology, and people along the way to help us with it.Corey: I've built something out, my lasttweetinaws.com threading Twitter client, and that's… it's fine. It's stateless, but it's a little too intricate to effectively run in the Lambda@Edge approach, so using their CloudFront offering is simply a non-starter. So, in order to get low latency for people using it around the world, I now have to deploy it simultaneously to 20 different AWS regions.And that is, to be direct, a colossal pain in the ass. No one is really doing stuff like that, that I can see. I had to build a whole lot of customs tooling just to get a CI/CD system up and working. Their strong regional isolation is great for containing blast radii, but obnoxious when you're trying to get something deployed globally. It's not the only way.Combine that with the reality that ingress data transfer to any of their regions is free—generally—but sending data to the internet is a jewel beyond price because all my stars, that is egress bandwidth; there is nothing more valuable on this planet or any other. And that doesn't quite seem right. Because if that were actively true, a whole swath of industries and apps would not be able to exist.Andy: Yeah, you know, Akamai, a huge part of our business is effectively distributing egress bandwidth to the world, right? And that is a big focus of ours. So, when we look at customers that are well positioned to do compute with Akamai, candidly, the filtering question that I typically ask with customers is, “Hey, do you have a highly distributed audience that you want to engage with, you know, a lot of interactivity or you're pushing a lot of content, video, updates, whatever it is, to them?” And that notion of highly distributed applications that have high egress requirements is exactly the sweet spot that we think Akamai has, you know, just a great advantage with, between our edge platform that we've been working on for the last 20-odd years and obviously, the platform that Linode brings into the conversation.Corey: Let's talk a little bit about Macrometa.Andy: Sure.Corey: What is the nature of your involvement with those folks? Because it seems like you sort of crossed into a whole bunch of different areas simultaneously, which is fascinating and great to see, but to my understanding, you do not own them.Andy: No, we don't. No, they're an independent company doing their thing. So, one of the fun hats that I get to wear at Akamai is, I'm responsible for our Akamai Ventures Program. So, we do our corporate investing and all this kind of thing. And we work with a wide array of companies that we think are contributing to the progression of the internet.So, there's a bunch of other folks out there that we work with as well. And Macrometa is on that list, which is we've done an investment in Macrometa, we're board observers there, so we get to sit in and give them input on, kind of, how they're doing things, but they don't have to listen to us since we're only observers. And we've also struck a preferred partnership with them. And what that means is that as our customers are building solutions, or as we're building solutions for our customers, utilizing the edge, you know, we're really excited and we've got Macrometa at the table to help with that. And Macrometa is—you know, just kind of as a refresher—is trying to solve the problem of distributed data access at the edge in a high-performance and almost non-blocking, developer-friendly way. And that is very, very exciting to us, so that's the context in which they're interesting to our continuing evolution of how the edge works.Corey: One of the questions I always like to ask, and it's usually not considered a personal attack when I asked the question—Andy: Oh, good.Corey: But it's, “Describe what the company does.” Now, at some places like the latter days of Yahoo, for example, it's very much a personal attack. But what is it that Macrometa does?Andy: So, Macrometa provides a worldwide, high-speed distributed database that is resident on what today, you could call the edge of the network. And the advantage here is, instead of having one SQL server sitting somewhere, or what you would call a distributed SQL Server, which is two SQL Servers sitting next to one another, Macrometa has a high-speed data store that allows you to, instead of having that centralized SQL Server, have it run natively at the edge of the network. And when you're building applications that run on the edge or anywhere, you need to try to think about how do you have the data as close to the user or to the access point as possible. And that's the problem Macrometa is after and that's what their products today solve. It's an incredibly bright team over there, a fantastic founder-CEO team, and we're really excited to be working with him.Corey: It wasn't intentionally designed this way as a setup when I mentioned a few minutes ago, but yeah, my Twitter client works across the 20-some-odd AWS regions, specifically because it's stateless. All of the state, other than a couple of API keys at provision time, wind up living in the user's browser. If this was something that needed to retain state in any way, like, you know, basically every real application under the sun, this strategy would absolutely not work unless I wound up with some heinous form of circular replication, and then you wind up with a single region going down and everything explodes. Having a cohesive, coherent data layer that spans all of that is key.Andy: Yeah, and you're on to the classical, you know, CompSci issue here around edge, which is if you have 100 edge regions, how do you have consistent state storage between applications running on N of those? And that is the problem Macrometa is after, and, you know, Akamai has been working on this and other variants of the edge problem for some time. We're very excited to be working with the folks at Macrometa. It's a cool group of folks. And it's an interesting approach to the technology. And from what we've seen so far, it's been working great.Corey: The idea of how do I wind up having persistent, scalable state across a bunch of different edge locations is not just a hard computer science problem; it's also a hard cloud economics problem, given the cost of data transit in a bunch of different directions between different providers. It turns, “How much does it cost?” In most cases to a question that can only be answered by well let's run it for a few days and find out. Which is not usually the best way to answer some questions. Like, “Is that power socket live?” “Let's touch it and find out.” Yeah, there are ways you learn that are extraordinarily painful.Andy: Yeah no, nobody should be doing that with power sockets. I think this is one of these interesting areas, which is this is really right in Akamai's backyard but it's not realized by a lot of folks. So, you know, Akamai has, for the last 20-odd-years, been all about how do we egress as much as possible to the entire internet. The weird areas, the big areas, the small areas, the up-and-coming areas, we serve them all. And in doing that, we've built a very large global fabric network, which allows us to get between those locations at a very low cost because we have to move our own content around.And hooking those together, having a essentially private network fabric that hooks the vast majority of our big locations together and then having very high-speed egress out of all of the locations to the internet, you know, that's been how we operate our business at scale effectively and economically for years, and utilizing that for compute data replication, data synchronization tasks is what we're doing.Corey: There are a lot of different solutions that could be used to solve a lot of the persistent data layer question. For example, when you had to solve a similar problem with compute, you had a few options in front of you. Well, we could buy a whole bunch of computers and stuff them in a rack somewhere because, eh, cloud; how hard could it be? Saner heads prevailed, and no, no, no, we're going to buy Linode, which was honestly a genius approach on about three different levels, and I'm still unconvinced the industry sees that for the savvy move that it was. I'm confident that'll change in time.Why not build it yourself? Or alternately, acquire another company that was working on something similar? Instead, you're an investor in a company that's doing this effectively, but not buying them outright?Andy: Yeah, you know, and I think that's—Akamai is beyond at this point in thinking that it's just about ownership, right? I think that this—we don't have to own everything in order to have a successful ecosystem. You know, certainly, we're going to want to own key parts of it and that's where you saw the Linode acquisition, where we felt that was kind of core. But ultimately, we believe in promoting customer choice here. And there's a pretty big role that we have that we think we can help with companies, such as folks like Macrometa where they have, you know, really interesting technology, but they can use leverage, they can use some of our go-to-market, they can use, you know, some of our, you know, kind of guidance and expertise on running a startup—which, by the way, it's not an easy job for these folks—and that's what we're there to do.So, with things like Linode, you know, we want to bring it in, and we want to own it because we think it's just so compelling, and it fits so well with where we want to go. With folks like Macrometa, you know, that's still a really young area. I mean, you know, Linode was in business for many, many, many years and was a good-sized business, you know, before we bought them.Corey: Yeah, there's something to be said, for letting the market shake something out rather than having to do it all yourself as trailblazers. I'm a big believer in letting other companies do things. I mean, one of the more annoying things, from my position, is this idea where AWS takes a product strategy of, “Yes.” That becomes a bit of a challenge when they're trying to wind up building compete decks, and how do we defeat the competition? And it's like, “Wh—oh, you're talking about the other hyperscalers?” “No, we're talking with the service team one floor away.”That just seems a little on the strange side to—some companies get too big and too expensive on some level. I think that there's a very real risk of Akamai trying to do everything on the internet if you continue to expand and start listing out things that are not currently in your portfolio. And, oh, we should do that, too, and we should do that, too, and we should do that, too. And suddenly, it feels pretty closely aligned with you're trying to do everything.Andy: Yeah. I think we've been a company who has been really disciplined and not doing everything. You know, we started with CDN. And you know, we're talking '98 to 2010, you know, CDN was really our thing, and we feel we executed really well on that. We probably executed quite quietly and well, but feel we executed pretty well on that.Really from 2010, 2012 to 2020, it was all about security, right? And, you know, we built, you know, pretty amazing security business, hundred percent of SaaS business, on top of our CDN platform with security. And now we're thinking about—we did that route relatively quietly, as well, and now we're thinking about the next ten years and how do we have that same kind of impact on cloud. And that is exciting because it's not just centralized cloud; it's about a distributed cloud vision. And that is really compelling and that's why you know, we've got great folks that are still here and working on it.Corey: I'm a big believer in the idea that you can start getting distilled truth out of folks, particularly companies, the more you compress the space they have to wind up saying. Something that's why Twitter very often lets people tip their hands. But a commonplace that I look for is the title field on a company's website. So, when I go over to akamai.com, you position yourself as something that fits in a small portion of a tweet, which is good. Whenever have a Tolstoy-length paragraph in the tooltip title for the browser tab, that's a problem.But you say simply, “Security, cloud delivery, performance. Akamai.” Which is beautifully well done, but security comes first. I have a mental model of Akamai as being a CDN and some other stuff that I don't fully understand. But again, I first encountered you folks in the early-2000s.It turns out that it's hard to change existing opinions. Are you a CDN Company or are you a security company?Andy: Oh, super—Corey: In other words, if someone wind up mis-alphabetizing that and they're about to get censured after this show because, “No, we're a CDN, first; why did you put security first?”Andy: You know, so all those things feed off each other, right? And this has been a question where it's like, you know, our security layer and our distributed WAF and other security offerings run on top of the CDN layer. So, it's all about building a common compute edge and then leveraging that for new applications. CDN was the first application. The next and second application was security.And we think the third application, but probably not the final one, is compute. So, I think I don't think anyone in marketing will be fired by the ordering that they did on that. I think that ultimately now, you know, for—just if we look at it from a monetary perspective, right, we do more security than we do CDN. So, there's a lot that we have in the security business. And you know, compute's got a long way to go, especially because it's not just one big data center of compute; it is a different flavor than I think folks have seen before.Corey: When I was at RSA, you folks were one of the exhibitors there. And I like to make the common observation that there are basically six companies that exhibit at RSA. Yeah, there are hundreds of booths, but it's the same six products, all marketed are different logos with different words. And they all seem to approach it from a few relatively expectable personas and positions. I've always found myself agreeing with the things that you folks say, and maybe it's because of my own network-centric background, but it doesn't seem like you take the same approach that a number of other companies do or it's, “Oh, it has to start with the way that developers write their first line of code.” Instead, it seems to take a holistic view that comes from the starting position of everything talks to each other on a network basis, and from here, let's move forward. Is that accurate to how you view the security space?Andy: Yeah, you know, our view of the security space is—again, it's a network-centric one, right? And our work in the security space initially came from really big DDoS attacks, right? And how do we stop Distributed Denial of Service attacks from impacting folks? And that was the initial benefit that we brought. And from there, we evolved our story around, you know, how do we have a more sophisticated WAF? How do we have predictive capabilities at the edge?So ultimately, we're not about ingraining into your process of how your thing was written or telling you how to write it. We're about, you know, essentially being that perimeter edge that is watching and monitoring everything that comes into you to make sure that, you know, hey, we're not seeing Log4j-type exploits coming at you, and we'll let you know if we do, or to block malicious activity. So, we fit on anything, which is why our security business has been so successful. If you have an application on the edge, you can put Akamai Security in front of it and it's going to make your application better. That's been super compelling for the last, you know, again, last decade or so that we've really been focused on security.Corey: I think that it is a mistake to take a security model that starts with a view of what people have in front of them day-to-day—like, I look at my laptop and say, “Oh, this is what I spend my time on. This is where all security must start and stop.” Because yeah, okay, great. If you get physical access to my laptop, it's pretty much game over on some level. But yeah, if you're at a point where you're going to bust into my house and threaten me in order to get access to my laptop, here you go.There are no secrets that I am in possession of that are worth dying for. It's just money and that's okay. But looking at it through a lens of the internet has gone from science experiment to thing that the nerds love to use to a cornerstone of the fabric of modern society. And that's not because of the magic supercomputer that we all have in our pockets, but rather because those magic supercomputers can talk to the sum total of human knowledge and any other human anywhere on the planet, basically, ever. And I don't know that that evolution has been really appreciated by society at large as far as just how empowering that can be. But it completely changes the entire security paradigm from back in the '80s when I got started, don't put untrusted floppy disks into your computer or it might literally explode on your desk.Andy: [laugh]. So, we're talking about floppy disks now? Yes. So, first of all, the scope of impact of the internet has increased, meaning what you can do with it has increased. And directly proportional to that increase the threat vectors have increased, right? And the more systems are connected, the more vulnerabilities there are.So listen, it's easy to scare anybody about security on the internet. It is a topic that is an infinite well of scariness. At the same time, you know, and not just Akamai, but there's a lot of companies out there that can, whether it's making your development more secure, making your pipeline, your digital supply chain a more secure, or then you know where Akamai is, we're at the end, which is you know, helping to wrap around your entire web presence to make it more secure, there's a variety of companies that are out there really making the internet work from a security perspective. And honestly, there's also been tremendous progress on the operating system front in the last several years, which previously was not as good—probably is way to characterize it—as it is today. So, and you know, at the end of the day, the nerds are still out there working, right?We are out here still working on making the internet, you know, scale better, making it more secure, making it more robust because we're probably not done, right? You know, phones are awesome, and tablet devices, et cetera, are awesome, but we've probably got more coming. We don't quite know what that is yet, but we want to have the capacity, safety, and compute to power it.Corey: How does Macrometa as a persistent data layer tie into your future vision of security first as what Akamai does? I can see a few directions, but I'm going to go out on a limb and guess that before you folks decided to make an investment in such a thing, you probably gave it more than the 30 seconds or whatnot or so a thought that I've had to wind up putting these pieces together.Andy: So, a few things there. First of all, Macrometa, ultimately, we see them coming in the front door with our compute solution, right? Because as folks are building capabilities on the edge, “Hey, I want to run compute on the edge. How do I interoperate with data?” The worst answer possible is, “Well, call back to the centralized data store.”So, we want to ensure that customers have choice and performance options for distributed data access. Macrometa fits great there. However, now pause that; let's transition back to the security point you raised, which is, you know, coordinating an edge data security platform is a really complicated thing. Because you want to make sure that threats that are coming in on one side of the network, or you know, in one given country, you know, are also understood throughout the network. And there's a definite role for a data platform in doing that.We obviously, you know, for the last ten years have built several that help accomplish that at scale for our network, but we also recognize that, you know, innovation in data platforms is probably not done. And you know, Macrometa's got some pretty interesting approaches. So, we're very interested in working