Podcasts about physiotherapy

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A health profession that aims to address the illnesses or injuries that limit a person's physical abilities to function in everyday life

  • 694PODCASTS
  • 2,228EPISODES
  • 38mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • May 20, 2022LATEST
physiotherapy

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Best podcasts about physiotherapy

Show all podcasts related to physiotherapy

Latest podcast episodes about physiotherapy

The Healthcare Education Transformation Podcast
Pain Treatment and Research - Rajam Roose

The Healthcare Education Transformation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 31:29


Rajam Roose, a massage therapist and founder of the San Diego Pain Summit, comes onto the HET Podcast to speak about her interest in pain treatment and research, as well as, explain how she was able to bring her dream conference to fruition. Biography: In 2014, Rajam Roose (a massage therapist with an interest in pain treatment and research) was organizing interdisciplinary continuing education workshops for manual and physical therapists in San Diego. During a break at one workshop, she overheard the instructor asking the participants if they were learning current pain research in their programs. If they were familiar with pain research experts such as Patrick Wall, David Butler, Lorimer Moseley, etc. The students nodded their heads, and one spoke out and replied: "Yes, we were taught current pain research at my school but I have no idea how to apply it into my practice."  Rajam realized there needed to be an event where participants could learn clinical applications of pain research that would be directly relevant to their work. Without any prior experience organizing or managing a conference, Rajam created this multidisciplinary pain management conference and found success from the start. Over the years, the San Diego Pain Summit has evolved into an event where clinicians learn how to have a person-centered practice. View the historical list of all speakers/presentations. The San Diego Pain Summit is on a mission to change how pain is managed and treated in the healthcare industry by organizing conferences and workshops where clinicians can learn up to date pain education and research. The Summit also includes voices representing the patient's lived experience, which is an integral part of creating person centered care.

The Words Matter Podcast with Oliver Thomson
The Clinical Reasoning Series – Navigating uncertainty with Dr Nathalia Costa

The Words Matter Podcast with Oliver Thomson

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 68:29


Welcome to another episode of The Words Matter Podcast.So we are up to the 8th episode of the Clinical Reasoning Series and on today I'm speaking with Dr Nathalia Costa about clinical uncertainty. Nathalia is a Brazilian physiotherapist who completed PhD studies in Australia used mixed-methods to investigate the nature of low back pain flares (see here). This PhD work was won the Lumbar Spine Research Prize awarded by the Society for Study of the Lumbar Spine in 2021 (see Nathalia's other research here).Nathalia is currently working as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Universities of Queensland (UQ) and Sydney (USyd) investigating how both clinicians and people with low back pain navigate uncertainty during clinical encounters. And as such we speak about her work investigating uncertainty and talk around a paper, she and her colleagues published this year titled 'Uncertainty in low back pain care – insights from an ethnographic study', published in the journal Disability and Rehabilitation (see paper here) and a previous podcast on ethnography here with Dr Fiona Webster here).So on this episode we speak about: What uncertainty is and allude to the different ways and taxonomies used to describe it. Different sources of uncertainty and use the ambiguous nature of low back pain as an exemplar. The ways that we as clinicians might neglect uncertainty or attend to it. How we often seek to reduce uncertainty through the use of clinical reasoning or the application of evidence for examples through clinical guidelines. We talk about how an intolerance to uncertainty may prompt binary thinking and cause us to retreat to the comfort of the biomedical model and biomedical thinking. Occasions when we really do want to be certain as we can possibly be, and that there may be some ethical and therapeutic merit in communicating this to our patients. How uncertainty with low back pain is imbued with emotions – on both patient and clinician's part. How clinicians may emphasise uncertainty to patients, intentionally or unintentionally and the resulting impact that this might have on the balance of power within the relationship And we reflect on ways that clinicians better navigate uncertainty. So this was another brilliant conversation. Uncertainty, whether we like it or not surrounds and often defines our clinical work and is the omnipresent elephant in the clinical room and lives of our patients. Nathalia's work provides some crucial insights into the slippery and uncomfortable nature of clinical uncertainty which can allow us to reflect on how it make us and our patients feel and consider how we react in the face of it.As always, I have linked Nathalia's paper in the show notes, but please look out for a follow up paper which adopts a theory-driven post-qualitative approach to explore clinicians' experiences navigating uncertainty when working with patients with low back pain (see podcasts here on post-qualitative research here and here).Find Nathalia on Twitter @nathaliaccosta1Support the podcast and contribute via Patreon hereIf you liked the podcast, you'll love The Words Matter online course and mentoring to develop your clinical expertise  - ideal for all MSK therapists.Follow Words Matter on:Instagram @Wordsmatter_education @TheWordsMatterPodcastTwitter @WordsClinicalFacebook Words Matter - Improving Clinical CommunicationFind Nathalia on Twitter @nathaliaccosta1★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

The Healthcare Education Transformation Podcast
Teach Me Something Tuesday Ep 19 - Use Rubrics to Teach and Learn

The Healthcare Education Transformation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 1:56


Dr. F Scott Feil and Dr. Fabian Bizama speak about rubrics and how they can be useful to both professors and students.    

The Healthcare Education Transformation Podcast
Learning in PT School with a Physical Disability - Dr. Clare Doss

The Healthcare Education Transformation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 32:06


In this episode of the HET Podcast, our co-host Farley Schweighart launches her first episode by interviewing one of her former students, Dr. Clare A Doss. Join us for a conversation about physical therapy education with students with disabilities from an instructor and student perspective. Biography: Dr. Clare A Doss, PT, DPT is a Physical Therapy Specialist in Berryville, Arkansas. She graduated with honors in 2020. She has more than 2 years of diverse experiences.

The Voice Of Health
WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT KNEE PAIN, PART 2 (+COVID-19 UPDATE)

The Voice Of Health

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 54:50


Dr. Prather spends the first half of the show with a COVID-19 update that reveals the latest efforts that would increase government control over our health. Then, we continue our discussion from last week about Knee Pain and how you can find relief without drugs or surgery. In this episode, you'll find out:—How the California legislature has introduced a bill that would regulate how medicine is practiced and would force doctors to subordinate their decisions to public health bureaucrats. —The "chilling" proposal for a central vaccination registry. And the California bill that would allow minors to be vaccinated without their parents' consent.—The push for a treaty that would allow the World Health Organization take over in a pandemic and supersede national laws. And why Dr. Prather says the United States should actually pull out of the WHO.—How the Walgreens vaccination statistics show you are more likely to get COVID the more times you are vaccinated.—Why Dr. Prather says, while pharmaceuticals and surgery are sometimes necessary, the only way you can really fix a Knee is through Structure-Function Care.—The reason why your Knee will function better if you just lose 5% of your Body Fat Percentage. —The importance of Chiropractic adjustments and corrective exercises in relieving Knee Pain and reversing Knee degeneration. Plus, how Physiotherapy electrical stimulation can provide "an immediate change" in a patient's pain level. —How just one Acupuncture session caused a patient's surgical scar from Knee surgery to immediately change color from white to pink.—The role Decompression Therapy played in helping numerous patients in Dr. Prather's office to cancel scheduled Knee surgeries.—Why Glucosamine "works better than pharmaceuticals" and gives the building blocks of cartilage. And how specialized topical herbal liniments at Holistic Integration can relieve pain almost immediately and promote healing. www.TheVoiceOfHealthRadio.com

The Sports Physical Therapy Academy Podcast
EP065: “ACL Case Study: What Would You Do?”

The Sports Physical Therapy Academy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 33:06


”How would you return an athlete back to soccer 10 months s/p ACL reconstruction?”  In this episode, I share a complex case study and outline a weekly progression to return to contact and practice integration. If you're a PT and want to improve your return to sport progressions with ACLs, you need to tune into this episode. Enjoy! _____________________________________ Are you a physical therapist or physiotherapist looking for tips, tools, and strategies to work with more athletes, become a sports specialist or get a job in a sports setting...so you can finally enjoy the career that you've always dreamed of? If so, you're in the right place...this podcast is for you. Your host is Dr. Chris Garcia, a physical therapist, business owner, entrepreneur, nationally recognized public speaker, and residency-trained sports specialist.  Dr. Chris Garcia, PT, DPT, SCS, CSCS, USAW has worked in professional sports and traveled around the world working with elite athletes throughout his career, and he's learned a lot of lessons along the way. He created this podcast to share his experiences and give you everything you need to know to help YOU become a successful clinician. Dr. Chris Garcia talks about everything from sports rehab and injury prevention to developing athletic performance and the path to getting your dream job...even if it is in professional sports. If you want to become a successful clinician so you can finally enjoy the career you've always dreamed of, visit www.DrChrisGarcia.com. LINKS: www.DrChrisGarcia.com www.Instagram.com/ChrisGarciaDPT www.Facebook.com/ChrisGarciaDPT ***DISCLAIMER: This content is for educational & informational use only and & does not constitute medical advice. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice or medical recommendations, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a qualified medical professional for proper evaluation & treatment, or beginning any exercises or activity in this content. Chris Garcia Academy, Inc. and The Sports PT Academy Podcast are not responsible for any harm caused by the use of this content.***

The NPTE Podcast
074--Long-Term Memory Aids for the NPTE

The NPTE Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 28:36


Do you struggle with memorizing the boatload of content needed for the NPTE?  There's so much you need to know that it can be OVERWHELMING trying to juggle it all.  This episode will give you the tools to CRUSH the NPTE! Find it all out in this podcast!  Be prepared for the NPTE so that you can pass with flying colors! Check out www.ptfinalexam.com/podcast for more information and to stay up-to-date with our latest courses and projects.

Perry Nickelston: Stop Chasing Pain
SCP Podcast Episode 225: Celest Pereira

Perry Nickelston: Stop Chasing Pain

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 59:06


In this episode, we chat with returning guest Celest Pereira. Celest is a trained dancer and martial artist with a BS in Physiotherapy, and over 10 years yoga practice. Celest completed her Yoga Teacher Training in India in 2009 and has

CBC Newfoundland Morning
People in the Port au Choix area don't have far to go for physiotherapy and more. We'll find out about what's being offered, and what's planned, at GNP Community Place

CBC Newfoundland Morning

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 9:18


These days, we're hearing all the time about a loss of health care services in rural areas, but we have a good news story for you today. A community-based not-for-profit called the Great Northern Peninsula Community Place Corporation has just opened a facility in Port au Choix to offer a variety of health and wellness services and activities. Joan Cranston is with the GNP Community Place.

Mobility Experiment
#84 - How Your Environment Affects Your Life & Heath

Mobility Experiment

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 21:48


In this episode of the podcast we discuss environment & community. This is something I'm always interested in chatting about as I feel many of us are not aware how the things around us have an affect on our thought patterns, attitudes & goals. We explore how this may affect your pain levels, whether you decide to get surgery, recovery times and the severity of injury you suffer. We also speak on whether your community is having a positive or negative impact on your life, when you need to reasses  as well as how you can improve it.

The Healthcare Education Transformation Podcast
Teach Me Something Tuesday Ep 17 - Avatar

The Healthcare Education Transformation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 3:04


Dr. F Scott Feil explains what the term avatar means and how creating an avatar could help teachers/professors who are looking to get down to the root of where their students are coming from and what they're trying to learn.

The Healthcare Education Transformation Podcast
NPTE Final Frontier with Dr. Gerbehy and Dr. Friedberg

The Healthcare Education Transformation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 27:03


In this episode of the HET Podcast, Dr. Gerbehy and Dr. Friedberg come onto the show to talk about how they got involved with the NPTE Final Frontier, a premiere NPTE prep course. Biographies: Emily Gerbehy, PT, DPT, ATC is licensed physical therapist and certified athletic trainer in New York. She received her Doctorate in Physical Therapy from Dominican College in Orangeburg, NY and her Bachelor of Science with a concentration in Athletic Training from Marywood University in Scranton, PA. Emily is an instructor for NPTE Final Frontier helping PT and PTA students pass the boards exam! One of her main roles with Final Frontier is serving as a co-host for the NPTEFF Podcast. Emily is also an adjunct professor in the DPT Program at Dominican College. Clinically, she works with a wide range of patients in the acute care and outpatient settings. When Emily is not working she enjoys training for half marathons and exploring local coffee shops! David Friedberg, PT, DPT is a physical therapist and a graduate from Russell Sage College DPT program in Troy, New York. David currently works in an outpatient private practice in Long Island, New York. While not inside of the clinic, he works for an NPTE preparation course named NPTE Final Frontier (https://www.npteff.com). He has found a true passion for assisting both PTA and PT students in passing their NPTE. He is also one of the hosts of the NPTE Final Frontier Podcast. David currently serves on the Board of Directors for the Foreign Academic Credentialing Tools & Services (https://www.factspt.org). FACTS PT is a 501 (c)(3) non-profit organization assisting foreign-trained students with the PT and PTA licensure process in the United States. Contact Information: NPTE Final Frontier | Facebook Twitter NPTE Final Frontier (@npteff) • Instagram photos and videos NPTEFF (@npteff) TikTok | Watch NPTEFF's Newest TikTok Videos

The Sports Physical Therapy Academy Podcast
EP064: “New Grad PTs Need To Do These 4 Things”

The Sports Physical Therapy Academy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 25:13


”What advice do you have for new grad PT's interested in sports physical therapy?”  In this episode, I share four important tips every new grad PT should use in their first 2-3 years of practice. If you're a PT student, new grad PT, or established PT who mentors PTs, this episode is for you. Enjoy! _____________________________________ Are you a physical therapist or physiotherapist looking for tips, tools, and strategies to work with more athletes, become a sports specialist or get a job in a sports setting...so you can finally enjoy the career that you've always dreamed of? If so, you're in the right place...this podcast is for you. Your host is Dr. Chris Garcia, a physical therapist, business owner, entrepreneur, nationally recognized public speaker, and residency-trained sports specialist.  Dr. Chris Garcia, PT, DPT, SCS, CSCS, USAW has worked in professional sports and traveled around the world working with elite athletes throughout his career, and he's learned a lot of lessons along the way. He created this podcast to share his experiences and give you everything you need to know to help YOU become a successful clinician. Dr. Chris Garcia talks about everything from sports rehab and injury prevention to developing athletic performance and the path to getting your dream job...even if it is in professional sports. If you want to become a successful clinician so you can finally enjoy the career you've always dreamed of, visit www.DrChrisGarcia.com. LINKS: www.DrChrisGarcia.com www.Instagram.com/ChrisGarciaDPT www.Facebook.com/ChrisGarciaDPT ***DISCLAIMER: This content is for educational & informational use only and & does not constitute medical advice. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice or medical recommendations, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a qualified medical professional for proper evaluation & treatment, or beginning any exercises or activity in this content. Chris Garcia Academy, Inc. and The Sports PT Academy Podcast are not responsible for any harm caused by the use of this content.***

Physiotutors Podcast
Episode 040: Achilles Tendon Rupture with Lizzie Marlow

Physiotutors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 68:03


On this episode of the podcast I talk with Lizzie Marlow, an MSK physiotherapist & educator specialising in lower limbs with special interests in running injuries, lower limb tendinopathies & of course management & treatment of achilles ruptures. We talk about everything surrounding Achilles tendon rupture rehabilitation. From the initial assessment to the rehabilitation - as well as what is important at the initial stages of identifying the rupture (I have unfortunately seen a 1 or 2 missed...) - utilising ultrasound to get the optimal position for the torn tendon to repair as well as decisions on whether or not to operate, then guiding through the rehabilitation process itself! 

