Podcasts about remaking

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Latest podcast episodes about remaking

1A
Remaking America: Recovery High Schools And Teens Facing Addiction

1A

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 6, 2023 35:12


Schools have spent decades trying to prevent teens from using drugs and alcohol. The Office of National Drug Control Policy spent $2.9 billion on drug prevention last year alone, but the success rates of prevention programs remains in question. As part of our "Remaking America" collaboration, we highlight reporting from partner station KUNC on kids facing mental health and substance abuse issues. One possible solution is recovery high schools. There are at least 45 recovery schools across the U.S. dedicated to students with addiction problems.We discuss the unique challenges young people face when seeking treatment, and how schools can do a better job of supporting them.This conversation is part of our Remaking America collaboration with six public radio stations around the country. Remaking America is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.Addiction is treatment is available. For help, please call the free and confidential treatment referral hotline (1-800-662-HELP) or visit findtreatment.gov.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

Everything Co-op with Vernon Oakes
Steve Dubb, Sr. Editor at NPQ discusses Black Food Sovereignty

Everything Co-op with Vernon Oakes

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 5, 2023 46:54


January 19, 2023 Steve Dubb, Senior Editor of Economic Justice at NPQ. Steve and Vernon will discuss the upcoming webinar "Remaking the Economy: Black Food Sovereignty, Community Stories" (nonprofitquarterly.org) focusing on the interconnections between food sovereignty, racial and economic justice, and community building, and other initiatives of NPQ. Steve and Vernon discuss Black food sovereignty, the Tulsa Massacre, and the webinar series and other programming provided by NPQ.  Steve Dubb is senior editor of economic justice at NPQ, where he writes articles, and moderates Remaking the Economy webinars, and works to cultivate voices from the field, and help them reach a broader audience. Prior to coming to NPQ in 2017, Steve worked with cooperatives and nonprofits for over two decades, including twelve years at The Democracy Collaborative and three years as executive director of NASCO (North American Students of Cooperation). In his work, Steve has authored, co-authored, and edited numerous reports; participated in and facilitated learning cohorts; designed community building strategies; and helped build the field of community wealth building. Steve is the lead author of Building Wealth: The Asset-Based Approach to Solving Social and Economic Problems (Aspen 2005) and coauthor (with Rita Hodges) of The Road Half Traveled: University Engagement at a Crossroads, published by MSU Press in 2012. In 2016, Steve curated and authored Conversations on Community Wealth Building, a collection of interviews of community builders that Steve had conducted over the previous decade.

Talks from the Hoover Institution
The Code: Silicon Valley and the Remaking of America | Hoover Institution

Talks from the Hoover Institution

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2023 14:41


January 27, 2023 Hoover Institution | Stanford University A Hoover History Working Group Seminar with Margaret O'Mara. The Hoover History Working Group hosted a seminar on The Code: Silicon Valley and the Remaking of America on Friday, January 27, 2023 from 12:00 pm - 1:20 pm PT. ABOUT THE SPEAKER Margaret O'Mara is the Scott and Dorothy Bullitt Professor of American History at the University of Washington. She writes and teaches about the growth of the high-tech economy, the history of American politics, and the connections between the two. Margaret is the author of two acclaimed books on the history of the modern technology industry: The Code (2019) and Cities of Knowledge: Cold War Science and the Search For The Next Silicon Valley (2005). She also is a historian of the American presidency and author of Pivotal Tuesdays: Four Elections that Shaped the Twentieth Century (2015), as well as a coauthor of the widely used United States history textbook, The American Pageant. From 1993 to 1997, she served in the Clinton Administration as an economic and social policy aide in the White House and in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. ABOUT THE TALK Margaret O'Mara chronicles how entrepreneurship, venture capital, and state and federal funding transformed Silicon Valley into a crucible of American economic dynamism. She explores the rise of each era's key companies and their products, as well as their changing relationship with government, including the slow evolution of computing capabilities as an issue of national security and economic competitiveness.

Marketplace Tech
Amazon is remaking small businesses in its own image, report says

Marketplace Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 9:45


Amazon might seem anathema to small business, but the fact is, third-party sellers account for the majority of the e-commerce giant’s sales. These sellers range from independent artisans and designers to opportunistic resellers of products from big-box stores. A new report from the nonprofit Data & Society examines how Amazon is helping, hurting and generally transforming the small business retail model. Marketplace’s Meghan McCarty Carino spoke with Moira Weigel, the author of the report and a professor at Northeastern University. She described the effect Amazon has on small businesses as a “trickle-down monopoly.” Need some Econ 101? Sign up for our Marketplace Crash Course and get weekly lessons to complete at your own pace!

Marketplace All-in-One
Amazon is remaking small businesses in its own image, report says

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 9:45


Amazon might seem anathema to small business, but the fact is, third-party sellers account for the majority of the e-commerce giant’s sales. These sellers range from independent artisans and designers to opportunistic resellers of products from big-box stores. A new report from the nonprofit Data & Society examines how Amazon is helping, hurting and generally transforming the small business retail model. Marketplace’s Meghan McCarty Carino spoke with Moira Weigel, the author of the report and a professor at Northeastern University. She described the effect Amazon has on small businesses as a “trickle-down monopoly.” Need some Econ 101? Sign up for our Marketplace Crash Course and get weekly lessons to complete at your own pace!

Strong Women
S3 4: A Woman in a Man's World With Mandy Birch

Strong Women

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 61:33


Listener Mandy Birch served in the military as an engineer for 30 years and now works in quantum computing, fields typically thought of as masculine. God has used Mandy's love of adventure and doing the hard things to show her how to overcome obstacles, extend charity to others, learn to make allies, and embrace her own limits. Join Erin and Sarah as they talk with Mandy, whose story demonstrates that God's design is big enough to encompass different giftings and callings.  48. Adversity Is Part of Our Grooming With Tammie Jo Shults Strong Women Podcast Best of Strong Women Podcast with Cheryl Bachelder  “Life Plan” with the Paterson Center  Officers Christian Fellowship   Live No Lies: Recognize and Resist the Three Enemies That Sabotage Your Peace By John Mark Comber    The Code: Silicon Valley and the Remaking of America by Margaret O'Mara   Bomb Shelter: Love, Time and Other Explosives by Mary Laura Philpott   Turnaround: How to Change Course When Things Are Going South By Lisa Gable  The Ambassadors By Henry James   Mandy's website    Erin and her husband, Brett, run Maven which “exists to help the next generation know truth, pursue goodness, and create beauty, all for the cause of Christ.” Check out more about Maven here: https://maventruth.com/   The Strong Women Podcast is a product of the Colson Center which equips Christians to live out their faith with clarity, confidence, and courage in this cultural moment. Through commentaries, podcasts, videos, and more, we help Christians better understand what's happening in the world, and champion what is true and good wherever God has called them.  Learn more about the Colson Center here: https://www.colsoncenter.org/   Visit our website and sign up for our email list so that you can stay up to date on what we are doing here and also receive our monthly book list: https://www.colsoncenter.org/strong-women  Join Strong Women on Social Media:   https://www.facebook.com/StrongWomenCC  https://www.facebook.com/groups/strongwomencommunitycc/  https://www.instagram.com/strongwomencc/   