with them and talking jointly with customers, which we've done a bunch of, to see how that progresses. But there's tie-ins, I would say, mostly on compute, but secondarily, there's a lot of interesting areas with real-time security intel, they can be very useful as well.Corey: Since I have you here, I would love to ask you something that's a little orthogonal to the rest of this conversation, but I don't even care about that because that's why it's my show; I can ask what I want.Andy: Oh, no.Corey: Talk to me a little bit about the Linode acquisition. Because when it first came out, I thought, “Oh, Linode must not be doing well, so it's an acqui-hire scenario.” Followed by, “Wait a minute, that doesn't seem quite right.” And I dug deeper, and suddenly, I started to see a bunch of things that made sense. But that's just my outside perspective. I prefer to see you justify what it is that you've done.Andy: Justify what we've done. Well, with that positive framing—Corey: Exactly. “Explain yourself. How dare you, sir?”Andy: [laugh]. “What are you doing?” So, to take that, which is first of all, Linode was doing great when we bought them and they're continuing to do great now. You know, backstory here is actually a fun one. So, I personally have been a customer of Linode for about 13 years, and you know, super familiar with their offerings, as we're a bunch of other folks at Akamai.And what ultimately attracted us to Linode was, first of all, from a strategic perspective, is we talked about how Akamai thinks about Compute being a gradient of compute: you've got the edge, you've got kind of a middle tier, and you've got more centralized locations. Akamai has the edge, we've got the middle, we didn't have the central. Linode has got the central. And obviously, you know, we're going to see some significant expansion of capacity and scale there, but they've got the central location. And, you know, ultimately, we feel that there's a lot of passion in Linode.You know, they're a Linux open-source-centric company, and believe it or not Akamai is, too. I mean, you know, that's kind of how it works. And there was a great connection between the sorts of folks that they had and how they think about customers. Linode was a really customer-driven company. I mean, they were fanatical.I mean, I as a, you know, customer of $30 a month personally, could open a ticket and I'd get an answer in five minutes. And that's very similar to kind of how Akamai is driven, which is we're very customer-centric, and when a customer has a problem or need something different, you know, we're on it. So, there's literally nothing bad there and it's a super exciting beginning of a new chapter for Akamai, which is really how do we tackle compute? We're super excited to have the Linode team. You know, they're still mostly down in Philadelphia doing their thing.And, you know, we've hired substantially and we're continuing to do so, so if you want to work there, drop a note over. And it's been fantastic. And it's one of our, you know, really large acquisitions that we've done, and I think we were really lucky to find a great company in such a good position and be able to make it work.Corey: From my perspective, one of the areas that has me excited about the acquisition stems from what I would consider to be something of a customer-base culture misalignment between the two companies. One of the things that I have always enjoyed about Linode—and in the interest of full transparency, they have been a periodic sponsor over the last five or six years of my ridiculous nonsense. I believe that they are not at the moment which I expect you to immediately rectify after this conversation, of course.Andy: I'll give you my credit card. Yeah.Corey: Excellent. Excellent. We do not get in the way of people trying to give you money. But it was great because that's exactly it. I could take a credit card in the middle of the night and spin up things on Linode.And it was one of those companies that aligned very closely to how I tended to view cloud infrastructure from the perspective of, I need a Linux box, or I need a bunch of Linux boxes right there, right now, and I don't have 12 weeks to go to cloud school to learn the intricacies of a given provider. It more or less just worked in a whole bunch of easy ways. Whereas if I wanted to roll out at Akamai, it was always I would pull up the website, and it's, “Click here to talk to our enterprise sales team.” And that tells me two things. One, it is probably going to be outside of my signing authority because no one trusts me with money for obvious reasons, when I was an employee, and two, you will not be going to space today because those conversations always take time.And it's going to be—if I'm in a hurry and trying to get something out the door, that is going to act as a significant drag on capability. Now, most of your customers do not launch things by the seat of their pants, three hours after the idea first occurs to them, but on Linode, that often seems to be the case. The idea of addressing developers early on in the ‘it's just an idea' phase. I can't shake the feeling that there's a definite future in which Linode winds up being able to speak much more effectively to enterprise, while Akamai also learns to speak to, honestly, half-awake shitposters at 2 a.m. when we're building something heinous.Andy: I feel like you've been sitting in on our strategy presentations. Maybe not the shitposters, but the rest of it. And I think the way that I would couch it, my corporate-speak of that, would be that there's a distinct yin and yang, there a complementary nature between the customer bases of Akamai, which has, you know, an incredible list of enterprise customers—I mean, the who's-who of enterprise customers, Akamai works with them—but then, you know, Linode, who has really tremendous representation of developers—that's what we'll use for the name posts—like, folks like myself included, right, who want to throw something together, want to spin up a VM, and then maybe tear it down and never do it again, or maybe set up 100 of them. And, to your point, the crossover opportunities there, which is, you know, Linode has done a really good job of having small customers that grow over time. And by having Akamai, you know, you can now grow, and never have to leave because we're going to be able to bring enough scale and throughput and, you know, professional help services as you need it to help you stay in the ecosystem.And similarly, Akamai has a tremendous—you know, the benefit of a tremendous set of enterprise customers who are out there, you know, frankly, looking to solve their compute challenges, saying, “Hey, I have a highly distributed application. Akamai, how can you help me with this?” Or, “Hey, I need presence in x or y.” And now we have, you know, with Linode, the right tools to support that. And yes, we can make all kinds of jokes about, you know, Akamai and Linode and different, you know, people and archetypes we appeal to, but ultimately, there's an alignment between Akamai and Linode on how we approach things, which is about Linux, open-source, it's about technical honesty and simplicity. So, great group of folks. And secondly, like, I think the customer crossover, you're right on it. And we're very excited for how that goes.Corey: I also want to call out that Macrometa seems to have split this difference perfectly. One of the first things I visit on any given company's page when I'm trying to understand them is the pricing page. It's one of those areas where people spend the least time, early on, but it's also where they tend to be the most honest. Maybe that's why. And I look for two things, and Macrometa has both of them.The first is a ‘try it for free, right now, get started.' It's a free-tier approach. Because even if you charge $10 or whatnot, there are many developers working on things in odd hours where they don't necessarily either have the ability to make that purchase decision, know that they have the ability to make that purchase decision, or are willing to do that by the seat of their pants. So, ‘get started for free' is important; it means you can develop right now. Conversely, there are a bunch of enterprise procurement departments out there who will want a whole bunch of custom things.Custom SLAs, custom support responses, custom everything, and they also don't know how to sign a check that doesn't have two commas in it. So, you don't probably want to avoid those customers, but what they're looking for is an enterprise offering that is no price. There should not be a price tag on that because you will never get it right for everyone, but what they want to see is ‘click here to contact sales.' That is coded language for, “We are serious professionals and know who you are and how you like to operate.” They've got both and I think that is absolutely the right decision.Andy: It do—Corey: And whatever you have in between those two is almost irrelevant.Andy: No, I think you're on it. And Macrometa, their pricing philosophy allows you to get in and try it with zero friction, which is super important. Like, I don't even have to use a credit card. I can experiment for free, I can try it for free, but then as I grow their pricing tier kind of scales along with that. And it's a—you know, that is the way that folks try applications.I always try to think about, hey, you know, if I'm on a team and we're tasked with putting together a proof of concept for something in two days, and I've got, you know, a couple folks working with me, how do I do that? And you don't have time for procurement, you might need to use the free thing to experiment. So, there is a lot that they can do. And you know, their pricing—this transparency of pricing that they have is fantastic. Now, Linode, also very transparent, we don't have a free tier, but you know, you can get in for very low friction and try that as well.Corey: Yeah, companies tend to go through a maturity curve evolution on these things. I've talked to companies that purely view it is how much money a given customer is spending determines how much attention they get. And it's like, “Yeah, maybe take a look through some of your smaller users or new signups there.” Yeah, they're spending $10 a month or whatnot, but their email address is@cocacola.com. Just spitballing here; maybe you might want a white-glove a few of those folks, just because not everyone comes in the door via an RFP.Andy: Yep. We look at customers for what your potential is, right? Like, you know, how much could you end up spending with us, right? You know, so if you're building your application on Linode, and you're going to spend $20, for the first couple months, that's totally fine. Get in there, experiment, and then you know, in the next several years, let's see where it goes. So, you're exactly right, which is, you know, that username@enterprisedomain.com is often much more indicative than what the actual bill is on a monthly basis.Corey: I always find it a little strange when I have a vendor that I'm doing business with, and then suddenly, an account person reaches out, like, hey, let's just have a call for half an hour to talk about what you're doing and how you're doing it. It's my immediate response to that these days, just of too many years doing that, as, “I really need to look at that bill. How much are we spending, again?” And I honestly, usually not that much because believe it or not, when you focus on cloud economics for a living, you pay attention to your credit card bills, but it is always interesting to see who reaches out and who doesn't. That's been a strange approach, and there is no one right answer for all of this.If every free tier account user of any given cloud provider wound up getting constant emails from their account managers, it's how desperate are you to grow revenue, and what are you about to do to pricing? At some level of becomes… unhelpful.Andy: I can see that. I've had, personally, situations where I'm a trial user of something, and all of a sudden I get emails—you know, using personal email addresses, no Akamai involvement—all of a sudden, I'm getting emails. And I'm like, “Really? Did I make the priority list for you to call me and leave me a voicemail, and then email me?” I don't know how that's possible.So, from a personal perspective, totally see that. You know, from an account development perspective, you know, kind of with the Akamai hat on, it's challenging, right? You know, folks are out there trying to figure out where business is going to come from. And I think if you're able to get an indicator that somebody, you know, maybe you're going to call that person at enterprisedomain.com to try to figure out, you know, hey, is this real and is this you with a side project or is this you with a proof of concept for something that could be more fruitful? And, you know, Corey, they're probably just calling you because you're you.Corey: One of the things that I was surprised by where I saw the exact same thing. I started getting a series of emails from my account manager for Google Workspaces. Okay, and then I really did a spit-take when I realized this was on my personal address. Okay… so I read this carefully because what the hell is happening? Oh, they're raising prices and it's a campaign. Great.Now, my one-user vanity domain is going to go from $6 a month to $8 a month or whatever. Cool, I don't care. This is not someone actively trying to reach out as a human being. It's an outreach campaign. Cool, fair. But that's the problem, on some level, for super-tiny customers. It's a, what is it, is it a shakedown? What are they about to yell at me for?Andy: No, I got the same thing. My Google Workspace personal account, which is, like, two people, right? Like, and I got an email and then I think, like, a voicemail. And I'm like, I read the email and I'm like—you know, it's going—again, it's like, it was like six something and now it's, like, eight something a month. So, it's like, “Okay. You're all right.”Corey: Just go—that's what you have a credit card for. Go ahead and charge it. It's fine. Now, yeah, counterpoint if you're a large company, and yeah, we're just going to be raising prices by 20% across the board for everyone, and you look at this and like, that's a phone number. Yeah, I kind of want some special outreach and conversations there. But it's odd.Andy: It's interesting. Yeah. They're great.Corey: Last question before we call this an episode. In 22 years, how have you seen the market change from your perspective? Most people do not work in the industry from one company's perspective for as long as you have. That gives you a somewhat privileged position to see, from a point of relative stability, what the industry has done.Andy: So—Corey: What have you noticed?Andy: —and I'm going to give you an answer, which is about, like, the sales cycle, which is it used to be about meetings and about everybody coming together and used to have to occasionally wear a suit. And there would be, you know, meetings where you would need to get a CEO or CFO to personally see a presentation and decide something and say, “Okay, we're going with X or Y. We're going to make a decision.” And today, those decisions are, pretty far and wide, made much, much further down in the organization. They're made by developers, team leads, project managers, program managers.So, the way people engage with customers today is so different. First of all, like, most meetings are still virtual. I mean, like, yeah, we have physical meetings and we get together for things, but like, so much more is done virtually, which is cool because we built the internet so we wouldn't have to go anywhere, so it's nice that we got that landed. It's unfortunate that we had to do with Covid to get there, but ultimately, I think that purchasing decisions and technology decisions are distributed so much more deeply into the organization than they were. It used to be a, like, C-level thing. We're now seeing that stuff happened much further down in the organization.We see that inside Akamai and we see it with our customers as well. It's been, honestly, refreshing because you tend to be able to engage with technical folks when you're talking about technical products. And you know, the business folks are still there and they're helping to guide the discussions and all that, but it's a much better time, I think, to be a technical person now than it probably was 20 years ago.Corey: I would say that being a technical person has gotten easier in a bunch of ways; it's gotten harder in a bunch of ways. I would say that it has transformed. I was very opposed to the idea that oh, as a sysadmin, why should I learn to write code? And in retrospect, it was because I wasn't sure I could do it and it felt like the rising tide was going to drown me. And in hindsight, yeah, it was the right direction for the industry to go in.But I'm also sensitive to folks who don't want to, midway through their career, pick up an entirely new skill set in order to remain relevant. I think that it is a lot easier to do some things. Back when Akamai started, it took an intimate knowledge of GCC compiler flags, in most cases, to host a website. Now, it is checking a box on a web page and you're done. Things have gotten easier.The abstractions continue to slip below the waterline, so the things we have to care about getting more and more meaningful to the business. We're nowhere near our final form yet, but I'm very excited about how accessible this industry is to folks that previously would not have been, while also disheartened by just how much there is to know. Otherwise, “Oh yeah, that entire aspect of the way that this core thing that runs my business, yeah, that's basically magic and we just hope the magic doesn't stop working, or we make a sacrifice to the proper God, which is usually a giant trillion-dollar company.” And the sacrifice is, of course, engineering time combined with money.Andy: You know, technology is all about abstraction layers, right? And I think—that's my view, right—and we've been spending the last several decades, not, ‘we' Akamai; ‘we' the technology industry—on, you know, coming up with some pretty solid abstraction layers. And you're right, like, the, you know, GCC j6—you know, -j6—you know, kind of compiler tags not that important anymore, we could go back in time and talk about inetd, the first serverless. But other than that, you know, as we get to the present day, I think what's really interesting is you can contribute technically without being a super coding nerd. There's all kinds of different technical approaches today and technical disciplines that aren't just about development.Development is super important, but you know, frankly, the sysadmin skill set is more valuable today if you look at what SREs have become and how important they are to the industry. I mean, you know, those are some of the most critical folks in the entire piping here. So, don't feel bad for starting out as a sysadmin. I think that's my closing comment back to you.Corey: I think that's probably a good place to leave it. I really want to thank you for being so generous with your time.Andy: Anytime.Corey: If people want to learn more about how you see the world, where can they find you?Andy: Yeah, I mean, I guess you could check me out on LinkedIn. Happy to shoot me something there and happy to catch up. I'm pretty much read-only on social, so I don't pontificate a lot on Twitter, but—Corey: Such a good decision.Andy: Feel free to shoot me something on LinkedIn if you want to get in touch or chat about Akamai.Corey: Excellent. And of course, our thanks goes well, to the fine folks at Macrometa who have promoted this episode. It is always appreciated when people wind up supporting this ridiculous nonsense that I do. My guest has been Andy Champagne SVP at the CTO office over at Akamai. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an insulting comment that will not post successfully because your podcast provider of choice wound up skimping out on a provider who did not care enough about a persistent global data layer.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Hacker Valley Studio
Cultivating Client Trust at Cybercon with NTT's Dirk Hodgson & Adam Green