The Words Matter Podcast with Oliver Thomson
The Clinical Reasoning Series - Should we always give patients the treatments they want? Ethical reasoning with Prof. Clare Delany

The Words Matter Podcast with Oliver Thomson

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 62:20


Welcome to another episode of The Words Matter Podcast.If you're enjoying the Clinical Reasoning Series and the podcast more generally, please consider supporting the show via Patreon. You can pledge as little as a pound or a couple of dollars per episode. Your support really makes a difference and helps ensure the quality and regularity of the episodes.Following on my previous episodes in the series with Bjørn Hofmann (here and here) where we spoke about the ethics of disease and the moral obligations that flowed from being given a disease label - on this episode we are going to speak more explicitly about clinicians' thinking directed towards ethical problems and the resulting moral judgments they should endeavour to make and the processes which delivers them to those judgments.And so today I'm speaking with Professor Clare Delany. Clare is a Professor in Clinical Education at the University of Melbourne, Department of Medical Education, and a Clinical Ethicist at the Royal Children's Hospital Children's Bioethics Centre and Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Melbourne. She also chairs the University of Melbourne Central Human Research Ethics Committee.  Clare's health professional background is in physiotherapy. For the past 15 years, Clare's research and professional work has focused on a combination of clinical education and clinical ethics. Her research interests  include applied health ethics, paediatric bioethics, clinical reasoning, and critical reflection and she has authored more than 100 publications in peer-reviewed journals covering these areas of applied clinical ethics and clinical education.Clare has co-edited the books ‘Learning and Teaching in Clinical Contexts: A Practical Guide' and ‘When Doctors and Parents Disagree: Ethics, Paediatrics and the Zone of Parental Discretion.'So on this episode we speak about: What ethics is in the context of healthcare practice including the ethical principles of autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence and justice About the interaction and occasional tension between evidence-based practice and ethics-based practice and how ethics can help settle clashes between research evidence, patient values and clinician judgement and experience. What ethical reasoning is and the processes involved In making moral judgements. How it feels to identify an ethical problem which is often intuitive or as Clare describes an ‘ikiness'. Ethical reasoning when the consequences or stakes are high. Communicating risk to patients prior to treatment. Some case examples including patients requesting seemingly ineffective treatments or treatments which the clinician may feel is potentially harmful or not in the patients best interest. How the ethical principles should apply to all healthcare settings, whether public or private but in reality there are differences on how these principles are interpreted and applied in these respective settings. And finally we speak about how ethical reasoning motivates us to be aware of our own assumptions and of the assumptions and values of others which enriches our clinical work and also the therapeutic bond with our patients. So, this was such a wonderful conversation with Clare. She beautifully highlighted the foundational nature yet often prickliness of the ethical dilemmas we all face in practice and shares some extremely useful reasoning strategies to identify, manage and resolve the inevitable ethical moments in our clinical practice.Support the podcast and contribute via Patreon here.If you liked the podcast, you'll love The Words Matter online course and mentoring to develop your clinical expertise  - ideal for all MSK therapists.Follow Words Matter on:Instagram @Wordsmatter_education @TheWordsMatterPodcastTwitter @WordsClinicalFacebook Words Matter - Improving Clinical Communication★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

The Movement and Mindfulness Podcast
Ep 151: Movement, Mindset and Motherhood with Surabhi Veitch

The Movement and Mindfulness Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 72:24


Welcome to this episode of SelfKind with Erica Webb! Today, I'm thrilled to be talking with Surabhi Veitch. Surabhi is a Physiotherapist and Pregnancy & Postpartum Coach. She has two of her own little ones, and works to inspire birthing people to learn to trust their own bodies again.We chat about pregnancy and postpartum, and the societal messaging we receive that leads to distrust and burnout for new mums. Surabhi shares her philosophy when working with clients, and how important self care and a support system are to healing and feeling whole.In this episode, you'll hear:—How Surabhi is breaking the cycle in her own life of the expectation that women are here to serve others.—Why Surabhi decided to open her own physiotherapy and coaching business, her approach to care, and how her philosophy differs from many others in the field.—Insight about why we're so disconnected from our intrinsic abilities, and how our connection to our bodies can help rebuild some of that intuitive trust again.—Why it's important for Surabhi to share her own real experience with postpartum challenges.—The importance of finding a supportive care provider with whom you feel comfortable enough asking questions as well as building a community that aligns with the changes you want to make in your life.Tune in to hear the full conversation and please connect with both Surabhi and Erica to share your thoughts.About Surabhi:Surabhi Veitch is the owner of The Passionate Physio, a Registered Physiotherapist, a Pregnancy & Postpartum Athleticism Coach, and a mum to 2 incredible humans. Surabhi is passionate about breaking the status quo on what it means to be a mum. She offers online Physiotherapy and Fitness Coaching helping people stay active and navigate symptoms through pregnancy, postpartum and beyond. She believes movement should be sustainable and fit the life you have now, not some idealized stress-free version that doesn't exist. She helps her clients gain strength, confidence and trust in their bodies through movement, self-compassion, and self-care. She also offers her signature small-group Postpartum Return to Exercise Program (PREP), and her BASE Fitness Membership for pregnant & postpartum people who want quick and effective workouts that help them feel strong and capable in their bodies.Connect with Surabhi:Website, Instagram, and the Mom Strength PodcastConnect with Erica via her website, on Instagram or Facebook.And remember to sign up for Simple Shifts to SelfKind Habits - your weekly email inspiration to treat yourself with SelfKindness through movement and mindset.

Physical Activity Researcher
Prolonged Sitting and Cognitive Functions | PA in Emirati Women – Prof Ashokan Arumugam (Pt1)

Physical Activity Researcher

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 27:51


Ashokan Arumugam is an Assistant Professor of Physiotherapy at the College of Health Sciences, University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates. He is an Orthopedic Manual Physiotherapist with a special interest in physical activity analysis in sedentary and diseased populations, biomechanical analyses of the lower limbs, and neuroplastic changes in individuals with and without musculoskeletal ligament injuries. ------------------------------------ This podcast episode is sponsored by Fibion Inc. | The New Gold Standard for Sedentary Behaviour and Physical Activity Monitoring Learn more about Fibion: fibion.com/research --- Collect, store and manage SB and PA data easily and remotely - Discover new Fibion SENS Motion: https://sens.fibion.com/

Inform Performance
Wayne Diesel - Reflections of a career at the highest levels of International sport (Sports Physiotherapist)

Inform Performance

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 52:34


Episode 102: Ben Ashworth chats to Wayne Diesel a Sports Physiotherapist with a lifetime of working at the highest level of sport around the world. Wayne is a South African educated Physiotherapist who during his Physio career has worked with The Sports Science Institute of South Africa, Gloucester Rugby Football Club, Charlton Athletic Football Club, Tottenham Hotspur Football Club, Springboks Rugby and more! On top of this international multi-sport experience Wayne has also worked in the USA as Sports Performance Director at the Miami Dolphins and as the Director of Player Care at the San Antonio Spurs. In this episode Ben and Wayne will reflect on Waynes incredible career journey, where the Physiotherapy profession is going and the technical differences between different sports and leagues.    Topics Discussed:    Embracing different approaches for player care Where is sports Physiotherapy going? Injury prognostic expectations across different sports/leagues  Risk assessment and communication Perspective on being a specialist v generalist      Where you can find Wayne:   LinkedIn Research Gate       Sponsor Inform Performance is sponsored by VALD Performance, makers of the Nordbord, Forceframe, ForeDecks and HumanTrak. VALD Performance systems are built with the high-performance practitioner in mind, translating traditionally lab-based technologies into engaging, quick, easy-to-use tools for daily testing, monitoring and training       Keep up to date with everything that is going on with the podcast by following Inform Performance on:     Instagram Twitter Our Website     Our Team   Andy McDonald Ben Ashworth Alistair McKenzie

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
589: Prof Michael Rathleff: Barriers Between the Research and Implementation

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 28:55


In this episode, Aalborg University Professor, Prof Michael Rathleff, talks about his role at the upcoming WCSPT. Today, Michael talks about how he organized the congress, creating tools for clinicians to educate their patients, and his research on overuse injuries in adolescents. What are the barriers between the research and implementation in practice? Hear about the mobile health industry, exciting events at the congress, and get his advice to his younger self, all on today's episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.   Key Takeaways “The clinicians out there have a hard time both finding the evidence, appraising the evidence, and understanding [if it's] good or bad science.” “There's a lot a clinician can do outside of a one-on-one interaction with a patient.” “It's our role to understand the needs of the individual patient, then make up something that really meets those needs.” “It's okay to say no. You have to make sure to say yes to the right things.”   More about Michael Rathleff Prof Michael Rathleff coordinates the musculoskeletal research program at the Research Unit for General Practice in Aalborg. The research programme is cross-disciplinary and includes researchers with a background in general practice, rheumatology, orthopaedic surgery, physiotherapy, sports science, health economics and human‐centered informatics. He is the head of the research group OptiYouth at the Research Unit for General Practice. Their aim is to improve the health and function of adolescents through research.   Suggested Keywords Healthy, Wealthy, Smart, Healthcare, Physiotherapy, Sports, Research, Injuries, WCSPT, Education,   IFSPT Fourth World Congress of Sports Physical Therapy   To learn more, follow Michael at: Website:          https://vbn.aau.dk/en/persons/130816 Research:       https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Michael-Rathleff Twitter:            @michaelrathleff   Subscribe to Healthy, Wealthy & Smart: Website:                      https://podcast.healthywealthysmart.com Apple Podcasts:          https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/healthy-wealthy-smart/id532717264 Spotify:                        https://open.spotify.com/show/6ELmKwE4mSZXBB8TiQvp73 SoundCloud:               https://soundcloud.com/healthywealthysmart Stitcher:                       https://www.stitcher.com/show/healthy-wealthy-smart iHeart Radio:               https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-healthy-wealthy-smart-27628927   Read the Full Transcript Here:  00:02 Hello, Professor Ratliff, thank you so much for coming on the podcast today to talk a little bit more about your role at the fourth World Congress is sports, physical therapy in Denmark, August 26, to the 27th. So, as we were talking, before we went on the air, we were saying, man, you're wearing a bunch of hats during this Congress, one of which is part of the organizing committee. So my first question to you is, as a member of the Organising Committee, what were your goals? And what are you hoping to achieve with this Congress?   00:35 I think my role is primarily within the scientific committee. And one of the things we discussed very, very early on was this, like, you know, when you go for a conference, you go up to a conference, you hear a bunch of interesting talks, and you feel like, I'm motivated, I'm listening, I'm taking in new things. But then Monday morning, when you see the next patient, it's not always that all the interesting stuff that you saw, is actually applicable to my patient Monday morning. So we wanted to try and emphasize more. How can we use this conference as a way to translate science into practice? So the whole program and the like, the presentations will be more about clinical applicability, and less about more p values and research methodology. So not that the research is not sound, but there'll be more focused on how can we actually apply it in the context that were working. That's why also, we had the main title of translating research into practice, which I think will be hopefully a cornerstone that people will see, well, if there's really interesting talk about, it could be overuse injuries in kids, which will be a lecture that I'm having, then they'll also be a practical workshop afterwards to kind of use that what's been presented, and then really drill down on how we can use it in in clinical practice. So the goal is to, to get people to reflect in your network, but also take a lot of the things and think, Wow, this is something that I can use next Monday for clinical practice.   02:09 And aside from a lot of lectures and talks, you've also got in informatics competition. And so could you explain that a little bit and why you decided to bring that into the Congress?   02:23 Yeah, so this was a major, not a debate, but an interesting discussion on how we can even in the early phases of the conference, when people submit an abstract, make sure that the abstract can actually also reach more end users target audiences for that case. So we decided that people actually had to submit an infographic together with their the abstract. So normally, you send in like, 250 words, for a conference, but for this conference, we wanted them to submit the abstract, but also the visual infographic to go along with Olympic Well, am I making an infographic that is tailored to patient? Is that a patient aid that I'm trying to make? Is it something that's aimed but other researchers? Or is it clinicians, so they have to tick off? Which box Am I infographic actually intended for? So when the audience or the participants come and join the conference, they can actually take these infographics for those that want to print them they can use in the clinic afterwards, just another layer of trying to make some of this research more easily communicated to the audience, but also, the things that can be used in clinical practice, like some of the people have submitted abstract, have some really, really nice infographics that I expect will be printed and hang on, on a few clinic doors around the world afterwards, I hope.   03:48 And when it comes to dissemination of research and information from the clinician, to the patient, or even to the wider public, where do you think clinicians and researchers get stuck? Like where is the disconnect between that dissemination of information as we the information as we see, and by the time it gets to the consumer or to let's say, a mass media outlet? It's like, what happened?   04:15 Yeah, that's a big a big question. Because it's almost like why are we not better at implementing new research into our clinical practice? And I think there's heaps of different barriers. We've we've done a couple of studies, something new was also in the pipeline where we look specific, get the official context, and we can see that this barriers in terms of understanding the research, that's actually one of the major barriers that the clinicians out there have a really hard time both finding the evidence, appraising the evidence, and also actually understanding is this good or bad science. And then you have the whole time constraints on a clinical practice because who's going to pay you to sit and use two hours On reading this paper, and remember, this is just one paper on ACL injuries. But in my clinical practice, I see a gazillion different different things. So how am I going to keep up with the with the evidence? Is it intended that I'm reading original literature? Or how am I going to keep up with it? So I think there's a lot of different barriers. But at least one of the ways I think we can overcome some of these barriers is that researchers climb out of the ivory tower and think of other ways that we can communicate, research, evidence synthesis, it could be infographics, it could be sort of like decision age for clinical practice, at least that's one of the routes we're taking in terms of also the talk I'm giving at the conference that we're trying to think of, Can we somehow develop AIDS that will support clinical practice something that scene but the physiotherapist something that's aimed at the patient, that will sort of make it easier to deliver evidence based practice? So we've done one, one tool that's being developed at the moment is called the Makhni, which is something that can assist clinicians in the diagnosis, the communication of how do you communicate to kids about chronic knee pain? How do I make sure that they have the right expectation for what my management can be? And how can we engage in a shared decision making process. And we have a few other things in the pipeline as well, where we want to, to build something, build something practical that you can take in use in clinical practice to to support you in delivering good quality care, because just publishing papers is not going to change clinical practice, I think,   06:45 yeah, and publishing papers, which are sometimes wonderful papers. But if they're not getting out to the clinicians, they're certainly not going to get out to the patients and to people, sort of the mass population.   07:02 I completely agree. It's a bigger discussion, I'm really focused on how to reach clinicians, because I see the clinicians as the entry point to delivering care to patients and parents and, and the surrounding surrounding community. But if you think of, like wider public health interventions, we have the same problem as well. And also we create this sort of like, No, this inequality in healthcare, but that's another   07:30 line, although there can of worms. Yeah, we could do a whole series of podcasts on that. Yeah, yeah. And I agree with you that it needs to come from the clinician. So creating these tools to help clinicians better educate their patients, which in turn really becomes their community. Because there's a lot a clinician can do outside of just a one on one interaction with the patient. And so having the right tools can make a big difference.   07:58 Like in, if you look at a patient that comes to you for an ACL injury, or long standing musculoskeletal complaint, they're going to spend maybe 0.1% of their time together with you and 99.9%, they're out on their own. And I think it's important that we when we're one on one with them, sort of like make them develop the competencies so they can do the right decisions for their health in the 99.9% of the time that they're out there alone, when they're not with with us, I completely agree with you that there's a lot of things we can do to make them more competent in thriving despite of knee pain, or shoulder pain or whatever it might, it might be. And I think that's one of the most important tasks, I think, for us as clinicians is to think about the everyday lives they have to live when they leave us and say see you next time.   08:51 Yeah, and to be able to clearly communicate whatever their diagnosis by might be, or exercise program or, or any number of, of 10s of 1000s of bio psychosocial impacts that are happening with this person. Because oftentimes, and I know I've been guilty of this in the past, I'm sure other therapists would agree that they've this has happened to them as well as you explain everything to the patient, and then they come back and it's, they got nothing zero. And it might be because you're not disseminating the information to them in a way that's helpful for them or in a way that's conducive with their learning style. So having different tools, like you said, maybe it's an infographic that the patient can look at and be like, Oh, I get it now. So having a lot of variety makes a huge difference.   09:48 And I think you touched on a super important point there that patients are very different, that they have different learning styles, they have different needs. And I think it's our role to enlist Send the needs of the individual patient and make up something that really meets those needs. So more about listening, asking questions and less about thinking that we have the solution to it, because I think within musculoskeletal health or care, whatever we call it, some clinicians would use their words to communicate a message that might be good for some other patients would prefer to have a folder or leaflet. Others would say, I want a phone, I want an app on my phone, something that's like learning on demand, because at least that's something we see regularly. Now that we have the older population that wants a piece of paper, we have the younger population that wants to have something that they can sort of like, rely on when they're out there on their own one advice on how do I manage this challenging situation to get some good advice when you're not there? When I'm all on my own? So, so different?   10:57 Yeah, and I love those examples. I use apps quite frequently. And I had a patient just the other day say, Oh, my husband put this, the app that that you use, because I was giving her PDFs, and she's like, Oh, my husband put the app on my phone. Now it's so much easier. So now I know exactly what to do if I have five minutes in my day. So it just depends.   11:21 And I think the whole like mobile health industry, there's a lot of potential there. But I also see, at least from a Danish context, that there's a lot of apps that is very limited. It's not not developed on a sound evidence base, or it's just sort of like a container of videos with exercises. And I think there's a huge potential in like thinking of how can we do more with this? How can we make sure that it's not just the delivery vehicle for a new exercise, but it's actually the delivery vehicle for improving the competencies for self management for individuals? I think there's, yeah, I'm looking forward to the next few years to see how this whole field develops. Because I think there's really big potential in this.   12:12 Yeah, not like you're not doing enough already. But you know, maybe you've just got your next project now. Like, you're not busy enough already. So as we, as you alluded to a few minutes ago, you've got a couple of different talks you're chairing, so you've got a lot going on at the World Congress. So do you want to break down, give maybe a little sneak peek, you don't have to give it all away, we want people to go to the conference to listen to your talks. But if you want to break down, maybe take a one or two of your topics that you'll be speaking on, and I give us a sneak peek.   12:48 I think the talk that will be most interesting for me to deliver and hopefully also to listen to is is the talk that I'm giving on overuse injuries in adolescence, because I think it's we haven't had a lot of like conferences in the past couple of years. So it will be one of these talks will be meaty in terms of of new date, and some of the things I'm most interested go out and present is all the qualitative research we've done on understanding adolescents and their parents, in terms of what are the challenges they experience? How can we help them and also, we've done a lot of qualitative works on what are the challenges that face us experience when dealing with kids with long standing pain complaints, we've developed some new tools that can sort of like, help this process to improve care for these young people. And I really look forward trying to Yeah, to hear what people think of, of our ideas and, and the practical tools that we've that we've developed. So that's at least one of the talks, that's going to be quite interesting, hopefully, also, we're going to actually have the data from our 10 year follow up of so I have a cohort that I started during my PhD. They were like 504 kids with with knee pain. And now I follow them prospectively for 10 years. And this time period, I've gotten a bit more gray hair and gray beard. But this wealth of data that comes from following more than 500 kids for 10 years with chronic knee pain is going to be really, really interesting. And we're going to be finished with that. So I'm also giving a sneak peek on unpublished data on the long term prognosis of adolescent knee pain and at the conference. So that's going to be the world premiere for for that big data set as well.   14:36 Amazing. And as you're talking about going through some of the qualitative research that you've done, and you had mentioned, there were some challenges from the physio side and from the child side in the patient and the child's parents side. Can you give us maybe one challenge that kind of stuck out to you that was like, boy, this is really a challenge that is maybe one of the biggest impediments in working with this population.   15:06 I think I think there's multiple one thing that I'm really interested in these in this moment is the whole level of like diagnostic uncertainty and kids, because one of the things we've understood is that if the kids and the parents don't really understand why they have knee pain, what's the name of the knee pain, it becomes this cause of them seeking care around the healthcare system on who can actually help me who can explain my pain. So so at the moment, we're trying to do a lot of things on how we can reduce this, what would you call diagnostic uncertainty and provide credible explanations to the kids and then trying to develop credible explanation for both kids and parents? That's actually not an easy task, because what is a credible explanation of what Patellofemoral Pain is when we don't have a good understanding of the underlying pathophysiology? So there, we're doing a lot of work on combining both clinical expertise, what the patient needs, what we know from the literature, and then we're trying to solve, iterate and test these credible explanations with the kids. And yeah, at the conference, we'll have the first draft of these, what we call credible explanation. So that's going to be at least one barrier one challenge, I hope that some of the practical tools we've developed can actually help   16:25 i for 1am, looking forward to that, because there is it is so challenging when you're working with children, adolescents, and their parents who are sort of call it doctor shopping, you know, where you're, like you said, you're going around to multiple different practitioners, just with their fingers crossed, hoping that someone can explain why their child is in pain or not performing are not able to, you know, be a part of their peer group or, or or engage in what normal kids would would generally do. Exactly. Yeah. Oh, I'm definitely looking forward to that. So what give us one other sneak peek? Because I know you've got the, you're also chairing a talk on the first day. But what else I shouldn't say I don't want to put words in your mouth. What else? Are you looking forward to even maybe if it's not your talk, are you looking forward to maybe some other presentations,   17:26 I'm actually looking forward to to the competitions we have as well, because I've had a sneak peek of some of the research that's been submitted as abstracts, and the quality is super high. So both the oral presentations but also the presentation that the best infographics because they'll also get time to actually rip on the big screen and present their infographic. And I look forward to see how people can communicate the messages from these amazing infographics. And I think these two competitions are going to be to be a blast and going to be really, really fun to, to look at. And amazing research as well. So I really look forward to the two events as well. And then of course, oh no, go ahead. No, I was just talking about look forward to meeting with friends and new friends and be out talking to people once again in beautiful new ball in Denmark in the middle of summer. It's hard to be Denmark in the summer. We don't have a lot of good weather, but Denmark in August is just brilliant.   18:31 Yes, I've only been there in February. So I am definitely looking forward to to Denmark and August as well. Because I've only been there for sports Congress when it's a little chilly and a little damp. So summer sounds just perfect. And I've one more question. Just kind of piggybacking off of your comments on the amazing research within these competitions. And since you know you have been in the research field, let's say for a decade plus right getting your PhD a decade ago. How have you seen physio research change and morph over the past decade? Have you seen just it better research coming from specifically from the physio world?   19:20 I think it's the first time someone said it's actually more than a decade. So, but that gives me a time perspective. But yeah, I've actually seen that. My perception is that physiotherapy research in general but also sports physiotherapy research went from being published in smaller journals we published in our own journals to now there's multiple example of sport fishers performing really, really nice trials that have reached the best medical journals that have informed clinical practice. So I think we see this both there's more good research Basically out there. And I also see that we've moved from, like a biomechanical paradigm to being more user a patient center, we see more qualitative research, we see that physiotherapist, sport physiotherapist, they sort of have a larger breadth of different research designs, they used to tackle the research. I think, like looking even at the ACL injuries, if you go back 10 years in time, looking at the very biomechanically oriented research that was primarily also joined by orthopedic surgeons to a large extent. Now, today where fishers have done amazing research, they understand all the the fear of reentry, they're trying to do very broad rehabilitation programs, ensuring that people don't return to sport too rapidly. And and also understanding why they shouldn't return back to his board now developing tools that you can use when you sit with a patient to try and and educate them on what are the phases, we need to go through the next nine to 12 months before you can return to sport and so on. So I think I'm just impressed by, by the research. And when I see the even the younger people in my group now, they start at a completely different level when they start their PhD compared to what we did. So I can only imagine that the quality is going to improve over the years as well, because they're much more talented, they're still hard working. And they have a larger evidence base to sort of like stand on. And they already from the beginning, see the benefit of these interdisciplinary collaborations with the whole medical field and who else is is relevant to include in these collaborations? So yeah, the future is bright. I see. Yeah,   21:50 I would agree with that. And now as we kind of start to wrap things up here, where can people find you? So websites, social media, tell the people where you're at.   22:04 So I think if you just type in my name on Google, there'll be a university profile at the very top where you can see all my contact information. Otherwise, just feel free to reach out on LinkedIn or Twitter, search for my name. And you'll find me, I try to be quite rapid and respond to the direct messages when, when possible, at least   22:25 perfect. And we'll have all the links to that in the show notes at podcast at healthy, wealthy smart.com. So you can just go there, click on it'll take you right to all of your links. So is there anything that you want to kind of leave the listeners with when it comes to the world congresses, sports physiotherapy or physical therapy, sorry.   22:52 Be careful not to miss it, it's going to be one of these conferences with a magical blend of practical application of signs, it's going to be a terrific program in terms of possibilities to to network and engage in physical activity, whatever it's running, or mountain biking, and with an amazing conference dinner as well. So I think it's, so this would come to be one of one of the highlights for me this year. So and I think the whole atmosphere around this conference is also that if you come there, as a clinician, you don't know anybody, that people will be open and welcoming and happy to engage in conversation. There's no speakers, that wouldn't be super happy to grab a beer or walk to discuss some of the ideas that's been presented at the conference. So I think it's going to be quite, quite good.   23:45 Yeah. So come with an open mind come with a lot of questions and come with your workout clothes. Is is what I'm hearing?   23:56 Yes, definitely. Definitely.   23:59 And final question, and it's one that I asked everyone is knowing where you are now in your life and in your career? What advice would you give to your younger self, and you can pick whatever time period your younger self is.   24:13 So I think in if I had to give myself one advice when I was in my sort of like, MIT Ph. D, time coming towards the end, I would say to myself, that it's okay to say no, you have to make sure to say yes to the right things because it's very easy to say yes to everything. And then you create these peak stress periods for yourself that would prohibit you from from doing things that is value being with friends or family and so on. You don't have to say yes to everything because there will be multiple opportunities afterwards. So practice in saying no and do it in a in a polite way. People actually have a lot of respect for people that say, No, I don't have a time or I'm I'm going to invest my time on this because this is what I really think is going to change the field. And this is my vision. So So young Michael, please please practice in saying no.   25:11 I love that advice. Thank you so much. So Michael, thank you so much for coming on the podcast. And again, just a reminder, I know we've said this before, but the World Congress is sports, physical therapy, we'll be in Denmark, August 26 and 27th of this year 2022. So thank you so much for coming on the podcast and thank you for all of your hard work and getting making this conference the best it can be.   25:36 Thank you, Karen, thank you for the invitation to the podcast.   25:39 Absolutely. And everyone. Thank you so much for tuning in. Have a great couple of days and stay healthy, wealthy and smart.