The Vergecast
The Last of Us recap, lessons learned from Silicon Valley, and Vergecast Hotline

The Vergecast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 74:43


Today on the flagship podcast of zombie kisses: 02:02 - The Verge's managing editor Alex Cranz chats with film & TV reporter Charles Pulliam-Moore about HBO's The Last of Us and how it handles the video game adaptation. [Spoilers for episode 1 + 2] 22:40 - Historian and author of the book The Code: Silicon Valley and the Remaking of America Margaret O'Mara talks about how the lack of non-compete clauses shaped Silicon Valley. 38:30 - We answer your questions left on our Vergecast Hotline! Thunderbolt docks, end-to-end encryption, and smart assistants. Email us at vergecast@theverge.com or call us at 866-VERGE11, we'd love to hear from you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Pack Attack
Remaking the Packers

Pack Attack

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 13:20


Homer & Tony argue if the Packers are rebuilding, reloading or remaking themselves for the 2023 season.

The Ezra Klein Show
How Right-Wing Media Ate the Republican Party

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 83:20


In recent weeks, America got a preview of how the new Republican House majority would wield its power. In attempting to perform a basic function of government — electing a speaker — a coalition of 20 House members caused Kevin McCarthy to lose 14 rounds of votes, decreasing his power with each compromise and successive vote.This is not normal. Party unity ebbs and flows, but the G.O.P. in recent decades has come apart at the seams. Nicole Hemmer is the director of the Carolyn T. and Robert M. Rogers Center for the American Presidency at Vanderbilt University, an associate professor of history and the author of two books about the conservative movement and media ecosystem, “Messengers of the Right: Conservative Media and the Transformation of American Politics” and “Partisans: The Conservative Revolutionaries Who Remade American Politics in the 1990s.” And she says we can't understand the current G.O.P. without understanding when, where and how these dynamics began.We discuss why the Cold War bonded Republicans as a party, how the 1994 Republican congressional victory inaugurated a new era of intraparty fighting, how Rush Limbaugh's rise created a new market for far-out ideas and new pressures on conservative politicians, why conservative media has had so much more sway than liberal media over grass-roots voters, how the business model of Fox News differs from that of MSNBC and what kinds of political ideas those businesses produce, how the G.O.P. is now caught between the pincers of the donor class and the grass roots, when the chief Republican enemy became the Democratic Party, why more moderate conservatives have become so weak and more.Mentioned:The Tea Party and the Remaking of Republican Conservatism by Theda Skocpol and Vanessa WilliamsonThe Rise and Fall of the Neoliberal Order by Gary GerstleAsymmetric Politics by Matt Grossman and David A. HopkinsRealigners by Timothy ShenkBook Recommendations:Fit Nation by Natalia Mehlman PetrzelaDreamland by Carly GoodmanFreedom's Dominion by Jefferson CowieThoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at ezrakleinshow@nytimes.com.You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of “The Ezra Klein Show” at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.“The Ezra Klein Show” is produced by Emefa Agawu, Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld, Rogé Karma and Kristin Lin. Fact-checking by Michelle Harris and Kate Sinclair. Original music by Isaac Jones. Mixing by Jeff Geld. Audience strategy by Shannon Busta. The executive producer of New York Times Opinion Audio is Annie-Rose Strasser. Special thanks to Pat McCusker and Kristina Samulewski.

ON With Mario Daily Podcast
OWM: Channing Tatum Remaking a 90's Classic, a Throwback Throwdown from 1998, Your Tweets & More! (January 19, 2023)

ON With Mario Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 18:07


Coming Up #OnWithMarioLopez – Mario breaks down rumors that #ChanningTatum is trying to remake a 90's classic, Courtney shares a helpful kitchen hack, #throwback throwdown takes us back to 1998, your #Tweets, some celeb baby buzz, & more! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

History in the Bible
3.24 Remaking Paul I: Irenaeus

History in the Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 25:41


During the middle of the 2nd century, Paul was resuced from the Marcionites and Gnostics. He was elevated from honoured missionary to master theologian. I also discuss the Acts of Paul and his acolyte Thecla.

Crashing the War Party
What would a progressive world order look like? Michael Brenes weighs in

Crashing the War Party

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 42:45


The war in Ukraine will end with a negotiated settlement (no one knows how or when) but whatever it will be will likely forge the basis of a new European security order if not an international one, says Yale historian Michael Brenes. What would that order look like? He suggests it should be one in which the U.S. and other great powers play a role in eventually bringing the Global South into a multilateral embrace of shared national interests and around 'progressive' values beyond security — like economic development, health care, social justice, and climate change. Can this work, or is it just pie in the sky? Dan and Kelley ask him to explain. In the first segment, they discuss whether the Republicans have what it takes to tackle the bloat and corruption of escalating defense budgets.More Michael Brenes: Wealth for All Nations: The war in Ukraine and the making of a new global order, Warfare and Welfare, 1/4/23The Future of Restraint after Ukraine, Foreign Exchanges, 12/19/22For Might and Right: Cold War Defense Spending and the Remaking of American Democracy, University of Massachusetts Press (2020) This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit crashingthewarparty.substack.com

Free City Radio
Radio Alhara راديو الحارة - Interview on Remaking the Exceptional: Tea, Torture, and Reparations

Free City Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 30:00


On the January, 2023 edition of Stefan Christoff's monthly artist interview on Radio AlHara we hear from the creators of "Remaking the Exceptional: Tea, Torture, and Reparations," (www.tea-project.org) a collective work that is described this way: "Through the voices of torture survivors and activists, the Remaking the Exceptional podcast highlights connections between policing and incarceration in Chicago and the human rights violations of the Global War on Terror, while also celebrating the struggle for justice and reparations. Sitting, sipping, and reflecting over a cup of tea with others can create the space for conversations on difficult and at times painful subjects. It also can create opportunities to envision a new set of social relations." The interview is with Amber Ginsburg, Nate Sandberg, and Aaron Hughes. Music on this edition at the end is by Karim Wasfi with the track "Requiem aeternam, Cello Prelude." Each month Stefan contributes an interview to @radioalhara in Palestine. Accompanying image is the graphic from the podcast project.

History Unplugged Podcast
The Irish Conquered the World With Plentiful Cheap Labor and Pints of Guinness

History Unplugged Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 43:45 Very Popular


When people think of Irish emigration, they often think of the Great Famine of the 1840s, which caused many to flee Ireland for the United States. But the real history of the Irish diaspora is much longer, more complicated, and more global. Today's guest, Sean Connolly, author of “On Every Tide: The Making and Remaking of the Irish World,” argues that the Irish exodus helped make the modern world. Starting in the eighteenth century, the Irish fled limited opportunity at home and fanned out across America, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. These emigrants helped settle new frontiers, industrialize the West, and spread Catholicism globally. This led to the commodification of Irish culture, best exemplified by the ubiquity of the Irish Pub and Guinness, the popularity of River Dance, and annual Saint Patrick's Day parades. As the Irish built vibrant communities abroad, they leveraged their newfound power—sometimes becoming oppressors themselves.