Hacker Valley Studio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 40:39


Hacker Valley: On the Road is a curated collection of conversations that Chris and Ron have had during conferences and events around the globe. In this episode, NTT's Dirk Hodgson, Director of Cybersecurity, and Adam Green, Senior Cybersecurity Executive, speak with the Hacker Valley team at CyberCon in Melbourne, Australia. Dirk and Adam cover the intersection of their roles at NTT, their experiences at conferences like RSA, their country's cybersecurity industry, and their team's cultivated trust with clients.    Timecoded Guide: [00:00] Reuniting at CyberCon after years of COVID limiting security conferences [06:30] Differentiating Australia's cybersecurity industry from the rest of the world [10:48] Watching current cyber trends with CMMC & the Essential 8 frameworks [25:41] Creating interpersonal communication in a technology-driven industry [34:58] Building trust by knowing your clients & your adversaries equally   Sponsor Links: Thank you to our sponsor Axonius for bringing this episode to life! Life is complex. But it's not about avoiding challenges or fearing failure. Just ask Simone Biles — the greatest gymnast of all time. Want to learn more about how Simone controls complexity? Watch her video at axonius.com/simone For more than 2 decades, NetSPI has helped companies discover and remediate critical security issues through its platform-driven, human delivered security test. NetSPI is much more than a pentesting company, bringing you the most comprehensive suite of offensive security solutions. Visit netspi.com/HVM to learn more.   How are Australian cybersecurity practitioners different from the rest of the world? According to Adam, the past 3 years have led to a massive shift in maturity for Australia's cybersecurity industry. Previously, Australia relied on its physical isolation as a country as a means of security, but breaches have become more high profile and more impactful for Australian businesses in recent years. Now, Adam is pleased to see there be a greater understanding beyond the 101 of cybersecurity and more collaboration with security teams. “Three years ago, we used to say Australia was 5 years behind the rest of the world [in cybersecurity]. We used to think, because of proximity to the rest of the world, we were pretty safe, but it's definitely become more of a professional approach to security now.” — Adam   How do your roles as Director and Executive work together at NTT?  For Dirk, cybersecurity is the ultimate team sport— and Adam is an impactful element to his cybersecurity team. While Adam often focuses on strategic planning through his background as a practitioner, Dirk enjoys how his business-driven perspective contrasts with Adam and with other members of the team. With a variety of experiences and perspectives in the room, NTT can cover issues from all sides, instead of falling victim to tunnel vision. “Adam is the person on the team, who's great at that scenario planning piece. ‘Here are the things that are gonna go wrong.' Whereas myself and a couple of the other people on the team, look at that go, ‘What's that going to cost the organization?'” —Dirk   Where are the strengths and weaknesses in communication in cybersecurity? Just like Dirk's thoughts about cybersecurity being a team sport, Adam believes that you have to cultivate a team member-like trust with your clients. The client in an initial conversation might seem defensive of your advice or critical of your actions. However, Adam explains that establishing credibility, especially in the business-focused cyber industry in Australia, goes a long way to creating the opportunity for more casual conversations down the line.  “What we find is, in Australia in particular, it's about not just the company, but you as an individual. Do you have my back? Can I trust you? If I don't like you, will you at least mitigate my risk for me? You have to establish credibility real fast.” —Adam   What advice would you give to someone interested in cultivating more trust between clients and their team? Dirk loves a good James Bond villain, but the average hacker attacking the average business is nothing like the movies. Establishing trust with clients starts with not only understanding what they need, Dirk explains, but also knowing the most likely threats beyond the showstopping Blackhats of media fame. Being able to explain to and protect clients from the most common threats keeps their data safest and strengthens their trust in your team. “I think it's about making sure that you know what the worst case scenario is, what the most dangerous course of action that the attacker or a potential attacker could follow, but also, being able to talk credibly about what's the most likely threat.” —Dirk --------------- Links: Keep up with our guest Dirk Hodgson on LinkedIn Keep up with our guest Adam Green on LinkedIn Learn more about NTT on LinkedIn and the NTT website Connect with Ron Eddings on LinkedIn and Twitter Connect with Chris Cochran on LinkedIn and Twitter Purchase a HVS t-shirt at our shop Continue the conversation by joining our Discord Check out Hacker Valley Media and Hacker Valley Studio

Polarised
Special series: ReGeneration Rising

Polarised

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 34:52


In this special series, we explore how regenerative practice is helping people collectively re-design their communities, cities and economies to create a thriving home for all on our planet. In this first episode, co-hosts Josie Warden and Daniel Christian Wahl discuss what it means to think and act regeneratively.Every second of every day, our cells are fed, nourished, and regenerated by the living systems around us -- and our presence, in turn, enables other species to thrive. But our current way of living is interfering with these vital processes and undermining the very systems that enable life on this planet. As communities around the world grapple with the devastating consequences of a climate emergency and converging social and economic crises, there is growing consensus that our current way of thinking will not bring about the change we need in the time we have. We urgently need to rethink who we are as a species and our role on this planet. We need a new collective story for humanity – one that recognises our interconnection with the rest of life on Earth and galvanises collaborative action towards regenerative futures.     Josie Warden leads regenerative design practice at the RSA, working with policy makers, businesses and civil society organisations to explore how design can shape regenerative futures where people and planet thrive together for the long term.Dr Daniel Christian Wahl works internationally as a consultant and educator in regenerative design, whole systems design and transformative innovation. His vast catalogue of forward-thinking work (notably his book Designing Regenerative Cultures) has inspired and enabled people from all walks of life to apply regenerative design to their own contexts. In 2021, he was awarded the RSA's prestigious Bicentenary Medal for his contribution to the field of regenerative design.Join the Re-generation: https://www.thersa.org/regenerative-futures

Real Synthetic Audio For iTunes

I still have no idea whats going on with my life, my work, etc, and its still causing me anxiety issues. But I'm being kind to myself and setting more reasonable goals for myself. For today it was getting RSA published so that others can enjoy what I do. I don't know who you are, or where you're from, but if my 40 minutes a week makes you smile, mission accomplished! ES23 - Never (Antibody)Minuit Machine - ContradictionsIntent Outtake - Tabula Rasa (Chainreactor)Vanguard - Move OutSolitary Experiments - Head Over HeelsSimon Carter & Fabsi - We Are The Witches (Teknovore)Katran - Centre CircledavaNtage - Grey Roads (Mesh) http://synthetic.org/https://www.instagram.com/djtodd242/https://twitter.com/djtoddrsahttps://www.youtube.com/c/RealSyntheticAudio

Entendez-vous l'éco ?
Que faire du RSA ?

Entendez-vous l'éco ?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 5:02


durée : 00:05:02 - Le Pourquoi du comment : économie et social - par : Dominique Méda - En 2009, le Revenu Minimum d'Insertion (RMI) a été transformé en Revenu de Solidarité Active (RSA) au prétexte de mieux inciter les allocataires à reprendre un emploi. Or, le RSA n'a cessé d'être critiqué, tout comme l'a été le RMI avant lui. Que faire de ce Revenu ?

RSA Events
Viral justice – the big impact of small change

RSA Events

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 61:34


Small change can have a big impact on our lives. Through knock-on effects and cumulative action, little shifts have the potential for great harm and great good. And when it is easy to feel overwhelmed at the scale of change needed to solve big, structural problems, we need to recognise the value of practical change we can enact on a daily basis.In recent times, the twin plagues of Covid-19 and anti-Black police violence have caused Ruha Benjamin to rethink the importance of these every day, individual actions across our lives and societies - from the impact of the chronic stress of racism and inequities in our health care system to the power of community organisers who are fostering mutual aid and collective healing.Here at the RSA, Ruha Benjamin will demonstrate the impact of these micro-changes, drawing on her personal experience and professional research on race, technology, and justice. Alongside the chair of the discussion, Mandu Reid, leader of the Women's Equality Party, Ruha will offer an inspiring and practical vision of how seemingly minor decisions and habits can spread virally and have exponentially positive effects.#RSAviraljusticeBecome an RSA Events sponsor: https://utm.guru/udI9xDonate to The RSA: https://utm.guru/udNNBFollow RSA Events on Instagram: https://instagram.com/rsa_events/Follow the RSA on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RSAEventsLike RSA Events on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rsaeventsofficialJoin our Fellowship: https://www.thersa.org/fellowship/join 

Bankless
Bitboy | Two Different Worlds

Bankless

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 69:46


Bitboy -- aka Ben Armstrong -- is the notorious crypto influencer with one of the largest audiences in the space. After some jabs back and forth on twitter, we're bringing him on Bankless to clear the air. What's up with Ryan's glasses? Is Bitboy changing his approach? ------  Earnifi | Check For Your Unclaimed Airdrops, POAPs, & NFTs https://bankless.cc/earnifi  ------  SUBSCRIBE TO NEWSLETTER:          https://newsletter.banklesshq.com/    ️ SUBSCRIBE TO PODCAST:                 http://podcast.banklesshq.com/    ------ BANKLESS SPONSOR TOOLS:  ️ ARBITRUM | SCALING ETHEREUM https://bankless.cc/Arbitrum   ACROSS | BRIDGE TO LAYER 2 https://bankless.cc/Across   BRAVE | THE BROWSER NATIVE WALLET https://bankless.cc/Brave   NEXO | CRYPTO FINANCIAL HUB https://bankless.cc/Nexo   LEDGER | NANO HARDWARE WALLETS https://bankless.cc/Ledger  ️FUEL | THE MODULAR EXECUTION LAYER https://bankless.cc/Fuelpod  ----- Topics Covered 0:00 Intro 6:00 Bitboy's Glasses 8:00 The Rant 14:50 RSA's Perspective 19:30 Bitboy's Bill 24:20 Ethical Platforms 28:05 Beef with SBF 34:24 Changing in Crypto 41:00 Two Different Worlds 44:55 Shortcuts 50:45 Disclosures 52:20 Heavy is the Head 59:41 Man of the People 1:03:03 Best Practices 1:05:50 Closing Thoughts ----- Not financial or tax advice. This channel is strictly educational and is not investment advice or a solicitation to buy or sell any assets or to make any financial decisions. This video is not tax advice. Talk to your accountant. Do your own research. Disclosure. From time-to-time I may add links in this newsletter to products I use. I may receive commission if you make a purchase through one of these links. Additionally, the Bankless writers hold crypto assets. See our investment disclosures here: https://www.bankless.com/disclosures 

Polarised
Behind the scenes at Brompton Bicycles

Polarised

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 32:35


In this thought-provoking interview series from the RSA, Matthew Taylor, puts a range of leading thinkers on the spot - from writers to business leaders, politicians to journalists - by asking for big ideas to help build effective bridges to our new future. Matthew meets with Will Butler-Adams, the CEO of Brompton Bicycles, originally a small British company that has grown to become one of the biggest cycling brand names in the world.Will discusses the challenge of producing intricate folding bikes at scale, why passion is key to his success and why he's convinced that bikes can help solve global problems and improve our lives. Will Butler-Adams is a chartered engineer and CEO of Brompton Bicycle Limited. He was appointed OBE in the 2015 New Year Honours, featured in multiple publications including the Financial Times, and delivered talks forGoogle and PwC. His latest book is, The Brompton: Engineering for Change (with Dan Davies). A Tempo & Talker production for the RSA. In this time of global change, strong communities and initiatives that bring people together are more invaluable than ever before. The RSA Fellowship is a global network of problem solvers. We invite you to join our community today to stay connected, inspired and motivated in the months ahead. You can learn more about the Fellowship or start an application by clicking here.

The Paid Search Podcast | A Weekly Podcast About Google Ads and Online Marketing
334: The Best Google Ads Q&A Episode We've Ever Done

The Paid Search Podcast | A Weekly Podcast About Google Ads and Online Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 50:04


Please support our sponsors because they make the show possible!Get Opteo for free for two months - https://opteo.com/pspJason Rothman - https://rothmanppc.com/Chris Schaeffer - https://www.chrisschaeffer.com/Show Notes:In this episode, we're once again opening the proverbial mailbag once again and answering listener questions about the "golden triangle", competitor searches, first bids for manual bidding, Performance Max, and more. (5:10) Is smart bidding + RSA + broad match ideal?(15:41) Should I block competitor searches?(22:03) How to choose your first bids for manual bidding?(29:29) How do you qualify the quality of the lead using the search term?(38:45) Does Performance Max work well for all industries?We need your help! Please help us grow the show:If you don't mind, please leave us a rating and review where you listen to podcasts and share the show with friends because it helps us grow the show and create more content. Send us your questions here - https://paidsearchpodcast.com/contact-us/Subscribe on YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/c/ThePaidSearchPodcast First 100 Episodes - https://paidsearchpodcast.com/archive/   Adventures by A Himitsu https://soundcloud.com/a-himitsuCreative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0Free Download / Stream: http://bit.ly/2Pj0MtTMusic released by Argofox https://youtu.be/8BXNwnxaVQEMusic promoted by Audio Library

RSA Events
Edible economics

RSA Events

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 46:08


When the economist Ha-Joon Chang arrived in Britain in the eighties, he was struck by how bland and homogeneous the British diet was. But it wasn't just the food – in mainstream economic thinking too, there seemed to only be one item on the menu – the Neoclassical tradition.  Whilst our diet has expanded and diversified since then, our economic preference has remained stubbornly singular. Chang argues that just as a nourishing and appetising diet needs a variety of flavours and nutrients, our economics also needs to borrow from different traditions and ways of thinking in order to produce the best results for the greatest number of people.   Discover more about how economics affects every dimension of our lives - check out Ha-Joon Chang's RSA Animate here.#RSAeconomicsBecome an RSA Events sponsor: https://utm.guru/udI9xDonate to The RSA: https://utm.guru/udNNBFollow RSA Events on Instagram: https://instagram.com/rsa_events/Follow the RSA on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RSAEventsLike RSA Events on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rsaeventsofficialJoin our Fellowship: https://www.thersa.org/fellowship/join 

RSA Events
Exploring the wellbeing impacts of a universal basic income

RSA Events

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 72:31


Is there scope for the introduction of a universal basic income as a transformative public health intervention?As part of an academic partnership, funded by Wellcome, the RSA is exploring the potential for a UBI, how it could work in practice and what its impacts might be. The research brings together new analysis which shows that even a fiscally neutral UBI could have a significant effect in reducing poverty and insecurity and bring health benefits to those benefiting from the scheme. Speakers to include report authors Matthew Johnson, Northumbria University and Hannah Webster, RSA; and guest speakers Ruth Lister CBEand Professor Guy Standing.The event marks the launch of a new RSA report exploring the health and wellbeing impacts of a universal basic income.Read our interim report on a UBI and mental health#RSAUBIBecome an RSA Events sponsor: https://utm.guru/udI9xDonate to The RSA: https://utm.guru/udNNBFollow RSA Events on Instagram: https://instagram.com/rsa_events/Follow the RSA on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RSAEventsLike RSA Events on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rsaeventsofficialJoin our Fellowship: https://www.thersa.org/fellowship/join

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe
Network Break 404: Episode Not Found

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 50:37


This week the Network Break covers new SASE capabilities from Fortinet, new 800G hardware from Cisco that uses its homegrown ASIC, and an app from RSA for smart phones that can disable authentication if the app detects malicious behavior. Plus we cover new initiatives from the Open Compute Project, disaggregated Wi-Fi, and more tech news. The post Network Break 404: Episode Not Found appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed
Network Break 404: Episode Not Found

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 50:37


This week the Network Break covers new SASE capabilities from Fortinet, new 800G hardware from Cisco that uses its homegrown ASIC, and an app from RSA for smart phones that can disable authentication if the app detects malicious behavior. Plus we cover new initiatives from the Open Compute Project, disaggregated Wi-Fi, and more tech news. The post Network Break 404: Episode Not Found appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Network Break
Network Break 404: Episode Not Found

Packet Pushers - Network Break

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 50:37


This week the Network Break covers new SASE capabilities from Fortinet, new 800G hardware from Cisco that uses its homegrown ASIC, and an app from RSA for smart phones that can disable authentication if the app detects malicious behavior. Plus we cover new initiatives from the Open Compute Project, disaggregated Wi-Fi, and more tech news. The post Network Break 404: Episode Not Found appeared first on Packet Pushers.