Mobility Experiment
#83 - Do You Play These Subconscious Tricks On Yourself?

Mobility Experiment

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 21:41


In this episode of the podcast we discuss the different tricks people play on themselves consciously & subconsciously that cause them to fall at the same hurdles consistently. We asses it from a rehab perspective & from a life perspective. We also explore certain tricks people will play to give themselves excuses when crunch time comes. As well as how this may manifest in the body as pain or injury. Lastly we speak on different solutions to the problems at hand as well as how to become more aware of these issues to tackles them before they crop up.

The Healthcare Education Transformation Podcast
Dr. Susie Gronski - Male Pelvic Health Specialist

The Healthcare Education Transformation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 33:29


Dr. Susie Gronski, DPT comes onto the HET Podcast to speak about her journey as a physical therapist and how it led her to find a role in pelvic health, specifically male public health!  Biography: Dr. Susie Gronski is a licensed doctor of physical therapy since 2010, certified pelvic rehabilitation practitioner, sex counselor and educator (Michigan trained), author of Pelvic Pain The Ultimate Cock Block international male pelvic pain, and sexual health educator.

The Sports Physical Therapy Academy Podcast
EP063: “Don't Be a Doctor of Physical Therapy”

The Sports Physical Therapy Academy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 26:48


”Why does being a Doctor of Physical Therapy work against you?”  In this episode, I share why you should not be a Doctor of Physical Therapy and why this concept will help you get athletes to stay on your schedule. I also share how it will help prevent athletes from canceling or dropping off your schedule. Enjoy! _____________________________________ Are you a physical therapist or physiotherapist looking for tips, tools, and strategies to work with more athletes, become a sports specialist or get a job in a sports setting...so you can finally enjoy the career that you've always dreamed of? If so, you're in the right place...this podcast is for you. Your host is Dr. Chris Garcia, a physical therapist, business owner, entrepreneur, nationally recognized public speaker, and residency-trained sports specialist.  Dr. Chris Garcia, PT, DPT, SCS, CSCS, USAW has worked in professional sports and traveled around the world working with elite athletes throughout his career, and he's learned a lot of lessons along the way. He created this podcast to share his experiences and give you everything you need to know to help YOU become a successful clinician. Dr. Chris Garcia talks about everything from sports rehab and injury prevention to developing athletic performance and the path to getting your dream job...even if it is in professional sports. If you want to become a successful clinician so you can finally enjoy the career you've always dreamed of, visit www.DrChrisGarcia.com. LINKS: www.DrChrisGarcia.com www.Instagram.com/ChrisGarciaDPT www.Facebook.com/ChrisGarciaDPT ***DISCLAIMER: This content is for educational & informational use only and & does not constitute medical advice. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice or medical recommendations, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a qualified medical professional for proper evaluation & treatment, or beginning any exercises or activity in this content. Chris Garcia Academy, Inc. and The Sports PT Academy Podcast are not responsible for any harm caused by the use of this content.***

The Healthcare Education Transformation Podcast
Teach Me Something Tuesday Ep 16 - Share Your Knowledge

The Healthcare Education Transformation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 3:00


Dr. F Scott Feil explains the importance of sharing your knowledge and why teaching someone else and storytelling are great ways to absorb the material you're learning.   

A Neuro Physio Podcast
Professor Sheila Lennon

A Neuro Physio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 61:26


Emeritus Professor Sheila Lennon is semi-retired but still manages to keep driving powerful change for neuro patients. She's from Flinders university in Adelaide South Australia, has worked all over the world, and stays involved on the Physiotherapy Board of Australia and the Chartered society of Physiotherapy in the UK. She's a clinician and educator, continues clinical work for the MS society, has been an important contributor to our global body World Physiotherapy and has edited neurology textbooks. This episode covers her divisive research on the bobath concept, her thoughts on the complex interventions we provide and whether they are effective, clinical reasoning frameworks and her passionate work in self-management in multiple sclerosis. Sheila has fantastic perspectives on physio from her broad worldview3:30 - Intro4:24 - Experience around the world13:00 - Be a healthy sceptic15:30 - Keeping the passion19:25 - Sheila's career growth20:45 - Balancing part time PhD22:40 - Bobath and theoretical assumptions28:35 - Complex interventions31:10 - Taking the RCT to interventions33:15 - Is the RCT the gold standard for physio research36:28 - Work with MS42:25 - What is unique for physio management of MS44:55 - The importance of motivation48:05 - Reflection and clinical reasoning51:20 - New inclusions to undergrad53:30 - Flinders University Chronic Disease Management55:30 - INPA

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
588: Dr. Clarence Holmes:Generational Differences: Can They Contribute to Burnout?