Off the Page: A Columbia University Press Podcast
Daniel Barish, "Learning to Rule: Court Education and the Remaking of the Qing State, 1861-1912" (Columbia UP, 2022)

Off the Page: A Columbia University Press Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 64:48


The late Qing was a time of great turmoil and upheaval but also a time of great possibility, as scholars, officials, the press, and revolutionaries all sought to find ways to shape China's future. For many, as explored in Daniel Barish's new book, Learning to Rule: Court Education and the Remaking of the Qing State, 1861-1912 (Columbia UP, 2022), the solution lay not outside the Qing but within it — with the emperor himself. Learning to Rule explores the education of the final three Qing emperors, looking at how debates about Western learning, foreign language education, the Manchu Way, and constitutionalism played out in the classrooms of the Qing emperors. Not only is this an intimate and deeply human look at the emperor and court life, it also shows just how involved the Qing was in global conversations about the role and education of a monarch, with many drawing on the examples of rulers in Russia and Japan when proposing their own plans for the Qing. Vividly written, this book will be of interest to any readers looking to learn about the late Qing, modern Chinese history, and the history of global empires — as well as those who might be curious about what it was like to try to teach the Son of Heaven. Sarah Bramao-Ramos is a PhD candidate in History and East Asian Languages at Harvard. She works on Manchu language books and is interested in anything with a kesike. She can be reached at sbramaoramos@g.harvard.edu

New Books in Education
Daniel Barish, "Learning to Rule: Court Education and the Remaking of the Qing State, 1861-1912" (Columbia UP, 2022)

New Books in Education

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 64:48


The late Qing was a time of great turmoil and upheaval but also a time of great possibility, as scholars, officials, the press, and revolutionaries all sought to find ways to shape China's future. For many, as explored in Daniel Barish's new book, Learning to Rule: Court Education and the Remaking of the Qing State, 1861-1912 (Columbia UP, 2022), the solution lay not outside the Qing but within it — with the emperor himself. Learning to Rule explores the education of the final three Qing emperors, looking at how debates about Western learning, foreign language education, the Manchu Way, and constitutionalism played out in the classrooms of the Qing emperors. Not only is this an intimate and deeply human look at the emperor and court life, it also shows just how involved the Qing was in global conversations about the role and education of a monarch, with many drawing on the examples of rulers in Russia and Japan when proposing their own plans for the Qing. Vividly written, this book will be of interest to any readers looking to learn about the late Qing, modern Chinese history, and the history of global empires — as well as those who might be curious about what it was like to try to teach the Son of Heaven. Sarah Bramao-Ramos is a PhD candidate in History and East Asian Languages at Harvard. She works on Manchu language books and is interested in anything with a kesike. She can be reached at sbramaoramos@g.harvard.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/education

New Books in Chinese Studies
Daniel Barish, "Learning to Rule: Court Education and the Remaking of the Qing State, 1861-1912" (Columbia UP, 2022)

New Books in Chinese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 64:48


The late Qing was a time of great turmoil and upheaval but also a time of great possibility, as scholars, officials, the press, and revolutionaries all sought to find ways to shape China's future. For many, as explored in Daniel Barish's new book, Learning to Rule: Court Education and the Remaking of the Qing State, 1861-1912 (Columbia UP, 2022), the solution lay not outside the Qing but within it — with the emperor himself. Learning to Rule explores the education of the final three Qing emperors, looking at how debates about Western learning, foreign language education, the Manchu Way, and constitutionalism played out in the classrooms of the Qing emperors. Not only is this an intimate and deeply human look at the emperor and court life, it also shows just how involved the Qing was in global conversations about the role and education of a monarch, with many drawing on the examples of rulers in Russia and Japan when proposing their own plans for the Qing. Vividly written, this book will be of interest to any readers looking to learn about the late Qing, modern Chinese history, and the history of global empires — as well as those who might be curious about what it was like to try to teach the Son of Heaven. Sarah Bramao-Ramos is a PhD candidate in History and East Asian Languages at Harvard. She works on Manchu language books and is interested in anything with a kesike. She can be reached at sbramaoramos@g.harvard.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/chinese-studies

New Books in History
Daniel Barish, "Learning to Rule: Court Education and the Remaking of the Qing State, 1861-1912" (Columbia UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 64:48


The late Qing was a time of great turmoil and upheaval but also a time of great possibility, as scholars, officials, the press, and revolutionaries all sought to find ways to shape China's future. For many, as explored in Daniel Barish's new book, Learning to Rule: Court Education and the Remaking of the Qing State, 1861-1912 (Columbia UP, 2022), the solution lay not outside the Qing but within it — with the emperor himself. Learning to Rule explores the education of the final three Qing emperors, looking at how debates about Western learning, foreign language education, the Manchu Way, and constitutionalism played out in the classrooms of the Qing emperors. Not only is this an intimate and deeply human look at the emperor and court life, it also shows just how involved the Qing was in global conversations about the role and education of a monarch, with many drawing on the examples of rulers in Russia and Japan when proposing their own plans for the Qing. Vividly written, this book will be of interest to any readers looking to learn about the late Qing, modern Chinese history, and the history of global empires — as well as those who might be curious about what it was like to try to teach the Son of Heaven. Sarah Bramao-Ramos is a PhD candidate in History and East Asian Languages at Harvard. She works on Manchu language books and is interested in anything with a kesike. She can be reached at sbramaoramos@g.harvard.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in East Asian Studies
Daniel Barish, "Learning to Rule: Court Education and the Remaking of the Qing State, 1861-1912" (Columbia UP, 2022)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 64:48


The late Qing was a time of great turmoil and upheaval but also a time of great possibility, as scholars, officials, the press, and revolutionaries all sought to find ways to shape China's future. For many, as explored in Daniel Barish's new book, Learning to Rule: Court Education and the Remaking of the Qing State, 1861-1912 (Columbia UP, 2022), the solution lay not outside the Qing but within it — with the emperor himself. Learning to Rule explores the education of the final three Qing emperors, looking at how debates about Western learning, foreign language education, the Manchu Way, and constitutionalism played out in the classrooms of the Qing emperors. Not only is this an intimate and deeply human look at the emperor and court life, it also shows just how involved the Qing was in global conversations about the role and education of a monarch, with many drawing on the examples of rulers in Russia and Japan when proposing their own plans for the Qing. Vividly written, this book will be of interest to any readers looking to learn about the late Qing, modern Chinese history, and the history of global empires — as well as those who might be curious about what it was like to try to teach the Son of Heaven. Sarah Bramao-Ramos is a PhD candidate in History and East Asian Languages at Harvard. She works on Manchu language books and is interested in anything with a kesike. She can be reached at sbramaoramos@g.harvard.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

New Books Network
Daniel Barish, "Learning to Rule: Court Education and the Remaking of the Qing State, 1861-1912" (Columbia UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 64:48