RSA Events
After the summer of discontent: where next and what's needed now?

RSA Events

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 42:13


Households, businesses and even essential services are feeling the pressure, with the poorest in our society most harshly affected.To add to the burden, wages and salaries have failed to rise in line with inflation. The past summer saw several sectors push back on this, as train operators, posties, barristers, dock workers and more went out on strike. Some success was achieved, but for many, their battle is ongoing. With cost of living pressures expected to worsen over the winter, what kind of support is needed now from employers and from the government? And what can the ‘summer of discontent' teach us about the power of collective action and how people can best make their voice heard in the workplace and wider society?Hear representatives from Citizens Advice, the Living Wage Foundation and the Trades Union Congress as they explore these urgent questions and their potential solutions.  #RSAdiscontentBecome an RSA Events sponsor: https://utm.guru/udI9xDonate to The RSA: https://utm.guru/udNNBFollow RSA Events on Instagram: https://instagram.com/rsa_events/Follow the RSA on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RSAEventsLike RSA Events on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rsaeventsofficial 

RSA Events
Building a politics of the common good

RSA Events

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 62:50


Rejecting both New Labour's embrace of free markets and the statism of Corbynism, Blue Labour thinking sought to reconnect Labour with its working-class base, and to bring assets, power and dignity back to local communities. As workers' rights and futures - and the future of the places they live - take centre-stage in politics once more, Blue Labour's founder, political scientist Maurice Glasman, is joined by Shadow Levelling-Up Secretary Lisa Nandy MP to explore what left-conservatism has to offer the Labour Party, and the country, in the post-Brexit, post-Covid era.#RSAcommongoodBecome an RSA Events sponsor: https://utm.guru/udI9xDonate to The RSA: https://utm.guru/udNNBFollow RSA Events on Instagram: https://instagram.com/rsa_events/Follow the RSA on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RSAEventsLike RSA Events on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rsaeventsofficialListen to RSA Events podcasts: https://bit.ly/35EyQYU 

Polarised
Successfully shaping the second half of life

Polarised

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 36:33


In this thought-provoking interview series from the RSA, Matthew Taylor, puts a range of leading thinkers on the spot - from writers to business leaders, politicians to journalists - by asking for big ideas to help build effective bridges to our new future. In her latest book, 'Hagitude', Sharon Blackie shares her personal story alongside potent female figures from history to offer a rich vision of how we can grow into a more connected and creative second half of life. She joins Matthew to talk maturity, menopause and myth - and why all women at a certain stage in their life should embrace their 'inner hag'.  Sharon Blackie is an award-winning writer, psychologist and mythologist. Her books, courses, lectures and workshops are focused on the development of the mythic imagination, and on the relevance of myth, fairy tales and folk traditions to the personal, cultural and environmental problems we face today. Her latest book is, 'Hagitude: Reimagining the Second Half of Life'. A Tempo & Talker production for the RSA. In this time of global change, strong communities and initiatives that bring people together are more invaluable than ever before. The RSA Fellowship is a global network of problem solvers. We invite you to join our community today to stay connected, inspired and motivated in the months ahead. You can learn more about the Fellowship or start an application by clicking here.

Dos Marcos
Time For a Gut Check Around Being "Sleep Experts"

Dos Marcos

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 33:10


Are we entitled to call ourselves sleep experts? Do we know what that entails and if so, are we living up to it? On today's episode, Kinsley and Quinn discuss an idea from Dream Camp in conjunction with exclusive FAM data on what contributes to a good night's sleep. They dig deep into why people may not trust an RSA when it comes to which mattress will give them the best night's sleep and how we shift the conversation and the way the industry is viewed in order to become the ultimate wellness resource. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mattresspodcast/message

Roots and All
Episode 181: Darryl Moore

Roots and All

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 26:35 Very Popular


This week my guest is garden and landscape designer and writer, Darryl Moore. Darryl is one of the most, if not in my opinion, the most informed voice on gardens and design in the UK and his new book Gardening in A Changing World: People, Plants and the Climate Crisis presents an overarching perspective of the complexity of plant life, and the ways that we can begin to appreciate and work together with plants, rather than against them, in addressing the rapidly changing conditions affecting the planet. About Darryl Moore Darryl Moore is an award-winning garden and landscape designer and writer.  He is Director and co-founder of the innovative urban landscape organisation Cityscapes, realising creative approaches to greening city spaces through novel design ideas that ensure ecological, economic and social sustainability. He is co-curator of thehub.earth. He sits on the Society of Garden Designers Council, and is a fellow of the RSA. His most recent award was for the St Mungo's Putting Down Roots Garden at the RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2022, showcasing sustainability and ecology in public places.  Links Gardening in A Changing World: People, Plants and the Climate Crisis by Darryl Moore - Pimpernel Press Ltd, Oct 2022 Other episodes if you liked this one: Wild Gardens with Jo McKerr James Basson of Scape Design Patreon Membership

Screaming in the Cloud
Raising Awareness on Cloud-Native Threats with Michael Clark