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 35:12


In this episode, Owner of Access Physical Therapy, Clarence Holmes, Jr, talks about generational differences in physical therapy. Today, Clarence talks about burnout, the idea of value, and the different ideas of pay structure. Why is the measurement of productivity problematic? Hear about the promise of mentorship for lower pay, the problem of toxic positivity, and finding the better way in each new generation, all on today's episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.   Key Takeaways “The reason why things are fluid and changing with every generation is because there's always a better way.” “We have to be open to that better way.” “No one loves PTs as much as PTs love PTs.” “It is so heathy to have a full well-rounded conversation that points out the bad and the good, and you don't have to finish with a positive statement in a conversation.” “Get comfortable with being uncomfortable.” “It's become an expectation in this country to overwork.”   More about Clarence Holmes, Jr Dr Clarence Holmes, Jr is a native of Cleveland MS. He attended Mississippi State University for his undergraduate studies and received his Doctor of Physical Therapy degree from the University of Mississippi Medical Center in 2014. Dr Holmes then completed an orthopedic residency with Mercer university in Atlanta GA in 2015. He has worked in various settings to include sports/outpatient orthopedics, acute care, and the state jail system. Now, he owns and operates Access Physical Therapy, a concierge cash based physical therapy practice in the Atlanta metropolitan area. He also works as a staff physical therapist with Kindred At Home. Dr Holmes has been involved with APTA at various levels to include 2 terms on the Student Assembly Board of Directors, delegate for the state of Georgia to the House of Delegates, and currently serves as a board member for the Georgia Foundation for Physical Therapy. In his free time, he also owns and operates The Travel Doctor, a full service travel agency as well as tackling small woodworking projects. He also scuba dives and enjoys traveling the world with his beautiful wife, Turquoise and their golden retriever and chihuahua/terrier mix puppies.   Suggested Keywords Healthy, Wealthy, Smart, Healthcare, Physiotherapy, Burnout, Generational Differences, Productivity, Mentorship, Improvement,   To learn more, follow Clarence at: Website:          https://www.accessptatl.com Twitter:            @matterundrmined Instagram:       @caholmes6 Facebook:       @clarenceh3   Subscribe to Healthy, Wealthy & Smart: Website:                      https://podcast.healthywealthysmart.com Apple Podcasts:          https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/healthy-wealthy-smart/id532717264 Spotify:                        https://open.spotify.com/show/6ELmKwE4mSZXBB8TiQvp73 SoundCloud:               https://soundcloud.com/healthywealthysmart Stitcher:                       https://www.stitcher.com/show/healthy-wealthy-smart iHeart Radio:               https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-healthy-wealthy-smart-27628927   Read the Full Transcript Here:  Hello, this is Jenna Cantor with healthy, wealthy and smart. I'm really excited. I am interviewing Dr. Clarence a Holmes Jr. Just wrote on Zoom, or we're doing the interview. And Dr. Clarence who said, just call me clearance. I'm like, Okay, hi, Clarence, said that he works with home health and is the owner of a concierge cash based practice, which everybody who listens knows I'm cash based. I'm like, Yeah, hello, Conrad. I love that so much. Let's serve our people, our patients. We are coming on because we met at a conference. And there was a discussion on generational differences in physical therapy. And Clarence had some real interesting thoughts on this. And I was like, this is a podcast in the making. So I approached him right away. And I said, Can we do this topic and a podcast? And fortunately enough, he said, Yes. Like a proposal. It was beautiful. So here we are talking about generational differences in physical therapy. I think this is a really, really important topic. Now. I just let's just start diving in to one we're saying general racial differences, everyone, please don't refrain from getting offended with how we, how we try to describe this, because this is one we're differentiating between ages. And I saw I saw individuals struggling with that trying to be appropriate. So if we do say anything in our descriptions, inappropriate, feel free, please absolutely correct us. But be nice, because we're doing the best we can. But this is a very important conversation. So we'd rather take the risk in in really diving into the topic. So yeah, just let's all be nice. Okay. So regarding generational differences, I'm assuming that we're talking about the more seasoned crowd, people who have been around for a long period of time, compared to newer people in the physical therapy. Oh, right. Correct. Am I missing anything? Or is there any other way we need to define it?   02:39 No, I mean, and honestly, you're talking about me when you said if you recognize people being uncomfortable, trying to differentiate between these these generations, in conversation without trying to fin that was me at our conference. I didn't want to say the boomer generation, I didn't want to say the millennials simply because a lot of people tie a lot of negative connotations to those. And we're   03:03 also missing Gen X, because Gen X is actually the y'all are the youngest practitioners right now. Not millennials. Yeah.   03:09 Yeah. And I think there's a lot of similar Z   03:12 is Z. Oh, my God, ie, Z. Oh, my gosh, I missed the letter in the alphabet. Yeah. It might   03:17 be x. I don't don't hold me to it. But But, but yeah, so that was one. But But no, you captured it perfectly. I do think there is a a riff between the older generation and the younger generation to just put it put it lightly. Yeah. Just simply because and I mentioned it in the conferences that the older generation are the ones who are owning these practices, traditional practices. And the younger generation, our generation are the ones who tend to be more of the employees. And that's natural. But what's what's unnatural? Well, this is also natural to have some generational difference was unnatural is the riff, the, the battle that kind of comes along with it, and how we respond to it. So   04:03 yeah, so let's, yeah, I love that. Let's do what we're aware. I was very interested. Let's go back and and just do one general generational difference at a time and then if we okay, I feel like that's what pops in our head for now. And that's it. That's great. So one, just named one at the top of your head one Gen. Gen. Oh, my gosh, why is this? So? General? generational difference, let's start with one.   04:29 So I mean, there's two big ones that stick out to me. One is just this idea of pay structure. And specifically in the PT realm of, of how long has someone been here? versus what is this person doing for my company? And the best example I can give is me personally, of working in a job my first job post residency. I'm an ortho I'm a lover, or I will consider myself an ortho PT, even though I work in the home health arena, and the concierge cash base, I will consider myself an orthopedic physical therapist. My first job post residency was at a private practice in Atlanta, and I was paid the least amount of all the therapists across the entire company, which was four practices in Atlanta. But I was the second highest producing therapists in the company. And so, you know, generational differences comes down to the old way of doing things was, who has the most experience, they get paid the most? My personal opinion is, that's not logical, we're, I'm a logical being and a lot of my generation are, if it doesn't make sense to us, we're going to be vocal about it. And it didn't make sense to me that I was producing one paper, more money, better outcomes than the majority of the therapists and I was paid the least, that's one major win. And it kind of feeds into the second you asked for one, but this kind of feeds into it. Younger generations, older generations value loyalty. You know, they expect somebody to come in and work for them for 10 to 1520, almost 30 their entire careers. And my generation just, we're not happy, we're going to move on. And so that puts a lot of responsibility on the employer to find out what makes us happy. And sometimes that just doesn't, that doesn't translate well.   06:39 Yeah, I see where these connect, let's focus on the first one, because that is a really good, interesting point, I have definitely mentored some dance PTS who are burnt out, and they are in a situation where, Oh, Gosh, darn it, what is it productivity, productivity is measured. And that has been very problematic for them, because they'll come in, and they see that they are, they know, they're getting paid less. But they're not more because in your case, you actually saw the data, but they're seeing the, they are seeing the exact number of patients as a seasoned professional, there, and they're just they don't understand why they're getting paid less, if they're seeing the same amount, then they were there, they would imagine, I would be seeing less patients, then that would make more sense, you know, but no, that's not the case. And therefore, that income would still be it is assumed that income would still be made. So it's almost like they're being profit, they're more of a profit is being made off of them. They're exhausted, you know, but they're not getting a lighter load to feed that exhaustion, that adjustment, they're getting treated just the same. And so they don't understand that pay difference when they come in. And I'm going to bounce off this a little bit more because of what the reasoning so it's going to get a slightly off topic, but I'm always okay with that is the promise of mentorship as a reason for why they are paying less that can be a reasoning behind it, which still, there are some clinics that actually provide mentorship, but the majority of them do not actually provide that mentorship, so it's more verbage. Or they have some sort of automated system, that's there maybe videos or something. So there, it's not really an extra effort. It's something that's already there that can help streamline what's going on. Especially if you're in a place that measures the productivity. You can promise it as a as a somebody owns a clinic, however, who's the physical therapist, and how much time do they actually have to really mentor? So if there really, it doesn't make sense, right? This reasoning of oh, why, you know, and these are generational, different thoughts, but for I think that's what you're hitting is that the younger generation will speak their minds and say, hey, you know, they're not getting that mentorship, they're not getting that value for them to go. Oh, that's why then because they get oh, you know what, I'm getting great mentorship, kind of like where people think residencies, getting great mentorship that get one in paying less I get it. I totally get it. That's not the case. No, no, in a lot of circumstances.   09:33 Seven years, I think I've been out seven and a half years for a PT school. And I've never been in an environment outside of residency that that had any type of formal mentorship. But you're correct in that I've have had several interviews with several companies that have promised mentorship because that was important to me. I kind of did less the reason I worked at the job that I did that I'm mentioning in this in this interview. This conversation. The reason I took that job, and I knew I was getting paid less than I was worth. Um, the reason I took it was because my clinical manager and the only person who was more productive than I was a personal mentor, who was my was one of my direct mentors in residency. And so I saw it as an opportunity to continue getting mentored. And so I'm getting an exchange of additional mentorship. I will take less pay.   10:32 Okay, yes. And your, your through your apps, you're like, Oh, yes, yes.   10:36 Correct. But there was no formal mentorship. Now, I did continue work with this guy. I did learn a lot from him. But there was no formal.   10:45 That's a big, that's a big deal. It's not exactly,   10:48 exactly. And there's no when is the end point? I mean, when is the point where I say, Okay, I've received enough mentorship now I'm ready to get paid. Okay. Right. There has to be some kind of trade off there. So. But you're absolutely correct that that is there is a common promise of these employers to employees, younger, generational PTS, of mentorship, in exchange for, you know, lower, less than ideal pay, but is delivered upon.   11:20 Right, right. And I think that's the thing, because there's different ways to work around depending on the clinic, and everything that can happen in these rooms for negotiation. So when these different mindsets come into the room, for it to work out, but you got to follow through on both sides. One is providing the mentorship and the other side is accepting, that's what you accepted, and knowing that owning that. So, but it can be I mean, you know, what I was about to go into different things you can negotiate, but this is not a lesson on negotiation. So I'm going to skip over that. So yeah, when you when you are going into a clinic, I feel like that is a way to potentially solve the problem, but it's just not being solved right now. It's it's still, these gentlemen are the we have people who own these businesses who are getting annoyed about the the younger generation talking about money, but then they're not looking at, they're not really listening and taking in what is being said, because it's it's a block that we can get our own bias on how we lived our lives. And, and we need to get out of ourselves. I say that, as a practice owner, myself, we have to always work to get out of ourselves all the time, in order to better listen, to be with the changes of the world. And the reason why there are changes, but the reason why things are fluid, and it's always changing with every generation and so on, is because there's always a better way. Right? And we may not answer to it. But But there's always a better way. And and you got to figure out, you know, what's what's going to if you really care so much about keeping them around for a long time. And that's, that's a big deal for you. And absolutely, totally get that it's great to have somebody there for a long time, then what is it that they care about? What is it that they care about? You know, and how do you and then if you want to do something that is not financial? Because your your clinic can only afford so much? What are those intangibles that you can bring to the table? Or even the physical therapist coming into work for them? What are those intangibles, and that's where you can really come to the table for a better exchange with those generational differences. I think, you know, and,   13:36 you know, and one of the things that you kind of touched on is that we have to be, there's always a better way, and we have to be open to that better way. And I think that's where we run into an issue of when a younger generational PT says, well, this doesn't make sense to me, I want this amount of money. That's not us complaining. And I think that can be perceived as, as as, as a complaint, US whining, because we were known as the whiny generation. We you know, we complain a lot and what compared to what we're told is that we complain a lot, we're whining, we're never satisfied. And it's not that we're whining. It's not that we're sad. It's just that we grew up in the information age, we know what the PT next was making. Well, we know what the average PT makes. And so we come to the table and ask for this. It's not as whining and it shouldn't be perceived that way and we shouldn't be promoted as the whining generation is annoying. Having the information available to us and trying to benefit on or not even benefit just just be pay. We're given what we're worth. You know, we're rainbows and clouds profession. I mean, we we are a just a happy, just beautiful people and we just love people love everybody. And we're so happy go lucky and lovey dovey and I love that about us. But one thing that we do tend to forget is that the word can mean that we are healthcare practitioners first, but this is also a business. We have to be sustainable, to be able to provide the jobs for our employees, we have to be fulfilled in our careers to be able to provide the care the level of care that our patients deserve. And some of the ways that we do that is to ensure that our employees are happy. Somebody brought up at the conference, the idea of valuing your employees. And value in itself. I think, for us as this lovey dovey profession means so many different things, but value in itself as a word is a financial word. What is the value of me as a a physical therapist? I know my financial value, if you cannot meet that, as you've already touched on, if you can't meet what I'm asking for what else can you meet me, meet me halfway meet me with increase vacation days, maybe with an increase a formal mentorship program. We're supposed to meet and you're supposed to meet me where I am as an employee. And so I think that's where there's a big barrier as well. And that sometimes we're a little bit too focused on intangible things where a lot of or several of us are looking for tangible benefits in my generation. So I think that's a big riff. And it's a it's got to do with our identity crisis in our profession that I said this at the conference. Nobody loves pts. As much as PTS love BTS. And that's our issue as as a profession that we have to address. And I think that kind of that kind of flows over into this this generational difference. Oh, my God, it does. It does. Absolutely. Absolutely. And so that's, you know, I don't want to get too deep here, but I want I actually   16:55 want to bounce off you because, yes, because they popped in my head earlier. And I was like, I just let the idea, you know, because I just want to listen to you. But yes, it's the Pete, the best thing to T PTS, you know, and there's nothing wrong with us, the more seasoned professional that I mean, yes, ever. When I say this, I know they're seasoned. Like, I know, they're sick, we're not perfect. But the C's, they they live on this rainbows and clouds. I'm just saying, I know, it's a harsh way to say it. I hear I hear what I'm saying. But whatever I'm gonna say it. And then we have where the younger generation, I think it's Gen Z, because Gen X is before. So okay, so we have the Gen Z, and the millennials are newer in the profession. And they're not afraid to point out things that they think are wrong. But I think then with that in mind, I think from higher up there is toxic positivity. And I think that's where that comes in. Where it's pushed upon, you cannot say anything bad. But then we lose this honesty and transparency in what's going on in the communication. And, and God forbid, something bad is said, you know, boy, and guess who's on social media, everyone? So if you're talking about, you know, like, oh, there's younger people are complaining. Facebook is older people, man, Twitter is older people. Like there's some younger on there too. Yeah. But like the hotspots to be at are tick tock and mostly ticked in my opinion. Tick tock. Yes. And then I think I never looked at the data. So yeah, but I think Instagram is secondary, but that also has to do with like, how I like to watch the videos personally, I can I can scroll through the Tick Tock thing and then I can go to Instagram Instagrams a little bit not as smooth I go back to tick tock okay. So um, but but that's you know, that's where it's so far talking about all the younger they all they do is complain that's, that's all ages baby. That's all ages, we all we we all like don't I think it is so healthy, to have a full well rounded conversation that points out the bad and the good and you don't have to finish with a positive statement in a conversation about it's okay to end in a gray area. It's okay to end in a dark area and both see it you know, yeah, that is I don't have a solution. Like that's actually that's not a good thing. It's okay. But we but this toxic positivity puts anybody going through anything on the spot if you're anybody who might be oh gosh, dealing with somebody who is has poor health in your family and you can't talk about it or mention it at all and you're yet to put on this face. I get it. That's you know, I'm putting in air quotes professionalism, but professional professional only means literally other profession. Everything else is defined by you. Or defined by me. So literally, that's all perfect. Like everything else is like up in the air up for grabs. however you interpret it. So the you know, took like, place these these random rules on what professionalism, professionalism is from that point on is is purely subjective. And that's where that toxic positivity comes in. Yeah. And then in then we get these risks these butting heads, because everybody has different core values, which is great. And I think that is a huge generational difference and where we lose and miss out on opportunities to listen and hear more.   20:29 Correct, correct. And that's where the issue becomes. I spoke on generational differences, as in the context of what is leading to burnout in early career professionals are the career pts. And I spoke on generational differences as one of the things that I thought was a key key difference. And one thing to note to note is that this isn't specific to pt. It's not burnout is not specific to PT, these generational differences is not are not just specific to physical therapy. This is a doula globally, this is definitely an issue in our country. There are, you know, I'm gonna make this a political conversation. But you know, there are, you know,   21:16 whatever all's fair game when you're with me,   21:20 you see, there's a group of people that believe that, you know, there's no, this is the greatest country on Earth. And that this is there, they would, they would know, they would not live anywhere else. And to say anything bad about our country is anti American. And then there's another generation that says, this is a good country to live in. This is, hey, I'm happy to live here. But there's a crap ton of issues that we need to address to make this country as great as it could be. And so that is, I say all that to say that there is no, I don't think we solve this issue. I don't know if there is a solid solution to the issue. But as I stated before, I do believe there are pptx, specific generational difference issues that we can address. And we should address. And as long as everybody is willing to hear each other out. Yeah, compromise, which is kind of where my conversation was with with the gentleman at the conference that we spoke about earlier. I had an opinion, but I heard him out. And I still don't agree with him. 100%. But I can identify a little bit more with where he's coming from. And I think that's key, I think it's important to have these conversations get uncomfortable with being, you know, get comfortable with being uncomfortable. And have these uncomfortable conversations to say, yes, these are the issues we have with your generation. These are the issues y'all have with mine. Where is that common ground? You know, is they always is, like you said better than we are? And so So, you know, I don't know, I don't know, I'm not the visionary, I see that you I can't give you the solution. I   23:08 don't know where I know, it's just to have a conversation. So that's all we're just having a conversation about this, which I think is great. You know, to get your minds and everyone's minds to start to think you know, are there you know, generational differences and everything. And be careful as you listen, it can be very hard because we there are a lot of people we're going to people help, we're a service business. And with that we get these people pleasing mindsets, where we can lose ourselves. And I would actually say definitely big time in the younger, newer generation. And in order to please the generation that has been around longer, we don't listen to ourselves and just agree it's okay to disagree. It doesn't mean you have to disagree. But really keep challenging yourself to get more and more in tune with what you believe in. And greater conversations can happen, greater solutions, greater growth and progress between all of us can happen, which is so cool. And it may not happen overnight, where you feel comfortable to talk about it. But keep I definitely agree with what you're saying. It's just if you can just keep even if it's a little bit challenge yourself a little bit more every time to just, you know, get there, you know, not easy, not easy. No. I love it. Any any other generational differences that you think oh, Jenna this or have we reached kind of your like, those are kind of the main ones where we   24:41 Yeah, no, I I do think those are my, you know, very inter intertwine those two that I talked about. I don't think that as as a this is sort of like a final word if you Yes, yes. I do think that specifically to this country, we value overwork For example, I, you know, I think that we value the the clinician or the co worker, not just in PT, but in general, we value the person who does the things that they're not required to do as a part of their job. That's what we use to determine who is who's that shining employee, who's the one that that goes above and beyond. Right. And it shouldn't be that I mean, for example, I remember, at this same job, we hit a low point, we hit a low point, always in January, it's an outpatient clinic, deductibles reset, so we're January, it was a low period, had a lot of openings on my schedule, so that everyone else and I was sitting in and getting caught up on documentation, going over some things with my mentor, learning new skills, in walks the owner, are asked, What are we doing? I tell him, you know, I'm trying to learn some things. And he says, Well, why don't we are marketing? I say, What do you mean? He said, you know, your patients, your schedule is low, why aren't you are out, you know, getting us new clients. And I'm like, that's not my job. Is that is you are the employer, you hired me to see the patients that frequent your establishment. Okay, I'm not the one to go out and beg these physicians to send us, okay, how much begging you do, the deductibles reset, that's going to be a phenomenon that happens every single year. So, but that's what the expectation from some employers have. Yes, I hired you to see patients and turning the documentation on time. But in also, I expect you to do these things, these these things that I didn't tell you about in your interview, but we expect you to do these things is become an expectation in this country, to overwork to do things that are not required to view and that is how we measure our employees and not on the job that they do. If you see all the patients on your schedule, go home on time, get your documentation in on time, and it's all you did for the rest of your life as a PT you'd never be promoted and you know in traditional practices so I say that's that's another generational thing is that I think we older generations value overwork working you all you need to be busy all the time. And we value we being the younger generations, a healthy balance of work and home life. I think that is another riff all of these are intertwined, but I think that's a another riff that's that's that's causing an issue, not just in our not just in our profession, but but across this whole country.   27:42 Now, yeah, definitely. I love it. Thank you so much for coming on to talk about this. If you are listening to this podcast, and you have some other ideas and stuff, feel free to write in the comments, just keep the conversation going. I think it's always good to just talk about it. And then And then if you're somebody who's about to go in for job interviews, write these things down for you to consider what you're going to bring to the table for your negotiations track on both sides, what was discussed in that interview? So it's very clear. If things come up that are that we're not included, it's so you can have a better chance of being on the same page. Yes, you're correct. We didn't bring that up, or you know what we need to make sure we bring that up, because that does come up, the more we can be on top of that transparency in the communication can better help address generational differences right off the bat, do keep in mind seasoned professionals owning your own practice when these students are graduating, they have a very low sense in general sense of self worth. So for the overwhelming majority, they usually jump at a job faster than they should. Because they are so excited. Anyone wants them. And that is a big thing that happens often at clinics. So just be aware of that them saying yes doesn't necessarily mean they were listening to what they wanted in the first place. Because they feel so grateful that they were not rejected, they were accepted. And that takes over everything. It helps it feeds into them eliminating what their core wants are because they struggle with self value. Alright, that's it. Where can people find you on the social or email, whatever you feel comfortable with sharing.   29:40 So I laugh when you say the old people are on Facebook and Twitter because that's really what I use is   29:48 and I'm in that category. So I feel comfortable saying   29:51 I'm not a Snapchatter I do have an Instagram. My Facebook name is just mine. That's what I'm primarily on. That's where I'm most entertaining. Book   30:00 is it clearance a home's nobody's claiming homes, clients homes,   30:05 parents homes as well. I'm the one that's scuba diving in my photo.   30:11 If it changes to hiking, everyone's gonna get confused.   30:14 I know why it's not going to just all my photos are nice. And then my instagram name is CA Homes six ca h o l mes the number six. Oh, I   30:27 love it California. You're not from there. But it's fun to say. Wonderful. Thank you so much for coming on. Everyone. If you're listening, please be nice. Be nice. Yeah, you can communicate but be kind. If there is any possibility that what you wrote might be in a way interpreted in a mean tone. Don't write it. I just don't I don't see. Like, honestly, it's just why and I'm not being toxic positive. I'm just being real. Like it's only going to just why why? Like go speak to your legislative representative about it, you know that you can actually make changes. Alright, that's it. Thank you for coming on.