The late Qing was a time of great turmoil and upheaval but also a time of great possibility, as scholars, officials, the press, and revolutionaries all sought to find ways to shape China's future. For many, as explored in Daniel Barish's new book, Learning to Rule: Court Education and the Remaking of the Qing State, 1861-1912 (Columbia UP, 2022), the solution lay not outside the Qing but within it — with the emperor himself. Learning to Rule explores the education of the final three Qing emperors, looking at how debates about Western learning, foreign language education, the Manchu Way, and constitutionalism played out in the classrooms of the Qing emperors. Not only is this an intimate and deeply human look at the emperor and court life, it also shows just how involved the Qing was in global conversations about the role and education of a monarch, with many drawing on the examples of rulers in Russia and Japan when proposing their own plans for the Qing. Vividly written, this book will be of interest to any readers looking to learn about the late Qing, modern Chinese history, and the history of global empires — as well as those who might be curious about what it was like to try to teach the Son of Heaven. Sarah Bramao-Ramos is a PhD candidate in History and East Asian Languages at Harvard. She works on Manchu language books and is interested in anything with a kesike. She can be reached at sbramaoramos@g.harvard.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Welcome to Florida
Episode 131: Villainous Ed Ball & the St. Joe Company

Welcome to Florida

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 47:04


Our episode begins with a trip to Warm Mineral Springs.Our guest is Kathryn Ziewitz, co-author of "Green Empire: The St. Joe Company and the Remaking of Florida's Panhandle." The St. Joe Company, a legacy of the Dupont empire, at one point possessed 5% of all the land in Florida along with banks and railroads. It was run from Jacksonville with an iron fist by a true Florida villain: Ed Ball.

New Books in Communications
Victoria Hoyle, "The Remaking of Archival Values" (Routledge, 2022)

New Books in Communications

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 69:02


The Remaking of Archival Values by Victoria Hoyle (Routledge, October 2022) posits that archival theory and practice are fields in flux, and that recent critical archival discourse that addresses neoliberalism, racism, and the legacies of colonialism and patriarchy represents a disruption not only to established principles but also to the values that underpin them. Using critical discourse analysis and comparing theory and practice from the UK and the Anglophone world, Hoyle explores the challenges faced by scholars, institutions, organizations, and practitioners in embedding new values. She demonstrates how persistent underlying discursive structures about archives have manifested from the late nineteenth century to the present day. Qualitative and participatory research in the UK shows how conceptions of archival value arise, are expressed, and become authorized in practice at international, national, and local levels. Considering what might be learnt from similar debates in public history and cultural heritage studies, the book asks if and how dominant epistemologies of the archive can be dismantled amidst systems of power that resist change. As Hoyle reflects in this interview, “I call the book The Remaking of Archival Values and I talk throughout about how my own archival values have been remade, but I don't mean by that that we arrive at a new set of archival values. But rather: that we acknowledge that this process of remaking is fundamental to our practice, and that we enter this position of suspension in order to continue that process of remaking perpetually rather than expecting some kind of end point.” The Remaking of Archival Values is relevant to researchers and students in the field of archival and information studies, as well as practitioners who work with archives around the world. It will also speak to the interests of those working in the fields of cultural heritage, archaeology, museum studies, public history, and gender and race studies. Jen Hoyer is Technical Services and Electronic Resources Librarian at CUNY New York City College of Technology and a volunteer at Interference Archive. She is co-author of What Primary Sources Teach: Lessons for Every Classroom and The Social Movement Archive. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/communications

New Books Network
Victoria Hoyle, "The Remaking of Archival Values" (Routledge, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 69:02


The Remaking of Archival Values by Victoria Hoyle (Routledge, October 2022) posits that archival theory and practice are fields in flux, and that recent critical archival discourse that addresses neoliberalism, racism, and the legacies of colonialism and patriarchy represents a disruption not only to established principles but also to the values that underpin them. Using critical discourse analysis and comparing theory and practice from the UK and the Anglophone world, Hoyle explores the challenges faced by scholars, institutions, organizations, and practitioners in embedding new values. She demonstrates how persistent underlying discursive structures about archives have manifested from the late nineteenth century to the present day. Qualitative and participatory research in the UK shows how conceptions of archival value arise, are expressed, and become authorized in practice at international, national, and local levels. Considering what might be learnt from similar debates in public history and cultural heritage studies, the book asks if and how dominant epistemologies of the archive can be dismantled amidst systems of power that resist change. As Hoyle reflects in this interview, “I call the book The Remaking of Archival Values and I talk throughout about how my own archival values have been remade, but I don't mean by that that we arrive at a new set of archival values. But rather: that we acknowledge that this process of remaking is fundamental to our practice, and that we enter this position of suspension in order to continue that process of remaking perpetually rather than expecting some kind of end point.” The Remaking of Archival Values is relevant to researchers and students in the field of archival and information studies, as well as practitioners who work with archives around the world. It will also speak to the interests of those working in the fields of cultural heritage, archaeology, museum studies, public history, and gender and race studies. Jen Hoyer is Technical Services and Electronic Resources Librarian at CUNY New York City College of Technology and a volunteer at Interference Archive. She is co-author of What Primary Sources Teach: Lessons for Every Classroom and The Social Movement Archive. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Archaeology
Victoria Hoyle, "The Remaking of Archival Values" (Routledge, 2022)

New Books in Archaeology

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 69:02


The Remaking of Archival Values by Victoria Hoyle (Routledge, October 2022) posits that archival theory and practice are fields in flux, and that recent critical archival discourse that addresses neoliberalism, racism, and the legacies of colonialism and patriarchy represents a disruption not only to established principles but also to the values that underpin them. Using critical discourse analysis and comparing theory and practice from the UK and the Anglophone world, Hoyle explores the challenges faced by scholars, institutions, organizations, and practitioners in embedding new values. She demonstrates how persistent underlying discursive structures about archives have manifested from the late nineteenth century to the present day. Qualitative and participatory research in the UK shows how conceptions of archival value arise, are expressed, and become authorized in practice at international, national, and local levels. Considering what might be learnt from similar debates in public history and cultural heritage studies, the book asks if and how dominant epistemologies of the archive can be dismantled amidst systems of power that resist change. As Hoyle reflects in this interview, “I call the book The Remaking of Archival Values and I talk throughout about how my own archival values have been remade, but I don't mean by that that we arrive at a new set of archival values. But rather: that we acknowledge that this process of remaking is fundamental to our practice, and that we enter this position of suspension in order to continue that process of remaking perpetually rather than expecting some kind of end point.” The Remaking of Archival Values is relevant to researchers and students in the field of archival and information studies, as well as practitioners who work with archives around the world. It will also speak to the interests of those working in the fields of cultural heritage, archaeology, museum studies, public history, and gender and race studies. Jen Hoyer is Technical Services and Electronic Resources Librarian at CUNY New York City College of Technology and a volunteer at Interference Archive. She is co-author of What Primary Sources Teach: Lessons for Every Classroom and The Social Movement Archive. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/archaeology