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 38:44


About MichaelMichael is the Director of Threat Research at Sysdig, managing a team of experts tasked with discovering and defending against novel security threats. Michael has more than 20 years of industry experience in many different roles, including incident response, threat intelligence, offensive security research, and software development at companies like Rapid7, ThreatQuotient, and Mantech. Prior to joining Sysdig, Michael worked as a Gartner analyst, advising enterprise clients on security operations topics.Links Referenced: Sysdig: https://sysdig.com/ “2022 Sysdig Cloud-Native Threat Report”: https://sysdig.com/threatreport TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Something interesting about this particular promoted guest episode that is brought to us by our friends at Sysdig is that when they reached out to set this up, one of the first things out of their mouth was, “We don't want to sell anything,” which is novel. And I said, “Tell me more,” because I was also slightly skeptical. But based upon the conversations that I've had, and what I've seen, they were being honest. So, my guest today—surprising as though it may be—is Mike Clark, Director of Threat Research at Sysdig. Mike, how are you doing?Michael: I'm doing great. Thanks for having me. How are you doing?Corey: Not dead yet. So, we take what we can get sometimes. You folks have just come out with the “2022 Sysdig Cloud-Native Threat Report”, which on one hand, it feels like it's kind of a wordy title, on the other it actually encompasses everything that it is, and you need every single word of that report. At a very high level, what is that thing?Michael: Sure. So, this is our first threat report we've ever done, and it's kind of a rite of passage, I think for any security company in the space; you have to have a threat report. And the cloud-native part, Sysdig specializes in cloud and containers, so we really wanted to focus in on those areas when we were making this threat report, which talks about, you know, some of the common threats and attacks we were seeing over the past year, and we just wanted to let people know what they are and how they protect themselves.Corey: One thing that I've found about a variety of threat reports is that they tend to excel at living in the fear, uncertainty, and doubt space. And invariably, they paint a very dire picture of the internet about become cascading down. And then at the end, there's always a, “But there is hope. Click here to set up a meeting with us.” It's basically a very thinly- veiled cover around what is fundamentally a fear, uncertainty, and doubt-driven marketing strategy, and then it tries to turn into a sales pitch.This does absolutely none of that. So, I have to ask, did you set out to intentionally make something that added value in that way and have contributed to the body of knowledge, or is it because it's your inaugural report; you didn't realize you were supposed to turn it into a terrible sales pitch.Michael: We definitely went into that on purpose. There's a lot of ways to fix things, especially these days with all the different technologies, so we can easily talk about the solutions without going into specific products. And that's kind of way we went about it. There's a lot of ways to fix each of the things we mentioned in the report. And hopefully, the person reading it finds a good way to do it.Corey: I'd like to unpack a fair bit of what's in the report. And let's be clear, I don't intend to read this report into a microphone; that is generally not a great way of conveying information that I have found. But I want to highlight a few things that leapt out to me that I find interesting. Before I do that, I'm curious to know, most people who write reports, especially ones of this quality, are not sitting there cogitating in their office by themselves, and they set pen to paper and emerge four days later with the finished treatise. There's a team involved, there's more than one person that weighs in. Who was behind this?Michael: Yeah, it was a pretty big team effort across several departments. But mostly, it came to the Sysdig threat research team. It's about ten people right now. It's grown quite a bit through the past year. And, you know, it's made up of all sorts of backgrounds and expertise.So, we have machine learning people, data scientists, data engineers, former pen-testers and red team, a lot of blue team people, people from the NSA, people from other government agencies as well. And we're also a global research team, so we have people in Europe and North America working on all of this. So, we try to get perspectives on how these threats are viewed by multiple areas, not just Silicon Valley, and express fixes that appeal to them, too.Corey: Your executive summary on this report starts off with a cloud adversary analysis of TeamTNT. And my initial throwaway joke on that, it was going to be, “Oh, when you start off talking about any entity that isn't you folks, they must have gotten the platinum sponsorship package.” But then I read the rest of that paragraph and I realized that wait a minute, this is actually interesting and germane to something that I see an awful lot. Specifically, they are—and please correct me if I'm wrong on any of this; you are definitionally the expert whereas I am, obviously the peanut gallery—but you talk about TeamTNT as being a threat actor that focuses on targeting the cloud via cryptojacking, which is a fanciful word for, “Okay, I've gotten access to your cloud environment; what am I going to do with it? Mine Bitcoin and other various cryptocurrencies.” Is that generally accurate or have I missed the boat somewhere fierce on that? Which is entirely possible.Michael: That's pretty accurate. We also think it just one person, actually, and they are very prolific. So, they were pretty hard to get that platinum support package because they are everywhere. And even though it's one person, they can do a lot of damage, especially with all the automation people can make now, one person can appear like a dozen.Corey: There was an old t-shirt that basically encompassed everything that was wrong with the culture of the sysadmin world back in the naughts, that said, “Go away, or I will replace you with a very small shell script.” But, on some level, you can get a surprising amount of work done on computers, just with things like for loops and whatnot. What I found interesting was that you have put numbers and data behind something that I've always taken for granted and just implicitly assumed that everyone knew. This is a common failure mode that we all have. We all have blind spots where we assume the things that we spend our time on is easy and the stuff that other people are good at and you're not good at, those are the hard things.It has always been intuitively obvious to me as a cloud economist, that when you wind up spending $10,000 in cloud resources to mine cryptocurrency, it does not generate $10,000 of cryptocurrency on the other end. In fact, the line I've been using for years is that it's totally economical to mine Bitcoin in the cloud; the only trick is you have to do it in someone else's account. And you've taken that joke and turned it into data. Something that you found was that in one case, that you were able to attribute $8,100 of cryptocurrency that were generated by stealing $430,000 of cloud resources to do it. And oh, my God, we now have a number and a ratio, and I can talk intelligently and sound four times smarter. So, ignoring anything else in this entire report, congratulations, you have successfully turned this into what is beginning to become a talking point of mine. Value unlocked. Good work. Tell me more.Michael: Oh, thank you. Cryptomining is kind of like viruses in the old on-prem environment. Normally it just cleaned up and never thought of again; the antivirus software does its thing, life goes on. And I think cryptominers are kind of treated like that. Oh, there's a miner; let's rebuild the instance or bring a new container online or something like that.So, it's often considered a nuisance rather than a serious threat. It also doesn't have the, you know, the dangerous ransomware connotation to it. So, a lot of people generally just think of as a nuisance, as I said. So, what we wanted to show was, it's not really a nuisance and it can cost you a lot of money if you don't take it seriously. And what we found was for every dollar that they make, it costs you $53. And, you know, as you mentioned, it really puts it into view of what it could cost you by not taking it seriously. And that number can scale very quickly, just like your cloud environment can scale very quickly.Corey: They say this cloud scales infinitely and that is not true. First, tried it; didn't work. Secondly, it scales, but there is an inherent limit, which is your budget, on some level. I promise they can add hard drives to S3 faster than you can stuff data into it. I've checked.One thing that I've seen recently was—speaking of S3—I had someone reach out in what I will charitably refer to as a blind panic because they were using AWS to do something. Their bill was largely $4 a month in S3 charges. Very reasonable. That carries us surprisingly far. And then they had a credential leak and they had a threat actor spin up all the Lambda functions in all of the regions, and it went from $4 a month to $60,000 a day and it wasn't caught for six days.And then AWS as they tend to do, very straight-faced, says, “Yeah, we would like our $360,000, please.” At which point, people start panicking because a lot of the people who experience this are not themselves sophisticated customers; they're students, they're learning how this stuff works. And when I'm paying $4 a month for something, it is logical and intuitive for me to think that, well, if I wind up being sloppy with their credentials, they could run that bill up to possibly $25 a month and that wouldn't be great, so I should keep an eye on it. Yeah, you dropped a whole bunch of zeros off the end of that. Here you go. And as AWS spins up more and more regions and as they spin up more and more services, the ability to exploit this becomes greater and greater. This problem is not getting better, it is only getting worse, by a lot.Michael: Oh, yeah, absolutely. And I feel really bad for those students who do have that happen to them. I've heard on occasion that the cloud providers will forgive some debts, but there's no guarantee of that happening, from breaches. And you know, the more that breaches happen, the less likely they are going to forgive it because they still to pay for it; someone's paying for it in the end. And if you don't improve and fix your environment and it keeps happening, one day, they're just going to stick you with the bill.Corey: To my understanding, they've always done the right thing when I've highlighted something to them. I don't have intimate visibility into it and of course, they have a threat model themselves of, okay, I'm going to spin up a bunch of stuff, mine cryptocurrency for a month—cry and scream and pretend I got hacked because fraud is very much a thing, there is a financial incentive attached to this—and they mostly seem to get it right. But the danger that I see for the cloud provider is not that they're going to stop being nice and giving money away, but assume you're a student who just winds up getting more than your entire college tuition as a surprise bill for this month from a cloud provider. Even assuming at the end of that everything gets wiped and you don't owe anything. I don't know about you, but I've never used that cloud provider again because I've just gotten a firsthand lesson in exactly what those risks are, it's bad for the brand.Michael: Yeah, it really does scare people off of that. Now, some cloud providers try to offer more proactive protections against this, try to shut down instances really quick. And you know, you can take advantage of limits and other things, but they don't make that really easy to do. And setting those up is critical for everybody.Corey: The one cloud provider that I've seen get this right, of all things, has been Oracle Cloud, where they have an always free tier. Until you affirmatively upgrade your account to chargeable, they will not charge you a penny. And I have experimented with this extensively, and they're right, they will not charge you a penny. They do have warnings plastered on the site, as they should, that until you upgrade your account, do understand that if you exceed a threshold, we will stop serving traffic, we will stop servicing your workload. And yeah, for a student learner, that's absolutely what I want. For a big enterprise gearing up for a giant Superbowl commercial or whatnot, it's, “Yeah, don't care what it costs, just make sure you continue serving traffic. We don't get a redo on this.” And without understanding exactly which profile of given customer falls into, whenever the cloud provider tries to make an assumption and a default in either direction, they're wrong.Michael: Yeah, I'm surprised that Oracle Cloud of all clouds. It's good to hear that they actually have a free tier. Now, we've seen attackers have used free tiers quite a bit. It all depends on how people set it up. And it's actually a little outside the threat report, but the CI/CD pipelines in DevOps, anywhere there's free compute, attackers will try to get their miners in because it's all about scale and not quality.Corey: Well, that is something I'd be curious to know. Because you talk about focusing specifically on cloud and containers as a company, which puts you in a position to be authoritative on this. That Lambda story that I mentioned about, surprise $60,000 a day in cryptomining, what struck me about that and caught me by surprise was not what I think would catch most people who didn't swim in this world by surprise of, “You can spend that much?” In my case, what I'm wondering about is, well hang on a minute. I did an article a year or two ago, “17 Ways to Run Containers On AWS” and listed 17 AWS services that you could use to run containers.And a few months later, I wrote another article called “17 More Ways to Run Containers On AWS.” And people thought I was belaboring the point and making a silly joke, and on some level, of course I was. But I was also highlighting very clearly that every one of those containers running in a service could be mining cryptocurrency. So, if you get access to someone else's AWS account, when you see those breaches happen, are people using just the one or two services they have things ready to go for, or are they proliferating as many containers as they can through every service that borderline supports it?Michael: From what we've seen, they usually just go after a compute, like EC2 for example, as it's most well understood, it gets the job done, it's very easy to use, and then get your miner set up. So, if they happen to compromise your credentials versus the other method that cryptominers or cryptojackers do is exploitation, then they'll try to spread throughout their all their EC2 they can and spin up as much as they can. But the other interesting thing is if they get into your system, maybe via an exploit or some other misconfiguration, they'll look for the IAM metadata service as soon as they get in, to try to get your IAM credentials and see if they can leverage them to also spin up things through the API. So, they'll spin up on the thing they compromised and then actively look for other ways to get even more.Corey: Restricting the permissions that anything has in your cloud environment is important. I mean, from my perspective, if I were to have my account breached, yes, they're going to cost me a giant pile of money, but I know the magic incantations to say to AWS and worst case, everyone has a pet or something they don't want to see unfortunate things happen to, so they'll waive my fee; that's fine. The bigger concern I've got—in seriousness—I think most companies do is the data. It is the access to things in the account. In my case, I have a number of my clients' AWS bills, given that that is what they pay me to work on.And I'm not trying to undersell the value of security here, but on the plus side that helps me sleep at night, that's only money. There are datasets that are far more damaging and valuable about that. The worst sleep I ever had in my career came during a very brief stint I had about 12 years ago when I was the director of TechOps at Grindr, the gay dating site. At that scenario, if that data had been breached, people could very well have died. They live in countries where that winds up not being something that is allowed, or their family now winds up shunning them and whatnot. And that's the stuff that keeps me up at night. Compared to that, it's, “Well, you cost us some money and embarrassed a company.” It doesn't really rank on the same scale to me.Michael: Yeah. I guess the interesting part is, data requires a lot of work to do something with for a lot of attackers. Like, it may be opportunistic and come across interesting data, but they need to do something with it, there's a lot more risk once they start trying to sell the data, or like you said, if it turns into something very unfortunate, then there's a lot more risk from law enforcement coming after them. Whereas with cryptomining, there's very little risk from being chased down by the authorities. Like you said, people, they rebuild things and ask AWS for credit, or whoever, and move on with their lives. So, that's one reason I think cryptomining is so popular among threat actors right now. It's just the low risk compared to other ways of doing things.Corey: It feels like it's a nuisance. One thing that I was dreading when I got this copy of the report was that there was going to be what I see so often, which is let's talk about ransomware in the cloud, where people talk about encrypting data in S3 buckets and sneakily polluting the backups that go into different accounts and how your air -gapping and the rest. And I don't see that in the wild. I see that in the fear-driven marketing from companies that have a thing that they say will fix that, but in practice, when you hear about ransomware attacks, it's much more frequently that it is their corporate network, it is on-premises environments, it is servers, perhaps running in AWS, but they're being treated like servers would be on-prem, and that is what winds up getting encrypted. I just don't see the attacks that everyone is warning about. But again, I am not primarily in the security space. What do you see in that area?Michael: You're absolutely right. Like we don't see that at all, either. It's certainly theoretically possible and it may have happened, but there just doesn't seem to be that appetite to do that. Now, the reasoning? I'm not a hundred percent sure why, but I think it's easier to make money with cryptomining, even with the crypto markets the way they are. It's essentially free money, no expenses on your part.So, maybe they're not looking because again, that requires more effort to understand especially if it's not targeted—what data is important. And then it's not exactly the same method to do the attack. There's versioning, there's all this other hoops you have to jump through to do an extortion attack with buckets and things like that.Corey: Oh, it's high risk and feels dirty, too. Whereas if you're just, I guess, on some level, psychologically, if you're just going to spin up a bunch of coin mining somewhere and then some company finds it and turns it off, whatever. You're not, as in some cases, shaking down a children's hospital. Like that's one of those great, I can't imagine how you deal with that as a human being, but I guess it takes all types. This doesn't get us to sort of the second tentpole of the report that you've put together, specifically around the idea of supply chain attacks against containers. There have been such a tremendous number of think pieces—thought pieces, whatever they're called these days—talking about a software bill of materials and supply chain threats. Break it down for me. What are you seeing?Michael: Sure. So, containers are very fun because, you know, you can define things as code about what gets put on it, and they become so popular that sharing sites have popped up, like Docker Hub and other public registries, where you can easily share your container, it has everything built, set up, so other people can use it. But you know, attackers have kind of taken notice of this, too. Where anything's easy, an attacker will be. So, we've seen a lot of malicious containers be uploaded to these systems.A lot of times, they're just hoping for a developer or user to come along and use them because your Docker Hub does have the official designation, so while they can try to pretend to be like Ubuntu, they won't be the official. But instead, they may try to see theirs and links and things like that to entice people to use theirs instead. And then when they do, it's already pre-loaded with a miner or, you know, other malware. So, we see quite a bit of these containers in Docker Hub. And they're disguised as many different popular packages.They don't stand up to too much scrutiny, but enough that, you know, a casual looker, even Docker file may not see it. So yeah, we see a lot of—and embedded credentials and other big part that we see in these containers. That could be an organizational issue, like just a leaked credential, but you can put malicious credentials into Docker files, to0, like, say an SSH private key that, you know, if they start this up, the attacker can now just log—SSH in. Or other API keys or other AWS changing commands you can put in there. You can put really anything in there, and wherever you load it, it's going to run. So, you have to be really careful.[midroll 00:22:15]Corey: Years ago, I gave a talk at the conference circuit called, “Terrible Ideas in Git” that purported to teach people how to get worked through hilarious examples of misadventure. And the demos that I did on that were, well, this was fun and great, but it was really annoying resetting them every time I gave the talk, so I stuffed them all into a Docker image and then pushed that up to Docker Hub. Great. It was awesome. I didn't publicize it and talk about it, but I also just left it as an open repository there because what are you going to do? It's just a few directories in the route that have very specific contrived scenarios with Git, set up and ready to go.There's nothing sensitive there. And the thing is called, “Terrible Ideas.” And I just kept watching the download numbers continue to increment week over week, and I took it down because it's, I don't know what people are going to do with that. Like, you see something on there and it says, “Terrible Ideas.” For all I know, some bank is like, “And that's what we're running in production now.” So, who knows?But the idea o—not that there was necessarily anything wrong with that, but the fact that there's this theoretical possibility someone could use that or put the wrong string in if I give an example, and then wind up running something that is fairly compromisable in a serious environment was just something I didn't want to be a part of. And you see that again, and again, and again. This idea of what Docker unlocks is amazing, but there's such a tremendous risk to it. I mean, I've never understood 15 years ago, how you're going to go and spin up a Linux server on top of EC2 and just grab a community AMI and use that. It's yeah, I used to take provisioning hardware very seriously to make sure that I wasn't inadvertently using something compromised. Here, it's like, “Oh, just grab whatever seems plausible from the catalog and go ahead and run that.” But it feels like there's so much of that, turtles all the way down.Michael: Yeah. And I mean, even if you've looked at the Docker file, with all the dependencies of the things you download, it really gets to be difficult. So, I mean, to protect yourself, it really becomes about, like, you know, you can do the static scanning of it, looking for bad strings in it or bad version numbers for vulnerabilities, but it really comes down to runtime analysis. So, when you start to Docker container, you really need the tools to have visibility to what's going on in the container. That's the only real way to know if it's safe or not in the end because you can't eyeball it and really see all that, and there could be a binary assortment of layers, too, that'll get run and things like that.Corey: Hell is other people's workflows, as I'm sure everyone's experienced themselves, but one of mine has always been that if I'm doing something as a proof of concept to build it up on a developer box—and I do keep my developer environments for these sorts of things isolated—I will absolutely go and grab something that is plausible- looking from Docker Hub as I go down that process. But when it comes time to wind up putting it into a production environment, okay, now we're going to build our own resources. Yeah, I'm sure the Postgres container or whatever it is that you're using is probably fine, but just so I can sleep at night, I'm going to take the public Docker file they have, and I'm going to go ahead and build that myself. And I feel better about doing that rather than trusting some rando user out there and whatever it is that they've put up there. Which on the one hand feels like a somewhat responsible thing to do, but on the other, it feels like I'm only fooling myself because some rando putting things up there is kind of what the entire open-source world is, to a point.Michael: Yeah, that's very true. At some point, you have to trust some product or some foundation to have done the right thing. But what's also true about containers is they're attacked and use for attacks, but they're also used to conduct attacks quite a bit. And we saw a lot of that with the Russian-Ukrainian conflict this year. Containers were released that were preloaded with denial-of-service software that automatically collected target lists from, I think, GitHub they were hosted on.So, all a user to get involved had to do was really just get the container and run it. That's it. And now they're participating in this cyberwar kind of activity. And they could also use this to put on a botnet or if they compromise an organization, they could spin up at all these instances with that Docker container on it. And now that company is implicated in that cyber war. So, they can also be used for evil.Corey: This gets to the third point of your report: “Geopolitical conflict influences attacker behaviors.” Something that happened in the early days of the Russian invasion was that a bunch of open-source maintainers would wind up either disabling what their software did or subverting it into something actively harmful if it detected it was running in the Russian language and/or in a Russian timezone. And I understand the desire to do that, truly I do. I am no Russian apologist. Let's be clear.But the counterpoint to that as well is that, well, to make a reference I made earlier, Russia has children's hospitals, too, and you don't necessarily know the impact of fallout like that, not to mention that you have completely made it untenable to use anything you're doing for a regulated industry or anyone else who gets caught in that and discovers that is now in their production environment. It really sets a lot of stuff back. I've never been a believer in that particular form of vigilantism, for lack of a better term. I'm not sure that I have a better answer, let's be clear. I just, I always knew that, on some level, the risk of opening that Pandora's box were significant.Michael: Yeah. Even if you're doing it for the right reasons. It still erodes trust.Corey: Yeah.Michael: Especially it erodes trust throughout open-source. Like, not just the one project because you'll start thinking, “Oh, how many other projects might do this?” And—Corey: Wait, maybe those dirty hippies did something in our—like, I don't know, they've let those people anywhere near this operating system Linux thing that we use? I don't think they would have done that. Red Hat seems trustworthy and reliable. And it's yo, [laugh] someone needs to crack open a history book, on some level. It's a sticky situation.I do want to call out something here that it might be easy to get the wrong idea from the summary that we just gave. Very few things wind up raising my hackles quite like companies using tragedy to wind up shilling whatever it is they're trying to sell. And I'll admit when I first got this report, and I saw, “Oh, you're talking about geopolitical conflict, great.” I'm not super proud of this, but I was prepared to read you the riot act, more or less when I inevitably got to that. And I never did. Nothing in this entire report even hints in that direction.Michael: Was it you never got to it, or, uh—Corey: Oh, no. I've read the whole thing, let's be clear. You're not using that to sell things in the way that I was afraid you were. And simultaneously I want to say—I want to just point that out because that is laudable. At the same time, I am deeply and bitterly resentful that that even is laudable. That should be the common state.Capitalizing on tragedy is just not something that ever leaves any customer feeling good about one of their vendors, and you've stayed away from that. I just want to call that out is doing the right thing.Michael: Thank you. Yeah, it was actually a big topic about how we should broach this. But we have a good data point on right after it started, there was a huge spike in denial-of-service installs. And that we have a bunch of data collection technology, honeypots and other things, and we saw the day after cryptomining started going down and denial-of-service installs started going up. So, it was just interesting how that community changed their behaviors, at least for a time, to participate in whatever you want to call it, the hacktivism.Over time, though, it kind of has gone back to the norm where maybe they've gotten bored or something or, you know, run out of funds, but they're starting cryptomining again. But these events can cause big changes in the hacktivism community. And like I mentioned, it's very easy to get involved. We saw over 150,000 downloads of those pre-canned denial-of-service containers, so it's definitely something that a lot of people participated in.Corey: It's a truism that war drives innovation and different ways of thinking about things. It's a driver of progress, which says something deeply troubling about us. But it's also clear that it serves as a driver for change, even in this space, where we start to see different applications of things, we see different threat patterns start to emerge. And one thing I do want to call out here that I think often gets overlooked in the larger ecosystem and industry as a whole is, “Well, no one's going to bother to hack my nonsense. I don't have anything interesting for them to look at.”And it's, on some level, an awful lot of people running tools like this aren't sophisticated enough themselves to determine that. And combined with your first point in the report as well that, well, you have an AWS account, don't you? Congratulations. You suddenly have enormous piles of money—from their perspective—sitting there relatively unguarded. Yay. Security has now become everyone's problem, once again.Michael: Right. And it's just easier now. It means, it was always everyone's problem, but now it's even easier for attackers to leverage almost everybody. Like before, you had to get something on your PC. You had to download something. Now, your search of GitHub can find API keys, and then that's it, you know? Things like that will make it game over or your account gets compromised and big bills get run up. And yeah, it's very easy for all that to happen.Corey: Ugh. I do want to ask at some point, and I know you asked me not to do it, but I'm going to do it anyway because I have this sneaking suspicion that given that you've spent this much time on studying this problem space, that you probably, as a company, have some answers around how to address the pain that lives in these problems. What exactly, at a high level, is it that Sysdig does? Like, how would you describe that in an elevator without sabotaging the elevator for 45 minutes to explain it in depth to someone?Michael: So, I would describe it as threat detection and response for cloud containers and workloads in general. And all the other kind of acronyms for cloud, like CSPM, CIEM.Corey: They're inventing new and exciting acronyms all the time. And I honestly at this point, I want to have almost an acronym challenge of, “Is this a cybersecurity acronym or is it an audio cable? Which is it?” Because it winds up going down that path, super easily. I was at RSA walking the expo floor and I had I think 15 different companies I counted pitching XDR, without a single one bothering to explain what that meant. Okay, I guess it's just the thing we've all decided we need. It feels like security people selling to security people, on some level.Michael: I was a Gartner analyst.Corey: Yeah. Oh… that would do it then. Terrific. So, it's partially your fault, then?Michael: No. I was going to say, don't know what it means either.Corey: Yeah.Michael: So, I have no idea [laugh]. I couldn't tell you.Corey: I'm only half kidding when I say in many cases, from the vendor perspective, it seems like what it means is whatever it is they're trying to shoehorn the thing that they built into filling. It's kind of like observability. Observability means what we've been doing for ten years already, just repurposed to catch the next hype wave.Michael: Yeah. The only thing I really understand is: detection and response is a very clear detect things and respond to things. So, that's a lot of what we do.Corey: It's got to beat the default detection mechanism for an awful lot of companies who in years past have found out that they have gotten breached in the headline of The New York Times. Like it's always fun when that, “Wait, what? What? That's u—what? How did we not know this was coming?”It's when a third party tells you that you've been breached, it's never as positive—not that it's a positive experience anyway—than discovering yourself internally. And this stuff is complicated, the entire space is fraught, and it always feels like no matter how far you go, you could always go further, but left to its inevitable conclusion, you'll burn through the entire company budget purely on security without advancing the other things that company does.Michael: Yeah.Corey: It's a balance.Michael: It's tough because it's a lot to know in the security discipline, so you have to balance how much you're spending and how much your people actually know and can use the things you've spent money on.Corey: I really want to thank you for taking the time to go through the findings of the report for me. I had skimmed it before we spoke, but talking to you about this in significantly more depth, every time I start going to cite something from it, I find myself coming away more impressed. This is now actively going on my calendar to see what the 2023 version looks like. Congratulations, you've gotten me hooked. If people want to download a copy of the report for themselves, where should they go to do that?Michael: They could just go to sysdig.com/threatreport. There's no email blocking or gating, so you just download it.Corey: I'm sure someone in your marketing team is twitching at that. Like, why can't we wind up using this as a lead magnet? But ugh. I look at this and my default is, oh, wow, you definitely understand your target market. Because we all hate that stuff. Every mandatory field you put on those things makes it less likely I'm going to download something here. Click it and have a copy that's awesome.Michael: Yep. And thank you for having me. It's a lot of fun.Corey: No, thank you for coming. Thanks for taking so much time to go through this, and thanks for keeping it to the high road, which I did not expect to discover because no one ever seems to. Thanks again for your time. I really appreciate it.Michael: Thanks. Have a great day.Corey: Mike Clark, Director of Threat Research at Sysdig. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment pointing out that I didn't disclose the biggest security risk at all to your AWS bill, an AWS Solutions Architect who is working on commission.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