The Zero to Finals Medical Revision Podcast

This episode covers carpal tunnel syndrome.Written notes can be found at https://zerotofinals.com/surgery/orthopaedics/carpaltunnel/ or in the orthopaedic section of the Zero to Finals surgery book.The audio in the episode was expertly edited by Harry Watchman.

Mobility Experiment
#82 - When MRI's Can Be Harmful

Mobility Experiment

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 26:24


In this episode of the podcast we discuss the use & misuse of medical imaging in a healthcare setting, especially around recurring pain or injury. We look at when an MRI or X-ray may be the best option for your situation, as well as when it could be harmful to your recovery. We explore the use for knee, hip & shoulder injuries specifically. As well as should they be an option for long standing back pain or is it even necessary for possible cartilage issues? We also discuss what to expect when getting certain scans, what you need to worry about and what is not generally an issue.

The Sports Physical Therapy Academy Podcast
EP062: "Lessons From An Olympic Track & Field Coach” - Featuring Kris Mack

The Sports Physical Therapy Academy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2022 79:09


How do coaches at the elite level create programs for professional athletes? How do their programs integrate with medical professionals throughout the season? If you're a sports PT, you need to tune in. In this episode, I interview Kris Mack, USA Track and Field coach, and we discuss the following: ✅ Roles and responsibilities as an Olympic track and field coach  ✅ Creating a training program for a full season ✅ A comprehensive framework to create monthly and weekly programs ✅ Collaborating with medical professionals to improve athlete outcomes ✅ Advice for sports PTs who want to work and travel with professional athletes in the future Enjoy! _____________________________________ Are you a physical therapist or physiotherapist looking for tips, tools, and strategies to work with more athletes, become a sports specialist or get a job in a sports setting...so you can finally enjoy the career that you've always dreamed of? If so, you're in the right place...this podcast is for you. Your host is Dr. Chris Garcia, a physical therapist, business owner, entrepreneur, nationally recognized public speaker, and residency-trained sports specialist.  Dr. Chris Garcia, PT, DPT, SCS, CSCS, USAW has worked in professional sports and traveled around the world working with elite athletes throughout his career, and he's learned a lot of lessons along the way. He created this podcast to share his experiences and give you everything you need to know to help YOU become a successful clinician. Dr. Chris Garcia talks about everything from sports rehab and injury prevention to developing athletic performance and the path to getting your dream job...even if it is in professional sports. If you want to become a successful clinician so you can finally enjoy the career you've always dreamed of, visit www.DrChrisGarcia.com. LINKS: www.DrChrisGarcia.com www.Instagram.com/ChrisGarciaDPT www.Facebook.com/ChrisGarciaDPT ***DISCLAIMER: This content is for educational & informational use only and & does not constitute medical advice. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice or medical recommendations, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a qualified medical professional for proper evaluation & treatment, or beginning any exercises or activity in this content. Chris Garcia Academy, Inc. and The Sports PT Academy Podcast are not responsible for any harm caused by the use of this content.***

The Healthcare Education Transformation Podcast
Introducing new Co-Host Dr. Dawn Brown

The Healthcare Education Transformation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 26:25


In this episode of the HET Podcast, our host Dr. F Scott Feil introduces our new co-host, Dr. Dawn Brown! Biography: Dawn S. Brown PT, DPT is a Clinical Assistant Professor and Director of Clinical Education at Northern Illinois University Doctor of Physical Therapy Program, with over 21 years of clinical and educational experience. She completed a Bachelor of Psychology degree and Master of Physical Therapy degree from Northwestern University, a Doctor of Physical Therapy degree from Alabama State University, and is currently enrolled in the Doctor of Education (EdD) Program in Higher Education Administration at Northern Illinois University. She earned ABPTS certification in orthopaedic physical therapy, and uses this content expertise in her teaching, clinical practice, scholarship, and service activities. Her research interests include recruitment and retention of underrepresented minority students and faculty in physical therapy programs, transformative leadership in physical therapy and higher education, and attitudes towards social responsibility among physical therapy students and professionals. Dr. Brown is an active member of the Illinois Physical Therapy Association serving as former Chapter Nominating Committee Chair, former Chair of the Diversity Task Force, and current district Assembly Representative. She is a founding member of the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Consortium for the American Council of Academic Physical Therapy (ACAPT).  

The Healthcare Education Transformation Podcast
Dr. Kaelee Brockway - Hi Fidelity Simulation Labs

The Healthcare Education Transformation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 28:47


Dr. Kaelee Brockway, PT, DPT, comes onto the HET Podcast to explain what Hi Fidelity Simulation Labs are and how this type of teaching is beneficial to students.  Biography: Kaelee Brockway has eight years of practice experience across 13 different clinical and non‐clinical practice settings. Most of her experiences are in post-acute rehabilitation focusing on organ transplant rehabilitation and complex chronic disease management. Dr. Brockway held positions on the Board of Directors for APTA Michigan and the Michigan Physical Therapy Political Action Committee and served in the APTA House of Delegates from 2015 -2018. She was a heart and lung transplant educator for a large hospital system and now practices in acute care and academia, primarily teaching pharmacology, geriatrics, and cardiovascular and pulmonary courses. From 2016 to 2018, Dr. Brockway achieved the Advanced Credentialed Exercise Expert for Aging Adults (A-CEEAA) certification from APTA Geriatrics. In 2017 Dr. Brockway became a Board‐Certified Clinical Specialist in Geriatric Physical Therapy (GCS) and was the recipient of the APTA Emerging Leader Award. She is currently an Item‐Writer for the Geriatric Specialty Exam, the APTA Geriatrics CSM Programming Co-Chair, and recently completed contributions on geriatric considerations for exercise to the widely utilized Musculoskeletal Interventions textbook.

The Words Matter Podcast with Oliver Thomson
The Clinical Reasoning Series - Narrative ways of hearing and knowing with Sanja Maretic

The Words Matter Podcast with Oliver Thomson

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 58:16


Welcome to another episode of The Words Matter Podcast.In this episode of the clinical reasoning series, I'm speaking with Sanja Maretic. Sanja is an osteopath who works in a non-traditional osteopathic role as a pain clinician in the pain management service.Sanja has a background in humanities and passion for the intersection between healthcare and humanities and as such she published a qualitative study titled “Understanding patients' narratives” A qualitative study of osteopathic educators' opinions about using Medical Humanities in undergraduate education (see paper here). And Sanja wrote a truly captivating review for the CauseHealth book which I have linked here.So on this episode we speak about, Narrative-based approaches and the role and function of narratives in the care of people. Structural competency (see paper here by Metzl and Hansen) as a framework to appreciate the complex social contexts and structures which guide people health, illness and recovery (see paper on narrative humility here by DasGupta). How hearing our patients' narratives enables us to know and see them, the social structures surrounding their lives and environment How narrative analysis can be used to think critically about our practice and the narratives which surround our clinical realities. How incorporating the arts, poetry and humanities into healthcare education will help widen the therapeutic gaze of clinicians beyond the mere biomedical. Sanja's experience of journeying and finding her way into a multidisciplinary pain setting. The notion of ‘listening hands' in relation to touch and palpation in manual therapy and how this may or may not facilitate the construction and understanding of a person's narrative and life-world. This was such a wonderful conversation; Sanja speaks truly as a clinician in the way she passionately describes her work and her endeavour to better understand and the lives of those people she cares for.Find Sanja on Twitter @MareticSanja and Instagram @MareticSanjaSupport the podcast and contribute via Patreon hereIf you liked the podcast, you'll love The Words Matter online course and mentoring to develop your clinical expertise  - ideal for all MSK therapists.Follow Words Matter on:Instagram @Wordsmatter_education @TheWordsMatterPodcastTwitter @WordsClinicalFacebook Words Matter - Improving Clinical Communication★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

RX'D RADIO
E270: Sam Pedlow

RX'D RADIO

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 87:27


Today on RX'D Radio Shallow and Killian welcome Canadian professional beach volleyball player Sam Pedlow. Not only is Sam a skilled professional athlete but holds a Masters Degree in Physiotherapy . This conversation makes you feel like you're sitting around with a couple buddy's reminiscing about the good times when you were at your highest highs in athletics. Sam has tons of great stories of many trials and tribulations being a professional athlete in a sport like beach volleyball.  Instagram pedlowsamuel   Click the links below to sign up for our courses! PSL1 PS Nutrition Skill Acquisition   Don't miss the release of our newest educational community - The Pre-Script ™ Collective! Join the community today at www.pre-script.com. For other strength training, health, and injury prevention resources, check out our website, YouTube channel, and Instagram.  For more episodes, subscribe and tune in to our podcast. Also, make sure to sign up to our mailing list at www.pre-script.com to get the first updates on new programming releases. You can also follow Dr. Jordan Shallow and Dr. Jordan Jiunta on Instagram!

The Healthcare Education Transformation Podcast
Teach Me Something Tuesday Ep 15 - Accept Everyone Who Enters Your Classroom

The Healthcare Education Transformation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 4:26


Dr. F Scott Feil explains the importance of being accepting of everyone who comes into the classroom.  

The Zero to Finals Medical Revision Podcast

This episode covers trigger finger.Written notes can be found at https://zerotofinals.com/surgery/orthopaedics/triggerfinger/ or in the orthopaedic section of the Zero to Finals surgery book.The audio in the episode was expertly edited by Harry Watchman.

Dissecting Success
Ep 069: BE Who You Are With Jana Kapp

Dissecting Success

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 37:11


This week Blair and Theresa welcome Jana Kapp to Dissecting Success. Jana shares her incredible evolving journey to embrace all of herself while recovering from concussions, which ultimately led her to becoming her soul self. This discovery shifted her feelings on healing by changing her perspective from external to internal. Jana was caught up in the should of “how to be” but there was a voice that kept coming up saying “you are not living the way you desire”.  This launched her into starting her Holistic Concussion Support Coach business. Although concussions are a form of brain injury, the symptoms are not only physical but emotional as well.  A functional MRI isn't commonly available, so it is important to learn to trust and get to know yourself!  About the Guest: Jana Kapp MScPT, BSc Kin, is a Holistic Concussion Support Coach.  She has a neuroscience background in Physiotherapy and Kinesiology and has personally healed from 3 Concussions and lived with PTSD and Post Concussion Symptoms for 7 years. She has been symptom free since 2018.  As a Holistic Concussion Support Coach she guides you through your own unique recovery by marrying the physical aspects of healing ( Brain and Body) with the mental, emotional, and spiritual aspects (Mind and Soul) of healing.  Through her background in Neuroscience and Human Design, she supports you in understanding your brain, mind, emotions and energy to realign with your true essence so you can feel like yourself again and return to the life you truly desire to live.    https://www.facebook.com/groups/465866978342445 (https://www.facebook.com/groups/465866978342445)https://www.instagram.com/intuitive.concussion.support/ ( https://www.instagram.com/intuitive.concussion.support/) About the Hosts: Blair Kaplan Venables is an expert in social media marketing and the president of Blair Kaplan Communications, a British Columbia-based PR agency. As a pioneer in the industry, she brings more than a decade of experience to her clients, which includes global wellness, entertainment, and lifestyle brands. Blair has helped her customers grow their followers into the tens of thousands in just one month, win integrative marketing awards, and more. She has spoken on national stages and her expertise has been featured in media outlets including CBC Radio, CEOWORLD Magazine, She Owns It, and Thrive Global. Blair is also the #1 best-selling author of Pulsing Through My Veins: Raw and Real Stories from an Entrepreneur. When she's not working on the board for her local chamber of commerce, you can find Blair growing the “I Am Resilient Project,” an online community where users share their stories of overcoming life's most difficult moments. https://www.blairkaplan.ca/ (https://www.blairkaplan.ca/)  Theresa Lambert is an Online Business Strategy Coach with an impressive hotelier background in luxury Hospitality in the #1 Ski Resort in North America. Her mission is “ To make business easy so that your life can be more FULL!”. Theresa supports ambitious Women Entrepreneurs and Coaches to redefine success with elegance and create the Impact, Income and Freedom they desire in Business and in Life. In 2020 Theresa became the Bestselling Author of her book Achieve with Grace: A guide to elegance and effectiveness in intense workplaces. She is also a Speaker and the Podcast co-host of Dissecting Success. Theresa has been recognized as a business leader in Whistler's Profiles of Excellence, and is being featured in publications such as Hotelier Magazine, Thrive Global and Authority Magazine. https://www.theresalambertcoaching.com/ (https://www.theresalambertcoaching.com)   Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about...