New Books in History
Victoria Hoyle, "The Remaking of Archival Values" (Routledge, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 69:02


The Remaking of Archival Values by Victoria Hoyle (Routledge, October 2022) posits that archival theory and practice are fields in flux, and that recent critical archival discourse that addresses neoliberalism, racism, and the legacies of colonialism and patriarchy represents a disruption not only to established principles but also to the values that underpin them. Using critical discourse analysis and comparing theory and practice from the UK and the Anglophone world, Hoyle explores the challenges faced by scholars, institutions, organizations, and practitioners in embedding new values. She demonstrates how persistent underlying discursive structures about archives have manifested from the late nineteenth century to the present day. Qualitative and participatory research in the UK shows how conceptions of archival value arise, are expressed, and become authorized in practice at international, national, and local levels. Considering what might be learnt from similar debates in public history and cultural heritage studies, the book asks if and how dominant epistemologies of the archive can be dismantled amidst systems of power that resist change. As Hoyle reflects in this interview, “I call the book The Remaking of Archival Values and I talk throughout about how my own archival values have been remade, but I don't mean by that that we arrive at a new set of archival values. But rather: that we acknowledge that this process of remaking is fundamental to our practice, and that we enter this position of suspension in order to continue that process of remaking perpetually rather than expecting some kind of end point.” The Remaking of Archival Values is relevant to researchers and students in the field of archival and information studies, as well as practitioners who work with archives around the world. It will also speak to the interests of those working in the fields of cultural heritage, archaeology, museum studies, public history, and gender and race studies. Jen Hoyer is Technical Services and Electronic Resources Librarian at CUNY New York City College of Technology and a volunteer at Interference Archive. She is co-author of What Primary Sources Teach: Lessons for Every Classroom and The Social Movement Archive. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Scholarly Communication
Victoria Hoyle, "The Remaking of Archival Values" (Routledge, 2022)

Scholarly Communication

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 69:02


The Remaking of Archival Values by Victoria Hoyle (Routledge, October 2022) posits that archival theory and practice are fields in flux, and that recent critical archival discourse that addresses neoliberalism, racism, and the legacies of colonialism and patriarchy represents a disruption not only to established principles but also to the values that underpin them. Using critical discourse analysis and comparing theory and practice from the UK and the Anglophone world, Hoyle explores the challenges faced by scholars, institutions, organizations, and practitioners in embedding new values. She demonstrates how persistent underlying discursive structures about archives have manifested from the late nineteenth century to the present day. Qualitative and participatory research in the UK shows how conceptions of archival value arise, are expressed, and become authorized in practice at international, national, and local levels. Considering what might be learnt from similar debates in public history and cultural heritage studies, the book asks if and how dominant epistemologies of the archive can be dismantled amidst systems of power that resist change. As Hoyle reflects in this interview, “I call the book The Remaking of Archival Values and I talk throughout about how my own archival values have been remade, but I don't mean by that that we arrive at a new set of archival values. But rather: that we acknowledge that this process of remaking is fundamental to our practice, and that we enter this position of suspension in order to continue that process of remaking perpetually rather than expecting some kind of end point.” The Remaking of Archival Values is relevant to researchers and students in the field of archival and information studies, as well as practitioners who work with archives around the world. It will also speak to the interests of those working in the fields of cultural heritage, archaeology, museum studies, public history, and gender and race studies. Jen Hoyer is Technical Services and Electronic Resources Librarian at CUNY New York City College of Technology and a volunteer at Interference Archive. She is co-author of What Primary Sources Teach: Lessons for Every Classroom and The Social Movement Archive. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Climate Risk Podcast
Christmas Climate Book Club Special

Climate Risk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 34:02


What climate books do you want for Christmas?  Listen in to find out where to start on picking out those stocking fillers. In this special episode, Jo reunites with William McDonnell to discuss their top picks of climate books across all genres, from climate science to politics and economics, covering fiction and non-fiction. Although its light-hearted, there's a deadly serious point: given the urgency of the climate crisis, we need to educate ourselves on the nature of the problem and the solutions at hand. Books offer a wonderful opportunity to learn much more about the challenges we face to build up a holistic view of risks that we value so much at GARP. With so many excellent books out there, we hope this episode offers a guide, whether it's for expanding your own library of climate-related books or simply finding the perfect gift. And remember – as they say about dogs – a book is for life, not just for Christmas. If you enjoyed this episode and would like to give us feedback, please let us know at climateriskpodcast@garp.com. Books mentioned in today's discussion (in broad categories) Understanding the problem Six Degrees: Our Future on A Hotter Planet – Mark Lynas The Uninhabitable Earth: A Story of the Future – David Wallace-Wells The Burning Question: We Can't Burn Half the World's Oil, Coal and Gas. So How Do We Quit? – Mike Berners-Lees and Duncan Clark There Is No Planet B: A Handbook for the Make or Break Years – Mike Berners-Lees The Human Planet: How We Created the Anthropocene – Simon L. Lewis and Mark Maslin Climate Chaos: Lessons on Survival from Our Ancestors – Brian M. Fagan and Nadia Durrani Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind – Yuval Noah Harari The Great Leveller: Violence and the History of Inequality from the Stone Age to the Twenty-First Century – Walter Scheidel How did we get here? Losing Earth: The Decade We Could Have Stopped Climate Change – Nathaniel Rich Storms of My Grandchildren: The Truth About the Coming Climate Catastrophe and Our Last Chance to Save Humanity – James Hanson Merchants of Doubt: How a Handful of Scientists Obscured the Truth on Issues from Tobacco Smoke to Global Warming – Erik M. Conway and Naomi Oreskes The New Climate War: The fight to take back our planet – Michael E. Mann Climate economics Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st Century Economist – Kate Raworth Prosperity Without Growth: Economics for a Finite Planet – Tim Jackson Net Zero: How We Stop Causing Climate Change – Dieter Helm Measuring What Counts: The Global Movement for Well-Being – Joseph Stiglitz Risk psychology Don't Even Think About It: Why Our Brains Are Wired To Ignore Climate Change – George Marshall Thinking, Fast and Slow – Daniel Kahneman Climate and nature fiction Oryx and Crake – Margaret Atwood The Ministry for the Future – Kim Stanley Robinson Green Earth – Kim Stanley Robinson The Overstory – Richard Powers Communicating climate change Saving Us: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Healing in a Divided World – Katherine Hayhoe The Water Will Come: Rising Seas, Sinking Cities, and the Remaking of the Civilized World – Jeff Goodell Hot Mess: What on earth can we do about climate change? – Matt Winning Climate solutions How to Avoid a Climate Disaster: The Solutions We Have and the Breakthroughs We Need – Bill Gates Drawdown: The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed to Reverse Global Warming – Paul Hawken Investing in the Era of Climate Change – Bruce Usher Making Climate Policy Work – David Victor and Danny Cullenward Under a White Sky: The Nature of the Future – Elizabeth Kolbert The Planet Remade: How Geoengineering Could Change the World – Oliver Morton Social challenges of climate change This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate – Naomi Klein On Fire: The Burning Case for a Green New Deal – Naomi Klein Climate Justice: Hope, Resilience, and the Fight for a Sustainable Future – Mary Robinson Bonus: Invisible Women: Exposing Data Bias in a World Designed for Men – Caroline Criado Perez Environment and biodiversity Wilding: The return of nature to a British farm – Isabella Tree The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History – Elizabeth Kolbert Regenesis: Feeding the World without Devouring the Planet – George Monbiot Green and Prosperous Land: A Blueprint for Rescuing the British Countryside – Dieter Helm Looking forwards The Future We Choose: Surviving the Climate Crisis – Christiana Figueres and Tom Rivett-Carnac The Climate Book – Greta Thunberg Uplifting reads Humankind: A Human History – Rutger Bregman Humans: A Brief History of How We F***** It All Up – Tom Phillips  Speaker's Bio(s) William McDonnell, COO, Integrity Council for the Voluntary Carbon Market William is COO for the ICVCM, the new global governance body to set and enforce threshold quality standards for the voluntary carbon market. Prior to that he had a 25-year career in financial services. Most recently he was Group Chief Risk Officer and member of the Group Executive Committee for RSA Insurance Group plc for 7 years, responsible for Risk, Assurance and Compliance groupwide. Prior to RSA he held roles at HSBC Investment Bank, Aviva, the UK Financial Services Authority and Deloitte. William is a leading voice on climate risk in the financial sector, having served as a member of the ClimateWise Council and of the UK's Climate Financial Risk Forum, and as chair of the Emerging Risks Initiative of leading global insurers, publishing a major climate study ‘The Heat is on – Insurability and Resilience in a Changing Climate'. 