RSA Events
Slouching towards utopia

RSA Events

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 43:37


But, despite affording billions greater material wealth, health and freedom, the age of plenty has not delivered the utopia it initially seemed to promise.  Brad DeLong, one of the world's leading economists, argues that instead of ushering in an era of prosperity, wellbeing and unlocked human potential, the gains of what he terms the ‘long twentieth century' have not only been equivocal and double-edged, but also unfairly distributed.   DeLong's magnum opus, Slouching Towards Utopia was an instant NYT bestseller, and has been universally lauded as the must-read account of 20th century economics.  Join us as we explore why true economic and human progress is a complicated game of snakes and ladders, and what we need to do to create a better world.#RSAutopia Become an RSA Events sponsor: https://utm.guru/ueembDonate to The RSA: https://utm.guru/udNNBFollow RSA Events on Instagram: https://instagram.com/rsa_events/Follow the RSA on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RSAEventsLike RSA Events on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rsaeventsoff...

RSA Events
The Huxleys: a revolution in how we see ourselves

RSA Events

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 66:19


Across the 19th and 20th centuries, the Huxley family reshaped how we think about humanity and our relationship with the natural world. Within a family of scientists, educators, novelists, mystics, and filmmakers, two men led the way: ‘Darwin's Bulldog', the zoologist T.H. Huxley and his grandson and intellectual inheritor, the ecologist and conservationist, Julian Huxley.From religion to genetics, to human psychology, the Huxleys' impact was felt across some of the most controversial and significant topics of their day. In studies of the natural world, they contributed to the foundation of the new sciences of ecology and animal conservation.Adept at writing about themselves in painfully revealing, honest and unprecedented ways, the family's lives, marriages, successes and failures were also subject to their fascination with emotional, sexual, and psychological experience.At the RSA, leading historian of science Alison Bashford is joined by historian Thomas Dixon and writer Stuart Jeffries to discuss the impact of three generations of Huxleys, exploring how the roots of the Huxley legacy reach deep into scientific and cultural conversations we are still having today. #RSAhuxleyBecome an RSA Events sponsor: https://utm.guru/ueembDonate to The RSA: https://utm.guru/udNNBFollow RSA Events on Instagram: https://instagram.com/rsa_events/Follow the RSA on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RSAEventsLike RSA Events on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rsaeventsoff...

AEC Marketeer
Episode 75: Exploring Alternative Marketing Models with Ayo Abbas

AEC Marketeer

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 22:45


Today there are so many new and exciting ways to get things done and AEC marketing is no exception. On this episode, Ayo Abbas of Abbas Marketing walks me through several marketing models you might not have considered. Specifically, we look at groups/online programs, freelancers/consultants, and collectives. Ayo Abbas is a built environment marketing consultant from the UK. She has over 20 years' experience working in B2B marketing and has worked for major firms including Arup, Mace and Ramboll In February 2020, Ayo founded her own consultancy business Abbas Marketing and offers marketing strategy and content creation services for built environment firms and organisations. She enjoys working with companies who are passionate about what they do and aren't afraid to challenge our somewhat traditional sector. Ayo is a fellow of the RSA and a committee member for Build Up! - a built environment marketing networking group. She also hosts her own podcast The Built Environment Marketing Show. Here's her series on the marketing models: Collectives: https://www.abbasmarketing.com/mitc-podcast/ep32-marketing-collectives Consultants, Freelancers, and Independents: https://www.abbasmarketing.com/mitc-podcast/ep31-marketing-consultants-freelancers Groups and Online Programs: https://www.abbasmarketing.com/mitc-podcast/ep30-marketing-group-online-programmes Website: https://www.abbasmarketing.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ayoabbas/ If you're enjoying the show, please give us an good 'ol five stars and a review! This helps me get more guests in the future.

Real Synthetic Audio For iTunes

Its Thanksgiving tomorrow in Canada, so I'm getting the show posted bright and early. I have a couple of family visits to attend, much food to eat, but that doesn't mean the responsibilities end! No! There are people in the USA (Who celebrate on a wierd day and eat at 3pm) and the rest of the world (You know what you've done) who don't have a big holiday tomorrow. So you guys need your RSA fix! So before I go anywhere, I've gotten the show online for you to enjoy! Faderhead - Halloween Spooky Queens (v2022)MissSuicide - HerbivorMinuit Machine - Lovers Of The Night (Parallx)ES23 - Never (FabrikC)Solitary Experiments - The Great UnknownC-Lekktor - Don't Be Afraid (Club)Silver Walks - Eyes Of Caligula (Caustic)Apoptygma Berzerk - Enjoy The Silence (Studio) http://synthetic.org/https://www.instagram.com/djtodd242/https://twitter.com/djtoddrsahttps://www.youtube.com/c/RealSyntheticAudio

The Hyperfine Physics Podcast
Nobel Prize in Physics 2022 - The universe is not locally real. What does that mean?

The Hyperfine Physics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 37:23 Very Popular


The 2022 Physics Nobel Prize, awarded to Alain Aspect, John F. Clauser, and Anton Zeilinger "for experiments with entangled photons, establishing the violation of Bell inequalities and pioneering quantum information science" https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/physics/2022/press-release/ Scientific American article: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-universe-is-not-locally-real-and-the-physics-nobel-prize-winners-proved-it/ Bell's Theorem and EPR episode of Hyperfine https://thehyperfine.com/#bell Encryption: Diffie-Hellman & RSA episode of Hyperfine https://thehyperfine.com/#encryption CGP Grey video "The Trouble with Transporters" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nQHBAdShgYIThe podcast lives at https://www.thehyperfine.com/ Join our listener community on Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/TheHyperfine/ Follow the show on Instagram @thehyperfine: https://www.instagram.com/thehyperfine/ Derek on Instagram (and Twitter) @liketortilla: https://www.instagram.com/liketortilla/ Zak on Twitter @phyzaks: https://twitter.com/phyzaks

RSA Events
How climate migration will reshape people and planet

RSA Events

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 46:26


Estimates suggest that the planet's average temperature could rise by up to four degrees Celsius. From heatwaves and hurricanes to flooding and droughts, the extreme weather this would bring could render certain parts of our planet unliveable. Changes on this scale may leave many people with no other option but to migrate to more liveable parts of the planet. Those who do migrate may have to navigate national borders and a public image that paints migration as a problem that needs to be solved. If mass migration is to be an inevitable part of our future, how can we more proactively approach the scale of the challenge and view it as a key solution to climate-related threats? How can we ensure people driven to migration have agency over their experience and ensure that we build a future that does not exaggerate existing social inequalities?Here, Gaia Vince will set out her manifesto for this era of planetary change. After outlining likely futures for our planet and the changes this will require from countries, communities and cities, Gaia will explore key questions that will shape the future of human geography and explain how we should see these changes as key solutions to build a better, greener and fairer future.#RSAclimatemigrationBecome an RSA Events sponsor: https://utm.guru/ueembDonate to The RSA: https://utm.guru/udNNBFollow RSA Events on Instagram: https://instagram.com/rsa_events/Follow the RSA on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RSAEventsLike RSA Events on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rsaeventsoff...

Hacker Valley Studio
Beers, Tears, & Breaking Through in Cybersecurity Marketing with Gianna Whitver & Maria Velasquez

Hacker Valley Studio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 31:20


In this special episode, Hacker Valley community members and hosts of the Breaking Through in Cybersecurity Marketing podcast, Gianna Whitver and Maria Velasquez, tell all about the ups and downs of cyber marketing. As podcast hosts and founders of the Cybersecurity Marketing Society, Gianna and Maria eat, sleep, and breathe cybersecurity marketing. This week, Gianna and Maria share the history behind the Society and explain why they decided to host their CyberMarketingCon2022 conference in person.   Timecoded Guide: [02:41] Creating the Cybersecurity Marketing Society [06:29] Transitioning CyberMarketingCon2022 from virtual to in-person [10:50] Combating the difficulty of growth marketing to cybersecurity practitioners [18:34] Examining ROIs for attendees of conferences like Black Hat and RSA [28:15] Finding the one thing they would instantly change about cyber marketing   Sponsor Links: Thank you to our sponsor Axonius for bringing this episode to life! Life is complex. But it's not about avoiding challenges or fearing failure. Just ask Simone Biles — the greatest gymnast of all time. Want to learn more about how Simone controls complexity? Watch her video at axonius.com/simone   How did the Cybersecurity Marketing Society come to exist? Gianna and Maria initially met and bonded over how the cybersecurity marketing world is constantly changing and evolving, for better or worse. They would get together to chat, as well as share strategies and insights. They quickly realized, through their friendship, that there was potential for a solid community in cybersecurity marketing. They started a Slack channel, just to put something out there. The channel grew from 10 participants into a bustling community of over 1500 people. Now, the Society is growing every day and hosting online events. “It's always really nice to look back at the start, and it humbles you, right? As you continue this hustle of just growth and ongoing things happening, it's nice to take a step back and say, ‘Wow, look at where it all started.' It seemed like just a crazy idea then.” –Maria Velasquez What inspired the leap to host an in-person conference for CyberMarketingCon? Back in 2020, while everyone was experiencing the height of the pandemic, members of the Cybersecurity Marketing Society were still interested in making connections with other professionals in the industry. Gianna and Maria decided the best option available was hosting virtual conferences in 2020 and 2021. Later, they branched into in-person chapter meetups in cities around the world. An in-person CyberMarketingCon2022 seemed like the next natural step in the process to cement those community connections. “We started planning on a spreadsheet, basically. What's the theme? What do we want to cover in terms of topics? We looked to our members within the Society to hear what they'd like to learn at the conference and the speakers they'd like to see.” –Maria Velasquez   What makes it so difficult to market to cybersecurity practitioners? Cybersecurity practitioners are notoriously skeptical. Their purview is full of phishing links and threat actors, and their guards are always up. Practitioners also often have a revolving door of folks wanting them to try demos, which makes it harder for someone to stand out. Maria and Gianna explain that you have to create a different kind of connection to build a relationship with practitioners, and advise marketers to avoid the cringeworthy commercial buzzwords. “We're here to make sure that together, as an industry, cybersecurity marketers default to the best practices in marketing to practitioners, and that we're not bothering our target audience. We're doing great marketing, so that we can help everyone be more safe.” –Gianna Whitver   What did the ROIs look like for attendees of Black Hat and RSA? In general, according to Gianna and Maria, the return on investment seemed higher for attendees at Black Hat, rather than at RSA. For marketers, RSA is less about selling and more about brand awareness and meeting with investors. In contrast, those who attended Black Hat reported that, even though the quantity of traffic at their booths was lower, the quality of the connections was higher, and there is a lot of optimism about opportunities to connect next year becoming more frequent. “We're going to keep doing this every year. We're going to keep expanding the survey, we're going to have better data. I'm really looking forward to next year's debrief on Black Hat and RSA, seeing how things changed and how companies perceive their ROI.” –Gianna Whitver ----------  Links:  Grab your ticket to the CyberMarketingCon2022 Follow Gianna on LinkedIn Catch up with Maria on LinkedIn Connect with Ron Eddings on LinkedIn and Twitter Connect with Chris Cochran on LinkedIn and Twitter Purchase a HVS t-shirt at our shop Continue the conversation by joining our Discord Check out Hacker Valley Media and Hacker Valley Studio