The Physical Performance Show
321: Expert Edition: Anthony Nasser (PhD Candidate, APA Titled Sports & Exercise Physiotherapist): Proximal Hamstring Tendinopathy

The Physical Performance Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 59:29


Anthony Nasser is a Sports and Exercise Physiotherapist and Lecturer at the Graduate School of Health Discipline of Physiotherapy at University of Technology, Sydney.  Anthony graduated with a Bachelor of Applied Science Physiotherapy from the University of Sydney and a Clinical Masters of Physiotherapy in the field of Sports from the University of Queensland. Anthony has worked extensively as a clinician in musculoskeletal and sports physiotherapy, and is now a titled APA Sports Physiotherapist, he has considerable experience teaching musculoskeletal physiotherapy across multiple universities. Headline Sponsor: POLAR Polar are a sports technology company who build world class heart rate monitors and GPS watches for people who take their health, fitness and sports performance seriously. Coming from the heart of the Nordics, they have the experience, insight, and history of quality, design and innovation which is unparalleled. Worn by some of the best athletes on the planet, we're very excited to have Polar as a partner here so you can also access their heart rate monitors, watches and training platform. Polar are very excited to announce that they are launching two stunning new-generation running watches, the Polar Pacer and Polar Pacer Pro.  As a starting bonus, the team at Polar are offering 15% off. If it's time for you to check out a new heart rate monitor or watch to help improve your performance, head across to Polar.com and use the code TPPS on selected products. Featured Sponsor: Earshots Lock on, train on & rock on with Earshots. They have you covered for staying motivated while you train Their patented Magnetic ear clip means you can push your limits without being distracted by annoying cords or earbuds that fall out. Use the code PERFORMANCE at Earshots.com for 10% off your purchase. Join the The Physical Performance Show LEARNINGS membership through weekly podcasts | Patreon If you enjoyed this episode of The Physical Performance Show please hit SUBSCRIBE for to ensure you are one of the first to future episodes. Jump over to The Physical Performance Show - https://physicalperformanceshow.com/ for more details. Follow @Brad_Beer Instagram & Twitter The Physical Performance Show: Facebook, Instagram, & Twitter (@tppshow1) Please direct any questions, comments, and feedback to the above social media handles.

The Healthcare Education Transformation Podcast
Teach Me Something Tuesday Ep 14 - Handwritten Notes

The Healthcare Education Transformation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 2:44


Dr. F Scott Feil explains why handwritten notes are better in comparison to writing notes on your computer and why it helps you retain information more effectively in class.

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
587: Dr. Luciana De Michelis Mendonça: Sports Injury Prevention: What is the Role of the PT?

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 41:02


In this episode, President of IFSPT, Luciana de Michelis Mendonça, talks about her research and the upcoming World Congress of Sports Physical Therapy. Today, Luciana talks about the importance of the WCSPT and the results from her research. Why are organisations like IFSPT important? Hear about why sports PTs are important in injury prevention and reduction programs, pre-season assessments, implementing prevention programs, and get Luciana's advice to her younger self, all on today's episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.   Key Takeaways “We should assess our athletes to make the most amazing tailored prevention program.” “Injuries happen, but if you can decrease the time that the athlete is spent outside the game, then that is a win for the team.” “Warm-up sessions with the physical therapist were the methods used to prevent injuries.” “Be lighter, less stress, [put] less pressure on yourself.” “I am where I am because I'm good at what I do.”   More about Luciana de Michelis Mendonça Luciana is a professor in a federal university in Belo Horizonte (Brazil) and develops research in the field of sports physical therapy. She has participated in the last four IOC world conferences on injury and illness in sport with poster and workshop presentations. She was involved in organisation of physical therapy services for the Rio 2016 Olympics and Paralympics Games. She was the first female president of the Brazilian Society of Sports Physical Therapy (SONAFE), in a country with many restrictions to women's participation in sport and politics. Since 2017, she has been an executive director of the World Physiotherapy subgroup International Federation of Sports Physical Therapy (IFSPT) and is now IFSPT's president. She is committed to enhancing the dissemination of sports physiotherapy good practice and knowledge globally and to increase equity in sports physiotherapy.   Suggested Keywords Healthy, Wealthy, Smart, Healthcare, Physiotherapy, Sports, Research, Injury Prevention, Prevention Programs, Exercise,   Recommended Reading How injury registration and preseason assessment are being delivered: An international survey of sports physical therapists How injury prevention programs are being structured and implemented worldwide: An international survey of sports physical therapists Sign up for the Fourth World Congress of Sports Physical Therapy To learn more, follow Luciana at: Website:          https://ifspt.org Twitter:            @luludemichelis Instagram:       @lucianademichelis   Subscribe to Healthy, Wealthy & Smart: Website:                      https://podcast.healthywealthysmart.com Apple Podcasts:          https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/healthy-wealthy-smart/id532717264 Spotify:                        https://open.spotify.com/show/6ELmKwE4mSZXBB8TiQvp73 SoundCloud:               https://soundcloud.com/healthywealthysmart Stitcher:                       https://www.stitcher.com/show/healthy-wealthy-smart iHeart Radio:               https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-healthy-wealthy-smart-27628927   Read the Full Transcript Here: 00:07 Welcome to the healthy, wealthy and smart podcast. Each week we interview the best and brightest in physical therapy, wellness and entrepreneurship. We give you cutting edge information you need to live your best life healthy, wealthy and smart. The information in this podcast is for entertainment purposes only and should not be used as personalized medical advice. And now, here's your host, Dr. Karen Litzy.   00:35 Hey everybody, welcome back to the podcast. I am your host Karen Litzy. And today I'm very honored and excited to have on the program Dr. Luciana de mckaela Mendoza. She is a professor in a Federal University in Belo Horizonte in Brazil and develops research in the field of sports physical therapy. She has participated in the last four IOC world conferences on injury and illness in sport with poster and workshop presentations. She was involved in organization of physical therapy services for the Rio 2016 Olympics and Paralympic Games. She was the first female president of the Brazilian society of Sports Physical Therapy in a country with many restrictions to women's participation in sports and politics. Since 2017, she has been the executive director of the world physiotherapy subgroup, International Federation of sports, physical therapy or ifs PT, and is now IFSP T's president. She is committed to enhancing the dissemination of sports physiotherapy, good practice and knowledge globally, and to increase equity in sports physiotherapy. And in today's podcast, we will talk about some of her research into injury prevention and the role of sports physiotherapist in those programs. And of course, we will also talk a lot more about the fourth World Congress is Sports Physical Therapy, which is happening in Denmark this August 26, and 27th. That's 2022. So if you want to find more information about that, you can click on the link at podcast at healthy, wealthy smart.com. To find out more about the fourth World Congress is sports physiotherapy, again, taking place in Denmark. So we will talk a lot about that. And we will also get a sneak peek of some of Luciana has talks there. She's speaking and she is moderating. So she's got her hands full for sure. So I want to thank her for coming on the podcast and everyone enjoyed today's episode. Hi, Luciana. Welcome to the podcast. I'm excited to have a conversation with you today. Hi, Carrie. Thank you very much for having me. Yeah, it is my pleasure. And now before we get into the meat of our interview, can you tell the listeners a little bit more about you about your history in sports, physical therapy. And as I mentioned, you are the current president of ifs pts. You can talk a little bit about that as well. So I will hand the mic over to you.   03:06 Okay, Karen, so I'm from Brazil. I'm a sports physiotherapist and I graduated in 2003. So I'm 20 years as a physiotherapist. And I'm also a professor in diversity here in Brazil. I'm based in Belo Horizonte. And   03:28 I started to work. Since the as a students and sports team, I wanted to do physical therapy because of sports. I am passionate about it. And I, I started in this political scenario in the Brazilian society of sports, physical therapy. And I started it was in 2016, it was the year of real to tastic significant part Paralympic Games. So it was a really big challenge. I also work in the physical therapy services during the Olympics and Paralympic game here. And I started being part of the Executive Board of the IFSP CI in 2017. So I learned a lot during the presidency of Anthony Schneider's in Christian torborg. And now I have this big challenge to be IFSEC. President so I'm balancing this actions related to if activity and also with teaching and also research about sports, physical therapy. And my research is mainly directed to injury prevention, and also injury risk profile. So I think that's perfect. And can you talk a little bit more about IFSP T and kind of the importance of having these organizations and what they what they do, what are they there for   05:00 Yes, so the International Federation of Sports Physical Therapy is a subgroup of the word physiotherapy. That's our main our mother organization. So as a subgroup, we have to engage countries all around the world that have specific group related to sports, physical therapy to join the IFSP team. So nowadays, we have 34 member organizations in the SSP T. And our main mission is related to disseminate good practices, support research on sports, physical therapy, of course, and also promote actions to support our members, the whole community. So improve the practices around the world. And also it's a good it's an important way to connect with people. So I think the most amazing gifts that I had, being in IFSP T board is to network with people around the world. So it's a really   06:18 important way to have our professional, our profession, organize it. And so I probably will be in the presidency for the next four years. That's the plan. Yeah, that's, that's amazing. And one of the things that, like you said, as part of the organization is networking, and we'll say this will probably repeat this a couple of times, but the Fourth World Congress is sports, physical therapy is coming up August 26 27th, of 2022 in Denmark, and obviously, you will be there and you are a part of several presentations.   06:57 But like you said, your research is around injury prevention and assessment in sports, in sports. So can you talk about why the sports physical therapist is an important component of these injury prevention programs or injury reduction programs?   07:19 Yes, I just want to stress that, yes, the Congress of sports, physical therapy, it's important action that IFSP t also have, we are one of the main organizations, the main sub groups of world physiotherapy that deliver International Congress. So we have the first one in Bern, the second one Belfast, the third in Vancouver, and now illegal in Denmark. So I, I went to Belfast to Vancouver, and now I will be enabled for sure. So   07:55 I'm sorry, Carrie, I forgot your question. Oh, yeah. No, so my, my question, like I said, you're doing you're doing a ton. You'll be doing a ton in Nyberg. But one of the things that I know you are talking about is about your research that centers around injury prevention, and something that you're passionate about as if the sports physical therapist should really be involved. So why is that?   08:19 Yes. So I always thought that the main action as a sports physical therapy in a sports team, of course, I should be aware that, for me, I need support all athletes available to the coach to the head coach to train. So for me, it's, it was always a good time to have like the physical therapy department, empty without athletes there, because all athletes should be on the fields playing and training.   08:56 So for me, prevention was always important action that we as therapists should be aware of. So I, when I finished my PhD and start to be a teacher in university in Brazil, I started to wander, especially after I started to work in the IFSP. Board, I started to wonder if the prevention, the role that the Sports Physical Therapy had in prevention, and I know that how this works in Brazil because I was sports physical therapist and the volleyball team and soccer team. I was wondering if it was like the same, or I was wondering if it should be the same. Or if we are here in Brazil, we're doing like similar things that other professionals data around the world. So I have a sabbatical year in 2020 and I went to Belgium to work with Eric FitPro.   10:00 I was there in Uganda, the University of Ghana, as a visiting professor. And we started to develop a surveying to understand what role the sports physical therapists had in injury prevention. So I will talk about some of our results, we have two papers about this survey that were that are published in physical therapy in sports. And this helped me to have   10:33 sort of idea about the role. And we have really interesting information about this, that, of course, I will share here in this podcast, and also in the World Congress of sports, physical therapy. And also we develop a Delphi design to establish a consensus on sports injury prevention programs. So this is also an interesting   11:01 study that we could deliver an IFSP participated to, with this Delphi study linking   11:09 people from different countries. So I'm really excited to talk to you about this caring and say something that should make people a little bit curious and participate in the Congress. In Denmark. Yes. So when can can you give us a little bit of info, you don't have to give it all away? Of course, people can go and read the the   11:36 published papers, but in this   11:40 in this study, you had, how many people? What did you find? How did you do it?   11:50 So yes, for sure, I can share some of the data that we had the papers are published. And also you can indicate for your audience, I can send you the links. It's important, I totally understand caring that sports injury prevention area, we need to move forward related to research, we need to understand a lot of things. But I think it's interesting to understand what the professionals what the sports physical therapists are doing, because this can bring up some questions for future research. So   12:29 on the survey, we   12:32 we had 414, sports, physical therapists participating around the world. So I think we had like, people from 32 countries. So I know that the amount is not so high, we could have more people participating, but it was delivered in 2020, during the pandemic. So this is one thing that I should stress because, yes, we had 32 countries participating, but I, for sure, I expected to have more people there. But we had questions in this online survey that was related, link it to the synchronous sequence of prevention that were Matalan delivered, and maybe it's the the most use it, model or to make decisions about prevention. So we ask it if this sports physical therapists participated on injury prevention, sorry, injury registration. It's common here, Brazil, but I didn't know if my colleagues in other countries participating in the injury registration. We also asked if they assess it, the athletes to build the prevention program. So if they did, for example, preseason assessment, that's the more common way at least in Brazil. So I was curious about that. And also, I we asked about their prevention program. So if the pieces participated in this action or not. So about equal registration, the first thing this I think this is an amazing result, because we had more than then 80% of the sports physical therapists that participate in this study, were responsible for me to reverse the situation. So we can now say that maybe the sports physio are the are the person like more important more responsible to properly register injury in their sports team? So this brings brings up a lot of other questions. So for example, maybe we should IFSP T should deliver some actions to maybe   15:00 increase the knowledge and maybe the competence on this matter on our community. Because of course, if we are responsible for this, we want to do an amazing job. So it's, it's interesting. And it's good also to exchange some experience and learn from good examples. So this is really good. And we also ask about the main barriers.   15:29 So for sure now register the injuries. So more than a half of this physios said that lack of time in their routine was the main factor to not properly register injuries. So maybe we need to discuss also about the sports physio routine, inside the sports team. I think we talk we should talk more about this, especially in conferences that we can get together a lot of professionals from different countries, and we can learn from their experience.   16:08 So can I move forward? You have a comment about registration? Nope, I think I think that's good. And I do like that. You said, Hey, maybe this is a chance for us to get together learn from each other. Because perhaps there are ways to streamline this that people just haven't thought of that other people are doing. So you're right. It's a great opportunity for sports organizations, like if SPT to bring sports physical therapist together and say, Well, wait a second, some of you are doing this with some of you aren't. And if it's a lack of time, what can we do to give you a structure that can streamline your process? Yes, exactly. And it's one thing that here needs to be done. We just We can't like, Okay, I'm not going to register injuries, because how can I be sure if I'm going to prevent the injuries if I'm not registering? So if you're not registering, is it like they didn't happen?   17:09 Yes. And another another thing that is really interesting, what is the injury definition? That is sports, physical therapists are using my understanding, we can select different definitions, because this maybe rely on the sports modality.   17:32 But we need to talk more about this, I think we should   17:37 exchange and learned and maybe from this, maybe if aspartate can deliver some guidelines, I don't know, because it's one of our missions. Also to make the FSB T is the main resource for the Sports Physical Therapy community. So I think we will maybe in the future, we are going to have more actions based on the findings of so I'm really excited about this. Okay, so let's move on to preseason assessment. So how many are performing? And what are the barriers? I know that this is this, topics of little bit controversial, I know that we have a group that thinks that we should assess, and another group of sports physio, or research thinks that we, we don't need to. But our survey shows that 77% of the participants perform preseason assessments in their athletes.   18:45 So 222 sports fields, said that they do. This is amazing information. And I didn't expect for this high percentage.   18:59 And I was happy because I believe that we should assess our athletes to make the most tailored, most amazing tailored prevention program for our athletes. I know that this is a challenge. I totally understand this. But if I think about myself as a sports, physical therapy, if I'm working in a sports team, I will like I will do my best to assess the athletes and try to deliver   19:30 into an individualized prevention programs. So but we have like, opposite side here because only 30% of these sports physical therapists that do preseason assessment, customize the provincial program bases in the results of the assessment.   19:54 So this is a point that we need to understand better. We need to understand what is happening. Why   20:00 They sports fees you give energy to assess the athletes, but they don't apply the results to build the prevention program.   20:11 So we didn't   20:14 ask it like specific questions about this. To understand this, we only asked about the barrier. So the main barrier   20:23 that was indicated to not before assessment, it was lack of structure and organization of the sports team.   20:33 So about half of the participants indicated this barrier.   20:38 I understand makes sense, but I'm not sure if this barrier explain 100% of the reasons to not perform the precision assessment. And I think maybe this is also relied on the evidence that we have related to these. We have big discussions about injury prediction probability. So maybe we need to make some advance in research about this topic. And maybe we need to talk more about this to make more like have this issue more clear to everyone, specially the clinician.   21:22 Because I think so now, it's my opinion. Okay. I think we need to assess our athletes, and maybe maybe even the process of assessment should be discussed. Because if we, if we are here in a roundtable with sports, physical therapists, and we ask how you assess your athletes, which tests do you select, probably carrying, we are going to have different answers. So I don't I'm not sure what this means. It means that we don't have standards. We don't have like a protocol. Should we have a protocol? I don't know. But what I know is that we need to talk more about this. Yeah, I mean, oh, go ahead. Sorry. No, no, I just like, I just want to say that I was really happy with the the results that sports fields with a majority is performing a preseason assessment. But on contrary, I was I get a little sad to see that not like 1/3 of them are really applying the Results to Build provincial programs. And yeah, and so I brings up a couple of questions for me, and that is, have you seen preseason assessments? Decrease injury, are they and again, this goes on? I think what you just said that sort of prediction and probability. So if you do a preseason assessment, does that predict less injuries? I don't know. Have you seen? What are your thoughts on that?   23:06 Thank you for asking this caring, I think   23:10 preseason assessment. The main propose is not to predict injury, they may propose is to identify those athletes with more susceptibility or probability to get the injury and then we can act before this happened. I'm not saying that if we perform a preseason assessment and beta prevention program on the results, our athletes not going to get into I'm not saying that injury, always going to happen sports, but we can, for example, decrease the severity.   23:52 So if I have one athlete that I can, for example, I apply the stars question balance test, and I see that this athlete have a really low stability, functional stability in the lower league. So I can include in their provincial program, exercise to improve the stability, and maybe he will, he will, like have the ankle sprain, but I can decrease the severity.   24:26 So I will decrease the time loss. I will make this athlete more available to the head coach at the end. That's my reasoning on preseason assessment. And I think there is a misconception about this issue also. Right? Because I think, you know, if we're playing devil's advocate, some people may say, well, the preseason assessment isn't going to eliminate injuries. Why am I why am I doing it? Right? But like you said, injuries happen. But if you can decrease the severity if you can decrease the time that the athlete is spent out of the game   25:00 Yeah, then that's a win for the team. And it's a win for the coach in the organization. But if only 30% If if you have all of these sport physiotherapist doing a preseason assessment, then only 30% customize the program. Now we have to come up with some incentives for that physiotherapist to customize   25:19 the program for the athlete. And again, that may be like you said resources available to them, if it's one person and 50 players,   25:30 that it's difficult, you know that that's that that's quite difficult. But   25:37 I can understand how this can be a very frustrating part of research, because there's a lot of moving parts. And it's not just the sport physiotherapist, who has all best intentions and at at the heart of, of of their work. But there's a lot of external factors that need to come into play. But   26:03 I do I also like your that idea of being on a round table with sport physiotherapist and saying, Well, what do you do? What do you do? And maybe like you said, I don't know if a protocol is right, but maybe some sort of a roadmap where you have some basic assessments, and then you have the freedom and the ability to get creative, but to have certain certain things in there that makes sense for that sport?   26:31 Yes, I totally agree with you. Here in Brazil, I have a lot of colleagues and friends that came from the Brazilian society of sports, physical therapy. So we talked a lot in exchange a lot. So I, I myself, I have my challenges related to really delivering the prevention program that I i understand that would be like the best thing to do. But of course, this also relies on the relationship with the head coach, district parenting coach. So it's a lot of factors variables that we need to understand. And that's, that's really individual. It depends on the context of each sports team. So that's what I when I say that maybe we don't, we will not have like a protocol, because it depends on the sports team reality. But I agree with you that we can give maybe some roadmap to help everyone to organize better, considering the context, right? Yeah, exactly. Exactly. Oh, that's yeah, that's that really opens up a can of worms for people. That being said, let's move on to prevention programs. So what did you find with that?   27:53 Yes, so about the prevention program, we see that warm up.   27:59 sessions with the physical therapists were the methods more use it to prevent injury. And I think about warm up this was already expected because it was one roadmap that FIFA 11 Plus gave to everyone, not only for soccer, we have evidence on basketball, handball players. So FIFA 11 Plus really helped in this maybe this   28:31 basic organization, and how to deliver some preventive action in a more easy and accessible way. So I think it's really interesting that this survey, like confirm that one map, it's a really good strategy to include the provincial probe on athletes routine, because the athlete will need to warm up. So we have this moment, and why not. So instead of make the athlete do like,   29:06 whatever exercise or just running on the field, why not to be more specific and includes exercise that the athletes really need to do based on the sport modality.   29:20 Epidemiology. So for example, we know that in soccer, we have a lot of famous hamstring strain, we have a lot of ankle sprain, knee sprain. So why not to include some melodic at the size it some balance exercise? I think this is a really   29:38 important action that every old sports physical therapist needs, so be engaged and participate and about the individual sessions with the sports physical therapists. It's important to us and then I really expected some information around this   30:00 because we know that we have some time zone athletes that need a specific exercise that needs to be delivered by the physical therapist. So I was happy to say this because this was the methods more use it more indicated by our participants. And above the barrier, we saw that lack of time in athletes routine was the main barrier to perform the provision. This was indicated by 66% of the participants.   30:34 Of course, I expected results. And that's why warm up, it's important action because this is already in adults routine, we don't need to change the routine to include one more time and period to do   30:51 the exercise related related to prevention. So again, carry I don't know if this only this area only about athletes routine, we can understand why we can't perform major prevention. And as I said, Before, I understand the challenges. I think it's not easy. But I think it's a wonderful, it's a wonderful action that sports physical therapists participate. And it's really, of course, important for our athletes health, not only performance, because we have evidence that provincial programs also increased performance. But also I'm concerned about athlete's health, we need to, of course, help the athlete because no one wants to get into it. So this is really, it was really important.   31:49 For information that is the also indicated and these information helped us. So sort of build the questions related to the consensus, that was our second step during my experience in Ghent University with Eric.   32:11 Right. And so at W CSPG. You're going to show some data about the Delphi consensus, so you don't have to give all that away, people can go to the conference to hear more about that. But if you want to give a little preview, now's your time. So you what are the main topics investigated?   32:31 So about our Delphi, we organized the consensus in three parts. So the first part was related to how the thesis should plan the provincial programs. So this planning was about the information or the reasoning to develop the injury prevention program. So this is interesting, because we have information that, for example, sports, physio, use the reasoning related to biomechanics, or the base decision only on evidence and injury, Epidemiology, or athletes, injury history. So we have this kind of information and result and this is really brings up some discussions. So I hope that on the conference, I can, we can have this moment to discuss about our information, our data. The second part was about the organization. So how work environments before the implementation, how this affects the delivering the injury prevention programs. And the third one is about the implementation phase that I know that there is a lot of discussion and research, we have a specific we have specific groups of research that really go deep in this matter of implementation. So in this third phase, we identify barriers and facilitators to implement the injury prevention programs, and also related to compliance, if visibility. So this is how we organize the Delphi. It was a huge amount of work from all the core authors that participated in this study, and really happy that we can now say that this is accepted in physical therapy in sports generally, we can now really disseminate   34:39 this information, and I'm really happy to be part of this. Yeah, well, congratulations because that is a ton of work. And again, if people want to learn more about this, then you can come to Nyberg August 26 27th The Fourth World Congress is Sports Physical Therapy in Denmark.   35:00 And I mean, who doesn't want to be in Denmark in the summer? Right? I mean, amazing. Yeah, this will be my first time in Denmark. So my I am excited. So of course, no Denmark, but also to meet my friends from Sports Physical Therapy community, specifically before this, sorry, after this pandemic. Yeah. So I really miss my friends. And I really excited to talk more about injury prevention. And so our consensus results, and exchange and networking with everyone there. Yeah. And where can people find you? If they have questions? If they you know, we'll have the links to the studies that you mentioned in the show notes. So if people read that, and they have questions, where can they find you?   35:53 Yes, Carrie, so I am on social media. So I have my Facebook profile, Instagram, it's with my name, no change at all. And also in Twitter, is Lulu the chalice so you can find me there. And we can keep talking about information. IFSEC. I invite everyone for be like in the World Congress of sports, physical therapy, it's in August. So I'm really excited to be there. And I hope to see you there all for caring. Yeah, I will be there. I'm looking forward to it. And now final question that I asked everyone knowing where you are now in your life and in your career, what advice would you give to your younger self? Good question. Okay. So maybe, first, I would say to my own self, congratulations, you are an amazing woman in you accomplished a lot.   36:52 For sure, I never thought that I would be where I am now. As IFSP President working in federal, probably the most important federal university here in Brazil. So I'm really happy. If I could give her some advice should be be more lighter, less stress, less pressure on yourself, Luciana.   37:23 But at the end, we don't don't care if this increased pressure or stress, help in a way.   37:31 me to be here where I am. Or if I could go through this path. Be more.   37:41 I don't know light. I think the word is like, Yeah, I think so. And, and I love the fact that you said you know, you would congratulate yourself. And I think celebrating wins and celebrating what we do are things that women don't often do. Right? We're always sort of congratulating others and putting others up, but we never sort of congratulate ourselves and celebrate our wins. And, and I think if I were to go back and tell my younger self, something that would be it, like stop making yourself smaller so that other people can be bigger. It's a constant exercise. I didn't accomplished my winnings, my victories so often, but now I can see clearly that I am where I am, because I'm good in what I do. So perfect. What a way to end the podcast. I think that's great. So again, people can see you live in Nyberg, August 26 and 27th. At the fourth world, Congress is sports, physical therapy, you again will have the link on the conference and how to sign up. And we certainly encourage everyone to do that. Like you said, What a great way to meet up with colleagues to get some really great information and be in a beautiful place while you do it. Yeah, exactly. And on August 25, five, we are going to have a network session delivered by FFTT. So we are going to have also this moment to get together and exchange. Perfect. Is there anything else? You know, you're the president? So is there anything else that we missed? Talking about the conference that you want to let people know is is also happening? We are going to have an interesting conference because it's going to be I think the first World Congress of sports, physical therapy that we're going to have specific moments to do sports in the program. So we are going to have this more serious moments to talk more about our practices and research but also light moments to practice sports and be more friendly there. Yeah, so basically bring your workout clothes is what you're saying. Yeah,   40:00 Oh, yeah, that's exactly perfect. Perfect. And I don't think I mentioned that when I spoke to Katie so I'll be mentioning that moving forward that bring your sneakers bring your workout clothes, that traditional   40:13 well here in the US for whatever reason, people like always wear suits to these things.   40:20 So don't don't worry about the suits, but definitely bring your workout gear. Yes. Perfect. Perfect. Well, Luciana, thank you so much for taking the time out today and coming on to the podcast to talk about all the great stuff you're doing. Thank you so much. My pleasure, Kara. Thank you so much, and everyone thanks so much for tuning in. Have a great couple of days and stay healthy, wealthy and smart.   40:43 Thank you for listening and please subscribe to the podcast at podcast dot healthy, wealthy smart.com. And don't forget to follow us on social media.    