1A
1A Remaking America: Being A Trans Kid In Texas

1A

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 34:11


A record number of bills targeting trans people in the U.S. have passed this year. In February, Texas Republican Gov. Greg Abbott issued a directive, classifying gender-affirming care as child abuse. 1A recently traveled to Austin to speak with trans kids and their families as part of the Remaking America Series. This conversation is part of our Remaking America collaboration with six public radio stations around the country. Remaking America is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

Odd Lots
This Is What Happens to Silicon Valley in a Downturn

Odd Lots

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 42:08


The US economy may not be in a recession, but Silicon Valley, which had a mega-boom throughout the 2010s, is in a downturn. Tech stocks have tanked and almost every day there are new reports about industry layoffs. So what happens next? What happens to its unique corporate culture? What happens to management and employees? On this episode, we speak with Margaret O'Mara, a professor at the University of Washington and the author of the book The Code: Silicon Valley and the Remaking of America. We talk about the history of Silicon Valley's upside-down moments and how the industries that have dominated the region have changed over time, particularly as government money comes in and out of the picture.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Judaism Unbound
Episode 354: Remaking Jewish Weddings - Jen Gubitz

Judaism Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 65:36


Jen Gubitz is the founder and executive director of Modern JewISH Couples -- an organization that supports committed couples on the pathway to partnership, marriage, and beyond. She joins Dan Libenson and Lex Rofeberg for a conversation about Jewish weddings that asks a number of questions. What typically happens, and what should happen, before the wedding day? Why is it not only okay, but wonderful, when non-clergy officiate Jewish weddings? What transformation does the ritual of a wedding ceremony effect, in 2022, when many traditional understandings of what a wedding “does” no longer resonate?Inspired by what you hear in this podcast episode? You can sign up for a 3-week mini-course in Judaism Unbound's UnYeshiva (a digital center for Jewish learning and unlearning), taught by Adina Allen and revolving around the Torah of Creativity. Register for a 3-week mini-course in Judaism Unbound's UnYeshiva, taught by Jen Gubitz and Dan Libenson, entitled "How to Perform a Jew-Ish Wedding," by clicking here. 

The Brother Cousins
Episode 57 - The Gospel - Remaking Humanity

The Brother Cousins

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 64:43


Today we continue part 3 of our Gospel series with THE GOSPEL: REMAKING HUMANITY. Not only does the Gospel of Jesus birng salvation for our souls, but it also redeems our life from sin and futility to serve God in His Kingdom. In essence, we learn a whole new way to be a human--in the image and likeness of Jesus.

1A
1A Remaking America: Is Our Democracy Truly Representative?

1A

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 36:26


Almost half of eligible voters cast a ballot in the most recent election, according to the U.S. Elections Project.Still, voters can feel like our centuries-old voting system isn't working for us today.1A spent election week in Wichita, Kansas, after voters decided to change how they elect their city school board.This conversation is part of our Remaking America collaboration with six public radio stations around the country. Remaking America is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

On the Media
Flipping The Bird

On the Media

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 50:18


Since Elon Musk took over Twitter, there has been nothing short of crisis — leading to massive layoffs and lost advertisers. On this week's On the Media, what this chaos means for activists worldwide who used the platform as a public square. Plus, how political predictions distort coverage of elections.  1. James Fallows [@JamesFallows], writer of the “Breaking the News” newsletter on Substack, on the political press' obsession with telling the future and the narratives that have a chokehold on elections coverage. Listen. 2. Zoë Schiffer [@ZoeSchiffer], Managing Editor of Platformer, on the mass exodus of employees from one of the world's most significant social media sites. Listen. 3. Avi Asher-Schapiro [@AASchapiro], tech reporter for the Thomson Reuters Foundation, on the impact of Musk's leadership on Twitter users around the world. Listen. 4. Clive Thompson [@pomeranian99], journalist and author of Coders: The Making of a New Tribe and the Remaking of the World, on the website many are fleeing to amid chaos at Twitter. Listen.

1A
1A Remaking America: Redistricting And The Midterm Elections

1A

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 35:02


Every ten years, election maps are re-evaluated and redrawn to reflect states' populations. But how the maps are drawn differs from state to state. So was the outcome of the midterms determined before voters even cast their ballots? We gather a panel of experts to discuss how redistricting can advantage one party over another. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

FreightCasts
Fireside Chat: The Second Cold War and Remaking of the Global Supply Chain - F3 2022

FreightCasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 22:14


Jonathan Hoffman, former Chief Spokesman at the Pentagon, is joined by FreightWaves Founder and CEO, Craig Fuller, in this fireside chat on day 3 of F3 2022. Discover an easier way of doing business with the J.B. Hunt 360°® platform. Manage the entire shipping process from start to finish, all in one place. See what the power of the J.B. Hunt 360 platform can do for you at jbhunt.com/power.Follow FreightWaves on Apple PodcastsFollow FreightWaves on SpotifyMore FreightWaves Podcasts

On the Media
Mastodon: The Platform Taking Twitter's Worn and Weary

On the Media

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 25:39


In the wake of the five alarm fire at Twitter, a small, quiet social media alternative has been quietly attracting the tweeting weary. Mastodon, named for the prehistoric elephant relatives, was originally created by a German programmer named Eugen Rochko in 2016. And even though it shares similarities to its blue bird peer, the two platforms possess many differences. For one, Mastodon is organized by groups called "servers" or "instances," there's no universal experience like on Twitter. It's also completely decentralized — each server is run by individuals or small groups — with no overseeing company. But is it here to stay? This week, Brooke sits down with Clive Thompson, a tech journalist and author of the book Coders: The Making of a New Tribe and the Remaking of the World, to talk about why people like Mastodon, who it's for, and why we should watch its latest evolution. You can find Clive Thompson on Mastodon at @clive@saturation.social and OTM by searching @onthemedia@journa.host.