Rebel Energy
You Can Do It Too! with Haley Benson

Rebel Energy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 22:02 Transcription Available


You're in for a treat today! I'll be talking with a dear friend and RSA graduate, Haley Benson. Haley is a mom of 3 very busy kids and going back to the 9-5 was not an option with the activity schedules. She had found a makeup company, but wanted to branch out into more online work, and she found Rock Solid Academy.  Listen in as we chat about Haley's path to success through being a virtual assistant! ROCK SOLID ACADEMY IS NOW ENROLLING! https://jadejessicacoaching.mykajabi.com/Rock%20Solid%20Academy%202-0 (https://jadejessicacoaching.mykajabi.com/Rock%20Solid%20Academy%202-0) https://www.instagram.com/jadejessicacoaching/ (https://www.instagram.com/jadejessicacoaching/) Music credit: Bouncin' Back by Reaktor Productions A https://www.angiemjordan.com/podcast-launch-bestie (Podcast Launch Bestie) production

Manager Minute-brought to you by the VR Technical Assistance Center for Quality Management
VRTAC-QM Manager Minute: National Disability Employment Awareness Month - See how Self-Employment Serves a Critical Need in Wyoming with Inge Huband and Nicky Harper

Manager Minute-brought to you by the VR Technical Assistance Center for Quality Management

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 23:44


Joining Carol Pankow in the studio today is Inge Huband, Program Consultant for the Wyoming Department of Workforce Services Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Small Business and Employment First programs, and Nicky Harper, Vocational Rehabilitation Administrator for Wyoming VR. This year, the National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM) has a theme of Disability: Part of the Equity Equation in recognition of the vital role people with disabilities play in making the nation's workforce diverse and inclusive. For our listeners, Wyoming VR does not participate in the Randolph Sheppard program; however, they have concentrated for almost two decades on their small business program that focuses on self-employment. Learn how this focus has attained over a 50 percent success rating for small businesses through partnerships, creativity, education, and community networking.   Listen Here   Full Transcript   VRTAC-QM Manager Minute: National Disability Employment Awareness Month - See how Self-Employment Serves a Critical Need in Wyoming with Inge Huband and Nicky Harper   {Music} Speaker1: Manager Minute brought to you by the VRTAC for Quality Management, Conversations powered by VR, one manager at a time, one minute at a time. Here is your host Carol Pankow.   Carol: Well, welcome to the Manager Minute. Joining me in the studio today is Inge Huband, Program Consultant for the Wyoming Department of Workforce Services, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Small Business and Employment First Program, and Nicky Harper, Vocational Rehabilitation Administrator for Wyoming VR. And wow, was that a mouthful? So good to have you both. Inge, how are things going in Wyoming?   Inge: Oh, they're pretty good. We had a very hot summer. We're looking forward to some cool down here.   Carol: Absolutely. And Nicky, how about you? How are things going?   Nicky: I am well, Carol, thank you for having us. Life is good in Wyoming.   Carol: Excellent. Well, you're some of our favorite people, that's for sure. So this year, the National Disability Employment Awareness Month, or NDEAM, has a theme of disability: Part of the equity equation in recognition of the vital role people with disabilities play in making the nation's workforce diverse and inclusive. So this past year, my colleague Alison Flanagan and I had the opportunity to participate in the Wyoming VR on site monitoring review by RSA. And during the week we spent together, Alison was sitting in the session discussing your small business program in Wyoming and was completely blown away. She told me immediately, She's like, You got to follow up with them and get a podcast together. So for our listeners out there, Wyoming VR does not participate in the Randolph Shepard program. However, they have had a focus for almost two decades on their small business program that focuses on self-employment. The Bureau of Labor Statistics states that over 10% of US workers are self-employed, and self-employed workers also represent many of the country's entrepreneurs who are responsible for creating jobs for other workers. So let's dig in. So I'm really excited about your small business program, and I wanted to talk a little bit more about that. So Nicky, can you give us a little context about Wyoming does not participate in the Randolph Shepard program?   Nicky: That is correct, Carol. We don't have a Randolph Shepard program for a couple of reasons. Primarily, incidents of visually impaired individuals is very low. So when the cafeteria programs went away, oh gosh, several years ago, it was set up that funding was coming into vocational rehabilitation. So at that time, my predecessor and I believe the field services administrator took a look at that and said, well, there's still funding coming in. So instead of a cafeteria program, can we still continue to look at the vending program and how can we get some legislation and statutes written so that vending income could be utilized to still support individuals with disabilities wanting to develop small businesses? So instead of doing vending cafeteria with Randolph Shepard, we kind of went a slightly different avenue.   Carol: So Wyoming has their own take on this. So you actually have your own legislation that governs what you're doing.   Nicky: We do, yes.   Carol: Excellent. I was very curious about that. So how does the funding work for this program?   Nicky: So the legislation or the statute allows for us to go out for bid for individuals in the communities. They don't necessarily have to be an individual with a disability, but I do believe this score additional points on an RFP, if they have a disability to set up vending machines in state owned buildings. So they set up the vending machines with understanding that a percentage of the earnings come to vocational rehabilitation. So we then use those earnings as match dollars when we set up a small business so that we use federal dollars obviously, and that vending income is used as a non-federal match portion.   Carol: Gotcha. Thank you for clearing that up. So do you partner with the Wyoming Small Business Administration?   Inge: Not directly. So I would call that an indirect partnership. We put a couple of years. We have partnered with the Wyoming Women's Business Center and they receive part of their funding through the Small Business Administration. So what we have started doing is to refer some of our clients. Not all of them will work for this program. Some of them can be referred with the approved loan amount, and then they will actually have to go through a loan process through the Wyoming Women's Business Center. The amount that DVR has approved for their small business is the loan amount that they're applying for, and we are able to pay that loan and the client will have to provide us with showing that they actually purchase what they have. So that's another layer of responsibility for the clients. It's no longer just gives me money. It's like, Oh no, I have to fill out a loan application and I have to talk to the loan officer and put everything out there and they have to have a. That's account ready. They have to have their legal entity already registered before they can even receive those funds. So it puts everything in another level of reality. And then they have the responsibility of purchasing all the approved items and approved that they did purchase them. And they have to send that also to the Women's Business Center as well as to us. So that's kind of how we keep track of all of that. But it does help with the diverse things that clients need. It's sometimes very difficult for, say, to purchase certain items through the process that we have. And so that makes it a lot easier, a lot more efficient than quicker for the client to obtain those needed items.   Carol: I know your state is very you know, you have the rural component. There's sort of a little bit of the bigger city areas and such. But what are some unique challenges that people face in Wyoming with creating a small business?   Inge: It is probably infrastructure. Internet sometimes is an issue, just being in very small communities and very rural, having to drive to places and it causes a lot of issues. But as I said, people are very resourceful when they buy into their idea and they see their idea growing from, Oh, here's that concept that I have in my head and through the process of business planning, it becomes a tangible idea of something that really makes sense and we help them really understand, okay, where you're at in this particular situation, does it really make sense to have a ginormous warehouse? For example? Would it not be better to utilize drop shippers or whatever we're considering in that situation? And then the idea grows from this big monstrosity to something small, functional and doable, and the client is able to just move forward with it. And also, I think giving them the future outlook of you can always grow your business, you can always change. And Wyoming has a really great network of support for small business. We work with local economic development chambers. I encourage the clients to work with all of these entities to really get into the nitty gritty of their small business idea and figure things out.   So it's not uncommon that I ask clients to do surveys, talk to their community and say, Do they really want this service? Because being online works sometimes, but not all the time. It's difficult. It's a big market out there. So when you have a following in your local community and get started, it's a lot easier to transition online or go into a warehouse. So for example, in a small town here in Wyoming called Buffalo, we have a saddle maker and he was visited by our governor. And because of that, we had another visitor from a local retailer who wants to help him with some free space. And so now he's able to move from his own property into a free rented location down the road. We'll probably have to pay rent, right now it's free and he'll have a little retail location. So what he can offer are smaller items. So he doesn't just rely on saddles and so he's really excited and things are moving.   Carol: Well, that sounds like a super smart approach, especially when you talked about having some of the Internet issues that can happen in rural areas too. So you want to have somewhat of a following in that community because people may not be able to get to you online either. That makes some sense. So you talked about this saddle maker. So what are some of the other interesting businesses that have been pursued?   Nicky: Oh, my gosh, quite a few. We get really, really creative. And Inge is a really good job with ensuring that the business is viable and they can be successful. The clients have to put together a pretty detailed business plan. The one that I kind of laugh about is we call it the pole dancing business.   Carol: Do tell!   Inge: This one was a client who just came to me and said, Well, I'm this athletic person. I teach pole dancing. I want to do that as a business. And I wasn't sure if we could do that, being tied to federal funding and all of that. So sure. And I didn't understand the idea of that being just physical exercise and all of that. So there were all these other things with it. But she opened up a studio and a really small town. It worked really well. She had a nice clientele. She was big enough to open a second studio in adjacent small town that worked also well, and then her injury got worse. Unfortunately, she had to sell to local studios. She moved and she's still selling her choreography and her merchandise online. And so that one was a really fun one to work with because it was so out of the ordinary, something different.   Nicky: We have done some really cool ones like. On supporting horses for Wyoming that works out. There's a lot of rodeo and that kind of stuff happening, and individuals may not always have the capacity to transport their animals across state lines. So we've done that kind of business and sometimes even to some micro-businesses kind of thing. One that comes to mind that was pretty cool was the latest craze of like essential oils and that kind of business. So we have really supported from large businesses, from mowing companies to moving horses to one was a t shirt company. This guy, he would get this product and then resell it. I think in his second year of business he cleared like 70,000. Well, that was.   Carol: Well that is cool though, because you guys have been super creative and it's worked for Wyoming, you know, and what people have needed there, because I know you definitely have a lot of challenges with the geographic nature of your state.   Nicky: Absolutely.   Carol: Very, very cool. So how do your outcomes look and how did the pandemic impact your customers and their businesses?   Inge: So our outcomes on general, when we check our numbers, they're about 50% success rate, which is pretty good because nationwide, when you look at all the small businesses that start in the first year, you have a 90% failure rate. And of those 90% within five years, you have another 50% failure rate of those remaining business. So it's very tough. So we are doing pretty good. The pandemic really didn't do that much to us. I was as busy as before the pandemic actually even busier. People were really hunkering down, thinking, well, what can I do? How can I support myself? And we did a lot throughout the pandemic. So the pandemic itself did not. We're seeing a slowdown right now. That is because there are a lot of jobs available. I believe right now the unemployment is at about 3% in Wyoming.   Carol: Oh, excellent.   Inge: So there is that natural slowdown that happens with that. So when work is available, micro slows down a little bit. When it's not available, we get really busy. And so we have that here. But yeah, the pandemic itself was a busy time for me.   Carol: Good. That's good to hear. So how do you partner with the VR counselor in making all of this happen?   Inge: Yeah, so that is a really good relationship. The counselor works with our clients. Sometimes clients get to refer to me right away. Sometimes they have good working with a VR counselor for some time before they even come my way. And then the counselor reaches out. Here's the client, here's what they want to do. So I provide services to our counselors as well as to our clients. I encourage our counselors to contact me if they have a client that has, let's call it a harebrained idea that may not work. So we do research with the client together to figure out is that even a decent idea or these pyramid schemes that people sometimes get involved with. We research stuff like that. So when a counselor isn't sure, I encourage them to contact me. When we're ready, the client gets referred to me and I start working and that looks different for different clients. So sometimes they're very proactive. Other clients, they want their counselors with them. So we just schedule phone calls again, virtual meetings or something to work together and then make sure that the client has all the support that they need. Usually, once the client is comfortable with working with yet another person, they are okay with working with me. That helps lead the process up a little bit because we don't need to coordinate all of our calendars and so we can solve this on that. Again, it depends on the client, but in general, the client can get a bland easy in three months.   They have to do financial projections. So at minimum we have to do a one year, month by month financial projection to see what is your projected income, your expenses, what's the bottom line looking like? How much money do you want to take out of that business? Where is all going to go? That's kind of what determines the whole process and everyone is of a different level. So some people you will have to explain everything to them. You have to teach them entrepreneurship, you have to guide them through the process while others come in with some knowledge already. Sometimes I get completed business class before I even have met the individual, and then once a plan is approved, the client goes back to their VR counselor and then they work together on finalizing the business. They start up their business. The VR counselor meets with them regularly to ensure that everything is on par, and if not, I hope that they will contact me and let me in. And that works pretty well that way. Working with the Women's Business Center. Has been really tremendous because that long counseling that they're receiving is just another way to make sure that everything that we try to teach them, try to put into this plan and process is being reinforced and someone else tells them, know some of the same things that we have went through with them already.   Carol: So that sounds like a great partnership that you have.   Inge: Yeah, it took me a long time to get that build out because outside of vocational rehabilitation, we're considered a brand and to educate those partners, it's not a grant and it's a different kind of process and program and people have different kinds of needs. We need to sometimes slow it down or speed it up, depending on where they are on that continuum, then that's where we need to be. And so that's not always easy. So it took me a long, long time to get through and it took a food truck business who needed a loan, couldn't get a loan through a bank, and the Women's Business Center was able to make a loan. So that client, they finally understood our process. And then I was approached for a contract. We actually entered a contract to make sure that everything is being all the confidentiality and all of that of oversight. And there's information that I cannot share and they cannot share because of lending rules and all of that. So we do have to have all of that information and continually work together.   Carol: So how does that work when you close a case? Because I understand that you're opening a case for the consumer in some situations. So how do you determine when you're closing in the case and consider it successful?   Nicky: Usually it's part of the business plan. They have to be able to demonstrate self-sufficiency, you know, and sometimes we might support them for a good couple of years just following them along for additional supports, just like a regular rehab closure, so to speak. We want to ensure that they are earning adequately, that they can self-sustain their business, that they don't have any additional supports from the division that they need to sustain business. We usually ask for regular paystubs and that kind of stuff to track that. They are doing well and by the time we are looking at closing the case, they have also established a working relationship and develop their credit through the Women's Business Center, which is where we funnel the funds through, so to speak. So they have established credit and I think each closure is very individualized, just like every case is so individualized, the counselor and the client and Inga works together to ensure that things are going well. The client does believe that they can self-sustain by themselves. And we did have a recent success story, which was really cool. We helped an individual set up a small business. I think it was like car detailing, if I'm not mistaken, and because the division helped him and he became really successful, this client then started hiring other V.R. clients to work for him, which was just really neat.   Carol: Wow. That is good stuff right there. Yeah. So what are you most proud of regarding this program?   Nicky: Oh, wow. Most proud of. That's a difficult question. I think it's the fact that we have some flexibilities in the program because we have a client who would essentially be eligible for VA services and considered to have a significant disability can potentially qualify. And if it is a viable business idea, we are always open to exploring it. And I think I really like is that we don't just say, okay, here's a set of funds now what do we walk them through that process? And then our recent engagement with the Women's Business Center, where the clients then get the opportunity to start developing their own credit as well, because we all know a lot of individuals with disabilities have challenges in that area where they don't necessarily have good credits or try to borrow in the future becomes difficult. Trying to borrow from the state small business might be challenging, so this really sets the client up for success and we're not necessarily doing for them, we're doing with them. And I think that's what I like to see, that we just don't say, Well, here's a set amount of dollars. Just like our individualized plans. Business plans are very individualized too. So depending on the need and the business, sometimes it might be 5000, sometimes it might be 50,000. I like that we can individualize it and work with the clients to help them out and help them out in their communities. Most recently, we sent a client to Nashville. He is super talented in the music industry and as a counselor, I was always hesitant to support someone to get a music degree right. But this individual, we sent him to Nashville. He's doing amazingly well. And one of the final things we are going to assist with is so the v r program is going to purchase the vehicle and the small business program will purchase kind of a mobile studio that he can. Around recording, and he already has multiple offers for recording contracts in Nashville. So that's really.   Carol: Cool. Wow, that is super cool. Well, and it speaks to what Inge said earlier about the percent of people that are successful because most small businesses, 90%, fail in that first year. But you guys are seeing a success rate well over 50%, which is good stuff. And that just speaks to what you're talking about with all of that support that you're giving to individuals the entire way through.   Nicky: Absolutely. And it's kind of a comprehensive support group of the counselor working with them, the area manager, getting involved when needed, the community support. I mean, it really does take a village, right, to support folks. And we have some really good success stories.   Carol: I love that. I love that. So, Nick, is there anything else you'd like to share with our listeners out there about your small business program or if they're considering something like that? I know most of the states have a Randolph Shepard program, but you have expanded obviously out to working with other people with other types of disabilities.   Nicky: I think sometimes we just get so stuck in bureaucratic, can we do this? Can't we do this? Is it allowable just giving clients and counselors the flexibility and the freedom to get creative, but then also having someone like Inga on staff who really have the expertise to determine if that business actually has the viable to be successful in your state, in that community, being able to do some fiscal projections for that said business, like I said, you know, the pole dancing thing, we were like, Wait a minute, worked. But they were very successful in that community. There was a lot of research that happened, went in to determine that there was a need for specialized exercise kind of thing and that there wasn't anyone providing it. So we do a lot of research and it is time consuming. But I think I go back to our staff, just us can be very creative and we need to believe in our clients too. So giving people the opportunity, being realistic, saying they want to start a small business to mirror Elon Musk might not be feasible, but being realistic and working within your boundaries, but sometimes stretching comfort zones and being curious and exploring options. So that's what I would suggest.   Inge: I would just say, know your local economy, get to know the people, talk to local people. Because if you hear for the third time that you want to have another woodworker opening up shop, you really need to know can that community support another business?   Carol: Yeah. Good stuff. Well, thank you so much for joining us today and I really appreciate you highlighting what's happening in Wyoming and helping us to celebrate National Disability Employment Awareness Month. Best of luck to you all.   Nicky: Thank you so much. Yep. And like you said, the beauty of what we do is just giving opportunities for individuals with disabilities to do what they think maybe that they were not going to be able to do to be contributing members of society. Again, we contribute to their families and we all come together. We can all make a difference.   Carol: Thanks much.   Nicky: Thank you, Carol.   Inge: Thank you, Carol. I appreciate it.   {Music} Speaker1: Conversations powered by VR, one manager at a time, one minute at a time, brought to you by the VR TAC for Quality Management. Catch all of our podcast episodes by subscribing on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. Thanks for listening!      