The Zero to Finals Medical Revision Podcast
De Quervain's Tenosynovitis

The Zero to Finals Medical Revision Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 4:47


This episode covers De Quervain's tenosynovitis.Written notes can be found at https://zerotofinals.com/surgery/orthopaedics/dequervains/ or in the orthopaedic section of the Zero to Finals surgery book.The audio in the episode was expertly edited by Harry Watchman.

The Sports Physical Therapy Academy Podcast
EP061: "Strength & Conditioning For Professional Athletes" - Featuring Jamie Myers

The Sports Physical Therapy Academy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2022 73:22


“What is it like to create strength and conditioning programs for professional athletes?” How do you manage programming over the course of a full year or season of training? If you want to improve your confidence and structure with programming for athletes, this episode is for you. I interview Jamie Myers, senior strength and conditioning coach at the United States Olympic and Paralympic committee.   In this episode, we discuss the following: ✅ Roles and responsibilities as a strength & conditioning coach at the elite level ✅ Outline of a day and week and season with professional athletes ✅ Approach framework to create monthly and weekly programs ✅ Collaborating with medical professional to improve athlete outcomes ✅ Advice for sports PTs who want to improve their skills in program design Enjoy! _____________________________________ Are you a physical therapist or physiotherapist looking for tips, tools, and strategies to work with more athletes, become a sports specialist or get a job in a sports setting...so you can finally enjoy the career that you've always dreamed of? If so, you're in the right place...this podcast is for you. Your host is Dr. Chris Garcia, a physical therapist, business owner, entrepreneur, nationally recognized public speaker, and residency-trained sports specialist.  Dr. Chris Garcia, PT, DPT, SCS, CSCS, USAW has worked in professional sports and traveled around the world working with elite athletes throughout his career, and he's learned a lot of lessons along the way. He created this podcast to share his experiences and give you everything you need to know to help YOU become a successful clinician. Dr. Chris Garcia talks about everything from sports rehab and injury prevention to developing athletic performance and the path to getting your dream job...even if it is in professional sports. If you want to become a successful clinician so you can finally enjoy the career you've always dreamed of, visit www.DrChrisGarcia.com. LINKS: www.DrChrisGarcia.com www.Instagram.com/ChrisGarciaDPT www.Facebook.com/ChrisGarciaDPT ***DISCLAIMER: This content is for educational & informational use only and & does not constitute medical advice. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice or medical recommendations, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a qualified medical professional for proper evaluation & treatment, or beginning any exercises or activity in this content. Chris Garcia Academy, Inc. and The Sports PT Academy Podcast are not responsible for any harm caused by the use of this content.***

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
586: Ummukulthoum Bakare: The Unbreakable Young World Athlete