Ralph Nader Radio Hour
Midterm Postmortem

Ralph Nader Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 79:56


Ralph invites political psychologist Dr. Drew Westen back to the program to give his analysis of what happened in the midterm elections. What the Dems did right and what they still do wrong. And we also welcome back labor journalist, Steve Early, co-author of “Our Veterans: Winners, Losers, Friends, and Enemies on the New Terrain of Veterans Affairs.”Dr. Drew Westen  is a clinical, personality, and political psychologist and neuroscientist, and Professor in the Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry at Emory University. Dr. Westen is the author of The Political Brain: The Role of Emotion in Deciding the Fate of the Nation and is the founder of Westen Strategies, a strategic messaging consulting firm. He has advised a range of candidates and organizations, from presidential and congressional campaigns to major progressive organizations to the House and Senate Democratic Caucuses.Normally, within the first couple of years of a president's administration, he's usually picking up from where the last president left things— which is usually with a bad economy. And voters blame the new president for it, and that's why you see these historic midterm effects where the party in power usually gets killed. And this time, the Democrats didn't get killed. Let's give them that first.Dr. Drew WestenDemocrats have trouble figuring out that if you just speak honestly as a populist, you can win anywhere… Because people know when they're getting screwed. And they know when somebody has their back. And they know when someone is speaking honestly to them. Dr. Drew WestenAll politicians—with very few exceptions— flatter the voters. When do we say, “It's the voter's responsibility”? That they have exerted a wave of masochistic voting against their own interest?Ralph NaderSteve Early is a lawyer, organizer, union representative, and labor journalist. He is the author of Refinery Town: Big Oil, Big Money, and the Remaking of an American City, and co-author, with Suzanne Gordon and Jasper Craven, of Our Veterans: Winners, Losers, Friends, and Enemies on the New Terrain of Veterans Affairs.One of the great things about the VA is that a third of the VA caregiving workforce is veterans themselves. So you have this unique culture of solidarity and empathy, connection between patients and providers. You don't find that at Kaiser, or Sutter, or UnitedHealth, or any of the other big for-profit or nonprofit healthcare chains. So this is a real national treasure that needs to be defended.Steve Early, author of Our Veterans: Winners, Losers, Friends, and Enemies on the New Terrain of Veterans Affairs Get full access to Ralph Nader Radio Hour at www.ralphnaderradiohour.com/subscribe

New Models Podcast
Model Shock w/ Emmelyn Butterfield-Rosen (NM48)

New Models Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 67:56


By the end of the 19th century, cascading developments in science, theory, and philosophy were radically challenging the way Western society understood what it means “to think” — and how, in turn, this contemporary sentient human could be depicted. EMMELYN BUTTERFIELD-ROSEN, a scholar of late-19th and early-20th century art, and associate director of the Williams Graduate Program in the History of Art at the esteemed Clark Art Institute joins us to discuss her new book, “Modern Art & The Remaking of the Human Disposition” (U. Chicago Press, 2021), which brilliantly and with astonishing depth explores not just the shifts in artistic conventions during this time, but also the emergent cybernetic processes that catalyzed it. Published to subscribers: 28. AUG 2022 For more: https://emmelynbutterfieldrosen.com https://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/M/bo89966631.html

1A
1A Remaking America: When State And Local Politics Don't Match

1A

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 36:39


For many, voting is a chance to make sure their voices are heard. But full and fair representation can feel out of reach depending on where you live and the party that dominates your district. We're camping out on so-called "political islands." These are cities or counties whose political demographics don't align with the states in which they're located. We discuss why living in these political islands can be frustrating but important for democracy. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

A StoneWall's Perspective Podcast
Remaking of the American Political System - WIth Doug Billings

A StoneWall's Perspective Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 5:23


In this episode of A StoneWall's Perspective Podcast, Alex is at the ReAwaken America Tour in Branson, Missouri. One of the people that Alex has had the opportunity to become friends with is an author and the host of an amazing radio show, Doug Billings! Doug recently released a book called Remaking the American Political System. In this episode, Doug and Alex discuss his book. I hope that you enjoy!If you go to mypillow.com/stonewall you can get a discount of up to 66% off of your order!dougbillings.usastonewallsperspectivepodcast.commypillow.com/stonewallsherwood.tv/stonewalltimetofreeamerica.com

KQED’s Forum
Can There Be Such a Thing as Too Much Democracy?

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 55:35


“Not everyone should get a say” seems counterintuitive to the idea of democracy. But according to Atlantic writer Jerusalem Demsas, when it comes to new housing or infrastructure projects, sometimes community input can be undemocratic. Often a vocal and persistent minority is able to stymie much-needed proposals. We'll talk with Demsas and experts about how participatory democracy can get in the way of progress and whether it can be fixed. Guests: Jerusalem Demsas, staff writer, Atlantic Magazine Katherine Levine Einstein, associate professor, political science and director of Undergraduate Studies, Boston University; co-author, "Neighborhood Defenders: Participatory Politics and America's Housing Crisis" Paul Sabin, Randolph W. Townsend, Jr. Professor of History and Professor of American Studies, Yale University; author, "Public Citizens: The Attack on Big Government and the Remaking of American Liberalism;"

1A
1A Remaking America: Targeting Voters With Data

1A

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 35:32


Political spending is at an all-time high. Campaigns will spend almost $10 billion this year on advertising, according to AdImpact.But what are the rules? And in a world where every digital step we take is tracked, how much should we care? We get into who's behind this spending and how far down the ballot it goes.This conversation is part of our Remaking America collaboration with six public radio stations around the country. The series explores Americans' trust in institutions and the health of our democracy. Remaking America is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

Let's Give A Damn
Anand Giridharadas: Can Persuasion Heal and Change Our Deeply Fractured Country?

Let's Give A Damn

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 73:58


Anand Giridharadas is a writer. He is the author of The Persuaders: At the Front Lines of the Fight for Hearts, Minds, and Democracy (2022), Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World (2018), The True American: Murder and Mercy in Texas (2014), and India Calling: An Intimate Portrait of a Nation's Remaking (2011). A former foreign correspondent and columnist for The New York Times for more than a decade, he has also written for The New Yorker, The Atlantic, and Time, and he is the publisher of the newsletter The Ink. He has spoken on stages around the world and taught narrative journalism at New York University. He is a regular on-air political analyst for MSNBC. Born in Cleveland, Ohio, he was raised there, in Paris, France, and in Maryland, and educated at the University of Michigan, Oxford, and Harvard. He has received the Radcliffe Fellowship, the Porchlight Business Book of the Year Award, Harvard University's Outstanding Lifetime Achievement Award for Humanism in Culture, and the New York Public Library's Helen Bernstein Book Award for Excellence in Journalism. He lives in Brooklyn, New York, with his wife, Priya Parker, and their two children. NEXT STEPS: — Follow Anand on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. — Buy The Persuaders: At the Front Lines of the Fight for Hearts, Minds, and Democracy. — Buy Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World. — Watch Anand's fantastic TEDx talk — A tale of two Americas. And the mini-mart where they collided. __________________________________________________________ Reach out to us anytime and for any reason at hello@letsgiveadamn.com. Follow Let's Give A Damn on Facebook, Instagram, & Twitter to keep up with everything.