Polarised
Crisis? What Crisis?

Polarised

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 38:33


In this lively interview series from the RSA, Matthew Taylor, puts a range of practitioners on the spot - from scholars to business leaders, politicians to journalists - by asking for big ideas to help build effective bridges to our new future. In the last century of British mass democracy politics has lurched from crisis to crisis. So what can we learn by looking at  periods of turmoil and misery instead of focusing on moments of consensus and harmony? Documentary-maker and writer Phil Tinline joins Matthew to explain how past political panic and chaos can help illuminate our current age of upheaval. Phil Tinline works for BBC Radio; he has made and presented documentaries about how political history shapes our lives. Formerly executive producer of Radio 4's investigative history series, Document, he has written for The Guardian, The Independent on Sunday, The Daily Telegraph, BBC History Magazine and the New Statesman. His new book is, 'The Death of Consensus: 100 Years of British Political Nightmares'. A Tempo & Talker production for the RSA. In this time of global change, strong communities and initiatives that bring people together are more invaluable than ever before. The RSA Fellowship is a global network of problem solvers. We invite you to join our community today to stay connected, inspired and motivated in the months ahead. You can learn more about the Fellowship or start an application by clicking here.

Révélez votre Pouvoir Intérieur
134. 5 clés pour se remettre en action après un échec

Révélez votre Pouvoir Intérieur

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 18:21


Mon premier business a été un échec cuisant : 3 ans à bosser comme une malade sur mon e-commerce sans me verser 1€ de salaire et finir au RSA avec 2 enfants. La plupart des gens auraient recherché du travail pour assurer le quotidien. Mais, j'avais l'entrepreneuriat dans le sang. Je ne pouvais pas imaginer sacrifier mon temps et ma liberté pour 2 000 euros par mois. Lorsque vous avez la sensation de vivre un échec, reconsidérez ce qu'est l'échec à vos yeux. C'est quoi pour vous échouer ? Pour moi, l'échec c'était revenir au salariat. Alors j'ai continué dans ma quête et j'ai recréé un autre business en repartant de zéro. Bien sûr, c'est challengeant, et l'enjeux est d'autant plus important lorsqu'on a des enfants à charge. Mais ce n'est pas parce que j'ai échoué que je ne suis pas capable. Je n'avais juste pas les bonnes méthodes, les bonnes techniques. Je n'ai pas pris les bonnes décisions en temps et en heure. Mais je peux apprendre tout ça pour réussir! On peut tous apprendre à reproduire les mécanismes qui fonctionnent lorsqu'on écoute les bonnes personnes. Retrouvez mes 5 clés pour se remettre en action après un échec dans cet épisode de podcast. Je vous souhaite une belle écoute, Amélie Vous souhaitez lancer votre activité sur le web ? Télécharger le guide des 8 erreurs qui m'ont fait perdre du temps, de l'énergie et de l'argent :https://formation.famille-epanouie.fr/erreurs-entrepreneurs-doc Alors si toi aussi, tu souhaites ouvrir les yeux et redonner du sens à ton quotidien, retrouve-nous sur nos réseaux sociaux, juste ici ↓   ★ Sur INSTAGRAM : https://www.instagram.com/famille_epa... et https://www.instagram.com/fabien_blot/ ★ Sur FACEBOOK : https://www.facebook.com/famille.epan... ★ Sur YOUTUBE : http://www.famille-epanouie.fr/youtube ★ Sur LE BLOG : https://www.famille-epanouie.fr   “C'est en vous que vous devez investir pour être libre et profiter de votre vie de famille”  

OODAcast
Episode 102: Joseph Menn: Observations From Two Decades Of Tech Journalism

OODAcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 56:00


Covering technology issues, and specifically cybersecurity as a journalist is a tough endeavor. Some of these technologies are complex as are the security vulnerabilities often inherent in their deployment and making these topics broadly accessible can be a challenge. Many of the underlying issues touch upon national security and civil liberties creating an interesting nexus that must be highlighted in the proper context. Lastly, it can be a challenge to create trusted relationships with the hacker community, but they provide essential perspectives and leads. Joseph Menn has established himself as one of the top journalists covering these issues for over two decades at organizations like the Financial Times, Los Angeles Times, Bloomberg, Reuters, and now at the Washington Post. He's spoken at conferences like Black Hat, Def Con, and RSA. He's written three books covering topics like Napster, cybercrime, and most recently the infamous hacker group cDC in his book "Cult of the Dead Cow: How the Original Hacking Supergroup Might Just Save the World". In the OODAcast, Joseph provides insights from his career as a journalist covering technology and cybersecurity. We explore how he first got involved with Def Con Black Hat and the value of attending the events. Joseph discusses how he first got introduced to the cDC and why he decided to write a book about the group and developed an overall positive outlook in the critical role hackers will play in saving the world. Official Bio: Joseph Menn joined The Washington Post in 2022 where he specializes in computer security, hacking, privacy and surveillance. He has perhaps the longest running track record among professional journalists covering cyber security and cyber conflict issues, having over two decades of experience on the topic. Prior to the Washington Post he covered cybersecurity and technology for Reuters, the Financial Times and the Los Angeles Times His books include "Cult of the Dead Cow: How the Original Hacking Supergroup Might Just Save the World" (2019) and "Fatal System Error: The Hunt for the New Crime Lords who are Bringing Down the Internet" (2010). External Links: Cult of the Dead Cow book Joseph Menn on Twitter Book Recommendation:  The Dawn of Everything

RSA Events
The story behind extraordinary success

RSA Events

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 45:19


Society tells us that to be successful we must be tough, stubborn, and resilient. We can all achieve success if we just work hard enough. Across all corners of society, from sport to science and beyond, there are many examples of people who have overcome great hardship to achieve next-level success. However, this view focuses on individual achievement and can easily ignore many of the external factors that can undermine our confidence, take away our agency and stack the odds against us. When we look closely at the context around achievement and resilience, the road to extraordinary success is far more complex than it first appears.Join Bruce Daisley as he explores how success is achievable today and re-examines what it means to be resilient. In conversation with the RSA's Andrea Siodmok, Bruce will put forward an empowering new programme for building self-confidence and tenacity that can benefit us all, not just the elite few. #RSASuccessBecome an RSA Events sponsor: https://utm.guru/ueembDonate to The RSA: https://utm.guru/udNNBFollow RSA Events on Instagram: https://instagram.com/rsa_events/Follow the RSA on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RSAEventsLike RSA Events on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rsaeventsoff...

RSA Events
If science is to save us

RSA Events

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 63:36


There's no scientific impediment - even with present knowledge - to achieving a sustainable world in this century. We live under the shadow of new hazards - but these can be minimized by reprioritizing the thrust of the world's technological effort - and optimizing the educational system and the institutions where research is done.   Astronomer Royal Martin Rees has spent a lifetime exploring science's most profound questions, and advocating for its place in our common culture, at the heart of our democracy and decision-making.At the RSA, he insists that we can be technological optimists, despite the pessimism engendered by intractable politics and sociology.  Environmental degradation, unchecked climate change, and unintended consequences of advanced technology could trigger serious, even catastrophic, setbacks to our society, he warns – and our world is so interconnected that a collapse - societal or ecological - would be a truly global catastrophe. So it's ever more crucial to ensure that science is deployed optimally, and that brakes are applied to applications that are dangerous or unethical.  Scientists have a special obligation to promote beneficial applications of their researches, and to warn against the downsides. But priorities in how their work is applied are matters for the wider public - so it's crucial that the education system should offer everyone enough 'feel' for science to permit an informed debate on its ethics and hazards.Join one of our most eminent and far-seeing scientists to explore the future of scientific endeavour at a time when innovation must be guided by values science alone cannot provide. The stakes have never been higher.#RSAscienceBecome an RSA Events sponsor: https://utm.guru/ueembDonate to The RSA: https://utm.guru/udNNBFollow RSA Events on Instagram: https://instagram.com/rsa_events/Follow the RSA on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RSAEventsLike RSA Events on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rsaeventsoff...

Real Synthetic Audio For iTunes

Pretty much back to normal now, and I have an actual vacation coming up soon so I can recharge my batteries by actually doing things outside instead of baking (summer) or freezing (winter). But before I can do anything else, I have to get RSA published and out for everyone to enjoy this week! T-Error Machinez - Sins Of Eden (Chains Of Agony)SynthAttack - Electro In My Body (Basscalate)Nano Infect - Lifeless (Suicide Commando)Vanguard - Open SkyAll The Ashes - Kontrollverlust (Lvx Aeterna)Ruined Conflict - MiracleFabrikC - Chinese Food (C-Lekktor)Apoptygma Berzerk - Paranoia (Radio) http://synthetic.org/https://www.instagram.com/djtodd242/https://twitter.com/djtoddrsahttps://www.youtube.com/c/RealSyntheticAudio

C dans l'air
CDLA L'INVITÉ – FABIEN ROUSSEL – 22/09/22

C dans l'air

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 11:16


MANIFESTATIONS : LE RÉVEIL DE LA RUE ? - 22/09/22 FABIEN ROUSSEL Secrétaire national du Parti communiste français Jeudi 22 septembre 2022, les salariés du secteur social et médico-social sont appelés par la CGT à se mobiliser dans tout le pays. « Les salariés n'en peuvent plus de ne pouvoir exercer correctement leur travail par manque de moyens. Nous craignons pour la santé et la sécurité des personnels fatigués et épuisés par la dégradation des conditions de travail. Nos salaires sont en berne et nos qualifications sous-rémunérées » a indiqué la CGT dans un communiqué. Pour ce premier mouvement social de la rentrée, la principale revendication est l'amélioration des conditions de travail. La CGT entend donc peser sur le budget de la Sécurité sociale, présenté lundi en conseil des ministres. Ce mardi sur BFMTV, Fabien Roussel affirmait que « le RSA a été mis en place pour soi-disant lutter contre la pauvreté, mais il installe la pauvreté dans notre pays et oppose chômeurs et travailleurs. » En rejetant la « gauche des allocations », le leader communiste Fabien Roussel s'est attiré les foudres des autres membres de la Nupes. Quatre jours après, le secrétaire national du PCF persiste et signe mercredi 14 septembre sur Franceinfo en dénonçant les attaques qu'il a depuis reçu de « ceux qui défendent le droit à la paresse » dans son propre camp. Caroline Roux revendra sur cette rentrée et ce climat social sous haute tension avec Fabien Roussel.

The Psychiatrists Guide
Children of War in Ukraine

The Psychiatrists Guide

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 31:46


We interview Child & Adolescent Psychiatrist and from Ukraine about the effects of the Russian Invasion on the children in her country, what they're doing to fight back and what we can do to help. Please check out:https://voices.org.ua/en/https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAyigSe_AVjmW1WMdv5eM8g/featuredhttps://www.facebook.com/voicesofchildren.eng/https://www.instagram.com/voices_of_children/https://twitter.com/voices_org_uaNataliia Masiak is the Leader of the Project "Care for children with RSA in times of war" and a member of the expert council, the Voices of Children Fund ,Trainer of programs for psychologists under the "Children and War" program, the "Support Group Program" program, and the "Children and Grief" program.