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 25:27


In this episode, Nigerian Sports Physiotherapy Association Founding Member, Ummukulthoum Bakare, talks about her important research and advocacy of sports physiotherapy. Today, Ummukulthoum talks about her research on women's football, the issue of compliance and adherence, and the next steps in her research. What are the challenges for women football players, and how are they mitigated? Hear about her experience advocating for sports physiotherapy, her presentation on The Unbreakable Young World Athlete, and get her advice to her younger self, all on today's episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.   Key Takeaways “Passion will drive you.” “The increase in projections of the numbers of registered football players has skyrocketed by the participation of women in football.” “Coaches need to understand that they can be empowered to take charge.” “You don't have to think of injury prevention as this thing that is separate. It needs to be integrated.” “Nothing is impossible. If you can dream it, you can do it.” “The sky isn't the limit anymore.”   More about Ummukulthoum Bakare Ummukulthoum Bakare is a Doctorate Candidate in Sports Physical Therapy at the University of Witwatersrand in South Africa. Her research is focused on women's football and injury prevention. She is a founding member of the Nigerian Sports Physiotherapy Association and is active in disseminating the FIFA11+ injury prevention programme in her native country and across Africa. Her passion has centred around the sports of football, basketball, and para-athletes and injury prevention. She received her Bachelor of Physical Therapy and her Master of Physical Therapy from the College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. Ummukulthoum has worked as a physical therapist since 2001 and has won several awards for her service locally, regionally, and internationally. She is a member of the Medical and Scientific Commission of the Nigeria Olympic Committee and an Associate Editor for the British Journal of Sports Medicine.   Suggested Keywords Healthy, Wealthy, Smart, Healthcare, Physiotherapy, Sports, Research, Injury Prevention, Women's Football, Empowerment, Advocacy,   Third World Congress of Sports Physical Therapy   To learn more, follow Ummukulthoum at: Website:          https://www.facebook.com/nspa.org.ng/ Twitter:            @koolboulevard Instagram:       @koolboulevard   Subscribe to Healthy, Wealthy & Smart: Website:                      https://podcast.healthywealthysmart.com Apple Podcasts:          https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/healthy-wealthy-smart/id532717264 Spotify:                        https://open.spotify.com/show/6ELmKwE4mSZXBB8TiQvp73 SoundCloud:               https://soundcloud.com/healthywealthysmart Stitcher:                       https://www.stitcher.com/show/healthy-wealthy-smart iHeart Radio:               https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-healthy-wealthy-smart-27628927   Read the Full Transcript Here:  00:07 Welcome to the healthy, wealthy and smart podcast. Each week we interview the best and brightest in physical therapy, wellness and entrepreneurship. We give you cutting edge information you need to live your best life healthy, wealthy and smart. The information in this podcast is for entertainment purposes only and should not be used as personalized medical advice. And now, here's your host, Dr. Karen Litzy.   00:35 Hey everyone, welcome back to the podcast. I am your host Karen Litzy. And in today's episode, I'm really honored to welcome UMO cooltone Bukhari she has a doctorate candidate in Sports Physical Therapy at the University of Witwatersrand in African South Africa. Her research is focused on women's football and injury prevention. She is a founding member of the Nigerian sports physiotherapy Association, and is active in disseminating the FIFA 11 Plus injury prevention program in her native country and across Africa. Her passion has centered around the sports of football, basketball and para athletes and injury prevention. She received her Bachelor of physical therapy and her Master of physical therapy from the College of Medicine University of Ibadan in Nigeria UMO kooltherm has worked as a physical therapist since 2001, and has won several awards for her service locally, regionally and internationally. She is a member of the medical and scientific commission of the Nigeria Olympic Committee, and an associate editor for the British Journal of Sports Medicine. So in this episode, we give you all a sneak peek of what she is going to be speaking on as one of the guest speakers at the fourth World Congress of Sports Physical Therapy, which is taking place August 26, to the 22nd 2022 and Nyborg Denmark. If you want more information on the WC SPT conference, head over to podcast at healthy wealthy smart.com. Click on the link in the show notes under this episode. If you can, I highly suggest signing up and joining us in August in Denmark. So Lumo coutume is just one of many speakers that we're going to be highlighting over the next couple of months. We have a great conversation today about the unbreakable Young World athlete which she will be speaking about Nyberg. So everyone enjoyed today's episode and be on the lookout for more speakers coming up in the next couple of months. Hey, Katie, welcome to the podcast. I'm really happy to have you on.   02:43 It's lovely to be here, Karen. Thanks for having me. Yes. And like I said in the intro, gosh, you are a real rock star in the physiotherapy world. So you are a founding member of the Nigerian sports physiotherapy Association. You are a member of the medical and scientific commission of the Nigerian Olympic Committee and an assistant editor for the British Journal of Sports Medicine. And so that leads me to my first question is How important do you feel these associations are for the profession?   03:20 Thank you, Karen. It's is really very important, especially from my side of the   03:27 of the continent where we have very limited resources. And it's always a good opportunity to connect with other colleagues from around the world. When we first started the the Nigerian sports physiotherapy Association, were just a handful of people who, you know, came together to say, look, if we did start an association like this, it would help us be able to connect with other colleagues and associated other associations from around the world. And then we connected with IFSP T, which also given us a lot of opportunity to connect with the rest of the sports PT world globally. And that has kind of enriched us over the years. And I'm happy to say that Nigeria was also the first African country to be affiliated with IFSP T. And we still have a great relationship till today. And I'm also actually, I think, the first African and the IFSP T board. The executive board. I was elected in 2019 in the last Congress in Canada, for the Nigeria Olympic Committee. That took a lot of work because it's actually by appointment. And over time, it had only just been physicians. There hasn't been any room for physios to get on board, but I think for somehow I just kept well with the National Society. I'd be the Nigel site of physiotherapy, I just kept pushing to get on visit   05:00 ability for physios get us to get, I mean, get the Olympic Committee to also organize specialized training for physios and all of that, and I was doing all this work, making sure that where they were conferences happening, I wanted them to, you know, support people to attend and all that, and a former vice president of the Olympic Committee, and as I look, I think you'll bring your loved one on board. And I'd like to nominate you to be on the on the medical commission. And I was like, Okay. And   05:34 when I got in, I was the only female and I was the only physio. But I am glad that we time a lot of things have changed. Because one of the key things I'm passionate about is to give room to allow upcoming and early career sports medicine stakeholders, be it physio psychologists, you know, doctors, physicians, but give room for the younger ones to be supported and, you know, have access to all the IOC courses and things like that. So I it's been, it's not been an easy journey, but I think you can change a lot more from the inside than the outside. And that's, that's why I took on the assignment. And so far, so good. It's, it's worked out. Yeah, it's slow. But it has worked out a bit. Yeah, amazing. And I was going to my next question was going to be what, what has it been like for you to kind of be the first to have a seat at the table? Right, the first woman which I'm not surprised, and the first physio to kind of have that seat at the table, what has that been like for you? And what lessons have you learned?   06:43 Um, to be honest, it was not a really easy thing to do, especially when you are in the middle of about, you know, 12 other people who, and you probably also are the youngest. Let me add that, even though I don't consider myself young, per se, but in that tool,   07:06 I was the youngest. So but I think luckily, I What sort of helped me was that I spoke with the chairman. And I told him Look, this is   07:18 this is the ideas that I have. And I feel like I know there's a lot of work that needs to go on behind the scenes, I'm happy to do all the heavy lifting, or writing and all that, but we need to push for more things to achieve our mandate. And he was very happy with that. And later, a lot of a lot of the other board members just felt like Okay, it looks like we have somebody who's willing to do all this heavy lifting with you know, writing proposals and stuff. And we just kind of make things work. And somehow they just realized that I wasn't really doing it for any self. For myself, as it were, I was trying to get us to have a better a wider ecosystem for sports medicine resource, be it physios, doctors, you know psychologists, pharmacists, nutritionists and stuff like that. And so far, so good. We've we have quite a sizable number of young, early career people coming on board, a lot more people are not interested in sports, physio and all that. And which is because before now, nobody really wanted to do sports physio, they felt like,   08:26 you know, you're, you're never going to be rich. Like you're always just   08:31 the government is always owing you money. And so why are you a physio per se but then I tell them that look, passion will drive you it is just a calling and you really need to understand that.   08:44 What can in any another prefer in any other specialty or physio? It's quite rewarding as a sports physio as well, if you if you're driven by the right   08:55 circumstances. So yeah, it's not going to be easy, because half the time you'll find yourself like a fish out of water, especially being a female   09:05 where you're working multisport settings and you have to work with male team and all of that you have to hold your own. But it's it is rewarding. And yeah, so yeah. And it sounds to me like some of my students. Yeah, some big lessons. There are one, being willing to put in the work and to opening the door so you can help bring other people in. It's not opening the door for yourself and closing it on everyone behind you. No, no, because there definitely has to be a transitional plan. What is the sustainability of whatever you're doing? Because at the end of the day, your time is going to come and go. So who are the people that you're empowered to continue that journey, the vision and to be able to achieve   09:51 you know, the end goal of making sure that there is that continuity, and that you have, you know, so they pay forward and they can   10:00 didn't pay forward until, you know, for as long as as needed. And we would have a big pool of sports physios because I can tell you that Nigeria is over 200 million people, and maybe about 10 million active Lee involved in sports at a competitive level. And we still don't have enough physios to cater for that number.   10:27 So there's still a lot of work to be done. I can't do it alone. It's a collective team effort. Yeah, I mean, you have to increase the capacity. Exactly. Right. So that that all of these 10 million people, which is a huge number of people cannot be seen by estimating. It could be more, right. Definitely. Yeah. So obviously, you don't have the capacity for all of that. So if you can open that door and bring in a lot of like enthusiastic, like you said, physios, physicians, psychologists, nutritionists to help you continue to build up the capacity of a sports medicine program across the country, you'll be able to reach more people. Exactly. And that's what it's all about. And now, let's talk about your research. So you've got this passion of building up the capacity for sports medicine in Nigeria, let's talk about your research, which I know you're also passionate about. So I'll hand it over to you.   11:31 Okay, so I'm currently working in women's football. I mean, it is what it is because women really don't get much attention for anything, even in football, and for research specifically, as well. But as we all know that the   11:49 increase in projections of the numbers of registered football players has skyrocketed by the participation of women in football. And we know that for women's for women, we are more or less we have certain   12:08 certain factors, that puts us at higher risk of injuries. We know football has burden of you know, contact injuries and all that but can reduce the injury rates of non contact injuries. Now, because women I hire, that when population were what areas due to biomechanical factors, biological factors as a result of hormones and stuff, biological become biomechanical because of, you know, pelvic hip ratio, you know, being at higher risk of ACLs. So you want to be able to minimize that risk. And how to do that is to actively engage in injury prevention. So trying to bridge the gaps, especially in a low resource setting where we don't really have much human resources, infrastructure and all of that, and people still want to play football. So my research is trying to bridge the gap with the population of women playing football, and the use of an evidence based, comprehensive warmup program, which is the FIFA 11. Plus, it is a basic injury prevention program, but it works. But it's not going to work if people don't know about it and compliant with using it. So it's trying to find out what are the challenges in the setting? And how can we mitigate these challenges to be able to improve compliance and adherence, and be able to achieve injury prevention goals, because even on a global scale, compliance, and adherence is a big issue with anything. So, um, since we also know that we have to always tailor things to the broader ecological context, or whatever we're doing. It's not one size fits all, because you have to figure out what are the things that can work in this setting? How can we adapt that can we adjust certain things and whose responsibility is going to take the leadership of the injury prevention philosophy, how this behavioral change is gonna affecting? So this is this is a research that I was working on, or I'm concluding at the moment. And I'm really excited because now I think FIFA also is doing trying to do a lot of stuff for women's football. So hopefully, that can help. You know, in the next five years, we'll see women's football going to a different level than we are right now. Yeah. And you know, as you're talking about that and talking about the resources or lack thereof, it really makes me think I'm in New York City. I'm in the United States where we have an abundance of resources, and people still don't comply with injury prevention programs, right. And so I can't imagine being in   15:00 In a part of the world where you don't have the the manpower, the end all of the things that we have here, yeah, yeah, in order to make these programs stick.   15:13 Exactly. So this is one of the things that I found out is, along the course of my research, is that coaches need to understand that they can be empowered to take charge, rather than coach to see me as a medical person, like trying to take over their job, I'm not trying to take over your job, I'm only trying to help the team so that he can have more players available for selection and team can do better because at the end of the day, it's inversely proportional, the less injuries in the team, the more the team, you know, can can can progress and be successful. So at the end of the day, I think the messaging also matters, the messaging about, Okay, Coach, if you do this, you're going to have more players available for selection. And when you do have more players available for selection, then your team has a better potential to fight for the title to get to win a trophy. And when that happens, you get a bonus or something in your pocket. And it all everybody sort of it's a win win situation when your players do or injury free. They have longer carrier carrier longevity and so many other things. So the reason begins to change, you know, begins to change and at the end of the day. And then another thing I say to them that look, you don't have to think of injury prevention as this thing that is separate. It needs to be integrated. And there is no flexibility to adapt   16:45 and just integrate, it will still work. The most important thing is that you are committing at least twice a week for these exercises to be done. And you will see the difference that it brings to your team. Yeah, it's all about incentives. Right? How can you how can you meet the people where they're at with the incentives they need? And like you said, it's all about the messaging? Yes. Okay, wait, mindset changes, right. And that kind of takes us into I think what you're going to be speaking about at the fourth World Congress is sports physiotherapy, which takes place August 26 and 27th of this year in Nyborg, Denmark, and that is the unbreakable Young World athlete. So talk to us a little bit about that, and a little bit about your presentation. We don't give it all away, of course, you know, we want people to come and see you live, so we're not giving it all away.   17:46 We can dangle some highlights out there.   17:50 Okay, so the first thing is, I think that right now, everybody knows the potential of sports. So   17:58 everybody wants to start young. Now the pressure there on the young athlete is to begin to perform at a professional level at a young age. And that impacts a lot of things in terms of because you know, the type of dedication that you need to, to perfect, whatever sport that you're doing. And, you know, many parents and guidance, everybody wants, oh, I want my child to be Cristiano Ronaldo, I want my child to be messy. Now the pressure is much on these kids. And one of the biggest challenges that then these the burden of having to deal with that kind of pressure, whether physically, psychologically, and every other thing that makes up these young athletes would really be a huge load for young athletes out there. How can we balance that? Now, I will be talking from the perspective of law resource where I'm coming from a lot of many people.   18:57 In the developed countries, they have a lot of support for young athletes. And be it nutrition wise psychology, and so many other things that you we don't have the luxury of that. And many times, the kids who just want to play like they don't want to do anything serious or anything like that. But there's still the pressure and demand on them to excel. Because people see that if you if you're a good sports person, or you're able to make a break in either football or basketball, which is one of the top spots in Nigeria, then we can change our economic situation. And that helps us out of poverty, and all this kind of and all this type of thing. So I'm just going to be talking from that perspective of low resource and how the young athletes   19:50 as much as you want to encourage sports participation, but there has to be that striking balance to enable them to succeed   20:00 That's a lot of pressure on a young kid.   20:03 Yes, yeah. Yeah. Well, I mean, I know I'm definitely looking forward to that talk in Nyborg. Is there anything else that you're working on projects moving forward? Anything you're looking forward to in the future, whether it's future research, speaking gigs, getting more involved in in the profession as a whole? What do you have coming up?   20:30 Okay, so I'm trying, I'm rounding up my doctorate right now. So hopefully, I can get a postdoc position as well to continue to work in women's football.   20:44 That is what I'm hoping for the next maybe six months there about, but other projects that I'm passionate about involves power athletes, I'm very, very passionate about walking with our athletes, because also they too, were like a minority   21:01 group. But I see that they are really the super humans, you know, with everything. And with the limited resources and everything you can think of the still strive very hard I want to get on on the world stage. They are the ones who put Nigeria on the on the on the map for medals, because I was with the team in 2016, in Rio, and   21:27 we won eight gold medals, set new eight world records.   21:33 So I feel like yeah, there's a lot more that I want to learn. And   21:39 I'm also trying to do some technical courses. And   21:44 there's something called classification for power athletes, where it's like, you're trying to make sure that all the athletes are classed,   21:53 in in the desired classes that they can compete on a level playing ground. So apart from the technical officials, they also need the medical people to come and do all the assessments of you know, movement, muscle power, and all these things, just to be sure that, okay, we have classes athletes properly, and they can compete without having undue advantage over the other colleagues in a similar category. So yeah, so I think that's really the next thing that I want to do. It sounds amazing.   22:27 Some of my students trying to move on to postgrads. I've just provide them some of my own shares, some run experience, support them along the way as well. And so that's, that's what I think I'll do. Amazing. Well, it sounds like you have a busy time coming up and doing really, really great work. So congratulations on all of that. And now where can people find you? If they want to reach out to you? They have questions. They have thoughts, where can they find you?   22:56 Okay, so you couldn't find me on social media? You'll see on Twitter, it's at cool Boulevard.   23:04 And it's also the same handle on Instagram at cool Boulevard. So and that's cool with a K, correct? Yes. K with the K Yeah, yeah. And we'll have all of that information and links directly to all of your social media in the show notes for this podcast, so people won't have to search too far. And now as we wrap things up, one last question that I asked everyone, it's knowing where you are now in your life and career, what advice would you give to your younger self?   23:35 Um, nothing is impossible. If you dream it, you can do it. So just surround surround yourself with people who will always find your flames. People will always ginger you to keep going. And I think, you know, the sky isn't the limit anymore.   23:55 You can keep going so that I'll give to my younger self. Excellent advice. And just if people want to see Katie speak in person, like I said a little bit earlier, she will be speaking at the fourth World Congress is sports, physical therapy, August 26, to the 27th of this year, 2022 and Nyborg, Denmark. So again, we'll have a link for that as well. So you can go on and take a look at the whole program and sign up and come to Denmark in the summer, which I'm assuming is going to be great. I've never I've only been there in February when it's pretty chilly and snowy and rainy. So I'm excited for I'm excited to go. And I'm excited to listen. I have never been to Denmark. This will be my first time. So yes, I am looking forward to meeting you. And the rest of the delegates from around the world. Yeah, it's gonna be great. So Katie, thank you so much for taking the time out and coming on today and talking about all the great work you're doing. We are all inspired. So thank you so much. Thank you for having me.   25:00 and looking forward to see you soon. Yeah and everyone thanks so much for listening. Have a great couple of days and stay healthy, wealthy and smart.   25:08 Thank you for listening and please subscribe to the podcast at podcast dot healthy, wealthy smart.com. And don't forget to follow us on social media