Conservative Conversations with ISI
Joseph Stuart on Christopher Dawson, The Primacy of Religion, and Cultural Appreciation

Conservative Conversations with ISI

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 40:57


In this episode: Joseph Stuart, professor of history at the University of Mary and a former ISI Weaver fellow, joins the podcast to discuss the work of 20th century historian of culture, Christopher Dawsonwhy religion is at the heart of cultural identity, and how cultures that abandon their religion inevitably become captured by ideological “political religions”how to appreciate different cultures and have a rich, complex view of other civilizations without becoming a relativistTexts Mentioned:Christopher Dawson: A Cultural Mind in the Age of the Great War by Joseph StuartGifford Lectures by Christopher DawsonLeisure, The Basis of Culture by Josef PieperPrimitive Culture by Edward TylorThe Power and the Glory by Graham GreeneReligion and Culture by Christopher DawsonThe Dynamics of World History by Christopher DawsonThe Crisis of Western Education by Christopher DawsonThe Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order by Samuel Huntington“Christopher Dawson and Ayatollah Khatami and ‘The Dialogue of Civilizations' A Christian-Muslim Conversation” by Stephen G. CarterThe Mission movie“Conservatism” by Christopher Dawson (introduction by Joseph Stuart)Religion and the Modern State by Christopher DawsonJoseph Stuart Faculty PageBecome a part of ISI:Become a MemberSupport ISIUpcoming ISI Events

1A
1A Remaking America: What's Weighing On High Schoolers' Minds?

1A

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 35:57


Teenagers under 18 years old don't have a vote, but they do have a voice. According to PEW research, Gen Z – those born between 1996 and 2012 — are the most racially diverse generation. They're also the first generation of so-called "digital natives" to grow up with smartphones. These same young people can also be those most vulnerable to society's most pressing issues, like gun violence, poverty, sexual assault, and addiction. We hear from high schoolers across Louisville, Kentucky and their concerns as we near the midterm elections. We also discuss the recent school shooting in St. Louis, Missouri. This conversation is part of our Remaking America collaboration with six public radio stations around the country. Remaking America is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

American Prestige
E68 - For Might and Right, Ep. 2 w/ Michael Brenes

American Prestige

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 45:12


Danny and Derek welcome back Michael Brenes, associate director of the Brady-Johnson Program in Grand Strategy and lecturer in history at Yale University, to discuss his book For Might and Right: Cold War Defense Spending and the Remaking of American Democracy. They pick up the discussion after the Korean War, touching on Eisenhower's “military-industrial complex” farewell address, the 1958 National Defense Education Act, Robert McNamara and the Kennedy administration, defense conversion and “anti-militarist” Democrats, the effect of the Vietnam War on the MIC, and more.Check out the first episode here. This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.americanprestigepod.com/subscribe

1A
1A Remaking America: Abortion On The Ballot

1A

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 28:44


Kansas voters surprised the country when they overwhelmingly voted against a constitutional amendment that would have banned abortion in the state. But several more states are now set to vote on the issue next month. According to a recent NPR and PBS poll, abortion is the second most important issue for voters after inflation. The overturning of Roe v. Wade has altered the political landscape in the run-up to the midterms. We talk about how and take a look at what we can expect when Kentuckians head to the polls. This conversation is part of our Remaking America collaboration with six public radio stations around the country. Remaking America is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Trumpcast
Political Gabfest: Ron DeSantis' Sadistic Plan

Trumpcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 53:20


This week, David Plotz, Emily Bazelon, and John Dickerson New York's massive fraud case against the Trumps; Ron DeSantis' treatments of asylum seekers; and Dahlia Lithwick's Lady Justice.   Here are some notes and references from this week's show: Trading Barriers: Immigration and the Remaking of Globalization, Margaret E. Peters Lady Justice: Women, the Law, and the Battle to Save America, by Dahlia Lithwick Ruth Igielnik for The New York Times: “Trump Support Remains Unmoved by Investigations, Poll Finds” Here are this week's chatters: John: It was supposed to be...The Philosophy of Modern Song, by Bob Dylan Emily: Somebody Somewhere; Reservation Dogs David: The Space Force Anthem Listener chatter from Danny Edgel: Frank Vaisvilas and Sarah Volpenhein for The Green Bay Press-Gazette: “Oneida Nation Steps In To Defend Indian Child Welfare Act In Us Supreme Court Case” For this week's Slate Plus bonus segment Emily, David, and John discuss the vacation of Adnan Syed's murder conviction.   Tweet us your questions and chatters @SlateGabfest or email us at gabfest@slate.com. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Cheyna Roth. Research by Bridgette Dunlap. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Political Gabfest
Ron DeSantis' Sadistic Plan

Political Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 53:20 Very Popular


This week, David Plotz, Emily Bazelon, and John Dickerson New York's massive fraud case against the Trumps; Ron DeSantis' treatments of asylum seekers; and Dahlia Lithwick's Lady Justice.   Here are some notes and references from this week's show: Trading Barriers: Immigration and the Remaking of Globalization, Margaret E. Peters Lady Justice: Women, the Law, and the Battle to Save America, by Dahlia Lithwick Ruth Igielnik for The New York Times: “Trump Support Remains Unmoved by Investigations, Poll Finds” Here are this week's chatters: John: It was supposed to be...The Philosophy of Modern Song, by Bob Dylan Emily: Somebody Somewhere; Reservation Dogs David: The Space Force Anthem Listener chatter from Danny Edgel: Frank Vaisvilas and Sarah Volpenhein for The Green Bay Press-Gazette: “Oneida Nation Steps In To Defend Indian Child Welfare Act In Us Supreme Court Case” For this week's Slate Plus bonus segment Emily, David, and John discuss the vacation of Adnan Syed's murder conviction.   Tweet us your questions and chatters @SlateGabfest or email us at gabfest@slate.com. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Cheyna Roth. Research by Bridgette Dunlap. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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1A Remaking America: The Elections Theory That Could Disrupt Democracy

1A

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 33:45


The pandemic changed the 2020 election. Voters turned out in record numbers. Many Americans took advantage of mail-in and early voting.Since 2020, pro-democracy groups say states have enacted 50 laws that make voting harder or undermine the election process.We discuss a case that could drastically change how federal elections are run. We also ask law experts what legal standing this theory has and what it could mean for your vote. This conversation is part of our Remaking America collaboration with six public radio stations around the country. Remaking America is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.